Sample records for follow-up site visits

  1. Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization by Medicare Patients, 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    DeLia, Derek; Tong, Jian; Gaboda, Dorothy; Casalino, Lawrence P

    2014-01-01

    Objective Document trends in time to post-discharge follow-up visit for Medicare patients with an index admission for heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), or community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Determine factors predicting whether the first post-discharge utilization event is a follow-up visit, treat-and-release emergency department (ED) visit, or readmission. Methods Using Medicare claims data from 2007–2010, we plotted annual cumulative incidence functions for the time frame post-discharge to follow-up visit, accounting for competing risks with censoring at 30 days. We used multinomial probit regression to determine factors predicting the probability of first-occurring post-discharge utilization events within 30 days. Results For each cohort, the cumulative incidence of follow-up visits increased during the study period. For example, in 2010, 54.6% of HF patients had a follow-up visit within 10 days of discharge compared to 47.9% in 2007. Within each cohort, the largest increase in follow-up visits took place between 2008 and 2009. Follow-up visits were less likely for patients who were Black, Hispanic, and enrolled in Medicaid or Medicare Advantage, and they were more likely for patients with greater comorbidities and prior procedures as well as those with private or supplemental Medicare coverage. There were no changes in 30-day readmission rates. Discussion Although increases in follow-up visits may have been inf luenced by the introduction of publicly reported readmission rates in 2009, these increases did not continue in 2010 and were not associated with a change in readmissions. Patients who were Black, Hispanic, and/or enrolled in Medicaid or Medicare Advantage were less likely to have follow-up visits. PMID:24949226

  2. Posthospital follow-up visits and 30-day readmission rates in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fidahussein, Salman S; Croghan, Ivana T; Cha, Stephen S; Klocke, David L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effect of a follow-up visit with a primary care physician and/or pulmonologist within the first 30 days of hospital discharge on readmissions, emergency department (ED) visits, and mortality. Patients and methods This was a retrospective cohort study of 7,102 unique patients discharged from a Mayo Clinic hospital in Rochester, MN, and residing in Olmsted County, MN, with any mention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) from January 1, 2004 through November 30, 2011. The study included 839 patients who met study-entry criteria. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to determine the risk of hospital readmission, ED visits, and death of patients, with or without a follow-up visit during the first 30 days postdischarge. Results Our results showed 839 unique patients experienced 1,422 discharges with a primary diagnosis of COPD. Of the 1,422 discharges, 973 (68.4%) had a follow-up visit within 30 days. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazard-ratio (HR) model analysis, occurrence of a follow-up visit did not have a significant effect on the risk of the combined outcome of 30-day readmission and ED visit (HR 0.947, confidence interval 0.763–1.177; P=0.63). However, a postdischarge follow-up visit had a significant effect on 30-day mortality (HR 0.279, confidence interval 0.149–0.523; P<0.001). Conclusion Postdischarge follow-up visits after hospitalization for COPD did not significantly reduce the risk of 30-day readmission or ED visit. However, patients who received postdischarge follow-up visits had significantly reduced 30-day mortality. PMID:24971039

  3. Beliefs and Barriers to Follow-up after an Emergency Department Asthma Visit: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zorc, Joseph J.; Chew, Amber; Allen, Julian L.; Shaw, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior studies in urban emergency departments (EDs) have found poor quality of chronic asthma care and identified beliefs and barriers associated with low rates of follow-up with a primary care provider (PCP) after an ED visit. Objectives To develop an ED-based intervention including asthma symptom screening, a video developed to impact beliefs about PCP follow-up, and a mailed follow-up reminder; and measure the effect of the intervention on rates of PCP follow-up and asthma-related outcomes. Methods This randomized controlled trial enrolled children age 1–18 years who were discharged after asthma treatment in an urban children’s hospital ED. Control subjects received standard instructions to follow up with a PCP within 3–5 days. In addition, intervention subjects: 1. Received a letter to take to their PCP if they screened positive for persistent asthma symptoms, 2. Viewed a video featuring families and providers discussing the importance of asthma control, and 3. Received a mailed reminder to follow up with a PCP. All subjects were contacted by phone at 1, 3, and 6 months after the ED visit, and follow-up was confirmed by PCP record review. Asthma-related quality of life (AQOL), symptoms, and beliefs about asthma Results A total of 433 subjects were randomized, and baseline measures of demographics and asthma clinical status were similar between study groups. After the intervention and prior to ED discharge, intervention subjects were more likely to endorse beliefs about the benefits of regular care than controls. However, the percentage following up with a PCP during the 4 weeks after the ED visit (44.5%) was similar to controls (43.8%). AQOL, medication use, and ED visits over the subsequent 6 months were also similar between study groups. Conclusions An ED-based intervention influenced short-term beliefs but did not increase PCP follow-up or asthma-related outcomes. PMID:19786448

  4. The effect of follow-up visits or contacts after contraceptive initiation on method continuation and correct use?

    PubMed Central

    Steenland, Maria W.; Zapata, Lauren B.; Brahmi, Dalia; Marchbanks, Polly A.; Curtis, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted a systematic review to assess whether follow-up visits or contacts after a woman begins using contraception improve method continuation and correct use. Study Design We searched the PubMed database for all peer-reviewed articles in any language published from database inception through May 2012 that examined the effect of a structured follow-up schedule of visits or contacts on contraceptive use. We included studies that compared women who initiated a method of contraception with a certain follow-up schedule compared to women with a different follow-up schedule or no follow-up at all. To be included, studies must have compared groups on a measure of contraceptive use (e.g., pregnancy, correct use, consistent use, method discontinuation including expulsion). Though not ideally suited to answer our review question, studies in which women used a variety of contraceptive methods but results were not stratified by method type were included. Results Four studies met our inclusion criteria (Level I, poor to II-2, poor). Two studies examined the effect of a specific follow-up visit schedule on intrauterine device (IUD) continuation: one examining frequency of visits and one examining the timing of the first follow-up visit. Women with more frequent follow-up visits did not have a statistically significant difference in proportion of removals for medical reasons compared with women who had fewer follow-up visits; among women who had their IUDs removed for medical reasons, those who had more frequent follow-up visits had a longer mean time of use prior to removal. The other study found more removals and shorter continuation among women with a follow-up visit at 1 week compared to women with a follow-up visit at 1 month after IUD insertion (no statistical tests reported). Two studies examined the effect of follow-up phone calls compared to no follow-up phone calls after an initial family planning visit among adolescents initiating a variety of contraceptive methods. Neither of the two studies found any differences in method continuation or correct use between study groups. Conclusions It is difficult to determine what effect, if any, follow-up visits or contacts have on contraceptive method continuation or correct use. Few studies were identified, and those that were identified were mostly of poor quality, were not method specific and had either poor patient compliance with follow-up visits or poor phone contact completion rates. PMID:23114736

  5. Why Mothers Accompany Adolescent and Young Adult Childhood Cancer Survivors to Follow-up Clinic Visits

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Kinjal; Kazak, Anne E.; Hocking, Matthew C.; DeRosa, Branlyn Werba; Schwartz, Lisa A.; Hobbie, Wendy L.; Ginsberg, Jill P.; Deatrick, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Parents often accompany adolescent and young adult (AYA) pediatric cancer survivors to follow-up oncology clinic visits and remain involved in their care, although little is known about their reasons for doing so. Method This mixed methods (qualitative–quantitative) study of 76 mothers of AYA survivors of childhood cancer uses content analysis and logistic regression to identify and explore reasons mothers provided for coming to the visit. Demographic and treatment data are examined as potentially explanatory factors. Results Ten reasons (in decreasing order of frequency) were derived: Concern for Child’s Health and Well-Being, Practical Support, Transportation, Familial Experience, General Support, Companionship, Personal Interest in Follow-up Care, Characteristics of their Child, Emotional Support, and Parental Duty. The reasons were not related to demographic or treatment factors. Conclusion Mothers accompany AYAs to survivorship clinic for both maternal/family-focused and survivor-focused reasons that can be incorporated in survivorship and transition care to reflect ongoing communications among survivors, parents, and health care teams. PMID:24451909

  6. Assessing and Predicting the Likelihood of Interventions during Routine Annual Follow-up Visits for Management of Obstructive Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Nannapaneni, Srikant; Morgenthaler, Timothy I.; Ramar, Kannan

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on established positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment are often advised routine annual follow-up visits to assess ongoing effectiveness and address problems associated with therapy. This study evaluates the clinical utility of annual face-to-face follow-up visits. Design: We performed a retrospective chart review of OSA patients on PAP who had completed a routine annual follow-up visit. Demographics, polysomnography, PAP compliance, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), subjective complaints (efficacy and interface issues, equipment malfunction, prescription renewal), objective findings (efficacy or leak issues, equipment problems), and visit-specific interventions were recorded. We determined relationships between patient provided information and likelihood of therapeutic versus administrative interventions. Setting: Academic sleep center. Measurements and Results: Among 716 patients who met study criteria, we abstracted data on 180 randomly selected patients. On multivariate analyses, only subjective complaints or objective findings by providers were associated with a therapeutic intervention (p < 0.0001). Though most patients (55 of 63 patients, 87.3%) who required therapeutic interventions had objective findings, without subjective complaints, the odds of such findings were only 0.12 (95% CI = 0.06-0.24, p < 0.0001). Without subjective complaints, the likelihood of a therapeutic intervention was 0.07 (95% CI = 0.03-0.15, p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our data suggests that in the absence of a subjective complaint, an annual follow-up is more likely to require administrative rather than face-to-face clinical intervention. Designing a clinic model to account for this might reduce resource utilization. However, the value and optimal timing of “routine” annual follow-up visits requires further evaluation. Citation: Nannapaneni S, Morgenthaler TI, Ramar K. Assessing and predicting the likelihood of interventions during routine annual follow-up visits for management of obstructive sleep. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(8):919-924. PMID:25126040

