Science.gov

Sample records for folded compact range

  1. Folded Compact Range Development and Coherent Change Detection Measurement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, K.W.

    1995-03-01

    A novel, folded compact range configuration has been developed at the Sandia National Laboratories compact range antenna and radar cross section measurement facility, operated by the Radar/Antenna Department 2343, as a means of performing indoor, environmentally-controlled, far-field simulations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD) measurements. This report describes the development of the folded compact range configuration, as well as the initial set of coherent change detection measurements made with the system. These measurements have been highly successful, and have demonstrated the viability of the folded compact range concept in simulating SAR CCD measurements. It is felt that follow-on measurements have the potential of contributing significantly to the body of knowledge available to the scientific community involved in CCD image generation and processing, and that this tool will be a significant aid in the research and development of change detection methodologies.

  2. Coherent change detection and interferometric ISAR measurements in the folded compact range

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, K.W.

    1996-08-01

    A folded compact range configuration has been developed ant the Sandia National Laboratories` compact range antenna and radar-cross- section measurement facility as a means of performing indoor, environmentally-controlled, far-field simulations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements of distributed target samples (i.e. gravel, sand, etc.). The folded compact range configuration has previously been used to perform coherent-change-detection (CCD) measurements, which allow disturbances to distributed targets on the order of fractions of a wavelength to be detected. This report describes follow-on CCD measurements of other distributed target samples, and also investigates the sensitivity of the CCD measurement process to changes in the relative spatial location of the SAR sensor between observations of the target. Additionally, this report describes the theoretical and practical aspects of performing interferometric inverse-synthetic-aperture-radar (IFISAR) measurements in the folded compact range environment. IFISAR measurements provide resolution of the relative heights of targets with accuracies on the order of a wavelength. Several examples are given of digital height maps that have been generated from measurements performed at the folded compact range facility.

  3. Development of a folded compact range and its application in performing coherent change detection and interferometric ISAR measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, K.W.; Zittel, D.H.; Littlejohn, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    A folded compact range configuration has been developed at the Sandia National Laboratories` compact range antenna and radar cross section measurement facility as a means of performing indoor, environmentally controlled far-field simulations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements of distributed target samples (i.e. gravel, sand, etc.). In particular, the folded compact range configuration has been used to perform both highly sensitive coherent change detection (CCD) measurements and interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) measurements, which, in addition to the two-dimensional spatial resolution afforded by typical interferometric SAR (ISAR) processing, provides resolution of the relative height of targets with accuracies on the order of a wavelength. This paper describes the development of the folded compact range, as well as the coherent change detection and interferometric measurements that have been made with the system. The measurement have been very successful, and have demonstrated not only the viability of the folded compact range concept in simulating SAR CCD and IFSAR measurements, but also its usefulness as a tool in the research and development of SAR CCD and IFSAR image generation and measurement methodologies.

  4. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  5. Rapid compaction during RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rick; Millett, Ian S.; Tate, Mark W.; Kwok, Lisa W.; Nakatani, Bradley; Gruner, Sol M.; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Pande, Vijay; Doniach, Sebastian; Herschlag, Daniel; Pollack, Lois

    2002-04-01

    We have used small angle x-ray scattering and computer simulations with a coarse-grained model to provide a time-resolved picture of the global folding process of the Tetrahymena group I RNA over a time window of more than five orders of magnitude. A substantial phase of compaction is observed on the low millisecond timescale, and the overall compaction and global shape changes are largely complete within one second, earlier than any known tertiary contacts are formed. This finding indicates that the RNA forms a nonspecifically collapsed intermediate and then searches for its tertiary contacts within a highly restricted subset of conformational space. The collapsed intermediate early in folding of this RNA is grossly akin to molten globule intermediates in protein folding.

  6. Lightweight, Compact, Long Range Camera Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, Donald V.

    1983-08-01

    The model 700 camera is the latest in a 30-year series of LOROP cameras developed by McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC) and their predecessor companies. The design achieves minimum size and weight and is optimized for low-contrast performance. The optical system includes a 66-inch focal length, f/5.6, apochromatic lens and three folding mirrors imaging on a 4.5-inch square format. A three-axis active stabilization system provides the capability for long exposure time and, hence, fine grain films can be used. The optical path forms a figure "4" behind the lens. In front of the lens is a 45° pointing mirror. This folded configuration contributed greatly to the lightweight and compact design. This sequential autocycle frame camera has three modes of operation with one, two, and three step positions to provide a choice of swath widths within the range of lateral coverage. The magazine/shutter assembly rotates in relationship with the pointing mirror and aircraft drift angle to maintain film format alignment with the flight path. The entire camera is angular rate stabilized in roll, pitch, and yaw. It also employs a lightweight, electro-magnetically damped, low-natural-frequency spring suspension for passive isolation from aircraft vibration inputs. The combined film transport and forward motion compensation (FMC) mechanism, which is operated by a single motor, is contained in a magazine that can, depending on accessibility which is installation dependent, be changed in flight. The design also stresses thermal control, focus control, structural stiffness, and maintainability. The camera is operated from a remote control panel. This paper describes the leading particulars and features of the camera as related to weight and configuration.

  7. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-08-02

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  8. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-01-01

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  9. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, W.D.; Rudduck, R.C.; Yu, J.S.

    1987-02-27

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector. 2 figs.

  10. Compact range test applications, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Francis L.

    1992-01-01

    Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) has designed and fabricated a large outdoor Compact Antenna Range for the U.S. Army Electronic Proving Ground (USAEPG). This range enables USAEPG to test antenna systems of large ground vehicles or aircraft that weigh up to 70 tons and are up to 50 feet in size over a frequency range of 6 to 40 GHz. Ongoing investigation and study are being conducted to determine the compatibility and adaptability of this antenna pattern measurement range to measure other system parameters such as target return signals and system responses to specialized electromagnetic environments.

  11. Nonlocal interactions stabilize compact folding intermediates in reduced unfolded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, D S; Haas, E

    1992-12-15

    To further our understanding of the protein folding process, it is desirable to examine the structural intermediates (equilibrium and kinetic) that are populated between the statistical coil state and the folded molecule. X-ray crystallography and NMR structural studies are unable to determine long-range distances in proteins under denaturing solution conditions. Nonradiative (Förster) energy transfer, however, has been shown to be a spectroscopic ruler for the measurement of distance distributions and diffusion between selected sites in proteins under a range of different solution conditions. The distributions of distances between a donor probe at the N-terminal residue and an acceptor attached to one of the four lysine residues (15, 26, 41, 46) of reduced and unfolded (in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride and 20 mM dithiothreitol) bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) were measured as a function of temperature. Even in strong denaturant and reducing agent, BPTI does not exist as a statistical coil polypeptide. It appears that nonlocal (long-range) interactions are already beginning to "fold" the protein toward a more compact, native conformation. As the temperature is increased under these conditions, hydrophobic interactions lead to an even more compact structure consistent with the predictions of phase diagrams for globular proteins. PMID:1281424

  12. Folding associated with extensional faulting: Sheep Range detachment, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Guth, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Sheep Range detachment is a major Miocene extensional fault system of the Great Basin. Its major faults have a scoop shape, with straight, N-S traces extending 15-30 km and then abruptly turning to strike E-W. Tertiary deformation involved simultaneous normal faulting, sedimentation, landsliding, and strike-slip faulting. Folds occur in two settings: landslide blocks and drag along major faults. Folds occur in landslide blocks and beneath them. Most folds within landslide blocks are tight anticlines, with limbs dipping 40-60 degrees. Brecciation of the folds and landslide blocks suggests brittle deformation. Near Quijinump Canyon in the Sheep Range, at least three landslide blocks (up to 500 by 1500 m) slid into a small Tertiary basin. Tertiary limestone beneath the Paleozoic blocks was isoclinally folded. Westward dips reveal drag folds along major normal faults, as regional dips are consistently to the east. The Chowderhead anticline is the largest drag fold, along an extensional fault that offsets Ordovician units 8 km. East-dipping Ordovician and Silurian rocks in the Desert Range form the hanging wall. East-dipping Cambrian and Ordovician units in the East Desert Range form the foot wall and east limb of the anticline. Caught along the fault plane, the anticline's west-dipping west limb contains mostly Cambrian units.

  13. Compaction and tensile forces determine the accuracy of folding landscape parameters from single molecule pulling experiments.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Greg; Hyeon, Changbong; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2011-04-01

    We establish a framework for assessing whether the transition state location of a biopolymer, which can be inferred from single molecule pulling experiments, corresponds to the ensemble of structures that have equal probability of reaching either the folded or unfolded states (P(fold)=0.5). Using results for the forced unfolding of a RNA hairpin, an exactly soluble model, and an analytic theory, we show that P(fold) is solely determined by s, an experimentally measurable molecular tensegrity parameter, which is a ratio of the tensile force and a compaction force that stabilizes the folded state. Applications to folding landscapes of DNA hairpins and a leucine zipper with two barriers provide a structural interpretation of single molecule experimental data. Our theory can be used to assess whether molecular extension is a good reaction coordinate using measured free energy profiles. PMID:21517423

  14. Folding of polymer chains with short-range binormal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, A.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2006-05-01

    We study the structure of chains which have anisotropic short-range contact interactions that depend on the alignment of the binormal vectors of chain segments. This represents a crude model of hydrogen bonding or 'stacking' interactions out of the plane of curvature. The polymers are treated as ribbon-like semi-flexible chains, where the plane of the ribbon is determined by the local binormal. We show that with dipole-dipole interactions between the binormals of contacting chain segments, mean-field theory predicts a first-order transition to a binormally aligned state. We describe the onset of this transition as a function of the temperature-dependent parameters that govern the chain stiffness and the strength of the binormal interaction, as well as the binormal alignment's coupling to chain collapse. We also examine a metastable state governing the folding kinetics. Finally, we discuss the possible mesoscopic structure of the aligned phase, and application of our model to secondary structure motifs like β-sheets and α-helices, as well as composite structures like β-(amyloid) fibrils.

  15. Compaction and Tensile Forces Determine the Accuracy of Folding Landscape Parameters from Single Molecule Pulling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Greg; Hyeon, Changbong; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2011-04-01

    We establish a framework for assessing whether the transition state location of a biopolymer, which can be inferred from single molecule pulling experiments, corresponds to the ensemble of structures that have equal probability of reaching either the folded or unfolded states (Pfold=0.5). Using results for the forced unfolding of a RNA hairpin, an exactly soluble model, and an analytic theory, we show that Pfold is solely determined by s, an experimentally measurable molecular tensegrity parameter, which is a ratio of the tensile force and a compaction force that stabilizes the folded state. Applications to folding landscapes of DNA hairpins and a leucine zipper with two barriers provide a structural interpretation of single molecule experimental data. Our theory can be used to assess whether molecular extension is a good reaction coordinate using measured free energy profiles.

  16. Compact laser sources for laser designation, ranging and active imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Lew; Nettleton, John; Schilling, Brad; Trussel, Ward; Hays, Alan

    2007-04-01

    Recent advances in compact solid sate lasers for laser designation, eye-safe range finding and active imaging are described. Wide temperature operation of a compact Nd:YAG laser was achieved by end pumping and the use of multi-λ diode stacks. Such lasers enabled construction of fully operational 4.7 lb laser designator prototypes generating over 50 mJ at 10-20 Hz PRF. Output pulse energy in excess of 100 mJ was demonstrated in a breadboard version of the end-pumped laser. Eye-safe 1.5 μm lasers based on flash-pumped, low PRF, Monoblock lasers have enabled compact STORM laser range finders that have recently been put into production. To achieve higher optical and electrical efficiency needed for higher PRF operation, Monoblock lasers were end-pumped by a laser diode stack. Laser diode end-pumped Monoblock lasers were operated at 10-20 Hz PRF over a wide temperature range (-20 to +50 °C). Compared with bulk compact solid state lasers, fiber lasers are characterized by lower pulse energy, higher PRF's, shorter pulses and higher electrical efficiency. An example of fiber lasers suitable for LIDAR, and atmospheric measurement applications is described. Eye-safe, low intensity diode pumped solid state green warning laser developed for US Army checkpoint and convoy applications is also described.

  17. The ogive as a RCS compact range standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, A.; Nguyen, T.

    1989-01-01

    E- and H-plane radar cross section (RCS) patterns at 4 and 10 GHz are provided (based upon moment method calculations) for a perfectly conducting ogive to be used as a compact range verification standard. The dimensions of the ogive are 36 in. and 9.546 in. long with half tip angles of 15 deg and 20 deg, respectively. Comparison between the calculations and measurements are also provided.

  18. Compact-range coordinate system established using a laser tracker.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, Floyd H.; Bryce, Edwin Anthony

    2006-12-01

    Establishing a Cartesian coordinate reference system for an existing Compact Antenna Range using the parabolic reflector is presented. A SMX (Spatial Metrix Corporation) M/N 4000 laser-based coordinate measuring system established absolute coordinates for the facility. Electric field characteristics with positional movement correction are evaluated. Feed Horn relocation for alignment with the reflector axis is also described. Reference points are established for follow-on non-laser alignments utilizing a theodolite.

  19. Design of blended rolled edges for compact range main reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericksen, K. P.; Gupta, I. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure to design blended rolled edge terminations for arbitrary rim shape compact range main reflectors is presented. The reflector may be center-fed or offset-fed. The design procedure leads to a reflector which has a continuous and smooth surface. This procedure also ensures small diffracted fields from the junction between the paraboloid and the blended rolled edge while satisfying certain constraints regarding the maximum height of the reflector and minimum operating frequency of the system. The prescribed procedure is used to design several reflectors and the performance of these reflectors is presented.

  20. Nonlocal interactions stabilize long range loops in the initial folding intermediates of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ittah, V; Haas, E

    1995-04-01

    A search for the topology of the chain folding of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), in unfolded and partially folded states, was done by means of time resolved dynamic nonradiative excitation energy transfer (ET) measurements. Four double labeled BPTI derivatives were used in which the donor was attached to the N-terminal arginine residue and the acceptor was specifically attached to one of the lysine residues. The four derivatives form a series of labeled backbone segments of increasing length spanning the full lengths of the BPTI chain: 15, 26, 41, and 46 residues. The intramolecular segmental end-to-end distance (EED) distributions were determined for all the derivatives by global analysis of the decay curves of both the donor and the acceptor in the reduced state, in low (0.5 M) guanidinium chloride (GuHCl) concentrations at pH 3.6 and 2.1 (R and A states, respectively). The results show that, in the partial folding conditions of low GuHCl concentration, reduced BPTI is in a compact state, but in this state the polypeptide chain is not in a condensed statistical coil conformation. Two distinct subpopulations were found for the four intramolecular EED distributions. One subpopulation was compact, with native-like EED distribution, while the second was unfolded. The pairs of sites, residues 1 and 26 and residues 1 and 46, showed close proximity in the dominant subpopulation. These contacts form two loops (probably collapsed): one consists of the first 26 residues, and the second comprises the full length of the chain from the N- to the C-terminal segments, which is in fact made up to two shorter loops (1-26 and 27-46). The N-terminal 15 residue segment was relaxed into statistical coil-like non-native conformation, in contrast to its extended conformation in the native state. The effect of temperature in the range of 2-60 degrees C was small; the folded subpopulations were stable over this range. These results show that in BPTI the compact

  1. An aperture-matched compact range feed horn design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heedy, D. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The moment method and the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction are used to obtain two separate solutions for the E-plane far field pattern of an aperture-matched horn antenna. This particular horn antenna consists of a standard pyramidal horn with the following modifications: a rolled edge section attached to the aperture edges and a curved throat section. The resulting geometry provides significantly better performance in terms of the pattern, impedance, and frequency characteristics than normally obtainable. The moment method is used to calculate the E-plane pattern and voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR) of the antenna. However, at higher frequencies, the moment method requires large amounts of computation time. On the other hand, the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction provides a quick and efficient high frequency solution for the E-plane field pattern. This procedure has been successfully applied to design a compact range feed horn.

  2. Range estimation of cetaceans with compact volumetric arrays.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Walter M X

    2013-09-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is the method of choice to detect whales and dolphins that are acoustically active and to monitor their underwater behavior. The NATO Science and Technology Organization Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation has recently implemented a compact passive acoustic monitor (CPAM), consisting of three arrays of two hydrophones each that are combined in a fixed three-dimensional arrangement and that may be towed at depths of more than 100 m. With its volumetric configuration, the CPAM is capable of estimating the three-dimensional direction vector of arriving sounds and under certain conditions on relative geometry between the whale and hydrophone array, the CPAM may also estimate the range to echolocating animals. Basic ranging methods assume constant sound speed and apply straightforward geometry to obtain depth and distance to the sound source. Alternatively, ray-tracing based methods may be employed to integrate the information provided by real sound speed profiles. Both ranging methods combine measurements of sound arrival angles and surface reflection delays and are easily implemented in real-time applications, whereby one could promote the ray-tracing approach as the preferred method because it may integrate real sound speed profiles. PMID:23968058

  3. Osmolytes stabilize ribonuclease S by stabilizing its fragments S protein and S peptide to compact folding-competent states.

    PubMed

    Ratnaparkhi, G S; Varadarajan, R

    2001-08-01

    Osmolytes stabilize proteins to thermal and chemical denaturation. We have studied the effects of the osmolytes sarcosine, betaine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, and taurine on the structure and stability of the protein.peptide complex RNase S using x-ray crystallography and titration calorimetry, respectively. The largest degree of stabilization is achieved with 6 m sarcosine, which increases the denaturation temperatures of RNase S and S pro by 24.6 and 17.4 degrees C, respectively, at pH 5 and protects both proteins against tryptic cleavage. Four crystal structures of RNase S in the presence of different osmolytes do not offer any evidence for osmolyte binding to the folded state of the protein or any perturbation in the water structure surrounding the protein. The degree of stabilization in 6 m sarcosine increases with temperature, ranging from -0.52 kcal mol(-1) at 20 degrees C to -5.4 kcal mol(-1) at 60 degrees C. The data support the thesis that osmolytes that stabilize proteins, do so by perturbing unfolded states, which change conformation to a compact, folding competent state in the presence of osmolyte. The increased stabilization thus results from a decrease in conformational entropy of the unfolded state. PMID:11373282

  4. A Cassegrain reflector system for compact range applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, Mark D.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1986-01-01

    An integral part of a compact range is the means of providing a uniform plane wave. A Cassegrain reflector system is one alternative for achieving this goal. Theoretically, this system offers better performance than a simple reflector system. The longer pathlengths in the Cassegrain system lead to a more uniform field in the plane of interest. The addition of the subreflector creates several problems, though. System complexity is increased both in terms of construction and performance analysis. The subreflector also leads to aperture blockage and the orientation of the feed now results in spillover illuminating the target areas as well as the rest of the range. Finally, the addition of the subreflector leads to interaction between the two reflectors resulting in undesired field variations in the plane of interest. These difficulties are addressed and through the concept of blending the surfaces, a Cassegrain reflector system is developed that will provide a uniform plane wave that offers superior performance over large target areas for a given size reflector system. Design and analysis is implemented by considering the main reflector and subreflector separately. Then the system may be put together and the final design and system analysis completed.

  5. Ester-linked hen egg white lysozyme shows a compact fold in a molecular dynamics simulation - possible causes and sensitivity of experimentally observable quantities to structural changes maintaining this compact fold.

    PubMed

    Eichenberger, Andreas P; Smith, Lorna J; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and understanding of the folding and stability of the 3D structure of proteins is still a challenge. The different atomic interactions, such as non polar contacts and hydrogen bonding, are known but their exact relative weights and roles when contributing to protein folding and stability are not identified. Initiated by a previous molecular dynamics simulation of fully ester-linked hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), which showed a more compact fold of the ester-linked molecule compared to the native one, three variants of this protein are analyzed in the present study. These are 129-residue native HEWL, partly ester-linked HEWL, in which only 34 peptide linkages that are not involved in the helical or β-strand parts of native HEWL were replaced by ester linkages, and fully (126 residues) ester-linked HEWL. Native and partly ester-linked HEWL showed comparable behaviour, whereas fully ester-linked HEWL could not maintain the native secondary structure of HEWL in the simulation and adopted a more compact fold. The conformational changes were analyzed by comparing simulation averaged values of quantities that can be measured by NMR, such as (1)H-(15)N backbone order parameters, residual dipolar couplings, proton-proton NOE distances and (3)J-couplings with the corresponding values derived from experimental NMR data for native HEWL. The information content of the latter appeared to be insufficient to detect the local conformational rearrangements upon esterification of the loop regions of the protein. For fully ester-linked HEWL, a significantly reduced agreement was observed. Upon esterification, the backbone-side chain and side chain-side chain hydrogen-bonding pattern of HEWL changes to maintain its compactness and thus the structural stability of the ester-linked lysozymes. PMID:22093234

  6. Evolution and Dynamics of a Fold-Thrust Belt: The Sulaiman Range of Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, K.; Copley, A.; Hussain, E.

    2014-12-01

    Plan-view curvature of geological structures and range-front topography has long been a recognized and debated feature of both ancient and active fold-thrust belts. As part of the largest active mountain range on Earth, much of the body of work surrounding this topic has focused on the Tibetan Plateau. A lack of published data, extremely limited geodetic coverage and difficulty of access mean there have been relatively few studies of the western part of the India-Asia collision zone, where the Himalaya curve to the southwest into the lobate fold-thrust belts of Pakistan. The widest of these, the Sulaiman Range, forms a strongly curved lobe with ~300km across-strike width. We present observations and models of the Sulaiman Range of western Pakistan that shed new light on the evolution and deformation of fold-thrust belts. Earthquake source inversions show that the seismic deformation in the range is concentrated in the thick pile of sediments overlying the underthrusting lithosphere of the Indian subcontinent. The slip vectors of the earthquakes vary in strike around the margin of the range, in tandem with the shape of the topography, suggesting that gravitational driving forces arising from the topography play an important role in governing the deformation of the region. Numerical models suggest that the active deformation, and extreme plan-view curvature of the range, are governed by the presence of weak sediments in a pre-existing basin on the underthrusting Indian plate. These sediments affect the stress-state in the over-riding mountain range and allow for the rapid propagation of the nose of the range and the development of extreme curvature and laterally-varying surface gradients.

  7. Moho topography, ranges and folds of Tibet by analysis of global gravity models and GOCE data.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Hong; Shum, C K; Braitenberg, Carla; Lee, Sang Mook; Na, Sung-Ho; Choi, Kwang Sun; Hsu, Houtse; Park, Young-Sue; Lim, Mutaek

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the crustal structure is essential in geophysics, as it gives insight into the geohistory, tectonic environment, geohazard mitigation, etc. Here we present the latest advance on three-dimensional modeling representing the Tibetan Mohorovičić discontinuity (topography and ranges) and its deformation (fold), revealed by analyzing gravity data from GOCE mission. Our study shows noticeable advances in estimated Tibetan Moho model which is superior to the results using the earlier gravity models prior to GOCE. The higher quality gravity field of GOCE is reflected in the Moho solution: we find that the Moho is deeper than 65 km, which is twice the normal continental crust beneath most of the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, while the deepest Moho, up to 82 km, is located in western Tibet. The amplitude of the Moho fold is estimated to be ranging from -9 km to 9 km with a standard deviation of ~2 km. The improved GOCE gravity derived Moho signals reveal a clear directionality of the Moho ranges and Moho fold structure, orthogonal to deformation rates observed by GPS. This geophysical feature, clearly more evident than the ones estimated using earlier gravity models, reveals that it is the result of the large compressional tectonic process. PMID:26114224

  8. Moho topography, ranges and folds of Tibet by analysis of global gravity models and GOCE data

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Hong; Shum, C.K.; Braitenberg, Carla; Lee, Sang Mook; Na, Sung -Ho; Choi, Kwang Sun; Hsu, Houtse; Park, Young-Sue; Lim, Mutaek

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the crustal structure is essential in geophysics, as it gives insight into the geohistory, tectonic environment, geohazard mitigation, etc. Here we present the latest advance on three-dimensional modeling representing the Tibetan Mohorovičić discontinuity (topography and ranges) and its deformation (fold), revealed by analyzing gravity data from GOCE mission. Our study shows noticeable advances in estimated Tibetan Moho model which is superior to the results using the earlier gravity models prior to GOCE. The higher quality gravity field of GOCE is reflected in the Moho solution: we find that the Moho is deeper than 65 km, which is twice the normal continental crust beneath most of the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, while the deepest Moho, up to 82 km, is located in western Tibet. The amplitude of the Moho fold is estimated to be ranging from −9 km to 9 km with a standard deviation of ~2 km. The improved GOCE gravity derived Moho signals reveal a clear directionality of the Moho ranges and Moho fold structure, orthogonal to deformation rates observed by GPS. This geophysical feature, clearly more evident than the ones estimated using earlier gravity models, reveals that it is the result of the large compressional tectonic process. PMID:26114224

  9. Optical design and development of near-range compact lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Tatsuo

    2011-12-01

    There are large demands to monitor the atmosphere in the closed space (hall, factory and so on), to check vegetation remotely and to detect hazardous gases such as explosive gas and bio terror from explosion-proof distance. On the contrary, traditional lidars have blind area, it is hard to monitor the atmosphere and the gas in the near range. In this study, optical designs and concrete developments for the atmosphere monitoring and the certain gas detection in near range were accomplished. Unique optical designs are introduced and their practical setups are explained.

  10. Range-Gated Metrology with Compact Optical Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Shaddock, Daniel; Ware, Brent; Lay, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    This work represents a radical simplification in the design of the optical head needed for high-precision laser ranging applications. The optical head is now a single fiber-optic collimator with dimensions of order of 1 1 2 cm, which can be easily integrated into the system being measured with minimal footprint.

  11. Design and implementation of the ESL compact range underhung bridge crane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamansky, H. T.; Dominek, A. K.; Burnside, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    As the indoor compact range technology has continued to increase, the need to handle larger and heavier targets has also increased. This need for target lifting and handling prompted the feasibility study of the use of an underhung bridge crane to be installed in the ESL (ElectroScience Laboratory, Ohio State University) compact range. This report documents both the design of the underhung bridge crane that was installed and the implementation of the design in the actual installation of the crane.

  12. Compact and low power thermo-optic switch using folded silicon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Densmore, Adam; Janz, Siegfried; Ma, Rubin; Schmid, Jens H; Xu, Dan-Xia; Delâge, André; Lapointe, Jean; Vachon, Martin; Cheben, Pavel

    2009-06-22

    By exploiting the small bend radius achievable using high-index-contrast silicon photonic wire waveguides, we demonstrate a new low power thermo-optic switch arranged in a dense, double spiral geometry. Such a design permits the waveguide length to be extended for increased phase shift, without the need for increased heated volume. This provides an effective means to reduce the power consumption of thermo-optic switches, as well as a compact geometry desirable for the development of switch arrays. A low switching power of 6.5 mW was obtained for a spiral-path Mach-Zehnder interferometer device having a 10% - 90% rise time of 14 micros. The switching power is shown to be reduced by more than 5 times compared to a Mach-Zehnder interferometer employing a conventional straight waveguide geometry. PMID:19550441

  13. Folding of the four-helix bundle FF domain from a compact on-pathway intermediate state is governed predominantly by water motion.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Ashok; Vallurupalli, Pramodh; Kay, Lewis E

    2012-11-20

    Friction plays a critical role in protein folding. Frictional forces originating from random solvent and protein fluctuations both retard motion along the folding pathway and activate protein molecules to cross free energy barriers. Studies of friction thus may provide insights into the driving forces underlying protein conformational dynamics. However, the molecular origin of friction in protein folding remains poorly understood because, with the exception of the native conformer, there generally is little detailed structural information on the other states participating in the folding process. Here, we study the folding of the four-helix bundle FF domain that proceeds via a transiently formed, sparsely populated compact on-pathway folding intermediate whose structure was elucidated previously. Because the intermediate is stabilized by both native and nonnative interactions, friction in the folding transition between intermediate and folded states is expected to arise from intrachain reorganization in the protein. However, the viscosity dependencies of rates of folding from or unfolding to the intermediate, as established by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy, clearly indicate that contributions from internal friction are small relative to those from solvent, so solvent frictional forces drive the folding process. Our results emphasize the importance of solvent dynamics in mediating the interconversion between protein configurations, even those that are highly compact, and in equilibrium folding/unfolding fluctuations in general. PMID:23129654

  14. The Cenozoic structural evolution of a fold-and-thrust belt, northeastern Brooks Range, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, C.L. )

    1993-03-01

    A Cenozoic fold-and-thrust belt in the eastern structural province of the northeastern Brooks Range exposes polydeformed low-grade metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks of the pre-Mississippian basement and its sedimentary cover immediately adjacent to much younger foredeep deposits. Analysis of mesoscopic and map-scale structures in the range-front region suggests that at least one pre-Mississippian deformational event was recorded into the basement sequence by north-vergent fold-and-thrust structures and associated penetrative structures. Most of later Cenozoic shortening of the pre-Mississippian rocks was accommodated by thrust duplication, with little development of penetrative mesoscopic structures. Although separated from the underlying basement rocks by a major regional decollement horizon, Cenozoic deformation in the overlying Mississippian through Lower Cretaceous cover sequence also was primarily by thrust duplication. Although local and regional structural trends within the cover sequence suggest that Cenozoic deformation was north-northwest directed, east-west Cenozoic structural trends within the pre-Mississippian rocks may reflect an inherited pre-Mississippian structural grain and/or pre-Mississippian-age structures reactivated during Cenozoic deformation. A regional balanced cross section of the eastern structural province was constructed. 29 refs., 14 figs.

