Science.gov

Sample records for follow-up site visits

  1. QL-10NEURO-ONCOLOGY TELEMEDICINE FOLLOW-UP VISITS

    PubMed Central

    Green, Richard; Woyshner, Emily

    2014-01-01

    We report our 18 month experience with the use of a videoconferencing system to perform neuro-oncology follow-up visits. The Neuro-oncology Program at the Kaiser Permanente-Los Angeles Medical center serves the majority of Kaiser HMO patients in the Southern California region. We installed a videoconferencing system (Cisco TelePresence EX90, Cisco Systems, San Jose, CA) in our office in Los Angeles and in a medical office building in Anaheim, CA at a distance of 35 miles. Established neuro-oncology patients from Orange County chose between in-person and remote visits. Patients were seated in an examination room and the neuro-oncology provider alerted by text page. A focused history and physical examination was performed, followed by desktop sharing of clinical and laboratory data using an electronic medical record (Epic Systems Corporation, Verona, WI) and of neuroimages (Phillips iSite PACS, Andover, MA). Patients were asked, but not required, to complete an anonymous online 16 question satisfaction survey after each visit. Visits were performed by either a neuro-oncologist (179) or a Physician's Assistant (12). Of the 191 visits, 174 included evaluation of neuroimaging and 77 included evaluation of response to ongoing chemotherapy. During 12 visits chemotherapy was initiated, and during 15 visits the chemotherapy regimen was changed based on imaging findings. One-hundred and eleven surveys (58% of visits) were completed. Patients reported a high level of satisfaction with the visits (average 9.6, on a 1-10 scale). The average estimated travel time saved was 118 minutes per visit. Four surveys reported technical problems and 1 indicated a preference for an in-person visit. No adverse events could be attributed to use of the telemedicine system. These data suggest that neuro-oncology follow-up visits can be practiced safely and effectively using a telemedicine system, with high levels of patient satisfaction.

  2. Brief Intervention and Follow-Up for Suicidal Patients With Repeat Emergency Department Visits Enhances Treatment Engagement.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Barbara; Brown, Gregory K; Currier, Glenn W; Lyons, Chelsea; Chesin, Megan; Knox, Kerry L

    2015-08-01

    We implemented an innovative, brief, easy-to-administer 2-part intervention to enhance coping and treatment engagement. The intervention consisted of safety planning and structured telephone follow-up postdischarge with 95 veterans who had 2 or more emergency department (ED) visits within 6 months for suicide-related concerns (i.e., suicide ideation or behavior). The intervention significantly increased behavioral health treatment attendance 3 months after intervention, compared with treatment attendance in the 3 months after a previous ED visit without intervention. The trend was for a decreasing hospitalization rate. PMID:26066951

  3. Replacing Ambulatory Surgical Follow-Up Visits With Mobile App Home Monitoring: Modeling Cost-Effective Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Semple, John L; Coyte, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Background Women’s College Hospital (WCH) offers specialized surgical procedures, including ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Most patients receiving ambulatory surgery have low rates of postoperative events necessitating clinic visits. Increasingly, mobile monitoring and follow-up care is used to overcome the distance patients must travel to receive specialized care at a reduced cost to society. WCH has completed a feasibility study using a mobile app (QoC Health Inc, Toronto) that suggests high patient satisfaction and adequate detection of postoperative complications. Objective The proposed cost-effectiveness study models the replacement of conventional, in-person postoperative follow-up care with mobile app follow-up care following ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Methods This is a societal perspective cost-effectiveness analysis, wherein all costs are assessed irrespective of the payer. The patient/caregiver, health care system, and externally borne costs are calculated within the first postoperative month based on cost information provided by WCH and QoC Health Inc. The effectiveness of telemedicine and conventional follow-up care is measured as successful surgical outcomes at 30-days postoperative, and is modeled based on previous clinical trials containing similar patient populations and surgical risks. Results This costing assumes that 1000 patients are enrolled in bring-your-own-device (BYOD) mobile app follow-up per year and that 1.64 in-person follow-ups are attended in the conventional arm within the first month postoperatively. The total cost difference between mobile app and in-person follow-up care is $245 CAD ($223 USD based on the current exchange rate), with in-person follow-up being more expensive ($381 CAD) than mobile app follow-up care ($136 CAD). This takes into account the total of health care system, patient, and external borne costs. If we examine health care system costs alone, in-person follow-up is $38 CAD ($35 USD) more expensive than mobile app follow-up care over the first postoperative month. The baseline difference in effect is modeled to be zero based on clinical trials examining the effectiveness of telephone follow-up care in similar patient populations. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) is not reportable in this scenario. An incremental net benefit (INB) is reportable, and reflects merely the cost difference between the two interventions for any willingness-to-pay value (INB=$245 CAD). The cost-effectiveness of mobile app follow-up even holds in scenarios where all mobile patients attend one in-person follow-up. Conclusions Mobile app follow-up care is suitably targeted to low-risk postoperative ambulatory patients. It can be cost-effective from a societal and health care system perspective. PMID:25245774

  4. Predictors of non-adherence to follow-up visits and deferasirox chelation therapy among jordanian adolescents with Thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Al-Kloub, Manal Ibrahim; A Bed, Mona A; Al Khawaldeh, Omar A; Al Tawarah, Yasin M; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2014-10-01

    Poor adherence to treatment can have negative effects on outcomes and heath care cost. However, little is known about the factors that impact adherence to deferasirox chelation therapy. The aims of this study were to identify rates and predictors of non-adherence to medical regimen among thalassemia major adolescents on deferasirox oral chelation therapy by using subjective (self-reporting) and objective (serum ferritin and follow-up visits) measures. Convenient samples of 164 adolescents, aged 12-19 years were recruited from three National Thalassemia Centers in Jordan. Patients were interviewed using a four-section questionnaire and the medical records were checked. Results indicated that rate of adherence according to self-report was (73%); while to follow-up medical appointments and serum ferritin level rates was 57% and 47%, respectively. One-third of participant adolescents (n = 52) were psychologically impaired. Multivariate analysis showed that factors affecting adolescent non-adherence to deferasirox chelation therapy is different from that affecting adherence to follow-up visits. In general, adolescents more than 16 years old, presence of sibling with thalassemia, lack of parental monitoring, lower family income, decrease frequency of blood transfusion, and psychological impairment were found significant predictors of non-adherence among adolescents. Disease knowledge was not associated with adherence status of the adolescents. Clinician should be aware of high prevalence of low adherence to chelation therapy during adolescent years. Nurses need to regularly assess, monitor, and promote adherence behavior that might impact patients' outcomes. PMID:25116329

  5. Follow up policy after treatment for Hodgkin's disease: too many clinic visits and routine tests? A review of hospital records.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, J. A.; Eardley, A.; Woodman, C.; Crowther, D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effectiveness of routine clinic review in detecting relapse after treatment for Hodgkin's disease. DESIGN: Review of hospital records. SETTING: Regional centre for cancer treatment and research. SUBJECTS: 210 patients with Hodgkin's disease recruited to a chemotherapy trial protocol between 1984 and the end of 1990 who had achieved a complete or partial remission after treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of clinic visits made by patients over the period of observation, the number of relapses occurring during that time, and the route by which relapse was detected. RESULTS: The 210 patients generated 2512 outpatient reviews, and 37 relapses were detected. Thirty relapses (81%) were diagnosed in patients who described symptoms, which in 15 cases had resulted in an earlier appointment being arranged. In only four cases (11%; 95% confidence interval 4% to 25%) was relapse detected as a result of routine physical examination on investigation of a patient who did not have symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Relapse of Hodgkin's disease after treatment is usually detected as a result of the investigation of symptoms rather than by routine screening of asymptomatic patients. It is therefore proposed that the frequency of routine follow up visits should be reduced and greater emphasis placed on patient education. This should underline the importance of symptoms and encourage patients to arrange an earlier appointment if these develop. PMID:9040326

  6. Visit-to-Visit Glucose Variability Predicts the Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Type 2 Diabetes: 10-Year Follow-Up of Taiwan Diabetes Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Fei; Li, Tsai-Chung; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of glucose variability using coefficient of variation of fasting plasma glucose (FPG-CV) and coefficient of variation of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c-CV) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 31,841 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes.Patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in National Diabetes Care Management Program, aged ?30 years, and free of ESRD (n?=?31,841) in January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2004 were included. Extended Cox proportional hazards regression models with competing risk of all-cause mortality were used to evaluate risk factors on ESRD incidence. Patients were followed till 2012.After a median follow-up period of 8.23 years, 1642 patients developed ESRD, giving a crude incidence rate of 6.27/1000 person-years (6.36 for men, 6.19 for women). After the multivariate adjustment, both FPG-CV and HbA1c-CV were independent predictors of ESRD with corresponding hazard ratios of 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01, 1.41), 1.24 (95% CI 1.05, 1.46) in HbA1c-CV from fourth to fifth quintile and 1.23 (95% CI 1.03, 1.47) in FPG-CV from fifth quintile.One-year visit-to-visit glucose variability expressed by FPG-CV and HbA1c-CV predicted development of ESRD in patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting therapeutic strategies toward a goal to minimize glucose fluctuation. PMID:26554779

  7. Outpatient Follow-Up Visit after Hospital Discharge Lowers Risk of Rehospitalization in Patients with Schizophrenia: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Yup; Kim, Kyoung Hoon; Kim, Tae; Kim, Sun Min; Kim, Jong-Woo; Han, Changsu; Song, Ji Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective Non-adherence to medication is a recognized problem in psychiatric patients and may be one of the most challenging aspects of treatment for patients with schizophrenia. Failure of follow-up care after discharge greatly increases non-adherence to prescribed medications, relapse and rehospitalization. However, it is still unknown whether and how much outpatient follow-up visits can mitigate the risk of rehospitalization. Therefore we sought to investigate the continuity and effectiveness of outpatient care after inpatient discharge and its effect on rehospitalization of patients with schizophrenia. Methods Data were extracted from National Health Insurance Claim Database covering the period from 2007 through 2010. We identified 10,246 patients aged 18 years or older who were admitted in psychiatric facilities with the diagnosis of schizophrenia between January 1 and December 31 in 2007. The number of outpatient visits within 60 days after discharge from index admission was defined as the indicator for the continuous care and rehospitalization was inspected during the following 36-month period. Cox's proportional hazard model was used to examine the factors affecting the risk of rehospitalization including the number of outpatient visits, age, sex, comorbidities, antipsychotics, and characteristics of medical institution. Results We found that 12.7% (n=1,327) of the patients visited psychiatric outpatient department once within 60 days after hospital discharge, 34.8% (n=3,626) twice, and 27.8% (n=2,900) more than three times. Patients taking atypical antipsychotics showed higher proportion in 2 or more outpatient visits, whereas patients taking typical antipsychotics showed higher proportion in one or no outpatient visits. Cox hazard ratios of rehospitalization for the factor of 3 or more outpatient visits referenced to that of no follow-up visit were 0.567 (0.428-0.750, 95% confidence interval) within 90 days, 0.673 (0.574-0.789) within 180 days, 0.800 (0.713-0.898) within a year, 0.906 (0.824-0.997) within 2 years, and 0.993 (0.910-1.084) within 3 years. Conclusion Although continuous outpatient treatment is important for relapse prevention, patients with schizophrenia showed a low rate of outpatient visit as 62.6% of total patients in 2 or more visits within 60 days after discharge. Lack of follow-up treatment might lead to increase psychotic symptoms and raised risk of relapse and rehospitalization. Our data suggest that the number of outpatient visits within 60 days after discharge in patients with schizophrenia is an important indicator of rehospitalization within a year. Therefore, further efforts to examine factors affecting failure of outpatient follow-up after discharge are warranted. PMID:26508952

  8. Job Candidates' Views of Site Visits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Laurence S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Followed 62 Master of Business Administration students through job search involving 97 site visits to determine whether site visits changed perceptions of visited companies, attitudes toward those firms, and intentions to accept job offers. Findings suggest that organizations can improve recruitment success by paying attention to how site visits

  9. 2011 Mound Site Groundwater Plume Rebound Exercise and Follow-Up - 13440

    SciTech Connect

    Hooten, Gwendolyn; Cato, Rebecca; Lupton, Greg

    2013-07-01

    The Mound Site facility near Miamisburg, Ohio, opened in 1948 to support early atomic weapons programs. It grew into a research, development, and production facility performing work in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons and energy programs. The plant was in operation until 1995. During the course of operation, an onsite landfill was created. The landfill was located over a finger of a buried valley aquifer, which is a sole drinking water source for much of the Miami Valley. In the 1980's, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were discovered in groundwater at the Mound site. The site was placed on the National Priorities List on November 21, 1989. DOE signed a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Federal Facility Agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The agreement became effective in October 1990. The area that included the landfill was designated Operational Unit 1 (OU-1). In 1995, a Record of Decision was signed that called for the installation and operation of a pump and treatment (P and T) system in order to prevent the VOCs in OU-1 groundwater from being captured by the onsite water production wells. In addition to the P and T system, a soil vapor extraction (SVE) system was installed in 1997 to accelerate removal of VOCs from groundwater in the OU-1 area. The SVE system was successful in removing large amounts of VOCs and continued to operate until 2007, when the amount of VOCs removed became minimal. A rebound study was started in February 2003 to determine how the groundwater system and contaminants would respond to shutting down the P and T system. The rebound test was stopped in February 2004 because predetermined VOC threshold concentrations were exceeded down-gradient of the landfill. The P and T and SVE systems were restarted after the termination of the rebound test. In 2006, the remediation of the Mound site was completed and the site was declared to be protective of human health and the environment, as long as the institutional controls are observed. The institutional controls that apply to the OU-1 area include provisions that no soil be allowed to leave the site, no wells be installed for drinking water, and the site may be approved only for industrial use. The onsite landfill with the operating CERCLA remedy remained. However, the Mound Development Corporation lobbied Congress for funds to remediate the remaining onsite landfill to allow for property reuse. In 2007 DOE received funding from Congress to perform non-CERCLA removal actions at OU-1 to excavate the site sanitary landfill. In 2009, DOE received American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding to complete the project. Excavation of the landfill occurred intermittently from 2006 through 2010 and the majority of the VOC source was removed; however, VOC levels near the P and T system remained greater than the EPA maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Presently, groundwater is contained using two extraction wells to create a hydraulic barrier to prevent down-gradient migration of VOC-impacted groundwater. Since the primary contamination source has been removed, the feasibility of moving away from containment to a more passive remedy, namely monitored natural attenuation (MNA), is being considered. A second rebound study was started in June 2011. If contaminant and groundwater behavior met specific conditions during the study, MNA would be evaluated and considered as a viable alternative for the groundwater in the OU-1 area. From June through December 2011, the second rebound study evaluated the changes in VOC concentrations in groundwater when the P and T system was not in operation. As the study progressed, elevated concentrations of VOCs that exceeded predetermined trigger values were measured along the down-gradient boundary of the study area, and so the P and T system was restarted. It was determined that a discrete area with VOC concentrations greater than the MCLs was present in groundwater down-gradient of the extracti

  10. SEA GRANT PROGRAM SITE VISITS Sea Grant Program Webinar

    E-print Network

    SEA GRANT PROGRAM SITE VISITS Sea Grant Program Webinar May 2014 Sami J. Grimes, NSGO #12;OVERVIEW Sea Grant Evaluation Process Why Site Visits? Results from Previous Site Visit Cycle Overview of How Site Visits are Conducted Site Visit Terms Changes from the Previous Site Visit Cycle Sea Grant

  11. Effects of Home Visits by Paraprofessionals and by Nurses on Children: Age-Six and Nine Follow-Up of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olds, David L.; Holmberg, John R.; Donelan-McCall, Nancy; Luckey, Dennis W.; Knudtson, Michael D.; Robinson, JoAnn

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of prenatal and infancy/toddler home visiting by paraprofessionals and by nurses on child development at child ages 6 and 9. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Public and private care settings in Denver, Colorado. Participants 735 low-income women and their first-born children; 85% of the mothers were unmarried, 47% Hispanic, 35% non-Hispanic white, 15% African-American, and 3% American Indian/Asian. Interventions Home visits provided from pregnancy through child age 2 delivered in one group by paraprofessionals and in the other by nurses. Primary Outcomes Reports of children's internalizing, externalizing, and total emotional/behavioral problems; tests of children's language, intelligence, attention, attention dysfunction, visual attention/task shifting, working memory, and academic achievement. We hypothesized that program effects on cognitive related outcomes would be more pronounced among children born to mothers with low psychological resources. We report paraprofessional-control and nurse-control differences with p-values <.10 given similar effects in a previous trial, earlier impacts in this trial, and limited statistical power. Results There were no significant paraprofessional effects on emotional/behavioral problems, but paraprofessional-visited children born to mothers with low psychological resources, compared to control group counterparts, exhibited fewer errors in visual attention/task switching at age 9 (ES=?0.30, p=.078). There were no statistically significant paraprofessional effects on other primary outcomes. Nurse-visited children were less likely to be classified as having total emotional/behavioral problems at age 6 (RR=0.45, p=.082), internalizing problems at age 9 (RR=0.44, p =.078), and dysfunctional attention at age 9 (RR=0.34, p=.070). Nurse-visited children born to low-resource mothers, compared to control-group counterparts, had better receptive language averaged over ages 2, 4, and 6 (ES = 0.30, p=.014), and sustained attention averaged over ages 4, 6, and 9 (ES = 0.36, p =.006). There were no significant nurse effects on externalizing problems, intellectual functioning, and academic achievement. Conclusions Children born to low-resource mothers visited by paraprofessionals exhibited improvement in visual attention/task switching. Nurse-visited children showed improved behavioral functioning, and those born to low-resource mothers benefited in language and attention, but did not improve in intellectual functioning and academic achievement. PMID:24296904

  12. Visiting the cinema, concerts, museums or art exhibitions as determinant of survival: a Swedish fourteen-year cohort follow-up.

    PubMed

    Konlaan, B B; Bygren, L O; Johansson, S E

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the possible influence of attending various kinds of cultural events or visiting cultural institutions as a determinant of survival. A cohort of individuals aged 25-74 years from a random sample were interviewed by trained non-medical interviewers in 1982 and 1983. The interviews covered standard-of-living variables. Our independent variables covered visiting cultural institutions and attendance at cultural events, reading books or periodicals, and music making. The non-response rate was about 25%. The cohort was followed with respect to survival for 14 years up to 31st December 1996. The background covariates that were used for control purposes were age, sex, cash buffer, educational standard, long-term disease, smoking, and physical exercise. Our setting was the Swedish survey of living conditions among the adult Swedish population aged 25-74 years. About 10,609 individuals were interviewed in 1982 and 1983. The outcome measure was survival until 31st December 1996. In all, 916 men and 600 women died during this period. We found a higher mortality risk for those people who rarely visited the cinema, concerts, museums, or art exhibitions compared with those visiting them most often. The significant relative risks ranging between RR 1.14 (95% CI. 1.01-1.31) of attending art exhibitions, and RR 1.42 (CI. 1.25-1.60) of attending museums, when adjusting for the nine other variables. Visits to the cinema and concerts gave significant RR in between. We could not discern any beneficial effect of attending the theatre, church service or sports event as a spectator or any effect of reading or music making. Our conclusion is that attendance at certain kinds of cultural events may have a beneficial effect on longevity. PMID:11045748

  13. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553...Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a) Visits...The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from...

  14. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553...Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a) Visits...The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from...

  15. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553...Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a) Visits...The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from...

  16. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553...Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a) Visits...The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from...

  17. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553...Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a) Visits...The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from...

  18. Predictors of Cosmetic Outcome Following MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy: A Single-Institution Experience of 100 Patients With Two Years of Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Dragun, Anthony E. . E-mail: dragun@radonc.musc.edu; Harper, Jennifer L.; Jenrette, Joseph M.; Sinha, Debajyoti; Cole, David J.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To identify the factors that predict for excellent cosmesis in patients who receive MammoSite breast brachytherapy (MBT). Methods and Materials: One hundred patients with Stage 0, I, or II adenocarcinoma of the breast underwent adjuvant therapy using MBT. A dose of 34 Gy, delivered in 10 fractions twice daily, was prescribed to 1-cm depth using {sup 192}Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Patients were assessed for acute toxicity on the day of therapy completion, 4 weeks after therapy, and at least every 3 months by radiation, surgical, and/or medical oncologists. All available data were reviewed for documentation of cosmesis and rated using the Harvard Scale. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 6 months (median = 24 months). Results: Of 100 patients treated, 90 had adequate data and follow-up. Cosmesis was excellent in 62 (68.9%), good in 19 (21.1%), fair in 8 (8.9%), and poor in 1 (1.1%) patient. Using stepwise logistic regression, the factors that predicted for excellent cosmesis were as follows: the absence vs. presence of infection (p = 0.017), and the absence vs. presence of acute skin toxicity (p = 0.026). There was a statistically significant association between acute skin toxicity (present vs. absent) and balloon-to-skin distance (<8 vs. >8 mm, p = 0.001). Factors that did not predict for cosmesis were age, balloon placement technique, balloon volume, catheter days in situ, subcutaneous toxicity, and chemotherapy or hormonal therapy. Conclusions: The acute and late-term toxicity profiles of MBT have been acceptable. Cosmetic outcome is improved by proper patient selection and infection prevention.

  19. A clinician-mediated, longitudinal tracking system for the follow-up of clinical results

    E-print Network

    Rosenthal, Daniel Todd

    2005-01-01

    Failure to follow-up on abnormal tests is a common clinical concern comprising the quality of care. Although many clinicians track their patient follow-up by scheduling follow-up visits or by leaving physical reminders, ...

  20. Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits

    E-print Network

    Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits April 17-19th, 2013 ISRP Review Team (4 at the Sheraton Airport at 7:15 a.m. Site Visits: Depart airport and head east: Wind, Klickitat, White Salmon in this review: 1998-019-00 Wind River Watershed Underwood Conservation District (UCD), US Forest Service (USFS

  1. Corrections Education Evaluation System Project. Site Visit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Orville; And Others

    Site visits to five correctional institutions in Wisconsin were conducted as part of the development of an evaluation model for the competency-based vocational education (CBVE) project for the Wisconsin Correctional System. The evaluators' perceptions of the CBVE system are presented with recommendations for improvement. Site visits were conducted…

  2. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel...

  3. 75 FR 6404 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... SERVICES Food and Drug Administration (formerly Docket No. 2004N-0408) Regulatory Site Visit Training... participation in its Regulatory Site Visit Training Program (RSVP). This training program is intended to give.... Henderson, Division of Manufacturers Assistance and Training, Center for Biologics Evaluation and...

  4. Designing a Marketing Course with Field Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Doren, Doris; Corrigan, Hope Bober

    2008-01-01

    A key goal of including field site visits in marketing courses is to give business students increased interaction with industry professionals and community leaders. Site visits give students a concrete idea of how different marketing disciplines work in the business world. Business students gain greater insight into a career in marketing from this…

  5. Expert Panel Reviews of Research Centers: The Site Visit Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrenz, Frances; Thao, Mao; Johnson, Kelli

    2012-01-01

    Site visits are used extensively in a variety of settings within the evaluation community. They are especially common in making summative value decisions about the quality and worth of research programs/centers. However, there has been little empirical research and guidance about how to appropriately conduct evaluative site visits of research…

  6. Lost to follow-up among pregnant women in a multi-site community based maternal and newborn health registry: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background It is important when conducting epidemiologic studies to closely monitor lost to follow up (LTFU) rates. A high LTFU rate may lead to incomplete study results which in turn can introduce bias to the trial or study, threatening the validity of the findings. There is scarce information on LTFU in prospective community-based perinatal epidemiological studies. This paper reports the rates of LTFU, describes socio-demographic characteristics, and pregnancy/delivery outcomes of mothers LTFU in a large community-based pregnancy registry study. Methods Data were from a prospective, population-based observational study of the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research Maternal Newborn Health Registry (MNHR). This is a multi-centre, international study in which pregnant women were enrolled in mid-pregnancy, followed through parturition and 42 days post-delivery. Risk for LTFU was calculated within a 95%CI. Results A total of 282,626 subjects were enrolled in this study, of which 4,893 were lost to follow-up. Overall, there was a 1.7% LTFU to follow up rate. Factors associated with a higher LTFU included mothers who did not know their last menstrual period (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1, 4.4), maternal age of < 20 years (RR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1, 1.3), women with no formal education (RR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1, 1.4), and attending a government clinic for antenatal care (RR 2.0, 95% CI 1.4, 2.8). Post-natal factors associated with a higher LTFU rate included a newborn with feeding problems (RR 1.6, 94% CI 1.2, 2.2). Conclusions The LTFU rate in this community-based registry was low (1.7%). Maternal age, maternal level of education, pregnancy status at enrollment and using a government facility for ANC are factors associated with being LTFU. Strategies to ensure representation and high retention in community studies are important to informing progress toward public health goals. Trial registration Registration at the Clinicaltrials.gov (ID# NCT01073475). PMID:26062899

  7. Russian research capabilities: Findings of site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, D.W.

    1994-02-01

    In June 1993, a proposal was presented to the International Environmental Institute (IEI) in Kennewick, Washington, to establish cooperation and coordination to further pursue the interests of the United States of America and the Republic of Russia in the application and promotion of environmental technology; characterization, treatment, handling, isolation, and disposal of hazardous and radioactive materials; conversion of defense sites to other purposes; and technology transfer, cooperative programs, joint technology development and contractual research. In response to this proposal, IEI and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) jointly provided funding to send Dr. Dennis W. Wester on a fact-finding mission to Novosibirsk, Moscow, and St. Petersburg, Russia. The trip covered a period of eight weeks, six of which were spent in Novosibirsk and adjoining or related cities and one of which was spent in each of Moscow and St. Petersburg. The general objectives of the trip were to establish a basis for cooperation between IEI and the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) for future coordination of mutual interests and objectives such as technology acquisition, development, demonstration, application, and commercialization; use of capabilities and assets developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the RAS; and expediting of cooperative agreements, personnel exchanges, joint ventures and other contractual relationships. The particular objectives of this trip were to evaluate the capabilities of the RAS to satisfy the technology needs associated with the cleanup of the Hanford Site and similar sites in the U.S. and to evaluate the expediency of establishing an IEI presence in Russia.

  8. 76 FR 76168 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Regulatory Site Visit Training Program AGENCY: Food and Drug... Training Program (RSVP). This training program is intended to give CBER regulatory review, compliance, and... INFORMATION CONTACT: Lonnie W. Henderson, Division of Manufacturers Assistance and Training, Center...

  9. 76 FR 4919 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Regulatory Site Visit Training Program AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Biologics...), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. If you...

  10. FAQs about the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities Site Visit Program What is the purpose of the site visit program?

    E-print Network

    research. The site visits will involve the evaluation and analysis of institutional systems of oversight institutions,hospitals and clinics, research institutes, and government facilities. The institutionsvisited of any forms or registration documentationused to register recombinant DNA research with the IBC. o

  11. Efficacy and Utility of Phone Call Follow-up after Pediatric General Surgery versus Traditional Clinic Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kevin; Hogan, Virginia; Jager, Alesha; von Allmen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Context: Typical follow-up for surgical procedures consists of an interim history and brief focused physical examination. These appointments occupy clinic resources, require a time investment by the family, and rarely identify problems. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety of a postoperative phone call. Objective: Compare a traditional in-person clinic postoperative visit with postoperative phone call follow-up regarding patient satisfaction, rate of successful follow-up, and clinic resource utilization in a large academic practice. Design: A retrospective review of charts of patients who underwent select surgical procedures, along with a review of the clinic schedule for the same time period. Main Outcome Measures: Efficacy, patient/family satisfaction, and impact on the clinic. Methods: Families were contacted by telephone two weeks after select surgical procedures to assess for complications and questions. Cohorts of patients six months before and six months after implementation were assessed for main outcome measures. Results: Before implementation, 55.5% of patients (427/769) who had one of the select surgical procedures were seen in the clinic postoperatively, and 62.6% (435/695) had a successful postoperative phone call follow-up. There were also 1090 overall scheduled postoperative appointments. Six months after implementation, overall postoperative appointments decreased 35.5% to 703. Overall, postoperative-scheduled visits decreased by 6% compared with new visits and other general follow-up visits, which each increased by 3%. A satisfaction survey revealed that 93% of patients (n = 231) were highly satisfied with the process. A hospital cost analysis suggested an 89% cost savings ($101.75 per patient for clinic visit vs $12.50 per patient for phone call follow-up). Conclusion: Postoperative phone call follow-up is an effective tool that improves patient and physician efficiency and satisfaction. PMID:25663201

  12. Impact of Follow Up Counseling on Academic Performance and Persistence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Terrence

    This document reports on a study done at Gavilan College regarding counseling intervention for students that are subject to academic dismissal. The students that were studied were required to visit a dedicated follow up counselor prior to enrolling in classes in order to assist them in designing an achievable academic plan. The data gathered came…

  13. Please visit our web site: w3.pppl.gov/CEMM The Center for Extended

    E-print Network

    Please visit our web site: w3.pppl.gov/CEMM The Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling APDEC #12;Please visit our web site: w3.pppl.gov/CEMM We have had (and are having) a very productive, etc.), and many journal papers #12;Please visit our web site: w3.pppl.gov/CEMM All the presentations

  14. Preliminary Report on the Impact of Follow Up Counseling on Academic Performance and Persistence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Terrence

    This study documents visits to a follow-up counselor at Gavilan College (California) beginning in the fall of 2000. Students on dismissal are required to visit a counselor prior to enrolling to assist them in designing an achievable academic plan. The goals of the follow-up counseling include: (1) helping students raise their grade point averages…

  15. Feasibility of tailored follow-up for patients with early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    van Hezewijk, Marjan; Smit, Dennis J F; Bastiaannet, Esther; Scholten, Astrid N; Ranke, Gemma M C; Kroep, Judith R; Marijnen, Corrie A M; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2014-12-01

    As the number of breast cancer survivors increases, this study prospectively examined whether tailored follow-up with differentiated number of visits per risk group, based on a prognostic index for local recurrence, is feasible and acceptable for patients and professionals. Between March 2007 and March 2010, 180 breast cancer patients (pT1-2N0-2cM0) were included. Primary endpoint was feasibility of tailored follow-up, based on the number of follow-up visits, patient satisfaction, anxiety and attitude towards follow-up. Secondary endpoints were reasons for visits, incidence, time to detection of local recurrences and the use of alternative care. In the second and third year of follow-up, the results show a 22% reduction in visits per patient in the low-risk group compared to the intermediate-risk group; 2.8 versus 3.6 visits. The majority of interval visits in both groups was initiated by the professional. No significant differences were found in attitude towards follow-up, patient satisfaction, anxiety and depression, alternative health care use or local recurrences between the risk groups. In conclusion, implementation of a tailored follow-up programme with decreased number of visits for low-risk patients is feasible and acceptable to patients. Appointing one coordinating professional, possibly a nurse practitioner, could further reduce the number of follow-up visits. PMID:25438712

  16. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Greenstreet, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to sites in the Canary Islands and Tibet is planned for 2016.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1) and several hundred targets are now being followed-up per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO Portal which will allow professionals, amateurs and Citizen Scientists to plan, schedule and analyze NEO imaging and spectroscopy observations and data using the LCOGT Network and to act as a co-ordination hub for the NEO follow-up efforts.

  17. Remotely operated excavator needs assessment/site visit summary

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, J.; Haller, S.; Worsley, R.; King, M.

    1992-12-02

    The Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration requested an assessment of soil excavation needs relative to soil remediation. The following list identifies the DOE sites assessed: Mound Laboratory, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Nevada Test Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, and Fernald Site. The reviewed sites fall into one or more of the following three categories: production, EPA National Priorities List, or CERCLA (superfund) designation. Only three of the sites appear to have the need for a remotely operated excavator rope. Hanford and Idaho Falls have areas of high-level radioactive contamination either buried or in/under buildings. The Fernald site has a need for remote operated equipment of different types. It is their feeling that remote equipment can be used to remove the health dangers to humans by removing them from the area. Most interviewees stated that characterization technologies needs are more immediate concern over excavation. In addition, the sites do not have similar geographic conditions which would aid in the development of a generic precision excavator. The sites visited were not ready to utilize or provide the required design information necessary to draft a performance specification. This creates a strong case against the development of one type of ROPE for use at these sites. Assuming soil characterization technology/methodology is improved sufficiently to allow accurate and real time field characterization then development of a precision excavator might be pursued based on FEMP needs, since the FEMP`s sole scope of work is remediation. The excavator could then be used/tested and then later modified for other sites as warranted.

  18. Outpatient follow-up of patients hospitalized for acute leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Spichler, Anne; Athanazio, Daniel; Seguro, Antonio C.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objective The outcome of leptospirosis after the resolution of acute disease, either spontaneously or after treatment, is not well described. The aim of this study was to assess the possible sequelae of acute leptospirosis after hospital discharge. Methods We report here a prospective study carried out in São Paulo, Brazil in which patients hospitalized for leptospirosis were followed in the outpatient setting. Results Forty-seven patients were serially assessed: 32 severe and 15 mild cases. Early and late complications were not common in either group, but subjective complaints were common in the first few weeks after hospital discharge (53% of severe cases, 40% of mild cases). Two patients had continuing complaints: one had profound general malaise and the other developed new onset panic disorder. The sample analyzed represented 26% of the patients hospitalized with leptospirosis in the city of São Paulo during the study period. The duration of follow-up was an average of approximately 20 days at the first visit, and approximately 40 days at the second visit. Forty-seven patients came for one follow-up visit and 22 of the same patients had two follow-up visits. Conclusions While two of 47 patients reported continuing symptoms after hospitalization for acute leptospirosis, no definitive, objective evidence of chronic sequelae due to this infection was proven. While preliminary, these observations point to the need for a prospective, rigorous and systematic study to definitively determine and characterize late complications and chronic disease after acute leptospirosis. PMID:21616696

  19. Determining Virtual Environment "Fit": The Relationship between Navigation Style in a Virtual Field Trip, Student Self-Reported Desire to Visit the Field Trip Site in the Real World, and the Purposes of Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutwiler, M. Shane; Lin, Ming-Chao; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a follow-up analysis of the data reported in Lin et al. ("Learn Media Technol." doi: 10.1080/17439884.2011.629660 , 2011), we investigated the relationship between student use of a virtual field trip (VFT) system and the probability of students reporting wanting to visit the national park site upon which the VFT was modeled,…

  20. Follow-up Cost Study. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baugh, Ronald C.

    This report presents data on the costs of follow-up studies, based on 29 separate follow-up studies conducted by eight public community/junior colleges in Texas. The purpose of this study, conducted by Navarro College as a subcontractor of Project FOLLOW-UP, was to provide data and information regarding the cost of follow-up studies that would be…

  1. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus; North-West University ; Pope, Jenny; Integral Sustainability; Curtin University ; Bond, Alan; University of East Anglia ; Retief, Francois

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Methodsfor Successful Follow-up

    E-print Network

    Adolphs, Ralph

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Methodsfor Successful Follow-up of Elusive Urban Populations: An Et research, in particular, has been hampered by poorfollow-up rates. This paper reports on thefollow-up illness. Each of the two trials achieved virtually complete follow-up over 18 months. The authors describe

  3. Cancer follow-up care. Patients' perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; MacDonald, Ian; Tatemichi, Sue

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess family physicians' and specialists' involvement in cancer follow-up care and how this involvement is perceived by cancer patients. DESIGN: Self-administered survey. SETTING: A health region in New Brunswick. PARTICIPANTS: A nonprobability cluster sample of 183 participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients' perceptions of cancer follow-up care. RESULTS: More than a third of participants (36%) were not sure which physician was in charge of their cancer follow-up care. As part of follow-up care, 80% of participants wanted counseling from their family physicians, but only 20% received it. About a third of participants (32%) were not satisfied with the follow-up care provided by their family physicians. In contrast, only 18% of participants were dissatisfied with the follow-up care provided by specialists. Older participants were more satisfied with cancer follow-up care than younger participants. CONCLUSION: Cancer follow-up care is increasingly becoming part of family physicians' practices. Family physicians need to develop an approach that addresses patients' needs, particularly in the area of emotional support. PMID:12901486

  4. Francoise, a Fifteen-Year Follow Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rondal, J. A.; Elbouz, M.; Ylieff, M.; Docquier, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on a 15-year follow-up of the linguistic and cognitive profile of a woman with standard trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). The follow-up found recent rapid deterioration in receptive and productive language skills. However, basic phonological and morphosyntactic skills are preserved. Her changing profile mirrors that found in aging…

  5. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; Palmer, Elizabeth; Heggy, Essam; Jurgens, Frank; Kennedy, Tim; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Lundy, Mike; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Wheeler, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  6. Graduate Follow-up. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Rayford T.

    This report details the research activities conducted by San Antonio College (SAC) as a subcontractor of Project FOLLOW-UP, in the design, development, and implementation of a graduate follow-up system. Numerous information gathering techniques, including personal interviews and follow-up questionnaires, were attempted. Four different groups of…

  7. A retrospective follow-up study of body dysmorphic disorder#

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Katharine A.; Grant, Jon E.; Siniscalchi, Jason M.; Stout, Robert; Price, Lawrence H.

    2006-01-01

    Background Although research on body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is increasing, no follow-up studies of this disorder’s course of illness have been published. Methods The status of 95 outpatients with BDD treated in a clinical practice was assessed by chart review. Standard scales were used to rate subjects at baseline and the most recent clinic visit (mean duration of follow-up, 1.7 ± 1.1; range, 0.5–6.4 years). Ratings were also done at 6-month intervals over the first 4 years of follow-up. Results Allowing for censoring, life table analysis estimated that the proportion of subjects who achieved full remission from BDD at the 6-month and/or 12-month assessment was 24.7%; the proportion who attained partial or full remission at 6 months and/or 12 months was 57.8%. After 4 years of follow-up, 58.2% had experienced full remission, and 83.8% had experienced partial or full remission, at one or more 6-month assessment points. Of those subjects who attained partial or full remission at one or more assessment points, 28.6% subsequently relapsed. Between baseline and the most recent assessment, BDD severity and functioning significantly improved: at the most recent assessment, 16.7% of subjects were in full remission, 37.8% were in partial remission, and 45.6% met full criteria for BDD. Greater severity of BDD symptoms and the presence of major depression or social phobia at baseline were associated with more severe BDD symptoms at study end point. All subjects received at least one medication trial, and 34.3% received some type of therapy during the follow-up period. Conclusions A majority of treated patients with BDD improved, although improvement was usually partial. Prospective longitudinal studies are needed to further elucidate the course of BDD. PMID:16122530

  8. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Follow-up: Role of Remote Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Linde, Cecilia; Braunschweig, Frieder

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is increasingly used in heart failure treatment and management of these patients imposes significant challenges. Remote monitoring is becoming essential for CRT follow-up and allows close surveillance of device function and patient condition. It is helpful to reduce clinic visits, increase device longevity and provide early detection of device failure. Clinical effects include prevention of appropriate and inappropriate shocks and early detection of arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation. For modification of heart failure the addition of monitoring to CRT by means of device-based multiparameters may help to modify disease progression and improve survival. PMID:26596821

  9. Teacher Education Follow-Up Study, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelazek, John R.; Williams, Wayne W.; McAdams, Charles; Palmer, Kyle

    This report represents the eighth Follow-Up Study by the Teacher Education Assessment Committee (TEAC) at Central Missouri State University (Central). TEAC is a centralized system of data collection and assessment that conducts and publishes results of periodic assessments and evaluations of Central's teacher education programs by soliciting input…

  10. Employer Follow-Up Survey Report, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    In 1998, Trident Technical College conducted the 1997 Employer Follow-Up Survey to collect information from employers of 1997 graduates. A total of 373 employers of graduates were identified, of which 243 were contacted and interviewed. Findings indicate that employers rate graduates average or above average in most technical and personal skills.…

  11. 1984 Graduate Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Tyler Community Coll., Chester, VA. Office of Institutional Research.

    A follow-up study is conducted of each graduating class of John Tyler Community College (JTCC) to document student successes in the job market and in pursuit of advanced studies, provide feedback to administrators and faculty for upgrading educational offerings and services, and provide a summary of student opinions to improve services. A…

  12. Florida Vocational Graduates' Follow-Up Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Patricia

    This document presents the Florida Vocational Graduates' Follow-Up Outcomes, which include Associate in Science, College Credit Certificates, and Vocational Credit Certificates. The total number of vocational graduates increased by 27.9% between 1990-91 and 1993-94. Females experienced greater increases than males both in terms of percents and…

  13. Follow-up Care After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Association of Cancer Online Resources, a cancer information system that offers access to electronic mailing lists and websites, provides a list of long-term follow-up care clinics on its Ped-Onc ... medical information should patients keep? It is important for people ...

  14. Follow-Up Research on Agoraphobics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Dianne L.

    In vivo exposure is the most commonly used and generally the most effective behavioral treatment for agoraphobia. Follow-up studies are difficult to interpret because additional treatment does not necessarily indicate relapse and non-treatment does not necessarily indicate non-relapse. Relapse rates are difficult to estimate because of lack of…

  15. Follow-up examinations: are multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients in Uttar Pradesh, India, on track?

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, S. B.; Tripathy, J. P.; Sahu, S. K.; Parmar, M.; Rade, K.; Bhatnagar, S.; Ranjan, A.; Sachdeva, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Setting: All multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients who had completed 6 months of treatment under the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) in Uttar Pradesh, the largest state in northern India. Objective: To determine the proportion of MDR-TB patients with regular follow-up examinations, and underlying provider and patient perspectives of follow-up services. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was undertaken involving record reviews of 64 eligible MDR-TB patients registered during April–June 2013 in 11 districts of the state. Patients and programme personnel from the selected districts were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 34 (53.1%) patients underwent follow-up sputum culture at month 3, 43 (67.2%) at month 4, 36 (56.3%) at month 5 and 37 (57.8%) at month 6. Themes associated with irregular follow-up that emerged from the interviews were multiple visits, long travel distances, shortages of equipment at the facility and lack of knowledge among patients regarding the follow-up schedule. Conclusion: The majority of the MDR-TB patients had irregular follow-up visits. Provider-related factors outweigh patient-related factors on the poor follow-up examinations. The programme should focus on the decentralisation of follow-up services and ensure logistics and patient-centred counselling to improve the regularisation of follow up. PMID:26400602

  16. Visiting the Site of Death: Experiences of the Bereaved after the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristensen, Pal; Tonnessen, Arnfinn; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined how many bereaved relatives of Norwegian tourists who perished in the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami had visited the site of death and the most important outcome from the visit. We conducted in-depth interviews (n = 110) and used self-report questionnaires (Impact of Event Scale--Revised, Inventory of Complicated Grief, and…

  17. Graduate Employer Follow Up. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Larry K.

    This report details the development and implementation of an employer follow-up system, by Amarillo College (AC) as a subcontractor for Project FOLLOW-UP, designed to determine employer assessment of the effectiveness of training received by AC graduates in their employ. The study was conducted in two sequences; in each, employer names and…

  18. 48 CFR 1352.270-71 - Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.270-71 Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1370.102... any perceived ambiguity in the solicitation or created by an amendment of the solicitation. (f)...

  19. Barriers to follow-up for pediatric cataract surgery in Maharashtra, India: How regular follow-up is important for good outcome. The Miraj Pediatric Cataract Study II

    PubMed Central

    Gogate, Parikshit; Patil, Shailbala; Kulkarni, Anil; Mahadik, Ashok; Tamboli, Rahin; Mane, Rekha; Borah, Rishiraj; Rao, G V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Regular follow up and amblyopia treatment are essential for good outcomes after pediatric cataract surgery. Aim: To study the regularity of follow-up after cataract surgery in children and to gauge the causes of poor compliance to follow up. Subjects: 262 children (393 cataracts) who underwent cataract surgery in 2004-8. Materials and Methods: The children were identified and examined in their homes and a “barriers to follow-up” questionnaire completed. Demographic data collected, visual acuity estimated, and ocular examination performed. Statistical Analysis: SPSS version 19. Results: Of the 262 children, only 53 (20.6%) had been regularly following up with any hospital, 209 (79.4%) had not. A total of 150 (57.3%) were boys and the average age was 13.23 years (Std Dev 5 yrs). Poor follow up was associated with the older age group (P < 0.001), less education of mother (P = 0.012), father's occupation (P = 0.031), how much money spent on travel (P = 0.033) and was it paid or free surgery (P = 0.001). It was not related to gender, numbers of children in family, ordinal status of child, and social strata. Distance and cost were major barriers, as was the inability of the eye care center to communicate the importance of follow up. A prospective follow-up visit showed that 93 children needed Nd: YAG LASER capsulotomy, 5 needed low vision aids, 4 contact lens, and 162 a change of spectacles. The average visual acuity improved in 150 (38.8%) eyes >1 line with regular follow-up. Conclusion: Regular follow-up is important and improves vision; eye care practitioners need to take special efforts to ensure better follow-up. PMID:24008794

  20. Oligometastases Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Long-Term Follow-Up of Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Michael T.; Katz, Alan W.; Zhang Hong; Okunieff, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term survival and tumor control outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for metastases limited in number and extent. Methods and Materials: We prospectively analyzed the long-term overall survival (OS) and cancer control outcomes of 121 patients with five or fewer clinically detectable metastases, from any primary site, metastatic to one to three organ sites, and treated with SBRT. Freedom from widespread distant metastasis (FFDM) was defined as metastatic disease not amenable to local therapy (i.e., resection or SBRT). Prognostic variables were assessed using log-rank and Cox regression analyses. Results: For breast cancer patients, the median follow-up was 4.5 years (7.1 years for 16 of 39 patients alive at the last follow-up visit). The 2-year OS, FFDM, and local control (LC) rate was 74%, 52%, and 87%, respectively. The 6-year OS, FFDM, and LC rate was 47%, 36%, and 87%, respectively. From the multivariate analyses, the variables of bone metastases (p = .057) and one vs. more than one metastasis (p = .055) were associated with a fourfold and threefold reduced hazard of death, respectively. None of the 17 bone lesions from breast cancer recurred after SBRT vs. 10 of 68 lesions from other organs that recurred (p = .095). For patients with nonbreast cancers, the median follow-up was 1.7 years (7.3 years for 7 of 82 patients alive at the last follow-up visit). The 2-year OS, FFDM, and LC rate was 39%, 28%, and 74%, respectively. The 6-year OS, FFDM, and LC rate was 9%, 13%, and 65%, respectively. For nonbreast cancers, a greater SBRT target volume was significantly adverse for OS (p = .012) and lesion LC (p < .0001). Patients whose metastatic lesions, before SBRT, demonstrated radiographic progression after systemic therapy experienced significantly worse OS compared with patients with stable or regressing disease. Conclusions: Select patients with limited metastases treated with SBRT are long-term survivors. Future research should address the therapeutic benefit of SBRT for these patients.

  1. Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders?

    E-print Network

    Marinova, Elena

    Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders? V. Linseele a in the Egyptian Eastern Desert with stratified archaeological deposits. In Middle Holocene contexts of both sites Cave site is situated approximately 40 km Northeast of Quseir, in the Egyptian Eastern Desert

  2. NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook is issued pursuant to the requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-50, Audit Follow-up, dated September 29, 1982. It sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for use when considering reports issued by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), other executive branch audit organizations, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), and the General Accounting Office (GAO). It is intended to: specify principal roles; strengthen the procedures for management decisions (resolution) on audit findings and corrective action on audit report recommendations; emphasize the importance of monitoring agreed upon corrective actions to assure actual accomplishment; and foster the use of audit reports as effective tools of management. A flow chart depicting the NASA audit and management decision process is in Appendix A. This handbook is a controlled handbook issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution channels.

  3. A Mobile Phone-Based, Community Health Worker Program for Referral, Follow-Up, and Service Outreach in Rural Zambia: Outcomes and Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sindano, Ntazana; Theis, Mathew; Zue, Cory; Joseph, Jessica; Chilengi, Roma; Chi, Benjamin H.; Stringer, Jeffrey S.A.; Chintu, Namwinga

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mobile health (m-health) utilizes widespread access to mobile phone technologies to expand health services. Community health workers (CHWs) provide first-level contact with health facilities; combining CHW efforts with m-health may be an avenue for improving primary care services. As part of a primary care improvement project, a pilot CHW program was developed using a mobile phone-based application for outreach, referral, and follow-up between the clinic and community in rural Zambia. Materials and Methods: The program was implemented at six primary care sites. Computers were installed at clinics for data entry, and data were transmitted to central servers. In the field, using a mobile phone to send data and receive follow-up requests, CHWs conducted household health surveillance visits, referred individuals to clinic, and followed up clinic patients. Results: From January to April 2011, 24 CHWs surveyed 6,197 households with 33,304 inhabitants. Of 15,539 clinic visits, 1,173 (8%) had a follow-up visit indicated and transmitted via a mobile phone to designated CHWs. CHWs performed one or more follow-ups on 74% (n=871) of active requests and obtained outcomes on 63% (n=741). From all community visits combined, CHWs referred 840 individuals to a clinic. Conclusions: CHWs completed all planned aspects of surveillance and outreach, demonstrating feasibility. Components of this pilot project may aid clinical care in rural settings and have potential for epidemiologic and health system applications. Thus, m-health has the potential to improve service outreach, guide activities, and facilitate data collection in Zambia. PMID:24926815

  4. Determining Virtual Environment "Fit": The Relationship Between Navigation Style in a Virtual Field Trip, Student Self-Reported Desire to Visit the Field Trip Site in the Real World, and the Purposes of Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutwiler, M. Shane; Lin, Ming-Chao; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a follow-up analysis of the data reported in Lin et al. (Learn Media Technol. doi: 10.1080/17439884.2011.629660, 2011), we investigated the relationship between student use of a virtual field trip (VFT) system and the probability of students reporting wanting to visit the national park site upon which the VFT was modeled, controlling for content knowledge and prior visits to the park. Students who were able to navigate the VFT in teams were more likely than their peers who had the system demonstrated by a teacher to want to visit the national park. In addition, students with higher pre-intervention content knowledge were more likely to want to visit the national park than their peers with lower pre-test scores, in both the teacher demonstration and student co-navigation conditions.

  5. Improving Lunar Exploration with Robotic Follow-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, T.; Bualat, M.; Deans, M.; Heggy E.; Helper, M.; Hodges, K.; Lee, P.

    2011-01-01

    We are investigating how augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity can improve lunar exploration. Robotic "follow-up" might involve: completing geology observations; making tedious or long-duration measurements of a target site or feature; curating samples in-situ; and performing unskilled, labor-intensive work. To study this technique, we have begun conducting a series of lunar analog field tests at Haughton Crater (Canada). Motivation: In most field geology studies on Earth, explorers often find themselves left with a set of observations they would have liked to make, or samples they would have liked to take, if only they had been able to stay longer in the field. For planetary field geology, we can imagine mobile robots - perhaps teleoperated vehicles previously used for manned exploration or dedicated planetary rovers - being deployed to perform such follow-up activities [1].

  6. TEXAS A&M ARSENIC WATER FOLLOW UP STUDY Arsenic Follow Up Study Codebook 2/19/07

    E-print Network

    Shaw, W. Douglass

    TEXAS A&M ARSENIC WATER FOLLOW UP STUDY Arsenic Follow Up Study Codebook 2/19/07 Page 1 ARSENIC&M ARSENIC WATER FOLLOW UP STUDY Arsenic Follow Up Study Codebook 2/19/07 Page 2 A6 About what percent of all) A10_6 Don't know #12;TEXAS A&M ARSENIC WATER FOLLOW UP STUDY Arsenic Follow Up Study Codebook 2

  7. Surveying Supported Employment in Finland: A Follow-up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saloviita, Timo; Pirttimaa, Raija

    2007-01-01

    The longitudinal status of supported employment in Finland was examined via a 2003 nationwide survey sent to job coaches involved in supporting workers with intellectual and other disabilities. Sustained supported employment, defined as "paid work in integrated settings with ongoing supports that contained at least two on-site visits per month at…

  8. Survivorship Clinic Introduction to long-term follow-up

    E-print Network

    Brent, Roger

    Survivorship Clinic Introduction to long-term follow-up Long-term follow-up for cancer survivors typically begins about two years following completion of therapy. In long-term follow-up, the focus shifts the original cancer treatment was given A specialized Long-Term Follow-Up Program for cancer survivors

  9. Effective Delivery of Therapeutic Interventions: Findings from Four Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Cathy; Squires, Garry; Bragg, Joanna; Wasilewski, David; Muscutt, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This project follows a survey into the role of UK educational psychologists (EPs) in delivering therapeutic interventions to children and young people. Four educational psychology services (EPSs) that identified themselves as providing effective therapeutic practice were selected on the basis of their qualitative responses to the survey. Site

  10. Duodenal atresia: late follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, M L; Kalima, T; Jääskeläinen, J; Louhimo, I

    1988-03-01

    In this study, 41 randomly chosen patients aged 15 to 35 years (mean 22 years) were carefully examined. As primary operations there were 13 membrane excisions, five duodenoduodenostomies, 22 duodenojejunostomies, and one gastrojejunostomy. Twenty-eight patients were symptom-free, ten admitted some discomfort, three had major pains, including one with a history of duodenal ulcer. Reoperation for adhesion ileus had been performed in six patients, in the early postoperative phase in one instance. At late follow-up barium meals (N = 41) showed completely normal findings in two cases only, hiatal hernia in two, gastritis in three, duodenogastric reflux in 12, slight dilation of the duodenum with good emptying and no reflux in 16, a huge duodenal sac in nine, diminished peristalsis in eight, delayed emptying in five, slight luminal narrowing in three, duodenal diverticuli in nine, bezoars in two, and a polyp in the duodenum of one patient. Ultrasound (N = 35) revealed a gallbladder septum in one patient and a dilated common bile duct in another; in one subject the gallbladder was not visualized satisfactorily. Isotope biligraphy (N = 15) showed biliary reflux to the stomach in 12 cases. Endoscopy (N = 20) findings were: esophagitis (1), hiatal hernia (2), gastric mucosa in the lower esophagus (2), biliary reflux (9), gastritis (7), gastric polyps (2), dilated duodenum of variable degree (19), diminished peristalsis (4), marked retention (2), abnormal papilla (3), diverticuli (4), and a persistent membrane (1). Histology showed superficial gastritis in three patients. E coli was cultured from the duodenal juice in five patients and Candida found in two.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3357136

  11. School Site Visits for Community-Based Participatory Research on Healthy Eating

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anisha I.; Bogart, Laura M.; Uyeda, Kimberly E.; Martinez, Homero; Knizewski, Ritamarie; Ryan, Gery W.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Background School nutrition policies are gaining support as a means of addressing childhood obesity. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers an approach for academic and community partners to collaborate to translate obesity-related school policies into practice. Site visits, in which trained observers visit settings to collect multilevel data (e.g., observation, qualitative interviews), may complement other methods that inform health promotion efforts. This paper demonstrates the utility of site visits in the development of an intervention to implement obesity-related policies in Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) middle schools. Methods In 2006, trained observers visited four LAUSD middle schools. Observers mapped cafeteria layout; observed food/beverage offerings, student consumption, waste patterns, and duration of cafeteria lines; spoke with school staff and students; and collected relevant documents. Data were examined for common themes and patterns. Results Food and beverages sold in study schools met LAUSD nutritional guidelines, and nearly all observed students had time to eat most or all of their meal. Some LAUSD policies were not implemented, including posting nutritional information for cafeteria food, marketing school meals to improve student participation in the National School Lunch Program, and serving a variety of fruits and vegetables. Cafeteria understaffing and cost were obstacles to policy implementation. Conclusions Site visits were a valuable methodology for evaluating the implementation of school district obesity-related policies and contributed to the development of a CBPR intervention to translate school food policies into practice. Future CBPR studies may consider site visits in their toolbox of formative research methods. PMID:19896033

  12. White-tailed Deer Visitation Rates at Medicated Bait Sites in Southern Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has been found on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) complicating eradication efforts of the USDA’s Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program. Our objective was to assess patterns of deer visitation to medicated bait sites used to treat...