  7. Outpatient Follow-up Visit and 30-Day Emergency Department Visit and Readmission in Patients Hospitalized for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gulshan; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Freeman, Jean L.; Zhang, Dong D.; Goodwin, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Readmissions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are common and costly. We examined the effect of early follow-up visit with patient’s primary care physician (PCP) or pulmonologist following acute hospitalization on the 30-day risk of an emergency department (ER) visit and readmission. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries with an identifiable PCP who were hospitalized for COPD between 1996 and 2006. Three or more visits to a PCP in the year prior to the hospitalization established a PCP for a patient. We performed a Cox proportional hazard regression with time-dependent covariates to determine the risk of 30-day ER visit and readmission in patients with or without a follow-up visit to their PCP or pulmonologist. Results Of the 62 746 patients admitted for COPD, 66.9% had a follow-up visit with their PCP or pulmonologist within 30 days of discharge. Factors associated with lower likelihood of outpatient follow-up visit were longer length of hospital stay, prior hospitalization for COPD, older age, black race, lower socioeconomic status, and emergency admission. Those receiving care at nonteaching, for-profit, and smaller-sized hospitals were more likely to have a follow-up visit. In a multivariate, time-dependent analysis, patients who had a follow-up visit had a significantly reduced risk of an ER visit (hazard ratio [HR], 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83–0.90) and readmission (HR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.87–0.96). Conclusion Continuity with patient’s PCP or pulmonologist after an acute hospitalization may lower rates of ER visits and readmission in patients with COPD. PMID:20937926

  8. Brief Intervention and Follow-Up for Suicidal Patients With Repeat Emergency Department Visits Enhances Treatment Engagement.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Barbara; Brown, Gregory K; Currier, Glenn W; Lyons, Chelsea; Chesin, Megan; Knox, Kerry L

    2015-08-01

    We implemented an innovative, brief, easy-to-administer 2-part intervention to enhance coping and treatment engagement. The intervention consisted of safety planning and structured telephone follow-up postdischarge with 95 veterans who had 2 or more emergency department (ED) visits within 6 months for suicide-related concerns (i.e., suicide ideation or behavior). The intervention significantly increased behavioral health treatment attendance 3 months after intervention, compared with treatment attendance in the 3 months after a previous ED visit without intervention. The trend was for a decreasing hospitalization rate. PMID:26066951

  9. Predictors of non-adherence to follow-up visits and deferasirox chelation therapy among jordanian adolescents with Thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Al-Kloub, Manal Ibrahim; A Bed, Mona A; Al Khawaldeh, Omar A; Al Tawarah, Yasin M; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2014-10-01

    Poor adherence to treatment can have negative effects on outcomes and heath care cost. However, little is known about the factors that impact adherence to deferasirox chelation therapy. The aims of this study were to identify rates and predictors of non-adherence to medical regimen among thalassemia major adolescents on deferasirox oral chelation therapy by using subjective (self-reporting) and objective (serum ferritin and follow-up visits) measures. Convenient samples of 164 adolescents, aged 12-19 years were recruited from three National Thalassemia Centers in Jordan. Patients were interviewed using a four-section questionnaire and the medical records were checked. Results indicated that rate of adherence according to self-report was (73%); while to follow-up medical appointments and serum ferritin level rates was 57% and 47%, respectively. One-third of participant adolescents (n = 52) were psychologically impaired. Multivariate analysis showed that factors affecting adolescent non-adherence to deferasirox chelation therapy is different from that affecting adherence to follow-up visits. In general, adolescents more than 16 years old, presence of sibling with thalassemia, lack of parental monitoring, lower family income, decrease frequency of blood transfusion, and psychological impairment were found significant predictors of non-adherence among adolescents. Disease knowledge was not associated with adherence status of the adolescents. Clinician should be aware of high prevalence of low adherence to chelation therapy during adolescent years. Nurses need to regularly assess, monitor, and promote adherence behavior that might impact patients' outcomes. PMID:25116329

  10. Cohort Profile update: The 1993 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort follow-up visits in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Helen; Assunção, Maria CF; Wehrmeister, Fernando C; Oliveira, Isabel O; Barros, Fernando C; Victora, Cesar G; Hallal, Pedro C; Menezes, Ana MB

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we update the profile of the 1993 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort Study, with emphasis on a shift of priority from maternal and child health research topics to four main categories of outcome variables, collected throughout adolescence: (i) mental health; (ii) body composition; (iii) risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCDs); (iv) human capital. We were able to trace 81.3% (n = 4106) of the original cohort at 18 years of age. For the first time, the 18-years visit took place entirely on the university premises, in a clinic equipped with state-of-the-art equipment for the assessment of body composition. We welcome requests for data analyses from outside scientists. For more information, refer to our website (http://www.epidemio-ufpel.org.projetos_de_pesquisas/estudos/coorte_1993) or e-mail the corresponding author. PMID:24729426

  11. A follow-up study of the community near the McColl waste disposal site.

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, J A; Goldman, L R; Satin, K P; Smith, D F; Vance, W A; Neutra, R R

    1991-01-01

    To assess the effect of interim clean-up measures on the current health of a community, we conducted a follow-up survey of 193 residents living near the McColl waste disposal site and a comparison area located approximately 5 miles from the site. Results from this survey were compared with results from a similar survey conducted 7 years earlier. Odors were detected at least once per week by 32.7% of "high-exposed" respondents in 1988 compared with 68.5% in 1981, but prevalence odds ratios (PORs) comparing symptom reporting between "high-exposed" and comparison-area respondents were greater than that of the 1981 survey for 89% of symptoms. PORs comparing symptom reporting between these two areas were greater than 2.0 for 64% of symptoms assessed in the current survey. Symptoms reported in excess did not represent a single organ system or suggest a mechanism of response. PORs comparing respondents who were very worried about the environment and those reporting no worry were greater than 2.0 for 86% of symptoms. These finding, along with environmental data from the area, suggest that living near the waste disposal site and being very worried about the environment, rather than a toxicologic effect of chemical from the site, explain excess symptom reporting found in this follow-up study. PMID:1954927

  12. Follow-Up support for graduates of AKU-IED's Visiting Teachers Program in their school contexts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Farman Nisa Mir Khan

    2003-01-01

    Without consistent follow-up support in school contexts teachers learning from the training program can be a piecemeal experience for teachers who may find it difficult to apply their learning in their classrooms. Continuous school improvement begins when school based follow-up support is available for teachers with the training program, such as peer coaching, mentoring, self reflection, time and resources, professional

  13. Women's reasons for not participating in follow up visits before starting short course antiretroviral prophylaxis for prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV: qualitative interview study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas M Painter; Kassamba L Diaby; Danielle M Matia; Lillian S Lin; Toussaint S Sibailly; Moise K Kouassi; Ehounou R Ekpini; Thierry H Roels; Stefan Z Wiktor

    2004-01-01

    Objective To find out why pregnant women who receive HIV-1 positive test results and are offered short course antiretroviral prophylaxis to prevent transmission of HIV from mother to child do not participate in necessary follow up visits before starting prophylaxis. Design Qualitative interview study. Setting A programme aiming to prevent transmission of HIV from mother to child at a public

  14. Telephone Follow-Up by a Midlevel Provider After Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair Instead of Face-to-Face Clinic Visit

    PubMed Central

    Hwa, Kimberly; Wren, Sherry M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The need for more cost- and time-efficient provision of medical care has prompted an interest in remote or telehealth approaches to delivery of health care. We present a study examining the feasibility and outcomes of implementation of a telephone follow-up program for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Methods: This is a retrospective review of consecutive patients who prospectively agreed to undergo telephone follow-up after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair instead of standard face-to-face clinic visits. Patients received a telephone call from a dedicated physician assistant 2 to 3 weeks after surgery and answered a predetermined questionnaire. A face-to-face clinic visit was scheduled based on the results of the call or on patient request. Results: Of 62 patients who underwent surgery, all agreed to telephone follow-up instead of face-to-face clinic visits. Their mean round-trip distance to the hospital was 122 miles. Fifty-five patients (88.7%) successfully completed planned telephone follow-up. Three patients (4.8%) were lost to follow-up, and 4 (6.5%) were erroneously scheduled for a clinic appointment. Of the 55 patients who were reached by telephone, 50 (90.9%) were satisfied and declined an in-person clinic visit. Five patients (9.1%) returned for a clinic appointment based on concerns raised during the telephone call. Of these, 1 was found to have an early hernia recurrence and 1 had a seroma. Conclusion: Telephone follow-up by a midlevel provider after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is feasible and effective and is well received by patients. PMID:25848178

  15. A Five-Year Follow-Up: Teachers' Perceptions of the Benefits of Home Visits for Early Elementary Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, James A.; Mann, Mary Beth; Becker, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate previous research about teachers' perceived benefits of home visits to determine if they remained stable. Furthermore, the investigation sought to find out whether home visits impacted variables often associated with improved school success (i.e., school attendance, academic performance, parent…

  16. Emergency health care use and follow-up among sociodemographic groups of children who visit emergency departments for mental health crises

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Amanda S.; Rosychuk, Rhonda J.; Dong, Kathryn; Curran, Janet; Slomp, Mel; McGrath, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous studies of differences in mental health care associated with children’s sociodemographic status have focused on access to community care. We examined differences associated with visits to the emergency department. Methods: We conducted a 6-year population-based cohort analysis using administrative databases of visits (n = 30 656) by children aged less than 18 years (n = 20 956) in Alberta. We measured differences in the number of visits by socioeconomic and First Nations status using directly standardized rates. We examined time to return to the emergency department using a Cox regression model, and we evaluated time to follow-up with a physician by physician type using a competing risks model. Results: First Nations children aged 15–17 years had the highest rate of visits for girls (7047 per 100 000 children) and boys (5787 per 100 000 children); children in the same age group from families not receiving government subsidy had the lowest rates (girls: 2155 per 100 000 children; boys: 1323 per 100 000 children). First Nations children (hazard ratio [HR] 1.64; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–2.05), and children from families receiving government subsidies (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.30–1.98) had a higher risk of return to an emergency department for mental health care than other children. The longest median time to follow-up with a physician was among First Nations children (79 d; 95% CI 60–91 d); this status predicted longer time to a psychiatrist (HR 0.47, 95% CI 0.32–0.70). Age, sex, diagnosis and clinical acuity also explained post-crisis use of health care. Interpretation: More visits to the emergency department for mental health crises were made by First Nations children and children from families receiving a subsidy. Sociodemographics predicted risk of return to the emergency department and follow-up care with a physician. PMID:22690003