  15. Folded multiple-capture: an architecture for high dynamic range disturbance-tolerant focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavusi, Sam; El Gamal, Abbas

    2004-08-01

    Earlier studies have shown that multiple capture can achieve high SNR, but cannot satisfy the high dynamic range (HDR) and high speed requirements of the Vertically-Integrated-Sensor-Array (VISA) project. Synchronous self-reset, on the other hand, can achieve these requirements, but suffers from poor SNR. Extended counting can achieve high dynamic range at high frame rate and with good SNR, but at the expense of high power consumption. The paper proposes a new HDR focal plane array architecture, denoted by folded-multiple capture (FMC), which by combining features of the synchronous self-reset and multiple capture schemes, can satisfy the VISA requirements at a fraction of the power dissipation and with more robustness to device variations than extended counting. The architecture is also capable of detecting subframe disturbances, e.g., due to laser jamming, and correcting for it.

  16. Folding mechanism of a polymer chain with short-range attractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitold, Christian; Dellago, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the crystallization of a single, flexible homopolymer chain using transition path sampling. The chain consists of N identical spherical monomers evolved according to Langevin dynamics. While neighboring monomers are coupled via harmonic springs, the non-neighboring monomers interact via a hard core and a short-ranged attractive potential. For a sufficiently small interaction range λ, the system undergoes a first-order freezing transition from an expanded, disordered phase to a compact crystalline state. Using a new shooting move tailored to polymers combined with a committor analysis, we study the transition state ensemble of an N = 128 chain and search for possible reaction coordinates based on likelihood maximization. We find that typical transition states consist of a crystalline nucleus with one or more chain fragments attached to it. Furthermore, we show that the number of particles in the crystalline core is not well suited as a reaction coordinate. We then present an improved reaction coordinate, which includes information from the potential energy and the overall crystallinity of the polymer.

  17. Range-front deformation on the northern limb of the Manastash Anticline, Yakima Fold Belt, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladinsky, T. C.; Kelsey, H. M.; Sherrod, B. L.; Pratt, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Manastash Ridge range front on the south edge of the Kittitas Valley near Ellensburg Washington is a prominent north-facing range front within the Yakima fold belt that hosts a suite of landforms that may reflect active faulting. Quaternary mapping on LiDAR imagery of the northern limb provides evidence for episodic uplift and/or base level lowering that may be associated with crustal shortening of the Manastash anticline. The geomorphic evolution of the Manastash front is preserved through terrace sequences and uplifted alluvial fan deposits. Abandoned terraces record prior positions of the Yakima River. Field verification of the LiDAR mapping corroborated a series of fan deposits that record periods of sedimentation from short, steep drainages issuing north off the Manastash range front. Subsequently, the fans were modified through erosion by the Yakima River. Therefore, terrace sequences locally are proximal to the mouths of the short, steep drainages. Field exposures indicate that the lower terraces are composed of alluvial fill, while higher terraces are incised into bedrock with a surficial cover. The sequence of Quaternary alluvial deposits and terraces suggest a minimum of three base level-lowering events adjacent to the Manastash front. From the lack of well developed loess cover on lowest terrace, we infer that the most recent base level lowering event was latest Pleistocene or Holocene. Abandoned terraces and fan deposits are consistent with the interpretation that the Manastash Ridge is translating upward relative to the Kittitas Valley. Each base level lowering event may be a manifestation of co-seismic slip on a blind fault underlying the range front. If such a blind fault is responsible for base level lowering, the sense of slip is unclear from abandoned terraces alone. However, bedrock exposures along Shushuskin Canyon, a valley that drains north out of the range front, exhibit a tight syncline within the northern limb of the anticline. This

  18. Modelling of the void space of tablets compacted over a range of pressures.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, C J; Ridgway, K; Matthews, G P

    1997-04-01

    A previously developed computer model, named Pore-Cor, has been used to simulate the changes in the void-space dimensions which occur during the compaction of tablets over a range of pressures. The tablets were made by mixing pharmaceutical grade crystalline lactose and an anti-inflammatory compound in the proportion 4:1. Compacts were made by placing a weighed amount of the mixed powder into a stainless-steel die and applying pressure with a hand-operated calibrated hydraulic press. Compacts were prepared at eight pressures over the hydraulic pressure range 1 to 8 ton in-2 (15.4-123.2 MPa) in 1 ton in-2 increments. Mercury-intrusion curves were measured for the eight samples by use of a porosimeter and the Pore-Cor package was then used to simulate the mercury-intrusion curves and generate void-space models of the correct porosity. The experimental and simulated characteristic throat diameter, the experimental and simulated porosity, and the simulated permeability of the tablets have all been shown to follow expected trends. The successful modelling of void-structure parameters, which are difficult or impossible to measure experimentally, opens the way to an improved understanding of the strength of compacts. PMID:9232534

  19. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Tomohiro Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-16

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  20. An Integrated Compact Unit for Wide Range Micro-Newton Force Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, M. A. Salam; Tohmyoh, Hironori; Saka, Masumi

    Wide range compact sensor is preferably sought for force sensing in testing of micro objects or local area of macro objects with the observation of high resolution microscope. This paper presents the design and development of an integrated passive cantilever type force sensing unit with the specificities of range variation, interchangeability of components and compact size by incorporating with cantilever, probe and a capacitive sensor for measurement of large range micro-newton forces in wide scope of application. In the design, the tactile force at the probe perpendicularly attached to the cantilever is converted as cantilever deflection, which is measured by the capacitive sensor. In connection to a tiny capacitive sensor a compatible cantilever with double-beam structure is considered. Cantilever length variation facility is incorporated in the unit for obtaining different force measurement ranges by using the same cantilever. Characterization of the cantilever is performed against a standard load cell. The force resolution with a typical cantilever is estimated as 10 nN. The elastic property of human hair is efficiently determined by testing with the combination of a digital microscope and the developed sensor system. The utility of the unit for different resolution/range by the interchangeability of cantilevers is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that this integrated force sensing unit achieves good sensitivity and linearity, and wide measurement range.

  1. Long range correlations and folding angle with applications to α-helical proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Nicolis, Stam; Niemi, Antti J.

    2014-03-07

    The conformational complexity of chain-like macromolecules such as proteins and other linear polymers is much larger than that of point-like atoms and molecules. Unlike particles, chains can bend, twist, and even become knotted. Thus chains might also display a much richer phase structure. Unfortunately, it is not very easy to characterize the phase of a long chain. Essentially, the only known attribute is the radius of gyration. The way how it changes when the degree of polymerization becomes different, and how it evolves when the ambient temperature and solvent properties change, is commonly used to disclose the phase. But in any finite length chain there are corrections to scaling that complicate the detailed analysis of the phase structure. Here we introduce a quantity that we call the folding angle to identify and scrutinize the phase structure, as a complement to the radius of gyration. We argue for a mean-field level relationship between the folding angle and the scaling exponent in the radius of gyration. We then estimate the value of the folding angle in the case of crystallographic α-helical protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. We also show how the experimental value of the folding angle can be obtained computationally, using a semiclassical Born-Oppenheimer description of α-helical chiral chains.

  2. A method to design blended rolled edges for compact range reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Inder J.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1989-01-01

    A method to design blended rolled edges for arbitrary rim shape compact range reflectors is presented. The reflectors may be center-fed or offset-fed. The method leads to rolled edges with minimal surface discontinuities. It is shown that the reflectors designed using the prescribed method can be defined analytically using simple expressions. A procedure to obtain optimum rolled edges parameter is also presented. The procedure leads to blended rolled edges that minimize the diffracted fields emanating from the junction between the paraboloid and the rolled edge surface while satisfying certain constraints regarding the reflector size and the minimum operating frequency of the system.

  3. Compact MWIR zoom camera with 20:1 zoom range and automatic athermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun S.; Kim, Chang W.; Hong, Seok-Min

    2002-07-01

    A compact mid-wavelength infrared zoom camera with a zoom range of 20:1 and automatic athermalization has been developed. The moving groups for a wide zoom range are only two lens groups and the loci of zoom are very simple, which allows easy access of optomechanical and electromechanical design. In addition, the microscanning technique was introduced to improve resolving power. We acquired increased resolving power of 7.6 cycles/mrad, superior to the original Nyquist frequency of 4.5 cycles/mrad. The temperature range, being -30 to +55 degree(s)C, in which the camera is to operate, is rather wide. The minimum resolvable temperature difference of the zoom camera is 0.3 degree(s)C at 6 cycles/mrad.

  4. Range-Gated Metrology: An Ultra-Compact Sensor for Dimensional Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Ware, Brent; Woodruff, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    Point-to-point laser metrology systems can be used to stabilize large structures at the nanometer levels required for precision optical systems. Existing sensors are large and intrusive, however, with optical heads that consist of several optical elements and require multiple optical fiber connections. The use of point-to-point laser metrology has therefore been limited to applications where only a few gauges are needed and there is sufficient space to accommodate them. Range-Gated Metrology is a signal processing technique that preserves nanometer-level or better performance while enabling: (1) a greatly simplified optical head - a single fiber optic collimator - that can be made very compact, and (2) a single optical fiber connection that is readily multiplexed. This combination of features means that it will be straightforward and cost-effective to embed tens or hundreds of compact metrology gauges to stabilize a large structure. In this paper we describe the concept behind Range-Gated Metrology, demonstrate the performance in a laboratory environment, and give examples of how such a sensor system might be deployed.

  5. Compact and efficient nanosecond pulsed tuneable OPO in the mid-IR spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellström, J.; Jänes, P.; Elgcrona, G.; Karlsson, H.

    2013-05-01

    A compact, robust and efficient nanosecond pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO) generating radiation in the mid- IR spectral range is reported. The OPO is based on periodically poled material for the efficient non-linear processes of up-converting 1064 nm radiation to 1538 and 3450 nm respectively. Pulsed emission exceeding 130 mW average power at the idler (3450 nm) with a total conversion efficiency of 30%, including both signal and idler, has been reached. The maximum pulse energy of the idler is 11 μJ, pulse duration around 4 ns and peak power close to 3 kW. The results are achieved for an optical pump power of 1.4 W at the entrance of the OPO and an electrical pump power of 14 W. The total size of the OPO device is only 125x70x45 mm3 (LxWxH) including the pump laser at 1064 nm. The idler output radiation is narrowed by spectral filtering to < 1.5nm and temperature tuneable over > 50 nm. The OPO has a robust design and withstands shocks up to 60g at 8 ms and the storage temperature is -20 °C to + 60 °C. The compact size and low power consumption make this OPO device suitable for many kinds of molecular spectroscopy applications in the areas of environmental monitoring and pollution control as well as in combustion physics and process control. Integration of the OPO source into compact equipment for Photo Acoustic Spectroscopy (PAS) allowing fast and highly sensitive detection of methane and ethanol at ppb-levels is also described.

  6. Development of a phase contrast imaging system based on a yttrium aluminum garnet laser with folded beam for observations of density fluctuations in compact helical system

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, K.; Uchida, N.; Kawakubo, M.; Iguchi, H.; Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Akiyama, T.

    2008-10-15

    A near-infrared laser phase contrast optical system incorporating a folded beam was developed in order to measure the distribution of density fluctuations in a high-temperature plasma. The coherent light source used was an yttrium aluminum garnet laser stabilized by a ring oscillator. The probe beam system separates and reflects the incident and exiting beams with a polarizer and a fully reflective mirror with a waveplate. This system was employed with a compact helical system to detect fluctuations at the plasma edge.

  7. User manual for semi-circular compact range reflector code: Version 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Inder J.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    A computer code has been developed at the Ohio State University ElectroScience Laboratory to analyze a semi-circular paraboloidal reflector with or without a rolled edge at the top and a skirt at the bottom. The code can be used to compute the total near field of the reflector or its individual components at a given distance from the center of the paraboloid. The code computes the fields along a radial, horizontal, vertical or axial cut at that distance. Thus, it is very effective in computing the size of the sweet spot for a semi-circular compact range reflector. This report describes the operation of the code. Various input and output statements are explained. Some results obtained using the computer code are presented to illustrate the code's capability as well as being samples of input/output sets.

  8. Stray signal requirements for compact range reflectors based on RCS measurement errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Teh-Hong; Burnside, Walter D.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present a performance criterion for compact range reflectors such that their edge diffracted stray signal levels meet a reasonable radar cross section (RCS) measurement error requirement. It is shown by example that one of the significant error sources is the diffracted fields emanating from the edges or junctions of the reflector. This measurement error is demonstrated by placing a diagonal square flat plate in the target zone and rotating it to appropriate angles. These angles are determined by bisecting the plane wave and stray signal directions. This results in a peak bistatic measurement of the edge diffracted stray signal. It is proposed that the diagonal flat plate be used to evaluate new reflector designs as well as existing systems. A reasonable stray signal performance level has been developed so that new reflector systems can be characterized in terms of an RCS measurement error requirement.

  9. The slow folding reaction of barstar: the core tryptophan region attains tight packing before substantial secondary and tertiary structure formation and final compaction of the polypeptide chain.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, K; Juneja, J; Bhuyan, A K; Krishnamoorthy, G; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-09-15

    The slow folding of a single tryptophan-containing mutant of barstar has been studied in the presence of 2 M urea at 10 degrees C, using steady state and time-resolved fluorescence methods and far and near-UV CD measurements. The protein folds in two major phases: a fast phase, which is lost in the dead time of measurement during which the polypeptide collapses to a compact form, is followed by a slow observable phase. During the fast phase, the rotational correlation time of Trp53 increases from 2.2 ns to 7.2 ns, and its mean fluorescence lifetime increases from 2.3 ns to 3.4 ns. The fractional changes in steady-state fluorescence, far-UV CD, and near-UV CD signals, which are associated with the fast phase are, respectively, 36 %, 46 %, and 16 %. The product of the fast phase can bind the hydrophobic dye ANS. These observations together suggest that the folding intermediate accumulated at the end of the fast phase has: (a) about 20 % of the native-state secondary structure, (b) marginally formed or disordered tertiary structure, (c) a water-intruded and mobile protein interior; and (d) solvent-accessible patches of hydrophobic groups. Measurements of the anisotropy decay of Trp53 suggest that it undergoes two types of rotational motion in the intermediate: (i) fast (tau(r) approximately 1 ns) local motion of its indole side-chain, and (ii) a slower (tau(r) approximately 7.2 ns) motion corresponding to global tumbling of the entire protein molecule. The ability of the Trp53 side-chain to undergo fast local motion in the intermediate, but not in the fully folded protein where it is completely buried in the hydrophobic core, suggests that the core of the intermediate is still poorly packed. The global tumbling time of the fully folded protein is faster at 5.6 ns, suggesting that the volume of the intermediate is 25 % more than that of the fully folded protein. The rate of folding of this intermediate to the native state, measured by steady-state fluorescence, far

  10. Tectonic insight based on anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and compaction studies in the Sierras Australes thrust and fold belt (southwest Gondwana boundary, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzadún, Guadalupe; Tomezzoli, Renata N.; Cesaretti, Nora N.

    2016-04-01

    The Sierras Australes fold and thrust belt (Buenos Aires Province, Argentina) was in the southwestern Gondwanaland margin during the Paleozoic. The Tunas Formation (Permian) is exposed along the eastern part of it and continues eastward beneath the Claromecó Basin. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and compaction studies are described and compared with previous paleomagnetic studies with the aim of determining direction and magnitude of the main stresses acting during the sedimentation of the Tunas Formation. The anisotropy ellipsoids are triaxial with oblate or prolate shapes, reflecting different stages of layer parallel shortening during the evolution of the basin. Kmax axes trend NW-SE, parallel to the fold axes, while Kmin move from a horizontal (base) to a vertical orientation at the top of the succession, showing a change from a tectonic to almost a sedimentary fabric. The magnitude of anisotropy and compaction degree decreases toward the top of the succession. The AMS results are consistent with the outcrop structural observations and the compaction and paleomagnetic data. Regional pattern indicates a compression from the SW along this part of Gondwana, with a migration of the orogenic front and attenuation toward the NE in the foreland basin during the Upper Paleozoic. This deformation, locally assigned to the San Rafael noncollisional orogenic phase, is the result of the latitudinal movements toward the Equator of Gondwana (southern plates) and Laurentia (northern plates) during the Permian. This movement is the result of a rearrangement of the microplates that collided with Gondwana during the Late Devonian, to configure Pangea during the Triassic.

  11. Compact laser transmitter delivering a long-range infrared beam aligned with a monitoring visible beam.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-Shik; Kim, Haeng-In; Lee, Sang-Shin

    2012-06-10

    A compact laser transmitter, which takes advantage of an optical subassembly module, was proposed and demonstrated, providing precisely aligned collinear IR and visible beams. The collimated IR beam acts as a long-range projectile for simulated combat, carrying an optical pulsed signal, whereas the visible beam plays the role of tracking the IR beam. The proposed laser transmitter utilizes IR (λ(1)=905 nm) and visible (λ(2)=660 nm) light sources, a fiber-optic collimator, and a beam combiner, which includes a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) filter in conjunction with optical fiber. The device was built via the laser welding technique and then evaluated by investigating the characteristics of the generated light beams. The IR collimated beam produced had a Gaussian profile and a divergence angle of ~1.3 mrad, and the visible monitoring beam was appropriately collimated to be readily discernible in the vicinity of the transmitter. The two beams were highly aligned within an angle of 0.004 deg as anticipated. Finally, we performed a practical outdoor field test to assess the IR beam with the help of a receiver. An effective trajectory was observed ranging up to 660 m with an overall detectable beam width of ~60 cm. PMID:22695673

  12. Rapid Protein Global Fold Determination Using Ultrasparse Sampling, High-Dynamic Range Artifact Suppression, and Time-Shared NOESY

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, Brian E.; Werner-Allen, Jonathan W.; Yan, Anthony; Zhou, Pei

    2012-01-01

    In structural studies of large proteins by NMR, global fold determination plays an increasingly important role in providing a first look at a target’s topology and reducing assignment ambiguity in NOESY spectra of fully-protonated samples. In this work, we demonstrate the use of ultrasparse sampling, a new data processing algorithm, and a 4-D time-shared NOESY experiment (1) to collect all NOEs in 2H/13C/15N-labeled protein samples with selectively-protonated amide and ILV methyl groups at high resolution in only four days, and (2) to calculate global folds from this data using fully automated resonance assignment. The new algorithm, SCRUB, incorporates the CLEAN method for iterative artifact removal, but applies an additional level of iteration, permitting real signals to be distinguished from noise and allowing nearly all artifacts generated by real signals to be eliminated. In simulations with 1.2% of the data required by Nyquist sampling, SCRUB achieves a dynamic range over 10000:1 (250× better artifact suppression than CLEAN) and completely quantitative reproduction of signal intensities, volumes, and lineshapes. Applied to 4-D time-shared NOESY data, SCRUB processing dramatically reduces aliasing noise from strong diagonal signals, enabling the identification of weak NOE crosspeaks with intensities 100× less than diagonal signals. Nearly all of the expected peaks for interproton distances under 5 Å were observed. The practical benefit of this method is demonstrated with structure calculations for 23 kDa and 29 kDa test proteins using the automated assignment protocol of CYANA, in which unassigned 4-D time-shared NOESY peak lists produce accurate and well-converged global fold ensembles, whereas 3-D peak lists either fail to converge or produce significantly less accurate folds. The approach presented here succeeds with an order of magnitude less sampling than required by alternative methods for processing sparse 4-D data. PMID:22946863

  13. A compact, short-pulse laser for near-field, range-gated imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.; Loubriel, G.M.; Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a compact laser, which produces high power, wide-angle emission for a near-field, range-gated, imaging system. The optical pulses are produced by a 100 element laser diode array (LDA) which is pulsed with a GaAs, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS). The LDA generates 100 ps long, gain-switched, optical pulses at 904 nm when it is driven with 3 ns, 400 A, electrical pulses from a high gain PCSS. Gain switching is facilitated with this many lasers by using a low impedance circuit to drive an array of lasers, which are connected electrically in series. The total optical energy produced per pulse is 10 microjoules corresponding to a total peak power of 100 kW. The entire laser system, including prime power (a nine volt battery), pulse charging, PCSS, and LDA, is the size of a small, hand-held flashlight. System lifetime, which is presently limited by the high gain PCSS, is an active area of research and development. Present limitations and potential improvements will be discussed. The complete range-gated imaging system is based on complementary technologies: high speed optical gating with intensified charge coupled devices (ICCD) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and high gain, PCSS-driven LDAs developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system is designed for use in highly scattering media such as turbid water or extremely dense fog or smoke. The short optical pulses from the laser and high speed gating of the ICCD are synchronized to eliminate the back-scattered light from outside the depth of the field of view (FOV) which may be as short as a few centimeters. A high speed photodiode can be used to trigger the intensifier gate and set the range-gated FOV precisely on the target. The ICCD and other aspects of the imaging system are discussed in a separate paper.

  14. Ultra-long-range symmetric plasmonic waveguide for high-density and compact photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chia-Chien

    2013-12-01

    This study reports a symmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguide consisting of a cylindrical metal nanowire surrounded by low-index SiO₂ and high-index Si covered with SiO₂. The symmetric circumambience relative to the metal nanowire significantly facilitates the present design to minimize the energy attenuation resulting from Ohmic losses while retaining highly confined modes guided in the low-index nanoscale gaps between the metal nanowire and the high-index Si. The geometric dependence of the mode characteristics on the proposed structure is analyzed in detail, showing long propagation lengths beyond 10 mm with normalized mode areas on the order of 10⁻². In addition to enabling the building of long-range plasmonic circuit interconnects, the compactness and high-density integration of the proposed structure are examined by analyzing crosstalk in a directional coupler composed of two such waveguides and bending losses for a 90° bend. A relatively short coupling length of 1.16 μm is obtained at a center-to-center separation of 0.26 μm between adjacent waveguides. Increasing the separation to 1.65 μm could completely prevent coupling between waveguides. Power transmission exceeds 80% in the case of a 90° bend with small radius of curvature of 0.5 μm. Moreover, the dependence of spectral response on coupling length and the transmission of a 90° bend, ranging from telecom wavelengths of 1.40 to 1.65 μm, are investigated. Over a wide wavelength range, a strong coupling length dependence on wavelength and a high transmission for a 90° bend also make the proposed plasmonic waveguide promising for the realization of wavelength-selective components. PMID:24514506

  15. Use of a compact range approach to evaluate rf and dual-mode missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Kenneth E.; Weiss, Yosef

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes a hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) system developed for testing Radio Frequency (RF), Infra-Red (IR), and Dual-Mode missile seekers. The system consists of a unique hydraulic five-axis (three seeker axes plus two target axes) Flight Motion Table (FMT), an off-axis parabolic reflector, and electronics required to generate the signals to the RF feeds. RF energy that simulates the target is fed into the reflector from three orthogonal feeds mounted on the inner target axis, at the focal point area of the parabolic reflector. The parabolic reflector, together with the three RF feeds (the Compact Range), effectively produces a far-field image of the target. Both FMT target axis motion and electronic control of the RF beams (deflection) modify the simulated line-of-sight target angles. Multiple targets, glint, multi-path, ECM, and clutter can be introduced electronically. To evaluate dual-mode seekers, the center section of the parabolic reflector is replaced with an IR- transparent, but RF-reflective section. An IR scene projector mounts to the FMT target axes, with its image focused on the intersection of the FMT seeker axes. The system eliminates the need for a large anechoic chamber and 'Target Wall' or target motion system used with conventional HWIL systems. This reduces acquisition and operating costs of the facility.

  16. Planar near-field scanning for compact range bistatic radar cross-section measurement. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuhela-Reuning, S. R.; Walton, E. K.

    1991-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a low cost, planar scanning system to be used in a compact range environment for bistatic radar cross-section (bistatic RCS) measurement data are discussed. This scanning system is similar to structures used for measuring near-field antenna patterns. A synthetic aperture technique is used for plane wave reception. System testing entailed comparison of measured and theoretical bistatic RCS of a sphere and a right circular cylinder. Bistatic scattering analysis of the ogival target support, target and pedestal interactions, and compact range room was necessary to determine measurement validity.

  17. Information and redundancy in the burial folding code of globular proteins within a wide range of shapes and sizes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Diogo C; van der Linden, Marx G; de Oliveira, Leandro C; Onuchic, José N; Pereira de Araújo, Antônio F

    2016-04-01

    Recent ab initio folding simulations for a limited number of small proteins have corroborated a previous suggestion that atomic burial information obtainable from sequence could be sufficient for tertiary structure determination when combined to sequence-independent geometrical constraints. Here, we use simulations parameterized by native burials to investigate the required amount of information in a diverse set of globular proteins comprising different structural classes and a wide size range. Burial information is provided by a potential term pushing each atom towards one among a small number L of equiprobable concentric layers. An upper bound for the required information is provided by the minimal number of layers L(min) still compatible with correct folding behavior. We obtain L(min) between 3 and 5 for seven small to medium proteins with 50 ≤ Nr  ≤ 110 residues while for a larger protein with Nr  = 141 we find that L ≥ 6 is required to maintain native stability. We additionally estimate the usable redundancy for a given L ≥ L(min) from the burial entropy associated to the largest folding-compatible fraction of "superfluous" atoms, for which the burial term can be turned off or target layers can be chosen randomly. The estimated redundancy for small proteins with L = 4 is close to 0.8. Our results are consistent with the above-average quality of burial predictions used in previous simulations and indicate that the fraction of approachable proteins could increase significantly with even a mild, plausible, improvement on sequence-dependent burial prediction or on sequence-independent constraints that augment the detectable redundancy during simulations. Proteins 2016; 84:515-531. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26815167

  18. The Gogebic Iron Range - A Sample of the Northern Margin of the Penokean Fold and Thrust Belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, William F.; LaBerge, Gene L.; Klasner, John S.; Schulz, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    The Gogebic iron range is an elongate belt of Paleoproterozoic strata extending from the west shore of Lake Gogebic in the upper peninsula of Michigan for about 125 km westward into northern Wisconsin. It is one of six major informally named iron ranges in the Lake Superior region and produced about 325 million tons of direct-shipping ore between 1887 and 1967. A significant resource of concentrating-grade ore remains in the western and eastern parts of the range. The iron range forms a broad, gently southward-opening arc where the central part of the range exposes rocks that were deposited somewhat north of the eastern and western parts. A fundamental boundary marking both the tectonic setting of deposition and the later deformation within the Penokean orogen lies fortuitously in an east-west direction along the range so that the central part of the range preserves sediments deposited north of that boundary, whereas the eastern and western parts of the range were deposited south of the boundary. Thus, the central part of the range provides a record of sedimentation and very mild deformation in a part of the Penokean orogen farthest from the interior of the orogen to the south. The eastern and western parts of the range, in contrast, exhibit a depositional and deformational style typical of parts closer to the interior of the orogen. A second fortuitous feature of the iron range is that the entire area was tilted from 40 degrees to 90 degrees northward by Mesoproterozoic deformation so that the map view offers an oblique cross section of the Paleoproterozoic sedimentary sequence and structures. Together, these features make the Gogebic iron range a unique area in which to observe (1) the lateral transition from deposition on a stable platform to deposition in a tectonically and volcanically active region, and (2) the transition from essentially undeformed Paleoproterozoic strata to their folded and faulted equivalents. Paleoproterozoic strata in the Gogebic iron

  19. Seismic images of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt, Arctic Alaska, from an integrated seismic reflection/refraction experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levander, A.; Fuis, G.S.; Wissinger, E.S.; Lutter, W.J.; Oldow, J.S.; Moore, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    We describe results of an integrated seismic reflection/refraction experiment across the Brooks Range and flanking geologic provinces in Arctic Alaska. The seismic acquisition was unusual in that reflection and refraction data were collected simultaneously with a 700 channel seismograph system deployed numerous times along a 315 km profile. Shot records show continuous Moho reflections from 0-180 km offset, as well as numerous upper- and mid-crustal wide-angle events. Single and low-fold near-vertical incidence common midpoint (CMP) reflection images show complex upper- and middle-crustal structure across the range from the unmetamorphosed Endicott Mountains allochthon (EMA) in the north, to the metamorphic belts in the south. Lower-crustal and Moho reflections are visible across the entire reflection profile. Travel-time inversion of PmP arrivals shows that the Moho, at 33 km depth beneath the North Slope foothills, deepens abruptly beneath the EMA to a maximum of 46 km, and then shallows southward to 35 km at the southern edge of the range. Two zones of upper- and middle-crustal reflections underlie the northern Brooks Range above ~ 12-15 km depth. The upper zone, interpreted as the base of the EMA, lies at a maximum depth of 6 km and extends over 50 km from the range front to the north central Brooks Range where the base of the EMA outcrops above the metasedimentary rocks exposed in the Doonerak window. We interpret the base of the lower zone, at ~ 12 km depth, to be from carbonate rocks above the master detachment upon which the Brooks Range formed. The seismic data suggest that the master detachment is connected to the faults in the EMA by several ramps. In the highly metamorphosed terranes south of the Doonerak window, the CMP section shows numerous south-dipping events which we interpret as a crustal scale duplex involving the Doonerak window rocks. The basal detachment reflections can be traced approximately 100 km, and dip southward from about 10-12 km

  20. Nuclear mass formula with a finite-range droplet model and a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Myers, W.D.; Swiatecki, W.J.; Treiner, J.