  13. Visit our website at: https://info.ornl.gov/sites/sbpo

    E-print Network

    Visit our website at: https://info.ornl.gov/sites/sbpo LeAnne Stribley, Division Director Inch Switch WBS 1.5.1.1 No gov 541330 334419 2015 Feb TBD Kelly West 865-576-6880 luckettwestk@ornl.gov Fabricated Equipment Prototype

  14. Appendix B: Site Visit Reports. Assessment of Research Needs for Coal Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, S.S.

    1983-05-01

    This section contains edited copies of site-visit and other reports prepared by CCAWG members. Some of the hand-out materials prepared by DOE contractors and others are included (without explication) to permit readers the construction of a coherent picture of work in progress.

  15. Female Faculty Members in University Chemistry Departments: Observations and Conclusions Based on Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Sally; Dixon, Felicia F.; Foster, Natalie; Kuck, Valerie J.; McCarthy, Deborah A.; Tooney, Nancy M.; Buckner, Janine P.; Nolan, Susan A.; Marzabadi, Cecilia H.

    2011-01-01

    Oral interviews in focus groups and written surveys were conducted with 877 men and women, including administrators, faculty members, postdoctoral associates, and graduate students, during one-day site visits to chemistry and chemical engineering departments at 28 Ph.D.-granting institutions. This report is a preliminary review of the perceptions…

  16. 77 FR 44675 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Site Visit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... (ETP), State Energy Sector Partnership (SESP), and Health Care and Other High Growth and Emerging... Register on April 20, 2012 (77 FR 23764). Interested parties are encouraged to send comments to the OMB...: Site Visit Data Collection Request for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funded Grants;...

  17. Preparing for a Successful Psychiatry Residency Review Committee Site Visit: A Guide for New Training Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Shashi K.; Bhatia, Subhash C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: New residency training directors are often faced with multiple competing tasks such as meeting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Psychiatry Program Requirements and achieving successful completion of residency review committee (RRC) site visits. For many years, the authors have presented workshops on this…

  18. The effect of long-term care and follow-up on complications in patients with external fixators.

    PubMed

    Cam, Rahsan; Korkmaz, Fatma Demir

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of long-term care and follow-up on complications in patients with external fixators. This study was conducted as a study research. The study sample included a total of 60 patients treated with external fixators for fractures, of whom 30 were in the control and 30 were in the study group. No intervention was made on the control group patients. The patients in the study group received external fixator pin site wound care, pin site massage and neurovascular follow-up. The study group patients were also given discharge training about external fixator pin site care two days before their discharge and were also provided with training manuals to guide their home care. Both groups were visited weekly at their homes to record their complications. Nine complications developed in eight patients (26.7%) in the study group, and 19 complications developed in 19 patients (63.3%) in the control group. Pin site infections were 11.6% of the total sample. The percentage for pin loosening, stiff joint, nerve and vessel injury and pain and swelling was 5%, 25%, 1.7% and 3.3%, respectively. PMID:24580979

  19. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

  20. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Follow-up questionnaire data set contains information concerning the activities within the household during the sampling week. The information is from 402 follow-up questionnaires for 80 households across 6 cycles. The Follow-up Questionnaire specifically addressed the time ...

  1. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all audit findings. As part of this responsibility, the auditee shall prepare a summary schedule of...

  2. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor Office... § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all audit findings. As part of this responsibility, the auditee shall prepare a...

  3. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all audit findings. As part of this responsibility, the auditee shall prepare a summary schedule of...

  4. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all audit findings. As part of this responsibility, the auditee shall prepare a...

  5. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all audit findings. As part of this responsibility, the auditee shall prepare a...

  6. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor... Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all audit findings. As part of this responsibility, the auditee shall prepare a...

  7. DISSS/PSDB - Personnel Security Database Modernization Project: Compilation of data gathered from DOE Operations Office`s site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.; Sweeney, D.

    1995-03-15

    This document is a compilation of the information gathered from visits to the DOE Operations Offices. The purpose of these visits was to gather requirements for the modernization of the personnel security database. The initial phase of visits were to sites which had known local systems to augment CPCI. They were; Rocky Flats, Richland, Las Vegas, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, and Oakland. The second phase of site visits were to; Headquarters, Schenectady, Pittsburgh, Idaho Falls, Chicago, and Albuquerque. We also visited the NRC. At each site we reviewed the current clearance process in use at the field office. If the site had a local personnel security database (PSDB), we also reviewed the current PSDB processing. Each meeting was began with the a discussion on the purpose of the meeting and the background of the redesign effort.

  8. The LCOGT near-Earth-object follow-up network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, T.

    2014-07-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network is a planned homogeneous network that will eventually consist of over 35 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres [1]. This network is versatile and designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to do long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make the LCOGT network ideal for follow-up and characterization of a wide range of solar-system objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper-belt objects, comets) and in particular near-Earth objects (NEOs). There are 3 classes to the telescope resources: 2-meter aperture, 1-meter aperture and 0.4-meter aperture. We have been operating our two 2-meter telescopes since 2005 and began a specific program of NEO follow-up for the Pan-STARRS survey in October 2010. The combination of all-sky access, large aperture, rapid response, robotic operation and good site conditions allows us to provide time-critical follow-up astrometry and photometry on newly discovered objects and faint objects as they recede from the Earth, allowing the orbital arc to be extended and preventing loss of objects. These telescope resources have greatly increased as LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment, designated as ''Version 1.0'', with the installation, commissioning and ongoing operation of nine 1-meter telescopes. These are distributed among four sites with one 1-meter at McDonald Observatory (Texas), three telescopes at Cerro Tololo (Chile), three telescopes at SAAO (South Africa) and the final two telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). In addition to the 1-meter network, the scheduling and control system for the two 2-meter telescopes have been upgraded and unified with that of the 1-meter network to provide a coherent robotic telescopic network. The telescope network is now operating and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and Pan-STARRS (PS1) with additional targets coming from the NEOWISE satellite and the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Robotic observations of NEOs and other solar-system objects have been routinely carried out for several years on the 2-m and 1-m telescopes, with over 20,000 positional and magnitude measurements reported to the Minor Planet Center (MPC) in the last two years. We have developed software to automatically fetch candidates from Pan-STARRS and the MPC Confirmation Page, compute orbits and ephemerides, plan and schedule observations on the telescopes and retrieve the processed data [2]. The program is being expanded which will allow us to greatly increase the amount of survey discoveries that are followed-up, obtain accurate astrometry and provide important characterization data in the form of colors, lightcurves, rotation rates and spectra for NEOs. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects in order to improve the orbits and determine the rotation periods. Priority for follow-up is now given to the fainter and most southern targets on the Confirmation Page, objects that are scheduled for Goldstone/Arecibo radar targeting and those objects which could become potential mission destinations for spacecraft. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) targets. With the increase in time available from the LCOGT 1-meter network and commissioning of low-resolution spectrographs on the 2-meter telescopes for moving objects, this will produce a large advance in capabilities for NEO follow-up and characterization. This will produce an unprecedented network for NEO follow-up, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere where there is currently a shortage of suitable facilities. We will continue to develo

  9. Meeting increased demand for total knee replacement and follow-up: determining optimal follow-up.

    PubMed

    Meding, J B; Ritter, M A; Davis, K E; Farris, A

    2013-11-01

    The strain on clinic and surgeon resources resulting from a rise in demand for total knee replacement (TKR) requires reconsideration of when and how often patients need to be seen for follow-up. Surgeons will otherwise require increased paramedical staff or need to limit the number of TKRs they undertake. We reviewed the outcome data of 16 414 primary TKRs undertaken at our centre to determine the time to re-operation for any reason and for specific failure mechanisms. Peak risk years for failure were determined by comparing the conditional probability of failure, the number of failures divided by the total number of TKRs cases, for each year. The median times to failure for the most common failure mechanisms were 4.9 years (interquartile range (IQR) 1.7 to 10.7) for femoral and tibial loosening, 1.9 years (IQR 0.8 to 3.9) for infection, 3.1 years (IQR 1.6 to 5.5) for tibial collapse and 5.6 years (IQR 3.4 to 9.3) for instability. The median time to failure for all revisions was 3.3 years (IQR 1.2 to 8.5), with an overall revision rate of 1.7% (n = 282). Results from our patient population suggest that patients be seen for follow-up at six months, one year, three years, eight years, 12 years, and every five years thereafter. Patients with higher pain in the early post-operative period or high body mass index (? 41 kg/m(2)) should be monitored more closely. PMID:24151267

  10. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  11. Follow-up after gastrectomy for cancer: Results of an international web round table

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchi, Gian Luca; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Marrelli, Daniele; Pacelli, Fabio; Morgagni, Paolo; Roviello, Franco; De Manzoni, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Oncological follow-up after radical gastrectomy for cancer still represents a discrepancy in the field, with many retrospective series demonstrating that early diagnosis of recurrence does not result in an improvement in patient survival; yet, many centers with high quality of care still provide routine patient follow-up after surgery by clinical and instrumental controls. This was the topic for a web round table entitled “Rationale and limits of oncological follow-up after gastrectomy for cancer” that was launched one year before the 10th International Gastric Cancer Congress. Authors having specific expertise were invited to comment on their previous publications to provide the subject for an open debate. During a three-month-long discussion, 32 authors from 12 countries participated, and 2299 people visited the dedicated web page. Substantial differences emerged between the participants: authors from Japan, South Korea, Italy, Brazil, Germany and France currently engage in instrumental follow-up, whereas authors from Eastern Europe, Peru and India do not, and British and American surgeons practice it in a rather limited manner or in the context of experimental studies. Although endoscopy is still considered useful by most authors, all the authors recognized that computed tomography scanning is the method of choice to detect recurrence; however, many limit follow-up to clinical and biochemical examinations, and acknowledge the lack of improved survival with early detection. PMID:25232232

  12. Follow-up after gastrectomy for cancer: results of an international web round table.

    PubMed

    Baiocchi, Gian Luca; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Marrelli, Daniele; Pacelli, Fabio; Morgagni, Paolo; Roviello, Franco; De Manzoni, Giovanni

    2014-09-14

    Oncological follow-up after radical gastrectomy for cancer still represents a discrepancy in the field, with many retrospective series demonstrating that early diagnosis of recurrence does not result in an improvement in patient survival; yet, many centers with high quality of care still provide routine patient follow-up after surgery by clinical and instrumental controls. This was the topic for a web round table entitled "Rationale and limits of oncological follow-up after gastrectomy for cancer" that was launched one year before the 10(th) International Gastric Cancer Congress. Authors having specific expertise were invited to comment on their previous publications to provide the subject for an open debate. During a three-month-long discussion, 32 authors from 12 countries participated, and 2299 people visited the dedicated web page. Substantial differences emerged between the participants: authors from Japan, South Korea, Italy, Brazil, Germany and France currently engage in instrumental follow-up, whereas authors from Eastern Europe, Peru and India do not, and British and American surgeons practice it in a rather limited manner or in the context of experimental studies. Although endoscopy is still considered useful by most authors, all the authors recognized that computed tomography scanning is the method of choice to detect recurrence; however, many limit follow-up to clinical and biochemical examinations, and acknowledge the lack of improved survival with early detection. PMID:25232232

  13. Improving patient follow-up after inpatient stay

    PubMed Central

    Wimble, Katie; Yeong, Keefai

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Follow-up is a vital part of ongoing patient safety. It allows for subsequent investigations to be checked and acted upon, encourages specialist review of patients and ensures that patients with chronic conditions receive the appropriate secondary care input. This study aims to highlight and quantify current problems with how follow-up arrangements are made within our hospital and provide a suitable solution to ensure that these problems are minimised. 20 sets of clinical notes were analysed for plans of follow-up and then compared with the discharge summaries produced. Hospital computer systems were used to find out which interventions happened, and when, to get the baseline data. A simple follow-up prompt sheet was introduced and a further 20 sets of notes were audited to complete the study. Patient follow-up improved after the introduction of a simple follow-up prompt sheet but highlighted the need for a complete change in the way follow up is arranged at our hospital. There is a need for an online system for requesting follow-up appointments in our hospital. This is vital given the 24 hour environment that we work in with many patients being discharged out of normal working hours. This is currently being discussed with management and we hope that the introduction will be imminent to improve the future safety of all patients.

  14. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 ...FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT...ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 3052.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a)...

  15. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section...Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT...ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a)...

  16. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 41.315 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT...ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 41.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a)...

  17. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 ...FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT...ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 3052.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a)...

  18. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section...Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT...ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a)...

  19. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 41.315 Section...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT...ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 41.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a)...

  20. Factors that influence follow-up after an abnormal mammogram 

    E-print Network

    Copeland, Valerie Anne

    2009-05-15

    The focus of this study was to explore women’s experiences with follow-up after an abnormal mammogram, and factors that influence follow-up. Factors, including health status, found in the cancer screening and treatment literature, are necessary...

  1. The transitioning from trials to extended follow-up studies

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Casper, Anne S.; Sternberg, Alice L.; Holbrook, Janet T.; Jenkins, Gabrielle; Meinert, Curtis L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Investigators may elect to extend follow-up of participants enrolled in a randomized clinical trial after the trial comes to its planned end. The additional follow-up may be initiated to learn about longer term effects of treatments including adverse events, costs related to treatment, or for reasons unrelated to treatment such as to observe the natural course of the disease using the established cohort from the trial. Purpose We examine transitioning from trials to extended follow-up studies when the goal of additional follow-up is to observe longer term treatment effects. Methods We conducted a literature search in selected journals from 2000–2012 to identify trials that extended follow-up for the purpose of studying longer term treatment effects and extracted information on the operational and logistical issues in the transition. We also draw experience from three trials coordinated by the Johns Hopkins Coordinating Centers that made transitions to extended followup: the Alzheimer’s Disease Anti-inflammatory Prevention Trial (ADAPT); Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) trial; and Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP). Results Transitions are not uncommon in multicenter clinical trials, even in trials that continued to the planned end of the trial. Transitioning usually necessitates new participant consents. If study infrastructure is not maintained during the transition, participants will be lost and re-establishing the staff and facilities will be costly. Merging data from the trial and follow-up study can be complicated by changes in data collection measures and schedules. Limitations Our discussion and recommendations are limited to issues that we have experienced in transitions from trials to follow-up studies. Discussion We discuss issues such as maintaining funding, IRB and consent requirements, contacting participants, and combining data from the trial and follow-up phases. We conclude with a list of recommendations to facilitate transitions from a trial to an extended follow-up study. PMID:25115882

  2. Long term follow up after inhalation of foreign bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, H; Gordon, I; Matthew, D J; Helms, P; Kenney, I J; Lutkin, J E; Lenney, W

    1990-01-01

    The long term results of treatment of inhalation of foreign bodies in a district children's hospital and in a tertiary referral centre were reviewed by clinical assessment, chest radiography, and standard four view 81mKr ventilation/99mTc macroaggregated albumin perfusion imaging (V/Q lung scan). The overall incidence in the population served by the district hospital was roughly one in 14,000/year. Of the 12 children reviewed there, three had abnormal chest radiographs and four had abnormal V/Q scans as a result of inhalation of the foreign bodies. Of 21 children treated and reviewed at the referral centre, eight had abnormal chest radiographs, and 14 had abnormal V/Q lung scans. Three factors were assessed for prognostic importance: site of impaction, initial radiographic appearance, and time before removal. A child who had inhaled a foreign body into the left lung and who had collapse/consolidation on the initial chest radiograph was at greatest risk of long term complications. These children merit close follow up. PMID:2378520

  3. [Follow-up after radiotherapy of anal canal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Meillan, N; Huguet, F; Peiffert, D

    2015-10-01

    Anal canal carcinoma is a rare and curable disease for which the standard of care is radiation therapy with concurrent 5-fluoro-uracil and mitomycine-based chemotherapy. Post-treatment follow-up however is rather poorly defined. This article offers a review of the various post-treatment surveillance options both for early diagnosis of relapse and care for late treatment effects. While follow-up remains mostly clinical, we will discuss morphologic (endorectal echoendoscopy, pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, tomodensitometry and positron emission tomography) and biologic (squamous cell carcinoma antigen and pathology) follow-up so as to determine their diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:26323891

  4. Surgery Patients Like Online Follow-Up, Study Finds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154881.html Surgery Patients Like Online Follow-up, Study Finds But sometimes ... over in-person care by a majority of patients who have routine, uncomplicated surgery, a new study ...

  5. Short-Term Follow-Up of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, June; Jabara, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    A follow-up questionnaire was mailed to 144 narcotic addict veterans approximately six months after termination from treatment at a multimodality drug program. It was found that 75 percent continued to use drugs, and 38 percent became readdicted. (Author)

  6. Popularity of less frequent follow up for breast cancer in randomised study: initial findings from the hotline study.

    PubMed Central

    Gulliford, T.; Opomu, M.; Wilson, E.; Hanham, I.; Epstein, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the experiences of patients with breast cancer who were conventionally monitored with those in whom routine follow up was restricted to the time of mammography. DESIGN: Randomisation to conventional schedule of clinic visits or to visits only after mammography. Both cohorts received identical mammography and were invited to telephone for immediate appointments if they detected symptoms. SETTING: Combined breast clinic, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital. SUBJECTS: 211 eligible outpatients with a history of breast cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Acceptability of randomisation, interim use of telephone and general practitioner, satisfaction with allocation to follow up. RESULTS: Of 211 eligible patients, 196 (93%) opted for randomisation in the study. Of these, 55 were under 50 years, 78 were diagnosed fewer than five years before, 90 had stage T2-4 tumours, and 71 had involved axillary nodes. Patients who did not participate were more likely to be under 50 years, to be two to five years after diagnosis, and to have had aggressive primary disease. Twice as many patients in both groups expressed a preference for reducing rather than increasing follow up. No increased use of local practitioner services or telephone triage was apparent in the cohort randomised to less frequent follow up by specialists. CONCLUSIONS: Reducing the frequency of routine follow up has so far proved popular among patients with breast cancer at standard risk in this cohort. A multicentre study is needed to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of routine follow up with respect to disease outcomes. PMID:9022429

  7. Long-Term Follow-Up Post-Cryosurgery in a Sheep Breast Model1 Yoed Rabin,*,

    E-print Network

    Rabin, Yoed

    Long-Term Follow-Up Post-Cryosurgery in a Sheep Breast Model1 Yoed Rabin,*, ,2 Thomas B. Julian. The current study focuses on the long-term follow-up post-cryosurgery in a sheep breast model. Results of this study indicate that the cryotreatment site in a sheep breast model cannot be identified up to 5 months

  8. How are those “lost to follow-up” patients really doing? A compliance comparison in arthroplasty patients

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung Keun; Geller, Jeffrey A; Jr, David A Patrick; Wang, Wenbao; Macaulay, William

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether there is a functional difference between patients who actively follow-up in the office (OFU) and those who are non-compliant with office follow-up visits (NFU). METHODS: We reviewed a consecutive group of 588 patients, who had undergone total joint arthroplasty (TJA), for compliance and functional outcomes at one to two years post-operatively. All patients were given verbal instructions by the primary surgeon to return at one year for routine follow-up visits. Patients that were compliant with the instructions at one year were placed in the OFU cohort, while those who were non-compliant were placed in the NFU cohort. Survey mailings and telephone interviews were utilized to obtain complete follow-up for the cohort. A ?2 test and an unpaired t test were used for comparison of baseline characteristics. Analysis of covariance was used to compare the mean clinical outcomes after controlling for confounding variables. RESULTS: Complete follow-up data was collected on 554 of the 588 total patients (93%), with 75.5% of patients assigned to the OFU cohort and 24.5% assigned to the NFU cohort. We found significant differences between the cohorts with the OFU group having a higher mean age (P = 0.026) and a greater proportion of females (P = 0.041). No significant differences were found in either the SF12 or WOMAC scores at baseline or at 12 mo postoperative. CONCLUSION: Patients who are compliant to routine follow-up visits at one to two years post-operation do not experience better patient reported outcomes than those that are non-compliant. Additionally, after TJA, older women are more likely to be compliant in following surgeon instructions with regard to follow-up office care. PMID:25621220

  9. Long-term results of viscocanalostomy and phacoviscocanalostomy: a twelve-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Gunenc, Uzeyir; Ozturk, Taylan; Arikan, Gul; Kocak, Nilufer

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety results of viscocanalostomy and phacoviscocanalostomy. METHODS The charts of 49 glaucoma patients who underwent viscocanalostomy or phacoviscocanalostomy surgery between February 1999 and August 2004 were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-one eyes of 21 glaucoma patients who underwent filtering procedure with a postoperative follow-up of at least 5y were included in the study. Results of complete ophthalmologic examinations were recorded and statistically analyzed. Long-term surgical outcome was defined as an overall success when intraocular pressure (IOP) was found as ?20 mm Hg with or without antiglaucomatous medication at the last follow-up visit, while it was defined as a complete success when IOP was measured ?20 mm Hg without antiglaucomatous medication. RESULTS Mean age was 68.1±9.6y (range: 32-81y). Mean follow-up time was 101.5±27.3mo (range: 60-144mo). Viscocanalostomy was performed in 8 eyes (25.8%) and phacoviscocanalostomy was performed in 23 eyes (74.2%). The mean preoperative IOP was 23.1±7.6 mm Hg with 2.1±1.0 medications, while mean IOP was 16.8±3.8 mm Hg with 0.9±1.1 medication at the last follow-up visit. Both the IOP decrease and the reduction in the antiglaucomatous medication were statistically significant (P<0.001 and P<0.001). No case required further glaucoma surgery. Overall success and complete success were found as 87.1% and 51.6%, respectively. Complete success rate was statistically higher in phacoviscocanalostomy group compared with the viscocanalostomy group (P=0.031), however there was no significant difference in overall success rate between two groups (P=0.072). CONCLUSION Both viscocanalostomy and phacoviscocanalostomy provide good IOP reduction in the long-term period. PMID:26682166

  10. A delay differential equation model for dengue transmission with regular visits to a mosquito breeding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaacob, Y.; Yeak, S. H.; Lim, R. S.; Soewono, E.

    2015-03-01

    Dengue disease has been known as one of widely transmitted vector-borne diseases which potentially affects millions of people throughout the world especially in tropical and sub-tropical countries. One of the main factors contributing in the complication of the transmission process is the mobility of people in which people may get infection in the places far from their home. Here we construct a delay differential equation model for dengue transmission in a closed population where regular visits of people to a mosquito breeding site out of their residency such as traditional market take place daily. Basic reproductive ratio of the system is obtained and depends on the ratio between the outgoing rates of susceptible human and infective human. It is shown that the increase of mobility with different variation of mobility rates may contribute to different level of basic reproductive ratio as well as different level of outbreaks.

  11. Linking Outdoor School with the Home Environment. A Follow-Up Resource Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Wallace H.; Gilfillan, Warren C.

    A source of ideas and direction for follow-up to the Multnomah County Outdoor School program, the guide identifies concepts generally common to all outdoor school sites from year to year: the water cycle; watershed; water as a habitat for plants and animals, an oxygen supplier, and a producer of usable power; sun energy; plants as producers and…

  12. [Post-occupational medical follow-up: stakes, terms, obstacles].

    PubMed

    Krief, Peggy; Andujar, Pascal; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2014-03-01

    The number of new cancers attributable to occupational exposure each year in France is estimated to be 20000, and about 25% of retired men have been occupationally exposed to asbestos, and 8% to wood dust. Since 1995, a post-occupational medical follow-up exists for people, inactive, unemployed or (pre-) retired, who during their employment were exposed to some pneumoconiosis-causing agents and/or carcinogens occupational. This system is little known and underused. The obstacles to this follow-up are multiple and complex. The main is the lack of information of the various participants in the process (employees, former employees, physicians, employers) but the outlook is optimistic. Strengthening ties between generalist practitioners and occupational physicians are needed to improve the efficiency of post-occupational medical follow-up. PMID:24851374

  13. Outpatient Follow-up and Secondary Prevention for Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Ryan G.; Jensen, Daniel; Suarez, Andrea L.; Hanson, Anne H.; McLaughlin, Lauren; Duke, Jodi; Dellavalle, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Health care providers and their patients jointly participate in melanoma prevention, surveillance, diagnosis, and treatment. This paper reviews screening and follow-up strategies for patients who have been diagnosed with melanoma, based on current available evidence, and focuses on methods to assess disease recurrence and second primary occurrence. Secondary prevention, including the roles of behavioral modification and chemoprevention are also reviewed. The role of follow-up dermatologist consultation, with focused physical examinations complemented by dermatoscopy, reflectance confocal microscopy, and/or full-body mapping is discussed. Furthermore, we address the inclusion of routine imaging and laboratory assessment as components of follow-up and monitoring of advanced stage melanoma. The role of physicians in addressing the psychosocial stresses associated with a diagnosis of melanoma is reviewed. PMID:24281112

  14. Go ahead, visit those web sites, you can`t get hurt, can you?

    SciTech Connect

    Rothfuss, J.S.; Parrett, J.W.

    1997-02-01

    Browsing (surfing) the World Wide Web (the web) has exploded onto the Internet with an unprecedented popularity. Fueled by massive acceptance, the web client/server technology is leaping forward with a speed that competes with no other software technology. The primary force behind this phenomenon is the simplicity of the web browsing experience. People who have never touched a computer before can now perform sophisticated network tasks with a simple point-and-click. Unfortunately, this simplicity gives many, if not most, web wanderers the impression that the web browser is risk free, nothing more than a high powered television. This misconception is dangerous by creating the myth that a user visiting a web site is immune from subversive or malicious intent. While many want you to believe that surfing the web is as simple as using any other household appliance, it is not like surfing television channels, it is bi-directional. You can learn a lot of useful information from web sites. But, either directly or indirectly, others can also learn quite a bit about you. Of even more concern is a web sites` potential ability to exert control over the local computer. This paper tries to consolidate some of the current concerns that you should consider as you jump into the surf.

  15. Natural history of herpes zoster: late follow-up of 3.9 years (n=43) and 7.7 years (n=10).

    PubMed

    Reda, Haatem; Greene, Kaitlin; Rice, Frank L; Rowbotham, Michael C; Petersen, Karin L

    2013-10-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a common complication after herpes zoster (HZ). Subjects who completed a longitudinal observational 6-month study (4 visits) of the natural history of HZ were recontacted for 2 additional follow-up visits that included pain and sensory symptom assessment, quantitative sensory testing, capsaicin response test, and 3-mm punch skin biopsies in HZ-affected, mirror-image, and control skin sites. Forty-three subjects (14 with PHN at 6 months) of the original 94 subjects in the cohort were comprehensively assessed at a median 3.9 years after HZ onset (visit 5), and 10 subjects underwent a final assessment at a median 7.7 years after HZ onset (visit 6). At 3.9 years, none of the 29 subjects who had been pain free at 6 months had a recurrence of pain. Only 2 of the 14 subjects with PHN at 6 months still had pain at 3.9 years. One subject with PHN at 6 months was free of symptoms at 3.9 years but had very mild pain at 7.7 years. Sensory function continued on a path toward normalization, but was still abnormal in many subjects, especially those who met criteria for PHN at 6 months. Even at 7.7 years, reinnervation of HZ-affected skin was not apparent. PMID:23719573

  16. Impact of on-site initiation visits on patient recruitment and data quality in a randomized trial of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    International Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Guidelines and Regulations require monitoring of clinical trial centers but leave monitoring frequency and intensity to the discretion of the trial sponsor. On-site initiation visits and regular visits to monitor activity at multiple clinical trial centers are labor-intensive and expensive. Study findings did not provide evidence that such visits contribute to patient recruitment.

  17. Metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty - five- to 11-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Vassilios S; Petit, Alain; Debiparshad, Kevin; Huk, Olga L; Zukor, David J; Antoniou, John

    2011-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been introduced in an attempt to reduce the wear rate and the consequent osteolysis around implants. The aim of this study was to present the intermediate to long-term clinical and radiological outcomes and to investigate the metal ion levels in the blood of patients who had undergone primary uncemented MoM THA in our institution. Between July 1997 and November 2003, 166 patients (193 hips), with a mean age of 50 years (range, 18-65 years), underwent primary MoM THA. Clinical data, radiographs, and blood samples were obtained at regular follow-up visits. Cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), and molybdenum (Mo) ions were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) from the patient's whole blood. All patients were prospectively followed for a minimum of 5 years (mean, 7 years; range, 5-11 years). The mean Harris hip score (HHS) and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) activity score at the latest follow-up was 88 ± 11 and 7 ± 1.8 points, respectively. Thirteen hips have been revised. Ten acetabular components had early failure, due to factory manufacturing problems. All other implants have been found stable, with no signs of aseptic loosening. The probability of survival at 11 years, if the hips that were revised due to manufacturing problems were excluded, was 98.4%. The Co and Cr metal ion levels, after increasing significantly during the first 4 to 5 years post-surgery, remained stable, with a tendency to decrease thereafter, but not significantly. During the same follow-up period, Mo ion levels remained stable. In this 5-to-11 year follow-up study of MoM THA patients, excellent survivorship, with low complications rates, was found. Results of longer follow-up studies are necessary to clarify the possible long-term effects of metal ion release. PMID:22035490

  18. Observational Follow-up Study on a Cohort of Children with Severe Pneumonia after Discharge from a Day-care Clinic in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nur H.; Chisti, Mohammod J.; Salam, Mohammed A.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gyr, Niklaus

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Compliance, morbidity, mortality, and hospitalization during fortnightly follow-up were evaluated by an observational study on a cohort of children with severe and very severe pneumonia after day-care treatment at an urban clinic. The primary outcome measures were proportions of success (compliance) and failure (non-compliance) of follow-up visits at the day-care clinic. In total, 251 children were followed up, with median (IQR) age of 5.0 (3.0-9.0) months, and their compliance dropped from 92% at the first to 85% at the sixth visit. Cough (28%), fever (20%), and rapid breathing (13%) were common morbidities. Successful follow-up visits were possible in 180 (95.2%) and 56 (90.3%) of the children with severe and very severe pneumonia respectively. Eleven (4.4%) needed hospitalization, and four (1.6%) died. Majority (?90%) of the children could be successfully followed up; some failed to attend their scheduled follow-up visits due to hospitalization and death. The common morbidities indicate the importance of follow-up for detecting medical problems and early treatment, thus reducing risk of death. PMID:25076656

  19. Extended Follow-Up | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI supports the continued follow-up of participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) to strengthen the PLCO as a valuable resource for molecular epidemiologic research as well as provide long-term data on the trial’s primary endpoints.

  20. 1982-83 Graduate Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nienkamp, Roger L.

    In fall 1983, a follow-up study was conducted of all 1982-83 graduates of St. Louis Community College at Forest Park. Questionnaires were sent to 610 graduates of transfer programs and 1- and 2-year career programs soliciting information on graduates' current location, employment status, postsecondary educational experiences, reactions to the…

  1. Employer Follow-Up Study: North Carolina Community College System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allred, Marcus D.; Wingfield, Julian C., Jr.

    A follow-up study was conducted by the North Carolina Department of Community Colleges in summer 1981 to obtain employer evaluations of the performance of occupational curriculum students who were enrolled in college in the 1979-80 school year, but did not return in 1980-81. Drawing from employment information obtained during the first statewide…

  2. Brevard District Plan for Placement and Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Olive W.

    The Brevard District Plan for placement and follow-up is intended for all secondary students, including dropouts, disadvantaged, adult students, and graduates. The areas of placement may be in gainful employment, educational institutions, or a combination of both. The plan specifies procedures for implementing placement and stipulates the type of…

  3. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  4. Trident Technical College 1999 Graduate Follow-Up Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1999 graduate follow-up survey report. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job satisfaction, job…

  5. Three Year Follow-Up of 1974 Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Mary Kathryne

    To evaluate the long-term benefits of attendance at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC), a three-year follow-up study was conducted of the 620 1974 graduates (324 transfer and 296 occupational students). Each graduate was sent a questionnaire collecting information on involvement with MVCC after graduation, present educational status,…

  6. Wide Angle Mobility Light (WAML) Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shull, L. E.; Kuyk, T.

    1990-01-01

    A follow-up study of an earlier report on the Wide Angle Mobility Light (WAML) was conducted to analyze the various applications of the device and its reliability. Results indicate high client satisfaction with WAML among test subjects (26 blind male veterans with night blindness, age 32 to 68). (Author/PB)

  7. Matching Methods for Selection of Participants for Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Lalongo, Nicholas S.

    2010-01-01

    This work examines ways to make the best use of limited resources when selecting individuals to follow up in a longitudinal study estimating causal effects. In the setting under consideration, covariate information is available for all individuals but outcomes have not yet been collected and may be expensive to gather, and thus only a subset of…

  8. Clouston Syndrome: 25-year follow-up of a patient*

    PubMed Central

    Trídico, Lívia Arroyo; Antonio, João Roberto; Pozetti, Eurides Maria de Oliveira; Rosa, Ana Maria Mendes; Antonio, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Clouston syndrome is a rare genodermatosis that affects skin and annexes. It is a form of ectodermal dysplasia characterized by generalized hypotrichosis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and nail dystrophy. This paper reports a 25-year follow-up of a patient with Clouston syndrome, from childhood to adulthood, monitoring diagnosis and clinical course of the disease.

  9. Arkansas Youth Opportunities Unlimited Follow-up. Final

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmiller, Georgine; Duncan, Lisa Bergeron

    The follow-up component of the Youth Opportunities Unlimited (YOU) program tracked students who graduated from YOU programs. Each participating university--Arkansas State, Henderson State, Southern Arkansas, University of Arkansas-Monticello, University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff, and University of the Ozarks--maintained contact with its own…

  10. Trident Technical College 1998 Graduate Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1998 graduate follow-up survey report of 915 TTC graduates. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job were obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job…

  11. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Notwithstanding any other provision of this part, the Administrator may authorize the use of other media besides first-class mail for a follow-up notification. [60 FR 17272, Apr. 5, 1995, as amended at 68 FR 18142, Apr. 15,...

  12. Cleft lip and palate surgery: 30 years follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Cesar A.

    2012-01-01

    Ten cleft lip and palate patients with complete unilateral (five patients) and bilateral (five patients) clefts were treated by a multidisciplinary team integrated by psychologists, surgeons, orthodontists, prosthodontists, pediatric dentists, and speech pathologists, to obtain ideal soft tissue and hard tissue continuity, facial symmetry, functional and esthetic dentitions, excellent nasal architecture, subtle, and hidden lip scars. No hypernasality and adequate social adaptation were found in the 30 years follow-up (20-30 years follow-up with an average of 25.5 years). The patients were treated in a pro-active fashion avoiding complications and related problems, executing the ideal surgical, dental, and speech therapy plan, based on a close follow-up over the entire period. Those patients treated at the right time required less surgeries and less salvaging maneuvers and presented complete dentitions with less dental prosthesis or dental implants and stable occlusions, than those who missed the ideal dental and surgical treatment opportunities. The focus of this article is the need of a close long-term follow-up to ensure an ideal patient's quality of life. PMID:23483117

  13. Factors Associated with Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Laura J.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Wordlaw-Stintson, Lashawn; Vidal, Adriana; Smith, Jennifer S.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding the gaps in knowledge about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, transmission, and health consequences and factors associated with the knowledge gap is an essential first step for the development of interventions to improve adherence to follow-up among women with abnormal Pap smears. Purpose: To examine the relationship…

  14. FOLLOW UP STUDY OF CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Follow-Up Study involves locating and interviewing a group of young adults who, as 10-year-old children, were included in the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Study, an investigation of the prevalence and risk factors for developmental disabilities that was con...

  15. A Follow-up Study: The Registered Nurses Program, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondwros, Jerry M.

    Twenty-seven (77.1%) of the thirty-five 1977 graduates of the South Georgia Colleges' Division of Nursing responded to a follow-up survey, producing the following information: (1) 17 were employed full-time, two were employed part-time, and eight were unemployed; (2) 88.9% agreed they were prepared adequately for the state board examination; (3)…

  16. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  17. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  18. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  19. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  20. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  1. The University of Wyoming GRB Afterglow Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, S. L.; Norris, J. P.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Pierce, M.; Canterna, R.

    2004-09-01

    As the Swift era approaches, the University of Wyoming in Laramie has been preparing its two observatories for a robust GRB afterglow follow-up program. The 2.3-m Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO) - first of its kind in collecting power and mid-infrared optimization - is located on Jelm Mt. (2944-m elevation) in a semi-arid atmosphere, 40 km southwest of Laramie. On dry, cold winter nights, our estimates show that WIRO's sensitivity in the K-band is comparable to that of a 4-m telescope at Mauna Kea observatory in Hawaii. Three instruments are currently in use at the observatory: WIRO-Prime, WIRO-Spec, and the Goddard IR camera. WIRO-Prime is a 20482 prime-focus camera with a 20 arcmin diameter FOV (f/2.1). Its sensitivity for a 300-s exposure will reach as faint as 24th (23rd) magnitude in V (R). WIRO-Spec is an integral field, holographic spectrometer which utilizes Volume-Phase-Holographic gratings with a 20482 detector. A bundle of 293 fiber optical cables (1 fiber ~ 1 arcsec) connects the Cassegrain platform to the stationary spectrometer, optimizing the image by reduction from f/27 to f/9. At 20th magnitude, a 700-s exposure yields a S/N ratio of ~ 10 at a resolution of ~ 1 Angstrom, sufficient for resolving the MgII doublet [279.8 nm] in GRB host galaxies to determine a 0.4 < z < 2.5 for an operational wavelength range of ~ 400-1000 nm (WIRO-Prime and WIRO-Spec). The Goddard IR Camera is a 2562 InSb camera (FOV ~ 108 arcsec) mounted at Cassegrain and operated at 15K. Available filters for GRB observations include R, I, J, H, and K'. WIRO slew timescale (~ 120 s) is comparable to that of Swift. Red Buttes Observatory (RBO) is located 19 km south of Laramie in a dark site and houses a 0.6-m f/8 Cassegrain DFM reflector. RBO's Apogee AP8p 10242 camera (18 arcmin FOV, sufficiently large for BAT localizations) is available for use with filters U, B, V, R and I. We are in the final stages of implementing fully automated response to Swift BAT alerts at RBO, and expect an average acquisition timescale to random sky positions of ~ 25 s. Thus, rapid GRB detections by RBO can be forwarded to WIRO even while Swift's pointed instruments are performing first integrations.

  2. Follow-up treatment utilization by hospitalized suicidal adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yen, Shirley; Fuller, Anne K; Solomon, Joel; Spirito, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    This study examines treatment utilization in a sample of 99 adolescents who were psychiatrically hospitalized due to a risk of suicide and followed for 6 months. Descriptive information regarding participants' use of various forms of outpatient and intensive treatment, including emergency, inpatient, and residential care is presented. In addition, the relationships between utilization of mental health services and various characteristics of the adolescents and their families were assessed. Overall treatment engagement was high, with 78 participants (79%) receiving some care for the duration of the follow-up period and 91 (92%) participating in at least one session of outpatient treatment, although the extent of utilization was highly variable. In addition, 28 participants (28%) were rehospitalized during follow-up. Both family and individual characteristics were associated with differences in adolescents' participation in follow-up treatment. Specifically, adolescents with a family history of mood disorders were more likely to participate in outpatient treatment and less likely to require intensive treatments. Conversely, more impaired baseline functioning and suicide attempts during the follow-up period were associated with greater utilization of intensive treatments and less utilization of outpatient therapy. Given that 19 participants (19%) in our sample attempted suicide during the follow-up interval, the findings of this study suggest that, in spite of high rates of outpatient treatment engagement, rates of suicide attempts and use of intensive treatment services remain high. These results suggest the need for improved outpatient care, as well as possibly longer inpatient stays and more elaborate discharge and transition planning. PMID:25226196

  3. Hepatocellular carcinoma after ablation: the imaging follow-up scheme.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin-Na; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei

    2013-02-14

    Percutaneous ablation using thermal or chemical methods has been widely used in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Nowadays, contrast-enhanced imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) are widely used to evaluate local treatment response after ablation therapies. CEUS is gaining increasing attention due to its characteristics including real-time scanning, easy performance, lack of radiation, wide availability, and lack of allergy reactions. Several studies have documented that CEUS is comparable to CT or MRI in evaluating local treatment efficacy within 1 mo of treatment. However, little information is available regarding the role of CEUS in the follow-up assessment after first successful ablation treatment. Zheng et al found that in comparison with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT), the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and overall accuracy of CEUS in detecting local tumor progression (LTP) were 67.5%, 97.4%, 81.8%, 94.4% and 92.3%, respectively, and were 77.7%, 92.0%, 92.4%, 76.7% and 84.0%, respectively for the detection of new intrahepatic recurrence. They concluded that the sensitivity of CEUS in detecting LTP and new intrahepatic recurrence after ablation is relatively low in comparison with CECT, and CEUS cannot replace CECT in the follow-up assessment after percutaneous ablation for HCC. These results are meaningful and instructive, and indicated that in the follow-up period, the use of CEUS alone is not sufficient. In this commentary, we discuss the discordance between CT and CEUS, as well as the underlying mechanisms involved. We propose the combined use of CT and CEUS which will reduce false positive and negative results in both modalities. We also discuss future issues, such as an evidence-based ideal imaging follow-up scheme, and a cost-effectiveness analysis of this imaging follow-up scheme. PMID:23429970

  4. Homeless Families with Children: Programmatic Responses of Five Communities. Volume II: Site Visit Reports and Program Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macro Systems, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    An exploratory study was conducted to examine the ways in which existing programs or service delivery systems have adapted to meet the needs of homeless families with children. Key issues and model and innovative approaches were identified prior to study site visits in five cities: (1) Atlanta (Georgia); (2) Baltimore (Maryland); (3) Boston…

  5. 76 FR 51022 - Juneau Hydropower, Inc.; Notice of Scoping Meeting and Site Visit and Soliciting Scoping Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Juneau Hydropower, Inc.; Notice of Scoping Meeting and Site Visit and.... Applicant: Juneau Hydropower, Inc. d. Name of Project: Sweetheart Lake Hydroelectric Project. e....

  6. A Study of Program Management Procedures in the Campus-Based and Basic Grant Programs. Site Visit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Richard, Ed.; Puma, Michael, Ed.

    Site visits to a sample of 173 colleges, universities, vocational-technical schools, and other postsecondary institutions--conducted to examine the procedures used to manage federal Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) and campus-based student financial assistance programs--are summarized. This report deals only with the conduct of the…

  7. 76 FR 38383 - Albany Engineering Corporation, Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Notice of Site Visit and Technical Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Albany Engineering Corporation, Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Notice of Site Visit and Technical Meeting On July 12, 2011, Office of Energy Projects staff will participate in a...

  8. Data Management and Site-Visit Monitoring of the Multi-Center Registry in the Korean Neonatal Network

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Won

    2015-01-01

    The Korean Neonatal Network (KNN), a nationwide prospective registry of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW, < 1,500 g at birth) infants, was launched in April 2013. Data management (DM) and site-visit monitoring (SVM) were crucial in ensuring the quality of the data collected from 55 participating hospitals across the country on 116 clinical variables. We describe the processes and results of DM and SVM performed during the establishment stage of the registry. The DM procedure included automated proof checks, electronic data validation, query creation, query resolution, and revalidation of the corrected data. SVM included SVM team organization, identification of unregistered cases, source document verification, and post-visit report production. By March 31, 2015, 4,063 VLBW infants were registered and 1,693 queries were produced. Of these, 1,629 queries were resolved and 64 queries remain unresolved. By November 28, 2014, 52 participating hospitals were visited, with 136 site-visits completed since April 2013. Each participating hospital was visited biannually. DM and SVM were performed to ensure the quality of the data collected for the KNN registry. Our experience with DM and SVM can be applied for similar multi-center registries with large numbers of participating centers. PMID:26566353

  9. Data Management and Site-Visit Monitoring of the Multi-Center Registry in the Korean Neonatal Network.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Won; Park, Moon Sung

    2015-10-01

    The Korean Neonatal Network (KNN), a nationwide prospective registry of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW, < 1,500 g at birth) infants, was launched in April 2013. Data management (DM) and site-visit monitoring (SVM) were crucial in ensuring the quality of the data collected from 55 participating hospitals across the country on 116 clinical variables. We describe the processes and results of DM and SVM performed during the establishment stage of the registry. The DM procedure included automated proof checks, electronic data validation, query creation, query resolution, and revalidation of the corrected data. SVM included SVM team organization, identification of unregistered cases, source document verification, and post-visit report production. By March 31, 2015, 4,063 VLBW infants were registered and 1,693 queries were produced. Of these, 1,629 queries were resolved and 64 queries remain unresolved. By November 28, 2014, 52 participating hospitals were visited, with 136 site-visits completed since April 2013. Each participating hospital was visited biannually. DM and SVM were performed to ensure the quality of the data collected for the KNN registry. Our experience with DM and SVM can be applied for similar multi-center registries with large numbers of participating centers. PMID:26566353

  10. Representative Sampling: Follow-up of Spring 1972 and Spring 1973 Students. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Larry; And Others

    This report presents the findings of a research study, conducted by the College of the Mainland (COM) as a subcontractor for Project FOLLOW-UP, designed to test the accuracy of random sampling and to measure non-response bias in mail surveys. In 1975, a computer-generated random sample of 500 students was drawn from a population of 1,256 students…

  11. KLENOT Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Milos; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal; Tichy, Milos

    2015-08-01

    Near Earth Object (NEO) research is important not only as a great challenge for science but also as an important challenge for planetary defense. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind.The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of NEOs since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO distribution. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008.The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013.The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation.Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry.The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. More than 8000 of minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to February 2015.The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have the large potential to contribute to recent NEO efforts.Since October 2014 the KLENOT Project has been a part of European Space Agency Space Systém Awareness Programme (ESA-SSA) - NEO Segment - Cooperating Sensors.

  12. Macular auto-fluorescence is a follow-up parameter for cystoids macular edema.

    PubMed

    Zhang, XinYuan; Gong, XiaoHong; Wang, YanHong; Wang, NingLi

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate if macular autofluorescence (MAF) is a valuable, non-invasive follow-up parameter for cystoid macular edema. A total of 71 eyes (71 cases) with cystoid macular edema (CME) were included in the study. Macular pigment (MP) was evaluated using HRA2 (infrared) IF and FA models. The density of MP was graded into three categories: without, partial, and normal amount of MP. A comparison was made between the baseline (before the first administration) level and at the fourth month, following three consecutive intravitreal lucentis injections every month. The morphology and distribution of MAF, and the density and distribution of MP were regarded as the main outcome measures. At the baseline visit, all eyes with CME had petaloid/irregular-shaped MAF in the macular area (100%). No MAF was detected in the control eyes (0). There was significant difference in MAF between the CME and normal groups (P=0.000). At the fourth monthly visit, normal levels of MP density without MAF was detected in 68 eyes (95.8%) with the best corrected spectacular visual acuity increasing to at least 1 line accordingly. We conclude that macular MAF can be used as a follow-up parameter for patients with CME. MP and MAF can indirectly reflect the fovea cone function. PMID:26187408

  13. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  14. Benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis--25 years of follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Putterman, C.; Keidar, S.; Brook, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Only 70 cases of recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis have been reported in the literature since the original description of this entity in 1959. The benign nature of the disease has been questioned, some authors suggesting progression to biliary cirrhosis. We report our follow-up of one such patient for over 25 years with no adverse physical consequences or histological deterioration. Sequential liver biopsies were obtained during this period. A conservative approach to diagnosis and treatment is therefore indicated. PMID:3684838

  15. Paediatrician office follow-up of common minor fractures

    PubMed Central

    Koelink, Eric; Boutis, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that minor paediatric fractures can be followed by primary care paediatricians (PCPs). OBJECTIVES: To determine PCP opinions, knowledge and perceived barriers to managing minor paediatric fractures in the office. METHODS: An online survey was sent between June and September 2013 to all paediatricians who subscribed to the American Academy of Pediatrics PROS-Net Listerv and to those who were registered with the Scott’s Canadian Medical Directory as paediatricians who treated children in a primary care capacity. The primary outcome was the proportion of PCPs who agreed with PCP follow-up of minor paediatric fractures. Secondary outcomes included PCP’s perceived barriers to office follow-up. RESULTS: A total of 1752 surveys were sent; 1235 were eligible and 459 (37.2%) responded to the survey. Overall, 296 (69.5% [95% CI 65.2% to 74.0%]) PCPs agreed that minor paediatric fractures could be followed in a PCP office. The most frequently reported barriers were lack of materials to replace immobilization (58.1%), PCP knowledge deficits (44.8%) and a perceived parental preference for an orthopedic surgeon (38.6%). Finally, 58.8% of respondents believed that further education was necessary if PCPs assumed responsibility for follow-up of midshaft clavicle fractures, while 66.5% and 77.1% (P<0.0001) believed this was necessary for distal radius buckle and fibular fractures, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: More than two-thirds of responding PCPs in Canada and the United States agreed that minor common paediatric fractures can be followed-up by paediatricians. However, PCPs reported some barriers to this management strategy, including a desire for more education on this topic. PMID:25382996

  16. A follow-up study of attempted railway suicides.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, I; Arthur, A J; Farmer, R D

    1994-02-01

    This paper reports the subsequent mortality of 94 persons who attempted suicide by jumping in front of London Underground trains between 1977 and 1979. The follow-up period was 10 yr. Despite the apparent seriousness of the method, completion of suicide was not found to be higher than in previous studies of attempted suicide by other methods. By the end of the follow-up period 18 persons had died, nine of natural causes. Coroners' inquests were held for the unnatural deaths. Seven verdicts of suicide and two of accidental death were recorded. Of the nine unnatural deaths four were from multiple injuries, three from drowning, one from asphyxia and one from acute narcotic poisoning. All four multiple injury deaths were women, three of these were from repeated incidents involving London Underground trains. The time interval between the index attempt and eventual death for the suicide/accident group ranged from 1 day to 43 months. For ethical reasons it was not possible to follow-up attempted suicides who were presumed to have remained alive. PMID:8153748

  17. A comparative resident site visit project: a novel approach for implementing programmatic change in the duty hours era.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Matthew J; Barkauskas, Christina E; Srygley, F Douglas; Kransdorf, Evan P; LeBlanc, Thomas W; Simel, David L; McNeill, Diana B

    2010-07-01

    The Duke University Medical Center Internal Medicine Residency Program did not reach its anticipated quota of applicants during the 2008 National Residency Matching Program. Post-Match feedback regarding workload prompted an effort to redesign the general medicine service. As part of that effort, Duke program leaders sought to learn how peer programs accommodated Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) regulations. They launched the Resident Site Visit Project (RSVP).In 2008, Duke resident teams visited six other academic internal medicine residency programs based in university hospitals in the eastern United States. They conducted a systematic survey using a standardized questionnaire, interviewed program leaders and residents, and observed workflow directly. The RSVP identified strategies for accommodating ACGME rules in service design and also highlighted challenges shared by all of the programs.Discussion of the shared challenges yielded six core principles that directly guided Duke's general medicine service redesign: emphasize patient safety, reduce resident work compression, create educational opportunities, ensure automatic duty hours compliance, preserve essential program attributes, and involve stakeholders in the process of change.The Duke RSVP is an approach to programmatic change that applies information collected during site visits in defining core principles for program redesign. Collaboration between programs through resident site visits facilitates innovation, creates a foundation for change that increases stakeholder involvement, and generates opportunities for multicenter research. PMID:20592509

  18. Twenty-month follow-up of occlusal carious lesions deemed questionable at baseline

    PubMed Central

    Makhija, Sonia K.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Bader, James D; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Qvist, Vibeke; Nørrisgaard, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Background A questionable occlusal caries (QOC) lesion can be defined as an occlusal surface with no radiographic evidence of caries, but caries is suspected because of clinical appearance. In this study, the authors report the results of a 20-month follow-up of these lesions. Methods Fifty-three clinicians from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network participated in this study, recording lesion characteristics at baseline and lesion status at 20 months. Results At baseline, 1,341 QOC lesions were examined; the treatment that was planned for 1,033 of those at baseline was monitoring (oral hygiene instruction, applying or prescribing fluoride or varnish, or both), and the remaining 308 received a sealant (n = 192) or invasive therapy (n = 116). Of the 1,033 monitored lesions, the clinician continued at the 20-month visit to monitor 927 (90 percent). Clinicians decided to seal 61 (6 percent) of these lesions (mean follow-up, 19 months), and invasively treat 45 (4 percent) of them (mean follow-up, 15 months). Young patient age (< 18 years) (odds ratio = 3.4; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.7–6.8) and the lesion’s being on a molar (odds ratio = 1.8; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.3–2.6) were associated with the clinician’s deciding at some point after follow-up to seal the lesion or treat it invasively. Conclusions Almost all (90 percent) QOC lesions for which the treatment planned at baseline was monitoring still were planned to undergo monitoring after 20 months. This finding suggests that noninvasive management is appropriate for these lesions. Practical Implications Previous study results from baseline indicated a high prevalence for QOC lesions (34 percent). Clinicians should consider long-term monitoring when making treatment decisions about these lesions. PMID:25359642

  19. Profile and follow-up of patients with tuberculosis in a priority city in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jisleny da Cruz; Silva, Marcio Roberto; da Costa, Ronaldo Rodrigues; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cases of tuberculosis and the impact of direct follow-up on the assessment of treatment outcomes. METHODS This open prospective cohort study evaluated 504 cases of tuberculosis reported in the Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação (SINAN – Notifiable Diseases Information System) in Juiz de Fora, MG, Southeastern Brazil, between 2008 and 2009. The incidence of treatment outcomes was compared between a group of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis and directly followed up by monthly consultations during return visits (287) and a patient group for which the information was indirectly collected (217) through the city’s surveillance system. The Chi-square test was used to compare the percentages, with a significance level of 0.05. The relative risk (RR) was used to evaluate the differences in the incidence rate of each type of treatment outcome between the two groups. RESULTS Of the outcomes directly and indirectly evaluated, 18.5% and 3.2% corresponded to treatment default and 3.8% and 0.5% corresponded to treatment failure, respectively. The incidence of treatment default and failure was higher in the group with direct follow-up (p < 0.05) (RR = 5.72, 95%CI 2.65;12.34, and RR = 8.31, 95%CI 1.08;63.92, respectively). CONCLUSIONS A higher incidence of treatment default and failure was observed in the directly followed up group, and most of these cases were neglected by the disease reporting system. Therefore, effective measures are needed to improve the control of tuberculosis and data quality. PMID:25741659

  20. Late recurrences of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) after 5 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Nannini, Margherita; Biasco, Guido; Pallotti, Maria Caterina; Di Battista, Monica; Santini, Donatella; Paterini, Paola; Maleddu, Alessandra; Mandrioli, Anna; Lolli, Cristian; Saponara, Maristella; Di Scioscio, Valerio; Zompatori, Maurizio; Catena, Fausto; Fusaroli, Pietro; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza

    2012-03-01

    In practice, relapses of gastrointestinal stromal tumours after long time of surgical resection occur. However, few published data are available for duration, intensity and imaging sources of follow-up in radically excised patients with localized disease. Therefore, every single institution chooses the surveillance schedule according to its experience. The aim of this study was to describe the late recurrences of disease 5 years after the primary tumour's excision in a series of patients with recurrent GIST from our institution. We retrospectively reviewed 42 patients with "recurrent" GIST, collected since 2001. Ten patients were always followed at our institution, and 32 patients came to our attention at the time of recurrence. The analysed series were divided into two groups: patients who developed recurrence before 5 years and patients who developed recurrence 5 years after the primary tumour's excision. Among 42 patients, 36 patients developed the recurrence within 5 years of the primary tumour excision, whereas 6 patients developed the recurrence 5 years after primary tumour excision diagnosed during follow-up or casually for other reasons. All patients had distant recurrence, involving liver and peritoneum, whereas no local relapse was observed. These patients were heterogeneous in primary tumour site, risk classification and molecular analysis. Duration of the follow-up for radically excised patients with GIST remains still unsettled; however, the integration of every clinical, pathological and molecular parameter is essential to optimize the duration and intensity of the follow-up for each single patient. PMID:21258878

  1. Early-onset schizophrenia: a 15-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Röpcke, Bernd; Eggers, Christian

    2005-09-01

    The study describes the psychopathological and social outcome of patients treated for schizophrenia in adolescence (mean age at onset 16.0 years/SD 1.52) after a mean follow-up period of 15.4 years (10.2-21.2 years). Out of 55 patients consecutively admitted to hospital, 47 (85 %) could be traced and 39 (71 %) could be re-examined. At follow-up, 33/39 patients (85 %) had had at least one readmission. Full remission of global psychopathological symptoms [Clinical Global Impression (CGI) follow-up. Gender, duration of first inpatient treatment and duration of untreated psychosis were of no predictive value for outcome. The nature of the diagnosis in the first episode strongly predicted the diagnosis given for the whole course after 15 years. In 26/37 cases (70 %), diagnosis at onset and overall diagnoses were the same. Our finding of an incidence of 61% insidious onset is similar to that in adult onset schizophrenia (AOS), but different to very early onset schizophrenia (VEOS), which shows a higher rate of insidious onset, cognitive impairment and poor outcome. Therefore, it seems that VEOS is a special group compared with early onset schizophrenia (EOS) and AOS. PMID:16220219

  2. Follow-up problems with fixed appliances in pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Ari, Timucin

    2015-03-01

    Fixed appliances are commonly used in managing early orthodontic problems. Despite their widespread use, they have the potential to impinge on the soft tissues, interfere with the eruption of adjacent teeth and become dislodged or broken. These two case reports present the poor outcomes of fixed appliance treatments if the patient fails to attend follow-up appointments. A successful outcome of treatment with fixed appliances depends upon proper patient selection and the communication skills of the dentist to help patients/parents understand the importance of regular checkups. PMID:25928968

  3. GRBs Optical follow-up observation at Lulin observatory, Taiwan

    E-print Network

    K. Y. Huang; Y. Urata; W. H. Ip; T. Tamagawa; K. Onda; K. Makishima

    2005-06-10

    The Lulin GRB program, using the Lulin One-meter Telescope (LOT) in Taiwan started in July 2003. Its scientific aims are to discover optical counterparts of XRFs and short and long GRBs, then to quickly observe them in multiple bands. Thirteen follow-up observations were provided by LOT between July 2003 and Feb. 2005. One host galaxy was found at GRB 031203. Two optical afterglows were detected for GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. In addition, the optical observations of GRB 031203 and a discussion of the non-detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 031203 are also reported in this article.