  17. An Electronic Health Record-Based Intervention to Increase Follow-up Office Visits and Decrease Rehospitalization in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Field, Terry S.; Ogarek, Jessica; Tjia, Jennifer; Cutrona, Sarah L.; Harrold, Leslie R.; Gagne, Shawn J.; Preusse, Peggy; Donovan, Jennifer L.; Kanaan, Abir O.; Reed, George; Garber, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives We assessed the impact of an electronic health record-based transitional care intervention involving automated alerts to primary care providers and staff when older patients were discharged from the hospital. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting A large multispecialty group practice. Participants Patients aged 65 or older discharged from hospital to home. Intervention In addition to notifying primary care providers about the patient's recent discharge, the system provided information about new drugs added during the inpatient stay, warnings about drug-drug interactions, and recommendations for dose changes and laboratory monitoring of high-risk medications, as well as alerts to the primary care provider's support staff to schedule a post-hospitalization office visit. Measurements An outpatient office visit with a primary care provider following discharge and rehospitalization within 30 days following discharge. Results Of the 1870 discharges in the intervention group, 27.7% had an office visit with a primary care provider within 7 days of discharge. Of the 1,791 discharges in the control group, 28.3% had an office visit with a primary care provider within 7 days of discharge. In the intervention group, 18.8% experienced a rehospitalization within the 30-day period post-discharge compared with 19.9% in the control group. The hazard ratio for an office visit with a primary care physician did not significantly differ between the intervention and control groups. The hazard ratio for rehospitalization in the 30-day period following hospital discharge in the intervention versus the control group was 0.94 (95% confidence interval: 0.81, 1.1). Conclusion We did not demonstrate a significant effect of this electronic health record-based intervention in increasing the timeliness of office visits to primary care providers following hospitalization, or reducing risk of rehospitalization. PMID:24779524

  18. Home visiting intervention for vulnerable families with newborns: follow-up results of a randomized controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JENNIFER A. FRASER; KENNETH L. ARMSTRONG; JEANETTE P. MORRIS; MARK R. DADDS

    2000-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to: (1) Assess the community utility of a screening tool to identify families with child abuse or neglect risk factors in the immediate postnatal period (2) Determine the social validity and effectiveness of a home visiting program using community child health nurses and offering social work services for identified families, and (3) Identify factors in the

  19. Effects of Nurse Home Visiting on Maternal and Child Functioning: Age9 Follow-up of a Randomized Trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Olds; Harriet Kitzman; Carole Hanks; Robert Cole; Elizabeth Anson; Kimberly Sidora-Arcoleo; Dennis W. Luckey; Charles R. Henderson; John Holmberg; Robin A. Tutt; Amanda J. Stevenson; Jessica Bondy; Louise Herrington

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Our goal was to test the effect of prenatal and infancy home visits by nurses on mothers' fertility and children's functioning 7 years after the program ended at child age 2. METHODS. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial in a public system of obstetric and pediatric care. A total of 743 primarily black women 29 weeks' gestation, with previous

  20. Effects of Nurse Home Visiting on Maternal and Child Functioning: Age-9 Follow-up of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olds, David L.; Kitzman, Harriet; Hanks, Carole; Cole, Robert; Anson, Elizabeth; Sidora-Arcoleo, Kimberly; Luckey, Dennis W.; Henderson, Charles R.; Holmberg, John; Tutt, Robin A.; Stevenson, Amanda J.; Bondy, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Our goal was to test the effect of prenatal and infancy home visits by nurses on mothers’ fertility and children’s functioning 7 years after the program ended at child age 2. METHODS We conducted a randomized, controlled trial in a public system of obstetric and pediatric care. A total of 743 primarily black women <29 weeks’ gestation, with previous live births and at least 2 sociodemographic risk characteristics (unmarried, <12 years of education, unemployed), were randomly assigned to receive nurse home visits or comparison services. Primary outcomes consisted of intervals between births of first and second children and number of children born per year; mothers’ stability of relationships with partners and relationships with the biological father of the child; mothers’ use of welfare, food stamps, and Medicaid; mothers’ use of substances; mothers’ arrests and incarcerations; and children’s academic achievement, school conduct, and mental disorders. Secondary outcomes were the sequelae of subsequent pregnancies, women’s employment, experience of domestic violence, and children’s mortality. RESULTS Nurse-visited women had longer intervals between births of first and second children, fewer cumulative subsequent births per year, and longer relationships with current partners. From birth through child age 9, nurse-visited women used welfare and food stamps for fewer months. Nurse-visited children born to mothers with low psychological resources, compared with control-group counterparts, had better grade-point averages and achievement test scores in math and reading in grades 1 through 3. Nurse-visited children, as a trend, were less likely to die from birth through age 9, an effect accounted for by deaths that were attributable to potentially preventable causes. CONCLUSIONS By child age 9, the program reduced women’s rates of subsequent births, increased the intervals between the births of first and second children, increased the stability of their relationships with partners, facilitated children’s academic adjustment to elementary school, and seems to have reduced childhood mortality from preventable causes. PMID:17908740

  1. The CACREP Site Visit Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Courtland C.

    2013-01-01

    An important step in the CACREP review process is the campus site visit. The visit involves a team, usually from comparable institutions, coming to a campus for a review of the counselor training program(s). The role of the team is to be the CACREP Board's representative on campus to verify the self-study. In this article, the author reviews…

  2. SEA GRANT PROGRAM SITE VISITS Sea Grant Program Webinar

    E-print Network

    SEA GRANT PROGRAM SITE VISITS Sea Grant Program Webinar May 2014 Sami J. Grimes, NSGO #12;OVERVIEW Sea Grant Evaluation Process Why Site Visits? Results from Previous Site Visit Cycle Overview of How Site Visits are Conducted Site Visit Terms Changes from the Previous Site Visit Cycle Sea Grant

  3. Long-term Effects of Nurse Home Visitation on Children's Criminal and Antisocial Behavior 15Year Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Olds; Charles R. Henderson; Robert Cole; John Eckenrode; Harriet Kitzman; Dennis Luckey; Lisa Pettitt; Kimberly Sidora; Pamela Morris; Jane Powers

    1998-01-01

    Context.— A program of home visitation by nurses has been shown to affect the rates of maternal welfare dependence, criminality, problems due to use of substances, and child abuse and neglect. However, the long-term effects of this program on children's antisocial behavior have not been examined. Objective.— To examine the long-term effects of a program of prenatal and early childhood

  4. Effects of Home Visits by Paraprofessionals and by Nurses on Children: Age-Six and Nine Follow-Up of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olds, David L.; Holmberg, John R.; Donelan-McCall, Nancy; Luckey, Dennis W.; Knudtson, Michael D.; Robinson, JoAnn

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of prenatal and infancy/toddler home visiting by paraprofessionals and by nurses on child development at child ages 6 and 9. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Public and private care settings in Denver, Colorado. Participants 735 low-income women and their first-born children; 85% of the mothers were unmarried, 47% Hispanic, 35% non-Hispanic white, 15% African-American, and 3% American Indian/Asian. Interventions Home visits provided from pregnancy through child age 2 delivered in one group by paraprofessionals and in the other by nurses. Primary Outcomes Reports of children's internalizing, externalizing, and total emotional/behavioral problems; tests of children's language, intelligence, attention, attention dysfunction, visual attention/task shifting, working memory, and academic achievement. We hypothesized that program effects on cognitive related outcomes would be more pronounced among children born to mothers with low psychological resources. We report paraprofessional-control and nurse-control differences with p-values <.10 given similar effects in a previous trial, earlier impacts in this trial, and limited statistical power. Results There were no significant paraprofessional effects on emotional/behavioral problems, but paraprofessional-visited children born to mothers with low psychological resources, compared to control group counterparts, exhibited fewer errors in visual attention/task switching at age 9 (ES=?0.30, p=.078). There were no statistically significant paraprofessional effects on other primary outcomes. Nurse-visited children were less likely to be classified as having total emotional/behavioral problems at age 6 (RR=0.45, p=.082), internalizing problems at age 9 (RR=0.44, p =.078), and dysfunctional attention at age 9 (RR=0.34, p=.070). Nurse-visited children born to low-resource mothers, compared to control-group counterparts, had better receptive language averaged over ages 2, 4, and 6 (ES = 0.30, p=.014), and sustained attention averaged over ages 4, 6, and 9 (ES = 0.36, p =.006). There were no significant nurse effects on externalizing problems, intellectual functioning, and academic achievement. Conclusions Children born to low-resource mothers visited by paraprofessionals exhibited improvement in visual attention/task switching. Nurse-visited children showed improved behavioral functioning, and those born to low-resource mothers benefited in language and attention, but did not improve in intellectual functioning and academic achievement. PMID:24296904

  5. Enduring Effects of Prenatal and Infancy Home Visiting by Nurses on Children: Age-12 Follow-Up of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kitzman, Harriet; Olds, David L.; Cole, Robert; Hanks, Carole; Anson, Elizabeth; Arcoleo, Kimberly; Luckey, Dennis W.; Knudtson, Michael D.; Henderson, Charles R.; Holmberg, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test, with an urban, primarily black sample, the effect of prenatal and infancy home visits by nurses on 12-year-old first-born children's use of substances, behavioral adjustment, and academic achievement. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Public system of obstetric and pediatric care in Memphis, Tennessee. Participants 12-year-old first-born children (N=613) of primarily African-American, economically disadvantaged women (N=743 randomized during pregnancy). Intervention Program of prenatal and infancy home visits by nurses. Main Outcome Measures Use of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana; internalizing, externalizing, and total behavioral problems; academic achievement. Results By the time the first-born child was 12 years of age, those visited by nurses, compared to those in the control group, reported fewer days of having used tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana during the 30-day period prior to the 12-year interview (0.03 versus 0.18, p=.019), and were less likely to report having internalizing disorders that met the clinical/borderline threshold (22% versus 31%, p=.043). Nurse-visited children born to mothers with low psychological resources, compared to control-group counterparts, scored higher on the PIAT achievement tests in reading and math (88.78 versus 85.70, p =.009) and, over their first 6 years of education, scored higher on group-administered standardized tests of math and reading achievement (40.52 versus 34.85, p=.023). There were no statistically significant program effects on children's externalizing or total behavioral problems. Conclusions Through child age 12, the program reduced children's use of substances and internalizing mental health problems; and improved the academic achievement of children born to mothers with low psychological resources. PMID:20439791

  6. DARPA Site Visit #2 Princeton University's Prospect 11

    E-print Network

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    DARPA Site Visit #2 Princeton University's Prospect 11 Tuesday, August 16, 2005 · Start: Lat: 40 is proportional to instantaneous speed. #12;1st required run on Prescribed Course (2 obstacles) DARPA Site Visit required run on Prescribed Course (2 obstacles) DARPA Site Visit #2 Princeton University's Prospect 11

  7. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553...Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a) Visits...The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from...