    1988-07-01

    We calculate ground-state masses for 4678 nuclei ranging from /sup 16/O to /sup 318/122 by use of a macroscopic-microscopic model, which incorporates several new features. For the macroscopic model we use the finite-range droplet model which we introduced in 1984. The microscopic contribution is taken from a calculation based on a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential. Some new features now incorporated are a new model for the average pairing strength and the solution of the microscopic pairing equations by use of the Lipkin-Nogami method with approximate particle number conservation. To estimate the parameters of the macroscopic model we use an approach that starts by defining the error of a mass formula in a rigorous way, which leads naturally to the use of experimental uncertainties and of the maximum-likelihood method to derive a set of equations for estimating the parameters and error of the theoretical model. By considering 1593 experimental masses from /sup 16/O to /sup 263/106 we estimate the error of the theoretical model to be 0.769 MeV. The model retains its accuracy far from stability and the values of the model parameters are very insensitive to details of the adjustment procedure. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  1. Long range Trp-Trp interaction initiates the folding pathway of a pro-angiogenic β-hairpin peptide

    PubMed Central

    Diana, Donatella; De Rosa, Lucia; Palmieri, Maddalena; Russomanno, Anna; Russo, Luigi; La Rosa, Carmelo; Milardi, Danilo; Colombo, Giorgio; D’Andrea, Luca D.; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    HPLW, a designed VEGF (Vascular Endothelium Growth Factor) receptor-binding peptide, assumes a well folded β-hairpin conformation in water and is able to induce angiogenesis in vivo. In this study, we investigated at atomic resolution the thermal folding/unfolding pathway of HPLW by means of an original multi-technique approach combining DSC, NMR, MD and mutagenesis analyses. In particular, careful NMR investigation of the single proton melting temperatures together with DSC analysis accurately delineate the peptide folding mechanism, which is corroborated by computational folding/unfolding simulations. The HPLW folding process consists of two main events, which are successive but do not superimpose. The first folding step initiates at 320 K upon the hydrophobic collapse of the Trp5 and Trp13 side-chains which stabilizes the concurrent β-turn formation, whose COi-HNi + 3 hydrogen bond (Asp10 → Arg7) appears particularly stable. At 316 K, once the β-turn is completely formed, the two β-strands pair, very likely starting by Trp5 and Trp13, which thus play a key role also in the final step of the β-hairpin folding. Overall, here we describe a multi-state hierarchical folding pathway of a highly structured β-hairpin, which can be classified as a broken-zipper mechanism. PMID:26602442

  2. Long range Trp-Trp interaction initiates the folding pathway of a pro-angiogenic β-hairpin peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Donatella; De Rosa, Lucia; Palmieri, Maddalena; Russomanno, Anna; Russo, Luigi; La Rosa, Carmelo; Milardi, Danilo; Colombo, Giorgio; D'Andrea, Luca D.; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2015-11-01

    HPLW, a designed VEGF (Vascular Endothelium Growth Factor) receptor-binding peptide, assumes a well folded β-hairpin conformation in water and is able to induce angiogenesis in vivo. In this study, we investigated at atomic resolution the thermal folding/unfolding pathway of HPLW by means of an original multi-technique approach combining DSC, NMR, MD and mutagenesis analyses. In particular, careful NMR investigation of the single proton melting temperatures together with DSC analysis accurately delineate the peptide folding mechanism, which is corroborated by computational folding/unfolding simulations. The HPLW folding process consists of two main events, which are successive but do not superimpose. The first folding step initiates at 320 K upon the hydrophobic collapse of the Trp5 and Trp13 side-chains which stabilizes the concurrent β-turn formation, whose COi-HNi + 3 hydrogen bond (Asp10 → Arg7) appears particularly stable. At 316 K, once the β-turn is completely formed, the two β-strands pair, very likely starting by Trp5 and Trp13, which thus play a key role also in the final step of the β-hairpin folding. Overall, here we describe a multi-state hierarchical folding pathway of a highly structured β-hairpin, which can be classified as a broken-zipper mechanism.

  3. A billion-fold range in acidity for the solvent-exposed amides of Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Janet S; Hernández, Griselda; Lemaster, David M

    2008-06-10

    The exchange rates of the static solvent-accessible amide hydrogens of Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin range from near the diffusion-limited rate to a billion-fold slower for the non-hydrogen-bonded Val 38 (eubacterial numbering). Hydrogen exchange directly monitors the kinetic acidity of the peptide nitrogen. Electrostatic solvation free energies were calculated by Poisson-Boltzmann methods for the individual peptide anions that form during the hydroxide-catalyzed exchange reaction to examine how well the predicted thermodynamic acidities match the experimentally determined kinetic acidities. With the exception of the Ile 12 amide, the differential exchange rate constant for each solvent-exposed amide proton that is not hydrogen bonded to a backbone carbonyl can be predicted within a factor of 6 (10 (0.78)) root-mean-square deviation (rmsd) using the CHARMM22 electrostatic parameter set and an internal dielectric value of 3. Under equivalent conditions, the PARSE parameter set yields a larger rmsd value of 1.28 pH units, while the AMBER parm99 parameter set resulted in a considerably poorer correlation. Either increasing the internal dielectric value to 4 or reducing it to a value of 2 significantly degrades the quality of the prediction. Assigning the excess charge of the peptide anion equally between the peptide nitrogen and the carbonyl oxygen also reduces the correlation to the experimental data. These continuum electrostatic calculations were further analyzed to characterize the specific structural elements that appear to be responsible for the wide range of peptide acidities observed for these solvent-exposed amides. The striking heterogeneity in the potential at sites along the protein-solvent interface should prove germane to the ongoing challenge of quantifying the contribution that electrostatic interactions make to the catalytic acceleration achieved by enzymes. PMID:18479148

  4. Anatomy of a volcanic district in a carbonate fold-and-thrust belt: the northern Volsci Range (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardello, Giovanni Luca; Consorti, Lorenzo; Di Filippo, Michele

    2015-04-01

    The Volsci Range is a carbonate fold-and-thrust belt crossed by important normal faults in places associated with explosive volcanic deposits and hydrothermal ongoing activity within a moderately active seismic area (e.g., Latina earthquake 2012, Mw=3.8). Though distribution of volcanites is known, origin, volume and field characterization of a previously unstudied volcanic district is far to be addressed and it is the topic of this work. Several monogenic phreatomagmatic vents occur at the edges of the chain and within its backbone. The most relevant ones are characterized at the base by well welded to zeolitized tuffs, followed either by incoherent tuffs or by surges (e.g., Patrica, Valvisciolo) and locally by lavas (i.e., Giuliano di Roma, Pofi, Terracina) and finally by late Quaternary slope deposits. Most explosive units are largely composed by local Mesozoic platform carbonate litic clasts, showing different degrees of rounding and decarbonation. Micropalaeontology and facies analysis confirm that clasts are not older than late Jurassic and not younger than Cenomanian (Upper part of the Ostracoda and Miliolidae biozone). Therefore considering the stratigraphy beneath the vent points, litics could come from depths of about 400-600 meters. Juvenile litics of different composition, accretionary lapilli and the above mention carbonate litic clasts testify for a complex conduct composition and for the rupture of the carbonatic aquifer during eruption. Right at the southern slope of the Lepini Mounts (northern Volsci Range), as detected from the analysis of the n-2 residual gravity anomalies, monogenic circular vents (tuff rings) occur buried under Quaternary deposits or are just barely cropping out as necks (Doganella di Ninfa). Further south, despite the occurrence of pyroclastic deposits in boreholes, thickness and shape of volcanic deposits below the Pontina Plain is still unconstrained, providing a challenge for further geophysical studies. However, the

  5. Folded waveguide cavity coupler for ICRF heating

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper introduces a new type of waveguide coupler for ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating which is an adaptation of a concept known as a ''folded waveguide'' reported by Barrow and Schaevitz in connection with low-frequency waveguide transmission systems. The basic idea involves ''folding'' a simple rectangular waveguide to form a more compact structure. Cutoff for the folded waveguide occurs when one-half of a free-space wavelength equals the path length around the ''folds'' of the structure. By adding a large number of folds, the path length around the folds can be made large, leading to very low cutoff frequencies relative to those for simple rectangular waveguides having comparable outside dimensions. Folded waveguide couplers are practical for frequencies as low as 60 MHz for some ports found on present-day experients.

  6. Association of deformation and fluid events in the central Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt, Northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Thomas E.; Potter, Christopher J.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Shelton, Kevin L.; Underwood, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Ocentral Brooks Range consists of two superposed north-directed contractional orogens, one formed between 140-120 Ma and the other at ~60-45 Ma. The older orogen was an arc-continent collisional zone characterized by far-traveled allochthons and relatively low structural relief. The younger orogen is a retroarc thrust belt with relatively low amounts of shortening and high structural relief. Folding and thrusting of the younger episode is superimposed on the thin-skinned deformational wedge of the earlier orogen and also produced a frontal triangle zone in a thick sequence of mid-Cretaceous foreland basin sediments to the north. Stable isotope compositions of calcite and quartz veins indicate two fluid events including: (1) an earlier, higher-temperature (~250-300° C) event that produced veins in deformed Devonian clastic rocks, and (2) a younger, lower-temperature (~150° C) event that deposited veins in deformed Mississippian through Albian strata. The fluids in the first event had variable d18O values, but nearly constant d13C values buffered by limestone lithologies. The vein-forming fluids in the second event had similarly variable d18O values, but with distinctly lower d13C values as a result of oxidation of organic matter and/or methane. Zircon fission track ages demonstrate cooling to temperatures below 200° C between 140-120 Ma for the Devonian rocks, whereas zircon and apatite fission track ages show that Mississippian to Albian rocks were never heated above 200° C and cooled below 110-90° C at ~60-45 Ma. These data are interpreted as indicating that the older, high-temperature fluid event was active during thrusting at 120-140 Ma, and the younger fluid event during deformation at ~60-45 Ma. The data and results presented in this poster will be published in early 2004 in Moore and others (in press).

  7. Geometrical optics design of a compact range Gregorian subreflector system by the principle of the central ray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clerici, Giancarlo; Burnside, Walter D.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, the compact range has become very popular for measuring Radar Cross Section (RCS) and antenna patterns. The compact range, in fact, offers several advantages due to reduced size, a controlled environment, and privacy. On the other hand, it has some problems of its own, which must be solved properly in order to achieve high quality measurement results. For example, diffraction from the edges of the main reflector corrupts the plane wave in the target zone and creates spurious scattering centers in RCS measurements. While diffraction can be minimized by using rolled edges, the field of an offset single reflector compact range is corrupted by three other errors: the taper of the reflected field, the cross polarization introduced by the tilt of the feed and the aperture blockage introduced by the feed itself. These three errors can be eliminated by the use of a subreflector system. A properly designed subreflector system offers very little aperture blockage, no cross-polarization introduced and a minimization of the taper of the reflected field. A Gregorian configuration has been adopted in order to enclose the feed and the ellipsoidal subreflector in a lower chamber, which is isolated by absorbers from the upper chamber, where the main parabolic reflector and the target zone are enclosed. The coupling between the two rooms is performed through a coupling aperture. The first cut design for such a subreflector system is performed through Geometrical Optics ray tracing techniques (GO), and is greatly simplified by the use of the concept of the central ray introduced by Dragone. The purpose of the GO design is to establish the basic dimensions of the main reflector and subreflector, the size of the primary and secondary illuminating surfaces, the tilt angles of the subreflector and feed, and estimate the feed beamwidth. At the same time, the shape of the coupling aperture is initially determined.

  8. The role of Precambrian rock compositions and fabrics on the structural development of a large foreland fold, southern Front Range, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Clarey, T.L.; Chase, R.B. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01

    Royal Gorge arch is a south-plunging, eastward asymmetrical, broad foreland fold. Precambrian lithologies occupy more than 50 km[sup 2] of the fold core and vary considerably from amphibolite-grade quartzofeldspathic, migmatitic gneiss on the south to poorly foliated to massive granodioritic gneiss on the north. The boundary between these two lithologies is marked by abundant and fairly concordant granitic pegmatites, and a change in fold style from broad folding in the northern sector to tighter folding to the south. Cover rocks are broadly arched carbonates, arenites, and lutites ranging in age from Ordovician to Late Cretaceous. Based on foliation patterns, basement rocks can be divided into seven homogeneous, cylindrical domains. Jointing appears strongly controlled by the foliation patterns. Joints and foliations in each domain show rotation in the same direction and magnitude with respect to other domains. The pattern of jointing in three sedimentary domains changes from flank to flank and does not match jointing in the Precambrian core, except in the unfoliated sectors. The sedimentary domains do not show the same sense of rotation as basement domains and basement joint clusters. These differences in deformation of the sedimentary cover reflect heterogeneous folding in response to fabric differences in the adjacent basement rocks. Analysis of slickenlines indicates that a non-uniform stress field developed within the Precambrian basement. Stresses apparently refracted through the core of the uplift, with refraction directions traceable across domain boundaries.

  9. Compact multispectral continuous zoom camera for color and SWIR vision with integrated laser range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, M.; Gerken, M.; Achtner, Bertram; Kraus, M.; Münzberg, M.

    2014-06-01

    In an electro-optical sensor suite for long range surveillance tasks the optics for the visible (450nm - 700nm) and the SWIR spectral wavelength range (900nm - 1700 nm) are combined with the receiver optics of an integrated laser range finder (LRF) .The incoming signal from the observed scene and the returned laser pulse are collected within the common entrance aperture of the optics. The common front part of the optics is a broadband corrected lens design from 450 - 1700nm wavelength range. The visible spectrum is split up by a dichroic beam splitter and focused on a HDTV CMOS camera. The returned laser pulse is spatially separated from the scene signal by a special prism and focused on the laser receiver diode of the integrated LRF. The achromatic lens design has a zoom factor 14 and F#2.6 in the visible path. In the SWIR path the F-number is adapted to the corresponding chip dimensions . The alignment of the LRF with respect to the SWIR camera line of sight can be controlled by adjustable integrated wedges. The two images in the visible and the SWIR spectral range match in focus and field of view (FOV) over the full zoom range between 2° and 22° HFOV. The SWIR camera has a resolution of 640×512 pixels. The HDTV camera provides a resolution of 1920×1080. The design and the performance parameters of the multispectral sensor suite is discussed.

  10. Beam-based measurements of long-range transverse wakefields in the Compact Linear Collider main-linac accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Latina, Andrea; Grudiev, Alexej; De Michele, Giovanni; Solodko, Anastasiya; Wuensch, Walter; Schulte, Daniel; Adli, Erik; Lipkowitz, Nate; Yocky, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    The baseline design of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) uses X-band accelerating structures for its main linacs. In order to maintain beam stability in multibunch operation, long-range transverse wakefields must be suppressed by 2 orders of magnitude between successive bunches, which are separated in time by 0.5 ns. Such strong wakefield suppression is achieved by equipping every accelerating structure cell with four damping waveguides terminated with individual rf loads. A beam-based experiment to directly measure the effectiveness of this long-range transverse wakefield and benchmark simulations was made in the FACET test facility at SLAC using a prototype CLIC accelerating structure. The experiment showed good agreement with the simulations and a strong suppression of the wakefields with an unprecedented minimum resolution of 0.1 V /(pC mm m ) .

  11. A Compact 3D Omnidirectional Range Sensor of High Resolution for Robust Reconstruction of Environments

    PubMed Central

    Marani, Roberto; Renò, Vito; Nitti, Massimiliano; D'Orazio, Tiziana; Stella, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an accurate range sensor for the three-dimensional reconstruction of environments is designed and developed. Following the principles of laser profilometry, the device exploits a set of optical transmitters able to project a laser line on the environment. A high-resolution and high-frame-rate camera assisted by a telecentric lens collects the laser light reflected by a parabolic mirror, whose shape is designed ad hoc to achieve a maximum measurement error of 10 mm when the target is placed 3 m away from the laser source. Measurements are derived by means of an analytical model, whose parameters are estimated during a preliminary calibration phase. Geometrical parameters, analytical modeling and image processing steps are validated through several experiments, which indicate the capability of the proposed device to recover the shape of a target with high accuracy. Experimental measurements show Gaussian statistics, having standard deviation of 1.74 mm within the measurable range. Results prove that the presented range sensor is a good candidate for environmental inspections and measurements. PMID:25621605

  12. Design of transmission-type phase holograms for a compact radar-cross-section measurement range at 650 GHz.

    PubMed

    Noponen, Eero; Tamminen, Aleksi; Vaaja, Matti

    2007-07-10

    A design formalism is presented for transmission-type phase holograms for use in a submillimeter-wave compact radar-cross-section (RCS) measurement range. The design method is based on rigorous electromagnetic grating theory combined with conventional hologram synthesis. Hologram structures consisting of a curved groove pattern on a 320 mmx280 mm Teflon plate are designed to transform an incoming spherical wave at 650 GHz into an output wave generating a 100 mm diameter planar field region (quiet zone) at a distance of 1 m. The reconstructed quiet-zone field is evaluated by a numerical simulation method. The uniformity of the quiet-zone field is further improved by reoptimizing the goal field. Measurement results are given for a test hologram fabricated on Teflon. PMID:17579673

  13. Ca-Dependent Folding of Human Calumenin

    PubMed Central

    Mazzorana, Marco; Hussain, Rohanah; Sorensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Human calumenin (hCALU) is a six EF-hand protein belonging to the CREC family. As other members of the family, it is localized in the secretory pathway and regulates the activity of SERCA2a and of the ryanodine receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have studied the effects of Ca2+ binding to the protein and found it to attain a more compact structure upon ion binding. Circular Dichroism (CD) measurements suggest a major rearrangement of the protein secondary structure, which reversibly switches from disordered at low Ca2+ concentrations to predominantly alpha-helical when Ca2+ is added. SAXS experiments confirm the transition from an unfolded to a compact structure, which matches the structural prediction of a trilobal fold. Overall our experiments suggest that calumenin is a Ca2+ sensor, which folds into a compact structure, capable of interacting with its molecular partners, when Ca2+ concentration within the ER reaches the millimolar range. PMID:26991433

  14. A Fold Province in the Hinterland of the Sevier Orogenic Belt in Eastern Nevada: A Valley and Ridge in the Basin and Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    The overprinting effects of Cenozoic extensional tectonism hinder analysis of the style, geometry, and timing of Cordilleran contractional deformation in the hinterland of the Sevier fold-thrust belt in Nevada. To address this problem, a 1:250,000-scale paleogeologic map of eastern Nevada, showing spatial distributions of Paleozoic-Mesozoic rocks exposed beneath a Paleogene unconformity, divided out at the formation scale, is integrated with maps of dip magnitude for Paleozoic-Mesozoic and Tertiary rocks, published sedimentary thickness records, and a published reconstruction of Basin and Range extension, in order to define and regionally-correlate thrust faults and folds, and estimate the pre-extensional amplitude, wavelength, and limb dips of folds. A new structural province, the Eastern Nevada fold belt (ENFB) is defined, and consists of a 100-150 km-wide region containing as many as five 1st-order, N-trending folds that can be traced for map distances between 100-250 km, have amplitudes between 2-4 km, wavelengths between 20-40 km, pre-extensional limb dips typically between 10-30˚, and deform rocks as young as Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. No regional-scale thrust faults or decollemont horizons breach modern exposure levels in the ENFB. ENFB folds are interpreted to have formed above a deep (≥10 km below the Paleogene unconformity), blind decollemont or shear zone, perhaps the westward projection of the master decollemont of the Sevier fold-thrust belt. Two additional structural provinces of the Sevier hinterland, the Central Nevada thrust belt (CNTB) and Western Utah thrust belt (WUTB), represent zones of N-striking, E-vergent thrust faults and folds that each accommodated ca. 10 km of shortening. Both thrust belts branch northward off of the Sevier thrust belt, and are interpreted to represent contemporary, interior components of the Sevier thrust system. The CNTB, WUTB, and the intervening ENFB collectively record low-magnitude (a few 10's of km) upper

  15. First observation of SASE radiation using the compact wide-spectral-range XUV spectrometer at FLASH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, T.; Hage, A.; Kuhlmann, M.; Gonschior, J.; Grunewald, S.; Plönjes, E.; Düsterer, S.; Brenner, G.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Braune, M.; Brachmanski, M.; Yin, Z.; Siewert, F.; Dzelzainis, T.; Dromey, B.; Prandolini, M. J.; Tavella, F.; Zepf, M.; Faatz, B.

    2016-09-01

    The Free-electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) has been extended with a new undulator line FLASH2 in 2014. A compact grazing-incident wide-spectral-range spectrometer based on spherical-variable-line-spacing (SVLS) gratings in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) region was constructed to optimize and characterize the free-electron laser (FEL) performance at FLASH2. The spectrometer is equipped with three different concave SVLS gratings covering a spectral range from 1 to 62 nm to analyze the spectral characteristics of the XUV radiation. Wavelength calibration and evaluation of the spectral resolution were performed at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH1 before the installation at FLASH2, and compared with analytical simulations. The first light using self-amplified spontaneous emission from FLASH2 was observed by the spectrometer during a simultaneous operation of both undulator lines-FLASH1 and FLASH2. In addition, the spectral resolution of the spectrometer was evaluated by comparing the measured spectrum from FLASH2 with FEL simulations.

  16. The Long-Range P3 Helix of the Tetrahymena Ribozyme Is Disrupted During Folding Between the Native and Misfolded Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, David; Jarmoskaite, Inga; Seval, Nikhil; Seifert, Soenke; Russell, Rick

    2013-01-01

    RNAs are prone to misfolding, but how misfolded structures are formed and resolved remains incompletely understood. The Tetrahymena group I intron ribozyme folds in vitro to a long-lived misfolded conformation (M) that includes extensive native structure but is proposed to differ in topology from the native state (N). A leading model predicts that exchange of the topologies requires unwinding of the long-range, core helix P3, despite the presence of P3 in both conformations. To test this model, we constructed sixteen mutations to strengthen or weaken P3. Catalytic activity and in-line probing showed that nearly all of the mutants form the M state before folding to N. The P3-weakening mutations accelerated refolding from M (3–30-fold) and the P3-strengthening mutations slowed refolding (6–1400-fold), suggesting that P3 indeed unwinds transiently. Upon depletion of Mg2+, the mutations had analogous effects on unfolding from N to intermediates that subsequently fold to M. The magnitudes for the P3-weakening mutations were larger than in refolding from M, and small angle X-ray scattering showed that the ribozyme expands rapidly to intermediates from which P3 is disrupted subsequently. These results are consistent with previous results indicating unfolding of native peripheral structure during refolding from M, which probably permits rearrangement of the core. Together, our results demonstrate that exchange of the native and misfolded conformations requires loss of a core helix in addition to peripheral structure. Further, the results strongly suggest that misfolding arises from a topological error within the ribozyme core, and a specific topology is proposed. PMID:23702292

  17. Chromatin Insulator Factors Involved in Long-Range DNA Interactions and Their Role in the Folding of the Drosophila Genome

    PubMed Central

    Dejardin, Stephanie; Allemand, Frederic; Gamot, Adrien; Labesse, Gilles; Cuvier, Olivier; Nègre, Nicolas; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Margeat, Emmanuel; Nöllmann, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin insulators are genetic elements implicated in the organization of chromatin and the regulation of transcription. In Drosophila, different insulator types were characterized by their locus-specific composition of insulator proteins and co-factors. Insulators mediate specific long-range DNA contacts required for the three dimensional organization of the interphase nucleus and for transcription regulation, but the mechanisms underlying the formation of these contacts is currently unknown. Here, we investigate the molecular associations between different components of insulator complexes (BEAF32, CP190 and Chromator) by biochemical and biophysical means, and develop a novel single-molecule assay to determine what factors are necessary and essential for the formation of long-range DNA interactions. We show that BEAF32 is able to bind DNA specifically and with high affinity, but not to bridge long-range interactions (LRI). In contrast, we show that CP190 and Chromator are able to mediate LRI between specifically-bound BEAF32 nucleoprotein complexes in vitro. This ability of CP190 and Chromator to establish LRI requires specific contacts between BEAF32 and their C-terminal domains, and dimerization through their N-terminal domains. In particular, the BTB/POZ domains of CP190 form a strict homodimer, and its C-terminal domain interacts with several insulator binding proteins. We propose a general model for insulator function in which BEAF32/dCTCF/Su(HW) provide DNA specificity (first layer proteins) whereas CP190/Chromator are responsible for the physical interactions required for long-range contacts (second layer). This network of organized, multi-layer interactions could explain the different activities of insulators as chromatin barriers, enhancer blockers, and transcriptional regulators, and suggest a general mechanism for how insulators may shape the organization of higher-order chromatin during cell division. PMID:25165871

  18. Cenozoic thrust emplacement of a Devonian batholith, northeastern Brooks Range: Involvement of crystalline rocks in a foreland fold-and-thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Involvement of crystalline rocks in thrusting near the foreland basin of a fold-and-thrust belt is relatively uncommon. In the northeastern Brooks Range, the Devonian Okpilak batholith was thrust northward and structurally elevated above adjacent foreland basin deposits during Cenozoic fold-and-thrust deformation. The batholith may have acted initially as a regional structural buttress, but a drop in the basal detachment surface to greater depth south of the batholith resulted in northward transport of the batholith. Shortening within the batholith was accommodated by (1) the development of discrete thrust slices bounded by ductile shear zones, (2) simple shear and development of penetrative mesoscopic and microscopic fabrics throughout the batholith, or both. The Mississippian Kayak Shale, a regional detachment horizon at the base of the overlying cover sequence, is depositionally thin or absent adjacent to the batholith. Thus, most of the cover sequence remained structurally coupled to the batholith during thrusting and was shortened by the development of penetrative structures.

  19. Hydrogen Bonds in Polymer Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H.; Sneppen, Kim; Tiana, Guido

    2001-02-01

    We studied the thermodynamics of a homopolymeric chain with both van der Waals and directed hydrogen bond interaction. The effect of hydrogen bonds is to reduce dramatically the entropy of low-lying states and to give rise to long-range order and to conformations displaying secondary structures. For compact polymers a transition is found between helix-rich states and low-entropy sheet-dominated states. The consequences of this transition for protein folding and, in particular, for the problem of prions are discussed.

  20. Ultra-compact and wide-spectrum-range thermo-optic switch based on silicon coupled photonic crystal microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xingyu E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com Chung, Chi-Jui; Pan, Zeyu; Yan, Hai; Chakravarty, Swapnajit E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com; Chen, Ray T. E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com

    2015-11-30

    We design, fabricate, and experimentally demonstrate a compact thermo-optic gate switch comprising a 3.78 μm-long coupled L0-type photonic crystal microcavities on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. A nanohole is inserted in the center of each individual L0 photonic crystal microcavity. Coupling between identical microcavities gives rise to bonding and anti-bonding states of the coupled photonic molecules. The coupled photonic crystal microcavities are numerically simulated and experimentally verified with a 6 nm-wide flat-bottom resonance in its transmission spectrum, which enables wider operational spectrum range than microring resonators. An integrated micro-heater is in direct contact with the silicon core to efficiently drive the device. The thermo-optic switch is measured with an optical extinction ratio of 20 dB, an on-off switching power of 18.2 mW, a thermo-optic tuning efficiency of 0.63 nm/mW, a rise time of 14.8 μs, and a fall time of 18.5 μs. The measured on-chip loss on the transmission band is as low as 1 dB.

  1. Connecting Crustal Faults and Tectonics from Puget Sound across the Cascade Range to the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt, Washington: Evidence from New High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, R. J.; Sherrod, B. L.; Weaver, C. S.; Wells, R. E.