  4. Root Resorption a 6-Year Follow-up Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dias, Caroline; Closs, Luciane; Barletta, Fernando; Reston, Eduardo; Tovo, Maximiano F; Lambert, Paula

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical course of a pediatric patient developing cervical external root resorption (CERR). An 11-year old male patient had sustained dental trauma and was diagnosed with crown fracture affecting the incisal and middle thirds of the maxillary right permanent central incisor and the maxillary right permanent lateral incisor with pulp exposure and CERR after 24 months. Diagnosis and treatment of CERR are a challenge for dental practitioners. In this case, preservation of natural dentition is shown as a successful treatment in a 6-year follow-up. PMID:25870717

  5. Root Resorption a 6-Year Follow-up Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Caroline; Closs, Luciane; Barletta, Fernando; Reston, Eduardo; Tovo, Maximiano F; Lambert, Paula

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical course of a pediatric patient developing cervical external root resorption (CERR). An 11-year old male patient had sustained dental trauma and was diagnosed with crown fracture affecting the incisal and middle thirds of the maxillary right permanent central incisor and the maxillary right permanent lateral incisor with pulp exposure and CERR after 24 months. Diagnosis and treatment of CERR are a challenge for dental practitioners. In this case, preservation of natural dentition is shown as a successful treatment in a 6-year follow-up. PMID:25870717

  6. SZ Follow-up of New Planck-Selected Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Gonzalvez, Carmen; Planck Collaboration; Consortium, AMI

    2013-01-01

    The Planck satellite has now surveyed the entire sky more than four times. The nominal mission of two full sky surveys is to be released to the public in early 2013. Hundreds of new cluster candidates are being identified by the Planck collaboration, which will be used to measure the cluster mass function and constrain cosmological parameters. However, achieving the mission's full potential to constrain cosmology depends on identifying spurious cluster candidates and measuring cluster masses accurately, amongst other things. Extensive follow-up of blind detections in the Planck survey and multi-wavelength studies are therefore crucial. We present our initial results on high-resolution SZ follow-up observations with AMI and the SZA instruments of a cluster sample comprising some well-known clusters as well as some new, Planck-selected massive, high-z clusters. We investigate possible biases and discrepancies in the measurements, assess the level of spurious detections and provide the first insight into the dynamical state of the new SZ-selected systems.

  7. The Epping jaundice outbreak: a 24 year follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, A J; Harrington, J M; Waterhouse, J A

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to trace 84 cases of jaundice that occurred following accidental ingestion of methylene dianiline (MDA) in Epping in 1965, and to look at long term health effects. DESIGN--The original case notes of the cases were used to identify the patients. Subsequent tracing procedures included local general practitioners, the Central NHS Registry, electoral rolls, and company records. SETTING--This was a community based survey. MAIN RESULTS--The health status of 68 (81%) of the group was established with 18 deaths. Of the 50 cases known to be alive, 58% completed a health questionnaire. The causes of death were unremarkable except for one case of carcinoma of the biliary tract. Two surviving cases had suffered retinal pathology. Four other surviving cases had had a further, perhaps unrelated, episode of jaundice. CONCLUSIONS--Although the dose and route of administration in the epidemic differed from occupational exposure, this follow up study a generation on provides little, if any, evidence of long term health sequelae. Nevertheless, in the absence of well documented exposure and health effects data, such accidental poisonings with proven animal carcinogens warrant long term follow up. The identified cohort will be the subject of further study. PMID:1431699

  8. Gastric and Duodenal Stents: Follow-Up and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto Pabon, Isabel Teresa; Paul Diaz, Laura; Ruiz de Adana, Juan Carlos; Lopez Herrero, Julio

    2001-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of self-expanding metallic stents in treating inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses during follow-up and to evaluate the complications encountered.Methods: A total of 31 patients suffering from gastroduodenal obstruction (29 malignant, 2 benign) were treated with a self-expanding metallic stent (Wallstent). In 24 cases insertion was by the peroral route, in seven cases via gastrostomy.Results: All the strictures were successfully negotiated under fluoroscopic guidance without having to resort to endoscopy. A total of 27 patients (87%) were able to resume a regular diet, a soft diet, or a liquid diet orally. Complications included one case of stent malpositioning, one case of leakage of ascitic fluid through the gastrostomy orifice, one case of perforation and fistula to the biliary tree, and two cases of hematemesis. In two patients (6%) additional stents were implanted to improve patency. In all patients follow-up was maintained until death. Recurrence of symptoms immediately before death occurred in seven cases (23%). Mean survival time of patients was 13.3 weeks (SE {+-} 4.6).Conclusions: The deployment of gastroduodenal stents resulted in good palliation of inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses. Certain technical aspects, e.g., adaptation of stents to bowel morphology, is critical to proper stent function and avoidance of complications.

  9. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    de ALMEIDA, Renato Rodrigues; de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; OLTRAMARI-NAVARRO, Paula Vanessa Pedron; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; NAVARRO, Ricardo de Lima; de SOUZA, Karen Regina Siqueira

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment. PMID:23032213

  10. Ten-Year Follow-Up of Endovascular Aneurysm Treatment with Talent Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Pitton, Michael B. Scheschkowski, Tobias; Ring, Markus; Herber, Sascha; Oberholzer, Katja; Leicher-Dueber, Annegret; Neufang, Achim; Schmiedt, Walther; Dueber, Christoph

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical results, complications, and secondary interventions during long-term follow-up after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to investigate the impact of endoleak sizes on aneurysm shrinkage. From 1997 to March 2007, 127 patients (12 female, 115 male; age, 73.0 {+-} 7.2 years) with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated with Talent stent-grafts. Follow-up included clinical visits, contrast-enhanced MDCT, and radiographs at 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results were analyzed with respect to clinical outcome, secondary interventions, endoleak rate and management, and change in aneurysm size. There was no need for primary conversion surgery. Thirty-day mortality was 1.6% (two myocardial infarctions). Procedure-related morbidity was 2.4% (paraplegia, partial infarction of one kidney, and inguinal bleeding requiring surgery). Mean follow-up was 47.7 {+-} 34.2 months (range, 0-123 months). Thirty-nine patients died during follow-up; three of the deaths were related to aneurysm (aneurysm rupture due to endoleak, n = 1; secondary surgical reintervention n = 2). During follow-up, a total of 29 secondary procedures were performed in 19 patients, including 14 percutaneous procedures (10 patients) and 15 surgical procedures (12 patients), including 4 cases with late conversion to open aortic repair (stent-graft infection, n = 1; migration, endoleak, or endotension, n = 3). Overall mean survival was 84.5 {+-} 4.7 months. Mean survival and freedom from any event was 66.7 {+-} 4.5 months. MRI depicted significantly more endoleaks compared to MDCT (23.5% vs. 14.3%; P < 0.01). Patients in whom all aneurysm side branches were occluded prior to stent-grafting showed a significantly reduced incidence of large endoleaks. Endoleaks >10% of the aneurysm area were associated with reduced aneurysm shrinkage compared to no endoleaks or <10% endoleaks ({Delta} at 3 years, -1.8% vs. -12.0%; P < 0.05). In conclusion, endovascular aneurysm treatment with Talent stent-grafts demonstrated encouraging long-term results with moderate secondary intervention rates. Primary occlusion of all aortic side branches reduced the incidence of large endoleaks. Large endoleaks significantly impaired aneurysm shrinkage, whereas small endoleaks did not.

  11. Closing the Feedback Loop: An Interactive Voice Response System to Provide Follow-up and Feedback in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Willig, James H.; Krawitz, Marc; Panjamapirom, Anantachai; Ray, Midge N.; Nevin, Christa R.; English, Thomas M.; Cohen, Mark P.; Berner, Eta S.

    2013-01-01

    In primary care settings, follow-up regarding the outcome of acute outpatient visits is largely absent. We sought to develop an automated interactive voice response system (IVRS) for patient follow-up with feedback to providers capable of interfacing with multiple pre-existing electronic medical records (EMRs). A system was designed to extract data from EMRs, integrate with the IVRS, call patients for follow-up, and provide a feedback report to providers. Challenges during the development process were analyzed and summarized. The components of the technological solution and details of its implementation are reported. Lessons learned include: (1) Modular utilization of system components is often needed to adapt to specific clinic workflow and patient population needs (2) Understanding the local telephony environment greatly impacts development and is critical to success, and (3) Ample time for development of the IVRS questionnaire (mapping all branching paths) and speech recognition tuning (sensitivity, use of barge-in tuning, use of “known voice”) is needed. With proper attention to design and development, modular follow-up and feedback systems can be integrated into existing EMR systems providing the benefits of IVRS follow-up to patients and providers across diverse practice settings. PMID:23340825

  12. West Foster Creek 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    A follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the West Foster Creek (Smith acquisition) wildlife mitigation site in May 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance and maintain the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The West Foster Creek 2007 follow-up HEP survey generated 2,981.96 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for a 34% increase (+751.34 HUs) above baseline HU credit (the 1999 baseline HEP survey generated 2,230.62 habitat units or 1.13 HUs per acre). The 2007 follow-up HEP analysis yielded 1,380.26 sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) habitat units, 879.40 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) HUs, and 722.29 western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) habitat units. Mule deer and sharp-tailed grouse habitat units increased by 346.42 HUs and 470.62 HUs respectively over baseline (1999) survey results due largely to cessation of livestock grazing and subsequent passive restoration. In contrast, the western meadowlark generated slightly fewer habitat units in 2007 (-67.31) than in 1999, because of increased shrub cover, which lowers habitat suitability for that species.

  13. Mineral licks: motivational factors for visitation and accompanying disease risk at communal use sites of elk and deer.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Michael J; Phillips, Gregory E; Fischer, Justin W; Burke, Patrick W; Seward, Nathan W; Stahl, Randal S; Nichols, Tracy A; Wunder, Bruce A; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2014-12-01

    Free-ranging cervids acquire most of their essential minerals through forage consumption, though occasionally seek other sources to account for seasonal mineral deficiencies. Mineral sources occur as natural geological deposits (i.e., licks) or as anthropogenic mineral supplements. In both scenarios, these sources commonly serve as focal sites for visitation. We monitored 11 licks in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado, using trail cameras to quantify daily visitation indices (DVI) and soil consumption indices (SCI) for Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) during summer 2006 and documented elk, mule deer, and moose (Alces alces) visiting licks. Additionally, soil samples were collected, and mineral concentrations were compared to discern levels that explain rates of visitation. Relationships between response variables; DVI and SCI, and explanatory variables; elevation class, moisture class, period of study, and concentrations of minerals were examined. We found that DVI and SCI were greatest at two wet, low-elevation licks exhibiting relatively high concentrations of manganese and sodium. Because cervids are known to seek Na from soils, we suggest our observed association of Mn with DVI and SCI was a likely consequence of deer and elk seeking supplemental dietary Na. Additionally, highly utilized licks such as these provide an area of concentrated cervid occupation and interaction, thus increasing risk for environmental transmission of infectious pathogens such as chronic wasting disease, which has been shown to be shed in the saliva, urine, and feces of infected cervids. PMID:24711146

  14. Follow-up of children with early expressive phonology disorders.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B A; Freebairn, L A; Taylor, H G

    2000-01-01

    Fifty-two children identified at age 4 to 6 years as demonstrating a moderate to severe expressive phonology disorder were followed to the third and fourth grades. Children were classified into two groups based on the presence of an early phonology disorder in isolation (P) or the presence of a phonology disorder with other language problems (PL). At follow-up, articulation measures failed to differentiate the groups; however, the PL group performed more poorly than the P group on measures of phoneme awareness, language, reading decoding, reading comprehension, and spelling. The P group demonstrated poor spelling skills relative to their reading and language abilities, suggesting residual spelling weaknesses in these children. The PL group reported more nuclear family members with speech-language disorders and with reading disorders than the P group. Findings support previous research linking early language disorders with later reading difficulties. PMID:15495546

  15. Gender identity change in transsexuals. Follow-up and replications.

    PubMed

    Barlow, D H; Abel, G G; Blanchard, E B

    1979-08-01

    An apparently successful change in gender identity of an adolescent transsexual was reported several years ago. Gender-specific motor behavior, appropriate sex role social behavior, cognitive sexual activity, and finally sexual arousal patterns were defined, measured, and sequentially modified. In this report, a 6 1/2-year follow-up is presented and the application of a similar therapeutic package to two additional cases is described. In the first case, sweeping changes in gender identity, sex-role behavior, and sexual arousal patterns were observed. In the second of these cases, rigid feminine gender was given up, but the patient chose to retain homosexual arousal. Social adaptation was satisfactory. These findings and other recent developments point to the possibility of psychosocial intervention as an alternative to surgery in the treatment of transsexualism. PMID:464738

  16. [Polysomnographic follow-up of sleep apneas after uvulopalatopharyngoplasty].

    PubMed

    Reimão, R; Lemmi, H; Akiskal, H; Cocke, E

    1985-12-01

    Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) was performed in 12 patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Pre-surgical clinical and polysomnographic data were compared with those one to three months after surgery. Excessive daytime sleepiness was partially improved in 4 cases and completely abolished in 8. Total sleep time, sleep efficiency, number of arousals and sleep latency were similar in both evaluations. REM latency to stage 2 markedly increased on the follow-up. Stage distributions were similar in both nights except for stage 4 which was more frequently absent on the first recording. SaO2 levels below 80% were seen in 10 cases before UPPP and in 4 after it. Apnea index decreased in all cases but it reached normal levels only in 4. PMID:3833137

  17. A follow-up study of 69 discharged SARS patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Yun; Geng, Hui; Feng, Weibin; Tang, Xiangjiang; Ou, Aihua; Lao, Yingrong; Xu, Yinji; Lin, Hao; Liu, Hui; Li, Yongwen

    2003-09-01

    Sixty-nine patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) discharged from Guangdong Provincial TCM Hospital were followed up from January to April 2003 during which the patients were asked to fill the questionnaire form and at the same time received blood routine examination, hepatic, renal, pulmonary and immune function tests, and spiral computerized tomography (CT) of the chest, color B-ultrasonography of the heart with the collected data treated by descriptive analysis and deductive analysis. The results showed that in the 69 followed-up patients, impairment of the hepatic function was found in 5 cases, hypoimmune state in 18, impediment of ventilation in the distal air passages with normal major air passages in 15, increased residual volume in 40, mild disturbance of pulmonary diffusion function in 14, incomplete absorption of inflammatory exudates, focal or multiple interstitial lesions, pulmonary interstitial fibrosis and pleural adhesion in 24; increased resistance or mild systolic hypertension in the pulmonary circulation, and segmental ischemia of the left myocardium in 34; and decreased visual acuity in 2. According to TCM differentiation 24 cases belonged to the type of deficiency of both qi and yin, 8 deficiency of both the heart and spleen, 37 depression of the liver and deficiency of the spleen, 18 intermingling with damp-heat, and 7 intermingling with stagnant blood. Some patients still had psychological problems. The study indicates that though clinically cured and discharged from hospital, some SARS patients have functional impairment of the heart, lung and liver, hypoimmune state as well as psychological problems, and need to be treated accordingly for a complete recovery. A rationale for suggested TCM treatment is expounded. PMID:14535196

  18. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Sayers, Jack; Bridge, Carrie; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Petty, Sara; Lake, Sean; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Evans, Neal J. II; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam; and others

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare ({approx}1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 {mu}m. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 {mu}m, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  19. Submillimeter Follow-up of Wise-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Cutri, Roc; Evans, Neal J., II; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lake, Sean; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam

    2013-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approximately 1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at zeta = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 micrometers, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 micrometers. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (zeta greater than 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 micrometers, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) solar luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  20. The LCOGT Near Earth Object (NEO) Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric; Larson, Steve

    2014-11-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network is a planned homogeneous network of over 35 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres. This network is versatile and designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to do long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network is now operating and observations are being executed remotely and robotically.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS), NEOWISE and PanSTARRS (PS1). Over 600 NEO candidates have been targeted so far this year with 250+ objects reported to the MPC, including 70 confirmed NEOs. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects in order to improve the orbits and determine the rotation periods. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) targets. Recent results have included the first period determination for the Apollo 2002 NV16 and our first NEO spectrum from the FLOYDS spectrographs on the LCOGT 2m telescopes obtained for 2012 DA14 during the February 2013 closepass.

  1. A follow-up study of agricultural chemical production workers

    SciTech Connect

    Sathiakumar, N.; Delzell, E.; Austin, H.; Cole, P. )

    1992-01-01

    This retrospective follow-up study evaluated the mortality experience of 4,323 men employed at a plant in Alabama (AL) that manufactures agricultural and other chemicals. On average, there were 18 years of follow-up per subject during the study period of 1951 to 1987. The observed numbers of deaths among cohort members were compared with the numbers expected on the basis of United States (US) and AL general population mortality rates. The all causes standardized mortality ratio (SMR), computed using US rates as the referent, was 97 (233 observed/240 expected deaths) for whites and 68 (47/69) for blacks. White subjects had more than expected deaths from buccal cavity and pharynx (BCP) cancer (SMR = 388; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 125-905) and from esophageal cancer (SMR = 417; 112-1,067). Their lung cancer mortality rate was 50% higher than the rate of US white men and 14% higher than the rate of AL white men. Each of these three cancers has strong nonoccupational determinants, the roles of which were not assessed and which may have been responsible in whole or in part for the observed increases. The excesses of lung and esophageal cancer were concentrated among short-term employees, an observation which also argues against a causal link with occupational factors. Black men experienced no increased mortality from BCP, esophageal or lung cancer, but results for blacks were imprecise. For white and black subjects combined, there were 3 observed versus 0.62 expected deaths due to soft tissue sarcoma (p = 0.05). The job histories of subjects with this type of cancer did not suggest any shared occupational exposure.

  2. Submillimeter Follow-Up of WISE-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Cutri, Roc; Evans, Neal J., II; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lake, Sean; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam; Weiner, Benjamin; Wright, Edward L.; Yan, Lin

    2012-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approx.1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 microns, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 microns. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 microns, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60 C120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) Stellar Luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  3. Follow-Up Study to Assess the Use and Performance of Household Filters in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Peletz, Rachel; Simuyandi, Michelo; Simunyama, Martin; Sarenje, Kelvin; Kelly, Paul; Clasen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Effective household water treatment can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease if used correctly and consistently over time. One year after completion of a randomized controlled study of water filters among households in Zambia with children < 2 years old and mothers who were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, we conducted a follow-up study to assess use and performance of new filters distributed at the conclusion of the study; 90% of participating households met the criteria for current users, and 75% of participating households had stored water with lower levels of fecal contamination than source water. Microbiologically, the filters continued to perform well, removing an average of 99.0% of fecal indicator bacteria. Although this study provides some encouraging evidence about the potential to maintain high uptake and filter performance, even in the absence of regular household visits, additional research is necessary to assess whether these results can be achieved over longer periods and with larger populations. PMID:24100635

  4. Long-term follow-up results of foot and ankle tuberculosis in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gursu, Sarper; Yildirim, Timur; Ucpinar, Hanifi; Sofu, Hakan; Camurcu, Yalkin; Sahin, Vedat; Sahin, Nursu

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis has been increasing, especially in the past 2 decades. Skeletal tuberculosis is very rare compared with the frequency of the pulmonary form. In the present study, we have shared our long-term experience with foot and ankle tuberculosis, providing information about the different aspects of the disease. A total of 70 patients with foot and ankle tuberculosis, treated from 1983 to 2005, were evaluated. The mean patient age was 34.4 (range 7 to 85) years at the diagnosis. The mean interval between the first symptoms and the diagnosis was 26.4 months (range 1 month to 15 years). The mean follow-up period was 21.7 (range 8 to 30) years. The infection affected both the joint and the bones in 29 patients, only the joints in 13, only the bones in 22, and the soft tissues alone in the remaining 6 patients. The most common joint location was the tibiotalar joint. The talus was the most commonly infiltrated bone. All patients underwent biopsy, and 28 patients underwent additional surgical procedures. In 18 patients (25.7%), 1 to 4 recurrences developed during the follow-up period. In the last follow-up visits, either severe destruction of the bones or end-stage arthrosis was evident in 39 patients (55.7%), especially in those with osseous tuberculosis. Foot and ankle tuberculosis is very rare. The diagnosis of the disease will often be late owing to the lack of pathognomonic findings. A histopathologic evaluation should not be omitted in cases with suspicion. The incidence of residual deformity or end-stage arthrosis has been high in the long term; however, the patients will usually be without any symptoms. PMID:24846160

  5. Recovery process in patients followed-up due to acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Magden, K; Yildirim, I; Kutu, ME; Ozdemir, MC; Peynir, S; Altas, A; Yildiz, G; Hur, E

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury (AKI) may result in complete recovery in some of the patients and partial recovery in others. AKI episodes may accelerate the progression to chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal failure, while risk for morbidity and mortality is high following AKI. Discharge of patients from the hospital, independently from dialysis is a crucial outcome. Many patients without a need for dialysis, require follow-up for various durations and different treatments. The objective of this study was to compare mean recovery time of the patients followed-up due to prerenal, renal and postrenal AKIs. Method: In this prospective observational study, a total of 159 patients hospitalized in Bulent Ecevit Hospital, clinic of nephrology or monitored in the other wards and intensive care unit due to AKI, between June 2011 and January 2012, were enrolled. The cases were divided into three groups as prerenal, renal and postrenal, and monitored with the daily visits and renal function testing. Results: Prerenal AKI was seen by 54%, while renal AKI was observed by 34% and post-renal AKI by 12%. Incidence of chronic kidney disease was 17.6%. Totally 43 patients required hemodialysis (27%). Of these patients, 23 were in the prerenal AKI (53.4%), 15 in the renal AKI (34.8%) and 5 (11.6%) in the postrenal AKI group. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine levels were dropped to the basal values only in the prerenal AKI group, on the seventh day of treatment. These levels remained higher in the postrenal and renal groups on the 7th day of treatment compared to the basal values. BUN levels decreased to the normal values on average 7th day in the postrenal, while remained higher in the renal group. Conclusion: Prerenal AKI patients recovered in seven days with a proper treatment, although AKI patients due to other reasons should be followed-up for a longer time. PMID:24470734

  6. Prospective follow-up study of 423 children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Bonduelle, M; Legein, J; Buysse, A; Van Assche, E; Wisanto, A; Devroey, P; Van Steirteghem, A C; Liebaers, I

    1996-07-01

    In order to evaluate the safety of the intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) procedure, a prospective follow-up study of 423 children born after ICSI was carried out. The aim of this study was to compile data on karyotypes, congenital malformations, growth parameters and developmental milestones. Before starting the infertility treatment, couples were asked to participate in a follow-up study including genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis. The follow-up study of the child was based on a visit to the paediatrician-geneticist at birth or at 2 months of age, at 1 year and at 2 years of age when a physical examination for major and minor malformations and a psychomotoric evaluation were done. Between April 1991 and September 1994, 320 pregnancies obtained after ICSI led to the birth of 423 children (222 singletons, 186 twins and 15 triplets). Prenatal diagnosis determined a total of 293 karyotypes, one of which was abnormal (0.3%), and four were benign familial structural aberrations, all inherited from the paternal side. A total of 14 (3.3%) major malformations were observed, defined as those causing functional impairment or requiring surgical correlation. Neurological or developmental problems at the age of 2 months were found in 14 children, four of whom were multiples. Compared to most registers of children born after assisted reproduction and to registers of malformations in the general population, the figure of 3.3% major malformations is within the expected range. Before drawing any firm conclusion, further careful evaluations of the available data are necessary. PMID:8671504

  7. A Comparative Study of Nurses as Case Manager and Telephone Follow-up on Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Severe Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh; Mirabzadeh, Arash; Mottaghipour, Yasaman; Zahiroddin, Alireza; Kangrani, Hamed Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Providing community-based mental health services is crucial and is an agreed plan between the Iranian Mental Health Office and the Regional Committee for the Eastern Mediterranean (affiliated with WHO). The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of home-visit clinical case-management services on the hospitalization rate and other clinical outcomes in patients with severe mental illness. Methods: A total of 182 patients were randomly allocated into three groups, namely, home-visit (n=60), telephone follow-up (n=61) and as-usual care (n=61) groups. Trained nurses as clinical case-managers provided home-visit services and the telephone follow-up tasks. Hospitalization rate as a measure of recurrence, as well as burden, knowledge, general health condition of caregivers with positive/negative symptoms, satisfaction, quality of life, and social skills of the consumers were assessed as the main and secondary outcomes, respectively. Results: Most clinical variables were improved in both intervention groups compared with the control group. During the one year follow-up, the rate of rehospitalization for the telephone follow-up and as-usual groups were respectively 1.5 and 2.5 times higher than the home-visit group. Conclusion: Trained clinical case-managers are capable of providing continuous care services to patients with severe mental illness. The telephone follow-up services could also have beneficiary outcome for the consumers, their caregivers, and the health system network. PMID:26722141

  8. Following up on the Discovery of Water Vapor at Europa's South Pole with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, L.; Retherford, K. D.; Saur, J.; Strobel, D. F.; Feldman, P. D.; McGrath, M. A.; Nimmo, F.; Spencer, J. R.; Grava, C.; Bloecker, A.

    2014-12-01

    We will present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of Europa's UV aurora obtained within two campaigns in 2014 to follow up on the water vapor plume detection. HST aurora images taken in 2012 have revealed coincident signals from atomic hydrogen and oxygen pointing to the existence of transient water vapor plumes near the south pole. The water vapor was detected only during one HST visit in December 2012 when Europa was near apocenter position and was speculated to be correlated with changing tidal stresses along Europa's orbit. In a first follow-up campaign new aurora images were taken by HST early in 2014 with Europa near apocenter, but the initial detection was not confirmed. More HST aurora images will be obtained in the course of a larger Hubble observing campaign starting in November 2014. We will review all HST aurora imaging observations to date and discuss potential sources for varying plume activity and changing detectability by HST. In particular, we will examine various explanations for the non-detections in the early 2014 observations near apocenter.

  9. Unilateral proptosis in thyroid eye disease with subsequent contralateral involvement: retrospective follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this retrospective follow-up study is to evaluate the prevalence of patients with thyroid eye disease presenting with apparent unilateral proptosis and determine the occurrence of exophthalmos in contralateral non-proptotic eye over the time. Associated features with this event were evaluated. Methods A cohort of 655 consecutive patients affected by thyroid eye disease with a minimum follow-up of 10 years was reviewed. Exophthalmos was assessed by using both Hertel exophthalmometer and computed tomography (CT). The influence of age, gender, hormonal status and of different therapies such as corticosteroids, radiotherapy and surgical decompression on this disease progression was evaluated. Results A total of 89 patients (13.5%) (95% confidence interval [CI] 15%-10%) had clinical evidence of unilateral exophthalmos at the first visit. Among these, 13 patients (14%) (95% CI 22%-7%) developed subsequent contralateral exophthalmos. The increase of protrusion ranged from 2 to 7 mm (mean of 4.2). The time of onset varied from 6 months to 7 years (mean time: 29 months). Smoking status, young age and surgical decompression are significantly associated with development of contralateral proptosis (p< .05). Conclusions Asymmetric thyroid eye disease with the appearance of unilateral exophthalmos at the initial examination is a fairly frequent event, while subsequent contralateral proptosis occurs less commonly. However, physicians should be aware that young patients, particularly if smokers, undergoing orbital decompression in one eye may need further surgery on contralateral side over time. PMID:23721066

  10. Records for the number of distinct sites visited by a random walk on the fully connected lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turban, Loïc

    2015-11-01

    We consider a random walk on the fully connected lattice with N sites and study the time evolution of the number of distinct sites s visited by the walker on a subset with n sites. A record value v is obtained for s at a record time t when the walker visits a site of the subset for the first time. The record time t is a partial covering time when v\\lt n and a total covering time when v = n. The probability distributions for the number of records s, the record value v and the record (covering) time t, involving r-Stirling numbers, are obtained using generating function techniques. The mean values, variances and skewnesses are deduced from the generating functions. In the scaling limit the probability distributions for s and v lead to the same Gaussian density. The fluctuations of the record time t are also Gaussian at partial covering, when n-v={{O}}(n). They are distributed according to the type-I Gumbel extreme-value distribution at total covering, when v = n. A discrete sequence of generalized Gumbel distributions, indexed by n-v, is obtained at almost total covering, when n-v={{O}}(1). These generalized Gumbel distributions are crossing over to the Gaussian distribution when n - v increases.

  11. Records for the number of distinct sites visited by a random walk on the fully-connected lattice

    E-print Network

    L. Turban

    2015-10-13

    We consider a random walk on the fully-connected lattice with $N$ sites and study the time evolution of the number of distinct sites $s$ visited by the walker on a subset with $n$ sites. A record value $v$ is obtained for $s$ at a record time $t$ when the walker visits a site of the subset for the first time. The record time $t$ is a partial covering time when $vdistributions for the number of records $s$, the record value $v$ and the record (covering) time $t$, involving $r$-Stirling numbers, are obtained using generating function techniques. The mean values, variances and skewnesses are deduced from the generating functions. In the scaling limit the probability distributions for $s$ and $v$ lead to the same Gaussian density. The fluctuations of the record time $t$ are also Gaussian at partial covering, when $n-v={\\mathrm O}(n)$. They are distributed according to the type-I Gumbel extreme-value distribution at total covering, when $v=n$. A discrete sequence of generalized Gumbel distributions, indexed by $n-v$, is obtained at almost total covering, when $n-v={\\mathrm O}(1)$. These generalized Gumbel distributions are crossing over to the Gaussian distribution when $n-v$ increases.

  12. Goddard Robotic Telescope - Optical follow-up of GRBs and coordinated observations of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Wallace, C. A.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2011-04-01

    Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will occur or when Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) flaring activity starts, follow-up/monitoring ground telescopes must be located as uniformly as possible all over the world in order to collect data simultaneously with Fermi and Swift detections. However, there is a distinct gap in follow-up coverage of telescopes in the eastern U.S. region based on the operations of Swift. Motivated by this fact, we have constructed a 14? fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are (1) to follow-up Swift/Fermi GRBs and (2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) AGN. Our telescope system consists of off-the-shelf hardware. With the focal reducer, we are able to match the field of view of Swift narrow instruments (20? × 20?). We started scientific observations in mid-November 2008 and GRT has been fully remotely operated since August 2009. The 3? upper limit in a 30 s exposure in the R filter is ˜15.4 mag; however, we can reach to ˜18 mag in a 600 s exposures. Due to the weather condition at the telescope site, our observing efficiency is 30-40% on average.

  13. Goddard Robotic Telescope - Optical Follow-up of GRBs and Coordinated Observations of AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Wallace, C. A.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2010-01-01

    Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will occur or when Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) flaring activity starts, follow-up/monitoring ground telescopes must be located as uniformly as possible all over the world in order to collect data simultaneously with Fermi and Swift detections. However, there is a distinct gap in follow-up coverage of telescopes in the eastern U.S. region based on the operations of Swift. Motivated by this fact, we have constructed a 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up Swift/Fermi GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) AGN. Our telescope system consists of off-the-shelf hardware. With the focal reducer, we are able to match the field of view of Swift narrow instruments (20' x 20'). We started scientific observations in mid-November 2008 and GRT has been fully remotely operated since August 2009. The 3(sigma) upper limit in a 30-second exposure in the R filter is approx.15.4 mag; however, we can reach to approx.18 mag in a 600-second exposures. Due to the weather condition at the telescope site. our observing efficiency is 30-40%, on average.

  14. Bilateral sacrospinous fixation without hysterectomy: 18-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    ?entürk, Mehmet Baki; Güraslan, Hakan; Çakmak, Yusuf; Ekin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of bilateral sacrospinous fixation (SSF), which was performed with surgical mesh interposition and bilateral vaginal repair. Material and Methods Twenty-two patients underwent SSF between 2010 and 2012, and the results were evaluated retrospectively. The results at preoperative and postoperative 6th, 12th, and 18th months of the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12) were compared using Friedman and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests. Values of p<0.05 and <0.01 were considered statistically significant. Results According to the POP-Q, significant healing was observed on all vaginal vault points (p=0.001), and no prolapse was observed until the 18-month follow-up stage. There were also prominent patients who felt satisfactory with respect to their sexual life according to PISQ-12 (p=0.001). Conclusion This technique appears to provide an adequate clinical resolution, and it may be the primary surgical option for women with pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:26097393

  15. SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Candidate RV Follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil; Ma, Bo; Li, Rui; SIthajan, Sirinrat

    2014-02-01

    Planetary systems, discovered by the radial velocity (RV) surveys, reveal strong correlations between the planet frequency and stellar properties, such as metallicity and mass, and a greater diversity in planets than found in the solar system. However, due to the sample sizes of extant surveys (~100 to a few hundreds of stars) and their heterogeneity, many key questions remained to be addressed: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate- mass stars and binaries? Is the ``planet desert'' within 0.6 AU in the planet orbital distribution of intermediate-mass stars real? The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars. The latest data pipeline effort at UF has been able to remove long term systematic errors suffered in the earlier data pipeline. 18 high confident giant planet candidates have been identified among newly processed data. We propose to follow up these giant planet candidates with the KPNO EXPERT instrument to confirm the detection and also characterize their orbits. The confirmed planets will be used to measure occurrence rates, distributions and multiplicity of giants planets around F,G,K stars with a broad range of mass (~0.6-2.5 M_?) and metallicity ([Fe/H]~-1.5-0.5). The well defined MARVELS survey cadence allows robust determinations of completeness limits for rigorously testing giant planet formation theories and constraining models.

  16. A 22-year follow-up of an endodontic implant.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jan; Sándor, George K; Forouzanfar, Tim; Schulten, Engelbert A J M; Oikarinen, Kyösti S

    2015-10-01

    Root fractures in the middle and apical thirds of the root are treated by repositioning and for approximately 6 weeks of immobilization while those in the cervical third are immobilized for 3 months. Even though the results are good, some root-fractured teeth are lost and replaced by dental implants or fixed partial dentures. One historic but effective treatment option for those root fractures with unfavorable crown to root ratios is an endodontic implant in middle and apical third root fractures. This method offers immediate stable fixation of a crown and its coronal root segment to the underlying alveolar bone. This report documents the long-term survival of a tooth treated with an endodontic implant. A 25-year-old male patient presented following a bicycle accident with a dislocated unfavorable root fracture in the middle third. The crown with the coronal root segment was secured to the bone using a commercially available endodontic implant. The apical part of the root was removed. Although the clinical and radiological follow-up results of the endodontic implant demonstrated a good clinical function and little bone loss, the implant ultimately had to be removed after 22 years of service due to pain and increasing mobility. PMID:25865147

  17. Integrated GW-EM Follow-up Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackley, Kendall; Eikenberry, Stephen; Klimenko, Sergey; LSC Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Advanced Gravitational-Wave (GW) detectors such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo are expected to become operational for observation runs in 2015, with an expected ultimate improvement in sensitivity over previous configurations by a factor of 10 by 2019. There are many potential electromagnetic (EM) counterparts to GWs including short and long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and kilonovae. While SGRBs and LGRBs predominantly emit in the X-ray, and the recently-observed kilonova primarily in the infrared, all three sources are expected to have detectable traces in the optical band, albeit requiring very sensitive optical telescopes. In order to aid in the optimization of GW trigger follow-up procedures, we perform an end-to-end analysis feasibility study using synthesized Advanced detector data simulating a GW detection with a theoretical EM counterpart injected into archival optical images. We use images from Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) and Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), and inject candidate events following observed lightcurves of SGRBs, LGRBs, and kilonovae. The use of Zernike PSF decomposition on candidate objects offers a fast way to identify point sources, speeding up the automated identification of transient sources in the images. We present our method of transient recovery and the latest results of our feasibility study of a joint GW-EM observation.

  18. Follow-up of MARVELS Brown Dwarf and Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Ma, Bo; Petersen, Eric; Li, Rui; Wang, Ji; Lee, Brian; De Lee, Nathan; Fleming, Scott

    2012-08-01

    The SDSS-III MARVELS planet search is the the largest homogeneous single radial velocity (RV) survey with moderate-high Doppler precision (10-30 m/s for V=7.6-12 FGK stars). To date, over 3000 stars have been observed at the SDSS 2.5m telescope with more than 20 times over about two year time windows. All of the survey data for 2580 FGK stars from the first two and half years have been processed with the latest data pipeline. A total of 24 new brown dwarfs (BD) and 28 new planet candidates have been identified in the processed RV data. This proposal requests KPNO 2.1m telescope time with the EXPERT instrument, to follow up all of these BD and planet candidates to confirm the detections and characterize the orbits. The results will be used to (1). reveal the overall distribution of the new BDs and giant planets in the parameter space; (2). measure occurrence rates of BDs and giants planets around stars with different mass and metallicity, especially at the low metallicity end; (3). measure dryness of the brown dwarf desert; (4). constrain theoretical models regarding the formation of substellar companions (BDs and giant planets); (5). identify additional companions associated with the detected systems.

  19. Follow-up of MARVELS Brown Dwarf Candidates using EXPERT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bo; Ge, Jian; Li, Rui; Sithajan, Sirinrat; Thomas, Neil; Wang, Ji; De Lee, Nathan

    2013-02-01

    The SDSS-III MARVELS survey is a comprehensive radial velocity survey of 3,300 nearby F-K stars, between 7.6 < V < 12.0 in 2008-2012. All of the survey data for 2580 FGK stars from the first two and half years have been processed with the latest data pipeline. A total of 26 new brown dwarfs (BD) candidates have been identified in the processed RV data. We expect to have 8 more BD candidates from the ~800 stars currently under processing, which will make a total of 34 BD candidates. This proposal requests KPNO 2.1m telescope time with the EXPERT instrument, to follow up all of these BD candidates to confirm the detections and characterize the orbits. The results will be used to (1) reveal the overall distribution of the new BDs in the parameter space; (2) measure the occurrence rate of BD around FGK type stars; (3) measure dryness of the brown dwarf desert around stars with different mass and metallicity; (4) constrain theoretical models regarding the formation of brown dwarfs; (5) confirm the discovery of `desert in the brown dwarf desert'; (6) identify additional companions associated with the detected systems.

  20. Follow up study of workers manufacturing chrysotile asbestos cement products.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M J; Winter, P D; Pannett, B; Powell, C A

    1986-01-01

    A cohort study has been carried out of 2167 subjects employed between 1941 and 1983 at an asbestos cement factory in England. The production process incorporated the use of chrysotile asbestos fibre only, except for a small amount of amosite during four months in 1976. Measured airborne fibre concentrations available since 1970 from personal samplers showed mean levels below 1 fibre/ml, although higher levels had probably occurred previously in certain areas of the factory. No excess of lung cancer was observed in the mortality follow up by comparison with either national or local death rates, and analyses of subgroups of the workforce by job, exposure level, duration of employment, duration since entry, or calendar years of employment gave no real suggestion of an asbestos related excess for this cause of death. There was one death from pleural mesothelioma and one with asbestosis mentioned as an associated cause on the death certificate, but neither is thought to be linked to asbestos exposure at this factory. Other suggested asbestos related cancers, such as laryngeal and gastrointestinal, did not show raised risks. Although the durations of exposure were short in this study, the findings are consistent with two other studies of workers exposed to low concentrations of chrysotile fibre in the manufacture of asbestos cement products which reported no excess mortality. PMID:3024695

  1. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Follow-Up of Borderline Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zikan, Michal; Dundr, Pavel; Cibula, David

    2012-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent a heterogeneous group of noninvasive tumors of uncertain malignant potential with characteristic histology. They occur in younger women, are present at an early stage, and have a favorable prognosis, but symptomatic recurrence and death may be found as long as 20 years after therapy in some patients. The molecular changes in borderline ovarian tumors indicate linkage of this disease to type I ovarian tumors (low-grade ovarian carcinomas). The pathological stage of disease and subclassification of extraovarian disease into invasive and noninvasive implants, together with the presence of postoperative macroscopic residual disease, appear to be the major predictor of recurrence and survival. However, it should be emphasized that the most important negative prognostic factor for recurrence is just the use of conservative surgery, but without any impact on patient survival because most recurrent diseases are of the borderline type—easily curable and with an excellent prognosis. Borderline tumors are difficult masses to correctly preoperatively diagnose using imaging methods because their macroscopic features may overlap with invasive and benign ovarian tumors. Over the past several decades, surgical therapy has shifted from a radical approach to more conservative treatment; however, oncologic safety must always be balanced. Follow-up is essential using routine ultrasound imaging, with special attention paid to the remaining ovary in conservatively treated patients. Current literature on this topic leads to a number of controversies that will be discussed thoroughly in this article, with the aim to provide recommendations for the clinical management of these patients. PMID:23024155

  2. [Functional scintigraphy in the follow-up of transplants].

    PubMed

    Gratz, K F

    1993-10-01

    Nuclear medicine procedures have special indications in the follow-up of transplanted patients: In case of renal transplantation perfusion, function (glomerular filtration) and urinary flow measured by bolus application of 99mTc-DTPA is an important tool to detect and monitor acute tubular necrosis, rejection, urinary leakage, obstruction or vascular complications. This method is used for pancreatic grafts, too. To exclude rejection in case of heart transplantation more than one year after operation the antimyosin antibody scintigraphy is introduced avoiding biopsies. The radionuclide ventriculography is able to monitor heart function by determining the ejection fraction. Cholescintigraphy in liver transplants is sensitive to detect complications of bile flow. In case of an auxiliary liver transplantation a competition between two livers has been described. This method allows a distinction of functional performance of donor and recipient liver. The same problem is solved by ventilation-perfusion scan in lung transplants. Bone scintigraphy is of prognostic value for graft viability. Other radionuclide examinations have been developed to measure perfusion, glucose-, fat-metabolism to detect rejection episodes, abscesses or tumor recurrencies. PMID:8233840

  3. Benzene-induced chromosome aberrations: A follow-up study

    SciTech Connect

    Forni, A.

    1996-12-01

    To study the evolution of cytogenetic damage from past exposure to high concentrations of benzene and its health significance, chromosome aberrations (CA) in lymphocytes were reinvestigated after approximately 20 years in four subjects with past severe hemopathy and in seven controls studied in the late 1960s. Increased chromosome-type aberrations were still present up to 30 years after benzene toxicity, but blood counts were normal. The vital status at the end of 1993 was ascertained for 32 subjects with a history of benzene toxicity and for 31 controls studied for CA from 1965 to 1970, who differed significantly for CA rates. Of the 32 benzene-exposed subjects, 1 was lost to follow-up, 20 were still alive, and 11 had died at ages 36 to 83, between 1 and 20 years after the last CA study. Five deaths were from neoplasia (acute erythroleukemia, brain tumor, cancer of lung, paranasal cavity, esophagus). The deceased subjects had significantly higher rates of chromosome-type aberrations than those alive, and those who died of neoplasia had the highest rates of these aberrations in the last study before death or diagnosis of cancer. Out of the 31 controls, 12 had died from 4 to 23 years after the CA study. Three deaths were from neoplasia (two lung cancer, one brain tumor). Even if this is a small sample, the results suggest a higher risk of cancer for the benzene-exposed cohort, who had persistently high CA rates in lymphocytes. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Lung Tumors Treated With Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation: Computed Tomography Imaging Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean Marcet, Benjamin; Descat, Edouard; Deschamps, Frederic; Rao, Pramod; Ravaud, Alain; Brouste, Veronique; Baere, Thierry de

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the morphologic evolution of lung tumors treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) by way of computed tomography (CT) images and to investigate patterns of incomplete RFA at the site of ablation. Materials and Methods: One hundred eighty-nine patients with 350 lung tumors treated with RFA underwent CT imaging at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. CT findings were interpreted separately by two reviewers with consensus. Five different radiologic patterns were predefined: fibrosis, cavitation, nodule, atelectasis, and disappearance. The appearance of the treated area was evaluated at each follow-up CT using the predefined patterns. Results: At 1 year after treatment, the most common evolutions were fibrosis (50.5%) or nodules (44.8%). Differences were noted depending on the initial size of the tumor, with fibrosis occurring more frequently for tumors <2 cm (58.6% vs. 22.9%, P = 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}). Cavitation and atelectasis were less frequent patterns (2.4% and 1.4%, respectively, at 1 year). Tumor location (intraparenchymatous, with pleural contact <50% or >50%) was not significantly correlated with follow-up image pattern. Local tumor progressions were observed with each type of evolution. At 1 year, 12 local recurrences were noted: 2 cavitations, which represented 40% of the cavitations noted at 1 year; 2 fibroses (1.9%); 7 nodules (7.4%); and 1 atelectasis (33.3%). Conclusion: After RFA of lung tumors, follow-up CT scans show that the shape of the treatment zone can evolve in five different patterns. None of these patterns, however, can confirm the absence of further local tumor progression at subsequent follow-up.

  5. Follow-up Study of Patients With Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Peter; Kohn, Jean G.

    1979-01-01

    Of 319 patients with cerebral palsy recalled for reevaluation 15 years after the initial visit, 10 percent had died. Of the living, 55 percent had spasticity, 32 percent had athetosis, 4 percent had ataxia and 9 percent had mixed spasticity and athetosis; 38 percent had an intelligence quotient (IQ) less than 50, 24 percent between 50 and 79, and 38 percent had IQ above 80. There was a high correlation between overall functional outcome and intellectual level. Severity of physical disability, as measured by hand use, mobility and speech, also correlated with dependence, in part because increased severity of the disability was associated with decreased intellectual capacity generally. Twenty-five years after the initial visit, parental attitudes and personality intactness were evaluated (using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory [MMPI]) and were correlated with satisfaction with status in life in 28 persons predicted to be independent on the 15-year study. Twenty (72 percent) of the 28 were satisfied with their status in life and of these, 16 were evaluated (with the MMPI) with 70 percent scoring in the normal range; 13 (65 percent) had parents with a positive attitude. Positive attitude was defined as parental feelings that the handicapped child was a worthy, valuable person, to be encouraged and assisted but not isolated from the world of nonhandicapped people. Careful serial assessment by professional teams combined with repeated long-term counseling of families can result in optimal outcome for the disability level involved, due to the primary role parents play in the development of a child's character and behavior. PMID:154207

  6. Follow up on the crystal growth experiments of the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. F.; Lind, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the 4 solution growth experiments on the LDEF have been published elsewhere. Both the crystals of CaCO3, which were large and well shaped, and the much smaller TTF-TCNQ crystals showed unusual morphological behavior. The follow up on these experiments was begun in 1981, when ESA initiated a 'Concept Definition Study' on a large, 150 kg, Solution Growth Facility (SGF) to be included in the payload of EURECA-1, the European Retrievable Carrier. This carrier was a continuation of the European Spacelab and at that time planned for launch in 1987. The long delay of the LDEF retrieval and of subsequent missions brought about reflections both on the concept of crystal growth in space and on the choice of crystallization materials that had been made for the LDEF. Already before the LDEF retrieval, research on TTF-TCNQ had been stopped, and a planned growth experiment with TTF-TCNQ on the SGF/EURECA had been cancelled. The target of the SGF investigation is now more fundamental in nature. None of the crystals to be grown here are, like TTF-TCNQ, in particular demand by science or industry, and the crystals only serve the purpose of model crystals. The real purpose of the investigation is to study the growth behavior. One of the experiments, the Soret Coefficient Measurement experiment is not growing crystals at all, but has it as its sole purpose to obtain accurate information on thermal diffusion, a process of importance in crystal growth from solution.