  8. Walla Walla, Umatilla and Tucannon Habitat Site Visits

    E-print Network

    : Site visits: projects sites (Tucannon - Walla Walla) 7:30 a.m. start Overnight in Pendleton @ Red lion Wednesday April 24th Site Visits: (7:00 a.m. start) (Umatilla) Overnight in Pendleton @ Red Lion Thursday of presentations. Staff return late Friday, April 26th ISRP (only)meeting @ Red Lion #12;Projects included

  9. The Community Follow-up Project (CFUP).

    PubMed

    Sherina, M S; Azhar, M Z; Mohd Yunus, A; Azlan Hamzah, S A

    2005-08-01

    The Community Follow-up Project (CFUP) is a project where medical students choose a hospital in-ward patient during their clinical ward-based attachments and follow-up this patient's progress after discharge from the hospital. The students do a series of home visits and also accompany their patients for some of their follow-ups at the hospital, government clinics, general practitioners' clinics and even to the palliative care or social welfare centres. The students assess the physical, psychological and social impact of the illness on the patient, family and community. By following their patients from the time their patients were in the hospital and back to their homes and community, the students are able to understand in depth the problems faced by patients, the importance of communication skills in educating patients on their illness and the importance of good communication between primary, secondary and tertiary care. PMID:16315625

  10. Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits

    E-print Network

    Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits April 17-19th, 2013 ISRP Review Team (4 at the Sheraton Airport at 7:15 a.m. Site Visits: Depart airport and head east: Wind, Klickitat, White Salmon in this review: 1998-019-00 Wind River Watershed Underwood Conservation District (UCD), US Forest Service (USFS

  11. FAQs about the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities Site Visit Program What is the purpose of the site visit program?

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    FAQs about the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities Site Visit Program General What at enhancing compliance with the NIH Guidelinesfor Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines). The aim of the site visits is to enhance institutional awareness of the requirements of the NIH Guidelines

  12. “Cold calling” in psychiatric follow up studies: is it justified?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Tyrer; H Seivewright; B Ferguson; T Johnson

    2003-01-01

    Background: The ethics of cold calling—visiting subjects at home without prior appointment agreed—in follow up research studies has received little attention although it is perceived to be quite common. We examined the ethical implications of cold calling in a study of subjects with defined neurotic disorders followed up 12 years after initial assessment carried out to determine outcome in terms

  13. Lost to follow-up among pregnant women in a multi-site community based maternal and newborn health registry: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background It is important when conducting epidemiologic studies to closely monitor lost to follow up (LTFU) rates. A high LTFU rate may lead to incomplete study results which in turn can introduce bias to the trial or study, threatening the validity of the findings. There is scarce information on LTFU in prospective community-based perinatal epidemiological studies. This paper reports the rates of LTFU, describes socio-demographic characteristics, and pregnancy/delivery outcomes of mothers LTFU in a large community-based pregnancy registry study. Methods Data were from a prospective, population-based observational study of the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research Maternal Newborn Health Registry (MNHR). This is a multi-centre, international study in which pregnant women were enrolled in mid-pregnancy, followed through parturition and 42 days post-delivery. Risk for LTFU was calculated within a 95%CI. Results A total of 282,626 subjects were enrolled in this study, of which 4,893 were lost to follow-up. Overall, there was a 1.7% LTFU to follow up rate. Factors associated with a higher LTFU included mothers who did not know their last menstrual period (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1, 4.4), maternal age of < 20 years (RR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1, 1.3), women with no formal education (RR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1, 1.4), and attending a government clinic for antenatal care (RR 2.0, 95% CI 1.4, 2.8). Post-natal factors associated with a higher LTFU rate included a newborn with feeding problems (RR 1.6, 94% CI 1.2, 2.2). Conclusions The LTFU rate in this community-based registry was low (1.7%). Maternal age, maternal level of education, pregnancy status at enrollment and using a government facility for ANC are factors associated with being LTFU. Strategies to ensure representation and high retention in community studies are important to informing progress toward public health goals. Trial registration Registration at the Clinicaltrials.gov (ID# NCT01073475). PMID:26062899

  14. Yakima Basin Habitat Site Visits May 14-16, 2013

    E-print Network

    for dinner Tuesday, May 14: Site Visits - Kittitas Overnight in Yakima at Red Lion Wednesday, May 15: Site S Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development 1992-009-00 Yakima Phase II Fish Screens Fish Colville Confederated Tribes 9:20 2000-001-00 Omak Creek Anadromous Fish Habitat and Passage

  15. NSF Site Visit ADVANCE-Nebraska

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    . The interviews and evaluations are meant to assess project performance and progress to date as well as to provide feedback to the project. Detailed Table of Contents Site Team Participants Karin Ruhlandt-Senge, Ph@uky.edu Laurel Smith-Dorerr, PhD Boston University ldoerr@bu.edu NSF Staff Kelly Mack kmack@nsf.gov Amy Rogers

  16. Visit our web site http://mdphd.gpp.nih.gov

    E-print Network

    Talbot, James P.

    Visit our web site http://mdphd.gpp.nih.gov e-mail: mdphd@mail.nih.gov The NIH MD/PhD Partnership for PhD training & eligibility for NIH partnership MSTP funding for medical school at participating institutions Work in the NIH Clinical Research Center, the world's largest clinical facility devoted 100

  17. Site Visit to Calvert County, Maryland ARC Family Support Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bersani, Hank A., Jr.

    The site visit report describes the Family Support Services program run by the Calvert County (Maryland) Association for Retarded Citizens. The program's goal is to prevent any person 21 years of age or younger from being institutionalized. It provides respite care services, specialized family support, and integrated day care for approximately 50…

  18. Efficacy and Utility of Phone Call Follow-up after Pediatric General Surgery versus Traditional Clinic Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kevin; Hogan, Virginia; Jager, Alesha; von Allmen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Context: Typical follow-up for surgical procedures consists of an interim history and brief focused physical examination. These appointments occupy clinic resources, require a time investment by the family, and rarely identify problems. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety of a postoperative phone call. Objective: Compare a traditional in-person clinic postoperative visit with postoperative phone call follow-up regarding patient satisfaction, rate of successful follow-up, and clinic resource utilization in a large academic practice. Design: A retrospective review of charts of patients who underwent select surgical procedures, along with a review of the clinic schedule for the same time period. Main Outcome Measures: Efficacy, patient/family satisfaction, and impact on the clinic. Methods: Families were contacted by telephone two weeks after select surgical procedures to assess for complications and questions. Cohorts of patients six months before and six months after implementation were assessed for main outcome measures. Results: Before implementation, 55.5% of patients (427/769) who had one of the select surgical procedures were seen in the clinic postoperatively, and 62.6% (435/695) had a successful postoperative phone call follow-up. There were also 1090 overall scheduled postoperative appointments. Six months after implementation, overall postoperative appointments decreased 35.5% to 703. Overall, postoperative-scheduled visits decreased by 6% compared with new visits and other general follow-up visits, which each increased by 3%. A satisfaction survey revealed that 93% of patients (n = 231) were highly satisfied with the process. A hospital cost analysis suggested an 89% cost savings ($101.75 per patient for clinic visit vs $12.50 per patient for phone call follow-up). Conclusion: Postoperative phone call follow-up is an effective tool that improves patient and physician efficiency and satisfaction. PMID:25663201

  19. Long-term 12 year follow-up of X-linked congenital retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Kjellström, Sten; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Ponjavic, Vesna; Sieving, Paul A.; Andréasson, Sten

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the retinal structure and function during the progression of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) from childhood to adulthood. Methods Ten patients clinically diagnosed with XLRS were investigated at 6–15 years of age (mean age 9 years) with a follow-up 8 to 14 years later (mean 12 years). The patients underwent regular ophthalmic examination as well as testing of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), visual field (VF) and assessment of full-field electroretinography (ERG) during their first visit. During the follow-up, the same clinical protocols were repeated. In addition, macular structure and function was examined with multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The patients were 18–25 years of age (mean age 21 years) at the follow-up examination. All exons and exon-intron boundaries of RS1-gene were sequenced for gene mutations in 9 out of the 10 patients. Results Best corrected VA and VF were stable during this follow-up period. No significant progression in cone or rod function could be measured by full-field ERG. Multifocal electroretinography and OCT demonstrated a wide heterogeneity of macular changes in retinal structure and function at the time of follow-up visit. Three different mutations were detected in these nine patients, including a known nonsense mutation in exon 3, a novel insertion in exon 5 and an intronic mutation at 5' splice site of intron 3. Conclusions Clinical follow-up (mean 12 years) of ten young XLRS patients (mean age of 9 years) with a typical congenital retinoschisis phenotype revealed no significant decline in retinal function during this time period. MfERG and OCT demonstrated a wide variety of macular changes including structure and dysfunction. The XLRS disease was relatively stable during this period of observation and would afford opportunity for therapy studies to judge benefit against baseline and against the fellow eye. PMID:20569020

  20. Long-term follow-up of pediatric trachyonychia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Monique G; Ciliberto, Heather; Bayliss, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric trachyonychia is an acquired nail disease that can cause distress to families. It is a poorly understood disease, and long-term follow-up data are lacking. We present an institutional review of 11 children with isolated pediatric trachyonychia followed over time. Children with the diagnosis of pediatric trachyonychia were identified and invited to participate. Pictures were taken on follow-up and a questionnaire was answered. Exclusion criteria include having another diagnosis at the initial visit that causes nail dystrophy. Eleven patients with the diagnosis of pediatric trachyonychia were available for follow-up. The mean age of appearance was 2.7 years (range 2-7 yrs) and the average follow-up was 66 months (range 10-126 mos). Nine patients were treated with potent topical corticosteroids, one used only petrolatum, and one took vitamin supplements. One patient was found to have an additional skin and hair diagnosis of alopecia areata on follow-up. On follow-up, 82% noted improvement of the nails, whereas 18% noted no change. A majority of cases of pediatric trachyonychia are isolated and improve with time, regardless of treatment. PMID:25556756

  1. Longitudinal Follow-up of Tinnitus Complaints

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerhard Andersson; Pernilla Vretblad; Hans C. Larsen; Leif Lyttkens

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the long-term outcome of patients with tinnitus, the long-term effects of cognitive behavioral therapy, and what properties of tinnitus predict distress at follow-up. Design: A longitudinal follow-up of a consecutive sample of patients with tinnitus initially seen by a clinical psy- chologist.