    2009-05-01

    A series of regional-scale faults in the Cascadia forearc, including the Tacoma, Seattle, and southern Whidbey Island faults, cuts the Puget Sound lowland in response to 6 mm/yr of north-south compression. The Cascadia backarc of Washington, on the other hand, currently migrates <3 mm/yr northeastward relative to stable North America (McCaffrey et al., 2007). The tectonic connection between these two regions has remained problematic in part because of the lack of clearly mapped faults across the Cascade Range. A new, high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of a portion of the Cascade Range and the Yakima fold and thrust belt offers a view of the tectonic connection between the forearc and backarc. The aeromagnetic survey was acquired in 2008 and includes the cities of Yakima and Ellensburg, Washington. Total-field intensity was measured at a nominal altitude of 250 m above terrain, along flight lines spaced 400 m apart, and along tie lines spaced 4 km apart. Upper crustal rocks in this region have diverse magnetic properties, ranging from highly magnetic rocks of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), with both normal and reverse polarities, to weakly magnetic sedimentary rocks of the Miocene Ellensburg Formation. These distinctive magnetic properties permit the mapping of important lithologies from their exposures to covered areas. High- gradient aeromagnetic lineaments correspond with mapped faults and folds of the CRBG and indicate where these structures extend beyond surface exposures. For example, a two-dimensional model of the northwest- striking Umtanum Ridge fault zone, based on the new aeromagnetic data and constrained by geologic mapping, consists of three thrust faults and associated folds that deform normal and reverse flows of the CRBG. In this model, Umtanum Ridge itself is viewed as a transpressional structure uplifted 1 to 2 km along northwest-striking thrust faults with opposing dip. Modeling indicates that these thrust faults penetrate

  2. Protein folding. Translational tuning optimizes nascent protein folding in cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jung; Yoon, Jae Seok; Shishido, Hideki; Yang, Zhongying; Rooney, LeeAnn A; Barral, Jose M; Skach, William R

    2015-04-24

    In cells, biosynthetic machinery coordinates protein synthesis and folding to optimize efficiency and minimize off-pathway outcomes. However, it has been difficult to delineate experimentally the mechanisms responsible. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we studied cotranslational folding of the first nucleotide-binding domain from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. During synthesis, folding occurred discretely via sequential compaction of N-terminal, α-helical, and α/β-core subdomains. Moreover, the timing of these events was critical; premature α-subdomain folding prevented subsequent core formation. This process was facilitated by modulating intrinsic folding propensity in three distinct ways: delaying α-subdomain compaction, facilitating β-strand intercalation, and optimizing translation kinetics via codon usage. Thus, de novo folding is translationally tuned by an integrated cellular response that shapes the cotranslational folding landscape at critical stages of synthesis. PMID:25908822

  3. Fault propagation folds induced by gravitational failure and slumping of the Central Costa Rica volcanic range: Implications for large terrestrial and Martian volcanic edifices

    SciTech Connect

    Borgia, A. ); Burr, J. ); Montero, W.; Morales, L.D. ); Alvarado, G.E. )

    1990-08-30

    Long sublinear ridges and related scarps located at the base of large volcanic structures are frequently interpreted as normal faults associated with extensional regional stress. In contrast, the ridges bordering the Central Costa Rica volcanic range (CCRVR) are the topographic expression of hanging wall asymmetric angular anticlines overlying low-angle thrust faults at the base of the range. These faults formed by gravitational failure and slumping of the flanks of the range due to the weight of the volcanic edifices and were perhaps triggered by the intrusion of magma over the past 20,000 years. These anticlines are hypothesized to occur along the base of the volcano, where the thrust faults ramp up toward the sea bottom. Ridges and scarps between 2,000 and 5,000 m below sea level are interpreted as the topographic expression of these folds. The authors further suggest that the scarps of the CCRVR and valid scaled terrestrial analogs of the perimeter scarp of the Martian volcano Olympus Mons. They suggest that the crust below Olympus Mons has failed under the load of the volcano, triggering the radial slumping of the flanks of the volcano on basal thrusts. The thrusting would have, in turn, formed the anticlinal ridges and scarps that surround the edifice. The thrust faults may extend all the way to the base of the Martian crust (about 40 km), and they may have been active until almost the end of the volcanic activity. They suggest that gravitational failure and slumping of the flanks of volcanoes is a process common to most large volcanic edifices. In the CCRVR this slumping of the flanks is a slow intermittent process, but it could evolve to rapid massive avalanching leading to catastrophic eruptions. Thus monitoring of uplift and displacement of the folds related to the slump tectonics could become an additional effective method for mitigating volcanic hazards.

  4. Protein folds and protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, R. Dustin; Daggett, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    The classification of protein folds is necessarily based on the structural elements that distinguish domains. Classification of protein domains consists of two problems: the partition of structures into domains and the classification of domains into sets of similar structures (or folds). Although similar topologies may arise by convergent evolution, the similarity of their respective folding pathways is unknown. The discovery and the characterization of the majority of protein folds will be followed by a similar enumeration of available protein folding pathways. Consequently, understanding the intricacies of structural domains is necessary to understanding their collective folding pathways. We review the current state of the art in the field of protein domain classification and discuss methods for the systematic and comprehensive study of protein folding across protein fold space via atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Finally, we discuss our large-scale Dynameomics project, which includes simulations of representatives of all autonomous protein folds. PMID:21051320

  5. Bistatic image processing for a 32 x 19 inch model aircraft using scattered fields obtained in the OSU-ESL compact range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T-H.; Burnside, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) images for a 32 in long and 19 in wide model aircraft are documented. Both backscattered and bistatic scattered fields of this model aircraft were measured in the OSU-ESL compact range to obtain these images. The scattered fields of the target were measured for frequencies from 2 to 18 GHz with a 10 MHz increment and for full 360 deg azimuth rotation angles with a 0.2 deg step. For the bistatic scattering measurement, the compact range was used as the transmitting antenna; while, a broad band AEL double ridge horn was used as the receiving antenna. Bistatic angles of 90 deg and 135 deg were measured. Due to the size of the chamber and target, the receiving antenna was in the near field of the target; nevertheless, the image processing algorithm was valid for this case.

  6. Tectonic and climatic influences on the deposition and preservation of Quaternary units along the range-front of the Manastash Anticline, Yakima Fold Belt, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladinsky, T. C.; Kelsey, H. M.; Sherrod, B. L.; Mahan, S.; Pratt, T. L.; Blakely, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Based on multiple independent data sets, we infer episodic base-level lowering of the Kittitas Valley relative to tributaries flowing northward off the Manastash Ridge range-front and within the neighboring Lower Yakima River Canyon of central Washington. Manastash Ridge is a southeast-striking anticline within the Yakima fold and thrust belt, which deforms the extensive Miocene Columbia River Basalt flows that cover the region. Understanding the roles of climate aggradation and degradation cycles in concurrence with tectonic faulting along Manastash Ridge suggests both have contributed to the landscape evolution of the southern Kittitas Valley and Manastash range-front. Previously described proglacial outwash terraces within the northern Kittitas Valley and Upper Yakima River Canyon document periods of aggradation followed by fluvial degradation and entrenchment due to alteration in hillslope sediment production and transport capacity related to glacial and interglacial conditions. Luminescence age determinations and tephrochronology for Manastash range-front Quaternary units yield preliminary timing for aggradation of alluvial units, which we correlate to the late Pleistocene (MIS Stage V) glacial-interglacial climate transition. Seismic-reflection imagery, LiDAR, aeromagnetic surveys, and field mapping of Quaternary deposits reveal fault scarp lineaments within the Manastash range-front, west of the canyon entrance. We suggest these scarps are related to a series of north-verging thrust faults accommodating growth of the Manastash anticline. These faults isolate and uplift fan complexes, each complex generated during climate conditions favorable to fan aggradation. Entrenched alluvial fan deposits along the rangefront, strath terrace sequences, coincident knickpoints within tributary longitudinal profiles, and fault scarp lineaments suggest uplift rates of 0.02 to 0.2 m/1000yrs.

  7. Chromosome Compaction by Active Loop Extrusion.

    PubMed

    Goloborodko, Anton; Marko, John F; Mirny, Leonid A

    2016-05-24

    During cell division, chromosomes are compacted in length by more than a 100-fold. A wide range of experiments demonstrated that in their compacted state, mammalian chromosomes form arrays of closely stacked consecutive ∼100 kb loops. The mechanism underlying the active process of chromosome compaction into a stack of loops is unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that chromosomes are compacted by enzymatic machines that actively extrude chromatin loops. When such loop-extruding factors (LEF) bind to chromosomes, they progressively bridge sites that are further away along the chromosome, thus extruding a loop. We demonstrate that collective action of LEFs leads to formation of a dynamic array of consecutive loops. Simulations and an analytically solved model identify two distinct steady states: a sparse state, where loops are highly dynamic but provide little compaction; and a dense state, where there are more stable loops and dramatic chromosome compaction. We find that human chromosomes operate at the border of the dense steady state. Our analysis also shows how the macroscopic characteristics of the loop array are determined by the microscopic properties of LEFs and their abundance. When the number of LEFs are used that match experimentally based estimates, the model can quantitatively reproduce the average loop length, the degree of compaction, and the general loop-array morphology of compact human chromosomes. Our study demonstrates that efficient chromosome compaction can be achieved solely by an active loop-extrusion process. PMID:27224481

  8. Truss Structure Could Be Folded For Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theer, Douglas S.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed truss structure comprises cubical bays and folded for compactness during transport. When folded, truss 1/25.6 as long as when fully extended. Conceived for transport and deployment in outerspace, suitable for terrestrial structures that must be transported compactly and erected quickly.

  9. Transtensional folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossen, Haakon; Teyssier, Christian; Whitney, Donna L.

    2014-05-01

    For now three decades transpression has dominated the concepts that underlie oblique tectonics, but in more recent years transtension has garnered much interest as a simple model that can be applied to shallow and deep crustal tectonics. One fundamental aspect that distinguishes transtension from transpression is that material lines in transtension rotate toward the direction of oblique divergence. Another point that may be less intuitive when thinking of transtension is that while transtensional strain involves shortening in the vertical direction, one of the horizontal axes is also a shortening axis, whatever the angle of divergence. It is the combination of these two shortening axes that leads to constrictional finite strain in transtension. The existence of a horizontal shortening strain axis implies that transtension offers the potential for folds of horizontal layers to form and then rotate toward the direction of oblique divergence. An investigation of transtensional folding using 3D strain modeling reveals that folding is more likely for simple shear dominated transtension (large wrench component). Transtensional folds can only accumulate a fixed amount of horizontal shortening and tightness that are prescribed by the angle of oblique divergence, regardless of finite strain. Transtensional folds are characterized by hinge-parallel stretching that exceeds that expected from pure wrenching. In addition, the magnitude of hinge-parallel stretching always exceeds hinge-perpendicular shortening, causing constrictional fabrics and hinge-parallel boudinage to develop. Because the dominant vertical strain axis is shortening, transtensional fold growth is generally suppressed, but when folds do develop their limbs enter the field of shortening, resulting in possible fold interference patterns akin to cascading folds. Application of these transtensional folding principles to regions of oblique rifting (i.e. Gulf of California) or exhumation of deep crust (i.e. Western

  10. Evaluation Of Microdosing Strategies For Studies In Preclinical Drug Development: Demonstration Of Linear Pharmacokinetics In Dogs Of A Nucleoside Analogue Over A 50-Fold Dose Range

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, P; Vogel, J S; Rose, M J; Ubick, E A; Brunner, J E; Wallace, M A; Adelsberger, J K; Baker, M P; Henderson, P T; Pearson, P G; Baillie, T A

    2004-04-22

    The technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was validated successfully and utilized to study the pharmacokinetics and disposition in dogs of a preclinical drug candidate (Compound A), after oral and intravenous administration. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether Compound A displayed linear kinetics across sub-pharmacological (microdose) and pharmacological dose ranges in an animal model, prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The AMS-derived disposition properties of Compound A were comparable to data obtained via conventional techniques such as LC-MS/MS and liquid scintillation counting analyses. Thus, Compound A displayed multiphasic kinetics and possessed low plasma clearance (4.4 mL/min/kg), a long terminal elimination half-life (19.4 hr) and high oral bioavailability (82%). Currently there are no published comparisons of the kinetics of a pharmaceutical compound at pharmacological versus sub-pharmacological doses employing microdosing strategies. The present study thus provides the first description of the pharmacokinetics of a drug candidate assessed under these two dosing regimens. The data demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic properties of Compound A were similar following dosing at 0.02 mg/kg as at 1 mg/kg, indicating that in the case of Compound A, the kinetics of absorption, distribution and elimination in the dog appear to be linear across this 50-fold dose range. Moreover, the exceptional sensitivity of AMS provided a pharmacokinetic profile of Compound A, even following a microdose, which revealed aspects of the disposition of this agent that were inaccessible by conventional techniques. The applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are broad ranging and vary from studying environmental and ecological issues such as the isotopic composition of the atmosphere, soil and water (Hughen et al., 2000; Beck et al., 2001; Keith-Roach et al., 2001; Mironov et al., 2002), to archaeology and volcanology

  11. Implementation of a k/k0 method to identify long-range structure in transition states during conformational folding/unfolding of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Lovy; Kurinov, Igor; Ealick, Steven E.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary A previously-introduced kinetic-rate constant (k/k0) method, where k and k0 are the folding (unfolding) rate constants in the mutant and the wild-type forms, respectively, of a protein, has been applied to obtain qualitative information about structure in the transition state (TS) ensemble of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) which contains four native disulfide bonds. The method compares the folding (unfolding) kinetics of two versions of RNase A, with and without a covalent crosslink (in the form of a fifth disulfide bond); the method tests whether the crosslinked residues are associated in the folding (unfolding) transition state of the non-crosslinked version. To confirm that the fifth disulfide bond has not introduced a significant structural perturbation, we solved the crystal structure of the V43C-R85C mutant to 1.6 Å resolution. Our findings suggest that residues Val 43 and Arg 85 are not associated in the folding (unfolding) TS ensemble of RNase A, and also that Ala 4 and Val 118 may form non-native contacts in the folding (unfolding) TS ensemble. PMID:17937908

  12. Implementation of a k/k(0) method to identify long-range structure in transition states during conformational folding/unfolding of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Lovy; Kurinov, Igor; Ealick, Steven E; Scheraga, Harold A

    2007-10-01

    A previously introduced kinetic-rate constant (k/k(0)) method, where k and k(0) are the folding (unfolding) rate constants in the mutant and the wild-type forms, respectively, of a protein, has been applied to obtain qualitative information about structure in the transition state ensemble (TSE) of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A), which contains four native disulfide bonds. The method compares the folding (unfolding) kinetics of RNase A, with and without a covalent crosslink and tests whether the crosslinked residues are associated in the folding (unfolding) transition state (TS) of the noncrosslinked version. To confirm that the fifth disulfide bond has not introduced a significant structural perturbation, we solved the crystal structure of the V43C-R85C mutant to 1.6 A resolution. Our findings suggest that residues Val43 and Arg85 are not associated, and that residues Ala4 and Val118 may form nonnative contacts, in the folding (unfolding) TSE of RNase A. PMID:17937908

  13. A repeated-measures analysis of the effects of soft tissues on wrist range of motion in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs: Implications for the functional origins of an automatic wrist folding mechanism in Crocodilia.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Joel David; Hutson, Kelda Nadine

    2014-07-01

    A recent study hypothesized that avian-like wrist folding in quadrupedal dinosaurs could have aided their distinctive style of locomotion with semi-pronated and therefore medially facing palms. However, soft tissues that automatically guide avian wrist folding rarely fossilize, and automatic wrist folding of unknown function in extant crocodilians has not been used to test this hypothesis. Therefore, an investigation of the relative contributions of soft tissues to wrist range of motion (ROM) in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs, and the quadrupedal function of crocodilian wrist folding, could inform these questions. Here, we repeatedly measured wrist ROM in degrees through fully fleshed, skinned, minus muscles/tendons, minus ligaments, and skeletonized stages in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis and the ostrich Struthio camelus. The effects of dissection treatment and observer were statistically significant for alligator wrist folding and ostrich wrist flexion, but not ostrich wrist folding. Final skeletonized wrist folding ROM was higher than (ostrich) or equivalent to (alligator) initial fully fleshed ROM, while final ROM was lower than initial ROM for ostrich wrist flexion. These findings suggest that, unlike the hinge/ball and socket-type elbow and shoulder joints in these archosaurs, ROM within gliding/planar diarthrotic joints is more restricted to the extent of articular surfaces. The alligator data indicate that the crocodilian wrist mechanism functions to automatically lock their semi-pronated palms into a rigid column, which supports the hypothesis that this palmar orientation necessitated soft tissue stiffening mechanisms in certain dinosaurs, although ROM-restricted articulations argue against the presence of an extensive automatic mechanism. Anat Rec, 297:1228-1249, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24664936

  14. Kinematics of constant arc length folding for different fold shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Mohammad R.; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Ghassemi, Ali R.

    2010-06-01

    Basic mathematical functions are applied for the two-dimensional geometrical and kinematical analysis of different fold shapes. Relationships between different fold parameters are established and related to the bulk shortening taking place during folding under upper crustal conditions. The bulk shortening taking place during constant arc length folding is mathematically related to the bulk shortening during homogenous pure shear using a particular aspect ratio, which is for folding the ratio of amplitude to half wavelength and for pure shear the ratio of vertical to horizontal length of the deformed, initially square body. The evolution of the fold aspect ratio with bulk shortening is similar for a wide range of fold shapes and indicates that the fold aspect ratio allows a good estimate of the bulk shortening. The change of the geometry of individual layers across a multilayer sequence in disharmonic folding indicates a specific kinematics of multilayer folding, referred to here as "wrap folding", which does not require significant flexural slip nor flexural flow. The kinematic analysis indicates that there is a critical value for constant arc length folding between shortening values of 30-40% (depending on the fold geometry). For shortening values smaller than the critical value limb rotation and fold amplitude growth are dominating. For shortening larger than this value, faulting, boudinage and foliation development are likely the dominating deformation process during continued shortening. The kinematical analysis of constant arc length folding can be used for estimating the bulk shortening taking place during multilayer folding which is an important component of the deformation of crustal rocks during the early history of shortening. The bulk shortening is estimated for a natural, multilayer detachment fold and the shortening estimates based on the kinematic analysis are compared and supported by numerical finite element simulations of multilayer detachment

  15. All-or-none folding of a polymer in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark

    A flexible homopolymer chain with sufficiently short-range interactions undergoes a discontinuous transition from an expanded coil to a compact crystallite analogous to the all-or-none folding transition exhibited by fast-folding proteins. One anticipates that geometric confinement will reduce the entropy of the unfolded chain, thereby stabilizing the folded state and shifting the transition to higher temperature. In this work we study a flexible square-well N-mer chain (monomer diameter d) located between two hard walls forming a slit-like pore (width W) with the chain end-tethered to one wall. We carry out Monte simulations with Wang-Landau sampling to construct the single-chain density of states and use both microcanonical and canonical analyses to characterize phase transitions. When the slit width is similar to the size of the folded chain we observe a modest stabilization effect. Further reduction of the slit width geometrically prohibits the chain from folding into the free-chain ground state. However, a discontinuous all-or-none folding transition still occurs to a flattened crystallite that spans the pore. All-or-none folding persists even to the limit of a very narrow pore (W d) where the ground-state structure is a quasi-two-dimensional crystal. Funding: NSF DMR-1204747.

  16. [Design of a medical folding fridge].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianjun; Wei, Jiancang; Wu, Taihu; Meng, Xingju

    2011-07-01

    This article introduces a design of a medical folding fridge, which consists of three major components, base, folding frame and insulated cover. The base has a cooling system. The frame and cover are expanded during normal use and folded during storage or transportation. The device is compact, durable, transportable and well environmental adaptable. The system design is proved proper and the temperature inside is reliable. It is very suitable for temperature sensitive supplies stored in the medical emergency field. PMID:22097750

  17. Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Clouds wind speed profile measurements with the new compact long range wind Lidar WindCube(TM) WLS70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquet, M.; Cariou, J. P.; Sauvage, L.; Lolli, S.; Parmentier, R.; Loaec, S.

    2009-04-01

    To fully understand atmospheric dynamics, climate studies, energy transfer, and weather prediction the wind field is one of the most important atmospheric state variables. Small scales variability and low atmospheric layers are not described with sufficient resolution up to now. To answer these needs, the WLS70 long-range wind Lidar is a new generation of wind Lidars developed by LEOSPHERE, derived from the commercial WindCube™ Lidar widely used by the wind power industry and well-known for its great accuracy and data availability. The WLS70 retrieves the horizontal and vertical wind speed profiles as well as the wind direction at various heights simultaneously inside the boundary layer and cloud layers. The amplitude and spectral content of the backscattering signal are also available. From raw data, the embedded signal processing software performs the computation of the aerosol Doppler shift and backscattering coefficient. Higher values of normalized relative backscattering (NRB) are proportional to higher aerosol concentration. At 1540 nm, molecular scattering being negligible, it is then possible to directly retrieve the Boundary Layer height evolution observing the height at which the WindCube NRB drops drastically. In this work are presented the results of the measurements obtained during the LUAMI campaign that took place in Lindenberg, at the DWD (Deutscher WetterDienst) meteorological observatory, from November 2008 to January 2009. The WLS70 Lidar instrument was placed close together with an EZ Lidar™ ALS450, a rugged and compact eye safe aerosol Lidar that provides a real time measurement of backscattering and extinction coefficients, aerosol optical depth (AOD), automatic detection of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and clouds base and top from 100m up to more than 20km. First results put in evidence wind shear and veer phenomena as well as strong convective effects during the raise of the mixing layer or before rain periods. Wind speed

  18. Single Mutations in the VP2 300 Loop Region of the Three-Fold Spike of the Carnivore Parvovirus Capsid Can Determine Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Organtini, Lindsey J.; Zhang, Sheng; Hafenstein, Susan L.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sylvatic carnivores, such as raccoons, have recently been recognized as important hosts in the evolution of canine parvovirus (CPV), a pandemic pathogen of domestic dogs. Although viruses from raccoons do not efficiently bind the dog transferrin receptor (TfR) or infect dog cells, a single mutation changing an aspartic acid to a glycine at capsid (VP2) position 300 in the prototype raccoon CPV allows dog cell infection. Because VP2 position 300 exhibits extensive amino acid variation among the carnivore parvoviruses, we further investigated its role in determining host range by analyzing its diversity and evolution in nature and by creating a comprehensive set of VP2 position 300 mutants in infectious clones. Notably, some position 300 residues rendered CPV noninfectious for dog, but not cat or fox, cells. Changes of adjacent residues (residues 299 and 301) were also observed often after cell culture passage in different hosts, and some of the mutations mimicked changes seen in viruses recovered from natural infections of alternative hosts, suggesting that compensatory mutations were selected to accommodate the new residue at position 300. Analysis of the TfRs of carnivore hosts used in the experimental evolution studies demonstrated that their glycosylation patterns varied, including a glycan present only on the domestic dog TfR that dictates susceptibility to parvoviruses. Overall, there were significant differences in the abilities of viruses with alternative position 300 residues to bind TfRs and infect different carnivore hosts, demonstrating that the process of infection is highly host dependent and that VP2 position 300 is a key determinant of host range. IMPORTANCE Although the emergence and pandemic spread of canine parvovirus (CPV) are well documented, the carnivore hosts and evolutionary pathways involved in its emergence remain enigmatic. We recently demonstrated that a region in the capsid structure of CPV, centered around VP2 position 300

  19. Compact sources for the generation of high-peak power wavelength-stabilized laser pulses in the picoseconds and nanoseconds ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, H.; Klehr, A.; Schwertfeger, S.; Liero, A.; Hoffmann, Th.; Brox, O.; Thomas, M.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2012-03-01

    Diode lasers are ideally suited for the generation of optical pulses in the nanoseconds and picoseconds ranges by gainswitching, Q-switching or mode-locking. We have developed diode-laser based light sources where the pulses are spectrally stabilized and nearly-diffraction limited as required by many applications. Diffraction limited emission is achieved by a several microns wide ridge waveguide (RW), so that only the fundamental lateral mode should lase. Spectral stabilization is realized with a Bragg grating integrated into the semiconductor chip, resulting in distributed feedback (DFB) or distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers. We obtained a peak power of 3.8W for 4ns long pulses using a gain-switched DFB laser and a peak power of more than 4W for 65ps long pulses using a three-section DBR laser. Higher peak powers of several tens of Watts can be reached by an amplification of the pulses with semiconductor optical amplifiers, which can be either monolithically or hybrid integrated with the master oscillators. We developed compact modules with a footprint of 4×5cm2 combining master oscillator, tapered power amplifier, beam-shaping optical elements and high-frequency electronics. In order to diminish the generation of amplified spontaneous emission between the pulses, the amplifier is modulated with short-pulses of high amplitude, too. Beyond the amplifier, we obtained a peak power of more than 10W for 4ns long pulses, a peak power of about 35W for 80ps long pulses and a peak power of 70W for 10ps long pulses at emission wavelengths around 1064nm.

  20. Adult Compacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin focuses on adult compacts, three-way agreements among employers, potential employees, and trainers to provide the right kind of quality training to meet the employers' requirements. Part 1 is an executive summary of a report of the Adult Compacts Project, which studied three adult compacts in Birmingham and Loughborough, England, and…

  1. Folding of proteins with diverse folds.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sandipan; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2006-11-15

    Using parallel tempering simulations with high statistics, we investigate the folding and thermodynamic properties of three small proteins with distinct native folds: the all-helical 1RIJ, the all-sheet beta3s, and BBA5, which has a mixed helix-sheet fold. In all three cases, simulations with our energy function find the native structures as global minima in free energy at experimentally relevant temperatures. However, the folding process strongly differs for the three molecules, indicating that the folding mechanism is correlated with the form of the native structure. PMID:16950845

  2. Protein Folding in Confined and Crowded Environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Confinement and crowding are two major factors that can potentially impact protein folding in cellular environments. Theories based on considerations of excluded volumes predict disparate effects on protein folding stability for confinement and crowding: confinement can stabilize proteins by over 10kBT but crowding has a very modest effect on stability. On the other hand, confinement and crowding are both predicted to favor conformations of the unfolded state which are compact, and consequently may increase the folding rate. These predictions are largely borne out by experimental studies of protein folding under confined and crowded conditions in the test tube. Protein folding in cellular environments is further complicated by interactions with surrounding surfaces and other factors. Concerted theoretical modeling and test-tube and in vivo experiments promise to elucidate the complexity of protein folding in cellular environments. PMID:17719556

  3. Peptide folding driven by Van der Waals interactions.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shen-Shu

    2015-09-01

    Contrary to the widespread view that hydrogen bonding and its entropy effect play a dominant role in protein folding, folding into helical and hairpin-like structures is observed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations without hydrogen bonding in the peptide-solvent system. In the widely used point charge model, hydrogen bonding is calculated as part of the interaction between atomic partial charges. It is removed from these simulations by setting atomic charges of the peptide and water to zero. Because of the structural difference between the peptide and water, van der Waals (VDW) interactions favor peptide intramolecular interactions and are a major contributing factor to the structural compactness. These compact structures are amino acid sequence dependent and closely resemble standard secondary structures, as a consequence of VDW interactions and covalent bonding constraints. Hydrogen bonding is a short range interaction and it locks the approximate structure into the specific secondary structure when it is included in the simulation. In contrast to standard molecular simulations where the total energy is dominated by charge-charge interactions, these simulation results will give us a new view of the folding mechanism. PMID:26013298

  4. Understanding the folding rates and folding nuclei of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Alexei V; Ivankov, Dmitry N; Garbuzynskiy, Sergiy O; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2007-12-01

    The first part of this paper contains an overview of protein structures, their spontaneous formation ("folding"), and the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of this phenomenon, as revealed by in vitro experiments. It is stressed that universal features of folding are observed near the point of thermodynamic equilibrium between the native and denatured states of the protein. Here the "two-state" ("denatured state" <--> "native state") transition proceeds without accumulation of metastable intermediates, but includes only the unstable "transition state". This state, which is the most unstable in the folding pathway, and its structured core (a "nucleus") are distinguished by their essential influence on the folding/unfolding kinetics. In the second part of the paper, a theory of protein folding rates and related phenomena is presented. First, it is shown that the protein size determines the range of a protein's folding rates in the vicinity of the point of thermodynamic equilibrium between the native and denatured states of the protein. Then, we present methods for calculating folding and unfolding rates of globular proteins from their sizes, stabilities and either 3D structures or amino acid sequences. Finally, we show that the same theory outlines the location of the protein folding nucleus (i.e., the structured part of the transition state) in reasonable agreement with experimental data. PMID:18220841

  5. Quantitative Morphology of Epithelial Folds.

    PubMed

    Štorgel, Nick; Krajnc, Matej; Mrak, Polona; Štrus, Jasna; Ziherl, Primož

    2016-01-01

    The shape of spatially modulated epithelial morphologies such as villi and crypts is usually associated with the epithelium-stroma area mismatch leading to buckling. We propose an alternative mechanical model based on intraepithelial stresses generated by differential tensions of apical, lateral, and basal sides of cells as well as on the elasticity of the basement membrane. We use it to theoretically study longitudinal folds in simple epithelia and we identify four types of corrugated morphologies: compact, invaginated, evaginated, and wavy. The obtained tissue contours and thickness profiles are compared to epithelial folds observed in invertebrates and vertebrates, and for most samples, the agreement is within the estimated experimental error. Our model establishes the groove-crest modulation of tissue thickness as a morphometric parameter that can, together with the curvature profile, be used to estimate the relative differential apicobasal tension in the epithelium. PMID:26745429