  7. Lost to follow-up for appointments in a dedicated dry eye clinic

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Kip Hoe; Yeo, Sharon; Tong, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dry eye is a prevalent condition with significant socioeconomic burden. This study evaluates the extent and reasons for loss to follow-up (LTF) in a dedicated dry eye clinic. LTF refers to patient who discontinued visits for >2 years. Method The proportion of patients LTF and the demographics in a cohort of dry eye patients (2006 to 2010) were determined. A telephone survey was prospectively conducted for patients who were LTF. Results Of 505 patients, 240 (47.5%) were LTF. Associated demographic factors for LTF were male sex, non-Chinese ethnicity, and age group <30 years old (all P<0.05). The reasons for LTF through the telephone survey (response rate 77.9%) were categorized into three broad groups, stabilized dry eye condition (47%), personal/social factors (25%) and perceived insufficiency of healthcare delivery (28%). Only two (1.1%) were considered as management failures. The younger patients (age <50 years) were more likely to become LTF (P<0.001) due to stabilized dry eye disease, compared to older patients who were more likely to be LTF due to personal/social reasons (P=0.02). Poor communication and service factors under healthcare delivery were found to be higher (P=0.002) in those who visited once before they were LTF (8.5%) compared to those who visited multiple times before they were LTF (0.1%). Conclusion LTF was relatively common in hospital-based dry eye management. Female and older patients were less likely to stop consultation. Stabilized dry eye condition, common in younger patients, was the most common reason for LTF. Elderly patients have difficulty attending clinics due to nonmedical problems, which may require a more holistic approach. PMID:25336929

  8. How do stroke patients fare when discharged straight to their homes? A controlled study on the significance of hospital follow-up after one month.

    PubMed

    Ytterberg, C; Anderson Malm, S; Britton, M

    2000-06-01

    In our experience, stroke patients discharged straight to their homes sometimes showed marked deterioration. We investigated whether this negative course of events could be prevented by means of follow-up visits entailing extensive testing and resultant measures one month after discharge. The patients in our study included a selection of mild cases with a short length of hospital stay. Forty-six patients returned to the stroke unit on a follow-up visit, and 49 patients made up the control group. The groups were compared after 3 months, by means of questionnaires. The results did not show any definite difference between the groups. However, after 3 months we detected depressions in 13 patients in the study group and in 11 patients in the control group, most of them untreated. The study points to a need for follow-up aimed specifically at detecting depression. PMID:10853724

  9. Kepler Data Validation and Follow-up Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    William, Borucki J.

    2009-01-01

    The approach that the Kepler Mission uses to remove false positive events and to validate the discoveries consists of two parts; data validation (DPI) and follow up observations program (FOP). DV consists of several methods of examining the data from the spacecraft observations. First, to rule out statistical fluctuations in the data, accept only signals that show 3 or more transits and that have a total signal-to-noise ratio that exceeds 7 sigma. Second. to identify small stellar companions to the target star, we check for secondary eclipses and determine if the transit characteristics are appropriate for a planetary companion. Third, check for background binaries that are in the target aperture. Here we measure the movement of the image centroid before, during, and after the transit. If the target is producing the signal, a dimming wi11 move the image centroid in a known direction and magnitude. If the signal comes from a nearby star, the amplitude and direction of the motion wi11 be different, This test is expected to rule out the hundreds of binary signals expected from background stars. The precision of the measurement depends on the stellar fluxes and positions but can be better than 0.01 pixel; i.e., 0.04". Those candidates that pass these tests are examined using ground-based telescopes and radial velocity spectrometers. First medium precision RV is used to rule out any remaining stellar companions. Then high spatial resolution imaging is used to check for nearby stars that are in the aperture- (The Kepler apertures depend on magnitude but are of order 36 sq are sec in area.) If no stars are present that quid generate the observed signal, then the candidate goes to a large telescope such as Keck, HET, or Wi1lilam Herschel for high precision observations to get the planet mass or an upper limit to it, if there are some stars in the aperture, then the photometric observations are employed to look for the transit by cane of the confounding stars. If none are seen, then the candidate is sent to a large telescope such as Keck

  10. Robot-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty: minimum 1-year follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vipul; Thaly, Rahul; Shah, Ketul

    2007-02-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty. Laparoscopic pyeloplasty has been shown to have a success rate comparable to that of the open surgical approach. However, the steep learning curve has hindered its acceptance into mainstream urologic practice. The introduction of robotic assistance provides advantages that have the potential to facilitate precise dissection and intracorporeal suturing. Methods: A total of 50 patients underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty. A four-trocar technique was used. Most patients were discharged home on day 1, with stent removal at 3 weeks. Patency of the ureteropelvic junction was assessed in all patients with mercaptotriglycylglycine Lasix renograms at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, then every 6 months for 1 year, and then yearly. Results: Each patient underwent a successful procedure without open conversion or transfusion. The average estimated blood loss was 40 ml. The operative time averaged 122 minutes (range 60 to 330) overall. Crossing vessels were present in 30% of the patients and were preserved in all cases. The time for the anastomosis averaged 20 minutes (range 10 to 100). Intraoperatively, no complications occurred. Postoperatively, the average hospital stay was 1.1 days. The stents were removed at an average of 20 days (range 14 to 28) postoperatively. The average follow-up was 11.7 months; at the last follow-up visit, each patient was doing well. Of the 50 patients, 48 underwent one or more renograms, demonstrating stable renal function, improved drainage, and no evidence of recurrent obstruction. Conclusions: Robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty is a feasible technique for ureteropelvic junction reconstruction. The procedure provides a minimally invasive alternative with good short-term results.

  11. Antiretroviral treatment and quality of life in Africans living with HIV: 12-month follow-up in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Jaquet, Antoine; Garanet, Franck; Balestre, Eric; Ekouevi, Didier K.; Azani, Jean Claude; Bognounou, René; Dah, Elias; Kondombo, Jean Charlemagne; Dabis, François; Drabo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The scale-up of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to a significant improvement in survival of the HIV-positive patient but its effects on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are less known and context-dependent. Our aim was to assess the temporal changes and factors associated with HRQOL among HIV-positive adults initiating HAART in Burkina Faso. Methods HIV-positive people initiating HAART were prospectively included and followed over a one-year period in three HIV clinics of Ouagadougou. HRQOL was assessed at baseline and at each follow-up visit using physical (PHS) and mental (MHS) summary scores derived from the Medical Outcome Study 36-Item short-form health survey (MOS SF-36) questionnaire. Toxicity related to HAART modification and self-reported symptoms were recorded during follow-up visits. Determinants associated with baseline and changes in both scores over a one-year period were assessed using a mixed linear model. Results A total of 344 patients were included. Their median age at baseline was 37 years [interquartile range (IQR) 30–44] and their median CD4 count was 181 cells/mm3 (IQR 97–269). The mean [standard deviation (SD)] PHS score increased from 45.4 (11.1) at baseline to 60.0 (3.1) at 12 months (p<10?4) and the mean (SD) MHS score from 42.2 (8.7) to 43.9 (3.4) (p<10?2). After one year of treatment, patients that experienced on average two symptoms during follow-up presented with significantly lower PHS (63.9) and MHS (43.8) scores compared to patients that presented no symptoms with PHS and MHS of 68.2 (p<10?4) and 45.3 (p<10?3), respectively. Discussion The use of HAART was associated with a significant increase in both physical and mental aspects of the HRQOL over a 12-month period in this urban African population. Perceived symptoms experienced during follow-up visits were associated with a significant impairment in HRQOL. The appropriate and timely management of reported symptoms during the follow-up of HAART-treated patients is a key component to restore HRQOL. PMID:24369739

  12. [Fortuitously discovered neutropenia in children: diagnosis and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Gaudichon, J; Cornet, E; Minckes, O; Bodet, D

    2015-08-01

    Neutropenia seems to be quite frequent in current pediatric practice and can confuse the clinician since it may result from a severe cause. The aim of this study was to provide a prospective description of episodes of neutropenia in children to assess its clinical relevance in a general pediatric cohort consulting and/or hospitalized in a French university hospital. In this prospective observational and monocentric study conducted from April 2012 to April 2013, we included all the patients under 18 years of age who presented neutropenia (defined as an absolute neutrophil count [ANC] below 1×10(9)/L before 1 year of age and below 1.5×10(9)/L beyond) on a whole blood count (WBC) performed in our hospital. Patients treated with chemotherapy were not included. Medical records were regularly checked for at least 1 year after inclusion, and clinical and biological data were collected prospectively to compare transient episodes of neutropenia (<3 months) with persistent episodes of neutropenia (>3months). Of 55,018 consultations and 13,967 hospitalizations (chemotherapy excluded), 8966 blood counts were performed and 250 episodes of neutropenia were found in 238 patients. Data concerning clinical progression were available in 195 cases of which 136 had at least one subsequent WBC. Two hundred thirty-one episodes corresponded to new episodes, while neutropenia preexisted before inclusion in the others. The median follow-up was 12.8 months. Most episodes of neutropenia occurred in children <2 years of age (52%), with a median age of 22.2 months. Mean ANC was 0.943×10(9)/L (±0.340) and a few episodes of neutropenia were below 0.5×10(9)/L (9.2%). Neutropenia persisted more than 3 months in only 13.2% of cases. When neutropenia was below 0.5×10(9)/L, it significantly persisted (RR=3.08; 95% CI [1.31-7.22]). Other factors associated with persistent neutropenia were thrombocytopenia, monocytopenia, a CRP more than 70mg/L, significant abnormality on the clinical exam, and age over 24 months. However, multivariate analysis showed that only an ANC below 0.5×10(9)/L was significantly associated with persistence. While etiology could not be determined in 32% of cases, neutropenia resulted mostly from infectious causes (37.8%), with other causes being more anecdotal. The majority of infectious episodes of neutropenia were viral (90.3%). Like other studies, this investigation suggests that most episodes of neutropenia concern young children, are transient, are benign and often due to infectious diseases. Although it may not reflect the medullar stock or the real capacity of neutrophils to fight bacterial infections, it seems that neutropenia below 0.5×10(9)/L is more likely to persist and be complicated, as previous studies also suggest. To conclude, neutropenia is not exceptional in children and, even if it often results from viral infections and mostly evolves favorably, the clinician should closely monitor these patients, especially when neutrophils are below 0.5×10(9)/L. PMID:26142763

  13. Exit Interviews: An Analysis of Orientation and Exit Interviews as an Answer to Follow-up Apathy. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, Jerry E.

    This report presents the findings of a research study conducted by Alvin Community College (ACC) as a subcontractor for Project FOLLOW-UP, which analyzed orientation and exit interview effects and their relationship to follow-up research on selected withdrawing and graduating students at ACC. Subjects of the study were 595 ACC students, 257 males…

  14. Educational Goals and Student Flow: Model for Institutional Student Flow and Follow-up. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Duane

    This report details the development and implementation of a follow-up system, by Western Texas Community College (WTCC) as a subcontractor for Project FOLLOW-UP, relating student flow patterns to educational goals. Phase I of this project involved establishment of a data base which included elements designed to reveal an adequate picture of…

  15. Understanding Patterns of User Visits to Web Sites: Interactive Starfield Visualizations of WWW Log Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochheiser, Harry; Shneiderman, Ben

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of Spotfire, a starfield visualization tool, to generate interactive visualizations of log data, ranging from aggregate views of all Web site hits in a time interval to close-ups that approximate the path of a user through a site. Highlights current efforts and provides examples of the visualizations created in Spotfire.…

  16. 77 FR 69896 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Follow-Up...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ...Follow-Up Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact Evaluation, American...Follow-Up Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact Evaluation...Recovery Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Green Jobs and Health Care Grants Impact...

  17. 20 CFR 664.450 - What are follow-up services for youth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth Program Design, Elements...follow-up services for youth? (a) Follow-up services for youth may include: (1...securing better paying jobs, career development...

  18. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations C Appendix C to Part 1356 Public Welfare...Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite Population Correction The Finite Population...

  19. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations C Appendix C to Part 1356 Public Welfare...Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite Population Correction The Finite Population...

  20. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations C Appendix C to Part 1356 Public Welfare...Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite Population Correction The Finite Population...

  1. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations C Appendix C to Part 1356 Public Welfare...Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite Population Correction The Finite Population...

  2. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations C Appendix C to Part 1356 Public Welfare...Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite Population Correction The Finite Population...

  3. Protecting the Lunar Heritage Sites from the Effects of Visiting Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip; Lane, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The Problem: Rocket exhaust blows soil and rocks over vast distances at velocities upwards of 1 to 3 km/s, and this will be highly abrasive and damaging if it impacts the valuable lunar heritage sites.

  4. Follow-up of K2 planet candiates with the LCOGT network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomir, Diana; Bayliss, Daniel; Colón, Knicole; Cochran, William; Zhou, George; Brown, Timothy; Shporer, Avi; Espinoza, Nestor; Fulton, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    K2 has proven to be an outstanding successor to the Kepler mission. It has already revealed dozens of new planet candidates, and unlike those found by the primary mission, many of these systems’ host stars are sufficiently bright to allow extensive follow-up observations. This is especially important since each of the K2 observing campaigns are only ~80 days long, leaving the community with the discovery of exciting new systems but often not enough time coverage to enable a thorough characterization of these systems.We are leading a large effort to observe K2 transiting planet candidates with the LCOGT telescope network. LCOGT’s longitudinal coverage, multiple identical telescopes per site and automated queue observing make it an ideal facility for fast, high-precision and multi-color follow-up. Our program focuses on specific aspects of K2 follow-up for which the network is especially powerful: period determination for candidates with fewer than three K2 transits; transit timing variation monitoring to measure planetary masses, orbital parameters and to search for additional planets in multiple systems; and multi-color photometry to vet planet candidates and carry-out preliminary atmospheric spectroscopy.We will present new results for a selection of systems observed so far through this program. These include K2-19, a multi-planet system extremely close to 3:2 resonance and experiencing transit timing variations with amplitudes as large as one hour; EPIC201702477, a long-period planet with only two K2 transits; WASP-47, a system hosting a hot Jupiter and two K2-discovered small planets; and EPIC201637175b, a disintegrating rocky planet.Our program demonstrates that LCOGT is uniquely positioned to be the primary ground-based photometric follow-up resource for K2 exoplanet discoveries, but also for the numerous bright systems that will result from the TESS mission. LCOGT photometry complements ongoing radial velocity and atmospheric spectroscopy efforts to reveal a more complete picture of the bright, nearby exoplanet systems discovered by these missions.

  5. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Follow-up Questionnaire data set provides information concerning the activities within the household during the sampling week. The information is from 201 Follow-up Questionnaires for 91 households. Medication and supplemental dietary information is provided. The Follow-up...

  6. Psychological adjustment in children after traumatic disfiguring injuries: a 12-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Rusch, M D; Grunert, B K; Sanger, J R; Dzwierzynski, W W; Matloub, H S

    2000-12-01

    The psychological adjustment of 57 children (age range, 3 to 12 years) who sustained mutilating traumatic injuries to the face or upper or lower extremities was assessed over a 12-month interval. The injuries had occurred as a result of boating, lawn mower, or home accidents or dog bites. Within 5 days of the traumatic event, 98 percent of the children were symptomatic for posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, or anxiety. One month after the injury, 82 percent were symptomatic. Symptom frequency had declined by the time of the 3-month and 6-month evaluations, but 44 percent of the children continued to report symptoms at 12-month follow-up visits, and 21 percent met the diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder. Typical symptoms included flashbacks, fear of re-injury, mood disorders, body-image changes secondary to disfigurement, sleep disturbances, and anxiety. These findings support the importance of psychological evaluation and treatment of children who suffer mutilating injuries that require the attention of plastic surgeons. PMID:11129171

  7. Prevalence and characteristics associated with default of treatment and follow-up in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Chan, C M H; Wan Ahmad, W A; Md Yusof, M; Ho, G F; Krupat, E

    2015-11-01

    Defaulting is an important issue across all medical specialties, but much more so in cancer as delayed or incomplete treatment has been shown to result in worse clinical outcomes such as treatment resistance, disease progression as well as lower survival. Our objective was to identify psychosocial variables and characteristics associated with default among cancer patients. A total of 467 consecutive adult cancer patients attending the oncology clinic at a single academic medical centre completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and reported their preference for psychological support at baseline, 4-6 weeks and 12-18 months follow-up. Default was defined as refusal, delay or discontinuation of treatment or visit, despite the ability to do so. A total of 159 of 467 (34.0%) cancer patients were defaulters. Of these 159 defaulters, 89 (56.0%) desired psychological support, compared to only 13 (4.2%) of 308 non-defaulters. Using a logistic regression, patients who were defaulters had 52 times higher odds (P = 0.001; 95% confidence interval 20.61-134.47) of desiring psychological support than non-defaulters after adjusting for covariates. These findings suggest that defaulters should be offered psychological support which may increase cancer treatment acceptance rates and improve survival. PMID:25810106

  8. Micro-Bypass Implantation for Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Combined with Phacoemulsification: 4-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Fea, Antonio Maria; Consolandi, Giulia; Zola, Marta; Pignata, Giulia; Cannizzo, Paola; Lavia, Carlo; Rolle, Teresa; Grignolo, Federico Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the long-term follow-up results in patients with cataract and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) randomly assigned to cataract surgery combined with micro-bypass stent implantation or phacoemulsification alone. Methods. 36 subjects with cataract and POAG were randomized in a 1?:?2 ratio to either iStent implantation and cataract surgery (combined group) or cataract surgery alone (control group). 24 subjects agreed to be evaluated again 48 months after surgery. Patients returned one month later for unmedicated washout assessment. Results. At the long-term follow-up visit we reported a mean IOP of 15,9 ± 2,3?mmHg in the iStent group and 17 ± 2,5?mmHg in the control group (p = NS). After washout, a 14,2% between group difference in favour of the combined group was statistically significant (p = 0,02) for mean IOP reduction. A significant reduction in the mean number of medications was observed in both groups compared to baseline values (p = 0,005 in the combined group and p = 0,01 in the control group). Conclusion. Patients in the combined group maintained low IOP levels after long-term follow-up. Cataract surgery alone showed a loss of efficacy in controlling IOP over time. Both treatments reduced the number of ocular hypotensive medications prescribed. This trial is registered with: NCT00847158. PMID:26587282

  9. Methods for successful follow-up of elusive urban populations: an ethnographic approach with homeless men.

    PubMed Central

    Conover, S.; Berkman, A.; Gheith, A.; Jahiel, R.; Stanley, D.; Geller, P. A.; Valencia, E.; Susser, E.

    1997-01-01

    Public health is paying increasing attention to elusive urban populations such as the homeless, street drug users, and illegal immigrants. Yet, valid data on the health of these populations remain scarce; longitudinal research, in particular, has been hampered by poor follow-up rates. This paper reports on the follow-up methods used in two randomized clinical trials among one such population, namely, homeless men with mental illness. Each of the two trials achieved virtually complete follow-up over 18 months. The authors describe the ethnographic approach to follow-up used in these trials and elaborate its application to four components of the follow-up: training interviewers, tracking participants, administering the research office, and conducting assessments. The ethnographic follow-up method is adaptable to other studies and other settings, and may provide a replicable model for achieving high follow-up rates in urban epidemiologic studies. PMID:9211004

  10. Evaluation of a residential nutrition rehabilitation center in rural Bolivia: Short-term effectiveness and follow-up results

    PubMed Central

    Rebolledo, Paulina A.; Huamani, Katherine Foy; Mues, Katherine E.; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Leon, Juan S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nutrition rehabilitation centers (NRCs) have shown mixed results in reducing morbidity and mortality among undernourished children in the developing world. Follow-up on children after leaving these programs remains undocumented. Objective To assess the nutritional improvement of children attending the Centro de Rehabilitación Infantil Nutricional (CRIN), a residential NRC in rural Bolivia, from entrance to exit and to a household follow-up visit 1 month to 6 years later, and to identify factors associated with nutritional improvement. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted of clinical records collected by CRIN staff from 135 children under 3 years of age attending CRIN in rural Cochabamba, Bolivia, from 2003 to 2009, and of clinical records of household follow-up measurements on a subset of 26 children that were taken between 1 month and 6 years postexit. Nutritional status was evaluated by calculating z-scores for weight-for-height (WHZ), weight-for-age (WAZ), and height-for-age (HAZ). Children with z-scores < ? 2 were considered to be wasted, underweight, or stunted, respectively. Results The prevalence of wasting decreased significantly, while the prevalence of stunting did not change significantly between entrance and exit from the program. From entrance to exit, the mean changes in WHZ (0.79) and WAZ (1.08) were statistically significant, while the mean change in HAZ (? 0.02) was not significant. Linear regression analysis suggested that nutritional status and diarrhea at entrance had the greatest effect on WHZ and HAZ changes between entrance and exit. Children maintained their nutritional gains from the program between exit and follow-up and showed statistically significant improvement in WAZ (but not HAZ). Conclusions CRIN is effective at rehabilitating nutritional deficits associated with wasting, but not those associated with stunting. PMID:25076769

  11. Implementation of medication review with follow-up in a Spanish community pharmacy and its achieved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Carla Castrillon; Garcia-Cardenas, Victoria; Martinez-Martinez, Fernando; Benrimoj, Shalom I; Amariles, Pedro; Gastelurrutia, Miguel Angel

    2015-10-01

    Background Despite many research studies demonstrating the benefit in clinical, economic, and humanistic outcomes of professional pharmacy services, there is a paucity of evidence when these services become incorporated into the usual practice of a community pharmacy. Objective The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical, economic, and humanistic impact of a pharmacist-conducted medication review with follow-up following 18 months implementation. Setting Community pharmacies in Spain. Method The study used an effectiveness-implementation hybrid design. During the follow-up, patients attended the pharmacy on a monthly basis and received the medication review with follow-up service. Main outcome measure Economic, clinical, and humanistic measures were used to assess the impact of the service. Results 132 patients received the service. During the 18 months of follow-up, 408 negative outcomes related to medicines (which are uncontrolled health problems) were identified, of which 393 were resolved. The average number of medicines used by patients significantly decreased from 6.1 (SD: 2.9) to 3.3 (SD: 2.2). A significant decrease was also observed in hospitalizations [OR = 0.31 (IC 95 % = 0.10-0.99)] and in emergency department visits [OR = 0.16 (IC 95 % = 0.05-0.55); p = 0.001]. A general trend to increase all quality of life domains was observed over time. The higher increase was observed in the construct health transition [mean increase: 30.7 (SD: 25.4)], followed by bodily pain [mean increase: 22.3 (SD: 25.4)], and general health [mean increase: 20.7 (SD: 23.7)]. Medication knowledge significantly increased in terms of aggregated domains of dose, frequency, drug indication [from 8.9 (SD: 17.5) to 87.9 (SD: 25.0)], and dose and frequency [from 9.3 (SD: 17.9) to 92.5 (22.1)]. Although a slight improvement was observed in terms of drug indication, this increase was not statistically significant. 68 out of 132 patients (51.5 %) were non-adherent to their treatment. This number decreased to 1 (0.8 %) after the follow-up [OR = 0.007 (IC 95 %: 0.001-0.053) p < 0.001]. Conclusion A community pharmacy based medication review with follow-up service delivered by a trained pharmacist, has positive effects across clinical, economic, and humanistic outcomes. These results are consistent with previous studies. Incorporating community pharmacists into the multidisciplinary team is a reliable solution to improve health care. PMID:26040837

  12. Follow up of patients who start treatment with antidepressants: treatment satisfaction, treatment compliance, efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Measuring satisfaction with treatment has proved useful to ascertain the treatment features that are most important to the patients, and to explain increased treatment compliance. However, there are few studies that relate satisfaction to other clinical or self-perceived health status indicators. Recent studies have shown the close relationship between satisfaction with treatment, treatment compliance, and effectiveness. This study attempts to design and validate a scale to evaluate satisfaction with antidepressant drug therapy, assess treatment compliance (self-reported, validated questionnaire, drug accountability and electronic monitorization system), assess efficacy in reducing depressive symptoms and safety in patients who initiate antidepressant drug therapy, as well as to establish predictors of satisfaction, compliance and effectiveness with these drugs. Methods/design This is an observational longitudinal study with a cohort of adults initiating treatment with antidepressant drugs. A multi-centre study will be performed in which 20 Primary Care practices from Castilla-La Mancha are expected to participate. An initial interview and follow-up visits at 15 days, 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months will be conducted with all study participants. 706 subjects will be studied (95% confidence interval, precision ± 3%, expected rate of non-compliance 50%, expected non-responders and lost to follow up rate 15%). The following measurements will be performed: development and validation of a scale of satisfaction with antidepressant therapy, participant and antidepressant characteristics, treatment compliance evaluation (Haynes-Sackett Test, Morisky-Green Test, drug accountability and Medication Event Monitoring System), depression symptom reduction (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale), observation of adverse effects, and beliefs about treatment (The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire). Discussion Antidepressant drugs are an extraordinarily important therapeutic group in the pharmacy composition; economic repercussions and social impact associated to their use is clear. Despite their well-established efficacy in clinical trials, treatment non-compliance is a major obstacle to their effectiveness in clinical practice. The proposed study brings about useful conclusions to improve the results of these drugs. Additionally, devising a scale specifically designed to evaluate satisfaction with antidepressant treatment could be of interest in healthcare outcomes research. PMID:23425500

  13. Determinants of First Antenatal Care Visit by Pregnant Women at Community Based Education, Research and Service Sites in Northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    TURYASIIMA, M.; TUGUME, R.; OPENY, A.; AHAIRWOMUGISHA, E.; OPIO, R.; NTUNGUKA, M.; MAHULO, N.; AKERA, P.; ODONGO-AGINYA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Antenatal care (ANC) aims mainly at prevention, early detection and management of general medical and pregnancy associated disorders. Early booking is recommended for maximum utilisation. Objective To investigate the determinants of first ANC visit and trimesters at which pregnant mothers enrol for ANC at the COBERS sites of Northern Uganda. Design A descriptive cross-sectional analytical study. Setting Five community based education, research and service sites (COBERS) of Atiak, Madi Opei, Mungula, Namukora and Pajule health centre fours (HC IV) in the five respective districts of Amuru, Lamwo, Adjumani, Kitgum and Pader, Northern Uganda, from April to July 2013. Subjects Four hundred and seventeen (417) pregnant women attending antenatal care (ANC) in five health centers and 10 purposively selected midwives were interviewed using questionnaires. Results Of the 417 respondents, only 11.5% (n = 48) had their first ANC at the recommended period of 0–16 weeks. Prevalence of late entry to ANC was 88.5% (n = 369). Mean gestational age at booking was 22.6±5.7 weeks. Paternal level of education, outcome of previous pregnancy, previous ANC attendance, weeks of amenorrhea, convenience of opening hours at ANC facility, commuting distance from home to health facility, knowing the right time for ANC enrollment, and pregnancy planning remained significant predictors governing early booking. Conclusion Late ANC booking is still a major public health concern that demands public enlightenment, and paternal education coupled with women empowerment will reduce the magnitude of the problem.

  14. Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia: follow-up for cancer incidence and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Rahu, Kaja; Auvinen, Anssi; Hakulinen, Timo; Tekkel, Mare; Inskip, Peter D; Bromet, Evelyn J; Boice, John D; Rahu, Mati

    2013-01-01

    This study examined cancer incidence (1986–2008) and mortality (1986–2011) among the Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers in comparison with the Estonian male population. The cohort of 4,810 men was followed through nationwide population, mortality and cancer registries. Cancer and death risks were measured by standardized incidence ratio (SIR) and standardized mortality ratio (SMR), respectively. Poisson regression was used to analyze the effects of year of arrival, duration of stay, and time since return on cancer and death risks. The SIR for all cancers was 1.06 with 95% confidence interval 0.93–1.20 (232 cases). Elevated risks were found for cancers of pharynx, oesophagus, and the joint category of alcohol-related sites. No clear evidence of an increased risk of thyroid cancer, leukaemia, or radiation-related cancer sites combined was apparent. The SMR for all causes of death was 1.02 with 95% confidence interval 0.96–1.08 (1,018 deaths). Excess mortality was observed for mouth and pharynx cancer, alcohol-related cancer sites together, and suicide. Duration of stay rather than year of arrival was associated with increased mortality. Twenty-six years of follow-up of this cohort indicates no definite health effects attributable to radiation, but the elevated suicide risk has persisted. PMID:23532116

  15. Intake of fried meat and risk of cancer: a follow-up study in Finland.

    PubMed

    Knekt, P; Steineck, G; Järvinen, R; Hakulinen, T; Aromaa, A

    1994-12-15

    It has been suggested that mutagens in fried meat may be involved in the cancer process. Therefore the relationships between intake of fried meat and subsequent risk of cancers at different sites were studied among 9,990 Finnish men and women, 15-99 years of age and initially free of cancer. The baseline study was carried out in 1966-1972, and cases of cancer were identified through data linkage with the Finnish Cancer Registry. During a 24-year follow-up, 853 cancer cases were diagnosed. The intake of fried meat was estimated from a dietary history interview covering the total diet of the participants during the previous year. There was a positive association between fried meat intake and the risk of female-hormone-related cancers, i.e., cancer of the breast, endometrium and ovary combined. The relative risk of these cancers combined between persons in the highest and lowest tertiles of daily intake of fried meat adjusted for age, personal characteristics and intake of other main food groups was 1.77 (95% confidence interval = 1.11-2.84). Pancreatic and nervous system cancers also presented non-significant suggestive associations. No associations were observed with respect to other single cancer sites studied or to all sites of cancer combined. Further epidemiological efforts are needed to ascertain the potential link between fried-food mutagens and cancer risk. PMID:7989114

  16. Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia: follow-up for cancer incidence and mortality.

    PubMed

    Rahu, Kaja; Auvinen, Anssi; Hakulinen, Timo; Tekkel, Mare; Inskip, Peter D; Bromet, Evelyn J; Boice, John D; Rahu, Mati

    2013-06-01

    This study examined cancer incidence (1986-2008) and mortality (1986-2011) among the Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers in comparison with the Estonian male population. The cohort of 4810 men was followed through nationwide population, mortality and cancer registries. Cancer and death risks were measured by standardised incidence ratio (SIR) and standardised mortality ratio (SMR), respectively. Poisson regression was used to analyse the effects of year of arrival, duration of stay and time since return on cancer and death risks. The SIR for all cancers was 1.06 with 95% confidence interval 0.93-1.20 (232 cases). Elevated risks were found for cancers of the pharynx, the oesophagus and the joint category of alcohol-related sites. No clear evidence of an increased risk of thyroid cancer, leukaemia or radiation-related cancer sites combined was apparent. The SMR for all causes of death was 1.02 with 95% confidence interval 0.96-1.08 (1018 deaths). Excess mortality was observed for mouth and pharynx cancer, alcohol-related cancer sites together and suicide. Duration of stay rather than year of arrival was associated with increased mortality. Twenty-six years of follow-up of this cohort indicates no definite health effects attributable to radiation, but the elevated suicide risk has persisted. PMID:23532116

  17. M.A. English or Technical Writing Graduate Certificate: How to Get Started Please visit the following sites to learn more about our Graduate Programs.

    E-print Network

    Selmic, Sandra

    M.A. English or Technical Writing Graduate Certificate: How to Get Started Greetings! Please visit the following sites to learn more about our Graduate Programs. The best place to begin is by reading the Graduate English Handbook Current tuition and fee rates are available through Louisiana Tech's Comptroller

  18. Child Care Checklist We recommend that you make an on-site visit to any provider that you are considering. Use this

    E-print Network

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    Child Care Checklist We recommend that you make an on-site visit to any provider that you, education philosophy, and environment) meet my child's needs? Do they provide an agreement or contract? Gets down on the child's level to talk with him? Has training in early childhood education or child

  19. Results from the LCOGT Near-Earth Object Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric; Larson, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter and two 2-meter telescopes to five locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with plans to extend to twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. The versitility and design of this network allows for rapid response to target of opportunity events as well as the long-term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The network's global coverage and the apertures of telescopes available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). This is complimented by the two 2-meter telescopes at Haleakala (Hawaii) and Siding Spring Observatory. The telescope network has been fully operational since May 2014, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to sites in the Canary Islands and Tibet are planned for 2016.The LCOGT near-Earth object group is using the network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS), PanSTARRS (PS1) and NEOWISE, with several hundred targets being followed per year. Follow-up astrometry and photometry of radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists are improving orbits, producing light curves and rotation periods, and better characterizing these NEOs. Recent results include the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. In addition, we are in the process of building a NEO portal that will allow professionals, amateurs, and Citizen Scientists to plan, schedule, and analyze NEO imaging and spectroscopy observations and data using the LCOGT Network and to act as a coordination hub for the NEO follow-up efforts.

  20. Femtosecond lenticule extraction for correction of myopia: a 6 month follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Demirok, Ahmet; Agca, Alper; Ozgurhan, Engin Bilge; Bozkurt, Ercument; Celik, Ugur; Demircan, Ali; Guleryuz, Nimet Burcu; Cankaya, Kadir ?lker; Yilmaz, Omer Faruk

    2013-01-01

    Aims To report our initial experience with femtosecond lenticule extraction (FLEX) compared with femtosecond laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Settings and design This was a prospective pilot study carried out at the Refractive Surgery Department of the Beyoglu Eye Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Materials and methods Surgery was performed on both eyes of 14 consecutive patients with myopia or myopic astigmatism. Patients underwent FLEX in one eye and femtosecond LASIK (FemtoLASIK) in the other eye. The primary outcome was based on uncorrected distance visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, and spherical equivalent of the subjective manifest refraction, at 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months postsurgery. Statistical analyses were performed using PAWS Statistics 18. Unpaired Student’s t-test was used to compare the groups. Results During the last follow-up visit (6 months postsurgery), the mean spherical was ?0.37 ± 0.60 diopters (D) (range ?1.00 to 0.50) (P < 0.001) and ?0.25 ± 0.41 D (range ?0.88 to 0.12 D) (P < 0.001) in the FLEX and FemtoLASIK eyes, respectively. The spherical was within ± 0.50 D of the intended correction in ten (72%) of the FLEX eyes and 12 (86%) of the FemtoLASIK eyes (P > 0.05). No complications occurred during surgery or the postoperative period. Conclusion FLEX is a safe, effective, and predictable procedure for surgical correction of myopia. Refractive results were stabilized within the first postoperative week, and visual acuities were stabilized within the first month, comparable to FemtoLASIK. PMID:23766626

  1. Patient Follow-Up After Participating in a Beach-Based Skin Cancer Screening Program

    PubMed Central

    Greaney, Mary L.; Puleo, Elaine; Geller, Alan C.; Hu, Stephanie W.; Werchniak, Andrew E.; DeCristofaro, Susan; Emmons, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    Many skin cancer screenings occur in non-traditional community settings, with the beach being an important setting due to beachgoers being at high risk for skin cancer. This study is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized trial of a skin cancer intervention in which participants (n = 312) had a full-body skin examination by a clinician and received a presumptive diagnosis (abnormal finding, no abnormal finding). Participants’ pursuit of follow-up was assessed post-intervention (n = 283). Analyses examined: (1) participant’s recall of screening results; and (2) whether cognitive and behavioral variables were associated with follow-up being as advised. Just 12% of participants (36/312) did not correctly recall the results of their skin examination. One-third (33%, 93/283) of participants’ follow-up was classified as being not as advised (recommend follow-up not pursued, unadvised follow-up pursued). Among participants whose follow-up was not as advised, 71% (66/93) did not seek recommended care. None of the measured behavioral and cognitive variables were significantly associated with recall of screening examination results or whether follow-up was as advised. Research is needed to determine what factors are associated with follow-up being as advised and to develop messages that increase receipt of advised follow-up care. PMID:22754476

  2. HPV clearance in postpartum period of HIV-positive and negative women: a prospective follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HPV persistence is a key determinant of cervical carcinogenesis. The influence of postpartum on HPV clearance has been debated. This study aimed to assess HPV clearance in later pregnancy and postpartum among HIV-positive and negative women. Methods We conducted a follow-up study with 151 HPV-positive women coinfected with HIV, in 2007–2010. After baseline assessment, all women were retested for HPV infection using PCR in later pregnancy and after delivery. Multivariable logistic regressions assessed the putative association of covariates with HPV status in between each one of the successive visits. Results Seventy-one women (47%) have eliminated HPV between the baseline visit and their second or third visits. HIV-positive women took a significantly longer time (7.0?±?3.8 months) to clear HPV, compared to those not infected by HIV (5.9?±?3.0 months). HPV clearance was significantly more likely to take place after delivery than during pregnancy (84.5% x 15.5%). Conclusions Both HIV-positive and negative women presented a significant reduction in HPV infection during the postpartum period. HIV-positive status was found to be associated with a longer period of time to clear HPV infection in pregnant women. PMID:24289532

  3. Home?Based Walking Exercise in Peripheral Artery Disease: 12?Month Follow?up of the Goals Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Criqui, Michael H.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zhao, Lihui; Liu, Kiang; Domanchuk, Kathryn; Spring, Bonnie; Tian, Lu; Kibbe, Melina; Liao, Yihua; Lloyd Jones, Donald; Rejeski, W. Jack

    2014-01-01

    Background We studied whether a 6?month group?mediated cognitive behavioral (GMCB) intervention for peripheral artery disease (PAD) participants, which promoted home?based walking exercise, improved 6?minute walk and other outcomes at 12?month follow?up, 6 months after completing the intervention, compared to a control group. Methods and Results We randomized PAD participants to a GMCB intervention or a control group. During phase I (months 1 to 6), the intervention used group support and self?regulatory skills during weekly on?site meetings to help participants adhere to home?based exercise. The control group received weekly on?site lectures on topics unrelated to exercise. Primary outcomes were measured at the end of phase I. During phase II (months 7 to 12), each group received telephone contact. Compared to controls, participants randomized to the intervention increased their 6?minute walk distance from baseline to 12?month follow?up, (from 355.4 to 381.9 m in the intervention versus 353.1 to 345.6 m in the control group; mean difference=+34.1 m; 95% confidence interval [CI]=+14.6, +53.5; P<0.001) and their Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ) speed score (from 36.1 to 46.5 in the intervention group versus 34.9 to 36.5 in the control group; mean difference =+8.8; 95% CI=+1.6, +16.1; P=0.018). Change in the WIQ distance score was not different between the 2 groups at 12?month follow?up (P=0.139). Conclusions A weekly on?site GMCB intervention that promoted home?based walking exercise intervention for people with PAD demonstrated continued benefit at 12?month follow?up, 6 months after the GMCB intervention was completed. Clinical Trial Registration URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00693940. PMID:24850615

  4. Stennis' granddaughter visit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Jane Kenna of Atlanta, granddaughter of the late Sen. John C. Stennis, visits StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Kenna and her husband, John, visited Stennis on April 6, her first trip to the rocket engine testing facility since the 1988 ceremony to rename the site in honor of her grandfather.

  5. Gestational trophoblastic diseases - clinical guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and counselling.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Isa; Vejerslev, Lars O; Frøding, Ligita; Blaakær, Jan; Maroun, Lisa Leth; Hansen, Estrid Stæhr; Grove, Anni; Lund, Helle; Havsteen, Hanne; Sunde, Lone

    2015-11-01

    Hydatidiform mole is treated with surgical uterine evacuation with suction and blunt curettage (D). Medical uterine evacuation should not be used (C). On clinical suspicion of hydatidiform mole, one representative sample of the evacuated tissue is fixed for histopathologic investigation and one is forwarded unfixed for genetic analysis (D). Serum hCG is measured on suspicion of hydatidiform mole. At the time of the uterine evacuation, the initial hCG is measured (A). After a hydatidiform mole that is both triploid and partial, serum hCG is measured weekly until there are two consecutive undetectable values (< 1 or < 2), after which the patient can be discharged from follow-up (C). After a diploid hydatidiform mole, a complete mole, or a hydatidiform mole without valid ploidy determination, serum hCG is measured weekly until the value is undetectable (< 1 or < 2). If serum hCG is undetectable within 56 days after evacuation, the patient can be discharged from follow-up after an additional four monthly measurements. If serum hCG is first normalised after 56 days, the patient is follow-up with monthly serum hCG measurement for six months. Safe contraception should be used during the follow-up period (A). If hCG stagnates (less than 10% fall over three measurements), increases, or if hCG can be demonstrated for longer than 6 months, the patient by definition has persistent trophoblastic disease (PTD). A chest X-ray should be taken and a gynaecologic ultrasound scanning performed. The patient is referred to oncologic treatment (A). Uterine re-evacuation as a treatment for PTD can, in general, not be recommended because the rate of remission is low, and there is the risk of perforation of the uterus (C). In all following pregnancies, the woman is offered an early ultrasound scan, e.g. in gestational week eight (D). Eight weeks after termination of all future pregnancies, serum hCG is measured (D). In PTD and invasive hydatidiform mole, the primary treatment is MTX, either orally every third week or IV every week (B). In MTX-resistant PTD, IV act D is added (or replaces the MTX) (B). Third line chemotherapy is BEP or EP, alternatively EMA-CO (B). Choriocarcinoma is primarily treated with chemotherapy. Hysterectomy and/or resection of metastases are possible treatments (A). Placental site trophoblastic tumour (PSTT) and epithelioid trophoblastic tumour (ETT) are primarily treated with hysterectomy. In the case of disseminated disease, chemotherapy is considered (A). The risk of reoccurrence after trophoblastic disease treated with chemotherapy is approximately 3%. Most reoccurrences are seen within 12 months, and for this reason monitoring of hCG is recommended for one year, the first third months once or twice a month, thereafter every second to third month. Patients with PSTT and ETT are monitored with measurement of hCG throughout their lifetimes (C). In genetically verified twin pregnancy with hydatidiform mole and a living foetus, the pregnancy can continue if serum hCG is monitored and ultrasound scans regularly performed, and possible obstetric complications dealt with (C). In the case of recurrent hydatidiform mole and/or familial hydatidiform mole, patients should be referred to genetic workup and counselling (C). Women with a hereditary disposition to hydatidiform mole because of a mutation in NLRP7 should be informed of the possibility of becoming pregnant via egg donation (C). PMID:26522484

  6. X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified VHE {gamma}-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Puehlhofer, Gerd

    2008-12-24

    A large fraction of the recently discovered Galactic Very High Energy (VHE) source population remains unidentified to date. VHE {gamma}-ray emission traces high energy particles in these sources, but for example in case of hadronic processes also the gas density at the emission site. Moreover, the particles have sufficiently long lifetimes to be able to escape from their acceleration sites. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray sources or at least the areas of maximum surface brightness are in many cases spatially offset from the actual accelerators. A promising way to identify the objects in which the particles are accelerated seems to be to search for emission signatures of the acceleration process (like emission from shock-heated plasma). Also the particles themselves (through primary or secondary synchrotron emission) can be traced in lower wavebands. Those signatures are best visible in the X-ray band, and current X-ray observatories are well suited to conduct such follow-up observations. Some aspects of the current status of these investigations are reviewed.

  7. Crisis Nursery and Respite Care Programs: Site Visit Results of Staff and Family Interviews (Winter and Spring of 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntington, Gail S.; And Others

    Visits were made to selected respite care and crisis nursery programs in order to describe the programs and services they offered to families of young children with special needs and to learn more about the families who used the services and the staff who provided them. The visits to 10 crisis nurseries and 24 respite care programs resulted in…

  8. Documentation for the 2008-09 Teacher Follow-up Survey. NCES 2011-304

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Shawna; Parmer, Randall; Chambers, Lisa; Tourkin, Steven; Lyter, Deanna M.

    2011-01-01

    The Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) is sponsored by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) on behalf of the U.S. Department of Education and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. TFS is a follow-up survey of selected elementary and secondary school teachers who participated in the Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). SASS is the…

  9. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--FOOD FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Follow-up Questionnaire data set provides information on the eating patterns and the food identification and preparation methods that occurred during the period the food sample was taken. The information is for 179 Food Follow-up Questionnaires for 179 households. In t...

  10. Utility of Follow-Up Skeletal Surveys in Suspected Child Physical Abuse Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Stephanie; Makoroff, Kathi; Care, Marguerite; Thomas, Amy; Shapiro, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the utility of a follow-up skeletal survey in suspected child physical abuse evaluations. Methods: In this prospective study, follow-up skeletal surveys were recommended for 74 children who, after an initial skeletal survey and evaluation by the Child Abuse Team, were suspected victims of physical abuse. The number and…

  11. Infantile Amnesia across the Years: A 2-Year Follow-Up of Children's Earliest Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Carole; Warren, Kelly L.; Short, Megan M.

    2011-01-01

    Although infantile amnesia has been investigated for many years in adults, only recently has it been investigated in children. This study was a 2-year follow-up and extension of an earlier study. Children (4-13 years old) were asked initially and 2 years later for their earliest 3 memories. At follow-up, their age at the time of these memories…

  12. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA (MONITORING PERIOD 1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes responses for 249 follow-up questionnaires collected during the first week-long monitoring period. The Follow-up Questionnaire was used to provide information on relatively infrequent (e.g., less than daily) activities during the sampling period to explain ...

  13. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA (ALL MONITORING PERIODS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes responses for 249 participants with a total of 444 follow-up questionnaires. Some participants were studied for more than one monitoring period. The Follow-up Questionnaire was used to provide information on relatively infrequent (e.g., less than daily) ac...

  14. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--FOOD FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes responses for 163 food follow-up questionnaires. The food diary follow-up questionnaire was used to identify how the dietary patterns observed for study participants who had submitted duplicate diet samples and completed the associated food diary related to...

  15. Compilation of Case Studies: Exemplary Placement and Follow-Up Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Jack

    Examples of placement and follow-up conceptual models developed for a program of vocational education (kindergarten through university) are presented. Section 1 contains a historical overview of placement and follow-up activities in Florida and describes a comprehensive model. Section 2, describing a model for utilizing community resources for the…

  16. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--FOOD FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Follow-up Questionnaire data set provides information on the eating patterns and the food identification and preparation methods that occurred during the period the food sample was taken. The information is for 86 Food Follow-up Questionnaires for 86 households. In the...

  17. Career Program Completers. 1989-90 Long-Term Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Office of Institutional Research.

    In summer 1994, a long-term follow-up study was conducted of 1989-90 graduates of career programs at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas. A survey was mailed to 536 graduates, certificate holders, and students who left JCCC with marketable skills to assess their satisfaction with JCCC and their jobs. With telephone follow-up, a…

  18. Quick statistics Survey 53495 'Follow-up Social Networks and Online Privacy Concerns Survey'

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Gail E.

    Quick statistics Survey 53495 'Follow-up Social Networks and Online Privacy Concerns Survey' Results Survey 53495 Number of records in this query: 10 Total records in survey: 10 Percentage of total: 100.00% Page 1 / 38 #12;Quick statistics Survey 53495 'Follow-up Social Networks and Online Privacy

  19. Two-Year Follow-Up of Bibliotherapy and Individual Cognitive Therapy for Depressed Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Mark; Rohen, Noelle; Shackelford, Jodie A. M.; Hubbard, Karen L.; Parnell, Marsha B.; Scogin, Forrest; Coates, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the stability of treatment gains after receiving either cognitive bibliotherapy or individual cognitive psychotherapy for depression in older adults. A 2-year follow-up of 23 participants from Floyd, Scogin, McKendree-Smith, Floyd, and Rokke (2004) was conducted by comparing pre- and posttreatment scores with follow-up scores…

  20. Men with Intellectual Disabilities Who Have Attended Sex Offender Treatment Groups: A Follow-up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Kathryn M.; Murphy, Glynis H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There have been a number of studies of treatment for men with intellectual disabilities and sexually abusive behaviour but few follow-up studies. Our aim was to follow up men with intellectual disabilities who had attended group cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) for sexually abusive behaviour. Method Thirty-four men (from seven…

  1. A Research on Students' Needs for Follow-Up Curriculum of College English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Jie; Liu, Hengying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Increased universities and colleges offer the undergraduates with more follow-up courses with the further reform in college English education in China. An investigation on self-evaluation, difficulty, and willingness of undergraduates in learning English further was made in order to design more appropriate and adaptable follow-up courses. This…

  2. The effect of follow-up inspections on critical violations identified during restaurant inspections.

    PubMed

    Waters, A Blake; VanDerslice, James; Porucznik, Christina; Kim, Jaewhan; Durrant, Lynne; DeLegge, Royal

    2015-06-01

    Follow-up inspections are recommended by the Food and Drug Administration as a tool to verify corrections to violations cited during restaurant inspections. The effectiveness of follow-up inspections as a tool in reducing critical violations is unknown, however. The purpose of the authors' study was to assess whether a serious violation that leads to a follow-up inspection reduces the probability of specific critical violations occurring during the next routine inspection. Outcome measures included poor personal hygiene, improper holding temperatures, substandard equipment cleanliness, potential cross contamination, and improper sanitizer concentration. The risk of having a violation increased for all targeted critical violations during inspections conducted after a follow-up inspection compared to restaurant inspections without a prior follow-up, when adjusting for restaurant type, inspector experience, and season. PMID:26058216

  3. EA follow-up in the Ghanaian mining sector: Challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Appiah-Opoku, Seth; Bryan, Hobson C.

    2013-07-15

    Environmental assessment (EA) follow-up provides a means for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of environmental impact studies. It is integral to the success or failure of a project or program. In spite of its importance, very little attention is given to the need for follow-up programs in most jurisdictions in Africa. Using a case study in the Ghanaian mining sector, this paper explores the challenges and opportunities within the country's EA process for an effective follow-up program. The paper is based on informal interviews, content analysis of relevant publications, official EA documents, and internet searches. The authors suggest a standard EA follow-up program to be formalized as an integral part of Ghana's environmental assessment policy. They also propose a follow-up process that harnesses existing opportunities within the country's EA system. This approach can be replicated in other African countries.

  4. Outcome of Preterm Infants With Postnatal Cytomegalovirus Infection via Breast Milk: A Two-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Jim, Wai-Tim; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Ho, Che-Sheng; Shu, Chyong-Hsin; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Hung, Han-Yang; Kao, Hsin-An; Chang, Hung-Yang; Peng, Chun-Chih; Yui, Bey-Hwa; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-10-01

    Approximately 15% of preterm infants may develop postnatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection from seropositive mothers via breast milk and are at risk for neurological sequelae in childhood. The aims of this study were to assess the effects and outcomes on growth, neurodevelopmental status, and hearing in very low birth weight (VLBW) premature infants with postnatal CMV infection via breast milk at the corrected age of 12 and 24 months.The prospective follow-up study population comprised all living preterm children (n?=?55) with a birth weight ?1500?g and gestational age of ?35 weeks, who had been participated in our "postnatal CMV infection via breast milk" studies in 2000 and 2009, respectively. The cohort of children was assessed at 12 and 24 months. Clinical outcomes were documented during hospitalization and after discharge. Long-term outcomes included anthropometry, audiologic tests, gross motor quotient, Infant International Battery, and neurodevelopmental outcomes; all were assessed at postcorrected age in 12 and 24 months during follow-up visits.Of the 55 infants enrolled in the study (4 noninfected infants were excluded because their parents did not join this follow-up program later), 14 infants postnatally acquired CMV infection through breast-feeding (infected group) and were compared with 41 infants without CMV infection (control group). No significant differences were observed between the groups with regard to baseline characteristics, clinical outcomes, anthropometry, or psychomotor and mental development on the Bayley scale of infant development. None of the infants had CMV-related death or permanent sensorineural hearing loss.Transmission of CMV from seropositive mother via breast milk to preterm infants does not appear at this time to have major adverse effects on clinical outcomes, growth, neurodevelopmental status, and hearing function at 12 and 24 months corrected age. PMID:26512588

  5. Follow-Up 92. Minnesota High School Follow-Up. Class of 1991--One Year Later. Trend Data: 1978-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedey, John M.

    A study examined the educational and employment activities of members of Minnesota's high school class of 1991. Data regarding 12,270 students (11,674 graduates, 218 dropouts, and 378 students school leavers not classified as dropouts) were collected from 107 high schools participating in the Minnesota Secondary School Follow-up System and from…

  6. Follow-Up 91. Minnesota High School Follow-Up. Class of 1990--One Year Later. Trend Data: 1978-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedey, John M.

    A study examined the educational and employment activities of members of Minnesota's high school class of 1990. Data regarding 12,458 students (11,814 graduates, 356 dropouts, and 288 students school leavers not classified as dropouts) were collected from 90 high schools participating in the Minnesota Secondary School Follow-up System and from 926…

  7. Follow-Up 89. Minnesota High School Follow-Up. Class of 1988: One Year Later. Trend Data: 1978-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedey, John M.

    A study examined the educational and employment activities of members of Minnesota's high school class of 1988. Data regarding 15,232 students (14,151 graduates, 503 dropouts, and 578 students school leavers not classified as dropouts) were collected from 87 high schools participating in the Minnesota Secondary School Follow-up System and from 966…

  8. Follow-Up 90. Minnesota High School Follow-Up. Class of 1989: One Year Later. Trend Data: 1978-1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedey, John M.