  2. Strategy for NEO follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Milos; Honkova, Michaela; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal

    2015-03-01

    The Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) belong to the most important small bodies in the solar system, having the capability of close approaches to the Earth and even possibility to collide with the Earth. In fact, it is impossible to calculate reliable orbit of an object from a single night observations. Therefore it is necessary to extend astrometry dataset by early follow-up astrometry. Follow-up observations of the newly discovered NEO candidate should be done over an arc of several hours after the discovery and should be repeated over several following nights. The basic service used for planning of the follow-up observations is the NEO Confirmation Page (NEOCP) maintained by the Minor Planet Center of the IAU. This service provides on-line tool for calculating geocentric and topocentic ephemerides and sky-plane uncertainty maps of these objects at the specific date and time. Uncertainty map is one of the most important information used for planning of follow-up observation strategy for given time, indicating also the estimated distance of the newly discovered object and including possibility of the impact. Moreover, observatories dealing with NEO follow-up regularly have prepared their special tools and systems for follow-up work. The system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used at the Klet Observatory are described here. Methods and techniques used at the Klet NEO follow-up CCD astrometric programme, using 1.06-m and 0.57-m telescopes, are also discussed.

  3. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: a.morrison-saunders@murdoch.edu.au [Murdoch University (Australia) [Murdoch University (Australia); North-West University (South Africa); Pope, Jenny, E-mail: jenny@integral-sustainability.net [North-West University (South Africa) [North-West University (South Africa); Integral Sustainability (Australia) [Australia; Curtin University (Australia); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [North-West University (South Africa) [North-West University (South Africa); University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [North-West University (South Africa)] [North-West University (South Africa)

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  4. Hepatobiliary cystadenoma exhibiting morphologic changes from simple hepatic cyst shown by 11-year follow up imagings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naoto Fukunaga; Masashi Ishikawa; Hisashi Ishikura; Toshihiro Ichimori; Suguru Kimura; Akihiro Sakata; Koichi Sato; Jyunichi Nagata; Yoshiyuki Fujii

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A long-term follow up case of hepatobiliary cystadenoma originating from simple hepatic cyst is rare. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of progressive morphologic changes from simple hepatic cyst to hepatobiliary cystadenoma by 11 – year follow up imaging. A 25-year-old man visited our hospital in 1993 for a simple hepatic cyst. The cyst was located in the left

  5. [Follow-up care of living kidney donors].

    PubMed

    Bock, H A; Thiel, G

    1995-09-01

    The follow-up of living kidney donors demands medical as well as psychological competence. In the postoperative period, attention focuses on pain management, early detection of wound complications and the prophylaxis of thromboembolism. Regular visits of the donor who may easily feel neglected should be as much part of the transplant team's post-operative routine as visits of the recipient. The later phase of recovery emphasizes strengthening abdominal wall and lumbar muscles as well as the gradual increase of physical activity. Long-term follow-up focuses on the early detection of arterial hypertension and proteinuria. Antihypertensive therapy in nephrectomized donors should include an ACE inhibitor or an angiotensin-II antagonist. In Switzerland, the long-term course after living donation is prospectively monitored by the Swiss Registry for Living Donors founded in 1993. The registry is responsible for the regular timing of follow-up examinations and assures transparency of the origin of the kidneys used for living donation in Switzerland. The registry heavily relies on the collaboration of the donor's family physicians. PMID:7502264

  6. Outpatient follow-up after traumatic injury: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Luke; Shaheen, Aisha; Crandall, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background: It has been shown that rates of ambulatory follow-up after traumatic injury are not optimal, but the association with insurance status has not been studied. Aims: To describe trauma patient characteristics associated with completed follow-up after hospitalization and to compare relative rates of healthcare utilization across payor types. Setting and Design: Single institution retrospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: We compared patient demographics and healthcare utilization behavior after discharge among trauma patients between April 1, 2005 and April 1, 2010. Our primary outcome of interest was outpatient provider contact within 2 months of discharge. Statistical Analysis: Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association between characteristics including insurance status and subsequent ambulatory and acute care. Results: We reviewed the records of 2906 sequential trauma patients. Patients with Medicaid and those without insurance were significantly less likely to complete scheduled outpatient follow-up within 2 months, compared to those with private insurance (Medicaid, OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.51-0.88; uninsured, OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.23-0.36). Uninsured and Medicaid patients were twice as likely as privately insured patients to visit the Emergency Department (ED) for any reason after discharge (uninsured patients (Medicaid, OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.50-4.53; uninsured, OR 2.10, 94% CI 1.31-3.36). Conclusion: We found marked differences between patients in scheduled outpatient follow-up and ED utilization after injury associated with insurance status; however, Medicaid seemed to obviate some of this disparity. Medicaid expansion may improve outpatient follow-up and affect patient outcome disparities after injury. PMID:25400385

  7. Diabetic Amyotrophy: A Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Casey, E. B.; Harrison, M. J. G.

    1972-01-01

    A clinical follow-up study of 12 patients with diabetic amyotrophy is reported. Re-examination after an interval indicated that improvement had occurred in all but one instance, and had been maintained over an average follow-up period of four and a half years. Improvement in the neurological syndrome appeared to follow improvement in diabetic control or institution of treatment in those whose diabetes had not previously been diagnosed. Seven patients made a good functional recovery, three no longer having any muscular weakness. Five showed significant residual disability. PMID:5015293

  8. Follow-Up Research on Agoraphobics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Dianne L.

    In vivo exposure is the most commonly used and generally the most effective behavioral treatment for agoraphobia. Follow-up studies are difficult to interpret because additional treatment does not necessarily indicate relapse and non-treatment does not necessarily indicate non-relapse. Relapse rates are difficult to estimate because of lack of…

  9. 1975 Graduates: Spring '77 Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selgas, James W.

    In 1976, a transfer and employment follow-up survey was conducted of 696 Associate of Arts and certificate students who had graduated between December 1974 and August 1975 from Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC). Responses, which were received from 70% of the graduates, indicated that (1) 93% would recommend HACC; (2) 72% were currently…

  10. Visiting the Site of Death: Experiences of the Bereaved after the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristensen, Pal; Tonnessen, Arnfinn; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined how many bereaved relatives of Norwegian tourists who perished in the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami had visited the site of death and the most important outcome from the visit. We conducted in-depth interviews (n = 110) and used self-report questionnaires (Impact of Event Scale--Revised, Inventory of Complicated Grief, and…

  11. Querulent Paranoia: A Follow-Up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Astrup

    1984-01-01

    This study deals with all querulent paranoias admitted to Gaustad Hospital during 1938–1972. As querulent paranoia is a rare clinical condition, a plea is made for a multicenter study. We had only 22 cases, but most of them have a follow-up over several years, so that we are able to know fairly well the long-term course of illness. The family

  12. Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders?

    E-print Network

    Marinova, Elena

    Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders? V. Linseele a by the Belgian Middle Egypt Prehistoric Project of Leuven University under the direction of P.M. Vermeersch

  13. 77 FR 23764 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Site Visit Data Collection; American Recovery and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ...For example, site visits are the only way the research team can observe the training programs in operation and collect real time data that amplifies the findings through other documentation. Lack of a rigorous evaluation process will mean that...

  14. Significant Accomplishments NSF Site Visit. A great deal of time, self-reflection,

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Significant Accomplishments NSF Site Visit. A great deal of time, self-reflection, and preparation with 10 chairs this semester, all from science and engineering departments. Hiring Workshops. We have

  15. Establishment, Retention, and Loss to Follow-Up in Outpatient HIV Care

    PubMed Central

    Fleishman, John A.; Yehia, Baligh R.; Moore, Richard D.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Gebo, Kelly A.

    2012-01-01

    Background For optimal clinical benefit, HIV-infected patients should receive periodic outpatient care indefinitely. However, initially establishing HIV care and subsequent retention in care are problematic. This study examines establishment, retention, and loss to follow-up (LTFU) in a large, multi-site cohort over a 2-8 year period. Methods Medical record data were reviewed for 22,984 adult HIV patients receiving care at 12 clinics in the HIV Research Network between 2001-2009. Three dichotomous outcome measures were based on each patient's history of outpatient visits. Establishment reflects whether the patient made outpatient visits for longer than 6 months after initial enrollment. The retention measure reflects whether the patient had at least 2 outpatient visits separated by 90 days in each year in care. LTFU reflects whether the patient had no outpatient visits for more than 12 months without returning. Multiple logistic regression examined demographic and clinical correlates of each outcome, as well as the combined outcome of meeting all three measures. Results Overall, 21.7% of patients never established HIV care after an initial visit. Among established patients, 57.4% did not meet the retention criterion in all years, and 34.9% were LTFU. Only 20.4% of all patients met all three criteria. The odds of successfully meeting all three criteria were higher for women, for older patients, for Hispanics compared with whites, and for those with CD4 levels ?50 cells/mm3. Conclusions These data highlight the need to improve establishment and retention in HIV care. PMID:22531758

  16. [Follow-up problems in scoliosis patients].