  6. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  7. Asymmetric hindwing foldings in rove beetles

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Okabe, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    Foldable wings of insects are the ultimate deployable structures and have attracted the interest of aerospace engineering scientists as well as entomologists. Rove beetles are known to fold their wings in the most sophisticated ways that have right–left asymmetric patterns. However, the specific folding process and the reason for this asymmetry remain unclear. This study reveals how these asymmetric patterns emerge as a result of the folding process of rove beetles. A high-speed camera was used to reveal the details of the wing-folding movement. The results show that these characteristic asymmetrical patterns emerge as a result of simultaneous folding of overlapped wings. The revealed folding mechanisms can achieve not only highly compact wing storage but also immediate deployment. In addition, the right and left crease patterns are interchangeable, and thus each wing internalizes two crease patterns and can be folded in two different ways. This two-way folding gives freedom of choice for the folding direction to a rove beetle. The use of asymmetric patterns and the capability of two-way folding are unique features not found in artificial structures. These features have great potential to extend the design possibilities for all deployable structures, from space structures to articles of daily use. PMID:25368178

  8. Asymmetric hindwing foldings in rove beetles.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Okabe, Yoji

    2014-11-18

    Foldable wings of insects are the ultimate deployable structures and have attracted the interest of aerospace engineering scientists as well as entomologists. Rove beetles are known to fold their wings in the most sophisticated ways that have right-left asymmetric patterns. However, the specific folding process and the reason for this asymmetry remain unclear. This study reveals how these asymmetric patterns emerge as a result of the folding process of rove beetles. A high-speed camera was used to reveal the details of the wing-folding movement. The results show that these characteristic asymmetrical patterns emerge as a result of simultaneous folding of overlapped wings. The revealed folding mechanisms can achieve not only highly compact wing storage but also immediate deployment. In addition, the right and left crease patterns are interchangeable, and thus each wing internalizes two crease patterns and can be folded in two different ways. This two-way folding gives freedom of choice for the folding direction to a rove beetle. The use of asymmetric patterns and the capability of two-way folding are unique features not found in artificial structures. These features have great potential to extend the design possibilities for all deployable structures, from space structures to articles of daily use. PMID:25368178

  9. Cotranslational protein folding on the ribosome monitored in real time.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Wolf; Kokic, Goran; Jäger, Marcus; Mittelstaet, Joerg; Komar, Anton A; Rodnina, Marina V

    2015-11-27

    Protein domains can fold into stable tertiary structures while they are synthesized on the ribosome. We used a high-performance, reconstituted in vitro translation system to investigate the folding of a small five-helix protein domain-the N-terminal domain of Escherichia coli N5-glutamine methyltransferase HemK-in real time. Our observations show that cotranslational folding of the protein, which folds autonomously and rapidly in solution, proceeds through a compact, non-native conformation that forms within the peptide tunnel of the ribosome. The compact state rearranges into a native-like structure immediately after the full domain sequence has emerged from the ribosome. Both folding transitions are rate-limited by translation, allowing for quasi-equilibrium sampling of the conformational space restricted by the ribosome. Cotranslational folding may be typical of small, intrinsically rapidly folding protein domains. PMID:26612953

  10. Improving protein fold recognition by random forest

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recognizing the correct structural fold among known template protein structures for a target protein (i.e. fold recognition) is essential for template-based protein structure modeling. Since the fold recognition problem can be defined as a binary classification problem of predicting whether or not the unknown fold of a target protein is similar to an already known template protein structure in a library, machine learning methods have been effectively applied to tackle this problem. In our work, we developed RF-Fold that uses random forest - one of the most powerful and scalable machine learning classification methods - to recognize protein folds. Results RF-Fold consists of hundreds of decision trees that can be trained efficiently on very large datasets to make accurate predictions on a highly imbalanced dataset. We evaluated RF-Fold on the standard Lindahl's benchmark dataset comprised of 976 × 975 target-template protein pairs through cross-validation. Compared with 17 different fold recognition methods, the performance of RF-Fold is generally comparable to the best performance in fold recognition of different difficulty ranging from the easiest family level, the medium-hard superfamily level, and to the hardest fold level. Based on the top-one template protein ranked by RF-Fold, the correct recognition rate is 84.5%, 63.4%, and 40.8% at family, superfamily, and fold levels, respectively. Based on the top-five template protein folds ranked by RF-Fold, the correct recognition rate increases to 91.5%, 79.3% and 58.3% at family, superfamily, and fold levels. Conclusions The good performance achieved by the RF-Fold demonstrates the random forest's effectiveness for protein fold recognition. PMID:25350499

  11. Stability and folding of the tumour suppressor protein p16.

    PubMed

    Tang, K S; Guralnick, B J; Wang, W K; Fersht, A R; Itzhaki, L S

    1999-01-29

    The tumour suppressor p16 is a member of the INK4 family of inhibi tors of the cyclin D-dependent kinases, CDK4 and CDK6, that are involved in the key growth control pathway of the eukaryotic cell cycle. The 156 amino acid residue protein is composed of four ankyrin repeats (a helix-turn-helix motif) that stack linearly as two four-helix bundles resulting in a non-globular, elongated molecule. The thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the folding of p16 are unusual. The protein has a very low free energy of unfolding, Delta GH-2O/D-N, of 3.1 kcal mol-1 at 25 degreesC. The rate-determining transition state of folding/unfolding is very compact (89% as compact as the native state). The other unusual feature is the very rapid rate of unfolding in the absence of denaturant of 0.8 s-1 at 25 degreesC. Thus, p16 has both thermodynamic and kinetic instability. These features may be essential for the regulatory function of the INK4 proteins and of other ankyrin-repeat-containing proteins that mediate a wide range of protein-protein interactions. The mechanisms of inactivation of p16 by eight cancer-associated mutations were dissected using a systematic method designed to probe the integrity of the secondary structure and the global fold. The structure and folding of p16 appear to be highly vulnerable to single point mutations, probably as a result of the protein's low stability. This vulnerability provides one explanation for the striking frequency of p16 mutations in tumours and in immortalised cell lines. PMID:9917418

  12. Let Them Fold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Nicholas; Tobin, Alexander

    1972-01-01

    Directions are given for seven activities involving the folding of paper strips to illustrate geometric concepts. Properties of pentagons, triangles, hexagons, and Mobius bands resulting from the various foldings are discussed. (DT)

  13. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  14. Teaching polymers to fold

    SciTech Connect

    Judson, R.S. )

    1992-12-10

    A new method is presented for predicting folding pathways of polymers. The folding pathway is described as a generic program or sequence of logical steps of such a form that a computer can carry them out to produce a folded structure. A genetic (GA) is used to learn specific sequences or folding pathways that carry a denatured conformation into a target final conformation. The method is demonstrated on a model 2-dimensional polymer for which the global energy minimum is known. The GA learns a program that will fold a denatured polymer into its global energy minimum conformation. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Compact middle infrared zoom lens design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan-zhi; Jiao, Ming-yin; Luan, Yadong; Chang, Wei-jun; Sun, Ting

    2011-08-01

    A compact mid-wavelength infrared zoom camera with a zoom range of 15:1 and active athermalization has been developed. The moving groups for a wide zoom range are only two lens groups and moving machanisms of zoom are very simple, which allows easy access of opto-mechanical and electromechanical design. The final design adopts the configuration of reflective mirror fold, comprising of two mirrors and eleven refractive lenses made of two infrared materials such as germanium or silicon. The movement of the lens groups and the focal length of the system are smooth and continuous. The zoom lens has the advantages of simple structure, high image quality, simple moving lens groups, short zoom path and smooth zoom locus.

  16. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  17. A technique for extending by ∼10(3) the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Sio, H; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Zylstra, A B; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D

    2014-11-01

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D(3)He-, D2-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 10(2) for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 10(3) for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 10(8) and 10(9) cm(-2), respectively. Using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ∼10(8) and ∼10(12), respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±∼10 mg/cm(2). PMID:25430298

  18. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold distribution procedure. The fold distribution provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of change in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Distribution, Proposal 13149, as Cycle 20.

  19. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold distribution procedure. The fold distribution provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of change in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Distribution, Proposal 12778, as Cycle 19.

  20. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Analysis {11863} during Cycle 17.

  1. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Analysis, Proposal 12416, as Cycle 18.

  2. A technique for extending by ∼10{sup 3} the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Sio, H. Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-11-15

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D{sup 3}He-, D{sub 2}-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 10{sup 2} for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 10{sup 3} for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}, respectively. Using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ∼10{sup 8} and ∼10{sup 12}, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±∼10 mg/cm{sup 2}.

  3. A galaxy of folds.

    PubMed

    Alva, Vikram; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N; Söding, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Many protein classification systems capture homologous relationships by grouping domains into families and superfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity. Superfamilies with similar 3D structures are further grouped into folds. In the absence of discernable sequence similarity, these structural similarities were long thought to have originated independently, by convergent evolution. However, the growth of databases and advances in sequence comparison methods have led to the discovery of many distant evolutionary relationships that transcend the boundaries of superfamilies and folds. To investigate the contributions of convergent versus divergent evolution in the origin of protein folds, we clustered representative domains of known structure by their sequence similarity, treating them as point masses in a virtual 2D space which attract or repel each other depending on their pairwise sequence similarities. As expected, families in the same superfamily form tight clusters. But often, superfamilies of the same fold are linked with each other, suggesting that the entire fold evolved from an ancient prototype. Strikingly, some links connect superfamilies with different folds. They arise from modular peptide fragments of between 20 and 40 residues that co-occur in the connected folds in disparate structural contexts. These may be descendants of an ancestral pool of peptide modules that evolved as cofactors in the RNA world and from which the first folded proteins arose by amplification and recombination. Our galaxy of folds summarizes, in a single image, most known and many yet undescribed homologous relationships between protein superfamilies, providing new insights into the evolution of protein domains. PMID:19937658

  4. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  5. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  6. Compact fixed wavelength femtosecond oscillators as an add-on for tunable Ti:sapphire lasers extend the range of applications towards multimodal imaging and optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakulinen, T.; Klein, J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-photon (2P) microscopy based on tunable Ti:sapphire lasers has become a widespread tool for 3D imaging with sub-cellular resolution in living tissues. In recent years multi-photon microscopy with simpler fixed-wavelength femtosecond oscillators using Yb-doped tungstenates as gain material has raised increasing interest in life-sciences, because these lasers offer one order of magnitude more average power than Ti:sapphire lasers in the wavelength range around 1040 nm: Two-photon (2P) excitation of mainly red or yellow fluorescent dyes and proteins (e.g. YFP, mFruit series) simultaneously has been proven with a single IR laser wavelength. A new approach is to extend the usability of existing tunable Titanium sapphire lasers by adding a fixed IR wavelength with an Yb femtosecond oscillator. By that means a multitude of applications for multimodal imaging and optogenetics can be supported. Furthermore fs Yb-lasers are available with a repetition rate of typically 10 MHz and an average power of typically 5 W resulting in pulse energy of typically 500 nJ, which is comparably high for fs-oscillators. This makes them an ideal tool for two-photon spinning disk laser scanning microscopy and holographic patterning for simultaneous photoactivation of large cell populations. With this work we demonstrate that economical, small-footprint Yb fixed-wavelength lasers can present an interesting add-on to tunable lasers that are commonly used in multiphoton microscopy. The Yb fs-lasers hereby offer higher power for imaging of red fluorescent dyes and proteins, are ideally enhancing existing Ti:sapphire lasers with more power in the IR, and are supporting pulse energy and power hungry applications such as spinning disk microscopy and holographic patterning.

  7. Multiply folded graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwanpyo; Lee, Zonghoon; Malone, Brad D.; Chan, Kevin T.; Alemán, Benjamín; Regan, William; Gannett, Will; Crommie, M. F.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Zettl, A.

    2011-06-01

    The folding of paper, hide, and woven fabric has been used for millennia to achieve enhanced articulation, curvature, and visual appeal for intrinsically flat, two-dimensional materials. For graphene, an ideal two-dimensional material, folding may transform it to complex shapes with new and distinct properties. Here, we present experimental results that folded structures in graphene, termed grafold, exist, and their formations can be controlled by introducing anisotropic surface curvature during graphene synthesis or transfer processes. Using pseudopotential-density-functional-theory calculations, we also show that double folding modifies the electronic band structure of graphene. Furthermore, we demonstrate the intercalation of C60 into the grafolds. Intercalation or functionalization of the chemically reactive folds further expands grafold's mechanical, chemical, optical, and electronic diversity.

  8. Compact CFB: The next generation CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Utt, J.

    1996-12-31

    The next generation of compact circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers is described in outline form. The following topics are discussed: compact CFB = pyroflow + compact separator; compact CFB; compact separator is a breakthrough design; advantages of CFB; new design with substantial development history; KUHMO: successful demo unit; KUHMO: good performance over load range with low emissions; KOKKOLA: first commercial unit and emissions; KOKKOLA: first commercial unit and emissions; compact CFB installations; next generation CFB boiler; grid nozzle upgrades; cast segmented vortex finders; vortex finder installation; ceramic anchors; pre-cast vertical bullnose; refractory upgrades; and wet gunning.

  9. Folding of a miniprotein with mixed fold.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sandipan; Hansmann, U H E

    2007-07-21

    Using the 28 residue betabetaalpha protein FSD-EY as a target system, we examine correction terms for the ECEPP/3 force field. We find an increased probability of formation of the native state at low temperatures resulting from a reduced propensity to form alpha helices and increased formation of beta sheets. Our analysis of the observed folding events suggests that the C-terminal helix of FSD-EY is much more stable than the N-terminal beta hairpin and forms first. The hydrophobic groups of the helix provide a template which promotes the formation of the beta hairpin that is never observed to form without the helix. PMID:17655464

  10. Protein Folding and Misfolding on Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Protein folding, misfolding and aggregation, as well as the way misfolded and aggregated proteins affects cell viability are emerging as key themes in molecular and structural biology and in molecular medicine. Recent advances in the knowledge of the biophysical basis of protein folding have led to propose the energy landscape theory which provides a consistent framework to better understand how a protein folds rapidly and efficiently to the compact, biologically active structure. The increased knowledge on protein folding has highlighted its strict relation to protein misfolding and aggregation, either process being in close competition with the other, both relying on the same physicochemical basis. The theory has also provided information to better understand the structural and environmental factors affecting protein folding resulting in protein misfolding and aggregation into ordered or disordered polymeric assemblies. Among these, particular importance is given to the effects of surfaces. The latter, in some cases make possible rapid and efficient protein folding but most often recruit proteins/peptides increasing their local concentration thus favouring misfolding and accelerating the rate of nucleation. It is also emerging that surfaces can modify the path of protein misfolding and aggregation generating oligomers and polymers structurally different from those arising in the bulk solution and endowed with different physical properties and cytotoxicities. PMID:19330090

  11. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  12. Multiple folding pathways of proteins with shallow knots and co-translational folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-07-01

    We study the folding process in the shallowly knotted protein MJ0366 within two variants of a structure-based model. We observe that the resulting topological pathways are much richer than identified in previous studies. In addition to the single knot-loop events, we find novel, and dominant, two-loop mechanisms. We demonstrate that folding takes place in a range of temperatures and the conditions of most successful folding are at temperatures which are higher than those required for the fastest folding. We also demonstrate that nascent conditions are more favorable to knotting than off-ribosome folding.

  13. Multiple folding pathways of proteins with shallow knots and co-translational folding.

    PubMed

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-07-28

    We study the folding process in the shallowly knotted protein MJ0366 within two variants of a structure-based model. We observe that the resulting topological pathways are much richer than identified in previous studies. In addition to the single knot-loop events, we find novel, and dominant, two-loop mechanisms. We demonstrate that folding takes place in a range of temperatures and the conditions of most successful folding are at temperatures which are higher than those required for the fastest folding. We also demonstrate that nascent conditions are more favorable to knotting than off-ribosome folding. PMID:26233164

  14. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  15. Fold interaction and wavelength selection in 3D models of multilayer detachment folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts are dominated by folding and exhibit a fairly regular fold-spacing. Yet, in map-view, the aspect ratio of doubly-plunging anticlines varies considerably from very elongated, and sometimes slightly curved, cylindrical folds to nearly circular, dome-like structures. In addition, the fold spacing often varies significantly around an average value. So far, it remains unclear whether these features are consistent with a folding instability. Therefore, we here study the dynamics of multilayer detachment folding, process by which shortening can be accommodated in thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belts. We start by analysing the physics of this process by using both a semi-analytical thick plate theory and numerical simulations. Results show that several different folding modes occur, about half of which are affected by gravity and have a wavelength that depends on the background deformation rate. Non-dimensional expressions are derived that predict the dominant wavelength and growth rate of each of these folding modes and mechanical phase diagrams are presented that illustrate the applicability of each of the modes. Next, we perform 3D simulations and compare the results with those of 2D models and analytical theory. Both 2D and 3D numerical simulations have wavelengths that are in good agreement with the analytical predictions. In the high-resolution 3D simulations the lateral growth of folds is studied, in particular with respect to fold segment interactions and evolution of fold width-length aspect ratio. The numerical simulations show a number of similarities with the Fars region of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt including a large range of fold aspect ratio and a normally distributed fold wavelength around a dominant one.

  16. Programmable matter by folding

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, E.; An, B.; Benbernou, N. M.; Tanaka, H.; Kim, S.; Demaine, E. D.; Rus, D.; Wood, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Programmable matter is a material whose properties can be programmed to achieve specific shapes or stiffnesses upon command. This concept requires constituent elements to interact and rearrange intelligently in order to meet the goal. This paper considers achieving programmable sheets that can form themselves in different shapes autonomously by folding. Past approaches to creating transforming machines have been limited by the small feature sizes, the large number of components, and the associated complexity of communication among the units. We seek to mitigate these difficulties through the unique concept of self-folding origami with universal crease patterns. This approach exploits a single sheet composed of interconnected triangular sections. The sheet is able to fold into a set of predetermined shapes using embedded actuation. To implement this self-folding origami concept, we have developed a scalable end-to-end planning and fabrication process. Given a set of desired objects, the system computes an optimized design for a single sheet and multiple controllers to achieve each of the desired objects. The material, called programmable matter by folding, is an example of a system capable of achieving multiple shapes for multiple functions. PMID:20616049

  17. Folding without charges

    PubMed Central

    Kurnik, Martin; Hedberg, Linda; Danielsson, Jens; Oliveberg, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Surface charges of proteins have in several cases been found to function as “structural gatekeepers,” which avoid unwanted interactions by negative design, for example, in the control of protein aggregation and binding. The question is then if side-chain charges, due to their desolvation penalties, play a corresponding role in protein folding by avoiding competing, misfolded traps? To find out, we removed all 32 side-chain charges from the 101-residue protein S6 from Thermus thermophilus. The results show that the charge-depleted S6 variant not only retains its native structure and cooperative folding transition, but folds also faster than the wild-type protein. In addition, charge removal unleashes pronounced aggregation on longer timescales. S6 provides thus an example where the bias toward native contacts of a naturally evolved protein sequence is independent of charges, and point at a fundamental difference in the codes for folding and intermolecular interaction: specificity in folding is governed primarily by hydrophobic packing and hydrogen bonding, whereas solubility and binding relies critically on the interplay of side-chain charges. PMID:22454493

  18. Folded supersymmetry with a twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; Pinner, David

    2016-03-01

    Folded supersymmetry ( f-SUSY) stabilizes the weak scale against radiative corrections from the top sector via scalar partners whose gauge quantum numbers differ from their Standard Model counterparts. This non-trivial pairing of states can be realized in extra-dimensional theories with appropriate supersymmetry-breaking boundary conditions. We present a class of calculable f-SUSY models that are parametrized by a non-trivial twist in 5D boundary conditions and can accommodate the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Although the distinctive phenomenology associated with the novel folded states should provide strong evidence for this mechanism, the most stringent constraints are currently placed by conventional supersymmetry searches. These models remain minimally fine-tuned in light of LHC8 data and provide a range of both standard and exotic signatures accessible at LHC13.

  19. Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

  20. Synthesizing folded band chaos.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Hayes, Scott T; Pethel, Shawn D; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2007-04-01

    A randomly driven linear filter that synthesizes Lorenz-like, reverse-time chaos is shown also to produce Rössler-like folded band wave forms when driven using a different encoding of the random source. The relationship between the topological entropy of the random source, dissipation in the linear filter, and the positive Lyapunov exponent for the reverse-time wave form is exposed. The two drive encodings are viewed as grammar restrictions on a more general encoding that produces a chaotic superset encompassing both the Lorenz butterfly and Rössler folded band paradigms of nonlinear dynamics. PMID:17500950

  1. Extended Structures in RNA Folding Intermediates Are Due to Nonnative Interactions Rather than Electrostatic Repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Nathan J.; Gong, Haipeng; Zaheer, Syed S.; Freed, Karl F.; Pan, Tao; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2010-05-25

    RNA folding occurs via a series of transitions between metastable intermediate states for Mg{sup 2+} concentrations below those needed to fold the native structure. In general, these folding intermediates are considerably less compact than their respective native states. Our previous work demonstrates that the major equilibrium intermediate of the 154-residue specificity domain (S-domain) of the Bacillus subtilis RNase P RNA is more extended than its native structure. We now investigate two models with falsifiable predictions regarding the origins of the extended intermediate structures in the S-domains of the B. subtilis and the Escherichia coli RNase P RNA that belong to different classes of P RNA and have distinct native structures. The first model explores the contribution of electrostatic repulsion, while the second model probes specific interactions in the core of the folding intermediate. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and Langevin dynamics simulations, we show that electrostatics plays only a minor role, whereas specific interactions largely account for the extended nature of the intermediate. Structural contacts in the core, including a nonnative base pair, help to stabilize the intermediate conformation. We conclude that RNA folding intermediates adopt extended conformations due to short-range, nonnative interactions rather than generic electrostatic repulsion of helical domains. These principles apply to other ribozymes and riboswitches that undergo functionally relevant conformational changes.

  2. Fold assessment for comparative protein structure modeling.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco; Sali, Andrej

    2007-11-01

    Accurate and automated assessment of both geometrical errors and incompleteness of comparative protein structure models is necessary for an adequate use of the models. Here, we describe a composite score for discriminating between models with the correct and incorrect fold. To find an accurate composite score, we designed and applied a genetic algorithm method that searched for a most informative subset of 21 input model features as well as their optimized nonlinear transformation into the composite score. The 21 input features included various statistical potential scores, stereochemistry quality descriptors, sequence alignment scores, geometrical descriptors, and measures of protein packing. The optimized composite score was found to depend on (1) a statistical potential z-score for residue accessibilities and distances, (2) model compactness, and (3) percentage sequence identity of the alignment used to build the model. The accuracy of the composite score was compared with the accuracy of assessment by single and combined features as well as by other commonly used assessment methods. The testing set was representative of models produced by automated comparative modeling on a genomic scale. The composite score performed better than any other tested score in terms of the maximum correct classification rate (i.e., 3.3% false positives and 2.5% false negatives) as well as the sensitivity and specificity across the whole range of thresholds. The composite score was implemented in our program MODELLER-8 and was used to assess models in the MODBASE database that contains comparative models for domains in approximately 1.3 million protein sequences. PMID:17905832

  3. Secondary structures in long compact polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberdorf, Richard; Ferguson, Allison; Jacobsen, Jesper L.; Kondev, Jané

    2006-11-01

    Compact polymers are self-avoiding random walks that visit every site on a lattice. This polymer model is used widely for studying statistical problems inspired by protein folding. One difficulty with using compact polymers to perform numerical calculations is generating a sufficiently large number of randomly sampled configurations. We present a Monte Carlo algorithm that uniformly samples compact polymer configurations in an efficient manner, allowing investigations of chains much longer than previously studied. Chain configurations generated by the algorithm are used to compute statistics of secondary structures in compact polymers. We determine the fraction of monomers participating in secondary structures, and show that it is self-averaging in the long-chain limit and strictly less than 1. Comparison with results for lattice models of open polymer chains shows that compact chains are significantly more likely to form secondary structure.

  4. Secondary structures in long compact polymers.

    PubMed

    Oberdorf, Richard; Ferguson, Allison; Jacobsen, Jesper L; Kondev, Jané

    2006-11-01

    Compact polymers are self-avoiding random walks that visit every site on a lattice. This polymer model is used widely for studying statistical problems inspired by protein folding. One difficulty with using compact polymers to perform numerical calculations is generating a sufficiently large number of randomly sampled configurations. We present a Monte Carlo algorithm that uniformly samples compact polymer configurations in an efficient manner, allowing investigations of chains much longer than previously studied. Chain configurations generated by the algorithm are used to compute statistics of secondary structures in compact polymers. We determine the fraction of monomers participating in secondary structures, and show that it is self-averaging in the long-chain limit and strictly less than 1. Comparison with results for lattice models of open polymer chains shows that compact chains are significantly more likely to form secondary structure. PMID:17279930

  5. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Martin, Raoul; Quan, Shu; Afonine, Pavel V; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Lili; Xu, Qingping; Trievel, Raymond C; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-01

    Challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding. Obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone-substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a new structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed residual electron and anomalous density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the Escherichia coli chaperone Spy, and to capture a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded to native-like states and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while being bound to a chaperone. PMID:27239796

  6. Protein folding and protein metallocluster studies using synchrotron small angler X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Eliezer, D.

    1994-06-01

    Proteins, biological macromolecules composed of amino-acid building blocks, possess unique three dimensional shapes or conformations which are intimately related to their biological function. All of the information necessary to determine this conformation is stored in a protein`s amino acid sequence. The problem of understanding the process by which nature maps protein amino-acid sequences to three-dimensional conformations is known as the protein folding problem, and is one of the central unsolved problems in biophysics today. The possible applications of a solution are broad, ranging from the elucidation of thousands of protein structures to the rational modification and design of protein-based drugs. The scattering of X-rays by matter has long been useful as a tool for the characterization of physical properties of materials, including biological samples. The high photon flux available at synchrotron X-ray sources allows for the measurement of scattering cross-sections of dilute and/or disordered samples. Such measurements do not yield the detailed geometrical information available from crystalline samples, but do allow for lower resolution studies of dynamical processes not observable in the crystalline state. The main focus of the work described here has been the study of the protein folding process using time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering measurements. The original intention was to observe the decrease in overall size which must accompany the folding of a protein from an extended conformation to its compact native state. Although this process proved too fast for the current time-resolution of the technique, upper bounds were set on the probable compaction times of several small proteins. In addition, an interesting and unexpected process was detected, in which the folding protein passes through an intermediate state which shows a tendency to associate. This state is proposed to be a kinetic molten globule folding intermediate.

  7. Modelling of lateral fold growth and fold linkage: Applications to fold-and-thrust belt tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    We use a finite element model to investigate the three-dimensional fold growth and interference of two initially isolated fold segments. The most critical parameter, which controls the fold linkage mode, is the phase difference between the laterally growing fold hinge lines: 1) "Linear-linkage" yields a sub-cylindrical fold with a saddle at the location where the two initial folds linked. 2) "Oblique-linkage" produces a curved fold resembling a Type II refold structure. 3) "Oblique-no-linkage" results in two curved folds with fold axes plunging in opposite directions. 4) "Linear-no-linkage" yields a fold train of two separate sub-cylindrical folds with fold axes plunging in opposite directions. The transition from linkage to no-linkage occurs when the fold separation between the initially isolated folds is slightly larger than one half of the low-amplitude fold wavelength. The model results compare well with previously published plasticine analogue models and can be directly applied to the investigation of fold growth history in fold-and-thust belts. An excellent natural example of lateral fold linkage is described from the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The fold growth in this region is not controlled by major thrust faults but the shortening of the Paleozoic to Cenozoic passive margin sediments of the Arabian plate occurred mainly by detachment folding. The sub-cylindrical anticlines with hinge-parallel lengths of more than 50 km have not developed from single sub-cylindrical embryonic folds but they have merged from different fold segments that joined laterally during fold amplification and lateral fold growth. Linkage points are marked by geomorphological saddle points which are structurally the lowermost points of antiforms and points of principal curvatures with opposite sign. Linkage points can significantly influence the migration of mineral-rich fluids and hydrocarbons and are therefore of great economic importance.