    A study examined the educational and employment activities of members of Minnesota's high school class of 1989. Data regarding 14,636 students (14,024 graduates, 324 dropouts, and 288 students school leavers not classified as dropouts) were collected from 97 high schools participating in the Minnesota Secondary School Follow-up System and from 853…

  9. Longitudinal health study of US 1991 Gulf War veterans: changes in health status at 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Mahan, Clare M; Kang, Han K; Eisen, Seth A; Engel, Charles C

    2011-10-01

    The authors assessed changes in the health status of US 1991 Gulf War-era veterans from a 1995 baseline survey to a 2005 follow-up survey, using repeated measurement data from 5,469 deployed Gulf War veterans and 3,353 nondeployed Gulf War-era veterans who participated in both surveys. Prevalence differences in health status between the 2 surveys were estimated for adverse health indices and chronic diseases for each veteran group. Persistence risk ratios and incidence risk ratios were calculated after adjustment for demographic and military service characteristics through Mantel-Haenszel stratified analysis. At 10-year follow-up, deployed veterans were more likely to report persistent poor health, as measured by the health indices (functional impairment, limitation of activities, repeated clinic visits, recurrent hospitalizations, perception of health as fair or poor, chronic fatigue syndrome-like illness, and posttraumatic stress disorder), than nondeployed veterans. Additionally, deployed veterans were more likely to experience new onset of adverse health (as measured by the indices) and certain chronic diseases than were nondeployed veterans. During the 10-year period from 1995 to 2005, the health of deployed veterans worsened in comparison with nondeployed veterans because of a higher rate of new onset of various health outcomes and greater persistence of previously reported adverse health on the indices. PMID:21795757

  10. Long-term follow-up of study participants from prophylactic HIV vaccine clinical trials in Africa.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Claudia; Jaoko, Walter; Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Mpendo, Juliet; Nanvubya, Annet; Karita, Etienne; Bayingana, Roger; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Chomba, Elwyn; Kilembe, William; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Nyombayire, Julien; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Lehrman, Jennifer; Cox, Josephine; Allen, Susan; Dally, Len; Smith, Carol; Fast, Patricia E

    2014-01-01

    Long-term safety is critical for the development and later use of a vaccine to prevent HIV/AIDS. Likewise, the persistence of vaccine-induced antibodies and their impact on HIV testing must be established. IAVI has sponsored several Phase I and IIA HIV vaccine trials enrolling healthy, HIV-seronegative African volunteers. Plasmid DNA and viral vector based vaccines were tested. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported. After completion of vaccine trials conducted between 2001-2007, both vaccine and placebo recipients were offered enrolment into an observational long-term follow-up study (LTFU) to monitor potential late health effects and persistence of immune responses. At scheduled 6-monthly clinic visits, a health questionnaire was administered; clinical events were recorded and graded for severity. Blood was drawn for HIV testing and cellular immune assays. 287 volunteers were enrolled; total follow-up after last vaccination was 1463 person years (median: 5.2 years). Ninety-three (93)% of volunteers reported good health at their last LTFU visit. Infectious diseases and injuries accounted for almost 50% of the 175 reported clinical events, of which over 95% were mild or moderate in severity. There were 30 six pregnancies, six incident HIV infections and 14 volunteers reported cases of social harm. Persistence of immune responses was rare. No safety signal was identified. No potentially vaccine-related medical condition, no immune mediated disease, or malignancy was reported. HIV vaccines studied in these trials had a low potential of induction of persisting HIV antibodies. PMID:24374365

  11. Observational follow-up study following two cohorts of children with severe pneumonia after discharge from day care clinic/hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nur H; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gyr, Niklaus

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To compare the features of relapse, morbidity, mortality and re-hospitalisation following successful discharge after severe pneumonia in children between a day care group and a hospital group and to explore the predictors of failures during 3?months of follow-up. Design An observational study following two cohorts of children with severe pneumonia for 3?months after discharge from hospital/clinic. Setting Day care was provided at the Radda Clinic and hospital care at a hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Participants Children aged 2–59?months with severe pneumonia attending the clinic/hospital who survived to discharge. Intervention No intervention was done except providing some medications for minor illnesses, if indicated. Primary outcome measures The primary outcome measures were the proportion of successes and failures of day care at follow-up visits as determined by estimating the OR with 95% CI in comparison to hospital care. Results The authors enrolled 360 children with a mean (SD) age of 8 (7)?months, 81% were infants and 61% were men. The follow-up compliance dropped from 95% at first to 85% at sixth visit. The common morbidities during the follow-up period included cough (28%), fever (17%), diarrhoea (9%) and rapid breathing (7%). During the follow-up period, significantly more day care children (n=22 (OR 12.2 (95% CI 8.2–17.8))) required re-hospitalisation after completion of initial day care compared with initial hospital care group (n=11 (OR 6.1 (95% CI 3.4–10.6))). The predictors for failure were associated with tachycardia, tachypnoea and hypoxaemia on admission and prolonged duration of stay. Conclusions There are considerable morbidities in children discharged following treatment of severe pneumonia like cough, fever, rapid breathing and diarrhoea during 3-month period. The findings indicate the importance of follow-up for early detection of medical problems and their management to reduce the risk of death. Establishment of an effective community follow-up would be ideal to address the problem of ‘non-compliance with follow-up’. Trial registration The original randomised control trial comparing day care with hospital care was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (identifier NCT00455468). PMID:22842561

  12. Using technology to deliver cancer follow-up: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background People with cancer receive regular structured follow up after initial treatment, usually by a specialist in a cancer centre. Increasing numbers of cancer survivors prompts interest in alternative structured follow-up models. There is worldwide evidence of increasing interest in delivering cancer follow-up using technology. This review sough evidence supporting the use of technology in cancer follow-up from good quality randomised controlled trials. Method A search strategy was developed to identify randomised controlled trials and reviews of randomised trials of interventions delivering some aspect of structured cancer follow-up using new technologies. Databases searched were: All EBM Reviews; Embase; Medline (No Revisions); Medline (Non-Indexed Citations), and CAB Abstracts. Included articles were published in English between 2000 and 2014. Key words were generated by the research question. Papers were read independently and appraised using a standardised checklist by two researchers, with differences being resolved by consensus [J Epidemiol Community Health, 52:377–384, 1998]. Information was collected on the purpose, process, results and limitations of each study. All outcomes were considered, but particular attention paid to areas under consideration in the review question. Results The search strategy generated 22879 titles. Following removal of duplicates and abstract review 17 full papers pertaining to 13 randomised controlled studies were reviewed. Studies varied in technologies used and the elements of follow-up delivered, length of follow-up, tumour type and numbers participating. Most studies employed only standard telephone follow-up. Most studies involved women with breast cancer and included telephone follow-up. Together the results suggest that interventions comprising technology had not compromised patient satisfaction or safety, as measured by symptoms, health related quality of life or psychological distress. There was insufficient evidence to comment on the cost effectiveness of technological cancer follow-up interventions. Conclusions Modern technology could deliver cancer follow-up that is acceptable and safe. More research is required to develop cancer follow-up systems which exploit modern technology, which should be assessed using randomised trials, with consistent outcomes, so that evidence on the acceptability, safety, cost effectiveness and impact in quality of life of technological follow-up can accumulate and be made available to patients, professionals and policy makers. PMID:24885758

  13. Urolastic for the treatment of women with stress urinary incontinence: 24-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Zajda, Janusz; Farag, Fawzy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the efficacy and durability of Urolastic, a new urethral bulking agent in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), after a follow-up of 24-months. Material and methods A follow-up study of women with SUI who received a Urolastic injection and successfully passed the 12-month follow-up. Assessment included the Stamey Grade, 1-h Pad weight test, and the International quality of life (I-QoL) score. Results Nineteen women who completed the 12-month follow-up were invited for the 24-month follow-up study. One patient did not respond to the correspondence. Four of the 18 patients who responded to the correspondence reported removal of the Urolastic implant at another facility, based on their desire. The explanation for this removal was painful intercourse (n = 1) or less than optimal dryness (n = 3). The overall objective improvement in continence status at 24-months was 66% compared to the 89% at the 12-month follow-up, while in addition the 1-h pad weight test showed >50% reduction in pad weight in 66% of patients compared to 84% at the 12-month follow-up. Adverse events reported were urinary tract infection (n = 1), local genital infection with erosion into the vagina (n = 1), painful intercourse (n = 2), and urgency (n = 4). Conclusions Urolastic is comparable to other bulking agents in terms of durability, efficacy, and complications. PMID:26568877

  14. Predictors of Follow-Up Completion Among Runaway Substance-Abusing Adolescents and their Primary Caretakers

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Rikki; Bantchevska, Denitza; Guo, Xiamei; Kim, Yunhwan

    2010-01-01

    Follow-up rates reported among longitudinal studies that focus on runaway adolescents and their families are relatively low. Identifying factors associated with follow-up completion might be useful for improving follow-up rates and therefore study validity. The present study explored how individual- and family-level constructs, as well as research project activities, influence the follow-up completion rate among runaway adolescents (N = 140) and their primary caregiver. Results showed that follow-up completion rates decreased as the number of research assistants (RA) assigned to each case increased and as participants’ address changes increased. Additionally, among adolescents, more frequent alcohol use was associated with lower follow-up rates. The current findings suggest that researchers should (1) design their research so that one RA is assigned to each specific case, and (2) adjust their retention strategies to account for the differences in follow-up rates based upon the participants’ drug of choice and residential stability. PMID:20043208

  15. Twenty-four Years of Follow-Up for a Hanford Plutonium Wound Case

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Antonio, Cheryl L.; Medina-Del Valle, Fernando

    2010-10-01

    A 1985 plutonium puncture wound resulted in the initial deposition of 48 kBq of transuranic alpha activity, primarily 239Pu and 241Am, in a worker’s right index finger. Surgical excisions in the week following reduced the long-term residual wound activity to 5.4 kBq, and 164 DTPA chelation therapy administrations over a 17-month period resulted in urinary excretion of about 7 kBq. The case was published in 1988, but now 20 additional years of follow-up data are available. Annual bioassay measurements have included wound counts, skeleton counts, liver counts, lung counts, axillary lymph node counts, and urinalyses for plutonium and 241Am. These measurements have shown relatively stable levels of 241Am at the wound site, with gradually increasing amounts of 241Am detected in the skeleton. Liver counts has shown erratic detection of 241Am, and lung counts indicate 241Am as shine from the axillary lymph nodes and skeleton. Urine excretion of 239Pu since termination of chelation therapy has typically ranged from 10 to 20 mBq d-1, with 241Am excretion being about 10% of that for 239Pu. In addition, the worker has undergone annual routine medical exams, which have not identified any adverse health effects associated with the intake.

  16. REMIR: The REM infrared camera to follow up the early phases of GRBs afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzoletti, L.; Melandri, A.; Testa, V.; Antonelli, L. A.; Vitali, F.; D'Alessio, F.; di Paola, A.; Zerbi, F. M.; Chincarini, G.; Cunniffe, R.; Jordan, B.; Rodonò, M.; Conconi, P.; Covino, S.; Cutispoto, G.; Molinari, E.; Tosti, G.; Ross/Rem Team

    2005-07-01

    REMIR is a near-infrared camera, covering the 0.95-2.3 ?m range with 5 filters (z,J,H,Ks and H2), mounted at one of the Nasmyth foci of the REM (Rapid Eye Mount) telescope. REM is a fully robotic fast-slewing 60 cm telescope, primarily designed to follow-up the early phases of the afterglow of GRBs detected by dedicated instruments onboard satellites (like SWIFT, a satellite entirely dedicated to GRBs science launched the 12 November 2004). Moreover REM hosts a slitless spectrograph covering the range 0.45-0.95 ?m, with 30 sample points and with the possibility to perform broad-band V,R,I photometry (ROSS, REM Optical Slitless Spectrograph). The main task of REMIR is to perform realtime NIR observations of GRBs detected by gamma-ray monitors onboard satellites, looking for any possible infrared transient source. As soon as a transient source is detected in the IR images, larger telescopes are promptly alerted to perform early spectroscopy of the afterglow. All the above operations are performed in a fully automatic way and without any human supervision. We present the results of on-site tests that have been done to characterize the REMIR camera and the performances of the dedicated reduction pipeline AQuA (Automatic Quick Analysis), suited for fast transients detection.

  17. Two year follow up of pulmonary function values among welders in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Erkinjuntti-Pekka..., R.; Slater, T.; Cheng, S.; Fishwick, D.; Bradshaw, L.; Kimbell-, D; Dronfield, L.; Pearce, N.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine whether welding is a risk factor for an accelerated decline in pulmonary function. METHODS: 2 Year follow up of pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms among 54 welders and 38 non- welders in eight New Zealand welding sites. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in age, height, smoking habits, ethnicity, or total time in industrial work between welders and non-welders. No overall differences were noted in the changes of pulmonary function variables between the two study groups. However, when the comparison was restricted to smokers, welders had a significantly greater (p = 0.02) annual decline (88.8 ml) in FEV1 than non-welders, who had a slight non-significant annual increase (34.2 ml). Also, welders without respiratory protection or local exhaust ventilation while welding had a greater annual decline both in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) than welders with protection (p = 0.001 and 0.04, respectively). Among welders a significant association was found between the acute across shift change and the annual decline in FEV1. Chronic bronchitis was more common among welders (24%) than non-welders (5%). Only one welder (2%) but eight non- welders (21%) reported having asthma. CONCLUSIONS: Welders who smoked and welders working without local exhaust ventilation or respiratory protection have an increased risk of accelerated decline in FEV1.   PMID:10472307

  18. Covered Stents in the Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Aneurysms: Procedural Results and Midterm Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Beregi, Jean-Paul; Prat, Alain; Willoteaux, Serge; Vasseur, Marc-Antoine; Boularand, Valerie; Desmoucelle, Frederic

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate initial and midterm results of percutaneous treatment of peripheral aneurysms using covered stents. Methods: Between June 1994 and December 1997 we used covered stents (EndoPro System or Passager) on 19 patients with peripheral aneurysms (7 iliac, 5 subclavian, 3 femoral, 3 popliteal, 1 carotid). Results: Successful aneurysm exclusion was achieved in 18 of 19 patients (95%). In the short term (<30 days), one patient died of puncture site hemorrhage complicated by myocardial infarction; two femoral stents were surgically removed because of leakage. At subsequent follow-up (mean 20 months) two further unrelated deaths occurred. At 1 year (intention-to-treat) the stent was patent in 13 of 19 patients (68%) and the aneurysm was excluded in 17 of 19 (89%). Conclusion: Treatment of peripheral aneurysms with covered stents has a high rate of immediate procedural success. Continued exclusion of the aneurysms is achieved in a large proportion of patients but there is a relatively high rate of stent thrombosis.

  19. Interventional Radiology in the Diagnosis, Management, and Follow-Up of Pseudoaneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, A. N.; McGrath, F. P.; Lee, M. J.

    2009-01-15

    Arterial wall disruption, as a consequence of inflammation/infection, trauma (penetrating or blunt), or iatrogenic causes, may result in pseudoaneurysm formation. Currently, iatrogenic causes are increasing as a result of the growth of endovascular intervention. The frequency of other causes also seems to be increasing, but this may simply be the result of increased diagnosis by better imaging techniques, such as multidetector contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Clinically, pseudoaneurysms may be silent, may present with local or systemic signs, or can rupture with catastrophic consequences. Open surgical repair, previously the mainstay of treatment, has largely been replaced by image-guided occlusion methods. On the basis of an experience of over 100 pseudoaneurysms, treatments at various anatomical sites, imaging modalities used for accurate diagnosis, current changing therapeutic options for pseudoaneurysm management, approved embolization agents, and clinical follow-up requirements to ensure adequate treatment will be discussed. Image-guided direct percutaneous and endovascular embolization of pseudoaneurysms are established treatment options with favorable success rates and minimal morbidity. The pendulum has now swung from invasive surgical repair of pseudoaneurysms to that of image-guided interventional radiology.

  20. Naturalistic Follow-up of Youths Treated for Pediatric Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Becker, Emily M.; Keeton, Courtney P.; Sakolsky, Dara; Piacentini, John; Albano, Anne Marie; Compton, Scott N.; Iyengar, Satish; Sullivan, Kevin; Caporino, Nicole; Peris, Tara; Birmaher, Boris; Rynn, Moira; March, John; Kendall, Philip C.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Pediatric anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and impairing and are considered gateway disorders in that they predict adult psychiatric problems. Although they can be effectively treated in the short term, data are limited on the long-term outcomes in treated children and adolescents, particularly those treated with medication. OBJECTIVE To determine whether acute clinical improvement and treatment type (ie, cognitive behavioral therapy, medication, or their combination) predicted remission of anxiety and improvement in global functioning at a mean of 6 years after randomization and to examine predictors of outcomes at follow-up. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This naturalistic follow-up study, as part of the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Extended Long-term Study (CAMELS), was conducted at 6 academic sites in the United States and included 288 youths (age range, 11–26 years; mean age, 17 years). Youths were randomized to 1 of 4 interventions (cognitive behavioral therapy, medication, combination, or pill placebo) in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS) and were evaluated a mean of 6 years after randomization. Participants in this study constituted 59.0% of the original CAMS sample. EXPOSURES Participants were assessed by independent evaluators using a semistructured diagnostic interview to determine the presence of anxiety disorders, the severity of anxiety, and global functioning. Participants and their parents completed questionnaires about mental health symptoms, family functioning, life events, and mental health service use. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Remission, defined as the absence of all study entry anxiety disorders. RESULTS Almost half of the sample (46.5%) were in remission a mean of 6 years after randomization. Responders to acute treatment were significantly more likely to be in remission (odds ratio, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.08–3.09) and had less severe anxiety symptoms and higher functioning; the assigned treatment arm was unrelated to outcomes. Several predictors of remission and functioning were identified. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Youths rated as responders during the acute treatment phase of CAMS were more likely to be in remission a mean of 6 years after randomization, although the effect size was small. Relapse occurred in almost half (48%) of acute responders, suggesting the need for more intensive or continued treatment for a sizable proportion of youths with anxiety disorders. PMID:24477837

  1. After the diabetes care trial ends, now what? A 1-year follow-up of the RxING study

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamarneh, Yazid N; Sauriol, Luc; Tsuyuki, Ross T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is strong evidence that pharmacist care improves patients’ glycaemic control. However, the sustainability and durability of such interventions beyond the research period is not known. RxING was the first trial of pharmacist prescribing in diabetes and it showed an improvement in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) of 1.8% over 6?months. Objective 1° objective: To evaluate glycaemic control in the RxING study patients 12?months after the end of the formal study follow-up. 2° objective: To assess the patients’ risk of cardiovascular events in the next 10?years. Methods We contacted the participating pharmacists to check if the patients who participated in the RxING study are still taking insulin, the dose of insulin they are taking, and their HbA1c. There were no mandated follow-up visits with the pharmacist after the study completion. Results A total of 100 patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes were enrolled in the original RxING study; 93 of them completed the study, while 83 participated in the 12-month follow-up. Seventy-five patients were still taking insulin, with the average dose increasing from 31.1 units (SD 18.4) at study completion to 37.4 units (SD 30.8) (95% CI ?13.3 to 0.88, p=0.085). HbA1c was reduced from 9.1% (SD 1) at baseline to 7.3% (SD 0.9) at study completion (95% CI 1.4 to 2, p <0.001), and increased to 8.1% (SD 1.3) 12?months later (95% CI ?1.1 to ?0.5, p <0.001 vs study completion). Conclusions Twelve months after completing the intervention, approximately half of the glycaemic control gains were lost. This highlights the importance of structured follow-up with the pharmacist in this patient population. Trial registration number clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT01335763. PMID:26270946

  2. Incident atrial fibrillation in the emergency department in Ontario: a population-based retrospective cohort study of follow-up care

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Ivers, Noah; Rochon, Paula; Lee, Douglas S.; Schull, Michael J.; Austin, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuity of care has been shown to be poor following in-hospital discharge, and there are substantially fewer resources to facilitate follow-up care arrangements after discharge from an emergency department. Our objective was to assess the frequency, timeliness and predictors for obtaining follow-up care following discharge from an emergency department in Ontario with a new diagnosis of atrial fibrillation. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving all patients discharged from the 157 nonpediatric emergency departments in Ontario, who received a new diagnosis of atrial fibrillation between 2007 and 2012. We determined the frequency of follow-up care with a family physician, cardiologist or internist within 7 (timely) and 30 days of the emergency department visit, and assessed the association of emergency and family physician characteristics, including primary care model type, with obtaining timely follow-up care. Results Among 14 907 patients discharged from Ontario emergency departments with a new, primary diagnosis of atrial fibrillation, half (n = 7473) had timely follow-up care. At 30 days, 2678 patients (18.0%) still had not obtained follow-up care. Among emergency and family physician factors, lack of a family physician had the largest independent association with acquiring timely follow-up care (odds ratio [OR] 0.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50–0.69). Using patients with a family physician belonging to a primarily fee-for-service remuneration model as the comparison group, patients with a family physician belonging to a capitation-based Family Health Network, as part of a Family Health Team, were less likely to receive timely follow-up care (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.62–0.86), as were those whose family physician belonged to the same model type that was not part of a Family Health Team (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.60–0.97). Interpretation Only half of the patients who were discharged from an emergency department in Ontario with a new diagnosis of atrial fibrillation were seen within 7 days of discharge. The most influential factor was having a family physician; patients with a family physician being remunerated via primarily fee-for-service methods were more likely to be seen within 7 days than those who were reimbursed through a primarily capitation model. Systems-wide solutions are needed to ensure timely follow-up care is available for all patients with chronic diseases. PMID:26389096

  3. South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Pranksters' follow-up to 'zombie attack' video ends on

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Pranksters' follow-up to 'zombie attack' video ends on wrong side the wrong guy to prank. The guys behind the YouTube sensation "Miami Zombie Attack Prank!" found themselves

  4. 20 CFR 664.450 - What are follow-up services for youth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth Program Design, Elements, and Parameters § 664.450 What are follow-up...problems that arise; (3) Assistance in securing better paying jobs, career development and further education; (4)...

  5. Breast Cancer and the Environment on Long Island Follow-up Study

    Cancer.gov

    A follow-up study on women with breast cancer who participated in the parent population-based case-control study of Long Island women to determine whether environmental and other lifestyle factors influence breast cancer survival.

  6. SWIFT FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF CANDIDATE GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENT EVENTS

    E-print Network

    Fridriksson, Joel K.

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency ...

  7. Benefits of and barriers to SEA follow-up - Theory and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Gachechiladze-Bozhesku, M.; Fischer, T.B.

    2012-04-15

    If SEA is to facilitate 'strategic' changes, it needs to focus on shaping the ways in which strategic initiatives are implemented, not just formulated. This is why follow-up which refers to postdecisional activities of SEA and strategic initiatives is increasingly seen as crucial. However, to date follow-up has only received limited attention in the SEA literature, as well as in practical guidance. The key reasons for why post decision activities are often overlooked are the lack of understanding of its actual benefits and purportedly multiple problems with its accomplishment. This paper reports on the results of a comprehensive literature review and an international e-survey on the topic, as well as an in-depth analysis of six SEA follow-up cases from England and Canada. Practically encountered and perceived benefits of, and obstacles to SEA follow-up are identified and discussed.

  8. Early Primary Care Provider Follow-up and Readmission After High-Risk Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Benjamin S.; Stone, David H.; Cronenwett, Jack L.; Nolan, Brian; DeMartino, Randall R.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Goodman, David C.; Goodney, Philip P.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Follow-up with a primary care provider (PCP) in addition to the surgical team is routinely recommended to patients discharged after major surgery despite no clear evidence that it improves outcomes. OBJECTIVE To test whether PCP follow-up is associated with lower 30-day readmission rates after open thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) repair and ventral hernia repair (VHR), surgical procedures known to have a high and low risk of readmission, respectively. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In a cohort of Medicare beneficiaries discharged to home after open TAA repair (n = 12 679) and VHR (n = 52 807) between 2003 to 2010, we compared 30-day readmission rates between patients seen and not seen by a PCP within 30 days of discharge and across tertiles of regional primary care use. We stratified our analysis by the presence of complications during the surgical (index) admission. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Thirty-day readmission rate. RESULTS Overall, 2619 patients (20.6%) undergoing open TAA repair and 4927 patients (9.3%) undergoing VHR were readmitted within 30 days after surgery. Complications occurred in 4649 patients (36.6%) undergoing open TAA repair and 4528 patients (8.6%) undergoing VHR during their surgical admission. Early follow-up with a PCP significantly reduced the risk of readmission among open TAA patients who experienced perioperative complications, from 35.0% (without follow-up) to 20.4% (with follow-up) (P < .001). However, PCP follow-up made no significant difference in patients whose hospital course was uncomplicated (19.4% with follow-up vs 21.9% without follow-up; P = .31). In comparison, early follow-up with a PCP after VHR did not reduce the risk of readmission, regardless of complications. In adjusted regional analyses, undergoing open TAA repair in regions with high compared with low primary care use was associated with an 18% lower likelihood of 30-day readmission (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71–0.96; P = .02), whereas no significant difference was found among patients after VHR. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Follow-up with a PCP after high-risk surgery (eg, open TAA repair), especially among patients with complications, is associated with a lower risk of hospital readmission. Patients undergoing lower-risk surgery (eg, VHR) do not receive the same benefit from early PCP follow-up. Identifying high-risk surgical patients who will benefit from PCP integration during care transitions may offer a low-cost solution toward limiting readmissions. PMID:25074237

  9. A quality improvement initiative to reduce unnecessary follow-up imaging for adnexal lesions.

    PubMed

    Hui, Jamie S; Kramer, Dawna J; Blackmore, C Craig; Hashimoto, Beverly E; Coy, David L

    2014-04-01

    Our objective was to improve the quality of pelvic ultrasound reports and decrease the number of physiologic and benign adnexal lesions unnecessarily referred for follow-up. We performed a prospective cohort study of 2 quality improvement interventions: academic detailing with education for the ultrasound radiologists and sonographers, and implementation of a national consensus guideline on adnexal cysts. Our primary quality outcome measure was the proportion of pelvic ultrasound exams in which follow-up was recommended for an adnexal lesion. Baseline data collection in January 2006 identified 252 pelvic ultrasound exams, of which 58 (23%) reported an adnexal lesion and 31 (12%) recommended follow-up. Retrospective review revealed that 17 of 31 (55%) reported adnexal lesions with follow-up recommended were physiologic or benign. After intervention 1, 59 of 214 (28%) pelvic ultrasound exams from January 2008 reported an adnexal lesion, with 18 (8%) recommending follow-up. After intervention 2, 64 of 296 (22%) pelvic ultrasound exams from January 2011 reported an adnexal lesion, with 16 (5%) recommending follow-up. Follow-up recommendations decreased 58% (12% versus 5%, P = .004), with significant increase in the proportion characterized as physiologic or benign (P = .001). Through a quality initiative aimed at appropriate description and follow-up recommendations for adnexal cystic lesions identified at ultrasound, we effectively reduced unnecessary imaging referrals. We conclude that: (1) acceptance of an expert consensus guideline was important to add credibility, (2) accessible image-rich charts are invaluable tools at point of use, and (3) elimination of some unnecessary imaging is under the control of the radiologist. PMID:24139962

  10. Living with faecal incontinence: a 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mary

    Faecal incontinence (FI) is a taboo subject, and people living with it can feel stigmatised. This article reports on a 10-year qualitative follow-up to an initial constructivist-grounded theory project, investigating living with FI. This article will also look back at the initial study and the 5-year follow-up study undertaken. The research examines the challenges associated with living with FI and different ways of managing the condition, including the importance of social support. PMID:25757581

  11. Radiology-led Follow-up System for IVC Filters: Effects on Retrieval Rates and Times

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.; Taylor, J.; Munneke, G.; Morgan, R.; Belli, A.-M.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Successful IVC filter retrieval rates fall with time. Serious complications have been reported following attempts to remove filters after 3-18 months. Failed retrieval may be associated with adverse clinical sequelae. This study explored whether retrieval rates are improved if interventional radiologists organize patient follow-up, rather than relying on the referring clinicians. Methods: Proactive follow-up of patients who undergo filter placement was implemented in May 2008. At the time of filter placement, a report was issued to the referring consultant notifying them of the advised timeframe for filter retrieval. Clinicians were contacted to arrange retrieval within 30 days. We compared this with our practice for the preceding year. Results: The numbers of filters inserted during the two time periods was similar, as were the numbers of retrieval attempts and the time scale at which they occurred. The rate of successful retrievals increased but not significantly. The major changes were better documentation of filter types and better clinical follow-up. After the change in practice, only one patient was lost to follow-up compared with six the preceding year. Conclusions: Although there was no significant improvement in retrieval rates, the proactive, radiology-led approach improved follow-up and documentation, ensuring that a clinical decision was made about how long the filter was required and whether retrieval should be attempted and ensuring that patients were not lost to follow-up.

  12. Who provides follow-up care for patients with early breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Worster, A.; Wood, M. L.; McWhinney, I. R.; Bass, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess how often family physicians are involved in posttreatment care of their stage I breast cancer patients and to identify factors associated with family physicians providing follow-up care. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study with a 5-year follow up by chart review. PARTICIPANTS: All cases of breast cancer seen at the London Regional Cancer Centre between 1982 and 1987 were reviewed to identify 183 stage I cancer patients alive at 5 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Whether a physician (other than an oncologist) was involved in the follow-up care of patients, and whether the physician was a family physician or a surgeon. RESULTS: Follow-up care during the 5-year postoperative period was provided in most cases by oncologists alone (66.7%); family physicians and surgeons were involved in 17.5% and 15.8% of cases, respectively. Surgeons became involved in follow-up care much earlier (12 months) than family physicians did (23 months) (P = 0.01) and were more likely to provide care for patients who received radiation treatment (P = 0.04) and for patients who lived in London (P = 0.004). Most malignant breast lesions (77.5%) were discovered by patients themselves (P = 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Currently, family physicians are infrequently involved in follow-up care of their patients with early breast cancer. PMID:7580380

  13. Comfort monitoring? Environmental assessment follow-up under community-industry negotiated environmental agreements

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Bram; Birk, Jasmine

    2011-01-15

    Negotiated environmental agreements are becoming common practice in the mining industry. In principle, negotiated environmental agreements are said to respond to many of the shortcomings of environmental impact assessment by providing for improved follow-up of project impacts through, among other things, data provision, engaging stakeholders in the monitoring and management of project impacts, and building capacity at the local level to deal with project-induced environmental change. In practice, however, little is known about the efficacy of follow-up under negotiated environmental agreements between proponents and communities and the demonstrated value added to project impact management. This paper examines follow-up practice under negotiated environmental agreements with a view to understanding whether and how community-based monitoring under privatized agreements actually contributes to improved follow-up and impact management. Based on lessons emerging from recent experiences with environmental agreements in Canada's uranium industry, we show that follow-up under negotiated agreements may be described as 'comfort monitoring'. While such monitoring does improve community-industry relations and enhance corporate image, it does little to support effects-based management. If follow-up under negotiated agreements is to be credible over the long term, there is a need to ensure that monitoring results are useful for, and integrated with, regulatory-based monitoring and project impact management practices.

  14. Creating the Action Model for High Risk Infant Follow Up Program in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Jodiery, Behzad; Mirnia, Kayvan; Akrami, Forouzan; Hosseini, Mohammad Bagher; Heidarabadi, Seifollah; HabibeLahi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Intervention in early childhood development as one of the social determinants of health, is important for reducing social gap and inequity. In spite of increasingly developing intensive neonatal care wards and decreasing neonatal mortality rate, there is no follow up program in Iran. This study was carreid out to design high risk infants follow up care program with the practical aim of creating an model action for whole country, in 2012. Methods This qualitative study has been done by the Neonatal Department of the Deputy of Public Health in cooperation with Pediatrics Health Research Center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. After study of international documents, consensus agreement about adapted program for Iran has been accomplished by focus group discussion and attended Delphi agreement technique. After compiling primary draft included evidence based guidelines and executive plan, 14 sessions including expert panels were hold to finalize the program. Results After finalizing the program, high risk infants follow up care service package has been designed in 3 chapters: Evidence based clinical guidelines; eighteen main clinical guidelines and thirteen subsidiaries clinical guidelines, executive plan; 6 general, 6 following up and 5 backup processes. Education program including general and especial courses for care givers and follow up team, and family education processes. Conclusion We designed and finalized high risk infants follow up care service package. It seems to open a way to extend it to whole country. PMID:26171344

  15. Implant success rates in full-arch rehabilitations supported by upright and tilted implants: a retrospective investigation with up to five years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the cumulative success rate, the implant survival rate, and the occurrence of biological complications in implants supporting full-arch immediately loaded rehabilitations supported by upright and tilted implants. Methods The clinical records and periapical radiographs of patients who attended follow-up visits were collected, and information was recorded regarding marginal bone loss resorption, the occurrence of peri-implant infectious diseases, and the implant survival rate. Implants were classified as successful or not successful according to two distinct classifications for implant success. Results A total of 53 maxillary and mandibular restorations including 212 implants were analysed, of which 56 implants were studied over the full five-year follow-up period. After five years, the cumulative success rate was 76.04% according to the Misch classification and 56.34% according to the Albrektsson classification. The cumulative implant survival rate was 100%, although one implant was found to be affected by peri-implantitis at the second follow-up visit. Conclusions The cumulative success rate of the implants dropped over time, corresponding to the progression of marginal bone resorption. The prevalence of peri-implantitis was very low, and the implant survival rate was not found to be related to the cumulative success rate.

  16. Unexpected Return for Follow-up During the First Year of Multidisciplinary Care May Be Predictive of Rapid Deterioration of Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Fang, Yu-Weil; Wang, Li Hui; You, Xiang Gin; Leu, Jyh-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Multidisciplinary predialysis education and team care (MDC) may slow the decline in renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, associations between unexpected return during MDC and progression of renal dysfunction have not been characterized in patients with CKD. Our study aimed to determine the association between exacerbation of renal dysfunction and the frequency of unexpected return during follow-up. A total of 437 patients with CKD receiving multidisciplinary care between January 2009 and June 2013 at the Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital were included in this retrospective observational cohort study, and multiple imputations were performed for missing data. The predictor was the frequency of unexpected return for follow-up during the first year after entering MDC. Main outcome was monthly declines in estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR). Moreover, the demographic data, comorbidities, history of medication, and routine laboratory data for patients with CKD were collected. Among all patients, 59.7% were male, the mean age at initiation of MDC was 69.4?±?13.2 years, and the duration of follow-up was 21.4?±?3.3 months. The subjects were divided into 2 groups according to frequencies of follow-up (?4 and >?4 visits) during the 1st year of MDC. The patients with CKD were regularly followed up every 3 months as a part of MDC in our hospital, and patients who returned for more than 4 follow-up visits were included in the unexpected return group. In crude regression analyses, unexpected return was significantly associated with higher monthly declines of eGFR (??=?0.092, 95% confidence interval, 0.014–0.170). This association remained after adjustments for multiple variables, and subgroup analyses of unexpected return showed that male gender, older age, CKD stage 1 to 3, hypertension, history of coronary artery disease, and use of renin–angiotensin system blockade were significantly associated with declines in renal function. In conclusion, unexpected return for follow-up during the 1st year of MDC was significantly associated with the deterioration of renal function. PMID:26469913

  17. Using social networking sites (namely Facebook) in health visiting practice--an account of five years experience.

    PubMed

    Dion, Xena

    2015-02-01

    With new developments in electronic and social networking communication methods the way health visitors communicate with clients is rapidly changing. With good governance these technologies can be utilised to enhance the health visiting service and can be an effective way of accessing hard-to-reach families, saving time and resources. This paper presents five years' experience in the use of Facebook between the health visiting team and clients and explains the benefits and potential it offers to health visitors and other community practitioners. PMID:25720211

  18. What happens to patients who do not follow-up after bariatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Harper, Jason; Madan, Atul K; Ternovits, Craig A; Tichansky, David S

    2007-02-01

    Loss of follow-up is a concern when tracking long-term clinical outcomes after bariatric surgery. The results of patients who are "lost to follow-up" are not known. After bariatric surgery, the lack of follow-up may result in less weight loss for patients. This study investigated the hypothesis that there are differences between patients who do not automatically return for their annual follow-up and those that do return. Patients who were greater than 14 months postoperative after laparoscopic gastric bypass were contacted if they had not returned for their annual appointment. They were seen in clinic and/or a phone interview was performed for follow-up. These patients (Group A) were compared with patients who returned to see us for their annual appointment (Group B) without us having to notify them. There were 105 consecutive patients, with 48 patients who did not automatically return for their annual appointment. Only six of these patients could not ultimately be contacted. There was no difference in preoperative body mass index between the two groups. Percentage excess body weight loss was greater in Group B (76 vs. 65%; P < 0.003). More patients had successful weight loss (defined as within 50% of ideal body weight) in Group B (50 [88%] vs. 28 [67%]; P < 0.02). We found that a significant number of patients will not comply with regular follow-up care after laparoscopic gastric bypass unless they are prompted to do so by their bariatric clinic. These patients have worse clinical outcome (i.e., less weight loss). Caution should be taken when examining the results of any bariatric study where there is a significant loss to follow-up. PMID:17305299

  19. Patients' and healthcare professionals' views of cancer follow-up: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ruth A; Neal, Richard D; Hendry, Maggie; France, Barbara; Williams, Nefyn H; Russell, Daphne; Hughes, Dyfrig A; Russell, Ian; Stuart, Nicholas SA; Weller, David; Wilkinson, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancer follow-up places a significant burden on hospital outpatient clinics. There are increasing calls to develop alternative models of provision. Aim To undertake a systematic review of qualitative studies examining patients' and healthcare professionals' views about cancer follow-up. Design of study Systematic review. Setting Primary and secondary care. Method Comprehensive literature searches included: 19 electronic databases, online trial registries, conference proceedings, and bibliographies of included studies. Eligible studies included qualitative studies examining patients' and healthcare professionals' views of cancer follow-up. Studies of patients with any type of cancer, considered free of active disease, or no longer receiving active treatment were included. Findings were synthesised using thematic analysis. Results Nineteen studies were included; seven were linked to randomised controlled trials. Eight studies examined the views of healthcare professionals (four of which included GPs) and 16 examined the views of patients. Twelve descriptive themes were identified, from which 12 perceived implications for practice were derived. Most themes related to conventional follow-up in secondary care. Some views concerning other models of care were based on participants' ideas, rather than experiences. Conclusion Patients' main concern is recurrent disease, and they find regular follow-up, expertise of specialists, and quick access to tests reassuring. Information regarding the effectiveness of follow-up is not given to patients who also have unmet information needs, which would help them to cope and be more involved. Continuity of care, unhurried consultations, and psychosocial support are important, but sometimes lacking in secondary care. GPs are thought to be unwilling and to have insufficient time and expertise to conduct follow-up. PMID:19566991

  20. Options for early breast cancer follow-up in primary and secondary care - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Both incidence of breast cancer and survival have increased in recent years and there is a need to review follow up strategies. This study aims to assess the evidence for benefits of follow-up in different settings for women who have had treatment for early breast cancer. Method A systematic review to identify key criteria for follow up and then address research questions. Key criteria were: 1) Risk of second breast cancer over time - incidence compared to general population. 2) Incidence and method of detection of local recurrence and second ipsi and contra-lateral breast cancer. 3) Level 1–4 evidence of the benefits of hospital or alternative setting follow-up for survival and well-being. Data sources to identify criteria were MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, ZETOC, Health Management Information Consortium, Science Direct. For the systematic review to address research questions searches were performed using MEDLINE (2011). Studies included were population studies using cancer registry data for incidence of new cancers, cohort studies with long term follow up for recurrence and detection of new primaries and RCTs not restricted to special populations for trials of alternative follow up and lifestyle interventions. Results Women who have had breast cancer have an increased risk of a second primary breast cancer for at least 20 years compared to the general population. Mammographically detected local recurrences or those detected by women themselves gave better survival than those detected by clinical examination. Follow up in alternative settings to the specialist clinic is acceptable to women but trials are underpowered for survival. Conclusions Long term support, surveillance mammography and fast access to medical treatment at point of need may be better than hospital based surveillance limited to five years but further large, randomised controlled trials are needed. PMID:22695275

  1. Genotype and phenotype characterization in a large dystrophinopathic cohort with extended follow-up.

    PubMed

    Magri, Francesca; Govoni, Alessandra; D'Angelo, Maria Grazia; Del Bo, Roberto; Ghezzi, Serena; Sandra, Gandossini; Turconi, Anna Carla; Sciacco, Monica; Ciscato, Patrizia; Bordoni, Andreina; Tedeschi, Silvana; Fortunato, Francesco; Lucchini, Valeria; Bonato, Sara; Lamperti, Costanza; Coviello, Domenico; Torrente, Yvan; Corti, Stefania; Moggio, Maurizio; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2011-09-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD and BMD, respectively) are allelic disorders with different clinical presentations and severity determined by mutations in the gene DMD, which encodes the sarcolemmal protein dystrophin. Diagnosis is based on clinical aspects and muscle protein analysis, followed by molecular confirmation. We revised the main aspects of the natural history of dystrophinopathies to define genotype-phenotype correlations in large patient cohorts with extended follow-up. We also specifically explored subjects carrying nucleotide substitutions in the DMD gene, a comparatively less investigated DMD/BMD subgroup. We studied 320 dystrophinopathic patients (205 DMD and 115 BMD), defining muscular, cardiac, respiratory, and cognitive involvement. We also subdivided patients according to the kind of molecular defect (deletions, duplications, nucleotide substitutions or other microrearrangements) and the mutation sites (proximal/distal to exon 45), studying phenotype-genotype correlations for each group. In DMD, mutation type did not influence clinical evolution; mutations located in distal regions (irrespective of their nature) are more likely to be associated with lower IQ levels (p = 0.005). BMD carrying proximal deletions showed a higher degree of cardiac impairment than BMD with distal deletions (p = 0.0046). In the BMD population, there was a strong correlation between the entity of muscle dystrophin deficiency and clinical course (p = 0.002). An accurate knowledge of natural history may help in the clinical management of patients. Furthermore, several clinical trials are ongoing or are currently planned, some of which aim to target specific DMD mutations: a robust natural history is therefore essential to correctly design these experimental trials. PMID:21399986

  2. Five-year clinical and angiographic follow-up after intracoronary iridium-192 radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Condado, Jose A.; Waksman, Ron; Saucedo, Jorge F.; Bhargava, Balram; Lansky, Alexandra J.; Calderas, Carlos; Gurdiel, Orlando; Gonzalez, Juan; Fadoul, Merche; Parra, Bogart; Iturria, Isabel; Amezaga, Bingen

    2002-06-01

    Background: Ionizing gamma radiation has been shown to reduce neointimal formation and the incidence of restenosis after balloon angioplasty and stenting in clinical trials. However, the long-term effects of this therapy are unknown. The first cohort of patients to receive intracoronary gamma radiation after balloon angioplasty for the prevention of restenosis have completed a 5-year angiographic and clinical follow-up. The outcome of these patients is presented and discussed. Methods: Twenty-one patients with unstable angina (22 arteries) underwent standard balloon angioplasty. Intracoronary radiation therapy was performed immediately after the intervention using an Iridium-192 source wire hand-delivered to the angioplasty site. All patients were followed clinically and Quantitative Coronary Analysis (QCA) was performed at 6, 24, 36 and 60 months. Results: Target lesion revascularization occurred in six lesions, three of which were total occlusions (two early within 30 days and one occurred at 2 years), and one patient had a myocardial infarction attributable to a nontarget vessel. Serial QCA detected a binary restenosis rate of 28.6% (n=6) at 6 months. The late loss (0.29 mm) and loss index (0.25) remained low at 2, 3 and 5 years. Angiographic complications included four aneurysms (two procedure related and two occurring within 3 months). At 2 years, only one aneurysm increased in size (46 vs. 27 mm{sup 2}); and at 3 and 5 years, all aneurysms remained unchanged. No other angiographic complications were observed. Conclusion: The early clinical and angiographic effects of intracoronary gamma radiation were maintained at 5 years without further increase in the aneurysm formation or apparent new adverse effects related to the radiation therapy between 2 and 5 years.

  3. Utility of the Serum ProGRP Level for Follow-up of Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Naohiro; Kawabata, Tsutomu; Ichi, Takaharu; Kushi, Kazuaki; Yohena, Tomofumi; Kawasaki, Hidenori; Ishikawa, Kiyoshi; Kato, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 67 Final Diagnosis: Pulmonary carcinoid tumor Symptoms: Abnormal shadow on chest X-ray Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Pulmonology Objective: Rare disease Background: Although pulmonary carcinoid tumors are generally considered to represent a low-grade malignancy, atypical carcinoids are more aggressive than typical carcinoids, metastasizing more commonly to both regional lymph nodes and distant sites. The treatment of choice for localized disease is surgery. In cases of advanced or metastatic disease, medical treatments, including chemotherapy, have not been proven to be very successful. Therefore, providing careful follow-up is extremely important. In general, tumor markers, such as the level of CYFLA21-1, are often useful for monitoring lung cancer. However, there are currently no sensitive tumor markers for carcinoid tumors. We herein report a rare case of an atypical carcinoid of the lung with the elevation of the serum ProGRP level. Case Eeport: A 67-year-old female was referred to our hospital for an abnormal chest X-ray. CT revealed an 18×13 mm nodule in the right middle lobe with no significant mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The serum tumor marker, the ProGRP level, was significantly elevated (161 ng/ml). We performed a right middle lobectomy, because the pathological diagnosis of lung cancer was confirmed according to the results of a rapid frozen section biopsy of the lesion, although the pathological type could not be precisely determined by the frozen section alone. The final pathological diagnosis was atypical carcinoid. The level of ProGRP decreased (69 ng/ml) within 1 month after the surgery. Conclusions: The ProGRP level may be useful for monitoring carcinoid tumors, although no serum tumor markers are highly specific or sensitive for detecting recurrences and/or distant metastasis of pulmonary carcinoid tumors. In conclusion, ProGRP should be further evaluated as biomarker in a larger series of patients to determine whether it demonstrates any significant correlation with cancer recurrence. PMID:25109370

  4. Development and Validation of Electronic Health Record-based Triggers to Detect Delays in Follow-up of Abnormal Lung Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Daniel R; Thomas, Eric J; Meyer, Ashley N D; Singh, Hardeep

    2015-10-01

    Purpose To develop an electronic health record (EHR)-based trigger algorithm to identify delays in follow-up of patients with imaging results that are suggestive of lung cancer and to validate this trigger on retrospective data. Materials and Methods The local institutional review board approved the study. A "trigger" algorithm was developed to automate the detection of delays in diagnostic evaluation of chest computed tomographic (CT) images and conventional radiographs that were electronically flagged by reviewing radiologists as being "suspicious for malignancy." The trigger algorithm was developed through literature review and expert input. It included patients who were alive and 40-70 years old, and it excluded instances in which appropriate timely follow-up (defined as occurring within 30 days) was detected (eg, pulmonary visit) or when follow-up was unnecessary (eg, in patients with a terminal illness). The algorithm was iteratively applied to a retrospective test cohort in an EHR data warehouse at a large Veterans Affairs facility, and manual record reviews were used to validate each individual criterion. The final algorithm aimed at detecting an absence of timely follow-up was retrospectively applied to an independent validation cohort to determine the positive predictive value (PPV). Trigger performance, time to follow-up, reasons for lack of follow-up, and cancer outcomes were analyzed and reported by using descriptive statistics. Results The trigger algorithm was retrospectively applied to the records of 89 168 patients seen between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2009. Of 538 records with an imaging report that was flagged as suspicious for malignancy, 131 were identified by the trigger as being high risk for delayed diagnostic evaluation. Manual chart reviews confirmed a true absence of follow-up in 75 cases (trigger PPV of 57.3% for detecting evaluation delays), of which four received a diagnosis of primary lung cancer within the subsequent 2 years. Conclusion EHR-based triggers can be used to identify patients with suspicious imaging findings in whom follow-up diagnostic evaluation was delayed. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:25961634

  5. Integrated maternal and child health services in Mozambique: structural health system limitations overshadow its effect on follow-up of HIV-exposed infants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The follow-up of HIV-exposed infants remains a public health challenge in many Sub-Saharan countries. Just as integrated antenatal and maternity services have contributed to improved care for HIV-positive pregnant women, so too could integrated care for mother and infant after birth improve follow-up of HIV-exposed infants. We present results of a study testing the viability of such integrated care, and its effects on follow-up of HIV-exposed infants, in Tete Province, Mozambique. Methods Between April 2009 and September 2010, we conducted a mixed-method, intervention-control study in six rural public primary healthcare facilities, selected purposively for size and accessibility, with random allocation of three facilities each for intervention and control groups. The intervention consisted of a reorganization of services to provide one-stop, integrated care for mothers and their children under five years of age. We collected monthly routine facility statistics on prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT), follow-up of HIV-exposed infants, and other mother and child health (MCH) activities for the six months before (January-June 2009) and 13 months after starting the intervention (July 2009-July 2010). Staff were interviewed at the start, after six months, and at the end of the study. Quantitative data were analysed using quasi-Poisson models for significant differences between the periods before and after intervention, between healthcare facilities in intervention and control groups, and for time trends. The coefficients for the effect of the period and the interaction effect of the intervention were calculated with their p-values. Thematic analysis of qualitative data was done manually. Results One-stop, integrated care for mother and child was feasible in all participating healthcare facilities, and staff evaluated this service organisation positively. We observed in both study groups an improvement in follow-up of HIV-exposed infants (registration, follow-up visits, serological testing), but frequent absenteeism of staff and irregular supply of consumables interfered with healthcare facility performance for both intervention and control groups. Conclusions Despite improvement in various aspects of the follow-up of HIV-exposed infants, we observed no improvement attributable to one-stop, integrated MCH care. Structural healthcare system limitations, such as staff absences and irregular supply of essential commodities, appear to overshadow its potential effects. Regular technical support and adequate basic working conditions are essential for improved performance in the follow-up of HIV-exposed infants in peripheral public healthcare facilities in Mozambique. PMID:23758816

  6. Factors Associated with Loss-to-Follow-Up during Behavioral Interventions and HIV Testing Cohort among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Nanjing, China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weiming; Huan, Xiping; Zhang, Ye; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Li, Jianjun; Liu, Xiaoyan; Mahapatra, Sanchita; Yan, Hongjing; Fu, Gengfeng; Zhao, Jinkou; Gu, Chenghua; Detels, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background Behavioral interventions (BIs) remained the cornerstone of HIV prevention in resource-limited settings. One of the major concerns for such efforts is the loss-to-follow-up (LTFU) that threatens almost every HIV control program involving high-risk population groups. Methods To evaluate the factors associated with LTFU during BIs and HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM), 410 HIV sero-negatives MSM were recruited using respondent driven sampling (RDS) in Nanjing, China during 2008, they were further followed for 18 months. At baseline and each follow-up visits, each participant was counseled about various HIV risk-reductions BIs at a designated sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic. Results Among 410 participants recruited at baseline, altogether 221 (53.9%) were LTFU at the 18-month follow-up visit. Overall, 46 participants were found to be positive for syphilis infection at baseline while 13 participants were HIV sero-converted during the follow-up period. Increasing age was less (Adjusted Odds Ratio(aOR) of 0.90, 95% confidence Interval (CI) 0.86–0.94) and official residency of provinces other than Nanjing (AOR of 2.49, 95%CI 1.32–4.71), lower level of education (AOR of 2.01, 95%CI 1.10–3.66) and small social network size (AOR of 1.75, 95%CI 1.09–2.80) were more likely to be associated with higher odds of LTFU. Conclusion To improve retention in the programs for HIV control, counseling and testing among MSM in Nanjing, focused intensified intervention targeting those who were more likely to be LTFU, especially the young, less educated, unofficial residents of Nanjing who had smaller social network size, might be helpful. PMID:25559678

  7. Research Units of Pediatric Psychopharmacology (RUPP) Autism Network Randomized Clinical Trial of Parent Training and Medication: One-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, L. Eugene; Aman, Michael G.; Li, Xiaobai; Butter, Eric; Humphries, Kristina; Scahill, Lawrence; Lecavalier, Luc; McDougle, Christopher J.; Swiezy, Naomi B.; Handen, Benjamin; Wilson, Krystina; Stigler, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To follow up on a three-site, 24-week randomized clinical trial (N = 124) comparing antipsychotic medication alone (MED) with antipsychotic medication plus parent training in the behavior management (COMB) of children with autism spectrum disorders and severe behavior problems. The COMB treatment had shown a significant advantage for…

  8. Long-term follow-up of conservatively treated chronic tennis elbow patients. A prospective and retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Pienimäki, T; Karinen, P; Kemilä, T; Koivukangas, P; Vanharanta, H

    1998-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the long-term outcome of progressive exercise and local pulsed ultrasound in the treatment of 30 chronic tennis elbow patients (2 men, 18 women, mean age 42.3 years). The patients were originally randomised into 1) four-step progressive exercise (EX, n = 16) and 2) local pulsed ultrasound (US, n = 14) treatment groups. Before the beginning of the treatment, the groups were similar in terms of pain scores, sick-leave days and duration of symptoms. The patients underwent an 8-week treatment intervention. Long-term follow-up evaluation of the patients was performed 1) prospectively using a pain questionnaire on VAS and pain drawings classified into 5 categories, and 2) retrospectively with a postal questionnaire (which was sent to the patients to fill in. Sick-leave days, medical and physiotherapy visits, operations, early retirements and job relocations were inquired in the postal questionnaire. The diagnosis-related sick-leave days of the patients were collected from the Database of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland and the number of operations from the local hospital register. Twenty-three patients (12 in the EX group and 11 in the US group) responded. The mean follow-up time was 36 months. After the treatment the patients in the EX group needed significantly less physiotherapy (p = 0.02), fewer medical consultations (p = 0.005) and other treatments and had fewer sick-leave days (p = 0.005) than before the treatment intervention. The patients in the US group had after the treatment intervention more 17 medical visits (ns), 291 sick-leave days (ns) and less 95 physiotherapy visits (ns) than before the treatment. Eight patients (67%) in the EX group and 5 (45%) in the US group still held their previous job, while two patients in the US group, but none in the EX group were absent from work because of the tennis elbow syndrome. The patients in the EX group reported significantly lower pain scores on VAS than those in the US group. The mean pain drawing category was 1.5 in the EX group and 2.7 in the US group (p = 0.008). All the pain scores and pain drawing categories in the EX group had changed to be significantly better than in the US group, where only pain under strain had significantly improved. Because of resistant symptoms, 5 patients were operated in the US group and one in the EX group. Neither spontaneous healing, nor self-limiting of the disorder were noted during the follow-up period. The progressive exercise evaluated in this study showed beneficial long-term effects compared to ultrasound treatment in terms of pain alleviation and working ability, and the functional overall condition of the exercise patients was also better. Exercise may be able to prevent chronicity and should hence be tried and recommended. PMID:9782543

  9. Automated follow-up facilities in Canada for monitoring delayed health effects.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M E; Newcombe, H B

    1980-01-01

    Increased public awareness of the possible presence of carcinogens and other potentially harmful agents in the workplace and in other areas of the environment has created a demand for studies to determine the extent of the risks associated with exposure to such agents. These studies require large numbers of individuals in various "control" populations to be followed-up over long periods of time. Such large-scale follow-up can be greatly facilitated where information on all deaths and on cases of serious morbidity is accumulated centrally, for a whole country, in a form that permits rapid searching by computer and in which individuals are well enough identified to minimize the possibility of mistaken identity. The Canadian Mortality Data Base and the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System are two such centralized follow-up facilities which have been developed in Canada. We describe here the manner in which these files are used, the problems encountered, and their solutions. PMID:7435743

  10. Improving the follow-up of microbiology results: the origins of the Pink Book

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Henry; Hunt, Charlie; McIlroy, Catherine; Qureshi, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Failure to check microbiology results put patients at risk of prolonged infections, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality from sepsis. There are some electronic systems designed to address this risk although they are rarely used in the hospital setting. In many hospitals the follow-up of microbiology results for discharged patients is reliant upon individual doctor's vigilance or ad hoc lists. Our intervention, the ‘Pink Book’, provides a simple, cost effective system to follow-up microbiology results for discharged patients. This simple paper based system enables prompt, effective, efficient follow-up of microbiology results, saving our paediatric department an estimated 1.5 hours per week, £17,440 per year and helping to prevent one case of inadequately treated infection per month. This project highlights how small scale, simple interventions at the local level, born out of the frustration at existing inefficient systems, can make great improvements to patient safety and the efficiency of healthcare.