    PubMed

    Schumpe, G; Hofmann, P; Rössler, H

    1984-01-01

    With reference to 4 different methods - theoretical derivation, computed model, recent radiological analysis based on 120 scoliosis patients and measurement of the posterior median line in 40 scoliosis patients - the unreliability of follow-up in scoliosis patients is illustrated. The results are compared with previous publications by other authors and discussed. A method of determining spinal geometry three-dimensionally by means of topometric methods (5) is described. The validity of this measuring method is demonstrated in the patient by geometrical measurement of the posterior median line without treatment, under halo gravity extension and in movement. PMID:6475210

  17. Follow-up study of pseudoephedrine users.

    PubMed

    Porta, M; Jick, H; Habakangas, J A

    1986-11-01

    A follow-up study of over 100,000 persons below age 65 years who filled a total of 243,286 prescriptions for pseudoephedrine indicated that there were no hospitalizations among users that could be attributed to the drug. There were no admissions within 15 days of filling a prescription for pseudoephedrine for cerebral hemorrhage, thrombotic stroke, or hypertensive crisis. There were a small number of hospitalizations for myocardial infarction, seizures and neuropsychiatric disorders, but the rate of such admissions among the pseudoephedrine users was close to the expected rate in the population at large. PMID:3777533

  18. Determining Virtual Environment "Fit": The Relationship Between Navigation Style in a Virtual Field Trip, Student Self-Reported Desire to Visit the Field Trip Site in the Real World, and the Purposes of Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutwiler, M. Shane; Lin, Ming-Chao; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a follow-up analysis of the data reported in Lin et al. (Learn Media Technol. doi: 10.1080/17439884.2011.629660, 2011), we investigated the relationship between student use of a virtual field trip (VFT) system and the probability of students reporting wanting to visit the national park site upon which the VFT was modeled, controlling for content knowledge and prior visits to the park. Students who were able to navigate the VFT in teams were more likely than their peers who had the system demonstrated by a teacher to want to visit the national park. In addition, students with higher pre-intervention content knowledge were more likely to want to visit the national park than their peers with lower pre-test scores, in both the teacher demonstration and student co-navigation conditions.

  19. Follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pagano, L; Klain, M; Pulcrano, M; Angellotti, G; Pasano, F; Salvatore, M; Lombardi, G; Biondi, B

    2004-12-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. More than 90% of primary thyroid cancers are differentiated papillary or follicular types. The treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) consists of total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine ablation therapy, followed by L-thyroxine therapy. The extent of initial surgery, the indication for radioiodine ablation therapy and the degree of TSH-suppression are all issues that are still being debated cancers are in relation to the risk of recurrence. Total thyroidectomy reduces the risk of recurrence and facilitates (131)I ablation of thyroid remnants. The aim of radioiodine ablation is to destroy any normal or neoplastic residuals of thyroid tissue. These procedures also improve the sensitivity of thyroglobulin (Tg) as a marker of disease, and increase the sensitivity of (131)I total body scan (TBS) for the detection of persistent or recurrent disease. The aim of TSH-suppressive therapy is to restore euthyroidism and to decrease serum TSH levels, in order to reduce the growth and progression of thyroid cancer. After initial treatment, the objectives of the follow-up of DTC is to maintain adequate thyroxine therapy and to detect persistent or recurrent disease through the combined use of neck ultrasound (US) and serum Tg and (131)I TBS after TSH stimulation. The follow-up protocol should be adapted to the risk of recurrence. Recent advances in the follow-up of DTC are related to the use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) in order to stimulate Tg production and the ultrasensitive methods for Tg measurement. Undetectable serum Tg during TSH suppressive therapy with L-T4 does not exclude persistent disease, therefore serum Tg should be measured after TSH stimulation. The results of rhTSH administration and L-thyroxine therapy withdrawal are equivalent in detecting recurrent thyroid cancer, but the use of rhTSH helps to avoid the onset of hypothyroid symptoms and the negative effects of acute hypothyroidism on cardiovascular, hepatic, renal and neurological function. In low-risk DTC patients serum Tg after TSH stimulation, together with ultrasound of the neck, should be used to monitor persistent disease, avoiding diagnostic TBS which has a poor sensitivity. These recommendations do not apply when Tg antibodies are present in the serum, in patients with persistent or recurrent disease or limited thyroid surgery. Low-risk patients may be considered to be in remission when undetectable Tg after TSH stimulation and negative US evaluation of the neck are present. On the contrary, detectable Tg after TSH stimulation is an indicator in selecting patients who are candidates for further diagnostic procedures. PMID:15765026

  20. Chronic fatigue syndrome: a follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, D; Ron, M; Chalder, T; Butler, S; Wessely, S

    1994-01-01

    Forty-six of 47 patients diagnosed as having chronic fatigue and offered treatment four years previously were followed up. Twenty-nine patients were interviewed, three patients refused an interview, and information on the remaining 14 was obtained from their general practitioners. All the instruments used at interview had been used in the initial study. The long-term prognosis for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome who have initially responded to treatment is good. Spontaneous recovery in those who declined or who did not benefit from treatment is unlikely. Patients who continue to fulfil the criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome four years after they were initially diagnosed are likely to have had more somatic disorders, to have been more fatigued, and to have had a previous psychiatric history when they were initially assessed. PMID:8201336

  1. Patient satisfaction with nurse-led telephone follow-up after curative treatment for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Current frequent follow-up after treatment for breast cancer does not meet its intended aims, but does depend on expensive and scarce specialized knowledge for routine history taking and physical examinations. The study described in this paper compared patient satisfaction with a reduced follow-up strategy, i.e. nurse-led telephone follow-up, to satisfaction with traditional hospital follow-up. Methods Patient satisfaction was assessed among patients (n = 299) who were participants of a randomized controlled trial investigating the cost-effectiveness of several follow-up strategies in the first year after treatment for breast cancer. Data on patient satisfaction were collected at baseline, three, six and 12 months after treatment, using the Dutch version of Ware's Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire III (PSQ III). In addition to general satisfaction, the PSQ III reports on satisfaction scores for technical competence, interpersonal aspects, and access of care. Regression analysis was used to predict satisfaction scores from whether or not nurse-led telephone follow-up was received. Results Nurse-led telephone follow-up had no statistically significant influence on general patient satisfaction (p = 0.379), satisfaction with technical competence (p = 0.249), and satisfaction with interpersonal aspects (p = 0.662). Regarding access of care, patient satisfaction scores were significantly higher for patients receiving telephone follow-up (p = 0.015). However, a mean difference at 12 months of 3.1 points was judged to be not clinically relevant. Conclusions No meaningful differences were found in satisfaction scores between nurse-led telephone and hospital follow-up in the first year after breast cancer treatment. With high satisfaction scores and the potential to substantially reduce clinic visits, nurse-led telephone follow-up may be an acceptable alternative to traditional hospital follow-up. Trial registration number ISRCTN 74071417. PMID:20429948

  2. Effective Delivery of Therapeutic Interventions: Findings from Four Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Cathy; Squires, Garry; Bragg, Joanna; Wasilewski, David; Muscutt, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This project follows a survey into the role of UK educational psychologists (EPs) in delivering therapeutic interventions to children and young people. Four educational psychology services (EPSs) that identified themselves as providing effective therapeutic practice were selected on the basis of their qualitative responses to the survey. Site

  3. Vibration white finger: a follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Ekenvall, L; Carlsson, A

    1987-01-01

    To study the course of vibration white finger (VWF) 55 men were re-examined three and a half to six years after the first examination. The patients were interviewed and finger systolic pressure after general body and local finger cooling was measured. The test results at the two examinations were compared. At the follow up examination some patients experienced a subjective improvement of VWF symptoms but not until more than three years had passed after they had stopped working with vibrating tools. To study the effect of diminished cold exposure on subjective symptoms, vibration exposed outdoor workers who changed to unexposed indoor work were studied separately. In this subgroup also improvement was reported only when more than three years has passed after the change of work, indicating that diminished cold exposure is not the primary explanation for the improvement. The cold provocation test, however, showed no tendency towards a diminished reaction of the vessels to cooling. Patients who continue to work with vibrating tools report a subjective increase in symptoms. This subjective impairment was reflected in an increased reaction to cold as measured in the cold provocation test. PMID:3620371

  4. Hot Spots on the Web for Teacher Librarians: A Selection of Recommended Web Sites for TLs To Visit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    Six papers review and recommend sites on the Web as resources for teacher librarians include: "Just Do It: A Guide to Getting Out There and Doing It Yourself" (Catherine Ryan); "A Selection of Recommended Web Sites for TLs To Visit" (Karen Bonanno); "A Selection of Recommended Web Sites for TLs To Visit" (Sandra Naude); "Internet Resources for the…

  5. SEASONAL VARIATION IN LATRINE SITE VISITATION AND SCENT MARKING BY NEARCTIC RIVER OTTERS (Lontra canadensis )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zachary H. OLSON; Thomas L. SERFASS; Olin E. RHODES

    We combined analyses of visitation (using remote cameras) and scent marking (using traditional sign surveys) to provide a comprehensive assessment of the mechanisms underlying variation in river otter scent marking at latrine sites and to verify that river otter scent marking varies seasonally in Pennsylvania and Maryland. We observed seasonal peaks in total scent marking in the fall (September) and

  6. A site visit survey of 101 mental health liaison and diversion schemes in England

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francis Pakes; Jane Winstone

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a unique site visit audit of all known assessment, liaison and diversion schemes in England. The Lord Bradley Review placed great importance upon such teams to be a hub of service provision for individuals with mental health needs who pass through the criminal justice system. This study, undertaken to inform the Lord Bradley Review

  7. Best Management Practices Identified in the 201011 Cycle of Site Visits

    E-print Network

    1 Best Management Practices Identified in the 201011 Cycle of Site Visits California Sea. The SRT determined that the data management system developed and used by HISG may be one of the best the students and HISG. #12;2 IllinoisIndiana Sea Grant Fostering good partnership among IISG, host

  8. White-tailed Deer Visitation Rates at Medicated Bait Sites in Southern Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has been found on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) complicating eradication efforts of the USDA’s Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program. Our objective was to assess patterns of deer visitation to medicated bait sites used to treat...

  9. Female Faculty Members in University Chemistry Departments: Observations and Conclusions Based on Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Sally; Dixon, Felicia F.; Foster, Natalie; Kuck, Valerie J.; McCarthy, Deborah A.; Tooney, Nancy M.; Buckner, Janine P.; Nolan, Susan A.; Marzabadi, Cecilia H.