  8. Guiding the folding pathway of DNA origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Katherine E.; Dannenberg, Frits; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Turberfield, Andrew J.; Bath, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    DNA origami is a robust assembly technique that folds a single-stranded DNA template into a target structure by annealing it with hundreds of short `staple' strands. Its guiding design principle is that the target structure is the single most stable configuration. The folding transition is cooperative and, as in the case of proteins, is governed by information encoded in the polymer sequence. A typical origami folds primarily into the desired shape, but misfolded structures can kinetically trap the system and reduce the yield. Although adjusting assembly conditions or following empirical design rules can improve yield, well-folded origami often need to be separated from misfolded structures. The problem could in principle be avoided if assembly pathway and kinetics were fully understood and then rationally optimized. To this end, here we present a DNA origami system with the unusual property of being able to form a small set of distinguishable and well-folded shapes that represent discrete and approximately degenerate energy minima in a vast folding landscape, thus allowing us to probe the assembly process. The obtained high yield of well-folded origami structures confirms the existence of efficient folding pathways, while the shape distribution provides information about individual trajectories through the folding landscape. We find that, similarly to protein folding, the assembly of DNA origami is highly cooperative; that reversible bond formation is important in recovering from transient misfoldings; and that the early formation of long-range connections can very effectively enforce particular folds. We use these insights to inform the design of the system so as to steer assembly towards desired structures. Expanding the rational design process to include the assembly pathway should thus enable more reproducible synthesis, particularly when targeting more complex structures. We anticipate that this expansion will be essential if DNA origami is to continue its

  9. Compaction behavior of roller compacted ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2008-06-01

    The effect of roller compaction pressure on the bulk compaction of roller compacted ibuprofen was investigated using instrumented rotary tablet press. Three different roller pressures were utilized to prepare granules and Heckel analysis, Walker analysis, compressibility, and tabletability were performed to derive densification, deformation, course of volume reduction and bonding phenomenon of different pressure roller compacted granules. Nominal single granule fracture strength was obtained by micro tensile testing. Heckel analysis indicated that granules prepared using lower pressure during roller compaction showed lower yield strength. The reduction in tabletability was observed for higher pressure roller compacted granules. The reduction in tabletability supports the results of granule size enlargement theory. Apart from the granule size enlargement theory, the available fines and relative fragmentation during compaction is responsible for higher bonding strength and provide larger areas for true particle contact at constant porosity for lower pressure roller compacted granules. Overall bulk compaction parameters indicated that granules prepared by lower roller compaction pressure were advantageous in terms of tabletability and densification. Overall results suggested that densification during roller compaction affects the particle level properties of specific surface area, nominal fracture strength, and compaction behavior. PMID:18280716

  10. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  11. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  12. The uteroglobin fold.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, I; Poupon, A; Bally, R; Demaret, J P; Housset, D; Delettré, J; Hossenlopp, P; Mornon, J P

    2000-01-01

    Uteroglobin (UTG) forms a fascinating homodimeric structure that binds small- to medium-sized ligands through an internal hydrophobic cavity, located at the interface between the two monomers. Previous studies have shown that UTG fold is not limited to the UTG/CC10 family, whose sequence/structure relationships are highlighted here, but can be extended to the cap domain of Xanthobacter autotrophicus haloalkane dehalogenase. We show here that UTG fold is adopted by several other cap domains within the alpha/beta hydrolase family, making it a well-suited "geode" structure allowing it to sequester various hydrophobic molecules. Additionally, some data about a new crystal form of oxidized rabbit UTG are presented, completing previous structural studies, as well as results from molecular dynamics, suggesting an alternative way for the ligand to reach the internal cavity. PMID:11193783

  13. Compaction of ribosomal protein S6 by sucrose occurs only under native conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, LuYang; Ferreira, José A B; Costa, Sílvia M B; Cabrita, Gonçalo J M; Otzen, Daniel E; Melo, Eduardo Pinho

    2006-02-21

    The effect of osmolyte sucrose on the stability and compaction of the folded and unfolded states of ribosomal protein S6 from Thermus thermophilus was analyzed. Confirming previous results obtained with sodium sulfate and trehalose, refolding stopped-flow measurements of S6 show that sucrose favors the conversion of the unfolded state ensemble to a highly compact structure (75% as compact as the folded state). This conversion occurs when the unfolded state is suddenly placed under native conditions and the compact state accumulates in a transient off-folding pathway. This effect of sucrose on the compaction of the unfolded state ensemble is counteracted by guanidinium hydrochloride. The compact state does not accumulate at higher guanidinium concentrations and the unfolded state ensemble does not display increased compaction in the presence of 6 M guanidinium as evaluated by collisional quenching of tryptophan fluorescence. In contrast, accessibility of the tryptophan residue of folded S6 above 1 M sucrose concentration decreased as a result of an increased compaction of the folded state. Unfolding stopped-flow measurements of S6 reflect this increased compaction of the folded state, but the unfolding pathway is not affected by sucrose. Compaction of folded and unfolded S6 induced by sucrose occurs under native conditions indicating that decreased protein conformational entropy significantly contributes to the mechanism of protein stabilization by osmolytes. PMID:16475807

  14. The protein folding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Francesco; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2004-03-01

    Networks are everywhere. The conformation space of a 20-residue antiparallel beta-sheet peptide [1], sampled by molecular dynamics simulations, is mapped to a network. Conformations are nodes of the network, and the transitions between them are links. As previously found for the World-Wide Web as well as for social and biological networks , the conformation space contains highly connected hubs like the native state which is the most populated free energy basin. Furthermore, the network shows a hierarchical modularity [2] which is consistent with the funnel mechanism of folding [3] and is not observed for a random heteropolymer lacking a native state. Here we show that the conformation space network describes the free energy landscape without requiring projections into arbitrarily chosen reaction coordinates. The network analysis provides a basis for understanding the heterogeneity of the folding transition state and the existence of multiple pathways. [1] P. Ferrara and A. Caflisch, Folding simulations of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet peptide, PNAS 97, 10780-10785 (2000). [2] Ravasz, E. and Barabási, A. L. Hierarchical organization in complex networks. Phys. Rev. E 67, 026112 (2003). [3] Dill, K. and Chan, H From Levinthal to pathways to funnels. Nature Struct. Biol. 4, 10-19 (1997)

  15. Ab initio RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-01

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  16. Ab initio RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-17

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding. PMID:25993396

  17. Folding within seconds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    Hypervelocity impacts of cosmic projectiles larger than ˜200 m diameter are capable of forming complex craters on Earth. At these craters, shock loading, shock damage, and excavation flow are followed by a gravity-driven collapse of the deep transient cavity. Such impact structures are characterized by a central uplift, a flat crater floor, and a terraced crater rim. Collapse-induced deformation features, like folds and brittle fault zones, have many similarities to tectonic structures. Typical deformation patterns of complex terrestrial impact craters of 5 15 km diameter are compiled and analyzed with respect to their kinematic development. Unlike their tectonic counterparts, deformation structures are always the result of non-plane-strain deformation and are formed in a single event that takes place in seconds to minutes. To understand the high-strain-rate processes, the microstructure of an impact-induced fold of the Crooked Creek impact crater (˜7 km diameter), Missouri, United States, is investigated in detail. A period of 20 30 s at the most is determined for the collapse phase of this crater. The gross plastic deformation behavior of the fold is achieved by localized brittle deformation along millimeter- to centimeter-spaced fault zones, forming a network of veins. Shock damage has fractured ˜40% of grain boundaries. The onset of collapse and associated deformation started in rocks with a reduced cohesion and is friction controlled.

  18. Chirality and protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecinska, Joanna I.; Cieplak, Marek

    2005-05-01

    There are several simple criteria of folding to a native state in model proteins. One of them involves crossing of a threshold value of the root mean square deviation distance away from the native state. Another checks whether all native contacts are established, i.e. whether the interacting amino acids come closer than some characteristic distance. We use Go-like models of proteins and show that such simple criteria may prompt one to declare folding even though fragments of the resulting conformations have a wrong sense of chirality. We propose that a better condition of folding should augment the simple criteria with the requirement that most of the local values of the chirality should be nearly native. The kinetic discrepancy between the simple and compound criteria can be substantially reduced in the Go-like models by providing the Hamiltonian with a term which favours native values of the local chirality. We study the effects of this term as a function of its amplitude and compare it to other models such as ones with side groups and ones with angle-dependent potentials.

  19. Folded waveguide coupler

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-03-01

    A resonant cavity waveguide coupler for ICRH of a magnetically confined plasma. The coupler consists of a series of inter-leaved metallic vanes disposed withn an enclosure analogous to a very wide, simple rectangular waveguide that has been "folded" several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a polarizing plate is provided which has coupling apertures aligned with selected folds of the waveguide through which rf waves are launched with magnetic fields of the waves aligned in parallel with the magnetic fields confining the plasma being heated to provide coupling to the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma in the frequency usage of from about 50-200 mHz. A shorting plate terminates the back of the cavity at a distance approximately equal to one-half the guide wavelength from the mouth of the coupler to ensure that the electric field of the waves launched through the polarizing plate apertures are small while the magnetic field is near a maximum. Power is fed into the coupler folded cavity by means of an input coaxial line feed arrangement at a point which provides an impedance match between the cavity and the coaxial input line.

  20. Folding funnels, binding funnels, and protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Kumar, S.; Ma, B.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    Folding funnels have been the focus of considerable attention during the last few years. These have mostly been discussed in the general context of the theory of protein folding. Here we extend the utility of the concept of folding funnels, relating them to biological mechanisms and function. In particular, here we describe the shape of the funnels in light of protein synthesis and folding; flexibility, conformational diversity, and binding mechanisms; and the associated binding funnels, illustrating the multiple routes and the range of complexed conformers. Specifically, the walls of the folding funnels, their crevices, and bumps are related to the complexity of protein folding, and hence to sequential vs. nonsequential folding. Whereas the former is more frequently observed in eukaryotic proteins, where the rate of protein synthesis is slower, the latter is more frequent in prokaryotes, with faster translation rates. The bottoms of the funnels reflect the extent of the flexibility of the proteins. Rugged floors imply a range of conformational isomers, which may be close on the energy landscape. Rather than undergoing an induced fit binding mechanism, the conformational ensembles around the rugged bottoms argue that the conformers, which are most complementary to the ligand, will bind to it with the equilibrium shifting in their favor. Furthermore, depending on the extent of the ruggedness, or of the smoothness with only a few minima, we may infer nonspecific, broad range vs. specific binding. In particular, folding and binding are similar processes, with similar underlying principles. Hence, the shape of the folding funnel of the monomer enables making reasonable guesses regarding the shape of the corresponding binding funnel. Proteins having a broad range of binding, such as proteolytic enzymes or relatively nonspecific endonucleases, may be expected to have not only rugged floors in their folding funnels, but their binding funnels will also behave similarly

  1. Folding and faulting of an elastic continuum

    PubMed Central

    Gourgiotis, Panos A.

    2016-01-01

    Folding is a process in which bending is localized at sharp edges separated by almost undeformed elements. This process is rarely encountered in Nature, although some exceptions can be found in unusual layered rock formations (called ‘chevrons’) and seashell patterns (for instance Lopha cristagalli). In mechanics, the bending of a three-dimensional elastic solid is common (for example, in bulk wave propagation), but folding is usually not achieved. In this article, the route leading to folding is shown for an elastic solid obeying the couple-stress theory with an extreme anisotropy. This result is obtained with a perturbation technique, which involves the derivation of new two-dimensional Green's functions for applied concentrated force and moment. While the former perturbation reveals folding, the latter shows that a material in an extreme anisotropic state is also prone to a faulting instability, in which a displacement step of finite size emerges. Another failure mechanism, namely the formation of dilation/compaction bands, is also highlighted. Finally, a geophysical application to the mechanics of chevron formation shows how the proposed approach may explain the formation of natural structures. PMID:27118925

  2. Information from folds: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudleston, Peter J.; Treagus, Susan H.

    2010-12-01

    Folds are spectacular geological structures that are seen in layered rock on many different scales. To mark 30 years of the Journal of Structural Geology, we review the information that can be gained from studies of folds in theory, experiment and nature. We first review theoretical considerations and modeling, from classical approaches to current developments. The subject is dominated by single-layer fold theory, with the assumption of perfect layer-parallel shortening, but we also review multilayer fold theory and modeling, and folding of layers that are oblique to principal stresses and strains. This work demonstrates that viscosity ratio, degree of non-linearity of the flow law, anisotropy, and the thickness and spacing distribution of layers of different competence are all important in determining the nature and strength of the folding instability. Theory and modeling provide the basis for obtaining rheological information from natural folds, through analysis of wavelength/thickness ratios of single layer folds, and fold shapes. They also provide a basis for estimating the bulk strain from folded layers. Information about folding mechanisms can be obtained by analysis of cleavage and fabric patterns in folded rocks, and the history of deformation can be revealed by understanding how asymmetry can develop in folds, by how folds develop in shear zones, and how folds develop in more complex three-dimensional deformations.

  3. Scaled-up in vitro experiments of vocal fold paralysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Keith; Wei, Timothy; Krane, Michael

    2006-11-01

    Vocal fold paralysis is the inability of either one, or both vocal folds to open and close properly. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) measurements were taken to further understand the consequences paralyzed vocal folds have on the fluid dynamics downstream of the vocal folds during human phonation. The experiments were taken in a free-stream water tunnel using a simplified scaled-up model of human vocal folds. The Reynolds and Strouhal numbers ranged from 4500 to 10000, and 0.01 to 0.04, respectively. Various configuration setups were tested to emulate several types of vocal fold paralyses. These configurations include unilateral vocal fold immobility (UVFI), bilateral vocal fold immobility (BVFI) and the vocal folds operating at different oscillating frequencies. Data from these different conditions will be compared with an eye toward understanding the critical dynamics associated with this class of disease.

  4. Peptide folding simulations.

    PubMed

    Gnanakaran, S; Nymeyer, Hugh; Portman, John; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; García, Angel E

    2003-04-01

    Developments in the design of small peptides that mimic proteins in complexity, recent advances in nanosecond time-resolved spectroscopy methods to study peptides and the development of modern, highly parallel simulation algorithms have come together to give us a detailed picture of peptide folding dynamics. Two newly implemented simulation techniques, parallel replica dynamics and replica exchange molecular dynamics, can now describe directly from simulations the kinetics and thermodynamics of peptide formation, respectively. Given these developments, the simulation community now has the tools to verify and validate simulation protocols and models (forcefields). PMID:12727509

  5. Improved Method of Design for Folding Inflatable Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    An improved method of designing complexly shaped inflatable shells to be assembled from gores was conceived for original application to the inflatable outer shell of a developmental habitable spacecraft module having a cylindrical mid-length section with toroidal end caps. The method is also applicable to inflatable shells of various shapes for terrestrial use. The method addresses problems associated with the assembly, folding, transport, and deployment of inflatable shells that may comprise multiple layers and have complex shapes that can include such doubly curved surfaces as toroids and spheres. One particularly difficult problem is that of mathematically defining fold lines on a gore pattern in a double- curvature region. Moreover, because the fold lines in a double-curvature region tend to be curved, there is a practical problem of how to implement the folds. Another problem is that of modifying the basic gore shapes and sizes for the various layers so that when they are folded as part of the integral structure, they do not mechanically interfere with each other at the fold lines. Heretofore, it has been a common practice to design an inflatable shell to be assembled in the deployed configuration, without regard for the need to fold it into compact form. Typically, the result has been that folding has been a difficult, time-consuming process resulting in a An improved method of designing complexly shaped inflatable shells to be assembled from gores was conceived for original application to the inflatable outer shell of a developmental habitable spacecraft module having a cylindrical mid-length section with toroidal end caps. The method is also applicable to inflatable shells of various shapes for terrestrial use. The method addresses problems associated with the assembly, folding, transport, and deployment of inflatable shells that may comprise multiple layers and have complex shapes that can include such doubly curved surfaces as toroids and spheres. One

  6. Statistical properties of a folded elastic rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Deboeuf, Stéphanie; Boué, Laurent; Corson, Francis; Boudaoud, Arezki; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    2010-03-01

    A large variety of elastic structures naturally seem to be confined into environments too small to accommodate them; the geometry of folded structures span a wide range of length-scales. The elastic properties of these confined systems are further constrained by self-avoidance as well as by the dimensionality of both structures and container. To mimic crumpled paper, we devised an experimental setup to study the packing of a dimensional elastic object in 2D geometries: an elastic rod is folded at the center of a circular Hele-Shaw cell by a centripetal force. The initial configuration of the rod and the acceleration of the rotating disk allow to span different final folded configurations while the final rotation speed controls the packing intensity. Using image analysis we measure geometrical and mechanical properties of the folded configurations, focusing on length, curvature and energy distributions.

  7. Folded waveguide coupler for ion cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, T.L.; Chen, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    A new type of waveguide coupler for plasma heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is described. The coupler consists of a series of interleaved metallic vanes within a rectangular enclosure analogous to a wide rectangular waveguide that has been ''folded'' several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a plate is attached which contains coupling apertures in each fold or every other fold of the waveguide, depending upon the wavenumber spectrum desired. This plate serves primarily as a wave field polarizer that converts coupler fields to the polarization of the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma. Theoretical estimates indicate that the folded waveguide is capable of high-efficiency, multimegawatt operation into a plasma. Bench tests have verified the predicted field structure within the waveguide in preparation for high-power tests on the Radio Frequency Test Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  8. Folds on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image, acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft on September 26, 1998, shows features on the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa that a scientific report published today interprets as signs of compressive folding.

    The imaged area is in the Astypalaea Linea region of Europa's southern hemisphere, seen with low-angle sunshine coming from the upper right. North is toward the top.

    Astypalaea Linea is the smooth, gray area that stretches from north to south across the image mosaic. It is thought to have formed by a combination of pulling apart and sliding of the icy surface. The telltale fold features are within the smoother portions of the surface between the more dominant ridges, which are attributed to upwelling of material through surface ice. In the smooth areas, the surface has gentle swells and dips, which show most clearly in the version on the right, processed to accentuate broader-scale shapes. For example, a dip about 15 kilometers (about 10 miles) wide cuts diagonally across the northern half of the largest smooth area, and a rise runs parallel to that in the southern half of the smooth area. closeup detail

    Louise M. Prockter, at Johns Hopkins University, and Robert T. Pappalardo, at Brown University, report in the journal Science today that those rises, or anticlines, and dips, or synclines, appear to be the result of compression causing the crust to fold.

    Additional evidence comes from smaller features more visible in the version on the left, covering the same area. At the crest of the gentle rise in the largest smooth area are small fractures that could be caused by the stretching stress of bending the surface layer upwards. Similarly, at the bottom of the adjacent dip are small, wrinkle-like ridges that could be caused by stress from bending the surface layer downwards.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California

  9. Cross folding in southern Bighorn basin

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbels, T.L.

    1986-08-01

    Analysis of Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery coupled with surface structural investigations of well-exposed folds in the southern Bighorn basin have revealed two northwest-trending folds that have been refolded. The eastern boundary of the Owl Creek Mountains is characterized by a well-defined alignment of folds that extend north-northwest from the Owl Creek thrust front. Bridger monocline, Wildhorse Butte anticline, and Red Hole anticline lie along this trend. Initial Laramide folding, probably during latest Cretaceous time, resulted in a single, continuous, north-northwest-trending anticline with a southwestward vergence. This anticline was progressively unfolded from south to north as the Owl Creek Range was thrust southward over the Wind River basin in earliest Eocene time; scissors-like vertical motion along this flexure rotated the axial surface of the early formed Bridger anticline, resulting in a monocline with a reversed vergence (northeastward). Formation of the Thermopolis/East Warm Springs anticline parallel to the north flank of the range accompanied thrusting and effectively refolded the northern end of the Wildhorse Butte anticline along an east-west axis. Faulting of the oversteepened south limb of the Red Hole cross fold was contemporaneous with folding. Cross-cutting fold axes in this area and the Mud Creek area to the west are best explained by a counterclockwise change in stress direction during the latest phase of the Laramide orogeny. Vertical movement along the eastern side of the Owl Creek Range results from differential motion in the hanging wall of the crystalline thrust sheet.

  10. Folding of Nucleosome Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steven; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Andresen, Kurt; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2014-03-01

    Chromatin conformation and dynamics is central to gene functions including packaging, regulation, and repair. At the molecular level, the basic building block of chromatin is a nucleosome core particle (NCP) made of 147 base pairs (bp) of dsDNA wrapped around an octamer of histone proteins. These NCPs are connected by short 10-90 bps of linker DNA as beads on a string. Key factors determining the packaging of NCP arrays to form chromatin include ionic condition, linker DNA length, and epigenetic modifications, especially of the histone tails. We have investigated how the conformations of model tetra-NCP arrays are modulated by these factors using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Here we present recent studies of the effects of ion (KCl and MgCl2), linker length, and histone modification (tail deletions) on NCP arrays. Our SAXS measurement makes it possible to learn about both the global compaction of NCP arrays and local inter-NCP spatial correlations within the same array.

  11. VARIABLE MOMENTUM COMPACTION LATTICE STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    KRAMER,S.; MURPHY,J.B.

    1999-03-29

    The VUV storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source was used to study the impact of changes in the momentum compaction factors over a large range from positive to negative values. Changes in bunch length and synchrotron tune were measured versus current and RF parameters for these different lattices. By controlling both the first and second-order momentum compaction factors, a lattice was developed in which a pair of alpha buckets was created within the energy aperture of the vacuum chamber and beam was stored simultaneously in both buckets.

  12. Control of folding by gravity and matrix thickness: Implications for large-scale folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalholz, S. M.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.; Burg, J.-P.

    2002-01-01

    We show that folding of a non-Newtonian layer resting on a homogeneous Newtonian matrix with finite thickness under influence of gravity can occur by three modes: (1) matrix-controlled folding, dependent on the effective viscosity contrast between layer and matrix, (2) gravity-controlled folding, dependent on the Argand number (the ratio of the stress caused by gravity to the stress caused by shortening), and (3) detachment folding, dependent on the ratio of matrix thickness to layer thickness. We construct a phase diagram that defines the transitions between each of the three folding modes. Our priority is transparency of the analytical derivations (e.g., thin-plate versus thick-plate approximations), which permits complete classification of the folding modes involving a minimum number of dimensionless parameters. Accuracy and sensitivity of the analytical results to model assumptions are investigated. In particular, depth dependence of matrix rheology is only important for folding over a narrow range of material parameters. In contrast, strong depth dependence of the viscosity of the folding layer limits applicability of ductile rheology and leads to a viscoelastic transition. Our theory is applied to estimate the effective thickness of the folded central Asian upper crust using the ratio of topographic wavelength to Moho depth. Phase diagrams based on geometrical parameters show that gravity does not significantly control folding in the Jura and the Zagros Mountains but does control folding in central Asia. Applicability conditions of viscous and thin sheet models for large-scale lithospheric deformation, derived in terms of the Argand number, have implications for the plate-like style of planetary tectonics.

  13. Folding of non-Euclidean curved shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, Nakul; Evans, Arthur; Innes-Gold, Sarah; Marin, Luis; Cohen, Itai; Santangelo, Christian; Hayward, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Origami-based folding of 2D sheets has been of recent interest for a variety of applications ranging from deployable structures to self-folding robots. Though folding of planar sheets follows well-established principles, folding of curved shells involves an added level of complexity due to the inherent influence of curvature on mechanics. In this study, we use principles from differential geometry and thin shell mechanics to establish fundamental rules that govern folding of prototypical creased shells. In particular, we show how the normal curvature of a crease line controls whether the deformation is smooth or discontinuous, and investigate the influence of shell thickness and boundary conditions. We show that snap-folding of shells provides a route to rapid actuation on time-scales dictated by the speed of sound. The simple geometric design principles developed can be applied at any length-scale, offering potential for bio-inspired soft actuators for tunable optics, microfluidics, and robotics. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation through EFRI ODISSEI-1240441 with additional support to S.I.-G. through the UMass MRSEC DMR-0820506 REU program.

  14. The folding of an ``average'' beta trefoil protein.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosavi, Shachi; Jennings, Pat; Onuchic, Jose

    2007-03-01

    The beta-trefoil fold is characterized by twelve beta strands folded into three similar beta-beta-beta-loop-beta (trefoil) units. The overall fold has pseudo-threefold symmetry and consists of a six stranded-barrel, capped by a triangular hairpin triplet. The loops connecting the beta-strands vary in length and structure. It is these loops that give the fold its varied binding capability and the binding sites lie in different parts of the fold. The beta-trefoil proteins have little sequence similarity (sometimes less than 17%) and bind a range of molecules, including other proteins, DNA, membranes and carbohydrates. Protein folding experiments have been performed on four of the beta trefoils, namely, interleukin-1 (IL1B), acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors (FGF-1 and FGF-2) and hisactophilin (HIS). These experiments indicate that the proteins fold by different routes. Folding simulations of the proteins identify the possible folding routes and also show that the shapes of the barriers are different for the different proteins. In this work, we design a model protein which contains only the core fold elements of the beta-trefoil fold. We compare the folding of this ``average'' protein to the folding of His, FGF and IL1B and make some connections with function.

  15. The Effect of Internucleosomal Interaction on Folding of the Chromatin Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Stehr, René; Kepper, Nick; Rippe, Karsten; Wedemann, Gero

    2008-01-01

    The folding of the nucleosome chain into a chromatin fiber modulates DNA accessibility and is therefore an important factor for the control of gene expression. The fiber conformation depends crucially on the interaction between individual nucleosomes. However, this parameter has not been accurately determined experimentally, and it is affected by posttranslational histone modifications and binding of chromosomal proteins. Here, the effect of different internucleosomal interaction strengths on the fiber conformation was investigated by Monte Carlo computer simulations. The fiber geometry was modeled to fit that of chicken erythrocyte chromatin, which has been examined in numerous experimental studies. In the Monte Carlo simulation, the nucleosome shape was described as an oblate spherocylinder, and a replica exchange protocol was developed to reach thermal equilibrium for a broad range of internucleosomal interaction energies. The simulations revealed the large impact of the nucleosome geometry and the nucleosome repeat length on the compaction of the chromatin fiber. At high internucleosomal interaction energies, a lateral self-association of distant fiber parts and an interdigitation of nucleosomes were apparent. These results identify key factors for the control of the compaction and higher order folding of the chromatin fiber. PMID:18658212

  16. How the genome folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman Aiden, Erez

    2012-02-01

    I describe Hi-C, a novel technology for probing the three-dimensional architecture of whole genomes by coupling proximity-based ligation with massively parallel sequencing. Working with collaborators at the Broad Institute and UMass Medical School, we used Hi-C to construct spatial proximity maps of the human genome at a resolution of 1Mb. These maps confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes. We identified an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments. At the megabase scale, the chromatin conformation is consistent with a fractal globule, a knot-free conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus. The fractal globule is distinct from the more commonly used globular equilibrium model. Our results demonstrate the power of Hi-C to map the dynamic conformations of whole genomes.

  17. Protein folding in the ER.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    1999-10-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major protein folding compartment for secreted, plasma membrane and organelle proteins. Each of these newly-synthesized polypeptides folds in a deterministic process, affected by the unique conditions that exist in the ER. An understanding of protein folding in the ER is a fundamental biomolecular challenge at two levels. The first level addresses how the amino acid sequence programs that polypeptide to efficiently arrive at a particular fold out of a multitude of alternatives, and how different sequences obtain similar folds. At the second level are the issues introduced by folding not in the cytosol, but in the ER, including the risk of aggregation in a molecularly crowded environment, accommodation of post-translational modifications and the compatibility with subsequent intracellular trafficking. This review discusses both the physicochemical and cell biological constraints of folding, which are the challenges that the ER molecular chaperones help overcome.

  18. A New Heuristic Algorithm for Protein Folding in the HP Model.

    PubMed

    Traykov, Metodi; Angelov, Slav; Yanev, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    This article presents an efficient heuristic for protein folding. The protein folding problem is to predict the compact three-dimensional structure of a protein based on its amino acid sequence. The focus is on an original integer programming model derived from a platform used for Contact Map Overlap problem. PMID:27153764

  19. Coherent topological phenomena in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Bohr, H; Brunak, S; Bohr, J

    1997-01-01

    A theory is presented for coherent topological phenomena in protein dynamics with implications for protein folding and stability. We discuss the relationship to the writhing number used in knot diagrams of DNA. The winding state defines a long-range order along the backbone of a protein with long-range excitations, 'wring' modes, that play an important role in protein denaturation and stability. Energy can be pumped into these excitations, either thermally or by an external force. PMID:9218961

  20. Evolutionary optimization of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Debès, Cédric; Wang, Minglei; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Gräter, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Nature has shaped the make up of proteins since their appearance, [Formula: see text]3.8 billion years ago. However, the fundamental drivers of structural change responsible for the extraordinary diversity of proteins have yet to be elucidated. Here we explore if protein evolution affects folding speed. We estimated folding times for the present-day catalog of protein domains directly from their size-modified contact order. These values were mapped onto an evolutionary timeline of domain appearance derived from a phylogenomic analysis of protein domains in 989 fully-sequenced genomes. Our results show a clear overall increase of folding speed during evolution, with known ultra-fast downhill folders appearing rather late in the timeline. Remarkably, folding optimization depends on secondary structure. While alpha-folds showed a tendency to fold faster throughout evolution, beta-folds exhibited a trend of folding time increase during the last [Formula: see text]1.5 billion years that began during the "big bang" of domain combinations. As a consequence, these domain structures are on average slow folders today. Our results suggest that fast and efficient folding of domains shaped the universe of protein structure. This finding supports the hypothesis that optimization of the kinetic and thermodynamic accessibility of the native fold reduces protein aggregation propensities that hamper cellular functions. PMID:23341762

  1. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-10-28

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57 eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  2. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  3. COS NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS MAMA Fold Analysis {11891} during Cycle 17.