  11. Sierra Leone's Former Child Soldiers: A Follow-up Study of Psychosocial Adjustment and Community Reintegration

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Borisova, Ivelina Ivanova; Williams, Timothy Philip; Brennan, Robert T.; Whitfield, T. Hatch; de la Soudiere, Marie; Williamson, John; Gilman, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    This is the first prospective study to investigate psychosocial adjustment in male and female former child soldiers (n=156, 12% female). The study began in Sierra Leone in 2002 and was designed to examine both risk and protective factors in psychosocial adjustment. Over the two-year period of follow up, youth who had wounded or killed others during the war demonstrated increases in hostility. Youth who survived rape had higher levels of anxiety and hostility, but also demonstrated greater confidence and prosocial attitudes at follow up. Of the potential protective resources examined, improved community acceptance was associated with reduced depression at follow up and improved confidence and prosocial attitudes regardless of levels of violence exposure. Retention in school was also associated with greater prosocial attitudes. PMID:20636683

  12. A new era of sub-millimeter GRB afterglow follow-ups with the Greenland Telescope

    E-print Network

    Urata, Yuji; Asada, Keiichi; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Makoto; Ho, Paul T P

    2015-01-01

    A planned rapid submillimeter (submm) Gamma Ray Burst (GRBs) follow-up observations conducted using the Greenland Telescope (GLT) is presented. The GLT is a 12-m submm telescope to be located at the top of the Greenland ice sheet, where the high-altitude and dry weather porvides excellent conditions for observations at submm wavelengths. With its combination of wavelength window and rapid responding system, the GLT will explore new insights on GRBs. Summarizing the current achievements of submm GRB follow-ups, we identify the following three scientific goals regarding GRBs: (1) systematic detection of bright submm emissions originating from reverse shock (RS) in the early afterglow phase, (2) characterization of forward shock and RS emissions by capturing their peak flux and frequencies and performing continuous monitoring, and (3) detections of GRBs as a result of the explosion of first-generation stars result of GRBs at a high redshift through systematic rapid follow ups. The light curves and spectra calcul...

  13. [Clinical and paraclinical follow-up after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Clément-Colmou, K; Troussier, I; Bardet, É; Lapeyre, M

    2015-10-01

    Head and neck cancer management often involves heavy multimodal treatments including radiotherapy. Despite the improvement of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, acute and late toxicities remain important. After such treatment, patients have to face different potential problems, depending on the post-therapeutic delay. In this way, short-term follow-up permits to appreciate the healing of acute toxicities and response to treatment. Long-term follow-up aims to recognize second primitive tumours and distant failure, and to detect and manage late toxicities. Medical and psychosocial supportive cares are essential, even after several years of complete remission. The objective of this article is to review the modalities of short-term and long-term follow-up of patients who receive a radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. PMID:26278985

  14. Statistical controversies in clinical research: long-term follow-up of clinical trials in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cuzick, J

    2015-12-01

    Long-term follow-up is an important unmet need for the full analysis of new treatments for cancer. Earlier detection of cancer and more effective treatment have led to many more patients surviving for more than 5 and even 10 years, so that evaluating late recurrences and side-effects is an increasingly important issue. This is particularly relevant for oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, where the existence of late recurrences is well documented. However, survival for other cancers, notably prostate, colorectal and cervix cancer, has dramatically increased in recent years due to screening and better treatment of early lesions. Trials of preventive therapies have an even greater need for long follow-up. Here, we review these issues and suggest ways in which provision for long-term follow-up can be improved. PMID:26433395

  15. Reactive attachment disorder in maltreated twins follow-up: from 18 months to 8 years.

    PubMed

    Heller, Sherryl Scott; Boris, Neil W; Fuselier, Sarah-Hinshaw; Page, Timothy; Koren-Karie, Nina; Miron, Devi

    2006-03-01

    The best means for the diagnosis and treatment of reactive attachment disorder of infancy and early childhood have not been established. Though some longitudinal data on institutionalized children is available, reports of maltreated young children who are followed over time and assessed with measures of attachment are lacking. This paper presents the clinical course of a set of maltreated fraternal twins who were assessed and treated from 19 months to 30 months of age and then seen in follow-up at 3 and 8 years of age. A summary of the early assessment and course is provided and findings from follow-up assessments of the cognitive, behavioral, and interpersonal functioning of each child is analysed. Follow-up measures, chosen to capture social-cognitive processing of these children from an attachment perspective, are highlighted. Finally, findings from the case are discussed from nosological and theoretical perspectives. PMID:16581624

  16. Statistical controversies in clinical research: long-term follow-up of clinical trials in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cuzick, J.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term follow-up is an important unmet need for the full analysis of new treatments for cancer. Earlier detection of cancer and more effective treatment have led to many more patients surviving for more than 5 and even 10 years, so that evaluating late recurrences and side-effects is an increasingly important issue. This is particularly relevant for oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, where the existence of late recurrences is well documented. However, survival for other cancers, notably prostate, colorectal and cervix cancer, has dramatically increased in recent years due to screening and better treatment of early lesions. Trials of preventive therapies have an even greater need for long follow-up. Here, we review these issues and suggest ways in which provision for long-term follow-up can be improved. PMID:26433395

  17. Visit to Hitachi Image & Media System Lab, September 3, 1991 This meeting was a follow-up to the June 11 visit and was arranged by Mr

    E-print Network

    Whitney, Daniel

    and several belts. The transfer from horizontal to skewed is provided by several precision plastic cams which lift the roller carriers as they move. The linkages and gears are arrayed in several horizontal layers

  18. Health in overweight children: 2-year follow-up of Finnmark Activity School—a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Kokkvoll, Ane; Grimsgaard, Sameline; Steinsbekk, Silje; Flægstad, Trond; Njølstad, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare a comprehensive lifestyle intervention for overweight children performed in groups of families with a conventional single-family treatment. Two-year follow-up data on anthropometric and psychological outcome are presented. Design Overweight and obese children aged 6–12?years with body mass index (BMI) corresponding to ?27.5?kg/m2 in adults were randomised to multiple-family (n=48) or single-family intervention (n=49) in a parallel design. Multiple-family intervention comprised an inpatient programme with other families and a multidisciplinary team, follow-up visits in their hometown, weekly physical activity and a family camp. Single-family intervention included counselling by paediatric nurse, paediatric consultant and nutritionist at the hospital and follow-up by a community public health nurse. Primary outcome measures were change in BMI kg/m2 and BMI SD score after 2?years. Results BMI increased by 1.29?kg/m2 in the multiple-family intervention compared with 2.02?kg/m2 in the single-family intervention (p=0.075). BMI SD score decreased by 0.20 units in the multiple-family group and 0.08 units in the single-family intervention group (p=0.046). A between-group difference of 2.4?cm in waist circumference (p=0.038) was detected. Pooled data from both treatment groups showed a significant decrease in BMI SD score of 0.14 units and a significant decrease in parent-reported and self-reported Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire total score of 1.9 units. Conclusions Two-year outcome showed no between-group difference in BMI. A small between-group effect in BMI SD score and waist circumference favouring multiple-family intervention was detected. Pooled data showed an overall improvement in psychological outcome measures and BMI SD score. Trial registration number NCT00872807, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:25414250

  19. Clinical Effects and Radiological Results of Vertebroplasty: Over a 2-year Follow-Up Period

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Han Ga Wi; Shin, Il Young; Moon, Seung-Myung; Hwang, Hyung Sik

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigated the association between clinical and radiological results and assessed the radiological changes according to the distribution pattern and amount of injected cement after vertebroplasty. Methods Two hundred and one patients underwent vertebroplasty; of these, 15 were follow up for more than 2 years. For radiological analysis, we grouped the patients according to cement distribution as follows: group 1, unilateral, unilateral distribution of cement; group 2, bilateral-uneven, bilateral distribution of cement but separated mass; and group 3, bilateral-even, bilateral single mass of cement. To compare radiologic with clinical results, we assessed the visual analogue scale (VAS) score, amount of injected cement, bone mineral density (BMD), postoperative and follow-up vertebral body compression ratios, and postoperative and follow-up kyphotic angles. Results There were 4 (26.7%) patients in group 1, 6 (40.0%) in group 2, and 5 (33.3%) in group 3. The mean VAS score was 5.2 preoperatively, 1.8 postoperatively, and 3.2 at 2-year follow-up. The 2-year follow-up compression ratio was better in patients with even distribution of injected cement (group 2 and 3) than group 1. However, it was not statistically insignificant (p>0.05). The follow-up kyphotic angle was more aggravated in the group 1 than in the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Our study showed that vertebroplasty had a beneficial effect on pain relief, particularly in the immediate postoperative stage. The augmented spine tended to be more stable in the cases with increased amount and more even distribution of injected cement. PMID:25983842

  20. Dietary changes in Vietnamese marriage immigrant women: The KoGES follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji-Yun; Lee, Hakim; Ko, Ahra; Han, Chan-Jung; Chung, Hye Won

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The immigrant population has grown considerably in South Korea since the early 1990s due to international marriages. Dietary changes in immigrants are an important issue, because they are related to health and disease patterns. This study was conducted to compare changes in dietary intake between baseline and follow-up periods. SUBJECTS/METHODS Two hundreds thirty three Vietnamese female married immigrants. Baseline data were collected during 2006-2009, and the follow-up data were collected during 2008 and 2010. Food consumption was assessed using a 1-day 24-hour recall. RESULTS The amount of the total food consumed (P < 0.001) including that of cereals (P = 0.004), vegetables (P = 0.003), and fruits (P = 0.002) decreased at follow-up compared to that at baseline, whereas consumption of milk and dairy products increased (P = 0.004). Accordingly, the overall energy and nutrient intake decreased at follow-up, including carbohydrates (P = 0.012), protein (P = 0.021), fiber (P = 0.008), iron (P = 0.009), zinc (P = 0.006), and folate (P = 0.002). Among various anthropometric and biochemical variables, mean skeletal muscle mass decreased (P = 0.012), plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol increased, (P = 0.020) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein decreased at follow-up (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS A long-term follow-up study is needed to investigate the association between changes in food and nutrient intake and anthropometric and biochemical variables in these Vietnamese female marriage immigrants. PMID:24944778

  1. The use of PET-MRI in the follow-up after radiofrequency- and microwave ablation of colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thermal ablation of colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) may result in local progression, which generally appear within a year of treatment. As the timely diagnosis of this progression allows potentially curative local treatment, an optimal follow-up imaging strategy is essential. PET-MRI is a one potential imaging modality, combining the advantages of PET and MRI. The aim of this study is evaluate fluorine-18 deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG) PET-MRI as a modality for detection of local tumor progression during the first year following thermal ablation, as compared to the current standard, FDG PET-CT. The ability of FDG PET-MRI to detect new intrahepatic lesions, and the extent to which FDG PET-MRI alters clinical management, inter-observer variability and patient preference will also be included as secondary outcomes. Methods/Design Twenty patients undergoing treatment with radiofrequency or microwave ablation for (recurrent) CRLM will be included in this prospective trial. During the first year of follow-up, patients will be scanned at the VU University Medical Center at 3-monthly intervals using a 4-phase liver CT, FDG PET-CT and FDG PET-MRI. Patients treated with chemotherapy <6 weeks prior to scanning or with a contra-indication for MRI will be excluded. MRI will be performed using both whole body imaging (mDixon) and dedicated liver sequences, including diffusion-weighted imaging, T1 in-phase and opposed-phase, T2 and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. The results of all modalities will be scored by 4 individual reviewers and inter-observer agreement will be determined. The reference standard will be histology or clinical follow-up. A questionnaire regarding patients’ experience with both modalities will also be completed at the end of the follow-up year. Discussion Improved treatment options for local site recurrences following CRLM ablation mean that accurate post-ablation staging is becoming increasingly important. The combination of the sensitivity of MRI as a detection method for small intrahepatic lesions with the ability of FDG PET to visualize enhanced metabolism at the ablation site suggests that FDG PET-MRI could potentially improve the accuracy of (early) detection of progressive disease, and thus allow swifter and more effective decision-making regarding appropriate treatment. Trial registration Trial registration number: NCT01895673 PMID:25103913

  2. Using Kid Power to Teach Kids about Mental Retardation: A Long Term Follow-Up

    E-print Network

    Turnbull, Amy; Bronicki, G. J. Buzz

    1987-01-01

    Perceptions of Disability BOTTOM LINE TIPS Turnbull, A., & Bronicki, G. J. “Buzz” (1987). Using kid power to teach kids about mental retardation: A long- term follow-up. Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 12(3). 216-217. Results... understanding about mental retardation can teach other kids. METHOD • This study is a follow-up of a fourth grade science project conducted one year prior which investigated whether or not an older child teaching younger children about mental retardation could...

  3. MRI of cerebral rheumatoid pachymeningitis: report of two cases with follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cellerini, M; Gabbrielli, S; Maddali Bongi, S; Cammelli, D

    2001-02-01

    We report the clinical and neuroradiological features of cerebral rheumatoid pachymeningitis with 1 year follow-up in two patients. MRI of the head enabled noninvasive diagnosis of both the meningeal abnormality and its complications, consisting of hypertensive hydrocephalus and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis, respectively. Dural sinus thrombosis, very uncommon in rheumatoid arthritis, was confirmed by phase-contrast MRA. Worsening of the pachymeningitis at follow-up was observed in both patients despite regression or stability of the clinical picture and long-term therapy. PMID:11326561

  4. Optimal delivery of male breast cancer follow-up care: improving outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ferzoco, Raina M; Ruddy, Kathryn J

    2015-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease. There are limited data to inform optimal treatment and follow-up strategies in this population. Currently, most follow-up guidelines are drawn from the vast literature on female breast cancer, despite the fact that male breast cancer has unique biological characteristics. In this review, we discuss clinical characteristics of male breast cancer as well as current best practices for long-term care with a focus on surveillance, screening, and treatment-related symptom management in male breast cancer survivors. PMID:26648754

  5. Follow-up study using iodine-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging in a patient with neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikekubo, K.; Habuchi, Y.; Jeong, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Saiki, Y.; Ito, H.; Hino, M.; Higa, T.

    1986-11-01

    A new radiopharmaceutical, I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-131 MIBG) was used to determine the location and to follow-up tumors in a 13-month-old girl with neuroblastoma. I-131 MIBG imaging revealed both a primary abdominal tumor and a distant metastatic orbital tumor. Follow-up study with I-131 MIBG imaging demonstrated significant resolution of tumors after external radiotherapy and chemotherapy. I-131 MIBG imaging is a simple, safe, and specific method of determining the location of tumors and also is clinically useful in the evaluation and management of patients with neuroblastoma.

  6. Mortality among patients treated for alcoholism: a 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    de Lint, J.; Levinson, T.

    1975-01-01

    During a 5-year follow-up of 154 male and female patients treated for alcoholism at the Donwood Institute, 22 deaths were recorded--almost 4 times the expected number. Typical causes were accidents, suicide, cirrhosis of the liver, cancers of the upper digestive and respiratory tracts and ischemic heart disease. Compared with other samples of alcoholics, unusually few deaths occurred during the first 2 years of follow-up, which suggests the importance of the post-treatment attention given to these patients and the need to greatly extend the duration of aftercare. PMID:168951

  7. Maturogenesis of Two Maxillary Central Incisors: A Case Report with 10 Years of Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the treatment of two immature maxillary central incisors in a 7-year-old female patient. She suffered complicated crown fracture because of trauma, and the root formation was incomplete. White mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was selected as the pulp-capping material after cervical pulpotomy to preserve the pulp tissue vitality and achieve maturogenesis. Follow-up evaluations showed successful treatment in terms of preservation of pulp vitality and demonstrated marked continuous physiological root development. During 10 years of follow-up, both teeth were clinically asymptomatic, and radiographic evaluations showed apparent root regeneration with apical root-end closure without pulp or periapical pathosis. PMID:26622286

  8. [Peculiarities of social adaptation in adolescents with schizoid personality disorder: a follow-up study].

    PubMed

    Borisova, D Iu

    2007-01-01

    A sample of 63 adolescents with schizoid personality disorder, aged 15-17 years, 58 males and 5 females, was followed up for a period of 3-8 years and re-examined at the age of 20-25. The patients were examined in a psychoneurologic out-patient center due to social maladaptation. The follow-up study revealed the improvement of social adaptation with an extremely low percent (5%) of schizophrenia manifestations. A number of clinical factors significant for the future social functioning of schizoid adolescents was found. A strategy of psychocorrection and sociotherapeutic care for the patients is worked out. PMID:18379484

  9. Long-term follow-up study of patients with refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stephen; Fallon, Brian A; Petkova, Eva; Feinstein, Suzanne; Liebowitz, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    The authors prospectively followed patients with treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Between 1988 and 1995, 56 patients with a history of inadequate response to oral clomipramine received 14 infusions of intravenous clomipramine. The follow-up period ranged from 4 to 11 years after treatment. Of the 44 subjects interviewed at follow-up, 70.5% had current OCD and 29.5% had sub-threshold OCD. Almost half reported feeling much improved or very much improved compared to their state prior to treatment with intravenous clomipramine. PMID:19196930

  10. The Safe Passage Study: Design, Methods, Recruitment, and Follow-Up Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dukes, Kimberly A.; Burd, Larry; Elliott, Amy J.; Fifer, William P.; Folkerth, Rebecca D.; Hankins, Gary D.V.; Hereld, Dale; Hoffman, Howard J.; Myers, Michael M.; Odendaal, Hein J.; Signore, Caroline; Sullivan, Lisa M.; Willinger, Marian; Wright, Colleen; Kinney, Hannah C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Safe Passage Study is a large, prospective, multidisciplinary study designed to (1) investigate the association between prenatal alcohol exposure, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and stillbirth, and (2) determine the biological basis of the spectrum of phenotypic outcomes from exposure, as modified by environmental and genetic factors that increase the risk of stillbirth, SIDS, and in surviving children, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Methods The results provided are based on an interim assessment of 6004 women enrolled, out of the 12 000 projected, from the Northern Plains, US, and Cape Town, South Africa, areas known to be of high risk for maternal drinking during pregnancy. Research objectives, study design, and descriptive statistics, including consent, recruitment, and retention information, are provided. Results Overall visit compliance is 87%, and includes prenatal, delivery/newborn, and postnatal contacts through 1 year post-delivery. Pregnancy outcome ascertainment is 98% prior to medical chart review; less than 2% of women withdraw. Consent for the use of DNA and placental tissue exceed 94%, and consent to participate in the autopsy portion of the study is 71%. Conclusions The Safe Passage Study is the first multi-site study of SIDS and stillbirth to integrate prospectively collected exposure information with multidisciplinary biological information in the same maternal and fetal/ infant dyad using a common protocol. Essential components of the study design and its success are close ties to the community and rigorous systems and processes to ensure compliance with the study protocol and procedures. PMID:25131605

  11. Schizo-Affective Psychoses in Childhood: A Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggers, Christian

    1989-01-01

    The follow-up study examined 16 schizo-affective children after a mean of 16 years. In comparison to purely schizophrenic controls, subjects showed an increased incidence of affective psychoses, suicide in the ancestry, and more pre-morbidly well-adjusted personalities. The schizo-affective psychoses had mainly an acute-recurrent character.…

  12. Personality Disorders in People with Learning Disabilities: Follow-Up of a Community Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lidher, J.; Martin, D. M.; Jayaprakash, M. S.; Roy, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: A sample of community-based service users with intellectual disability (ID) was re-examined after 5 years to determine the impact of a diagnosis of personality disorder (PD). Methods: Seventy-five of the original 101 participants were followed up. Of these, 21 people had a PD identified during the original study. Results: Compared with…

  13. Two-Year Follow-up of a Nonaversive Treatment for Cigarette Smoking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colletti, Gep; Stern, Linda

    1980-01-01

    Meaningful smoking reduction was maintained at follow-up, suggesting the relative efficacy of experiencing one of three maintenance strategies employed. Superior maintenance of smoking reduction was demonstrated by the self-monitoring group relative to the modeling and participant observing groups of the original sample. (Author/BEF)

  14. Follow-Up Study of 1983 Legal Technology Graduates. Volume 12, No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrandt, Sharrie; Lucas, John A.

    A follow-up study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to determine the employment and educational status of graduates of the Legal Technology (LTE) program 6 months after receiving their degree. Attempts were made to contact all 59 1983 LTE graduates for telephone interviews and compare their responses to findings from previous…

  15. Measuring Outcomes: A Follow-Up of Minnesota Private Career School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Richard W.; Smith, Edward J.

    In Phase I of a study, all students (n=4,488) enrolled in schools in the Minnesota Association of Private Postsecondary Schools (MAPPS) completed a quality assessment instrument to evaluate their school. In Phase II, a sample of 2,000 students who completed the initial assessment were followed up to measure completion, placement, and student…

  16. Alopecia Areata Increases the Risk of Stroke: a 3-year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Herng-Ching; Kao, Senyeong; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The risk for stroke in alopecia areata (AA) patients is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the risk for subsequent risk of a stroke in AA patients in a large-scale retrospective cohort study. We identified 3231 patients with AA included in the study group from 2004 to 2011 in the “Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000” in Taiwan. We randomly selected 16,155 matched patients as the comparison group. We individually tracked each patient for a 3-year period to identify patients who had received a diagnosis of stroke during the follow-up period. We found that incidence rates of stroke during the 3-year follow-up periods were 5.44 (95% confidence interval (CI)?=?4.03?~?7.20) and 2.75 (95% CI?=?2.30?~?3.27) per 1000 person-years for patients with and those without AA, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio for stroke for those patients with AA was 1.61 (95% CI?=?1.13?~?2.30) within the follow-up period compared to the controls. We concluded that patients with AA were associated with a higher risk of stroke in the 3-year follow-up period. PMID:26114569

  17. Adolescents' Declining Motivation to Learn Science: A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder-Weiss, Dana; Fortus, David

    2012-01-01

    This is a mix methods follow-up study in which we reconfirm the findings from an earlier study [Vedder-Weiss & Fortus [2011] "Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 48(2)", 199-216]. The findings indicate that adolescents' declining motivation to learn science, which was found in many previous studies [Galton [2009] "Moving to secondary school:…

  18. Exploring "Successful" Outcomes of Entrepreneurship Education: A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Laura; Kapasi, Isla; Whittam, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    During 2005-2006 entrepreneurship students in several UK universities completed a survey about their background and career intentions. This paper reports, eight years on, on a follow-up study with ten of these participants, with the aim of exploring the students' intentions and subsequent actions since graduating. Using a qualitative methodology,…

  19. Wireless Communicative stent for follow-up of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    E-print Network

    Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    Wireless Communicative stent for follow-up of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Johan Mazeyrat, Olivier aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a dilatation of the aorta at the abdominal level, which rupture is a life people in the world are nowadays subject to an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) illness. AAA illness

  20. A Follow-Up Study on Word and Non-Word Reading Skills in Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roch, Maja; Jarrold, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The current study was designed to trace changes in the relationship between non-word reading and irregular word reading on the one hand, and between phonological awareness and non-word reading on the other, through a follow-up study of a group of individuals with Down syndrome. Twelve individuals with Down syndrome, whose data were originally…

  1. Psychopathy, Treatment Behavior, and Recidivism: An Extended Follow-Up of Seto and Barbaree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbaree, Howard E.

    2005-01-01

    Seto and Barbaree reported the unexpected finding that adult male sex offenders who scored higher on psychopathy and exhibited better behavior in treatment were almost four times more likely to commit a new serious offence than other offenders once released. The present study reexamined this sample after a longer follow-up time using more complete…

  2. Four-Year Follow-Up of the Community Intervention "10 000 Steps Ghent"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Cocker, Katrien A.; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse M.; Brown, Wendy J.; Cardon, Greet M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the 4-year follow-up effects of the "10 000 steps Ghent" project, which had shown increases in pedometer steps after the first year of implementation (2005-06). All adults who had participated in 2005-06 (n = 866) were recontacted in 2009 and invited to complete the International Physical Activity…

  3. Follow-Up Study of Former Students of the Data Processing Program. Volume XVI, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rilki, Ernest; Lucas, John A.

    In spring 1987, a follow-up survey was conducted of former William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) students who had taken five or more data processing courses at the college between 1980 and 1986. The survey focused on the students' employment status and educational intent while attending WRHC, their present employment situation, and their evaluation…

  4. Howard Community College Follow-Up of 1987 Graduates. Research Report Number 61.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seboda, Barbara L.

    In 1988, a follow-up survey was conducted of 1987 Howard Community College (HCC) graduates to determine their employment and educational status, reasons for attending HCC, goal attainment, reasons for selecting HCC, ratings of the college, attendance pattern, transfer experiences, employment patterns, and satisfaction with the college and their…

  5. Follow-Up Study of 1990 Nursing Graduates. Volume XX, No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, J.; Meltesen, C.

    In 1990, a follow-up study of nursing program graduates was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) in Palatine, Illinois, to examine their employment patterns, further education plans, and evaluate particular aspects of their WRHC experience. All 98 nursing students who earned 48 credit hours in 1990 were mailed questionnaires 1 year…

  6. Follow-Up Study of 1986 Nursing Graduates. Volume XVI, No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dincher, J.; Flaherty, A.

    In spring 1987, a follow-up study of nursing program graduates was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to examine employment patterns, further education plans, and graduates' evaluation of particular aspects of their WRHC experience. Questionnaires were mailed to 112 nursing students who graduated with an associate degree in 1986.…

  7. Follow-Up Study of 1988 Nursing Graduates. Volume XVIII, No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dincher, J.; Meltesen, Cal

    In 1989, a follow-up study of nursing program graduates was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to examine their employment patterns, further education plans, and evaluate particular aspects of their WRHC experience. Questionnaires were mailed to 105 nursing students who graduated in 1988. Results were compared with previous surveys…

  8. Effects of Stimulant Medication on Growth Rates across 3 Years in the MTA Follow-up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, James M.; Elliott, Glen R.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Wigal, Timothy; Arnold, L. Eugene; Vitiello, Benedetto; Hechtman, Lily; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Pelham, William E.; Abikoff, Howard B.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Wells, Karen C.; Hoza, Betsy; Jensen, Peter S.; Gibbons, Robert D.; Hur, Kwan; Stehli, Annamarie; Davies, Mark; March, John S.; Conners, C. Keith; Caron, Mark; Volkow, Nora D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hypothesis of stimulant medication effect on physical growth in the follow-up phase of the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With ADHD. Method: Naturalistic subgroups were established based on patterns of treatment with stimulant medication at baseline, 14-, 24-, and 36-month assessments: not medicated (n = 65),…

  9. A One-Year Follow-up of Relaxation Training for Elders with Subjective Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Henry C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Results of a follow-up study of older adults (n=27) who one year earlier had participated in relaxation training to cope with tension and anxiety supported the efficacy of relaxation training for elderly persons with subjective anxiety. (Author/NB)

  10. B-School Follow Up: Class of 2013. GMAC® Data-to-Go Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graduate Management Admission Council, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This brief summarizes the findings of an annual poll of new business school alumni conducted each September by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC). The September 2013 follow-up study gathered data from students who responded to the Global Management Education Graduate Survey--the GMAC exit survey of graduating management students in…

  11. Sources of Validity Evidence for Educational and Psychological Tests: A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cizek, Gregory J.; Bowen, Daniel; Church, Keri

    2010-01-01

    This study followed up on previous work that examined the incidence of reporting evidence based on test consequences in "Mental Measurements Yearbook". In the present study, additional possible outlets for what has been called "consequential validity" evidence were investigated, including all articles published in the past 10 years in several…

  12. "Throw Follow-up: Part I: Cling" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES David Alciatore, PhD ("Dr. Dave")

    E-print Network

    Alciatore, David G.

    "Throw Follow-up: Part I: Cling" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES David Alciatore, PhD ("Dr. Dave at: dr-dave-billiards.com. This is the first article in a series dealing with throw, which is the change in object ball (OB) direction due to sideways forces between the cue ball (CB) and OB during

  13. High Risk Infants Follow-Up: A Case Study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Jodeiry, Behzad; Hosseini, Mohammad Baqer; Mirnia, Kayvan; Akrami, Forouzan; Habbibollahi, Abbas; Moazzen, Sara; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background. A follow-up program for high risk infants was initiated in Alzahra Maternity Hospital in Tabriz city, Iran, in 2013. The aim of this paper is to give a brief report of the program. Material and Methods. Two groups of high risk neonates were studied. The first group comprising 509 infants received services in Alzahra Maternity Hospital implemented by the follow-up program. This included a full package for family to look after high risk infant and periodic clinical evaluation at two and four weeks after birth and then two, three, four, five, and six months later again. The second group including 131 infants in Taleqani Maternity Hospital received routine services after birth with no specific follow-up care. Results. Some anthropometric indices showed a significant improvement in the intervention hospital compared to control group. These included the following: head circumference at first and second months; weight in the first, fourth, fifth, and sixth months; and height in sixth month only. Clinical evaluation of infants showed an improvement for some of the medical conditions. Conclusion. Follow-up care program for a minimum of six months after discharge from maternity hospitals may help to avoid adverse and life threatening consequences in high risk infants. PMID:26136787

  14. Emetic and Electric Shock Alcohol Aversion Therapy: Six- and Twelve-Month Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Dale S.; Baker, Timothy B.

    1981-01-01

    Follow-up data are presented for 6- and 12-months on male alcoholics (N=20) who received either a multifaceted inpatient alcoholism treatment program alone (controls) or emetic or shock aversion therapy in addition to that program. Both emetic and control subjects compiled more days of abstinence than shock subjects. (Author)

  15. The D.A.T. -- A Seven-Year Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Test Service Bulletin, 1955

    1955-01-01

    A second follow-up of students in five cities in 1947 who had taken the Differential Aptitude Tests is reported. Questionnaires were sent out to 2,386 individuals, and replies were received from 1,430. Their Differential Aptitude Test scores were converted to standard scores with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10, based upon the original…

  16. Colorado Even Start Follow-Up Study: Trinidad State Junior College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Beckie

    Even Start family literacy programs are integrated adult education, early childhood education, and parent support components intended to break the intergenerational cycle of poverty and low literacy. In Spring of 2002, a follow-up study of one Even Start project was conducted to assess the long-term effects of Even Start programming for families.…

  17. Follow-up actions from positive results of in vitro genetic toxicity testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appropriate follow-up actions and decisions are needed when evaluating and interpreting clear positive results obtained in the in vitro assays used in the initial genotoxicity screening battery (i.e., the battery of tests generally required by regulatory authorities) to assist in...

  18. A Follow up: Developing Growing Need for Soft-Skills in IT Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Dewey A.; Phillips, Julie

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we follow up "Developing Growing Need for Soft-Skills in IT Professionals," a paper from the 2003 ASCUE Conference. In that paper we examined the need for "soft-skills" by information technology professionals. In the current economic climate, IT outsourcing is becoming increasingly popular. Our Columbus, Indiana Purdue campus has a…

  19. 12-Month Follow-Up of Fluoxetine and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wilson, G. Terence; Masheb, Robin M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The longer term efficacy of medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED) remains unknown. This study examined the longer term effects of fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) either with fluoxetine (CBT + fluoxetine) or with placebo (CBT + placebo) for BED through 12-month follow-up after completing treatments.…

  20. ATel 7523: Optical follow-up of S3 1227+25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesci, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    Following the ATel #7516 by Mukherjee of a very high-energy flare of S3 1227+25, I performed an optical follow-up of the source in the V band with the 30cm telescope of the Foligno Observatory (IUA K56) on 2015-05-17.83 UT (JD 2,457,160). ...

  1. Colonoscopic screening and follow-up for colorectal cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jun; Zhang, Zi-Qi; Zhu, Cheng; Wang, Meng-Wei; Zhao, Dong-Hai; Fu, Yong-He; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Ya-Hong; Wu, Ben-Yan

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To improve the prevention and treatment of senile patients with colorectal cancer by evaluating the importance of colonoscopy in clinical screening and follow-up. METHODS: Clinical screening of colonoscopy was performed for 2196 patients aged 60-90 years old according to the protocol, and 1740 of them (79.2%) were followed-up. RESULTS: Colorectal cancer was found in 52 patients, and the detectable rate was 2.4%. Among them, 19 were diagnosed as early colorectal cancer, accounting for 36.5% of the detected colorectal cancer. Among the followed-up patients, early colorectal cancer was found in 9, accounting for 45.0% of the detected colorectal cancer. The resectable rate and 5 years survival rate of colorectal cancer were 97.7% and 80.9% respectively. The incidence of complication was 0.05%, and the successful rate of cecum intubation was 98.9%. CONCLUSION: Colonoscopic screening and follow-up of the elderly for colorectal cancer and pre-cancerous lesion (adenomatoid polyp) can increase the detectable rate of early colorectal cancer and improve its prevention and treatment. PMID:11925605

  2. Fifteen-Year Follow-Up of Thyroid Status in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V.; Ninan, S.; Haque, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The natural history of thyroid function in adults with Down syndrome is relatively unknown with limited long-term follow-up data. Method: This study investigated annual thyroid function tests in 200 adults with Down syndrome over a 15-year period. Results: For healthy adults with Down syndrome there is a gradual increase in thyroxine…

  3. The Development and Validation of a Teacher Preparation Program: Follow-Up Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulte, Laura E.

    2008-01-01

    Students in my applied advanced statistics course for educational administration doctoral students developed a follow-up survey for teacher preparation programs, using the following scale development processes: adopting a framework; developing items; providing evidence of content validity; conducting a pilot test; and analyzing data. The students…

  4. Young Adult Follow-Up of Hyperactive Children: Antisocial Activities and Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.; Fischer, Mariellen; Smallish, Lori; Fletcher, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hyperactive/ADHD children are believed to be a greater risk for adolescent and young adult antisocial activity and drug use/abuse, particularly that subset having comorbid conduct problems/disorder. Method: We report on the lifetime antisocial activities and illegal drug use self-reported at young adult follow-up (mean age 20-21 years;…

  5. To obtain the Hepatitis B vaccination series and follow up titer, simply do the following

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    To obtain the Hepatitis B vaccination series and follow up titer, simply do the following will begin the vaccination series (three shots, followed by a titer check about one month after the last injection) If your titer check does not indicate antibody production, the vaccination series can be repeated

  6. Study Protocol, Sample Characteristics, and Loss to Follow-Up: The OPPERA Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bair, Eric; Brownstein, Naomi C.; Ohrbach, Richard; Greenspan, Joel D.; Dubner, Ron; Fillingim, Roger B.; Maixner, William; Smith, Shad; Diatchenko, Luda; Gonzalez, Yoly; Gordon, Sharon; Lim, Pei-Feng; Ribeiro-Dasilva, Margarete; Dampier, Dawn; Knott, Charles; Slade, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    When studying incidence of pain conditions such as temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), repeated monitoring is needed in prospective cohort studies. However, monitoring methods usually have limitations and, over a period of years, some loss to follow-up is inevitable. The OPPERA prospective cohort study of first-onset TMD screened for symptoms using quarterly questionnaires and examined symptomatic participants to definitively ascertain TMD incidence. During the median 2.8-year observation period, 16% of the 3,263 enrollees completed no follow-up questionnaires, others provided incomplete follow-up, and examinations were not conducted for one third of symptomatic episodes. Although screening methods and examinations were found to have excellent reliability and validity, they were not perfect. Loss to follow-up varied according to some putative TMD risk factors, although multiple imputation to correct the problem suggested that bias was minimal. A second method of multiple imputation that evaluated bias associated with omitted and dubious examinations revealed a slight underestimate of incidence and some small biases in hazard ratios used to quantify effects of risk factors. Although “bottom line” statistical conclusions were not affected, multiply-imputed estimates should be considered when evaluating the large number of risk factors under investigation in the OPPERA study. Perspective These findings support the validity of the OPPERA prospective cohort study for the purpose of investigating the etiology of first-onset TMD, providing the foundation for other papers investigating risk factors hypothesized in the OPPERA project. PMID:24275220

  7. Handbook of Instructions for Conducting Follow-Up Studies of High School Graduates. Book I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Evelyn T. Comp.; And Others

    This handbook is designed to enable high schools to conduct follow-up studies on their graduates for 5 years after graduation. The information gathered should give schools pertinent data about: (1) post high school activities of graduates; (2) reactions of graduates to counseling and guidance opportunities; (3) reactions of graduates to…

  8. Loneliness, Social Networks, and Mortality: 18 Years of Follow-up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iecovich, Esther; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Stessman, Jochanan

    2011-01-01

    We examined the influence of changes in loneliness and social support networks upon mortality during 18 years of follow-up among an elderly cohort and determined the gender-specific nature of this relationship. The study is based on data collected from the Jerusalem Longitudinal Study (1990-2008), which has followed a representative sample of 605…

  9. A Follow-Up Study of Girls with Gender Identity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Kelley D.; Bradley, Susan J.; Peterson-Badali, Michele; Zucker, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    This study provided information on the natural histories of 25 girls with gender identity disorder (GID). Standardized assessment data in childhood (mean age, 8.88 years; range, 3-12 years) and at follow-up (mean age, 23.24 years; range, 15-36 years) were used to evaluate gender identity and sexual orientation. At the assessment in childhood, 60%…

  10. Self-Assessment for Career Change: Does It Really Work? A Follow-up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiant, Allen A.; Hutchinson, Ronald C.

    To examine the impact of evaluating one's transferable skills on subsequent employment experiences, a follow-up study compared past participants in Columbia University's Deep Investigation of Growth (DIG) program with a group of non-participants and a pre-program group. The program guides participants through a self-analysis process to identify…

  11. High-Active Children and Achievement Tests: A Two-Year Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weithorn, Corinne J.; Marcus, Maxine

    1985-01-01

    Presents data from 2-year follow-up of 52 elementary students which indicated that in fourth grade, as in second grade, language ability, as measured by the Wechsler Kntelligence Scale for Children-Revised Vocabulary subtest, was more strongly related to Achievement Test scores among high-actives than among nonhigh-actives. (Author/NRB)

  12. Longitudinal Follow-Up of Children with Autism Receiving Targeted Interventions on Joint Attention and Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasari, Connie; Gulsrud, Amanda; Freeman, Stephanny; Paparella, Tanya; Hellemann, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the cognitive and language outcomes of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) over a 5-year period after receiving targeted early interventions that focused on joint attention and play skills. Method: Forty children from the original study (n = 58) had complete data at the 5-year follow-up. Results: In all,…

  13. Follow-up Study of the Finances of Chemistry and Physics

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    Follow-up Study of the Finances of Chemistry and Physics Departments in UK Universities An Institute of Physics and Royal Society of Chemistry report | June 2010 #12;Acknowledgements I would like to thank all of the staff in the chemistry and physics departments and the staff in central finance

  14. Predictors of ADHD Persistence in Girls at 5-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Eric; Byrne, Deirdre; Fried, Ronna; Monuteaux, Michael; Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to examine the age-dependent remission from ADHD in girls transitioning through childhood into adolescence and early adulthood. Method: We conducted a 5-year prospective follow-up study of 123 girls with ADHD and 106 non-ADHD control girls aged between 6 and 17 years at ascertainment. ADHD was considered…

  15. Spiritual Well-Being Scale Ethnic Differences between Caucasians and African-Americans: Follow Up Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geri; Gridley, Betty; Fleming, Willie

    This follow up study is in response to Miller, Fleming, and Brown-Andersons (1998) study of ethnic differences between Caucasians and African-Americans where the authors suggested that the Spiritual Well-Being (SWB) Scale may need to be interpreted differently depending on ethnicity. In this study, confirmatory factor analyses were conducted for…

  16. Children of Mothers at Psychosocial Risk Growing Up: A Follow up at the Age of 16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsby, Marie; Svedin, Carl Goran; Sydsjo, Gunilla

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to make a 16-year follow-up of children of psychosocial risk mothers as concerns emotional/behavioural problems, self-esteem, life events, and academic grades. Forty-three teenagers (index group) and 61 reference teenagers were personally interviewed and asked to answer the Youth Self-report (YSR), the Self-image…

  17. An Evaluation of an Innovative Drug Education Program: Follow-Up Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskowitz, Joel M.; And Others

    This study provides a follow-up assessment of an innovative drug education program for seventh and eighth graders. Students learned Lasswell's framework for understanding human needs and motives, a systematic decision-making procedure, and information about the pharmacological, psychological, and social consequences of licit and illicit drug use.…

  18. Penetrating wound of the orbit: a 31-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Freiwald, M J

    1977-08-01

    The case is described of a man who at the age of 17 suffered accidental penetration of his right orbit by a rod and spring from a machine gun. Operation was successful, and follow-up 31 years later showed normal vision at 20/20 in both eyes. PMID:911736

  19. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations C Appendix C to Part 1356 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E Pt. 1356, App. C Appendix C to Part 1356—Calculating Sample Size for...

  20. FOLLOW-UP OF PATIENTS RECEIVING DIAGNOSTIC DOSES OF 131 IODINE DURING CHILDHOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the data collection methodology and procedures of a follow-up survey conducted of persons under 16 years old who received diagnostic Iodine 131 for evaluation of thyroid function at nine clinical centers prior to December 31, 1960. The intent of this data col...

  1. Personnel Needs in School Psychology: A 10-Year Follow-Up Study on Predicted Personnel Shortages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Jose M.; Curtis, Michael J.; Tan, Sim Yin

    2014-01-01

    Concerns regarding whether a sufficient supply of school psychologists exists have been evident for decades. Studies have predicted that school psychology would face a critical personnel shortage that would peak in 2010, but continue into the foreseeable future. The current study is a 10-year follow-up investigation based on previously published…

  2. PLENARY SESSION: Posttreatment Follow-up Care for Cancer Survivors - Office of Cancer Survivorship

    Cancer.gov

    The growing population of cancer survivors at risk for serious adverse effects after treatment, both psychological and physical, is in need of practitioners who understand the complicated health issues they face. Follow-up care needs vary with the survivor; pediatric, young adult, and older adult cancer survivors all face distinct challenges.

  3. 77 FR 69896 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Follow-Up...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ...; Follow-Up Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact Evaluation, American Recovery... Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact Evaluation, American Recovery Reinvestment Act... Health Care Grants Impact Evaluation (OMB 1205-0486), and in March, 2012, the OMB approved a...

  4. Supplementary Figure legends Supplementary Figure 1: Long term follow up of changing hair cycle domains on

    E-print Network

    Maini, Philip K.

    Supplementary Figure legends Supplementary Figure 1: Long term follow up of changing hair cycle to trace the temporal changes of hair cycle domains. Pictures were taken every 2-3 days and selective ones are shown here. In normal pigmented mice, similar hair cycle domains can be revealed by simple hair clipping

  5. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations C Appendix C to Part 1356 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E Pt. 1356, App. C Appendix C to Part 1356—Calculating Sample Size for...

  6. Psychopathy and Offending From Adolescence to Adulthood: A 10-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gretton, Heather M.; Hare, Robert D.; Catchpole, Rosalind E. H.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the predictive validity of the Hare Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL:YV; A. E. Forth, D. S. Kosson, & R. D. Hare, 2003) from adolescence to early adulthood. The authors coded the PCL:YV using file information and collected criminal record information over a 10-year follow-up period on 157 boys, ages 12 through 18,…

  7. Long-term follow-up of zonulo-hyaloido-vitrectomy for pseudophakic malignant glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Madgula, Indira M; Anand, Nitin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report long-term follow-up of zonulo-hyaloido-vitrectomy (ZHV) via anterior approach for pseudophakic malignant glaucoma refractory to medical treatment. Design: Noncomparative case-series. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 9 patients who sought treatment for aqueous humor misdirection refractory to medical treatment were reviewed. All patients underwent anterior vitrectomy, hyaloido-zonulectomy, and peripheral iridectomy (PI) via an anterior approach. Main outcome measures were preoperative and postoperative visual acuity, intraocular pressure, medications, slit-lamp examination, and fundus findings. Results: 10 eyes of 9 patients (7 female, 2 male) who underwent ZHV for refractory pseudophakic malignant glaucoma between 2003 and 2010 were included in this case-series. The mean age of patients was 77.4 ± 9.0 years, mean follow-up duration 50.2 ± 27.2 months. Recurrence of malignant glaucoma was noted in 40% (four cases) after a successful ZHV on long-term follow-up. Conclusions: An anterior segment surgeon can treat malignant glaucoma refractory to medical treatment successfully by vitrectomy, hyaloido-zonulectomy, and PI. This can be done via an anterior approach and patients require long follow-up to rule out a relapse despite a successful outcome in the short term. PMID:25579353

  8. Revised 10-14-2013 1 Pediatric Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines

    E-print Network

    Brent, Roger

    . · Cognitive development: Children who were younger than two at the time of transplant may have delayed.org/en/treatment/long-term-follow-up/information-for- physicians.html. Breast exam for teenage girls (and counseling about breast self-exams). · Recommended lab

  9. Follow-Up of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders from Age 2 to Age 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Lauren M.; Stone, Wendy L.; Pozdol, Stacie L.; Coonrod, Elaine E.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the developmental outcomes of children 7 years after their initial diagnosis. Children diagnosed with autism or PDD-NOS at age 2 received follow-up evaluations at age 9. Diagnostic stability was high, with 88 percent of the sample obtaining autism spectrum diagnoses at age 9. Cognitive scores…

  10. Follow-Up Study of Former Students of the Criminal Justice Program. Volume XVI, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, George; Lucas, John A.

    A follow-up study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) of students who had completed several courses in the Criminal Justice Program to determine why students left the criminal justice field, examine Criminal Justice students' enrollment and course-taking patterns, and to analyze withdrawal and failure rates in the course,…

  11. Follow-Up Study of a School-Based Scalds Prevention Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Julie; Morath, Karen; Harre, Niki

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the follow-up evaluation of a school-based scalds prevention programme designed to teach children about scalds hazards and encourage safe family practices. It involved two classroom sessions and a homework exercise that targeted five safety practices. The programme was taught to 28 classes in 14 schools in Waitakere City, New…

  12. Improving Library Services to Satellite Campuses: A Follow-Up Study at the University of Lethbridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eva, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to provide better service to the University of Lethbridge satellite campus locations, a survey was done of instructors on the northern campuses regarding their knowledge and use of the University of Lethbridge Library services available to them. This was a follow-up to a survey conducted in 2011, at which time it was found that many…

  13. The Sexual Adjustment of Coronary Bypass Surgery Patients: A 4-Year Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurer, Shari; Thurer, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    Measured the sexual adjustment of 14 individuals before coronary bypass surgery and both four months and four years afterwards. Results showed that sexual adjustment worsened with the onset of symptomatic coronary artery disease and did not improve at either follow-up interval. (LLL)

  14. 20 CFR 664.450 - What are follow-up services for youth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... education; (4) Work-related peer support groups; (5) Adult mentoring; and (6) Tracking the progress of youth... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are follow-up services for youth? 664... YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth Program Design, Elements,...

  15. Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children: Three-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beidel, Deborah C.; Turner, Samuel M.; Young, Brennan; Paulson, Autumn

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the results of a 3-year follow-up assessment of children and adolescents diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (social phobia) and treated with Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children (SET-C), a comprehensive behavioral treatment program combining social skills training, peer generalization, and individualized exposure. Among…

  16. Secondary Preventive Interventions with Preschool Children: A Follow-up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickel, Annette U.; Dyhdalo, Louise L.

    The long term effects of a preschool intervention program for an experimental group of high-risk, black, low income children were assessed and compared to a high-risk placebo control group and low-risk "normal" controls. Seventy first grade children were involved in this 2-year follow-up study. Of these children, 42 were involved in the preschool…

  17. Two-Stage Revision Arthroplasty for Periprosthetic Hip Infection: Mean Follow-Up of Ten Years

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chi-Chien; Chen, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Han; Hsieh, Pang-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Two-stage revision hip arthroplasty is the gold standard for treatment of patients with chronic periprosthetic joint infection (PJI), but few studies have reported outcomes beyond short-term follow-up. Methods. A total of 155 patients who underwent two-stage revision arthroplasty for chronic PJI in 157 hips were retrospectively enrolled in this study between January 2001 and December 2010. The mean patient age was 57.5 years, the mean prosthetic age was 3.6 years, and the interim interval was 17.8 weeks. These patients were followed up for an average of 9.7 years. Results. At the latest follow-up, 91.7% of the patients were free of infection. The mean Harris hip score improved significantly from 28.3 points before operation to 85.7 points at the latest follow-up. Radiographically, there was aseptic loosening of the stem or acetabular components in 4 patients. In the multivariate survival analysis using a Cox regression model, repeated debridement before final reconstruction, an inadequate interim period, bacteriuria or pyuria, and cirrhosis were found to be the independent risk factors for treatment failure. Conclusion. Our data show that two-stage revision hip arthroplasty provides reliable eradication of infection and durable reconstruction of the joint in patients with PJI caused by a variety of pathogens. PMID:26064901

  18. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OF A NEARBY GALAXY FROM THE ARECIBO ZONE OF AVOIDANCE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, T. P.; Henning, P. A.; Minchin, R. F.; Momjian, E.; Kaur, A.; Parton, B.

    2011-09-20

    The Arecibo L-Band Feed Array Zone of Avoidance (ALFA ZOA) Survey has discovered a nearby galaxy, ALFA ZOA J1952+1428, at a heliocentric velocity of +279 km s{sup -1}. The galaxy was discovered at low Galactic latitude by 21 cm emission from neutral hydrogen (H I). We have obtained follow-up observations with the Expanded Very Large Array and the 0.9 m Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy optical telescope. The H I distribution overlaps an uncataloged, potential optical counterpart. The H I linear size is 1.4 kpc at our adopted distance of D = 7 Mpc, but the distance estimate is uncertain as Hubble's law is unreliable at low recessional velocities. The optical counterpart has m{sub B} = 16.9 mag and B - R = 0.1 mag. These characteristics, including M{sub H} {sub i} = 10{sup 7.0} M{sub sun} and L{sub B} = 10{sup 7.5} L{sub sun}, if at 7 Mpc, indicate that this galaxy is a blue compact dwarf, but this remains uncertain until further follow-up observations are complete. Optical follow-up observations are ongoing and near-infrared follow-up observations have been scheduled.

  19. Evidence-Based Assessment in Case Management to Improve Abnormal Cancer Screen Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vourlekis, Betsy; Ell, Kathleen; Padgett, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe an evidence-based assessment protocol for intensive case management to improve screening diagnostic follow-up developed through a research project in breast and cervical cancer early detection funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Three components of an evidence-based approach to assessment are presented…

  20. Clinical and Radiological Long-Term Follow-up After Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Kjeldsen, Anette D.

    2006-02-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical and radiological long-term results of embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and to assess the quality of life after treatment. A clinical follow-up was undertaken after 67 months (mean) in 35 consecutive patients with 106 PAVMs. Outcome parameters at follow-up were PaO{sub 2} and patients' satisfaction. During follow-up, the patients had a clinical examination, measurement of arterial blood gases, chest X-ray, and contrast echocardiography performed and were asked to fill in a questionnaire exploring experience of the treatment and subjective effect of treatment on physical and social functioning. A significant rise in oxygenation of the blood after embolization was measured. In 77% of the patients symptoms improved, and 71% felt better performance. In eight patients, one of the PAVMs was found insufficiently embolized or recanalized at follow-up angiography and therefore were re-embolized. Endovascular embolization for PAVMs is effective. Clinical parameters and quality of life improved significantly. Regular clinical controls after therapy are necessary to discover insufficiently embolized, recanalized or new PAVMs.

  1. Emotionally Focused Interventions for Couples with Chronically Ill Children: A 2-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloutier, Paula F.; Manion, Ian G.; Walker, Jan Gordon; Johnson, Susan M.

    2002-01-01

    Couples with chronically ill children are particularly at risk for experiencing marital distress. The study presented here is a 2-year follow-up of a randomized control trial that assessed the efficacy of Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) in decreasing marital distress in a sample of couples with a chronically ill child. Thirteen couples with…

  2. Premarital Cohabitation vs. Traditional Courtship and Subsequent Marital Adjustment: A Replication and Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Roy E. L.; DeMeo, Peter W.