    2011-01-01

    Oral interviews in focus groups and written surveys were conducted with 877 men and women, including administrators, faculty members, postdoctoral associates, and graduate students, during one-day site visits to chemistry and chemical engineering departments at 28 Ph.D.-granting institutions. This report is a preliminary review of the perceptions…

  10. Predicting travel costs for recreational visits at aquatic sites within the Caribbean National Forest using GIS

    E-print Network

    Forest using GIS Brent M. Read, Melinda J. Laituri* Colorado State University, Department of Forest Systems (GIS) provide an ideal environment for studying the spatial patterns by which people choose to visit various recreation sites. Cost surface models, developed in a GIS, can estimate the amount

  11. The effect of long-term care and follow-up on complications in patients with external fixators.

    PubMed

    Cam, Rahsan; Korkmaz, Fatma Demir

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of long-term care and follow-up on complications in patients with external fixators. This study was conducted as a study research. The study sample included a total of 60 patients treated with external fixators for fractures, of whom 30 were in the control and 30 were in the study group. No intervention was made on the control group patients. The patients in the study group received external fixator pin site wound care, pin site massage and neurovascular follow-up. The study group patients were also given discharge training about external fixator pin site care two days before their discharge and were also provided with training manuals to guide their home care. Both groups were visited weekly at their homes to record their complications. Nine complications developed in eight patients (26.7%) in the study group, and 19 complications developed in 19 patients (63.3%) in the control group. Pin site infections were 11.6% of the total sample. The percentage for pin loosening, stiff joint, nerve and vessel injury and pain and swelling was 5%, 25%, 1.7% and 3.3%, respectively. PMID:24580979

  12. Factors that influence follow-up after an abnormal mammogram 

    E-print Network

    Copeland, Valerie Anne

    2009-05-15

    The focus of this study was to explore women’s experiences with follow-up after an abnormal mammogram, and factors that influence follow-up. Factors, including health status, found in the cancer screening and treatment ...

  13. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577...NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up notification. (a) If, based...direct the manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this...

  14. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section 179.15...DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who...required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified...

  15. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577...NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up notification. (a) If, based...direct the manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this...

  16. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section 179.15...DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who...required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified...

  17. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor ...Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all...

  18. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315 Agriculture...Auditees § 3052.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all...

  19. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315 Agriculture...Auditees § 3052.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all...

  20. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section 179.15...DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who...required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified...

  1. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 41.315 Section 41.315 Pensions...Auditees § 41.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all...

  2. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577...NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up notification. (a) If, based...direct the manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this...

  3. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor ...Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all...

  4. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315 Agriculture...Auditees § 3052.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all...

  5. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 41.315 Section 41.315 Pensions...Auditees § 41.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all...

  6. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section 382.311 Transportation...TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with...

  7. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor ...Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all...

  8. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577...NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up notification. (a) If, based...direct the manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this...

  9. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section 382.311 Transportation...TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with...

  10. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section 382.311 Transportation...TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with...

  11. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315 Agriculture...Auditees § 3052.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all...

  12. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section 382.311 Transportation...TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with...

  13. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section 382.311 Transportation...TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with...

  14. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 41.315 Section 41.315 Pensions...Auditees § 41.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all...

  15. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section 179.15...DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who...required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified...

  16. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section 179.15...DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who...required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified...

  17. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor ...Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all...

  18. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577...NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up notification. (a) If, based...direct the manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this...

  19. 2 CFR 200.511 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 200.511 Section 200.511 Grants...Auditees § 200.511 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all...

  20. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

  1. Nurse led telephone follow-up improves satisfaction in motorcycle trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Gaines-Dillard, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Telephone follow-up (TFU) is a good tool for providing transfer of health education, dealing with symptomatic concerns, early recognition of potential complications, and reassuring the patient after discharge. Telephone follow-up may also decrease knowledge deficits, increase communication improving patient satisfaction and patient outcomes to include decreased emergency department visits and hospital readmissions. An advanced practice nurse-led TFU program involving 59 motorcycle trauma patients discharged to home demonstrates how effective TFU can improve patient satisfaction in motorcycle trauma. PMID:25768962

  2. DISSS/PSDB - Personnel Security Database Modernization Project: Compilation of data gathered from DOE Operations Office`s site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.; Sweeney, D.

    1995-03-15

    This document is a compilation of the information gathered from visits to the DOE Operations Offices. The purpose of these visits was to gather requirements for the modernization of the personnel security database. The initial phase of visits were to sites which had known local systems to augment CPCI. They were; Rocky Flats, Richland, Las Vegas, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, and Oakland. The second phase of site visits were to; Headquarters, Schenectady, Pittsburgh, Idaho Falls, Chicago, and Albuquerque. We also visited the NRC. At each site we reviewed the current clearance process in use at the field office. If the site had a local personnel security database (PSDB), we also reviewed the current PSDB processing. Each meeting was began with the a discussion on the purpose of the meeting and the background of the redesign effort.

  3. Long-Term Follow-Up of Iliac Wallstents

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, Ricardo [Hospital Dr. Negrin, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit (Spain); Carreira, Jose Martin [Universidad de, Dept of Radiology (Spain)], E-mail: mrjoseca@usc.es; Gude, Francisco [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, Clinical Epidemiology Unit (Spain); Gorriz, Elias; Gallardo, Laura; Pardo, Maria Dolores; Hermida, Maria [Hospital Dr. Negrin, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit (Spain)

    2004-11-15

    We evaluated the long-term results of the iliac artery stent placement for the treatment of patients with intermittent claudication. From November 1988 to December 1998, 303 legs were treated with metal stents in 259 patients with iliac occlusive arterial disease in a follow-up study approved by the institutional review board. Stenoses (n = 162) were treated after failed angioplasty and occlusions (n = 141) were treated with primary stent placement. According to Fontaine's clinical classification of chronic ischemia, 266 (88%) legs presented stage IIB, 14 (5%) stage III, and 23 (7%) stage IV. In all legs, self-expandable stents (Wallstent) were implanted. The patients were followed up with clinical examination, ankle brachial- index examination measurement and intravenous angiography. The data were analyzed using the univariate analysis (Kaplan-Meier method) and multivariate analysis (Cox proportional model). The primary endpoint of the study was the identification of restenosis or reoclusion of the stenting arterial segment and a secondary endpoint that was an identification of the risk factors of restenosis and reoclusion. The mean {+-} SD ankle-brachial index pre-, post-procedure, and in the last control was 0.58 {+-} 0.18, 0.90 {+-} 0.23, and 0.86 {+-} 0.24, respectively. Primary cumulative patency rates were 70% {+-} 4 after 5 years, and 65% {+-} 5 after 7 years, and secondary patency rates were 92% {+-} 2 after 5 years, and 87% {+-} 4 after 9 years. Immediate complications in the first 24 hours appeared in 12 (4%) legs, thrombosis in 5 legs, 3 legs presented with distal embolism, 2 thrombi at the access site and pseudo aneurysm and artery rupture in 1 leg. A patient died in the first 24 hours. Within 30 days after the procedure seven complications, 3 thromboses and 4 stenosis appeared. During follow-up, 42 (16%) patients died of other causes. The main causes of death were cardiac disease (39%), cerebrovascular disease (15%), cancer (7%), respiratory diseases (4%), and death due to accidents (2%), and other causes (9%). In 24% of the cases there was insufficient information to assign a principal cause of death. Thirty-six patients (13%) were lost to follow-up. Complications arose in 54 (18%) legs due to occlusion of the treated segment (29%), and stenosis due to intimal hyperplasia (27%). Thirteen patients required surgical treatment. Primary and secondary patency mean time was 80 {+-} 3.7 and 102 {+-} 2.4 months, respectively. We found no significant relation between patency and the quality of run-off, but a small vessel diameter and the female gender were negative predictive factors for failure (proportional hazards model). The use of stents for treatment of iliac artery occlusive disease may be considered an effective method with a low complication rate and acceptable long-term follow-up results.

  4. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  5. Nail lichen planus: response to treatment and long term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Piraccini, Bianca Maria; Saccani, Elena; Starace, Michela; Balestri, Riccardo; Tosti, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    In our twenty years' experience of dermatological visits specifically for nail diseases, we saw 105 patients with pathologically proven nail lichen planus. We prescribed treatment to 75 of these patients and we report here the results of treatment. Twenty-seven of these patients were followed-up for more than 5 years (mean follow-up was 10 years): 9 of them (9/27 = 33.3%) did not respond to treatment with steroids (intramuscular or intralesional), 18 were cured (18/27 = 66.7%), 11 relapsed (11/27 = 40.7%). This study is important for the fact that no one has previously published the results of such a long follow-up of patients with nail lichen planus. PMID:20400392

  6. A Global Review of Melanoma Follow-up Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Sroa, Novie; Winkelmann, Richard R.; Olencki, Thomas; Bechtel, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of a melanoma recurrence is a major concern for the clinician. However, the follow-up care of melanoma patients lacks a uniform approach. Different dermatological and oncological organizations have developed their own strategies of follow-up management that vary by specialty and methods of screening for recurrence. Some areas of controversy in the follow-up care of melanoma patients include providers of care, use of staging versus Breslow depth to determine follow-up, the role of imaging and laboratory tests, frequency and duration of physical exams, and psychological well-being. Studies have evaluated these aspects of follow-up management, but no consensus exists. However, it is essential for clinicians to collaborate between specialties for an effective, evidence-based approach to melanoma clinical follow-up care. PMID:24062870

  7. Sports injuries in women: a one-year prospective follow-up study at an outpatient sports clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Kannus, P; Niittymäki, S; Järvinen, M

    1987-01-01

    A one-year prospective follow-up study of all patients visiting Tampere Research Station of Sports Medicine (TRSSM) was carried out in order to determine the specific features of women's sports injuries compared to those of men. During this period 334 women (31%) and 745 men (69%) visited the station. Women were significantly younger than men and the ten most usual sports events causing the injury differed from those of men. In women acute dislocations, contusions, and fractures were significantly less common in men, while women had more frequent stress-related sports injuries. In both sexes the most common sites of trouble were knee, ankle, and lower back, but in women as opposed to men, the metatarsal area, the toes, and the sole were among the ten most usual sites of the injury. Fourteen women (4%) and 49 men (6%) required operative treatment of the injury. The knee was the most common site of operation in both sexes, in women significantly more frequently than in men. PMID:3580728