  4. COS NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS MAMA Fold Analysis {12723} during Cycle 19.

  5. Limited cooperativity in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Victor; Campos, Luis A; Sadqi, Mourad

    2016-02-01

    Theory and simulations predict that the structural concert of protein folding reactions is relatively low. Experimentally, folding cooperativity has been difficult to study, but in recent years we have witnessed major advances. New analytical procedures in terms of conformational ensembles rather than discrete states, experimental techniques with improved time, structural, or single-molecule resolution, and combined thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of fast folding have contributed to demonstrate a general scenario of limited cooperativity in folding. Gradual structural disorder is already apparent on the unfolded and native states of slow, two-state folding proteins, and it greatly increases in magnitude for fast folding domains. These results demonstrate a direct link between how fast a single-domain protein folds and unfolds, and how cooperative (or structurally diverse) is its equilibrium unfolding process. Reducing cooperativity also destabilizes the native structure because it affects unfolding more than folding. We can thus define a continuous cooperativity scale that goes from the 'pliable' two-state character of slow folders to the gradual unfolding of one-state downhill, and eventually to intrinsically disordered proteins. The connection between gradual unfolding and intrinsic disorder is appealing because it suggests a conformational rheostat mechanism to explain the allosteric effects of folding coupled to binding. PMID:26845039

  6. Paradoxical Vocal Fold Movement (PVFM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careers Certification Publications Events Advocacy Continuing Education Practice Management Research Home / Information for the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Paradoxical Vocal Fold ...

  7. Folding superfunnel to describe cooperative folding of interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Smeller, László

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a generalization of the well-known folding funnel concept of proteins. In the funnel model the polypeptide chain is treated as an individual object not interacting with other proteins. Since biological systems are considerably crowded, protein-protein interaction is a fundamental feature during the life cycle of proteins. The folding superfunnel proposed here describes the folding process of interacting proteins in various situations. The first example discussed is the folding of the freshly synthesized protein with the aid of chaperones. Another important aspect of protein-protein interactions is the folding of the recently characterized intrinsically disordered proteins, where binding to target proteins plays a crucial role in the completion of the folding process. The third scenario where the folding superfunnel is used is the formation of aggregates from destabilized proteins, which is an important factor in case of several conformational diseases. The folding superfunnel constructed here with the minimal assumption about the interaction potential explains all three cases mentioned above. Proteins 2016; 84:1009-1016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27090200

  8. Start2Fold: a database of hydrogen/deuterium exchange data on protein folding and stability

    PubMed Central

    Pancsa, Rita; Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter; Vranken, Wim F.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fulfil a wide range of tasks in cells; understanding how they fold into complex three-dimensional (3D) structures and how these structures remain stable while retaining sufficient dynamics for functionality is essential for the interpretation of overall protein behaviour. Since the 1950's, solvent exchange-based methods have been the most powerful experimental means to obtain information on the folding and stability of proteins. Considerable expertise and care were required to obtain the resulting datasets, which, despite their importance and intrinsic value, have never been collected, curated and classified. Start2Fold is an openly accessible database (http://start2fold.eu) of carefully curated hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) data extracted from the literature that is open for new submissions from the community. The database entries contain (i) information on the proteins investigated and the underlying experimental procedures and (ii) the classification of the residues based on their exchange protection levels, also allowing for the instant visualization of the relevant residue groups on the 3D structures of the corresponding proteins. By providing a clear hierarchical framework for the easy sharing, comparison and (re-)interpretation of HDX data, Start2Fold intends to promote a better understanding of how the protein sequence encodes folding and structure as well as the development of new computational methods predicting protein folding and stability. PMID:26582925

  9. Chromatin Compaction Protects Genomic DNA from Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Hideaki; Hanafusa, Tomo; Mori, Toshiaki; Shimura, Mari; Iida, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Genomic DNA is organized three-dimensionally in the nucleus, and is thought to form compact chromatin domains. Although chromatin compaction is known to be essential for mitosis, whether it confers other advantages, particularly in interphase cells, remains unknown. Here, we report that chromatin compaction protects genomic DNA from radiation damage. Using a newly developed solid-phase system, we found that the frequency of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in compact chromatin after ionizing irradiation was 5–50-fold lower than in decondensed chromatin. Since radical scavengers inhibited DSB induction in decondensed chromatin, condensed chromatin had a lower level of reactive radical generation after ionizing irradiation. We also found that chromatin compaction protects DNA from attack by chemical agents. Our findings suggest that genomic DNA compaction plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity. PMID:24130727

  10. Pseudoknots in RNA folding landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Kucharík, Marcel; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Stadler, Peter F.; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The function of an RNA molecule is not only linked to its native structure, which is usually taken to be the ground state of its folding landscape, but also in many cases crucially depends on the details of the folding pathways such as stable folding intermediates or the timing of the folding process itself. To model and understand these processes, it is necessary to go beyond ground state structures. The study of rugged RNA folding landscapes holds the key to answer these questions. Efficient coarse-graining methods are required to reduce the intractably vast energy landscapes into condensed representations such as barrier trees or basin hopping graphs (BHG) that convey an approximate but comprehensive picture of the folding kinetics. So far, exact and heuristic coarse-graining methods have been mostly restricted to the pseudoknot-free secondary structures. Pseudoknots, which are common motifs and have been repeatedly hypothesized to play an important role in guiding folding trajectories, were usually excluded. Results: We generalize the BHG framework to include pseudoknotted RNA structures and systematically study the differences in predicted folding behavior depending on whether pseudoknotted structures are allowed to occur as folding intermediates or not. We observe that RNAs with pseudoknotted ground state structures tend to have more pseudoknotted folding intermediates than RNAs with pseudoknot-free ground state structures. The occurrence and influence of pseudoknotted intermediates on the folding pathway, however, appear to depend very strongly on the individual RNAs so that no general rule can be inferred. Availability and implementation: The algorithms described here are implemented in C++ as standalone programs. Its source code and Supplemental material can be freely downloaded from http://www.tbi.univie.ac.at/bhg.html. Contact: qin@bioinf.uni-leipzig.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID

  11. Structural Bridges through Fold Space

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Hannah; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2015-01-01

    Several protein structure classification schemes exist that partition the protein universe into structural units called folds. Yet these schemes do not discuss how these units sit relative to each other in a global structure space. In this paper we construct networks that describe such global relationships between folds in the form of structural bridges. We generate these networks using four different structural alignment methods across multiple score thresholds. The networks constructed using the different methods remain a similar distance apart regardless of the probability threshold defining a structural bridge. This suggests that at least some structural bridges are method specific and that any attempt to build a picture of structural space should not be reliant on a single structural superposition method. Despite these differences all representations agree on an organisation of fold space into five principal community structures: all-α, all-β sandwiches, all-β barrels, α/β and α + β. We project estimated fold ages onto the networks and find that not only are the pairings of unconnected folds associated with higher age differences than bridged folds, but this difference increases with the number of networks displaying an edge. We also examine different centrality measures for folds within the networks and how these relate to fold age. While these measures interpret the central core of fold space in varied ways they all identify the disposition of ancestral folds to fall within this core and that of the more recently evolved structures to provide the peripheral landscape. These findings suggest that evolutionary information is encoded along these structural bridges. Finally, we identify four highly central pivotal folds representing dominant topological features which act as key attractors within our landscapes. PMID:26372166

  12. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  13. Problem Solving through Paper Folding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, Arsalan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a couple of challenging mathematical problems that involve paper folding. These problem-solving tasks can be used to foster geometric and algebraic thinking among students. The context of paper folding makes some of the abstract mathematical ideas involved relatively concrete. When implemented…

  14. COS NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 20 proposal 13128.

  15. 3D fold growth rates in transpressional tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    Geological folds are inherently three-dimensional (3D) structures; hence, they also grow in 3D. In this study, fold growth in all three dimensions is quantified numerically using a finite-element algorithm for simulating deformation of Newtonian media in 3D. The presented study is an extension and generalization of the work presented in Frehner (2014), which only considered unidirectional layer-parallel compression. In contrast, the full range from strike slip settings (i.e., simple shear) to unidirectional layer-parallel compression is considered here by varying the convergence angle of the boundary conditions; hence the results are applicable to general transpressional tectonic settings. Only upright symmetrical single-layer fold structures are considered. The horizontal higher-viscous layer exhibits an initial point-like perturbation. Due to the mixed pure- and simple shear boundary conditions a mechanical buckling instability grows from this perturbation in all three dimensions, described by: Fold amplification (vertical growth): Fold amplification describes the growth from a fold shape with low limb-dip angle to a shape with higher limb-dip angle. Fold elongation (growth parallel to fold axis): Fold elongation describes the growth from a dome-shaped (3D) structure to a more cylindrical fold (2D). Sequential fold growth (growth perpendicular to fold axial plane): Sequential fold growth describes the growth of secondary (and further) folds adjacent to the initial isolated fold. The term 'lateral fold growth' is used as an umbrella term for both fold elongation and sequential fold growth. In addition, the orientation of the fold axis is tracked as a function of the convergence angle. Even though the absolute values of all three growth rates are markedly reduced with increasing simple-shear component at the boundaries, the general pattern of the quantified fold growth under the studied general-shear boundary conditions is surprisingly similar to the end

  16. How do chaperonins fold protein?

    PubMed Central

    Motojima, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    Protein folding is a biological process that is essential for the proper functioning of proteins in all living organisms. In cells, many proteins require the assistance of molecular chaperones for their folding. Chaperonins belong to a class of molecular chaperones that have been extensively studied. However, the mechanism by which a chaperonin mediates the folding of proteins is still controversial. Denatured proteins are folded in the closed chaperonin cage, leading to the assumption that denatured proteins are completely encapsulated inside the chaperonin cage. In contrast to the assumption, we recently found that denatured protein interacts with hydrophobic residues at the subunit interfaces of the chaperonin, and partially protrude out of the cage. In this review, we will explain our recent results and introduce our model for the mechanism by which chaperonins accelerate protein folding, in view of recent findings.

  17. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist. PMID:24300366

  18. Compaction behavior of isomalt after roll compaction.

    PubMed

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist. PMID:24300366

  19. Generation of buckle folds in Naga fold thrust belt, north-east India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, B.; Dietl, C.

    2009-04-01

    of the layer. The experiments are performed in a low stress and low temperature environment (ambient temperature being room temperature). The models produce a spectrum of fold shapes ranging from tight asymmetric to gentle. The folds generate initially as gentle folds with rounded hinges in the thick incompetent mica layers and box folds in the thin incompetent mica layers. Thrusts develop and grow by intersecting the existing fold limbs. With incremental compression, the folds become tighter. The thin mica layer is more affected by thrusting than the thicker layer. Our models have a clear advantage of using mixed layer models (sand + mica) over that of pure sand models, because mica accommodates the applied stress both by folding and thrusting. The pure sand models fail to reflect the subtle competence contrast and thus the buckle folds though they excellently simulate the upper crustal layer deformation through thrusting. From our experiments we infer that the difference in fold and thrust morphology is governed by the interplay of two main factors; namely: degree of competence contrast and thickness of competent unit. High mechanical anisotropy give rise to box folds with steep straight limbs, horizontal hinge and conjugate axial planes when the competent unit is a thick one; whereas comparatively low mechanical anisotropy generates rounded buckle fold when the competent unit is a thin one. The geometry of the buckle folds in the NFTB are in good agreement with our experimentally produced buckle folds. The competence contrast throughout the belt has been consistent, only minor variations of sand-shale content have been observed. The competence contrast remaining more or less constant throughout the region, the variable thickness of the stratigraphic units plays a significant role in determining the fold shape. The thicker incompetent units give rise to rounded tight folds and the thinner ones to open box shaped folds, both modified by simultaneously or later

  20. Structure based prediction of protein folding intermediates.

    PubMed

    Xie, D; Freire, E

    1994-09-01

    The complete unfolding of a protein involves the disruption of non-covalent intramolecular interactions within the protein and the subsequent hydration of the backbone and amino acid side-chains. The magnitude of the thermodynamic parameters associated with this process is known accurately for a growing number of globular proteins for which high-resolution structures are also available. The existence of this database of structural and thermodynamic information has facilitated the development of statistical procedures aimed at quantifying the relationships existing between protein structure and the thermodynamic parameters of folding/unfolding. Under some conditions proteins do not unfold completely, giving rise to states (commonly known as molten globules) in which the molecule retains some secondary structure and remains in a compact configuration after denaturation. This phenomenon is reflected in the thermodynamics of the process. Depending on the nature of the residual structure that exists after denaturation, the observed enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity changes will deviate in a particular and predictable way from the values expected for complete unfolding. For several proteins, these deviations have been shown to exhibit similar characteristics, suggesting that their equilibrium folding intermediates exhibit some common structural features. Employing empirically derived structure-energetic relationships, it is possible to identify in the native structure of the protein those regions with the higher probability of being structured in equilibrium partly folded states. In this work, a thermodynamic search algorithm aimed at identifying the structural determinants of the molten globule state has been applied to six globular proteins; alpha-lactalbumin, barnase, IIIGlc, interleukin-1 beta, phage T4 lysozyme and phage 434 repressor. Remarkably, the structural features of the predicted equilibrium intermediates coincide to a large extent with the known

  1. Scale invariant sheath folds in salt, sediments and shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Holdsworth, R. E.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.

    2007-10-01

    Sheath folds are developed in a broad spectrum of geological environments in which material flow occurs, including gravity-driven surficial deformation in ignimbrites, unconsolidated sediments and salt, together with deeper level ductile shear zones in metamorphic rocks. This study represents the first geometric comparison of sheath folds in these different settings across a wide range of scales. Elliptical closures defining eye-folds represent ( y- z) cross sections through highly-curvilinear sheath folds. Our analysis of the published literature, coupled with field observations, reveals remarkably similar ellipticities ( R yz) for sheath folds in metamorphic shear zones ( R yz 4.23), salt ( R yz 4.29), sediment slumps ( R yz 4.34), glaciotectonites ( R yz 4.48), and ignimbrites ( R yz 4.34). Nested eye-folds across this range of materials ( N = 1800) reveal distinct and consistent differences in ellipticity from the outer- ( R yz) to the inner-most ( R y' z' ) elliptical "rings" of individual sheath folds. The variation in ratios from outer to inner rings ( R' = R yz/ R y' z' ) in gravity-driven surficial flows typically displays a relative increase in ellipticity to define cats-eye-folds ( R' < 1) similar to those observed during simple and general shear in metamorphic rocks. We show that sheath folds develop across a range of scales within these different environments, and display elliptical ratios ( R yz) that are remarkably constant ( R2 > 0.99) across 9 orders of magnitude (sheath y axes range from ˜0.1 mm to >75 km). Our findings lead us to conclude that the geometric properties of sheath folds are scale invariant and primarily controlled by the type and amount of strain, with R' also reflecting the rheological significance of layering associated with original buckle fold mechanisms. The scaling pattern of sheath folds reflects the length scales of the precursor buckle folds (and width of deformation zones) across a broad range of materials and

  2. Compact Doppler magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Moynihan, Philip I.; Vaughan, Arthur H.; Cacciani, Alessandro

    1998-11-01

    We designed a low-cost flight instrument that images the full solar disk through two narrow band filters at the red nd blue 'wings' of the solar potassium absorption line. The images are produced on a 1024 X 1024 charge-coupled device with a resolution of 2 arcsec per pixel. Four filtergrams taken in a very short time at both wings in the left and right states of circular polarization are used to yield a Dopplergram and a magnetogram simultaneously. The noise-equivalent velocity associated with each pixel is less than 3 m/s. The measured signal is linearly proportional to the velocity in the range +/- 4000 m/s. The range of magnetic fields is from 3 to 3000 Gauss. The optical system of the instrument is simple and easily aligned. With a pixel size of 12 micrometers , the effective focal length is 126 cm. A Raleigh resolution limit of 4 arcsec is achieved with a 5-cm entrance apertures, providing an f/25 focal ratio. The foreoptic is a two-component telephoto lens serving to limit the overall optical length to 89 cm or less. The mass of the instrument is 14 kg. the power required is less than 30 Watts. The Compact Doppler Magnetograph can be used in space mission with severe mass and power requirements. It can also be effectively used for ground-based observations: large telescope, dome or other observatory facilities are not required.

  3. Fast events in protein folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.; Callender, R.; Causgrove, T.; Dyer, R.; Williams, S.

    1996-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a molecular understanding of how proteins achieve their native three-dimensional (folded) structures. This requires the identification and characterization of intermediates in the protein folding process on all relevant timescales, from picoseconds to seconds. The short timescale events in protein folding have been entirely unknown. Prior to this work, state-of-the-art experimental approaches were limited to milliseconds or longer, when much of the folding process is already over. The gap between theory and experiment is enormous: current theoretical and computational methods cannot realistically model folding processes with lifetimes longer than one nanosecond. This unique approach to employ laser pump-probe techniques that combine novel methods of laser flash photolysis with time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic probes of protein transients. In this scheme, a short (picosecond to nanosecond) laser photolysis pulse was used to produce an instantaneous pH or temperature jump, thereby initiating a protein folding or unfolding reaction. Structure-specific, time-resolved vibrational probes were then used to identify and characterize protein folding intermediates.

  4. Compact ultraviolet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Brian Walter

    1997-09-01

    wavelength are presented. This work includes results for the highest cw output powers reported for NUV SHG output from a laser-pumped KTP PSW. In an important step towards demonstration of an URSL- pumped KTP PSW laser, fabrication methods and test results ate reported for half-symmetric, low magnification SQW AlGaAs URSLs emitting at 770 nm and designed for use as diode pump sources for hydrothermal KTP PSWs. These devices utilize a 200 /mu m × 500 /mu m active region profile and were focused-ion- beam micromachined to achieve a total resonator magnification of 2.9. The first demonstration of high brightness, single-longitudinal mode operation from a core grating URSL is reported. This dissertation concludes with results for the first demonstration of an URSL-pumped KTP waveguide laser. This compact ultraviolet laser represents a pioneering effort to take advantage of the high cw output powers available from high brightness URSLs to increase the SH output powers obtainable from diode-pumped nonlinear waveguide lasers and to extend the useful spectral range from these sources into the near ultraviolet.

  5. Folded fibre bus interconnects with distributed amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, Raul Hernandez; Urquhart, Paul; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    1998-06-01

    An optical fibre network for application as an interconnect within major nodes is investigated theoretically. The network is configured as a folded bus in which the spine consists of erbium doped fibre to overcome the power division at the couplers. It is argued that high received powers with a narrow dynamic range can be obtained simultaneously with bit rates in the order of 10 Gbit/s and bit error rates of 10 -12 or less.

  6. Peptide folding in the presence of interacting protein crowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bille, Anna; Mohanty, Sandipan; Irbäck, Anders

    2016-05-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods, we explore and compare the effects of two protein crowders, BPTI and GB1, on the folding thermodynamics of two peptides, the compact helical trp-cage and the β-hairpin-forming GB1m3. The thermally highly stable crowder proteins are modeled using a fixed backbone and rotatable side-chains, whereas the peptides are free to fold and unfold. In the simulations, the crowder proteins tend to distort the trp-cage fold, while having a stabilizing effect on GB1m3. The extent of the effects on a given peptide depends on the crowder type. Due to a sticky patch on its surface, BPTI causes larger changes than GB1 in the melting properties of the peptides. The observed effects on the peptides stem largely from attractive and specific interactions with the crowder surfaces, and differ from those seen in reference simulations with purely steric crowder particles.

  7. Peptide folding in the presence of interacting protein crowders.

    PubMed

    Bille, Anna; Mohanty, Sandipan; Irbäck, Anders

    2016-05-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods, we explore and compare the effects of two protein crowders, BPTI and GB1, on the folding thermodynamics of two peptides, the compact helical trp-cage and the β-hairpin-forming GB1m3. The thermally highly stable crowder proteins are modeled using a fixed backbone and rotatable side-chains, whereas the peptides are free to fold and unfold. In the simulations, the crowder proteins tend to distort the trp-cage fold, while having a stabilizing effect on GB1m3. The extent of the effects on a given peptide depends on the crowder type. Due to a sticky patch on its surface, BPTI causes larger changes than GB1 in the melting properties of the peptides. The observed effects on the peptides stem largely from attractive and specific interactions with the crowder surfaces, and differ from those seen in reference simulations with purely steric crowder particles. PMID:27155657

  8. Folding analysis of the most complex Stevedore's protein knot.

    PubMed

    Wang, Iren; Chen, Szu-Yu; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2016-01-01

    DehI is a homodimeric haloacid dehalogenase from Pseudomonas putida that contains the most complex 61 Stevedore's protein knot within its folding topology. To examine how DehI attains such an intricate knotted topology we combined far-UV circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate its folding mechanism. Equilibrium unfolding of DehI by chemical denaturation indicated the presence of two highly populated folding intermediates, I and I'. While the two intermediates vary in secondary structure contents and tertiary packing according to CD and intrinsic fluorescence, respectively, their overall dimension and compactness are similar according to SAXS. Three single-tryptophan variants (W34, W53, and W196) were generated to probe non-cooperative unfolding events localized around the three fluorophores. Kinetic fluorescence measurements indicated that the transition from the intermediate I' to the unfolded state is rate limiting. Our multiparametric folding analyses suggest that DehI unfolds through a linear folding pathway with two distinct folding intermediates by initial hydrophobic collapse followed by nucleation condensation, and that knotting precedes the formation of secondary structures. PMID:27527519

  9. Rise of the Helix from a Collapsed Globule during the Folding of Monellin.

    PubMed

    Goluguri, Rama Reddy; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2015-09-01

    Early kinetic intermediates observed during the folding of many proteins are invariably compact and appear to possess some secondary structure. Consequently, it has been difficult to understand whether compaction drives secondary structure formation or secondary structure formation facilitates compaction during folding. In this study of the folding of single-chain monellin, it is shown that a kinetic molten globule (MG) is populated at 2 ms of folding. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) measurements show that the kinetic MG is devoid of any helical structure even under the most stabilizing folding conditions. Multisite fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements show that the kinetic MG is compact with different segments having contracted to different extents. It is shown that the sequence segment that goes on to form the sole helix in the native protein is fully collapsed in the kinetic MG. This segment expands to accommodate the helix as the kinetic MG folds further to the native state, while other segments of the protein contract. Helix formation starting from the kinetic MG is shown to occur in multiple kinetic steps, whether measured by far-UV CD or by FRET. PMID:26258844

  10. ACOUSTIC COMPACTION LAYER DETECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The depth and strength of compacted layers in fields have been determined traditionally using the ASAE standardized cone penetrometer method. However, an on-the-go method would be much faster and much less labor intensive. The soil measurement system described here attempts to locate the compacted...

  11. Fog spontaneously folds mosquito wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew K.; Liu, Xing; Zhu, Ting; Hu, David L.

    2015-02-01

    The flexibility of insect wings confers aerodynamic benefits, but can also present a hazard if exposed to fog or dew. Fog can cause water to accumulate on wings, bending them into tight taco shapes and rendering them useless for flight. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we use high-speed video to film the spontaneous folding of isolated mosquito wings due to the evaporation of a water drop. We predict shapes of the deformed wing using two-dimensional elastica theory, considering both surface tension and Laplace pressure. We also recommend fold-resistant geometries for the wings of flapping micro-aerial vehicles. Our work reveals the mechanism of insect wing folding and provides a framework for further study of capillarity-driven folding in both natural and biomimetic systems at small scales.

  12. Structure of a Folding Intermediate Reveals the Interplay Between Core and Peripheral Elements in RNA Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Nathan J.; Westhof, Eric; Qin, Hong; Pan, Tao; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2010-07-13

    Though the molecular architecture of many native RNA structures has been characterized, the structures of folding intermediates are poorly defined. Here, we present a nucleotide-level model of a highly structured equilibrium folding intermediate of the specificity domain of the Bacillus subtilis RNase P RNA, obtained using chemical and nuclease mapping, circular dichroism spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular modeling. The crystal structure indicates that the 154 nucleotide specificity domain is composed of several secondary and tertiary structural modules. The structure of the intermediate contains modules composed of secondary structures and short-range tertiary interactions, implying a sequential order of tertiary structure formation during folding. The intermediate lacks the native core and several long-range interactions among peripheral regions, such as a GAAA tetraloop and its receptor. Folding to the native structure requires the local rearrangement of a T-loop in the core in concert with the formation of the GAAA tetraloop-receptor interaction. The interplay of core and peripheral structure formation rationalizes the high degree of cooperativity observed in the folding transition leading to the native structure.

  13. Late Quaternary folding of coral reef terraces, Barbados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Frederick W.; Mann, Paul

    1991-02-01

    Uplifted late Ouaternary coral reefs on the island of Barbados record folding of the emergent crest of the Lesser Antilles accretionary prism (Barbados Ridge complex) since ca. 1 Ma. Three northeast striking folds are defined by systematic changes in altitudes in the crest of First High Cliff, a mostly constructional reef terrace about 125 ka, and Second High Cliff, a partially erosional reef terrace about 500 ka. The folds have wavelengths of 6 to 8 km and fold axes extend about 10 km. The largest anticline rises to the northeast, where it has been breached by erosion exposing highly deformed Eocene to lower Miocene rocks of the Scotland District. Uplift rates based on heights of the last interglacial First High Cliff range from 0.07 to 0.44 mm/yr. Quaternary folding on Barbados indicates that the crest of the accretionary prism continues to be an active fold belt undergoing northwestsoutheast shortening.

  14. Self-folding graphene-polymer bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tao; Yoon, ChangKyu; Jin, Qianru; Li, Mingen; Liu, Zewen; Gracias, David H.

    2015-05-01

    In order to incorporate the extraordinary intrinsic thermal, electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of graphene with three dimensional (3D) flexible substrates, we introduce a solvent-driven self-folding approach using graphene-polymer bilayers. A polymer (SU-8) film was spin coated atop chemically vapor deposited graphene films on wafer substrates and graphene-polymer bilayers were patterned with or without metal electrodes using photolithography, thin film deposition, and etching. After patterning, the bilayers were released from the substrates and they self-folded to form fully integrated, curved, and folded structures. In contrast to planar graphene sensors on rigid substrates, we assembled curved and folded sensors that are flexible and they feature smaller form factors due to their 3D geometry and large surface areas due to their multiple rolled architectures. We believe that this approach could be used to assemble a range of high performance 3D electronic and optical devices of relevance to sensing, diagnostics, wearables, and energy harvesting.

  15. Self-folding graphene-polymer bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Tao; Yoon, ChangKyu; Jin, Qianru; Li, Mingen; Liu, Zewen; Gracias, David H.

    2015-05-18

    In order to incorporate the extraordinary intrinsic thermal, electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of graphene with three dimensional (3D) flexible substrates, we introduce a solvent-driven self-folding approach using graphene-polymer bilayers. A polymer (SU-8) film was spin coated atop chemically vapor deposited graphene films on wafer substrates and graphene-polymer bilayers were patterned with or without metal electrodes using photolithography, thin film deposition, and etching. After patterning, the bilayers were released from the substrates and they self-folded to form fully integrated, curved, and folded structures. In contrast to planar graphene sensors on rigid substrates, we assembled curved and folded sensors that are flexible and they feature smaller form factors due to their 3D geometry and large surface areas due to their multiple rolled architectures. We believe that this approach could be used to assemble a range of high performance 3D electronic and optical devices of relevance to sensing, diagnostics, wearables, and energy harvesting.

  16. Compact Proton Accelerator for Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Paul, A C

    2007-06-12

    An investigation is being made into the feasibility of making a compact proton dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator for medical radiation treatment based on the high gradient insulation (HGI) technology. A small plasma device is used for the proton source. Using only electric focusing fields for transporting and focusing the beam on the patient, the compact DWA proton accelerator m system can deliver wide and independent variable ranges of beam currents, energies and spot sizes.

  17. Shock compaction of molybdenum powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Kostka, D.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Schwarz, R. B.; Kasiraj, P.

    1983-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments which were carried out in the 9 to 12 GPa range on 1.4 distension Mo and appear adequate to compact to full density ( 45 (SIGMA)m) powders were examined. The stress levels, however, are below those calculated to be from 100 to approx. 22 GPa which a frictional heating model predicts are required to consolidate approx. 10 to 50 (SIGMA)m particles. The model predicts that powders that have a distension of m=1.6 shock pressures of 14 to 72 GPa are required to consolidate Mo powders in the 50 to 10 (SIGMA)m range.

  18. Dynamical compactness and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen; Khilko, Danylo; Kolyada, Sergiĭ; Zhang, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    To link the Auslander point dynamics property with topological transitivity, in this paper we introduce dynamically compact systems as a new concept of a chaotic dynamical system (X , T) given by a compact metric space X and a continuous surjective self-map T : X → X. Observe that each weakly mixing system is transitive compact, and we show that any transitive compact M-system is weakly mixing. Then we discuss the relationships between it and other several stronger forms of sensitivity. We prove that any transitive compact system is Li-Yorke sensitive and furthermore multi-sensitive if it is not proximal, and that any multi-sensitive system has positive topological sequence entropy. Moreover, we show that multi-sensitivity is equivalent to both thick sensitivity and thickly syndetic sensitivity for M-systems. We also give a quantitative analysis for multi-sensitivity of a dynamical system.