    1987-01-01

    Replicated earlier study of couples in first year of marriage. Conducted follow-up study of couples in fourth year of marriage who had participated in original or replication studies. Concludes that premarital relationships of the couples, whether cohabitation or traditional courtship, does not appear to have had long-term effect on marital…

  3. A twenty-five year follow-up study of ten exceptionally creative adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Cangelosi, D M; Schaefer, C E

    1991-02-01

    A 25-yr. follow-up of 10 women identified as highly creative during adolescence indicated that most believed they had actualized their creative potential to a moderately high degree. However, only one woman stated that creative expression was a dominant life theme and primary commitment. Factors that facilitate and inhibit creativity over a lifetime are discussed. PMID:2034770

  4. Reversible Autism among Congenitally Blind Children? A Controlled Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, R. Peter; Lee, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Background: Atypical forms of autism may yield insights into the development and nature of the syndrome. Methods: We conducted a follow-up study of nine congenitally blind and seven sighted children who, eight years earlier, had satisfied formal diagnostic criteria for autism and had been included in groups matched for chronological age and verbal…

  5. Sierra Leone's Former Child Soldiers: A Follow-Up Study of Psychosocial Adjustment and Community Reintegration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Borisova, Ivelina Ivanova; Williams, Timothy Philip; Brennan, Robert T.; Whitfield, Theodore H.; de la Soudiere, Marie; Williamson, John; Gilman, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    This is the first prospective study to investigate psychosocial adjustment in male and female former child soldiers (ages 10-18; n = 156, 12% female). The study began in Sierra Leone in 2002 and was designed to examine both risk and protective factors in psychosocial adjustment. Over the 2-year period of follow-up, youth who had wounded or killed…

  6. Innovation of High-risk Infants Follow-up Surveillance System in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jodeiry, Behzad; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Mirnia, Kayvan; Akrami, Forouzan; Heidarabadi, Seifoallah; Ebadi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early childhood development is one of the most social determinants of health that must be notified in order to reducing social gap and inequity. In spite of increasingly developing intensive neonatal care wards and decreasing neonatal mortality rate, there is no follow-up surveillance system to identify high-risk infants (HRI) and their health problems for timely intervention after discharge. This study was carried out to design and pilot high-risk infant follow-ups (HRIFs) surveillance system, in Alzahra Hospital, a tertiary level center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (TUOMS), in 2012–2013. Methods: In this qualitative research after studying international documents, consensus about criteria of HRIs accomplished by focus group discussion. Then, Delphi agreement technique was used to finalizing assessment timetable. In the second phase, we piloted the designed surveillance system in Alzahra Hospital, a tertiary level center of TUOMS. Pilot study was implemented by follow-up team organized in designed model at the first phase of the study. Then, the findings of the pilot study were being assessed by an expert panel. If the members agreed on made decisions, they were being placed on the agenda of the national committee of development care of newborns for final approval. Results: High-risk infants follow-up surveillance system was designed in following steps: Defining of evidence-based criteria of HRIs, organizing the follow-up team, regulating the organs and neurodevelopment assessment timetable, publishing a health certificate notebook for HRIs, and designing Access database software for data collection, report and evaluation. Conclusions: We designed and piloted HRIFs surveillance system, so this system was institutionalized in Alzahra Hospital, finally. It can be prepared to apply in the whole country, after detecting the quantitative outcomes and developing the program in East Azarbijan. PMID:25969705

  7. Kidney preservation protocol for management of emphysematous pyelonephritis: Treatment modalities and follow-up

    PubMed Central

    El-Nahas, Ahmed R.; Shokeir, Ahmed A.; Eziyi, Amogu Kalu; Barakat, Tamer S.; Tijani, Kehinde Habeeb; El-Diasty, Tarek; Abol-Enein, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To present treatments for kidney preservation in the management of emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN), and to evaluate the functional outcome of preserved kidneys during the follow-up. Patients and methods The computerized files of patients with EPN from 2000 to 2010 were reviewed. After initial resuscitation, ultrasonography-guided percutaneous tubes were placed for drainage of infected fluid and gas. A radio-isotopic renal scan was done after stabilization of the patients’ condition. Preservation of the affected kidney was attempted when the differential function was >10%. A renal isotopic scan was taken during the follow-up to evaluate renographic changes in preserved kidneys. Results The study included 33 kidneys in 30 consecutive patients (mean age 51.7 years, SD 10.9). Kidney preservation was applicable for 23 kidneys (20 patients). Preservation methods included percutaneous nephrostomy for 12, percutaneous tube drain for two and conservative treatment for nine kidneys (six patients). Nephrectomy was performed for 10 kidneys (emergency in three and delayed in seven). The frequency of post-treatment septic shock after kidney preservation (10%) was significantly lower than after nephrectomy (20%, P = 0.005). The overall mortality rate was 7% (two patients). The follow-up was completed for 13 patients with 15 preserved kidneys for a mean duration of 21 months. During the follow-up, differential renographic clearance of the affected kidney was stable in 13 of 15 while two kidneys showed improvement. Conclusions Kidney preservation should be the primary goal in the treatment of EPN when the differential renal clearance is >10%. It was associated with fewer complications than nephrectomy and the follow-up showed a favourable functional outcome of the preserved kidneys. PMID:26579294

  8. One-Year Follow-Up of Patients Undergoing Transvenous Extraction of Pacemaker and Defibrillator Leads

    PubMed Central

    Kempa, Maciej; Budrejko, Szymon; Piepiorka-Broniecka, Marta; Rogowski, Jan; Kozlowski, Dariusz; Raczak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The number of pacemaker and ICD implantations has increased substantially in the recent years. Therefore, complications are also observed in a greater number. In many cases, transvenous extraction of the previously implanted device (pacemaker or ICD) is the only solution. One may find in the literature information about the efficacy and safety of that procedure, but data concerning the results of long-term follow up are still limited. Aim The aim of the study was to assess the one-year mortality in the cohort of patients undergoing transvenous lead extraction procedures in our centre. Methods Records of the patients undergoing transvenous lead removal in the Department of Cardiology and Electrotherapy of the Medical University of Gda?sk were analyzed. We collected detailed information about 192 patients that had undergone the procedure from January 2003 until June 2012. Data were collected from medical and surgical records. We analyzed concomitant diseases, indications, and possible complications. Long-term follow-up data were gathered in the follow-up ambulatory records and over-the-phone interviews with patients or families. In several cases, we consulted the database of the Polish National Health Fund. Results During the early post-operative period 5 patients died, although none of those deaths was associated with the procedure itself. No other major complications were observed. During one-year follow-up other 5 patients died, which gave the overall one-year survival rate of 92.7%. Heart failure, renal failure and an infective indication showed significant association with increased mortality. Conclusion Results of transvenous lead extraction, a relatively safe procedure, should be assessed over time extending beyond the sole perioperative period. Some complications may be delayed in their nature, and may be observed only during the long-term follow up. PMID:26694032

  9. Methods used for successful follow-up in a large scale national cohort study in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ensuring successful follow-up is essential when conducting a prospective cohort study. Most existing literature reviewing methods to ensure a high response rate is based on experience in developed nations. Findings We report our 4-year follow-up success for a national cohort study examining the health transition underway in Thailand. We began the cohort study in 2005 with a baseline postal questionnaire sent to all 200,000 Thais enrolled as distance learning students at Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University and residing all over Thailand; 87,134 or 44% of the students responded. Subsequently we used University and national media to inform cohort members of study progress. Also, we prepared a health book with study results and health advice which was distributed to all cohort members. After 4 years we repeated the survey and achieved a 71% response rate. In this paper we report the methods used to achieve this response The initial follow-up mail-out generated a response rate of about 48% reflecting the extensive preparatory work between baseline and follow-up. After 4 rounds of telephone contact (more than 100,000 phone calls) and 4 related mail-out rounds progressively over 16 months an overall response rate was achieved of just over 71% (n = 60,774). The total cost was US$4.06/respondent - 19% for printing, 21% for postage, 14% for tape measures (included in mail-out), 18% for data processing 22% for prizes and 6% for telephone. Conclusions Many of the methods reported as effective for mail questionnaire and cohort response rates held true for Thailand. These included being associated with a university, incentivating cooperation, follow-up contact, providing a second copy of questionnaire where necessary, and assurance of confidentiality. Telephone contact with the cohort and the small prizes given to responders were particularly important in the Thai context as was Thai leadership of the research team. PMID:21615963

  10. Observational study on Takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy: clinical features, diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Cacciotti, Luca; Passaseo, Ilaria; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Camastra, Giovanni; Campolongo, Giuseppe; Beni, Sergio; Lupparelli, Fabrizio; Ansalone, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The present study attempts to identify appropriate elements that may contribute to clarify the broad clinical features (diagnosis, care, complication and prognosis) of Takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy for improving its management. Design study Observational study. Setting Primary level of care referred to the emergency department of Vannini Hospital, Rome, Italy. Participants The study population consisted of 75 patients, 72 of the them were women and 3 were men with a mean age of 71.9±9.6?years. Methods From February 2004 to November 2010, prospectively included 84 consecutive patients diagnosed for suspected Takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy. To be eligible, patients had to meet all the Mayo clinic criteria in the absence of neurological trauma or intracranial haemorrhage. Moreover, those patients that at follow-up still presented alteration of acute phase at ECG and echocardiogram were excluded. Thus, 75 patients comprised the study population. To follow-up 19 patients were lost. Results None of 75 patients died in acute phase. All patients were promptly discharged (8.4±4.4?days), since they recovered their normal functional status without symptoms. Follow-up information was available for 56 patients. At a mean follow-up time of 2.2±2?years (range, 0.1–6.8?years) two octogenarian patients (2.6%) died because of sudden cardiac death and pulmonary embolism, respectively. The Takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy recurred in one patient. Conclusions The results of this study support the previous reports about the good prognosis, also in critically ill patients, of Takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy. Further assessment will be needed to determine a careful and sustained follow-up for choosing the best care and foreseeing the recurrences of this emerging condition. PMID:23065445

  11. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CODING: FOLLOW UP QUESTIONNAIRE (UA-D-11.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to define the coding strategy for the Follow Up Questionnaire. This questionnaire was developed for use in the Arizona NHEXAS project and the "Border" study. Household and individual follow-up data were combined in a single Follow-up Questionnaire data...

  12. The Impact of Sparse Follow-up on Marginal Structural Models for Time-to-Event Data.

    PubMed

    Mojaverian, Nassim; Moodie, Erica E M; Bliu, Alex; Klein, Marina B

    2015-12-15

    The impact of risk factors on the amount of time taken to reach an endpoint is a common parameter of interest. Hazard ratios are often estimated using a discrete-time approximation, which works well when the by-interval event rate is low. However, if the intervals are made more frequent than the observation times, missing values will arise. We investigated common analytical approaches, including available-case (AC) analysis, last observation carried forward (LOCF), and multiple imputation (MI), in a setting where time-dependent covariates also act as mediators. We generated complete data to obtain monthly information for all individuals, and from the complete data, we selected "observed" data by assuming that follow-up visits occurred every 6 months. MI proved superior to LOCF and AC analyses when only data on confounding variables were missing; AC analysis also performed well when data for additional variables were missing completely at random. We applied the 3 approaches to data from the Canadian HIV-Hepatitis C Co-infection Cohort Study (2003-2014) to estimate the association of alcohol abuse with liver fibrosis. The AC and LOCF estimates were larger but less precise than those obtained from the analysis that employed MI. PMID:26589708

  13. Case Study of Home-School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguerrebere, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    This case study evaluated one site of a California teacher home visit program. Home visits have been an important means of connecting families and schooling. In 1999, California inaugurated a statewide home visit program to promote effective partnership between home and school for low-achieving schools. At this site, families in 3 kindergarten…

  14. Changes in occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity: a follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physical activity is known to have health benefits across population groups. However, less is known about changes over time in socioeconomic differences in leisure-time physical activity and the reasons for the changes. We hypothesised that class differences in leisure-time physical activity would widen over time due to declining physical activity among the lower occupational classes. We examined whether occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity change over time in a cohort of Finnish middle-aged women and men. We also examined whether a set of selected covariates could account for the observed changes. Methods The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study cohort mail surveys; the respondents were 40-60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki at baseline in 2000-2002 (n = 8960, response rate 67%). Follow-up questionnaires were sent to the baseline respondents in 2007 (n = 7332, response rate 83%). The outcome measure was leisure-time physical activity, including commuting, converted to metabolic equivalent tasks (MET). Socioeconomic position was measured by occupational class (professionals, semi-professionals, routine non-manual employees and manual workers). The covariates included baseline age, marital status, limiting long-lasting illness, common mental disorders, job strain, physical and mental health functioning, smoking, body mass index, and employment status at follow-up. Firstly the analyses focused on changes over time in age adjusted prevalence of leisure-time physical activity. Secondly, logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for covariates of changes in occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity. Results At baseline there were no occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity. Over the follow-up leisure-time physical activity increased among those in the higher classes and decreased among manual workers, suggesting the emergence of occupational class differences at follow-up. Women in routine non-manual and manual classes and men in the manual class tended to be more often physically inactive in their leisure-time (<14 MET hours/week) and to be less often active (>30 MET hours/week) than those in the top two classes. Adjustment for the covariates did not substantially affect the observed occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity at follow-up. Conclusions Occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity emerged over the follow-up period among both women and men. Leisure-time physical activity needs to be promoted among ageing employees, especially among manual workers. PMID:21362168

  15. Major bile duct injuries during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Follow-up after combined surgical and radiologic management.

    PubMed Central

    Lillemoe, K D; Martin, S A; Cameron, J L; Yeo, C J; Talamini, M A; Kaushal, S; Coleman, J; Venbrux, A C; Savader, S J; Osterman, F A; Pitt, H A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors provide the results of follow-up evaluation after combined surgical and radiologic management of 89 patients with major bile duct injuries during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The incidence and mechanism of injury of major bile duct injuries during laparoscopic cholecystectomy has been clearly defined. Furthermore, a number of series have described the management of these injuries by surgical, endoscopic, and radiologic techniques with excellent short-term results. Long-term follow-up data, however, are lacking in the management of these injuries. METHODS: Data were collected prospectively on 89 patients treated at a single institution with major bile duct injuries after laparoscopic cholecystectomy managed between July 1, 1990, and July 1, 1996. Patients referred with injuries underwent early percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary drainage. Based on the cholangiographic appearance and clinical situation, patients were managed by either percutaneous balloon dilatation or surgical reconstruction with a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy with transanastomotic stenting. Follow-up was obtained by personal interview during October 1996. RESULTS: Two patients died without an attempt at definitive therapy. Both deaths were caused by sepsis and multisystem organ failure present at the time of transfer to the authors' institution. The remaining 87 patients were managed initially by either balloon dilatation (N = 28) or surgical reconstruction (N = 59). Ten patients have not completed treatment and still have biliary stents in place. Evaluation of 25 patients completing treatment after balloon dilatation (mean follow-up, 27.8 months) showed a success rate of 64%. Evaluation of 52 patients completing treatment after surgical reconstruction (mean follow-up, 33.4 months) showed a success rate of 92%. All failures were managed successfully by either surgical reconstruction or balloon dilatation. CONCLUSIONS: Major bile duct injuries can be managed successfully by combined surgical and radiologic techniques. This series provides, for the first time, significant follow-up on a large number of patients with overall success rates of 64% after balloon dilatation and 92% after surgical reconstruction. The combination of surgery and balloon dilatation resulted in a successful outcome in 100% of patients treated. PMID:9193174

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - Vaughn_Follow-UpCareintheAdultSurvivorSetting_color.ppt [Compatibility Mode

    Cancer.gov

    LAF LWAC TC Team Oncology Research Coordinator Primary C Counselin g Nutrition C are Psychiatry Rehab g TC Psychiatry Cancer Med Survivor Cancer Genetics Pigmented Lesion Clinic Endocrine Cardiology Clinic Urology What Happens at a Visit?

  17. Telephone follow-up of patients after radical prostatectomy: a systematic review1

    PubMed Central

    da Mata, Luciana Regina Ferreira; da Silva, Ana Cristina; Pereira, Maria da Graça; de Carvalho, Emilia Campos

    2014-01-01

    Objective to assess and summarize the best scientific evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials about telephone follow-up of patients after radical prostatectomy, based on information about how the phone calls are made and the clinical and psychological effects for the individuals who received this intervention. Method the search was undertaken in the electronic databases Medline, Web of Science, Embase, Cinahl, Lilacs and Cochrane. Among the 368 references found, five were selected. Results two studies tested interventions focused on psychological support and three tested interventions focused on the physical effects of treatment. The psychoeducative intervention to manage the uncertainty about the disease and the treatment revealed statistically significant evidences and reduced the level of uncertainty and anguish it causes. Conclusion the beneficial effects of telephone follow-up could be determined, as a useful tool for the monitoring of post-prostatectomy patients. PMID:26107844

  18. Follow-up for medical care among drug users with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Grace L; Fisher, Dennis G; Jaffe, Adi; Edwards, Jordan

    2006-12-01

    Prevalence of hepatitis C (HCV) in injection drug users (IDUs) is high and once HCV has been detected, follow-up medical care is essential. Six hundred and one current and former IDUs who tested positive for HCV antibodies received referrals for medical care. Twenty-four percent (147) of participants returned to be interviewed regarding their medical follow-ups. Of these, only 42% (61) had sought additional medical care in the form of further liver or blood tests or liver ultrasound. Four variables predicted seeking medical care: (a) ever being in residential drug treatment, (b) ever trading sex for money, (c) self-reported homelessness, and (d) living in one's own apartment or house. Having income from a job was inversely associated with seeking medical care. Knowledge of HCV infection alone does not mean that IDUs will seek medical care. Additional education concerning medical care and treatment options are needed to address IDU needs. PMID:17102060

  19. Mortality of a cohort in a polyamide-polyester factory in Lyon: a further follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Hours, M; Cardis, E; Marciniak, A; Quelin, P; Fabry, J

    1989-01-01

    In 1981-2 a retrospective study was undertaken in a polyamide-polyester factory in Lyon, France, to evaluate the effect of exposure to phthalates, nickel catalysers, and other chemicals in the work environment. The present paper reports the results of the follow up of this cohort up to July 1986. A slightly increased risk of cancers, in particular of the lung (44 cases), marginally related to exposure category but not significantly related to duration of exposure was found. The excess of skin cancers noted previously has disappeared, whereas an excess of cases of bladder cancer (based on seven cases) may be noted, mainly among nylon workers. The cohort is still young, however, and a continued follow up is likely to yield important information about the potential hazards associated with the nylon and tergal polymer industry. PMID:2789970

  20. Treatment of radiocarpal degenerative osteoarthritis by radioscapholunate arthrodesis: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hug, U; Guggenheim, M; Kilgus, M; Giovanoli, P

    2012-04-01

    Radioscapholunate arthrodesis is the treatment of choice for symptomatic, degenerative radioscapholunate osteoarthritis. We report on three patients after radioscapholunate arthrodesis with a follow-up of 22-28 years. There were no short-term postoperative complications; range of motion and strength were stable. All three patients showed radiological evidence of progressive, but clinically asymptomatic midcarpal osteoarthritis. The conversion rate for radioscapholunate to panarthrodesis of the wrist is reported at 31% with follow-ups of more than five years, invariably due to either non-union, or progressive, symptomatic midcarpal osteoarthritis. Primary excision of the distal pole of the scaphoid during radioscapholunate arthrodesis probably plays an important role in avoiding these conditions in the long-term. This measure allows a residual range of motion more than previously believed; considering that the dart thrower's motion is the physiological axis of wrist motion. PMID:22484245

  1. An investigation of online environments supporting follow-up to professional development for Texas school librarians 

    E-print Network

    Green, Mary Elizabeth

    2006-04-12

    -up and Noncollaborative/No Follow-up environments. No difference was found in completion rates between the other two environments. Credential proved to effect T A K S S u p p o r t P l a n c o m p l e t i o n . M a s t e r ? s d e g r e e h o l ders... in the Noncollaborative Follow-u p e n v i r o n m e n t a n d m a s t e r ? s a n d b a c h e l o r ? s d e g r e e h o l d e r s i n t h e Noncollaborative/No Follow-up environment were less likely to complete than these levels in the Collaborative...

  2. [Radiotherapy for gliomas in adults: What are the stakes of the follow-up?].

    PubMed

    Atallah, V; Gariel, F; Gillon, P; Crombé, A; Mazeron, J-J

    2015-10-01

    Linked to the difference of prognosis, the terms and conditions of the follow-up of low-grade and high-grade gliomas treated by irradiation differ highly. Patients treated for a low-grade glioma have prolonged survival. In this case, monitoring of toxicities linked to the treatment is a major objective. Opportunistic infections and depression are corticosteroids side effects widely underestimated. Radionecrosis search and differentiation with recurrent disease are done by MRI. Perfusion and spectroscopy showing a choline/creatine ratio increase are in favour of disease recurrence. Cognitive status and quality of life must be evaluated during the follow-up. They have to be evaluated by adapted scales. Cognitive rehabilitation improves interestingly the post-treatment cognitive status. Pseudoprogression rates for high-grade gliomas are near 20%. MRI is the benchmark imaging for its diagnosis. Diffusion weight imaging and spectroscopy are actually the most interesting techniques. PMID:26278986

  3. Replication of genetic linkage by follow-up of previously studied pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Gershon, E.S.; Goldin, L.R. )

    1994-04-01

    Independent replication of linkage in previously studied pedigrees is desirable when genetic heterogeneity is suspected or when the illness is very rare. When the likelihood of the new data in this type of replication study is computed as conditional on the previously reported linkage results, it can be considered independent. The authors describe a simulation method using the SLINK program in which the initial data are fixed and newly genotyped individuals are simulated under [theta] = .01 and [theta] = .50. These give appropriate lod score criteria for rejection and acceptance of linkage in the follow-up study, which take into account the original marker genotypes in the data. An estimate of the power to detect linkage in the follow-up data is also generated. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Environmental agreements, EIA follow-up and aboriginal participation in environmental management: The Canadian experience

    SciTech Connect

    O'Faircheallaigh, Ciaran . E-mail: Ciaran.Ofaircheallaigh@griffith.edu.au

    2007-05-15

    During the last decade a number of environmental agreements (EAs) have been negotiated in Canada involving industry, government and Aboriginal peoples. This article draws on the Canadian experience to consider the potential of such negotiated agreements to address two issues widely recognised in academic and policy debates on environmental impact assessment (EIA) and environmental management. The first relates to the need to secure indigenous participation in environmental management of major projects that affect indigenous peoples. The second and broader issue involves the necessity for specific initiatives to ensure effective follow-up of EIA. The Canadian experience indicates that negotiated environmental agreements have considerable potential to address both issues. However, if this potential is to be realized, greater effort must be made to develop structures and processes specifically designed to encourage Aboriginal participation; and EAs must themselves provide the financial and other resource required to support EIA follow-up and Aboriginal participation.

  5. Retrospective follow-up study of foundry and engine plant workers.

    PubMed

    Rotimi, C; Austin, H; Delzell, E; Day, C; Macaluso, M; Honda, Y

    1993-10-01

    A retrospective follow-up study of 21,013 workers employed at a foundry and two engine manufacturing plants was conducted to determine if these workers had an unusual mortality experience. A total of 2,235 deaths occurred during the follow-up period of 1970-1987. Mortality from all causes was lower than expected. Men experienced a 6-13% excess of lung cancer deaths, depending on the choice of the comparison group. The data displayed evidence of a positive trend between lung cancer mortality and increasing duration of employment (p = 0.008). White men experienced a statistically significant excess of deaths from stomach cancer (standardized mortality ratio [SMR] = 158; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 101-234). Black men had increased mortality from pancreatic cancer, especially among engine plant workers (SMR = 303; CI = 121-624), and an excess of prostate cancer, concentrated among foundry workers (SMR = 234; CI = 112-430). PMID:8250066

  6. Replantation of the midfoot in a child--six-year follow-up with pedobarographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, E H; Mackay, D R; Manders, E K; Segal, L S

    1999-07-01

    A 22-month old child underwent successful replantation of her midfoot at the level of Chopart's joint after a traumatic lawn mower amputation. The child demonstrated good sensation and function. Heel-to-toe length was 2 cm shorter, along with anterior migration of the heel pad on the injured foot. Pedobarographic analysis at 6-year follow-up demonstrated a normal range in the dynamic distribution of foot pressure measurements, except in the region of the medial heel. With replantation more commonly considered as an option in traumatic injuries, long-term functional evaluation is important in demonstrating the success of a replantation. The patient demonstrated a good result at 6-year follow-up, but will need further evaluation until skeletal maturity is reached. PMID:10445513

  7. HARPS-N and SOPHIE joint follow-up of Kepler close-in planetary candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebrard, Guillaume

    2015-12-01

    Radial velocity follow-up is mandatory to establish the nature of most of the transiting planet candidates detected with Kepler, then to characterize them and in particular to measure their mass and eccentricity. We started follow-up programs with the spectrograph HARPS-N that benefit from our SOPHIE observations on Kepler Objects of Interest. Our HARPS-N programs mainly aim at extending the SOPHIE results toward Kepler planetary candidates having lower masses, smaller radii, and/or fainter host stars. Up to now, they allowed the identification of several false positives and the characterization of 7 new planets, i.e. about half the number of transiting planets characterized with HARPS-N since its installation. Most of them are in parameters domain with a sparse number of known objects.

  8. Severe primary pulmonary lymphangiectasis in a premature infant: management and follow up to early childhood.

    PubMed

    Reiterer, Friedrich; Grossauer, Karin; Pfleger, Andreas; Häusler, Martin; Resch, Bernhard; Eber, Ernst; Popper, Helmut; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2015-02-01

    Primary pulmonary lymphangiectasis (PPL) is a rare congenital developmental abnormality of the lung with a generally poor prognosis. Only a limited number of patients with neonatal-onset PPL have been reported to survive. We present the case of a male preterm infant (gestational age 34?weeks 6?days) with histologically confirmed PPL, complicated by hydrops fetalis, bilateral hydrothorax (treated in utero with pleuro-amniotic shunts), and immediate respiratory distress at birth. He survived after extensive neonatal intensive care therapy and was discharged home at the age of 7?months. At last follow up he was 3?years 7?months old, still requiring assisted ventilation via tracheostomy, having recurrent episodes of wheezing and had mild global developmental delay. This case demonstrates that survival beyond the neonatal period is possible even with severe PPL but long-term morbidity may be relevant, and multidisciplinary management and close follow up are essential. PMID:25711257

  9. Desmoplastic fibroma in the proximal femur: A case report with long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    GONG, YU-BAO; QU, LI-MEI; QI, XIN; LIU, JIAN-GUO

    2015-01-01

    Desmoplastic fibroma of the bone is an extremely rare primary benign tumor. The present study reports a case of desmoplastic fibroma of the bone with the longest published follow-up. A 21-year-old female presented to The First Hospital of Jilin University (Changchun, Jilin, China) with thigh pain. Radiography demonstrated a lytic expansile lesion in the proximal femur. Curettage was performed, followed by use of an allogeneic graft. One month later, the patient suffered a pathological fracture and was treated with an open reduction and internal fixation. There was no recurrence of the tumor over a 28-year follow-up period. In conclusion, desmoplastic fibroma in the proximal femur is rare and an intralesional resection is strongly recommended to prevent recurrence. The disease may be misdiagnosed as a bone cyst, so the diagnosis should be confirmed with a histological examination.

  10. [Discitis in childhood: integrated neuroradiological imaging in diagnosis and follow-up study of one case].

    PubMed

    Giuffrè, M; Amato, G M; Manfrè, L; Morello, A

    1997-03-01

    Discitis is an inflammatory disease of the intervertebral disc which has usually a benign evolution in childhood. It often recognizes an infectious etiology. Still discussed however is the possibility of a primitive discal involvement (not secondary to a vertebral inflammation) or of a non infectious etiology and the subsequent more correct diagnostic-therapeutic procedures. We report a case of a girl with discitis diagnosed early and treated with antibiotics and orthopedic corset, whose follow-up shows a benign evolution. We underline the importance of modern neuroradiological imaging: in particular, MR plays a major role in the inflammatory diseases of the column, both in diagnosis and in follow-up. MR scans of the involved disc allow frequent controls without radiogenic risks and with a good resolution because of the multiplanarity typical of the method. PMID:9198729

  11. Follow-up of subjects who developed chloracne following TCDD exposure at Seveso

    SciTech Connect

    Assennato, G.; Cervino, D.; Emmett, E.A.; Longo, G.; Merlo, F. )

    1989-01-01

    Three follow-up surveys from 1976 to 1985 were carried out on 193 subjects who developed chloracne following the Seveso accident (1976). A comparison group, age and sex matched, was selected randomly from the list of residents of the town of Varedo (in the same health district but out of the dioxin-contaminated zone). At each follow-up a questionnaire was administered and biochemical tests, skin examination, and electrophysiologic measurements were performed. Biochemical indicators of hepatic function and nerve conduction studies did not show significant differences either between groups or for temporal trends. Chloracne was shown to be clinically reversible: all the chloracne cases (except for one subject) clinically recovered by 1983. The discrepancy between our results and those from other previous experiences can be related to a different type of exposure, the young age of the target population, and the interval since exposure.

  12. Endovascular Exclusion of Visceral Artery Aneurysms with Stent-Grafts: Technique and Long-Term Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto Greco, Laura; Citone, Michele; David, Vincenzo

    2008-01-15

    This paper describes four cases of visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs) successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts and discusses the endovascular approach to VAAs and the long-term results. Four balloon expandable stent-grafts were used to treat three splenic artery aneurysms and one bleeding common hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm. The percutaneous access site and the materials were chosen on the basis of CT angiography findings. In all cases the aneurysms were successfully excluded. In one case a splenic infarction occurred, with nonrelevant clinical findings. At 16- to 24-month follow-up three patients had patent stents and complete exclusion and shrinkage of the aneurysms. One patient died due to pancreatitis and sepsis, 16 days after successful stenting and exclusion of a bleeding pseudoaneurysm. We conclude that endovascular treatment using covered stent-grafts is a valid therapeutic option for VAAs. Multislice CT preoperative study helps in planning stent-graft positioning.

  13. Follow-Up of K2 Planetary Candidates from Campaigns 0, 1, and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardi, David R.

    2016-01-01

    As part of our efforts to understand how uniform the results of Kepler are across the Galaxy, we have combined programs from various groups to form a uniform search for exoplanets around FGK and M stars. We have obtained spectra and high resolution imaging of hundreds of candidates and have generated a catalog of planetary candidate properties. We discuss the overall results of the follow-up observations and the resulting properties of the catalog.

  14. A web-based image viewer for multiple PET-CT follow-up studies.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Daiki; Kim, Jinman; Kumar, Ashnil; Constantinescu, Liviu; Wen, Lingfeng; Feng, David Dagan

    2011-01-01

    There exist many viewers for single-modal medical images that are efficient and are equipped with powerful analysis tools. However, there is a distinct lack of efficient image viewers for multi-modality images, particularly for displaying multiple follow-up studies that depict a patient's response to treatment over time. Such viewers would be required to display large amounts of image data. In this study, we present the TAGIGEN viewer--a web-based image viewer designed specifically for the visualisation of multi-modality follow-up studies. We innovate by defining a series of dynamically generated image grid layouts that display sets of related images together in order to improve the ability to compare and assimilate the myriad images. We adopted a web-based client-server image streaming technology, thus enabling interactive navigation of the images in a computationally efficient manner. Furthermore, our web-based approach is interoperable and requires no software installation. We evaluated the ability of our viewer in displaying and understanding a patient's follow-up images in a case study with combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) follow-up scans. We conducted a usability survey on 10 participants to measure the usefulness of our viewer, used as an outpatient viewer e.g. viewer designed for use by the patients, in tracking a patient's disease state across four PET-CT studies. Our initial results suggest that our viewer was able to efficiently visualise the patient data over time, and that the web-based implementation was fast (loading on average within 5.6 seconds with real-time navigation) and easy to use (overall survey score higher than 4 / 5). PMID:22255529

  15. Fifteen-year follow-up of quality of life in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Peter R; Logtenberg, Susan JJ; Groenier, Klaas H; Keers, Joost C; Bilo, Henk JG; Kleefstra, Nanne

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate metabolic control and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) population. METHODS: As part of a prospective cohort study, 283 T1DM patients treated with various insulin treatment modalities including multiple daily injections (MDI) and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) were examined annually. HRQOL was measured using the SF-36 and EuroQol questionnaires. Data regarding HRQOL, glycaemic and metabolic control from baseline and follow-up measures in 2002 and 2010 were analysed. Linear mixed models were used to calculate estimated values and differences between the three moments in time and the three treatment modalities. RESULTS: Significant changes [mean ? (95%CI)] in body mass index [2.4 kg/m2 (1.0, 3.8)], systolic blood pressure [-6.4 mmHg (-11.4, -1.3)] and EuroQol-VAS [-7.3 (-11.4, -3.3)] were observed over time. In 2010, 168 patients were lost to follow-up. Regarding mode of therapy, 52 patients remained on MDI, 28 remained on CSII, and 33 patients switched from MDI to CSII during follow-up. Among patients on MDI, HRQOL decreased significantly over time: mental component summary [-9.8 (-16.3, -3.2)], physical component summary [-8.6 (-15.3, -1.8)] and EuroQol-VAS [-8.1 (-14.0, -2.3)], P < 0.05 for all. For patients using CSII, the EuroQol-VAS decreased [-9.6 (-17.5, -1.7)]. None of the changes over time in HRQOL differed significantly with the changes over time within the other treatment groups. CONCLUSION: No differences with respect to metabolic and HRQOL parameters between the various insulin treatment modalities were observed after 15 years of follow-up in T1DM patients. PMID:25126403

  16. Photometric follow-up of transiting exoplanets with the INTA-CAB robotic telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullán, A.; Eibe, M. T.; Cuesta, L.; Pérez-Verde, A.; Navas, J.

    2013-05-01

    We present some photometric results obtained by our group as part of a photometric follow-up of transiting exoplanets carried out with the INTA-CAB 50-cm robotic telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Almería, Spain). We show light curves of WASP-10, HATP-20 and HATP-32 and, after that, we fit our results with theoretical models in order to obtain some parameters as the central times of transits, depths and the transit durations of this extrasolar planets.

  17. A 9 year follow-up of a fractured tooth fragment reattachment

    PubMed Central

    Sargod, Sharan S.; Bhat, Sham S.

    2010-01-01

    Coronal fractures of the anterior teeth are a common form of dental trauma that mainly affects children and adolescents. One of the options for managing coronal tooth fractures, when the tooth fragment is available, is reattachment of the dental fragment. Reattachment of fractured fragment can provide good and long lasting esthetics. This is a report of a 9 -year follow-up of a oronal fracture case successfully treated using tooth fragment reattachment. PMID:22114429

  18. Student Follow-Up Survey, Spring 1991: A Report of Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westchester Community Coll., Valhalla, NY. Office of Institutional Research.

    In spring 1991, a student follow-up survey was conducted to assess the reasons for students not returning to Westchester Community College (WCC) in New York. Students who had been offered financial aid and chose not to return were specific targets. Of the 196 students in the total sample, 49.0% were male, 41.3% were White, 33.27% were Black, 15.8%…

  19. UN system machinery for coordinating follow-up to the World Food Summit.

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    FAO [UN Food and Agriculture Organization] does not stand alone in implementing and monitoring the Summit Plan of Action. Commitments 7.2 and 7.3 give responsibility to the UN's Administrative Committee on Coordination (ACC) for coordinating interagency follow-up and to the Economic and Social Committee (ECOSOC) for receiving progress reports from FAO and other agencies. The UN General Assembly in December 1996 welcomed the outcome of the Summit and received FAO's first report on it at its 1997 session. The ACC has launched interagency follow-up by establishing the ACC Network on Rural Development and Food Security, as proposed jointly by FAO and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). More than 16 UN agencies have joined and the UN Secretary-General has welcomed the intention to involve civil society and the emphasis placed on country-level action in the two-tiered network. All FAO country representatives and UN resident coordinators have been asked to help in setting up interagency thematic groups on rural development and food security at the country level. FAO has introduced a website for the network within SD Dimensions (http://www.fao.org/waicent/faoinfo/sustdev). ECOSOC has welcomed the ACC's decision to include follow-up to the World Food Summit within the context of the integrated follow-up process of all major UN conferences and summits. With these decisions, the machinery has been set in motion for early and sustained support from both interagency and intergovernmental bodies to national efforts to implement the Plan of Action. PMID:12321566

  20. Polyurethane-Coated Breast Implants Revisited: A 30-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Castel, Nikki; Soon-Sutton, Taylor; Deptula, Peter; Flaherty, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Polyurethane coating of breast implants has been shown to reduce capsular contracture in short-term follow-up studies. This 30-year study is the longest examination of the use of polyurethane-coated implants and their correlation with capsular contracture. Methods This study evaluates the senior surgeon's (F.D.P.) experience with the use of polyurethane-coated implants in aesthetic breast augmentation in 382 patients over 30 years. Follow-up evaluations were conducted for six months after surgery. After the six-month follow-up period, 76 patients returned for reoperation. The gross findings, histology, and associated capsular contracture were noted at the time of explantation. Results No patient during the six-month follow-up period demonstrated capsular contracture. For those who underwent reoperation for capsular contracture, Baker II/III contractures were noted nine to 10 years after surgery and Baker IV contractures were noted 12 to 21 years after surgery. None of the explanted implants had macroscopic evidence of polyurethane, which was only found during the first five years after surgery. The microscopic presence of polyurethane was noted in all capsules up to 30 years after the original operation. Conclusions An inverse correlation was found between the amount of polyurethane coating on the implant and the occurrence of capsular contracture. Increasingly severe capsular contracture was associated with a decreased amount of polyurethane coating on the surface of the implants. No contracture occurred in patients whose implants showed incomplete biodegradation of polyurethane, as indicated by the visible presence of polyurethane coating. We recommend research to find a non-toxic, non-biodegradable synthetic material as an alternative to polyurethane. PMID:25798390

  1. Long-Term Follow-up of Uterine Artery Embolization for Symptomatic Adenomyosis

    SciTech Connect

    Smeets, A. J. Nijenhuis, R. J.; Boekkooi, P. F.; Vervest, H. A. M.; Rooij, W. J. van; Lohle, P. N. M.

    2012-08-15

    Introduction: Long-term results of uterine artery embolization (UAE) for adenomyosis are largely unknown. We assess long-term outcome of UAE in 40 women with adenomyosis. Materials and methods: Between March 1999 and October 2006, 40 consecutive women with adenomyosis (22 in combination with fibroids) were treated with UAE. Changes in junction zone thickness were assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline and again at 3 months. After a mean clinical follow-up of 65 months (median 58 [range 38-129]), women filled out the uterine fibroid symptom and quality of life (UFS-QoL) questionnaire, which had additional questions on the long-term evolution of baseline symptoms and adverse events. Results: During follow-up, 7 of 40 women (18%) underwent hysterectomy. Among these 7 women, the junction zones were significantly thicker, both at baseline (mean 23 vs. 16 mm, P = 0.028) and at 3-month follow-up (mean 15 vs. 9 mm, P = 0.034). Of 33 women with preserved uterus, 29 were asymptomatic. Four patients had symptom severity scores of 50 to 85 and overall QoL scores of 60 to 66, indicating substantial clinical symptoms. There was no relation between clinical outcome and the initial presence of fibroids in addition to adenomyosis. Conclusion: In women with therapy-resistant adenomyosis, UAE resulted in long-term preservation of the uterus in the majority. Most patients with preserved uterus were asymptomatic. The only predictor for hysterectomy during follow-up was initial thickness of the junction zone. The presence or absence of fibroids in addition to adenomyosis had no relation with the need for hysterectomy or clinical outcome.

  2. Head injuries in children: a prospective five year follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff, H; Low, M D; Clark, C

    1977-01-01

    A five year follow-up study was conducted with two groups of head-injuried children. 131 younger than 9 years old at time of injury and 100 older than 9 years. The four aspects studied were neuropsychological function, neurological status, EEG status, and school progress. There was an extended recovery process over time, as well as evidence of a differential rate of recovery for the four aspects measured. PMID:591990

  3. Changes in leisure-time physical activity after transition to retirement: a follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retirement is a major life change that is likely to affect lifestyles. The aim of this study was to examine changes in leisure-time physical activity of moderate and vigorous intensity among ageing employees facing transition to retirement over a follow-up of 5-7 years. Methods The baseline data were collected by questionnaire surveys in 2000-2002 among 40-60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki. A follow-up survey was conducted among the baseline respondents in 2007 (n = 7332, response rate 83%). Those who were on disability retirement at the follow-up were distinguished from old-age retirees. Leisure-time physical activity was measured using similar questions in both surveys. Results Old-age retirees increased significantly their time spent in moderate-intensity physical activity: women 31 minutes per week and men 42 minutes per week on average. Such changes were not found among disability retirees or those remaining employed. There were no changes in vigorous activity. Leisure-time physical inactivity at follow-up was lower among old-age retirees compared with employees of nearly the same age. Adjustments made for potential baseline covariates had no effects on these findings. Conclusions Transition to old-age retirement was associated with an increase in moderate-intensity leisure-time physical activity and a decrease in the proportion of inactive. Encouraging people to leisure-time physical activity after retirement is worthwhile as the increase in free time brings new possibilities for it. PMID:21513555

  4. Swift/XRT follow-up of the unidentified INTEGRAL source IGR J03564+6242

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, M.; Landi, R.; Bazzano, A.; Fiocchi, M.; Bird, A. J.; Drave, S. P.

    2012-04-01

    We report the possible association of the unidentified INTEGRAL source IGR J03564+6242 with the radio galaxy 4C 62.08, obtained through a Swift/XRT Target of Opportunity follow-up observation. IGR J03564+6242 is listed in the 4th INTEGRAL/IBIS catalogue (Bird et al. 2010), at coordinates RA (J2000) = 59.099 and Dec (J2000) = 62.714, with a positional uncertainty of 4.6 arcmin.

  5. The Family Employment Awareness Training (FEAT): A Mixed-method Follow-up

    E-print Network

    Francis, Grace L.; Gross, Judith M. S.; Turnbull, Ann P.; Turnbull, H. Rutherford

    2014-01-13

    Disability Rights Network, 2011; Schmidt & Smith, 2007; Shier, Graham, & Jones 2009). For this study, we considered FEAT successful if participants rated their expectations and/or knowledge at or above “average.” Exploring perceptions of families (the.../plain; charset=UTF-8 Running head: FAMILY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS TRAINING 1 The Family Employment Awareness Training (FEAT): A Mixed-method Follow-up Corresponding author: Grace Francis, Ph.D University of Kansas 3125 Haworth Hall Lawrence, KS...

  6. Does Diagnostic Classification of Early-Onset Psychosis Change over Follow-Up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraguas, David; de Castro, Maria J.; Medina, Oscar; Parellada, Mara; Moreno, Dolores; Graell, Montserrat; Merchan-Naranjo, Jessica; Arango, Celso

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the diagnostic stability and the functional outcome of patients with early-onset psychosis (EOP) over a 2-year follow-up period. Methods: A total of 24 patients (18 males (75%) and 6 females (25%), mean age [plus or minus] SD: 15.7 [plus or minus] 1.6 years) with a first episode of EOP formed the sample. Psychotic symptoms…

  7. Suicide history and mortality: a follow-up of a national cohort in the United States.

    PubMed

    Al-Sayegh, Hasan; Lowry, Joseph; Polur, Ram N; Hines, Robert B; Liu, Fengqi; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the cause-specific deaths among young suicide attempters from the general population, and the time window for intervention to reduce the elevated rate of death was unclear. We analyzed a nationally representative sample of young adults (17-39 years old) who participated in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, 1988-1994) and were followed up with vital status through December 31, 2006. The history of attempted suicide was associated with an increased rate for all-cause death (HR = 1.52 [95% CI = 0.92-2.52]) with borderline statistical significance. Previous suicide attempters experienced a 3-fold (HR = 2.68[=1.01-7.09]) increased rate for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and a 7-fold (HR = 7.10 [95% CI = 1.37-36.9]) increased rate of death due to completed suicide compared with non-attempters. The survival curves of the attempters declined rapidly for the first 3 years of follow-up, and the distance between curves remained consistent starting from the third year to the end of the follow-up. Prevention services should be tailored not only for suicide, but also for cardiovascular diseases among populations with suicidal tendency, and the service should be intensified within first 3 years after suicidal behaviors occur. PMID:25674703

  8. Swift Follow-Up Observations of Candidate Gravitational-Wave Transient Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, P. A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Homan, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Siegel, M.; Beardmore, A.; Handbauer, P.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; Smith, M.; Zhu, Q.; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Blackburn, J. K.; Camp, J. B.; Kanner, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge." With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  9. Patient relationship management: an overview and study of a follow-up system.

    PubMed

    Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Räisänen, Teppo; Hummastenniemi, Niko

    2008-01-01

    Customer relationship management research is utilized to explain the need for a more patient-oriented support in patient care. This article presents a European study on how various hospital units of a single healthcare organization have utilized a patient relationship management system--in particular a patient treatment follow-up system--and how it affects patient care and the knowledge work performed by the medical staff. Eight physicians were interviewed at a university hospital on whether patient treatment was improved through a follow-up system that had been in use in the case organization for three years. The interviewees represented various hospital units, and all of them had used the system at their own unit. The results indicate that it is possible to improve patient care through more personalized treatment. The follow-up treatment system seems to be a tool to create and maintain better communication with the patients rather than just a technological solution. It may help better understand and analyze both individual patients and patient groups. For individual physicians it provides a way to reflect professional skills. The system was lacking in its support for one-to-one communication with patients. Nevertheless, the system is an example of patient relationship management which may help healthcare units to move towards a more patient-oriented care. PMID:19267028

  10. Follow-up to abnormal cancer screening tests: Considering the multilevel context of care

    PubMed Central

    Zapka, Jane M.; Edwards, Heather M.; Chollette, Veronica; Taplin, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    The call for multilevel interventions to improve the quality of follow-up to abnormal cancer screening has been out for a decade but published work emphasizes individual approaches, and conceptualizations differ regarding the definition of levels. To investigate the scope and methods being undertaken in this focused area of follow-up to abnormal tests (breast, colon, cervical), we reviewed recent literature and grants (2007-2012) funded by the National Cancer Institute. A structured search yielded 16 grants with varying definitions of “follow-up” (e.g. completion of recommended tests, time to diagnosis); most included minority racial/ethnic group participants. Ten grants concentrated on measurement/intervention development, and 13 piloted or tested interventions (categories not mutually exclusive). All studies considered patient level factors and effects. While some directed interventions at provider levels, few measured group characteristics and effects of interventions on the providers or levels other than the patient. Multilevel interventions are being proposed, but clarity regarding endpoints, definition of levels, and measures is needed. The differences in the conceptualization of levels and factors that affect practice need empirical exploration and we need to measure their salient characteristics to advance our understanding of how context affects cancer care delivery in a changing practice and policy environment. PMID:25073625

  11. Ergonomic Training Reduces Musculoskeletal Disorders among Office Workers: Results from the 6-Month Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Norashikin; Kenny, Dianna Theadora; Md Zein, Raemy; Hassan, Siti Nurani

    2011-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are commonly reported among computer users. This study explored whether these disorders can be reduced by the provision of ergonomics education. Methods: A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in which 3 units were randomised for intervention and received training, and 3 units were given a leaflet. The effect of intervention on workstation habits, musculoskeletal disorders, days and episodes of sick leave, and psychological well-being were assessed. Results: A significant improvement in workstation habits was found, and the differences remained significant at the follow-up time point for keyboard, mouse, chair, and desk use. The largest reduction in the percentage of musculoskeletal disorders was in the neck region (?42.2%, 95% CI ?60.0 to ?24.4). After adjusting for baseline values, significant differences were found at the follow-up time point in the neck, right shoulder, right and left upper limbs, lower back, and right and left lower limbs. No significant differences were found for the days and episodes of sick leave or the psychological well-being among workers after the intervention. Conclusion: Consistent reductions were observed for all musculoskeletal disorders at the follow-up time point, although the difference was not statistically significant for the upper back. The improvements in the musculoskeletal disorders did not translate into fewer days lost from work or improved psychological well-being. PMID:22135582

  12. Swift follow-up observations of candidate gravitational-wave transient events

    E-print Network

    P. A. Evans; J. K. Fridriksson; N. Gehrels; J. Homan; J. P. Osborne; M. Siegel; A. Beardmore; P. Handbauer; J. Gelbord; J. A. Kennea; M. Smith; Q. Zhu; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; Y. Bao; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; C. Bond; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; S. Eikenberry; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; B. F. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. A. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gelencser; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kaufman; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Keitel; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov

    2012-11-23

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory. Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge". With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  13. Patient satisfaction with radioiodine treatment and telephone follow-up for the management of thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Bashari, Waiel A; Coates, Rebecca L; Nazir, Shahbaz; Riddel, Naomi E; Lawanson, Oluwaseyi O; Mohamed, Ahmed M; Oyibo, Samson O

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Patient satisfaction is of paramount importance when delivering a patient-centered service. Our hospital has been a center for the use of radioiodine to treat thyrotoxicosis for several years, but we began carrying out patient satisfaction surveys and implementing changes after 2008. The aim of the project reported here was to assess patient satisfaction with our radioiodine treatment and telephone follow-up service, and to compare results with our previous surveys. Patients and methods Anonymous patient satisfaction questionnaires were sent to all patients who received radioiodine treatment for thyrotoxicosis between January 2012 and December 2013. Patients were asked to answer four questions concerning informed consenting, treatment, and telephone follow-up using a four-point Likert scale, and post back the questionnaires. A suggestion box was included for comments and suggestions for improvement. Results A total of 56 questionnaires were posted out (to 44 females and 12 males) and 34 questionnaires were returned (60.8% response rate). Between 94% and 100% of the responders, depending on the question asked, were satisfied with the service they received. Patients also put useful comments and suggestions in the suggestion box provided. Conclusion Patients with thyrotoxicosis were satisfied with our radioiodine treatment and telephone follow-up service. This survey has revealed areas for service improvement, and highlights the importance of patient satisfaction when assessing a patient-centered service. PMID:25999701

  14. Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome with partial epilepsy. Case report with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Margari, Lucia; Lucia, Margari; Presicci, Anna; Anna, Presicci; Ventura, Patrizia; Patrizia, Ventura; Buttiglione, Maura; Maura, Buttiglione; Andreula, Cosma; Cosma, Andreula; Perniola, Tommaso; Tommaso, Perniola

    2005-01-01

    Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS) is a rare neurological disorder characterised by pseudobulbar palsy, cognitive deficits and epilepsy associated with bilateral perisylvian cortical dysplasia on neuroimaging studies. We report a long-term follow-up of a 18-years girl diagnosed with CBPS according to the typical clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features. The patient showed faciopharyngoglossomasticatory diplegia, severe dysarthria, ataxia, spastic quadriparesis and severe mental retardation. Brain MRI evidenced bilateral perisylvian cortical dysplasia. Since early life she suffered from complex febrile seizures and epilepsy consisting of complex partial attacks with affective manifestations associated with centro-temporal EEG abnormalities. During 18 years of follow-up she was treated with phenobarbital, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin but did not show any significant clinical improvement. Subsequently, monotherapy with phenytoin (PHT) was followed by a significant clinical improvement. At age 17, because of adverse effects, PHT was gradually substituted by topiramate (TPM). Full control of seizures was obtained at the age of 17 years with TPM. EEG abnormalities throughout the years have been reduced according to the clinical course. These findings emphasised the importance of long-term follow-up, suggesting that the prognosis for epilepsy may not be predicted based on the early response to treatment or on the presence of structural encephalic abnormalities, as reported in the literature. PMID:15626542

  15. Swift follow-up observations of candidate gravitational-wave transient events

    E-print Network

    Evans, P A; Gehrels, N; Homan, J; Osborne, J P; Siegel, M; Beardmore, A; Handbauer, P; Gelbord, J; Kennea, J A; Smith, M; Zhu, Q; Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; ac, F Acernese; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; ac, A Allocca; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; ac, F Barone; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; ab, A Basti; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; ab, L Bonelli; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; ab, M Branchesi; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; ab, H J Bulten; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; ab, E Calloni; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; ab, E Coccia; Cohadon, P -F; ab, C N Colacino; ab, A Colla; Colombini, M; ab, A Conte; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; ab, R De Rosa; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; ab, A Di Lieto; Di Palma, I; ac, M Di Paolo Emilio; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; ab, M Drago; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eikenberry, S; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; ab, V Fafone; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; ab, I Ferrante; Ferrini, F; ab, F Fidecaro; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; ab, S Frasca; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; ab, L Gammaitoni; Garcia, J; ab, F Garufi; Gaspar, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; ab, G M Guidi; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; d, P Jaranowski; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L

    2012-01-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory. Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge". With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected...

  16. SWIFT FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF CANDIDATE GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENT EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, P. A.; Osborne, J. P.; Beardmore, A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Homan, J.; Gehrels, N.; Siegel, M.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; Smith, M.; Zhu, Q.; Handbauer, P.; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a 'blind injection challenge'. With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  17. A 2-year follow-up study of discharged psychiatric patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyang; Chen, Chao; Qiu, Bin; Yang, Guang

    2014-08-15

    This study investigated medication compliance, disease recurrence and the recovery of social function in discharged psychiatric patients with bipolar disorder. A 2-year follow-up was conducted on all patients with bipolar disorder, who were hospitalized in our psychiatric department between June 2010 and May 2011. Risk factors for recurrence were analyzed based on a self-designed questionnaire. Of the 252 patients in the study, 210 had complete information (83.3%) for the 2-year follow-up: 170 cases of bipolar I disorder and 40 cases of bipolar II disorder. The 1-year and 2-year full-compliance rates were 41.0% and 35.7%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year recurrence rates were 42.4% and 61.0%, respectively. Statistically significant differences in rates were found between the bipolar subtypes for 1-year full compliance, 1-year non-compliance, 2-year recurrence, and 2-year readmission. Logistic regression identified different sets of independent variables that were risk factors for recurrence, and protective factors for recurrence at 1 year and 2 years after hospital discharge. The results of the follow-up indicated that the situation of patients with bipolar disorder after discharge is not optimistic, because of high recurrence rates, high non-compliance rates and low recovery rates. Clinical and social experts should pay more attention to the situation. PMID:24794029

  18. Developing COPD: a 25 year follow up study of the general population

    PubMed Central

    Løkke, A; Lange, P; Scharling, H; Fabricius, P; Vestbo, J

    2006-01-01

    Background Smokers are more prone to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) than non?smokers, but this finding comes from studies spanning 10?years or less. The aim of this study was to determine the 25?year absolute risk of developing COPD in men and women from the general population. Methods As part of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, 8045 men and women aged 30–60?years with normal lung function at baseline were followed for 25?years. Lung function measurements were collected and mortality from COPD during the 25?year observation period was analysed. Results The percentage of men with normal lung function ranged from 96% of never smokers to 59% of continuous smokers; for women the proportions were 91% and 69%, respectively. The 25?year incidence of moderate and severe COPD was 20.7% and 3.6%, respectively, with no apparent difference between men and women. Smoking cessation, especially early in the follow up period, decreased the risk of developing COPD substantially compared with continuous smoking. During the follow up period there were 2912 deaths, 109 of which were from COPD. 92% of the COPD deaths occurred in subjects who were current smokers at the beginning of the follow up period. Conclusion The absolute risk of developing COPD among continuous smokers is at least 25%, which is larger than was previously estimated. PMID:17071833

  19. Swift Follow-up Observations of Candidate Gravitational-wave Transient Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Homan, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Siegel, M.; Beardmore, A.; Handbauer, P.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; Smith, M.; Zhu, Q.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eikenberry, S.; Endr?czi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge." With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  20. Antrochoanal Polyps: How Long Should Follow-Up Be after Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Chaiyasate, Saisawat; Roongrotwattanasiri, Kannika; Patumanond, Jayanton; Fooanant, Supranee

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the length of follow-up needed to detect recurrence of antrochoanal polyps. Methods. A retrospective investigation was performed on patients who had been operated on with a preoperative diagnosis of antrochoanal polyps in Chiang Mai University hospital from 2006 to 2012. Results and Discussion. Of the 38 cases of choanal polyps, 27 were adults (71%). The median age was 23.5, ranging from 7 to 64 years old. Eighteen patients were male (47.4%). The origin of choanal polyps was the maxillary antrum in 32 patients. The most common symptom was nasal obstruction (97.4%). The surgical procedures were polypectomy in one child and combined endoscopic and transcanine fossa approach in two adults. The remainder of the patients underwent endoscopic removal of the polyps. The follow-up time ranged from 1 day to 8 years. There were 5 cases of recurrence of which four were in children. The time for recurrence was 1.2 ± 0.6 years (95% CI 0.51, 1.97). Conclusion. Antrochoanal polyps are more common in younger patients. Recurrence was significantly higher in children. Follow-up of patients should be for at least 2 years postoperatively in order to detect 95% of recurrence. PMID:26339246

  1. Multicentre European study of thalamic stimulation in essential tremor: a six year follow up

    PubMed Central

    Sydow, O; Thobois, S; Alesch, F; Speelman, J

    2003-01-01

    Background: Thalamic stimulation is an efficient treatment for disabling essential tremor, as previously shown, but follow up has mostly been short term. Objectives: To see whether good results can be maintained in the longer term. Methods: 37 patients with essential tremor had implantation of a thalamic stimulator, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The results at one year have been reported earlier. After six years, 19 patients were available for follow up. The main instrument for evaluation was the essential tremor rating scale. The patients were examined with pulse generators turned on and off. Results: In the majority of patients, the very good results with stimulation seen at one year were maintained after a mean of 6.5 years. The reduction in tremor scores and improvement in activities of daily living were highly significant compared with baseline and with the stimulation turned off. There were few serious adverse events. Minor side effects related to stimulation were common. Few device related complications were observed and most could be resolved. Conclusions: Good reduction in tremor can be maintained for more than six years in the majority of these severely disabled patients. Thalamic stimulation can be recommended in essential tremor where there is insufficient response to drug treatment. Surgical procedures and follow up should be concentrated in relatively few centres, which will thereby acquire a high degree of expertise. PMID:14570831

  2. A case of dissociative fugue and general amnesia with an 11-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Helmes, Edward; Brown, Julie-May; Elliott, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Dissociative fugue refers to loss of personal identity, often with the associated loss of memories of events (general amnesia). Here we report on the psychological assessment of a 54-year-old woman with loss of identity and memories of 33 years of her life attributed to dissociative fugue, along with a follow-up 11 years later. Significant levels of personal injury and stress preceded the onset of the amnesia. A detailed neuropsychological assessment was completed at a university psychology clinic, with a follow-up assessment there about 11 years later with an intent to determine whether changes in her cognitive status were associated with better recall of her life and with her emotional state. Psychomotor slowing and low scores on measures of attention and both verbal and visual memory were present initially, along with significant psychological distress associated with the diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder. Although memories of her life had not returned by follow-up, distress had abated and memory test scores had improved. The passage of time and a better emotional state did not lead to recovery of lost memories. Contrary to expectations, performance on tests of executive functions was good on both occasions. Multiple stressful events are attributed as having a role in maintaining the loss of memories. PMID:25365262

  3. The role of primary care in early detection and follow-up of cancer.

    PubMed

    Emery, Jon D; Shaw, Katie; Williams, Briony; Mazza, Danielle; Fallon-Ferguson, Julia; Varlow, Megan; Trevena, Lyndal J

    2014-01-01

    Primary care providers have important roles across the cancer continuum, from encouraging screening and accurate diagnosis to providing care during and after treatment for both the cancer and any comorbid conditions. Evidence shows that higher cancer screening participation rates are associated with greater involvement of primary care. Primary care providers are pivotal in reducing diagnostic delay, particularly in health systems that have long waiting times for outpatient diagnostic services. However, so-called fast-track systems designed to speed up hospital referrals are weakened by significant variation in their use by general practitioners (GPs), and affect the associated conversion and detection rates. Several randomized controlled trials have shown primary care-led follow-up care to be equivalent to hospital-led care in terms of patient wellbeing, recurrence rates and survival, and might be less costly. For primary care-led follow-up to be successful, appropriate guidelines must be incorporated, clear communication must be provided and specialist care must be accessible if required. Finally, models of long-term cancer follow-up are needed that provide holistic care and incorporate management of co-morbid conditions. We discuss all these aspects of primary care, focusing on the most common cancers managed at the GP office-breast, colorectal, prostate, lung and cervical cancers. PMID:24247164

  4. OSTA program: A French follow up intervention program for suicide prevention.

    PubMed

    Mouaffak, Fayçal; Marchand, Arnaud; Castaigne, Emmanuelle; Arnoux, Armelle; Hardy, Patrick

    2015-12-30

    Attempted suicide is a strong risk factor for subsequent suicidal behavior. In recent years, a particular interest has been given to follow-up interventions as a potential effective strategy in preventing recurrent suicidal behavior. We developed a follow-up intervention program called OSTA (organization of a suitable monitoring for suicide attempters) aimed at addressing this issue and tested its effectiveness in a 1-year randomized controlled trial. Individuals who attempted suicide and were admitted to the emergency department (ED) of Bicêtre Hospital (n=320) were randomly allocated to receive either the OSTA program or a control treatment. On an intention to treat basis, the proportion of patients who reattempted suicide did not differ significantly between the interventional group (IG) 14.5% (22/152) and the control group (CG) 14% (21/150). There were also no significant differences, between the two arms, in the number of suicide attempts. Although no significant difference has been found between the OSTA program and the control treatment concerning the rate of suicide reattempts, we believe that further studies should be conducted to test the effectiveness of more standardized follow-up studies in suicide prevention. PMID:26607432

  5. Some field problems in follow-up surveys: a study of IUD acceptor.

    PubMed

    Talwar, P P; Singh, R P

    1978-01-01

    This paper deals with problems encountered in an attempt to conduct a follow-up study of Lippe's Loop insertion (among women who were reported to have had insertions between April 1977 and June 1978) in rural and urban areas of Lucknow, India. The problems in the rural areas included: 1) difficulty in deciphering handwritten addresses, 2) difficulty in locating clients without a member of local health center staff present, 3) lack of information on "caste" of husband of client, 4) biased reports given in the presence of health center staff. In the urban areas, similar difficulties were encountered with handwritten addresses, as well as problems in locating clients due to greater mobility in urban centers. It was also found that many cases were nonexistent and had been invented to increase a particular center's achievements. Some cases were found to have another form of IUD rather than Lippe's Loop. The authors recommend several improvements in follow-up study techniques, including: 1) clearer address records, 2) inclusion of "caste" on information care in rural areas, 3) name of hamlet in rural areas, 4) current as opposed to permanent address in urban centers. A table is provided to show how many clients were located for the follow-up and reasons for difficulty in locating clients. PMID:12233602

  6. Congressman Clyburn Visit

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Congressman James Clyburn visits the new employees of the Savannah River Site. These new jobs the graduates have received are a result of the Recovery Act at work. Lisa Jackson of the Environmental Protection Agency speaks about how the ARRA is in line with President Obama's vision of a better economy and cleaner environment.

  7. Congressman Clyburn Visit

    ScienceCinema

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    Congressman James Clyburn visits the new employees of the Savannah River Site. These new jobs the graduates have received are a result of the Recovery Act at work. Lisa Jackson of the Environmental Protection Agency speaks about how the ARRA is in line with President Obama's vision of a better economy and cleaner environment.

  8. Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation: Post Trial Follow-Up of Randomized Groups

    PubMed Central

    Jafar, Tazeen H.; Jehan, Imtiaz; Liang, Feng; Barbier, Sylvaine; Islam, Muhammad; Bux, Rasool; Khan, Aamir Hameed; Nadkarni, Nivedita; Poulter, Neil; Chaturvedi, Nish; Ebrahim, Shah

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence on long term effectiveness of public health strategies for lowering blood pressure (BP) is scarce. In the Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation (COBRA) Trial, a 2 x 2 factorial, cluster randomized controlled trial, the combined home health education (HHE) and trained general practitioner (GP) intervention delivered over 2 years was more effective than no intervention (usual care) in lowering systolic BP among adults with hypertension in urban Pakistan. However, it was not clear whether the effect would be sustained after the cessation of intervention. We conducted 7 years follow-up inclusive of 5 years of post intervention period of COBRA trial participants to assess the effectiveness of the interventions on BP during extended follow-up. Methods A total of 1341 individuals 40 years or older with hypertension (systolic BP 140 mm Hg or greater, diastolic BP 90 mm Hg or greater, or already receiving treatment) were followed by trained research staff masked to randomization status. BP was measured thrice with a calibrated automated device (Omron HEM-737 IntelliSense) in the sitting position after 5 minutes of rest. BP measurements were repeated after two weeks. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to analyze the primary outcome of change in systolic BP from baseline to 7- year follow-up. The multivariable model was adjusted for clustering, age at baseline, sex, baseline systolic and diastolic BP, and presence of diabetes. Findings After 7 years of follow-up, systolic BP levels among those randomised to combined HHE plus trained GP intervention were significantly lower (2.1 [4.1–0.1] mm Hg) compared to those randomised to usual care, (P = 0.04). Participants receiving the combined intervention compared to usual care had a greater reduction in LDL-cholesterol (2.7 [4.8 to 0.6] mg/dl. Conclusions The benefit in systolic BP reduction observed in the original cohort assigned to the combined intervention was attenuated but still evident at 7- year follow-up. These findings highlight the potential for scaling-up simple strategies for cardiovascular risk reduction in low- and middle- income countries. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00327574 PMID:26540210

  9. Long-term follow-up of functioning after spinal surgery in patients with Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aaro, Stig; Ahlinder, Peter; Normelli, Helena; Tropp, Hans; Öberg, Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    In a prospective study, 23 consecutive girls with Rett syndrome and neuromuscular scoliosis were evaluated for functioning at a long-term follow-up. The patients had mostly improved, which was confirmed by their parents. Rett syndrome is associated with neuromuscular scoliosis and has a typically long C-shaped thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis. Prospective long-term follow-up studies related to these patients’ total situation are sparse. Most studies focus on the Cobb angle of the scoliosis, whereas parents are mainly concerned about the girls’ continued functioning. Twenty-three patients with Rett syndrome and neuromuscular scoliosis were evaluated preoperatively from 1993 to 2002. At follow-up, 19 patients remained in the study. Three patients died (not due to surgery), and one patient could not participate because it was too far to travel. Mean follow-up time was 74 months (range 49–99 months). The assessments comprised the sitting balance, seating supports in wheelchair, weight distribution, time used for rest, care given, and angle of scoliosis. Follow-up questionnaires and two-open-ended questions about the positive and negative effects of surgery were sent to parents. Sitting balance, number of seating supports in wheelchair, weight distribution, time used for rest, and the Cobb angle had all improved after surgery. The parents assessed improvement in seating position, daily activities, time used for rest, and cosmetic appearance. We can conclude that the stabilized spine resulted in sufficient strength to keep the body upright with the possibility of looking around at the surroundings more easily. The girls got better seating position with less need for seating adaptations in the wheelchair and with reduced time needed for resting during the day. Finally we can conclude that the indication for surgery is to get a better posture which lead to less risk of pressure sores, and that un upright position lead to better possibility to easily breath with fewer episodes of pneumonia and a better general health as result. The evidence of positive surgical effects for girls with Rett syndrome is of great importance in indication for surgery in the decision-making process. PMID:19165511

  10. A prospective 3-year follow-up trial of implantation of two trabecular microbypass stents in open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Donnenfeld, Eric D; Solomon, Kerry D; Voskanyan, Lilit; Chang, David F; Samuelson, Thomas W; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K; Katz, L Jay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate 3-year safety and intraocular pressure (IOP) following two trabecular microbypass stents in phakic and pseudophakic subjects with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) not controlled on preoperative medication. Patients and methods In this prospective pilot study, phakic or pseudophakic subjects with OAG and IOP between 18 mmHg and 30 mmHg on one preoperative topical ocular hypotensive medication underwent medication washout. Thirty-nine qualified subjects with preoperative unmedicated IOP ?22 mmHg and ?38 mmHg received two stents. Postoperative examinations were scheduled at Day 1, Week 1, Months 1, 3, 6, and 12, and semiannually through Month 60. Ocular hypotensive medication was considered if postoperative IOP exceeded 21 mmHg. IOP, medication use, and safety were assessed at each visit. Subject follow-up through Month 36 was completed. Results Thirty-six eyes (92.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 79.1%, 98.4%) achieved the primary efficacy end point of Month 12 reduction in IOP ?20% from baseline (unmedicated IOP) without ocular hypotensive medication. Four subjects required medication during the Month 36 follow-up period. Mean IOP at 36 months for subjects not taking medication was 15.2 mmHg. At 36 months, subjects sustained mean IOP decrease of 9.1±2.7 mmHg (95% CI 8.0 mmHg, 10.14 mmHg), or 37% IOP reduction, from unmedicated baseline IOP. Compared to preoperative medicated IOP, subjects had mean reduction at Month 36 of 5.5±2.7 mmHg (95% CI 4.5 mmHg, 6.6 mmHg), or 26% reduction. Both measures of IOP reduction were highly significant (P<0.001). Other than one case of early postoperative hyphema that resolved at 1 week, no postoperative adverse events were attributed to stent implantation. Conclusion In a pilot study, two trabecular microbypass stents to treat OAG subjects on one preoperative medication provided statistically significant, sustained, and safe reduction of IOP to ?15 mmHg without medication through 36 months. PMID:26604675

  11. Klenot near-Earth-object follow-up program --- next generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticha, J.; Tichy, M.; Kocer, M.; Honkova, M.

    2014-07-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now --- for science, for exploration, and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic, has pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements has helped to improve the inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It was ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. A fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. A new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry. Methods and techniques used for the KLENOT Project are also discussed. Sources of particular inaccuracies of astrometric measurements as input data for orbit computations were identified. Then we have searched for ways to eliminate them and this effort still continues. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. More than 3000 minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to March 2014. The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have a large potential to contribute to recent NEO efforts. We also plan to discuss an international dimension of NEO astrometric follow-up, crucial for reasonable results. A meaningful connection and collaboration with the next generation ground-based and space surveys will be important. The cooperation with and through the Minor Planet Center, the worldwide clearinghouse for small solar system bodies astrometric observations and orbits, is an essential feature of NEO efforts. We also plan to cooperate and directly take part with the ESA's SSA-NEO Programme as a part of European network of cooperating sensors.

  12. Follow-Up Study of the Use of Refrigerated Homogenous Bone Transplants in Orthopaedic Operations

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Philip Duncan Wilson was born in Columbus, Ohio. His father was a family physician who held the Chair of Obstetrics in the Sterling Medical School [1]. The young Philip graduated from Harvard College in 1909 and then served as President of his graduating class at Harvard Medical School. He spent two years as a surgical intern at MGH, after which he returned to Columbus to practice. During WWI he was invited back to Boston to join the Harvard Unit under Harvey Cushing, and served with that unit when it was housed in the Lycée Pasteur. (The members of that unit included Marius Smith-Petersen, who also spent many years at the Massachusetts General Hospital and also became AAOS President.) He rejoined MGH on the staff in 1919. In 1925 he published an influential monograph with W.A. Cochrane (formerly of the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary), entitled, “Fractures and Dislocations” [5]. Toward the end of his years in Boston he helped found the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. In 1934 he was appointed as Surgeon-in-Chief at the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled in New York City. Dr. Wilson was active in many organizations, and reorganized and renamed the hospital he served (Hospital for Special Surgery), oversaw the building of a new hospital at its current site on the Cornell University medical campus, and raised money for a large research building. His zest inspired generations, and he was known for his gracious hospitality. Dr. Wilson was one of three of the first fifteen Presidents (the others being Drs. John C. Wilson, Sr. and Melvin Henderson) whose son (Dr. Philip D. Wilson, Jr.) succeeded him as a President of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Dr. Wilson had a long interest in bone grafting and wrote numerous research papers, a few of which are referenced here [2–4]. In the article reprinted in this issue [3], he described the rapid increase in use of a bone bank he developed at the Hospital for Special Surgery in 1946: 19 operations using grafts in 1946, 48 in 1947, 106 in 1948, 134 in 1949, and 259 in 1950. He describes his animal experiments with autogenous grafts in which grafts rapidly incorporated. He further describes biopsies of previously implanted autogenous and homogenous bone transplants in patients undergoing serial fusions for scoliosis. The pathologist (Dr. Milton Helpern) commented they found “...no evidence that the cells in the bone transplants survived...” Autogenous grafts, his evidence suggested, incorporated more rapidly that homogenous grafts, but “...in the end the results are the same.” His followup studies suggested successful incorporation of graft in 210 of 248 cases. Philip Duncan Wilson, MD is shown. Photograph is reproduced with permission and ©American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Fifty Years of Progress, 1983. References Philip Duncan Wilson, MD 1886–1969. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1969;51:1445–1447. Wilson PD. Experiences with a bone bank. Ann Surg. 1947;126:932–945. Wilson PD. Experience with the use of refrigerated homogenous bone. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1951;33:301–315. Wilson PD. Follow-up study of the use of refrigerated homogenous bone grafts in orthopaedic operations. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1951;33:307–323. Wilson PD, Cochrane WA. Fractures and Dislocations. Philadelphia, PA: JB Lippincott; 1925. PMID:18196370

  13. Long-term follow-up after ileocaecal continent cutaneous urinary diversion (Mainz I pouch): A retrospective study of a monocentric experience

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Fahd; Fellahi, Saad; Ouslim, Hicham; Mhanna, Tarik; El Houmaidi, Amine; Aynaou, Mohammed; Boteng, Paapa Dua; Barki, Ali; Nouini, Yassine

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the long-term follow-up after ileocaecal continent cutaneous reservoir (ICCR) and to review the late complications. Patients and methods In all, 756 patients underwent an ICCR in our department, with long-term follow-up data available in 50 patients. The inclusion criterion was ICCR regardless of the indication and the exclusion criteria were orthotopic neobladder or other continent urinary diversions not performed with the ileocaecum. Patients were followed to record primary outcomes and late complications. Complications were stratified according to the Clavien–Dindo classification. Results The mean patient age was 44 years and pelvic malignancies were the first indication for urinary diversion. The mean (range) follow-up was 19 (9–36) years. A stoma stenosis was the most frequent outlet-related complication requiring re-intervention, followed by ischaemic outlet degeneration, and stoma incontinence. Six renal units (RUs) developed obstruction at the anastomotic site and were managed by open surgery. Three RUs had to be removed due to deterioration. A dederivation was necessary in three patients (6%). Conclusion The ICCR is a safe and established technique when an orthotopic pouch is impossible. The long-term follow-up shows acceptable complication rates and satisfactory continence conditions. However, large population studies are necessary to confirm this observation. PMID:26609442

  14. Accuracy of Five Serologic Tests for the Follow up of Strongyloides stercoralis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Buonfrate, Dora; Sequi, Marco; Mejia, Rojelio; Cimino, Ruben O.; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J.; Albonico, Marco; Degani, Monica; Tais, Stefano; Angheben, Andrea; Requena-Mendez, Ana; Muñoz, José; Nutman, Thomas B.; Bisoffi, Zeno

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional faecal-based methods have poor sensitivity for the detection of S. stercoralis, therefore are inadequate for post-treatment evaluation of infected patients who should be carefully monitored to exclude the persistence of the infection. In a previous study, we demonstrated high accuracy of five serology tests for the screening and diagnosis of strongyloidiasis. Aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of the same five tests for the follow up of patients infected with S. stercoralis. Methods Retrospective study on anonymized, cryo-preserved samples available at the Centre for Tropical Diseases (Negrar, Verona, Italy). Samples were collected before and from 3 to 12 months after treatment. The samples were tested with two commercially-available ELISA tests (IVD, Bordier), two techniques based on a recombinant antigen (NIE-ELISA and NIE-LIPS) and one in-house IFAT. The results of each test were evaluated both in relation to the results of fecal examination and to those of a composite reference standard (classifying as positive a sample with positive stools and/or at least three positive serology tests). The associations between the independent variables age and time and the dependent variable value of serological test (for all five tests), were analyzed by linear mixed-effects regression model. Results A high proportion of samples demonstrated for each test a seroreversion or a relevant decline (optical density/relative light units halved or decrease of at least two titers for IFAT) at follow up, results confirmed by the linear mixed effects model that showed a trend to seroreversion over time for all tests. In particular, IVD-ELISA (almost 90% samples demonstrated relevant decline) and IFAT (almost 87%) had the best performance. Considering only samples with a complete negativization, NIE-ELISA showed the best performance (72.5% seroreversion). Conclusions Serology is useful for the follow up of patients infected with S. stercoralis and determining test of cure. PMID:25668740

  15. Optimal delivery of colorectal cancer follow-up care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Mikaela L; Young, Jane M; Solomon, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. With population aging and increases in survival, the number of CRC survivors is projected to rise dramatically. The time following initial treatment is often described as a period of transition from intensive hospital-based care back into “regular life.” This review provides an overview of recommended follow-up care for people with CRC who have been treated with curative intent, as well as exploring the current state of the research that underpins these guidelines. For patients, key concerns following treatment include the development of recurrent and new cancers, late and long-term effects of cancer and treatment, and the interplay of these factors with daily function and general health. For physicians, survivorship care plans can be a tool for coordinating the surveillance, intervention, and prevention of these key patient concerns. Though much of the research in cancer survivorship to date has focused on surveillance for recurrent disease, many national guidelines differ in their conclusions about the frequency and timing of follow-up tests. Most CRC guidelines refer only briefly to the management of side effects, despite reports that many patients have a range of ongoing physiological, psychosocial, and functional needs. Guidance for surveillance and intervention is often limited by a small number of heterogeneous trials conducted in this patient group. However, recently released survivorship guidelines emphasize the potential for the effectiveness of secondary prevention strategies, such as physical activity, to improve patient outcomes. There is also emerging evidence for the role of primary care providers and nurse coordinated care to support the transition and increase the cost-effectiveness of follow-up. The shift in focus from recurrence alone to the assessment and management of a range of survivorship issues will be important for ensuring that this growing group of patients achieves optimal outcomes. PMID:26056501

  16. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in very elderly patients: immediate results and medium term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Isaac; Muñoz-García, Antonio J; López-Otero, Diego; Avanzas, Pablo; Jimenez-Navarro, Manuel F; Cid-Alvarez, Belén; del Valle, Raquel; Alonso-Briales, Juan H; Ocaranza-Sanchez, Raimundo; Hernández, José M; Trillo-Nouche, Ramiro; Morís, César

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate immediate transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) results and medium-term follow-up in very elderly patients with severe and symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Methods This multicenter, observational and prospective study was carried out in three hospitals. We included consecutive very elderly (> 85 years) patients with severe AS treated by TAVI. The primary endpoint was to evaluate death rates from any cause at two years. Results The study included 160 consecutive patients with a mean age of 87 ± 2.1 years (range from 85 to 94 years) and a mean logistic EuroSCORE of 18.8% ± 11.2% with 57 (35.6%) patients scoring ? 20%. Procedural success rate was 97.5%, with 25 (15.6%) patients experiencing acute complications with major bleeding (the most frequent). Global mortality rate during hospitalization was 8.8% (n = 14) and 30-day mortality rate was 10% (n = 16). Median follow up period was 252.24 ± 232.17 days. During the follow-up period, 28 (17.5%) patients died (17 of them due to cardiac causes). The estimated two year overall and cardiac survival rates using the Kaplan-Meier method were 71% and 86.4%, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regression showed that the variable EuroSCORE ? 20 was the unique variable associated with overall mortality. Conclusions TAVI is safe and effective in a selected population of very elderly patients. Our findings support the adoption of this new procedure in this complex group of patients. PMID:26345138

  17. Epidemiological Follow-up 15 Years after the Breast Cancer Scandal in Essen

    PubMed Central

    Hauth, E. A. M.; Berkemeyer, S.; Jaeger, H.; Forsting, M.; Hoffmann, B.; Jöckel, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the years 1993–1996 a number of presumably false-positive breast cancer diagnoses were made by a pathologist in Essen. A follow-up, undertaken 15 years later, investigated how many women had tumour recurrence and/or metastasis or had died from breast cancer. Material and Methods: A total of 151 (68?%) out of 222 women could be traced. One hundred and forty-seven (66.2?%) of the 222 women were alive. The observed survival rate, number of recurrences and/or metastases, and number of deaths from breast cancer were compared with data from the Munich Tumour Registry. The number of breast cancer cases among daughters of the affected women was ascertained. Results: The total observed survival rate at follow-up after 15 years was 93?%, a much higher figure than the survival rate of 45?% given by the Munich Tumour Registry. Recurrence and/or metastasis or death from breast cancer occurred in 9/222 cases (4.1?%). The incidence for these events calculated according to data from the Munich Tumour Registry is 13?%. Two daughters (2.2?%) out of a total of 90 were diagnosed with breast cancer whereas, according to the German Cancer Research Centre, the expected rate would have been between 5 and 10?%. Conclusions: The results of our follow-up after 15 years show that more women survived than expected and that the number of recurrences and/or metastases and deaths due to breast cancer was lower than expected. Fewer daughters of affected women were diagnosed with breast cancer than expected. These results support our suspicion that not all women diagnosed with breast cancer by a pathologist in Essen actually had breast cancer. PMID:25284840

  18. Follow-up evaluation for benign stricture of upper gastrointestinal tract with stent insertion

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ying-Sheng; Li, Ming-Hua; Chen, Wei-Xiong; Zhuang, Qi-Xin; Chen, Ni-Wei; Shang, Ke-Zhong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine the best mothod for benign stricture of the upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) with stent insertion by follow-up evaluation. METHODS: A total of 110 stents insertions were performed in 110 cases of benign stricture of the UGIT. Permanent (group A) and temporary (group B) placement of an expandable metal stent in 30 cases and 80 cases respectively. All cases were completed under fluoroscopy. RESULTS: In group A, 30 uncovered or antireflux covered or partially covered expandable metal stents were placed permanently. In group A, 5 cases (16.7%) in 3-months, 5 cases (20.0%) in 6-months, 6 cases (25%) in the 1st year, 6 cases (50%) in the 3rd year, and 4 cases (80%) in the 5th year exhibited dysphagia relapse. In group B, a partially-covered expandable metal stent was temporarily placed in each patient and removed after 3-7 d via gastroscopy. Follow-up data in this group showed that 8 cases (7.5%) in 3-months, 9 cases (12.0%) in 6-months, 10 cases (15.4%) in the 1st year, 6 cases (20%) in the 3rd year, and 3 cases (25%) in the 5th year exhibited dysphagia relapse. The placement and withdrawal of all stents were all performed successfully. The follow-up of all cases lasted for 3-99 mo (mean 41.6 ± 19.7 mo). CONCLUSION: The best mothod for benign stricture of UGIT with stent insertion is temporary placement of a partially-covered expandable metal stent. PMID:14606108

  19. [Quality control of capillary blood measurements in clinical services: follow up by the biologist].

    PubMed

    Desjobert, H; Durand, G; Chérubin, N; Le Moël, G

    2001-04-01

    In Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, the study of capillary glucose analyzers in the aim of uniformizing the selection of glucose meters, has shown the relevance of a standardized handling in order to obtain clinically interpretable results. It has been necessary to implement a quality follow up by the biologist. In the first stage, the biochemistry laboratory, with the clinical service supervisor and the supplier, has assured the training of the medical staff habilitated to use the meters and to carry out a quality control. In the second stage, the biologist implemented a monthly control on a total blood control sample, the stability of which has been checked after the necessary addition of glucose. Dosing of that sample, which is used as an external control, is carried out in parallel by the QID Precision glucose analyzer (Abbott) and by the portable Hemocue B Glucose (Vermed), which is selected as a comparison standard. This allows a monthly control of the accuracy of the meter. The condition of the equipment, as well as the weekly control follow up, validated by the nurse, is registered on a sheet prepared by the biologist. In partnership with Vermed, we have developed a processing software of the data stored in the Hemocue, allowing the automatic issue of a report summarizing the equipment condition and the data of weekly and monthly controls follow up. This report, signed by the biologist, is sent to every Service Manager and Supervising Nurse. On the basis of our one year experience, this practice has generated an efficient collaboration between the clinical services and the biochemistry laboratory, allowing to keep the quality of the capillary glucose measurements performed in inpatients. PMID:11353886

  20. Application of Deamidated Gliadin Antibodies in the Follow-Up of Treated Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Chaisemartin, Luc; Meatchi, Tchao; Malamut, Georgia; Fernani-Oukil, Fahima; Hosking, Frédérique; Rault, Dorothée; Bellery, Fabienne; Cellier, Christophe; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The role of serological tests such as IgA anti-transglutaminase autoantibodies has become increasingly important in celiac disease (CD) diagnosis. However, the efficiency of these tests for patient follow-up is controversial. We investigated the correlation of 12 different serological tests, including recent deamidated gliadin and actin IgA tests, with villous atrophy (VA) in a retrospective cohort of treated celiac patients. Materials and Methods Serum samples were collected from 100 treated CD patients who had intestinal biopsy in the course of their follow-up. Antibodies against transglutaminase, deamidated gliadin peptides, and native gliadin were measured, along with IgA anti-actin. The biopsy slides were all blind-reviewed and scored according to Marsh classification. Results For all deamidated gliadin and transglutaminase tests, we found that a positive result was significantly associated with persistence of intestinal VA, with a diagnostic efficacy up to 80%. Furthermore, antibodies titers directly correlated with the degree of VA, indicating a strong link between disease activity and presence of antibodies in the serum. Interestingly, the tests with the highest association with persistent VA were those for deamidated gliadin IgG. Using a test positivity pattern analysis, we were also able to identify several groups of patients with distinct antibody profiles that showed significant differences in intestinal damage and diet compliance. Conclusions Altogether, these results show that deamidated gliadin antibodies are strongly correlated with VA and should be considered valuable tools in CD follow-up and that multiplex serologic analysis for treated CD represents a promising tool for personalized patient management. PMID:26322980

  1. Retinal Embolization During Carotid Angioplasty and Stenting: Periprocedural Data and Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, J. A. Werkum, M. H. van; Bistervels, J. H. G. M.; Ackerstaff, R. G. A. Tromp, S. C.; Berg, J. C. van den

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the incidence of retinal emboli during carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) and to correlate emboli with clinical findings and transcranial Doppler (TCD)-detected cerebral embolic load. Between 2001 and 2005, 33 CAS procedures in 32 patients (23 [72%] male, 19 [58%] symptomatic, mean age 72.5 years [range 54.6 to 83.9]) scheduled for CAS were included in this study. Bilateral fundoscopy with retinal photography was performed by an experienced ophthalmologist immediately before, immediately after (fundoscopy only), and 1 day after the procedure and again at long-term follow-up (mean 37 months). Visual field testing was performed before CAS and again at long-term follow-up. TCD-detected cerebral emboli were stratified to five procedural phases: wiring, predilatation, stent placement, postdilatation, and cerebral protection device (CPD) use (if applicable). To establish correlation between TCD data and retinal embolization, Mann-Whitney test was used, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. All procedures were performed successfully. In five of 33 procedures (15%), new retinal emboli were found. Two of the procedures with emboli had small retinal infarcts. Three of five were performed using CPDs versus seven of 28 that had no retinal emboli (P = not significant). Two of four patients (50%) with previous radiation therapy to the neck had new retinal emboli versus three of 29 patients (10%) who had no previous radiation therapy (P = 0.038). None of the other patient characteristics was associated with retinal embolization. In 30 (91%) of patients with an adequate acoustic temporal window for TCD monitoring, there was no statistically significant correlation between TCD data and the incidence of retinal emboli. No visual field defects were found. On long-term follow-up, all retinal emboli and retinal infarcts had resolved. Retinal embolization during CAS is not uncommon, and it occurs in both protected and unprotected procedures. Most retinal emboli are clinically silent.

  2. Vertebral Augmentation with Nitinol Endoprosthesis: Clinical Experience in 40 Patients with 1-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo; Manca, Antonio; Marcia, Stefano; Chiara, Gabriele; Marini, Stefano; Baroud, Gamal; Regge, Daniele; Montemurro, Filippo

    2013-05-08

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the clinical outcomes of patients treated by vertebral augmentation with nitinol endoprosthesis (VNE) to treat painful vertebral compression fractures.MethodsForty patients with one or more painful osteoporotic VCF, confirmed by MRI and accompanied by back-pain unresponsive to a minimum 2 months of conservative medical treatment, underwent VNE at 42 levels. Preoperative and postoperative pain measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), disability measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and vertebral height restoration (measured with 2-dimensional reconstruction CT) were compared at last follow-up (average follow-up 15 months). Cement extravasation, subsequent fractures, and implant migration were recorded.ResultsLong-term follow-up was obtained in 38 of 40 patients. Both VAS and ODI significantly improved from a median of 8.0 (range 5–10) and 66 % (range 44–88 %) to 0.5 (range 0–8) and 6 % (range 6–66 %), respectively, at 1 year (p < 0.0001). Vertebral height measurements comparing time points increased in a statistically significant manner (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Overall cement extravasation rate was 9.5 %. Discal and venous leakage rates were 7.1 and 0 % respectively. No symptomatic extravasations occurred. Five of 38 (13.1 %) patients experienced new spontaneous, osteoporotic fractures. No device change or migration was observed.ConclusionsVNE is a safe and effective procedure that is able to provide long-lasting pain relief and durable vertebral height gain with a low rate of new fractures and cement leakages.

  3. Prehypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease in Chinese Population: Four-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junjuan; Gao, Jingsheng; Chen, Shuohua; Zhu, Hang; Wu, Shouling

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a well established cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the effect of prehypertension on risk of CKD is controversial. The aim of this study is to determine whether prehypertension increases the risk of CKD events in the Chinese population. We enrolled 20,034 with prehypertension and 12,351 with ideal blood pressure in this prospective study. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min 1.73m2. The new occurrences of CKD events were collected during follow-up. Cumulative survival and freedom for the occurrence of new CKD events was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier approach. Multivariate Cox Regression was used to analyze the effect of prehypertension on CKD. The median follow-up time was 47 (interquartile range 44–51) months. 601 new onset CKD events occurred during the follow-up period. The cumulative incidence of new CKD events was higher in the prehypertensive population than that in the ideal blood pressure population (2.10% vs 1.46%, P = 0.0001). Multivariate Cox Regression showed that relative risks (RRs) for the new onset CKD events in the prehypertensive population were 1.69 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.41~2.04, P = 0.001) higher than those in the ideal blood pressure population. Similarly, the risks were 1.68 (95% CI: 1.33~2.13 P = 0.001) times higher in females and 2.14 (95% CI: 1.58~2.91 P = 0.001) times higher in males by adjustment for traditional CV risk factors. Our findings demonstrated prehypertension is an independent risk factor for the occurrence of new CKD events in the Chinese population. PMID:26670101

  4. Imaging in diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of stone patients.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Mrinal; Denstedt, John D

    2009-01-01

    Imaging has an essential role in the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of patients with stone disease. A variety of imaging modalities are available to the practicing urologist, including conventional radiography (KUB), intravenous urography (IVU), ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance urography, and computed tomography (CT) scans, each with its advantages and limitations. Traditionally, IVU was considered the gold standard for diagnosing renal calculi, but this modality has largely been replaced by unenhanced spiral CT scans at most centers. Renal US is recommended as the initial imaging modality for suspected renal colic in pregnant women and children, but recent literature suggests that a low-dose CT scan may be safe in pregnancy. Intraoperative imaging by fluoroscopy or US plays a large part in assisting the urologist with the surgical intervention chosen for the individual stone patient. Posttreatment imaging of stone patients is recommended to ensure complete fragmentation and stone clearance. Plain radiography is suggested for the follow-up of radiopaque stones, with ultrasound and limited IVU reserved for the follow-up of radiolucent stones to minimize cumulative radiation exposure from repeated CT scans. Patients with asymptomatic calyceal stones who prefer an observational approach should have a yearly KUB to monitor progression of stone burden. Current research has been aimed toward the development of a micro-CT scan and coherent-scatter analysis to determine stone composition in vivo. This may have a significant impact on the future clinical management of renal calculi by facilitating selection of the most appropriate surgical intervention based on stone composition at the time of presentation. PMID:19095204

  5. Diagnostic criteria and follow-up in neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy: a case series*

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Vivianne Calheiros Chaves; Silva, Mara Cristina Coelho; Maia, José Holanda; Daltro, Pedro; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Brody, Alan S.; Marchiori, Edson

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy (NEHI) is a form of childhood interstitial lung disease characterized by tachypnea, retractions, crackles, and hypoxia. The aim of this study was to report and discuss the clinical, imaging, and histopathological findings in a series of NEHI cases at a tertiary pediatric hospital, with an emphasis on diagnostic criteria and clinical outcomes. METHODS: Between 2003 and 2011, 12 full-term infants were diagnosed with NEHI, based on clinical and tomographic findings. Those infants were followed for 1-91 months. Four infants were biopsied, and the histopathological specimens were stained with bombesin antibody. RESULTS: In this case series, symptoms appeared at birth in 6 infants and by 3 months of age in the remaining 6. In all of the cases, NEHI was associated with acute respiratory infection. The most common initial chest HRCT findings were ground-glass opacities that were in the middle lobe/lingula in 12 patients and in other medullary areas in 10. Air trapping was the second most common finding, being observed in 7 patients. Follow-up HRCT scans (performed in 10 patients) revealed normal results in 1 patient and improvement in 9. The biopsy findings were nonspecific, and the staining was positive for bombesin in all samples. Confirmation of NEHI was primarily based on clinical and tomographic findings. Symptoms improved during the follow-up period (mean, 41 months). A clinical cure was achieved in 4 patients. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of patients, the diagnosis of NEHI was made on the basis of the clinical and tomographic findings, independent of the lung biopsy results. Most of the patients showed clinical improvement and persistent tomographic changes during the follow-up period, regardless of the initial severity of the disease or type of treatment. PMID:24310630

  6. Asthma and risk of lethal prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Platz, Elizabeth A; Drake, Charles G; Wilson, Kathryn M; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Kenfield, Stacey A; Mucci, Lorelei A; Stampfer, Meir J; Willett, Walter C; Camargo, Carlos A; Giovannucci, Edward

    2015-08-15

    Inflammation, and more generally, the immune response are thought to influence the development of prostate cancer. To determine the components of the immune response that are potentially contributory, we prospectively evaluated the association of immune-mediated conditions, asthma and hayfever, with lethal prostate cancer risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We included 47,880 men aged 40-75 years with no prior cancer diagnosis. On the baseline questionnaire in 1986, the men reported diagnoses of asthma and hayfever and year of onset. On the follow-up questionnaires, they reported new asthma and prostate cancer diagnoses. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate relative risks (RRs). In total, 9.2% reported ever having been diagnosed with asthma. In all, 25.3% reported a hayfever diagnosis at baseline. During 995,176 person-years of follow-up by 2012, we confirmed 798 lethal prostate cancer cases (diagnosed with distant metastases, progressed to distant metastasis or died of prostate cancer [N = 625]). Ever having a diagnosis of asthma was inversely associated with risk of lethal (RR = 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]?= 0.51-1.00) and fatal (RR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.42-0.96) disease. Hayfever with onset in the distant past was possibly weakly positively associated with risk of lethal (RR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.92-1.33) and fatal (RR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.91-1.37) disease. Men who were ever diagnosed with asthma were less likely to develop lethal and fatal prostate cancer. Our findings may lead to testable hypotheses about specific immune profiles in the etiology of lethal prostate cancer. PMID:25648070

  7. The Sugen 5416/hypoxia mouse model of pulmonary hypertension revisited: long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Hansmann, Georg; Rose, Chase; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Scheid, Annette; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The combination of a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor antagonist, Sugen 5416 (SU5416), and chronic hypoxia is known to cause pronounced pulmonary hypertension (PH) with angioobliterative lesions in rats and leads to exaggerated PH in mice as well. We sought to determine whether weekly SU5416 injections during 3 weeks of hypoxia leads to long-term development of angioobliterative lesions and sustained or progressive PH in mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were injected with SU5416 (SuHx) or vehicle (VehHx) weekly during 3 weeks of exposure to 10% oxygen. Echocardiographic and invasive measures of hemodynamics and pulmonary vascular morphometry were performed after the 3-week hypoxic exposure and after 10 weeks of recovery in normoxia. SuHx led to higher right ventricular (RV) systolic pressure and RV hypertrophy than VehHx after 3 weeks of hypoxia. Ten weeks after hypoxic exposure, RV systolic pressure decreased but remained elevated in SuHx mice compared with VehHx or normoxic control mice, but RV hypertrophy had resolved. After 3 weeks of hypoxia and 10 weeks of follow-up in normoxia, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion was significantly decreased, indicating decreased systolic RV function. Very few angioobliterative lesions were found at the 10-week follow-up time point in SuHx mouse lungs. In conclusion, SU5416 combined with 3 weeks of hypoxia causes a more profound PH phenotype in mice than hypoxia alone. PH persists over 10 weeks of normoxic follow-up in SuHx mice, but significant angioobliterative lesions do not occur, and neither PH nor RV dysfunction worsens. The SuHx mouse model is a useful adjunct to other PH models, but the search will continue for a mouse model that better recapitulates the human phenotype. PMID:25610598

  8. Maternal dioxin exposure and pregnancy outcomes over 30 years of follow-up in Seveso.

    PubMed

    Wesselink, Amelia; Warner, Marcella; Samuels, Steven; Parigi, Aliza; Brambilla, Paolo; Mocarelli, Paolo; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2014-02-01

    Animal evidence suggests an association between exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Epidemiologic studies report inconsistent results, but are limited by narrow range of exposure, small sample size, and lack of a biologic measure of highest lifetime exposure. On July 10, 1976, a chemical explosion in Seveso, Italy resulted in the highest known residential exposure to TCDD. In 1996, we initiated the Seveso Women's Health Study (SWHS), a retrospective cohort of TCDD exposure and reproductive health. Individual-level TCDD was measured in serum collected soon after the explosion. After 20years of follow-up, we found no association between maternal TCDD in 1976 serum or estimated at pregnancy and spontaneous abortion (SAB), fetal growth, or gestational length. Here, we present an updated analysis of TCDD exposure and adverse pregnancy outcomes from a subsequent follow-up of the SWHS cohort in 2008-2009. SWHS women had 1211 post-explosion pregnancies through the 2008-2009 follow-up. We found no association between TCDD estimated at pregnancy and SAB, fetal growth, or gestational length. However, we found a non-significant inverse association between maternal 1976 serum TCDD and birthweight (adjusted ?=-22.8, 95% CI: -80.1, 34.6). The association was stronger among first post-explosion births, but remained non-significant (adjusted ?=-47.7, 95% CI: -107.3, 11.9). SWHS is the first study to be able to consider two potentially relevant measures of TCDD exposure: highest lifetime dose and in utero. Our results, although non-significant, suggest that highest dose may be more relevant in epidemiologic studies of TCDD and pregnancy outcomes. PMID:24291766

  9. Learning, Memory, and Executive Function in New MDMA Users: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Daniel; Tkotz, Simon; Koester, Philip; Becker, Benjamin; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne; Daumann, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is associated with changes in neurocognitive performance. Recent studies in laboratory animals have provided additional support for the neurodegeneration hypothesis. However, results from animal research need to be applied to humans with caution. Moreover, several of the studies that examine MDMA users suffer from methodological shortcomings. Therefore, a prospective cohort study was designed in order to overcome these previous methodological shortcomings and to assess the relationship between the continuing use of MDMA and cognitive performance in incipient MDMA users. It was hypothesized that, depending on the amount of MDMA taken, the continued use of MDMA over a 2-year period would lead to further decreases in cognitive performance, especially in visual paired association learning tasks. Ninety-six subjects were assessed, at the second follow-up assessment: 31 of these were non-users, 55 moderate-users, and 10 heavy-users. Separate repeated measures analyses of variance were conducted for each cognitive domain, including attention and information processing speed, episodic memory, and executive functioning. Furthermore, possible confounders including age, general intelligence, cannabis use, alcohol use, use of other concomitant substances, recent medical treatment, participation in sports, level of nutrition, sleep patterns, and subjective well-being were assessed. The Repeated measures analysis of variance (rANOVA) revealed that a marginally significant change in immediate and delayed recall test performances of visual paired associates learning had taken place within the follow-up period of 2 years. No further deterioration in continuing MDMA-users was observed in the second follow-up period. No significant differences with the other neuropsychological tests were noted. It seems that MDMA use can impair visual paired associates learning in new users. However, the groups differed in their use of concomitant use of illicit drugs. Therefore, performance differences between the groups cannot completely ascribed to the use of MDMA. PMID:26696809

  10. Ten-Year Follow-up of Patients with Epidemic Post Infectious Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Sergio Wyton L.; Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna; Sesso, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Scarce information on outcomes of epidemic post infectious glomerulonephritis is available. This is a 10-year follow-up of the patients that developed acute glomerulonephritis in an epidemic outbreak caused by group C Streptococcus zooepidemicus in Brazil in 1998, that were also previously evaluated 2 and 5 years after the acute episode. Methods In this prospective study 60 cases (out of 134 in 1998) were reevaluated after 10 years, as well as community controls matched by gender and age. They underwent clinical and renal function evaluation, including serum creatinine and cystatin C, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), albuminuria and hematuria. Results Comparisons of clinical and renal function aspects of 60 patients and 48 community controls have not shown significant differences (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2 and/or albuminuria >30mg/g creatinine: 13.8% vs. 12.2%, respectively, p = 0.817) except for a higher frequency of hypertension in the cases (45.0% vs. 20.8%, p = 0.009). Comparing the same patients affected in the acute episode, 2, 5 and 10 years later, it was observed an improvement of median eGFR levels at 2 years and a trend toward subsequent stabilization in these levels, associated with decrease in albuminuria and increased hypertension rates in the last survey. At 10 years it was not observed additional reduction of renal function using serum creatinine, eGFR and cystatin C. Conclusions During the acute episode of epidemic GN a considerable proportion of patients presented hypertension and reduced renal function; after 2 years and particularly at this 10-year follow-up survey there was no worsening of renal function parameters, except for persistent higher frequency of hypertension. Nevertheless, a longer follow up is necessary to confirm that progressive loss of renal function will not occur. PMID:25962068

  11. Severe Agnathia-Otocephaly Complex: Surgical Management and Longitudinal Follow-up From Birth Through Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Golinko, Michael S; Shetye, Pradip; Flores, Roberto L; Staffenberg, David A

    2015-11-01

    Agnathia-otocephaly complex (AOC) is characterized by mandibular hypo- or aplasia, ear abnormalities, microstomia, and microglossia. Though rare and often fatal, this is the first report detailing various reconstructive strategies beyond infancy as well as longitudinal follow-up into adulthood.All patients with AOC treated at our institution over a 30 year period were reviewed. Four patients were identified, one with agnathia, one with micrognathia. Two males with nanognathia (defined as a symphyseal remnant without body nor ramus) were also included. The mean follow-up was 17 years. All four underwent perinatal tracheostomy and gastrostomy-tube placement. Commissuroplasties were typically performed before 3 years of age and repeated as necessary to allow for oral hygiene. Mandibular reconstruction was most successful with rib between ages 3 and 8, after which time, free fibula transfer was utilized. Due to some resoprtion or extrusion, all patients underwent repeated bone grafting procedures. Tissue expansion of the neck was used to restore the lower third of the face, but was most successful in the teenage years. At last follow-up of the eldest patients, one was in college while another was pursuing graduate education.AOC need not be a fatal nor untreatable condition; a reasonable quality of life can be achieved. Although the lower-facial contour may be improved, and a stoma created, the lack of musculature make deglutition virtually impossible with current therapies. Just as transplantation has emerged as a modality for facial restoration following severe trauma, so too may it be a future option for congenital deformities. PMID:26517463

  12. Adolescent Suicide Risk Screening: The Effect of Communication about Type of Follow-Up on Adolescents' Screening Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Cheryl A.; Hill, Ryan M.; Wynne, Henry A.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.

    2012-01-01

    This experimental study examined the effect of communication about type of screening follow-up (in-person follow-up vs. no in-person follow-up) on adolescents' responses to a self-report suicide risk screen. Participants were 245 adolescents (131 girls, 114 boys; ages 13-17; 80% White, 21.6% Black, 9.8% American Indian, 2.9% Asian) seeking medical…

  13. Limiting loss to follow-up in a multicenter randomized trial in orthopedic surgery. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Strategies used to minimize loss to follow-up included exclusion criteria and a consent process designed to minimize losses; study staff trained in communication and negotiation with patients; and a central methods center to monitor all patient follow-up and aid in finding lost patients. The patients that completed their follow-up reported that remuneration, commitment to finish, and belief that the study was important motivated them to complete the study.

  14. Follow-up of patients with mycosis fungoides after interferon ?2b treatment failure

    PubMed Central

    Studzi?ski, Maciej; Giebel, Sebastian; Krause, Anna; Olejniczak, Monika; Grzanka, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of T cell cutaneous lymphoma( CTCL) is a controversial subject and the effectiveness of treatment is still low. Aim Report of single center experience of management CTCL after progression after first line treatment. Material and methods We present 41 patients with CTCL, 29 received interferon ?2b in first line, and 12 of them received second line therapy. Results Overall response rate for second line therapy was 60%. Conclusions Results of the follow-up of patients with mycosis fungoides after interferon ?2b treatment failure with the literature review and discussion. PMID:26015774

  15. Sherlock: An Automated Follow-Up Telescope for Wide-Field Transit Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotredes, L.; Charbonneau, D.; O'Donovan, F. T.; Looper, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    The current challenge facing photometric surveys for transiting gas-giant planets is that of confusion with eclipsing binary systems that mimic the photometric signature. A simple way to reject most forms of these false positives is high-precision, rapid-cadence monitoring of the suspected transit at higher angular resolution and in several filters. We are currently building a telescope that will perform higher-angular-resolution, multi-color follow-up observations of candidate systems identified by Sleuth (our wide-field transit survey instrument at Palomar), and its two twin instruments in Tenerife and northern Arizona.

  16. Sherlock: An Automated Follow-Up Telescope for Wide-Field Transit Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotredes, Lewis; Charbonneau, David; Looper, Dagny L.; O'Donovan, Francis T.

    2004-06-01

    The most significant challenge currently facing photometric surveys for transiting gas-giant planets is that of confusion with eclipsing binary systems that mimic the photometric signature. A simple way to reject most forms of these false positives is high-precision, rapid-cadence monitoring of the suspected transit at higher angular resolution and in several filters. We are currently building a system that will perform higher-angular-resolution, multi-color follow-up observations of candidate systems identified by Sleuth (our wide-field transit survey instrument at Palomar), and its two twin system instruments in Tenerife and northern Arizona.

  17. Attrition in drug court research: Examining participant characteristics and recommendations for follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Natasha S.; Linley, Jessica V.; Nochajski, Thomas H.; Farrell, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    Drug court research is often challenged by study attrition. In this study, researchers attempted to predict study completion using variables traditionally associated with treatment attrition. Findings showed that participants who reported a need for additional help to resolve legal problems and who reported accessing outpatient treatments were more likely to complete the study at the three-month follow-up. The study also demonstrated a relationship between trauma-related symptoms and study attrition. Although sample size was a limitation with these pilot data, researchers are urged to examine attrition and increase efforts to engage drug court enrollees in research studies, especially those with trauma-related symptoms. PMID:24475320

  18. Attrition in drug court research: Examining participant characteristics and recommendations for follow-up.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Natasha S; Linley, Jessica V; Nochajski, Thomas H; Farrell, Mark G

    2013-01-01

    Drug court research is often challenged by study attrition. In this study, researchers attempted to predict study completion using variables traditionally associated with treatment attrition. Findings showed that participants who reported a need for additional help to resolve legal problems and who reported accessing outpatient treatments were more likely to complete the study at the three-month follow-up. The study also demonstrated a relationship between trauma-related symptoms and study attrition. Although sample size was a limitation with these pilot data, researchers are urged to examine attrition and increase efforts to engage drug court enrollees in research studies, especially those with trauma-related symptoms. PMID:24475320

  19. X-ray and optical follow-up of ASAS 150946-2147.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, M.; Takahashi, H.; Arai, A.; Sasada, M.; Yamanaka, M.; Ito, R.; Kato, T.; Nogami, D.; Maehara, H.; Kinugasa, K.; Honda, S.; Hashimoto, O.

    2009-04-01

    ASAS 150946-2147.7 is a suspected blackhole X-ray binary, currently in an optical outburst (CBET 1774). We performed an X-ray ToO observation and optical follow-up by Swift and "KANATA", respectively. The Swift-XRT ToO observation started on 18 Apr. 2009 at 01:17:47 (UT) and ended at 04:08:33 (UT) with the total exposure time of 2.0 ks. The source was quite faint; the 1-10 keV average count-rate was about 0.014 counts/s.

  20. Discovery and Spectroscopic Follow-up of Milky Way Satellites in the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting

    2016-01-01

    A complete census of Milky Way satellite galaxies provides crucial tests of both galaxy formation models and the Lambda-Cold Dark Matter theoretical paradigm. Wide-field imaging survey data from the first two year of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) have recently been used to discover many new Milky Way satellites, nearly doubling the number of known satellites. In this talk, I will describe the new dwarf galaxy candidates found in DES. I will also discuss the latest results from spectroscopic follow-up observations on some of the candidates using the Magellan, VLT, and AAT telescopes.