  19. Protein folding by motion planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Shawna; Song, Guang; Amato, Nancy M.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate a novel approach for studying protein folding that has evolved from robotics motion planning techniques called probabilistic roadmap methods (PRMs). Our focus is to study issues related to the folding process, such as the formation of secondary and tertiary structures, assuming we know the native fold. A feature of our PRM-based framework is that the large sets of folding pathways in the roadmaps it produces, in just a few hours on a desktop PC, provide global information about the protein's energy landscape. This is an advantage over other simulation methods such as molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo methods which require more computation and produce only a single trajectory in each run. In our initial studies, we obtained encouraging results for several small proteins. In this paper, we investigate more sophisticated techniques for analyzing the folding pathways in our roadmaps. In addition to more formally revalidating our previous results, we present a case study showing that our technique captures known folding differences between the structurally similar proteins G and L. This research was supported in part by NSF CAREER Award CCR-9624315, NSF Grants ACI-9872126, EIA-9975018, EIA-0103742, EIA-9805823, ACR-0113971, CCR-0113974, EIA-9810937, EIA-0079874 and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board grant ATP-000512-0261-2001. ST was supported in part by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. GS was supported in part by an IBM PhD Fellowship.

  20. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties. PMID:19327398

  2. UFO (UnFold Operator) computer program abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Kissel, L.; Biggs, F.

    1982-11-01

    UFO (UnFold Operator) is an interactive user-oriented computer program designed to solve a wide range of problems commonly encountered in physical measurements. This document provides a summary of the capabilities of version 3A of UFO.

  3. Folding of a large protein at high structural resolution.

    PubMed

    Walters, Benjamin T; Mayne, Leland; Hinshaw, James R; Sosnick, Tobin R; Englander, S Walter

    2013-11-19

    Kinetic folding of the large two-domain maltose binding protein (MBP; 370 residues) was studied at high structural resolution by an advanced hydrogen-exchange pulse-labeling mass-spectrometry method (HX MS). Dilution into folding conditions initiates a fast molecular collapse into a polyglobular conformation (<20 ms), determined by various methods including small angle X-ray scattering. The compaction produces a structurally heterogeneous state with widespread low-level HX protection and spectroscopic signals that match the equilibrium melting posttransition-state baseline. In a much slower step (7-s time constant), all of the MBP molecules, although initially heterogeneously structured, form the same distinct helix plus sheet folding intermediate with the same time constant. The intermediate is composed of segments that are distant in the MBP sequence but adjacent in the native protein where they close the longest residue-to-residue contact. Segments that are most HX protected in the early molecular collapse do not contribute to the initial intermediate, whereas the segments that do participate are among the less protected. The 7-s intermediate persists through the rest of the folding process. It contains the sites of three previously reported destabilizing mutations that greatly slow folding. These results indicate that the intermediate is an obligatory step on the MBP folding pathway. MBP then folds to the native state on a longer time scale (~100 s), suggestively in more than one step, the first of which forms structure adjacent to the 7-s intermediate. These results add a large protein to the list of proteins known to fold through distinct native-like intermediates in distinct pathways. PMID:24191053

  4. Folding of a large protein at high structural resolution

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Benjamin T.; Mayne, Leland; Hinshaw, James R.; Sosnick, Tobin R.; Englander, S. Walter

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic folding of the large two-domain maltose binding protein (MBP; 370 residues) was studied at high structural resolution by an advanced hydrogen-exchange pulse-labeling mass-spectrometry method (HX MS). Dilution into folding conditions initiates a fast molecular collapse into a polyglobular conformation (<20 ms), determined by various methods including small angle X-ray scattering. The compaction produces a structurally heterogeneous state with widespread low-level HX protection and spectroscopic signals that match the equilibrium melting posttransition-state baseline. In a much slower step (7-s time constant), all of the MBP molecules, although initially heterogeneously structured, form the same distinct helix plus sheet folding intermediate with the same time constant. The intermediate is composed of segments that are distant in the MBP sequence but adjacent in the native protein where they close the longest residue-to-residue contact. Segments that are most HX protected in the early molecular collapse do not contribute to the initial intermediate, whereas the segments that do participate are among the less protected. The 7-s intermediate persists through the rest of the folding process. It contains the sites of three previously reported destabilizing mutations that greatly slow folding. These results indicate that the intermediate is an obligatory step on the MBP folding pathway. MBP then folds to the native state on a longer time scale (∼100 s), suggestively in more than one step, the first of which forms structure adjacent to the 7-s intermediate. These results add a large protein to the list of proteins known to fold through distinct native-like intermediates in distinct pathways. PMID:24191053

  5. Nanoparticles of compacted DNA transfect postmitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ge; Li, DeShan; Pasumarthy, Murali K; Kowalczyk, Tomasz H; Gedeon, Christopher R; Hyatt, Susannah L; Payne, Jennifer M; Miller, Timothy J; Brunovskis, Peter; Fink, Tamara L; Muhammad, Osman; Moen, Robert C; Hanson, Richard W; Cooper, Mark J

    2003-08-29

    Charge-neutral DNA nanoparticles have been developed in which single molecules of DNA are compacted to their minimal possible size. We speculated that the small size of these DNA nanoparticles may facilitate gene transfer in postmitotic cells, permitting nuclear uptake across the 25-nm nuclear membrane pore. To determine whether DNA nanoparticles can transfect nondividing cells, growth-arrested neuroblastoma and hepatoma cells were transfected with DNA/liposome mixtures encoding luciferase. In both models, growth-arrested cells were robustly transfected by compacted DNA (6,900-360-fold more than naked DNA). To evaluate mechanisms responsible for enhanced transfection, HuH-7 cells were microinjected with naked or compacted plasmids encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein. Cytoplasmic microinjection of DNA nanoparticles generated a approximately 10-fold improvement in transgene expression as compared with naked DNA; this enhancement was reversed by the nuclear pore inhibitor, wheat germ agglutinin. To determine the upper size limit for gene transfer, DNA nanoparticles of various sizes were microinjected into the cytoplasm. A marked decrease in transgene expression was observed as the minor ellipsoidal diameter approached 25 nm. In summary, suitably sized DNA nanoparticles productively transfect growth arrested cells by traversing the nuclear membrane pore. PMID:12807905

  6. Complex RNA Folding Kinetics Revealed by Single-Molecule FRET and Hidden Markov Models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a hidden Markov model and optimization procedure for photon-based single-molecule FRET data, which takes into account the trace-dependent background intensities. This analysis technique reveals an unprecedented amount of detail in the folding kinetics of the Diels–Alderase ribozyme. We find a multitude of extended (low-FRET) and compact (high-FRET) states. Five states were consistently and independently identified in two FRET constructs and at three Mg2+ concentrations. Structures generally tend to become more compact upon addition of Mg2+. Some compact structures are observed to significantly depend on Mg2+ concentration, suggesting a tertiary fold stabilized by Mg2+ ions. One compact structure was observed to be Mg2+-independent, consistent with stabilization by tertiary Watson–Crick base pairing found in the folded Diels–Alderase structure. A hierarchy of time scales was discovered, including dynamics of 10 ms or faster, likely due to tertiary structure fluctuations, and slow dynamics on the seconds time scale, presumably associated with significant changes in secondary structure. The folding pathways proceed through a series of intermediate secondary structures. There exist both compact pathways and more complex ones, which display tertiary unfolding, then secondary refolding, and, subsequently, again tertiary refolding. PMID:24568646

  7. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S.; Reverdy, F.; Meyer, L.R.; Duranti, L.; Ball, G.

    2010-12-15

    Sediments undergoing compaction typically exhibit transversely isotropic (TI) elastic properties. We present a new experimental apparatus, the phased array compaction cell, for measuring the TI elastic properties of clay-rich sediments during compaction. This apparatus uses matched sets of P- and S-wave ultrasonic transducers located along the sides of the sample and an ultrasonic P-wave phased array source, together with a miniature P-wave receiver on the top and bottom ends of the sample. The phased array measurements are used to form plane P-waves that provide estimates of the phase velocities over a range of angles. From these measurements, the five TI elastic constants can be recovered as the sediment is compacted, without the need for sample unloading, recoring, or reorienting. This paper provides descriptions of the apparatus, the data processing, and an application demonstrating recovery of the evolving TI properties of a compacting marine sediment sample.

  8. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  9. Dark compact planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We investigate compact objects formed by dark matter admixed with ordinary matter made of neutron-star matter and white-dwarf material. We consider non-self annihilating dark matter with an equation of state given by an interacting Fermi gas. We find new stable solutions, dark compact planets, with Earth-like masses and radii from a few Km to few hundred Km for weakly interacting dark matter which are stabilized by the mutual presence of dark matter and compact star matter. For the strongly interacting dark matter case, we obtain dark compact planets with Jupiter-like masses and radii of few hundred Km. These objects could be detected by observing exoplanets with unusually small radii. Moreover, we find that the recently observed 2 M⊙ pulsars set limits on the amount of dark matter inside neutron stars which is, at most, 1 0-6 M⊙ .

  10. Compaction Waves in Granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kober; R. Menikoff

    1999-01-01

    Piston driven compaction waves in granular HMX are simulated with a two-dimensional continuum mechanics code in which individual grains are resolved. The constitutive properties of the grains are modeled with a hydrostatic pressure and a simple elastic-plastic model for the shear stress. Parameters are chosen to correspond to inert HMX. For a tightly packed random grain distribution (with initial porosity of 19%) we varied the piston velocity to obtain weak partly compacted waves and stronger fully compacted waves. The average stress and wave speed are compatible with the porous Hugoniot locus for uni- axial strain. However, the heterogeneities give rise to stress concentrations, which lead to localized plastic flow. For weak waves, plastic deformation is the dominant dissipative mechanism and leads to dispersed waves that spread out in time. In addition to dispersion, the granular heterogeneities give rise to subgrain spatial variation in the thermodynamic variables. The peaks in the temperature fluctuations, known as hot spots, are in the range such that they are the critical factor for initiation sensitivity.

  11. Thixoforming of Stellite Powder Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, S. C.; Atkinson, H. V.; Kapranos, P.

    2007-04-01

    Thixoforming involves processing metallic alloys in the semi-solid state. The process requires the microstructure to be spheroidal when part-solid and part-liquid i.e. to consist of solid spheroids surrounded by liquid. The aim of this work was to investigate whether powder compacts can be used as feedstock for thixoforming and whether the consolidating pressure in the thixoformer can be used to remove porosity from the compact. The powder compacts were made from stellite 6 and stellite 21 alloys, cobalt-based alloys widely used for e.g. manufacturing prostheses. Isothermal heat treatments of small samples in the consolidated state showed the optimum thixoforming temperature to be in the range 1340°C-1350°C for both materials. The alloys were thixoformed into graphite dies and flowed easily to fill the die. Porosity in the thixoformed components was lower than in the starting material. Hardness values at various positions along the radius of the thixoformed demonstrator component were above the specification for both alloys.

  12. Thixoforming of Stellite Powder Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, S. C.; Atkinson, H. V.; Kapranos, P.

    2007-04-07

    Thixoforming involves processing metallic alloys in the semi-solid state. The process requires the microstructure to be spheroidal when part-solid and part-liquid i.e. to consist of solid spheroids surrounded by liquid. The aim of this work was to investigate whether powder compacts can be used as feedstock for thixoforming and whether the consolidating pressure in the thixoformer can be used to remove porosity from the compact. The powder compacts were made from stellite 6 and stellite 21 alloys, cobalt-based alloys widely used for e.g. manufacturing prostheses. Isothermal heat treatments of small samples in the consolidated state showed the optimum thixoforming temperature to be in the range 1340 deg. C-1350 deg. C for both materials. The alloys were thixoformed into graphite dies and flowed easily to fill the die. Porosity in the thixoformed components was lower than in the starting material. Hardness values at various positions along the radius of the thixoformed demonstrator component were above the specification for both alloys.

  13. Compact baby Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, C.; Klimas, P.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2009-11-15

    For the baby Skyrme model with a specific potential, compacton solutions, i.e., configurations with a compact support and parabolic approach to the vacuum, are derived. Specifically, in the nontopological sector, we find spinning Q-balls and Q-shells, as well as peakons. Moreover, we obtain compact baby skyrmions with nontrivial topological charge. All these solutions may form stable multisoliton configurations provided they are sufficiently separated.

  14. RNAiFold: a web server for RNA inverse folding and molecular design.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter; Dotu, Ivan

    2013-07-01

    Synthetic biology and nanotechnology are poised to make revolutionary contributions to the 21st century. In this article, we describe a new web server to support in silico RNA molecular design. Given an input target RNA secondary structure, together with optional constraints, such as requiring GC-content to lie within a certain range, requiring the number of strong (GC), weak (AU) and wobble (GU) base pairs to lie in a certain range, the RNAiFold web server determines one or more RNA sequences, whose minimum free-energy secondary structure is the target structure. RNAiFold provides access to two servers: RNA-CPdesign, which applies constraint programming, and RNA-LNSdesign, which applies the large neighborhood search heuristic; hence, it is suitable for larger input structures. Both servers can also solve the RNA inverse hybridization problem, i.e. given a representation of the desired hybridization structure, RNAiFold returns two sequences, whose minimum free-energy hybridization is the input target structure. The web server is publicly accessible at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold, which provides access to two specialized servers: RNA-CPdesign and RNA-LNSdesign. Source code for the underlying algorithms, implemented in COMET and supported on linux, can be downloaded at the server website. PMID:23700314

  15. Polymer principles and protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Dill, K. A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper surveys the emerging role of statistical mechanics and polymer theory in protein folding. In the polymer perspective, the folding code is more a solvation code than a code of local phipsi propensities. The polymer perspective resolves two classic puzzles: (1) the Blind Watchmaker's Paradox that biological proteins could not have originated from random sequences, and (2) Levinthal's Paradox that the folded state of a protein cannot be found by random search. Both paradoxes are traditionally framed in terms of random unguided searches through vast spaces, and vastness is equated with impossibility. But both processes are partly guided. The searches are more akin to balls rolling down funnels than balls rolling aimlessly on flat surfaces. In both cases, the vastness of the search is largely irrelevant to the search time and success. These ideas are captured by energy and fitness landscapes. Energy landscapes give a language for bridging between microscopics and macroscopics, for relating folding kinetics to equilibrium fluctuations, and for developing new and faster computational search strategies. PMID:10386867

  16. Predicting RNA pseudoknot folding thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Song; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experimentally determined atomic coordinates for RNA helices and the self-avoiding walks of the P (phosphate) and C4 (carbon) atoms in the diamond lattice for the polynucleotide loop conformations, we derive a set of conformational entropy parameters for RNA pseudoknots. Based on the entropy parameters, we develop a folding thermodynamics model that enables us to compute the sequence-specific RNA pseudoknot folding free energy landscape and thermodynamics. The model is validated through extensive experimental tests both for the native structures and for the folding thermodynamics. The model predicts strong sequence-dependent helix-loop competitions in the pseudoknot stability and the resultant conformational switches between different hairpin and pseudoknot structures. For instance, for the pseudoknot domain of human telomerase RNA, a native-like and a misfolded hairpin intermediates are found to coexist on the (equilibrium) folding pathways, and the interplay between the stabilities of these intermediates causes the conformational switch that may underlie a human telomerase disease. PMID:16709732

  17. Osmolyte solutions and protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Char Y; Roesgen, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    In this brief review we discuss the evolution of recent thought regarding the role and mechanism of osmolytes with respect to protein stability. Osmolytes are naturally occurring intracellular compounds that change the protein folding landscape. Contributions from experiments are considered in the context of current theory and simulation results. PMID:19960095

  18. Mitotic chromosome compaction via active loop extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim; Marko, John; Mirny, Leonid; MIT-Northwestern Team

    During cell division, two copies of each chromosome are segregated from each other and compacted more than hundred-fold into the canonical X-shaped structures. According to earlier microscopic observations and the recent Hi-C study, chromosomes are compacted into arrays of consecutive loops of ~100 kilobases. Mechanisms that lead to formation of such loop arrays are largely unknown. Here we propose that, during cell division, chromosomes can be compacted by enzymes that extrude loops on chromatin fibers. First, we use computer simulations and analytical modeling to show that a system of loop-extruding enzymes on a chromatin fiber self-organizes into an array of consecutive dynamic loops. Second, we model the process of loop extrusion in 3D and show that, coupled with the topo II strand-passing activity, it leads to robust compaction and segregation of sister chromatids. This mechanism of chromosomal condensation and segregation does not require additional proteins or specific DNA markup and is robust against variations in the number and properties of such loop extruding enzymes. Work at NU was supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1206868 and MCB-1022117, and by the NIH through Grants GM105847 and CA193419. Work at MIT was supported by the NIH through Grants GM114190 R01HG003143.

  19. New charged anisotropic compact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  20. Microfluidic Mixers for Studying Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Waldauer, Steven A.; Wu, Ling; Yao, Shuhuai; Bakajin, Olgica; Lapidus, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    The process by which a protein folds into its native conformation is highly relevant to biology and human health yet still poorly understood. One reason for this is that folding takes place over a wide range of timescales, from nanoseconds to seconds or longer, depending on the protein1. Conventional stopped-flow mixers have allowed measurement of folding kinetics starting at about 1 ms. We have recently developed a microfluidic mixer that dilutes denaturant ~100-fold in ~8 μs2. Unlike a stopped-flow mixer, this mixer operates in the laminar flow regime in which turbulence does not occur. The absence of turbulence allows precise numeric simulation of all flows within the mixer with excellent agreement to experiment3-4. Laminar flow is achieved for Reynolds numbers Re ≤100. For aqueous solutions, this requires micron scale geometries. We use a hard substrate, such as silicon or fused silica, to make channels 5-10 μm wide and 10 μm deep (See Figure 1). The smallest dimensions, at the entrance to the mixing region, are on the order of 1 μm in size. The chip is sealed with a thin glass or fused silica coverslip for optical access. Typical total linear flow rates are ~1 m/s, yielding Re~10, but the protein consumption is only ~0.5 nL/s or 1.8 μL/hr. Protein concentration depends on the detection method: For tryptophan fluorescence the typical concentration is 100 μM (for 1 Trp/protein) and for FRET the typical concentration is ~100 nM. The folding process is initiated by rapid dilution of denaturant from 6 M to 0.06 M guanidine hydrochloride. The protein in high denaturant flows down a central channel and is met on either side at the mixing region by buffer without denaturant moving ~100 times faster (see Figure 2). This geometry causes rapid constriction of the protein flow into a narrow jet ~100 nm wide. Diffusion of the light denaturant molecules is very rapid, while diffusion of the heavy protein molecules is much slower, diffusing less than 1 μm in 1 ms

  1. Metagratings for Diffraction Based, Compact, Holographic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inampudi, Sandeep; Podolskiy, Viktor; Multiscale Electromagnetics Group Team

    2013-03-01

    Recent developments in semiconductor technology brought to life a new generation of highly-compact visible-frequency cameras. Unfortunately, straight forward extension of this progress to low-frequency domains (such as mid-IR imaging) is impossible since the pixel size at these frequencies is limited by free-space diffraction limit. Here we present an approach to realize highly-compact imaging systems at lower frequencies. Our approach takes advantage of high refractive index of materials commonly utilized in semiconductor detectors of mid-IR radiation, accompanied by metagratings, structures with engineered diffraction properties, to achieve a 10-fold reduction in the pixel size. In contrast to conventional refraction-based imaging, the approach essentially produces a digital hologram - a 2D projection of the 3D optical field, enabling a post-imaging ``refocusing'' of the picture. The perspectives of numerical recovery of the optical field and the stability of such recovery are discussed.

  2. Homogeneous Crystal Nucleation: To Fold or Not to Fold?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crist, Buckley

    2007-03-01

    Recent simulations and related theories have addressed interesting aspects of homogeneous nucleation of polymer crystals in very dilute solutions; embryos and very small crystals are composed of folded chains. At the same time there has been renewed activity with experimental studies of homogeneous nucleation in molten polymers, either with dispersed droplets or with microphase-separated block copolymers. Compared to dilute solutions, melts offer enhanced possibilities for nucleation by fringed micelle structures with stems from different chains. Basal or ``end'' surface energy is estimated for unfolded and folded chain nuclei and employed with classical nucleation theory to distinguish between nucleation rates in the two cases. The effect of chain length on the nucleation barrier offers a way to test model predictions.

  3. Human Frataxin Folds Via an Intermediate State. Role of the C-Terminal Region

    PubMed Central

    Faraj, Santiago E.; González-Lebrero, Rodolfo M.; Roman, Ernesto A.; Santos, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the folding reaction of human frataxin, whose deficiency causes the neurodegenerative disease Friedreich’s Ataxia (FRDA). The characterization of different conformational states would provide knowledge about how frataxin can be stabilized without altering its functionality. Wild-type human frataxin and a set of mutants, including two highly destabilized FRDA-associated variants were studied by urea-induced folding/unfolding in a rapid mixing device and followed by circular dichroism. The analysis clearly indicates the existence of an intermediate state (I) in the folding route with significant secondary structure content but relatively low compactness, compared with the native ensemble. However, at high NaCl concentrations I-state gains substantial compaction, and the unfolding barrier is strongly affected, revealing the importance of electrostatics in the folding mechanism. The role of the C-terminal region (CTR), the key determinant of frataxin stability, was also studied. Simulations consistently with experiments revealed that this stretch is essentially unstructured, in the most compact transition state ensemble (TSE2). The complete truncation of the CTR drastically destabilizes the native state without altering TSE2. Results presented here shed light on the folding mechanism of frataxin, opening the possibility of mutating it to generate hyperstable variants without altering their folding kinetics. PMID:26856628

  4. Human Frataxin Folds Via an Intermediate State. Role of the C-Terminal Region.

    PubMed

    Faraj, Santiago E; González-Lebrero, Rodolfo M; Roman, Ernesto A; Santos, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the folding reaction of human frataxin, whose deficiency causes the neurodegenerative disease Friedreich's Ataxia (FRDA). The characterization of different conformational states would provide knowledge about how frataxin can be stabilized without altering its functionality. Wild-type human frataxin and a set of mutants, including two highly destabilized FRDA-associated variants were studied by urea-induced folding/unfolding in a rapid mixing device and followed by circular dichroism. The analysis clearly indicates the existence of an intermediate state (I) in the folding route with significant secondary structure content but relatively low compactness, compared with the native ensemble. However, at high NaCl concentrations I-state gains substantial compaction, and the unfolding barrier is strongly affected, revealing the importance of electrostatics in the folding mechanism. The role of the C-terminal region (CTR), the key determinant of frataxin stability, was also studied. Simulations consistently with experiments revealed that this stretch is essentially unstructured, in the most compact transition state ensemble (TSE2). The complete truncation of the CTR drastically destabilizes the native state without altering TSE2. Results presented here shed light on the folding mechanism of frataxin, opening the possibility of mutating it to generate hyperstable variants without altering their folding kinetics. PMID:26856628

  5. Human Frataxin Folds Via an Intermediate State. Role of the C-Terminal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraj, Santiago E.; González-Lebrero, Rodolfo M.; Roman, Ernesto A.; Santos, Javier

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the folding reaction of human frataxin, whose deficiency causes the neurodegenerative disease Friedreich’s Ataxia (FRDA). The characterization of different conformational states would provide knowledge about how frataxin can be stabilized without altering its functionality. Wild-type human frataxin and a set of mutants, including two highly destabilized FRDA-associated variants were studied by urea-induced folding/unfolding in a rapid mixing device and followed by circular dichroism. The analysis clearly indicates the existence of an intermediate state (I) in the folding route with significant secondary structure content but relatively low compactness, compared with the native ensemble. However, at high NaCl concentrations I-state gains substantial compaction, and the unfolding barrier is strongly affected, revealing the importance of electrostatics in the folding mechanism. The role of the C-terminal region (CTR), the key determinant of frataxin stability, was also studied. Simulations consistently with experiments revealed that this stretch is essentially unstructured, in the most compact transition state ensemble (TSE2). The complete truncation of the CTR drastically destabilizes the native state without altering TSE2. Results presented here shed light on the folding mechanism of frataxin, opening the possibility of mutating it to generate hyperstable variants without altering their folding kinetics.

  6. The radius of gyration of an apomyoglobin folding intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Eliezer, D.; Jennings, P.A.; Wright, P.E.

    1995-10-20

    Apomyoglobin (apoMb) forms a stable compact partially folded state under acidic conditions. This {open_quotes}molten globule{close_quotes} intermediate is slightly expanded relative to the native form of the protein, with a radius of gyration (R{sub g}) of 23 ({plus_minus} 2) {Angstrom} versus 19 ({plus_minus}) {Angstrom}, and shows stable secondary structure in the A,G, and H helices. We demonstrated recently, with the use of stopped-flow circular dichroism and pulse-labeling hydrogen exchange measurements, that the earliest detectable intermediate (formed with 6 ms) in the apoMb kinetic refolding pathway closely resembles the equilibrium molten globule state populated under acid conditions. A key question remained as to how compact this kinetic intermediate is compared to the equilibrium and native states. The cooperative unfolding of the kinetic intermediate and the significant protection from amide proton exchange (as compared to corresponding isolated peptides in solution) led us to propose that the kinetic intermediate is also compact. Such a proposal could best be verified by direct determination of the size of the protein as it folds, but measurements of this nature were not feasible at the time. Newly developed improvements in time-resolved small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments allow direct measurement of the time-dependent change of R{sub g} of a protein as it folds in the millisecond to second time frame. We initiated studies of the refolding of apoMb using this technique, under conditions similar to those employed in our previous work. SAXS data collected during the first 100 ms after initiation of the refolding reaction are shown. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  7. A technique for extending by ~103 the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGAa)

    SciTech Connect

    Sio, H.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-11-01

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D3He-, D2-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 102 for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 103 for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 108 and 109 cm-2, respectively. Finally, using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ~108 and ~1012, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±~10 mg/cm2.

  8. RNAiFOLD: a constraint programming algorithm for RNA inverse folding and molecular design.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter; Dotu, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    Synthetic biology is a rapidly emerging discipline with long-term ramifications that range from single-molecule detection within cells to the creation of synthetic genomes and novel life forms. Truly phenomenal results have been obtained by pioneering groups--for instance, the combinatorial synthesis of genetic networks, genome synthesis using BioBricks, and hybridization chain reaction (HCR), in which stable DNA monomers assemble only upon exposure to a target DNA fragment, biomolecular self-assembly pathways, etc. Such work strongly suggests that nanotechnology and synthetic biology together seem poised to constitute the most transformative development of the 21st century. In this paper, we present a Constraint Programming (CP) approach to solve the RNA inverse folding problem. Given a target RNA secondary structure, we determine an RNA sequence which folds into the target structure; i.e. whose minimum free energy structure is the target structure. Our approach represents a step forward in RNA design--we produce the first complete RNA inverse folding approach which allows for the specification of a wide range of design constraints. We also introduce a Large Neighborhood Search approach which allows us to tackle larger instances at the cost of losing completeness, while retaining the advantages of meeting design constraints (motif, GC-content, etc.). Results demonstrate that our software, RNAiFold, performs as well or better than all state-of-the-art approaches; nevertheless, our approach is unique in terms of completeness, flexibility, and the support of various design constraints. The algorithms presented in this paper are publicly available via the interactive webserver http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold; additionally, the source code can be downloaded from that site. PMID:23600819

  9. All complete intersection Calabi-Yau four-folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, James; Haupt, Alexander S.; Lukas, Andre

    2013-07-01

    We present an exhaustive, constructive, classification of the Calabi-Yau four-folds which can be described as complete intersections in products of projective spaces. A comprehensive list of 921,497 configuration matrices which represent all topologically distinct types of complete intersection Calabi-Yau four-folds is provided and can be downloaded from http://www-thphys.physics.ox.ac.uk/projects/CalabiYau/Cicy4folds/index.html. The manifolds have non-negative Euler characteristics in the range 0 ≤ χ ≤ 2610. This data set will be of use in a wide range of physical and mathematical applications. Nearly all of these four-folds are elliptically fibered and are thus of interest for F-theory model building.

  10. Plastic folding of buckling structures.

    PubMed

    Colin, Jérôme; Coupeau, Christophe; Grilhé, Jean

    2007-07-27

    Atomic force microscopy observations of the free surface of gold thin films deposited on silicon substrates have evidenced the buckling of the films and the formation of blister patterns undergoing plastic folding. The classical elastic buckling and plastic deformation of the films are analyzed in the framework of the Föppl-Von Kármán theory of thin plates introducing the notion of low-angle tilt boundaries and dislocation distributions to describe this folding effect. It is demonstrated that, in agreement with elementary plasticity of bent crystals, the presence of such tilt-boundaries results in the formation of buckling patterns of lower energy than "classical" elastic blisters. PMID:17678376