  8. Factors associated with physician follow-up among patients with chest pain discharged from the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michael K.Y.; Wang, Julie T.; Czarnecki, Andrew; Koh, Maria; Tu, Jack V.; Schull, Michael J.; Wijeysundera, Harindra C.; Lau, Ching; Ko, Dennis T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many patients with chest pain do not receive follow-up from a physician after discharge from the emergency department despite significant survival benefit associated with follow-up care. Our objective was to evaluate factors associated with physician follow-up to understand this gap in practice. Methods: We conducted an observational study involving patients at high risk who were assessed for chest pain and discharged from an emergency department in Ontario between April 2004 and March 2010. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine the association of clinical and nonclinical characteristics with physician follow-up. Results: We identified 56 767 patients, of whom 25.1% did not receive any follow-up by a physician, 69.0% were seen by their primary care physician, and 17.3% were seen by a cardiologist within 30 days. Patients who had medical comorbidities and cardiac conditions such as myocardial infarction or heart failure were less likely to have follow-up. In contrast, a previous visit to a primary care physician was associated with the highest odds of having physician follow-up (odds ratio [OR] 6.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.91–7.01). Similarly, a previous visit to a cardiologist was strongly associated with follow-up by a cardiologist (OR 3.01, 95% CI 2.85–3.17). Patients evaluated in emergency departments with the highest tertile of chest pain volume were more likely to receive follow-up from any physician (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.31–1.77) and from a cardiologist (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.61–2.57). Interpretation: Nonclinical factors are strongly associated with physician follow-up for patients with chest pain after discharge from the emergency department. However, patients with comorbidities and at higher risk for future adverse events are less likely to receive follow-up care. PMID:25712950

  9. Follow-up after gastrectomy for cancer: results of an international web round table.

    PubMed

    Baiocchi, Gian Luca; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Marrelli, Daniele; Pacelli, Fabio; Morgagni, Paolo; Roviello, Franco; De Manzoni, Giovanni

    2014-09-14

    Oncological follow-up after radical gastrectomy for cancer still represents a discrepancy in the field, with many retrospective series demonstrating that early diagnosis of recurrence does not result in an improvement in patient survival; yet, many centers with high quality of care still provide routine patient follow-up after surgery by clinical and instrumental controls. This was the topic for a web round table entitled "Rationale and limits of oncological follow-up after gastrectomy for cancer" that was launched one year before the 10(th) International Gastric Cancer Congress. Authors having specific expertise were invited to comment on their previous publications to provide the subject for an open debate. During a three-month-long discussion, 32 authors from 12 countries participated, and 2299 people visited the dedicated web page. Substantial differences emerged between the participants: authors from Japan, South Korea, Italy, Brazil, Germany and France currently engage in instrumental follow-up, whereas authors from Eastern Europe, Peru and India do not, and British and American surgeons practice it in a rather limited manner or in the context of experimental studies. Although endoscopy is still considered useful by most authors, all the authors recognized that computed tomography scanning is the method of choice to detect recurrence; however, many limit follow-up to clinical and biochemical examinations, and acknowledge the lack of improved survival with early detection. PMID:25232232

  10. Follow-up after gastrectomy for cancer: Results of an international web round table

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchi, Gian Luca; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Marrelli, Daniele; Pacelli, Fabio; Morgagni, Paolo; Roviello, Franco; De Manzoni, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Oncological follow-up after radical gastrectomy for cancer still represents a discrepancy in the field, with many retrospective series demonstrating that early diagnosis of recurrence does not result in an improvement in patient survival; yet, many centers with high quality of care still provide routine patient follow-up after surgery by clinical and instrumental controls. This was the topic for a web round table entitled “Rationale and limits of oncological follow-up after gastrectomy for cancer” that was launched one year before the 10th International Gastric Cancer Congress. Authors having specific expertise were invited to comment on their previous publications to provide the subject for an open debate. During a three-month-long discussion, 32 authors from 12 countries participated, and 2299 people visited the dedicated web page. Substantial differences emerged between the participants: authors from Japan, South Korea, Italy, Brazil, Germany and France currently engage in instrumental follow-up, whereas authors from Eastern Europe, Peru and India do not, and British and American surgeons practice it in a rather limited manner or in the context of experimental studies. Although endoscopy is still considered useful by most authors, all the authors recognized that computed tomography scanning is the method of choice to detect recurrence; however, many limit follow-up to clinical and biochemical examinations, and acknowledge the lack of improved survival with early detection. PMID:25232232

  11. West Foster Creek 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ashley; Paul R

    2008-01-01

    A follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the West Foster Creek (Smith acquisition) wildlife mitigation site in May 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance and maintain the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The

  12. The average number of distinct sites visited by a random walker on random graphs

    E-print Network

    De Bacco, Caterina; Sollich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We study the linear large $n$ behavior of the average number of distinct sites $S(n)$ visited by a random walker after $n$ steps on a large random graph. An expression for the graph topology dependent prefactor $B$ in $S(n) = Bn$ is proposed. We use generating function techniques to relate this prefactor to the graph adjacency matrix and then devise message-passing equations to calculate its value. Numerical simulations are performed to evaluate the agreement between the message passing predictions and random walk simulations on random graphs. Scaling with system size and average graph connectivity are also analysed.

  13. Timing of Discharge Follow-up for Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Vinson, David R.; Ballard, Dustin W.; Huang, Jie; Rauchwerger, Adina S.; Reed, Mary E.; Mark, Dustin G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Historically, emergency department (ED) patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) have been admitted for several days of inpatient care. Growing evidence suggests that selected ED patients with PE can be safely discharged home after a short length of stay. However, the optimal timing of follow up is unknown. We hypothesized that higher-risk patients with short length of stay (<24 hours from ED registration) would more commonly receive expedited follow up (?3 days). Methods This retrospective cohort study included adults treated for acute PE in six community EDs. We ascertained the PE Severity Index risk class (for 30-day mortality), facility length of stay, the first follow-up clinician encounter, unscheduled return ED visits ?3 days, 5-day PE-related readmissions, and 30-day all-cause mortality. Stratifying by risk class, we used multivariable analysis to examine age- and sex-adjusted associations between length of stay and expedited follow up. Results The mean age of our 175 patients was 63.2 (±16.8) years. Overall, 93.1% (n=163) of our cohort received follow up within one week of discharge. Fifty-six patients (32.0%) were sent home within 24 hours and 100 (57.1%) received expedited follow up, often by telephone (67/100). The short and longer length-of-stay groups were comparable in age and sex, but differed in rates of low-risk status (63% vs 37%; p<0.01) and expedited follow up (70% vs 51%; p=0.03). After adjustment, we found that short length of stay was independently associated with expedited follow up in higher-risk patients (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.5; 95% CI [1.0–11.8]; p=0.04), but not in low-risk patients (aOR 2.2; 95% CI [0.8–5.7]; p=0.11). Adverse outcomes were uncommon (<2%) and were not significantly different between the two length-of-stay groups. Conclusion Higher-risk patients with acute PE and short length of stay more commonly received expedited follow up in our community setting than other groups of patients. These practice patterns are associated with low rates of 30-day adverse events. PMID:25671009

  14. Short-Term Follow-Up of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, June; Jabara, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    A follow-up questionnaire was mailed to 144 narcotic addict veterans approximately six months after termination from treatment at a multimodality drug program. It was found that 75 percent continued to use drugs, and 38 percent became readdicted. (Author)

  15. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up...DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the...

  16. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up...DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the...

  17. Challenges of Loss to Follow-up in Tuberculosis Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas N. Nissen; Michala V. Rose; Godfather Kimaro; Ib C. Bygbjerg; Sayoki G. Mfinanga; Pernille Ravn

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundIn studies evaluating methods for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB), follow-up to verify the presence or absence of active TB is crucial and high dropout rates may significantly affect the validity of the results. In a study assessing the diagnostic performance of the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test in TB suspect children in Tanzania, factors influencing patient adherence to attend follow-up examinations and

  18. Prognosis in autism: A follow-up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marian K. DeMyer; Sandra Barton; William E. DeMyer; James A. Norton; John Allen; Robert Steele

    1973-01-01

    A follow-up study involving 85 autistic boys and 35 girls, c. 5 1\\/2 years of age at initial evaluation and 12 years at follow-up, is presented and discussed in considerable detail. Measures, also applied to 26 non-psychotic subnormal controls, included speech, social, educational, and family adequacy ratings, IQ's, and neurological data. Most autistic children remained educationally retarded and 42% were

  19. Privacy Policies: 1. The SRC and Recreational Sports respects your right to privacy. When you visit our web site, you

    E-print Network

    our web site, you may be providing information to the University on two different levels: a. Anonymous people use to visit our site 3. The SRC and Recreational Sports do not: a. Collect personal information to the best of our ability. b. Collect, maintain, and use customer information as necessary to provide

  20. Popularity of less frequent follow up for breast cancer in randomised study: initial findings from the hotline study.

    PubMed Central

    Gulliford, T.; Opomu, M.; Wilson, E.; Hanham, I.; Epstein, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the experiences of patients with breast cancer who were conventionally monitored with those in whom routine follow up was restricted to the time of mammography. DESIGN: Randomisation to conventional schedule of clinic visits or to visits only after mammography. Both cohorts received identical mammography and were invited to telephone for immediate appointments if they detected symptoms. SETTING: Combined breast clinic, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital. SUBJECTS: 211 eligible outpatients with a history of breast cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Acceptability of randomisation, interim use of telephone and general practitioner, satisfaction with allocation to follow up. RESULTS: Of 211 eligible patients, 196 (93%) opted for randomisation in the study. Of these, 55 were under 50 years, 78 were diagnosed fewer than five years before, 90 had stage T2-4 tumours, and 71 had involved axillary nodes. Patients who did not participate were more likely to be under 50 years, to be two to five years after diagnosis, and to have had aggressive primary disease. Twice as many patients in both groups expressed a preference for reducing rather than increasing follow up. No increased use of local practitioner services or telephone triage was apparent in the cohort randomised to less frequent follow up by specialists. CONCLUSIONS: Reducing the frequency of routine follow up has so far proved popular among patients with breast cancer at standard risk in this cohort. A multicentre study is needed to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of routine follow up with respect to disease outcomes. PMID:9022429

  1. [Long-term follow-up in patients with spinal cord injury - prevention and comprehensive care].

    PubMed

    Spreyermann, Regula; Michel, Franz

    2014-01-15

    Patients with spinal cord injuries suffer not only from sensory and motor deficits, but from failure of the autonomic nerve system which in consequence involves many organs and metabolic pathways. These deficits lead to a different approach to these patients and their medical, psychological and social problems. Three examples will illustrate the different approaches to typical medical problems of these patients. Regularly ambulatory long term follow up visits in specialized centres in close collaboration with general practitioners help to diminish complications and rehospitalisations. Facing the now ageing population with a spinal cord injury we need evidence based guidelines in follow up and preventive strategies for these patients. We updated these recommendations recently. The brochure is available on the webside oft he swiss society of paraplegia www.ssop.ch. PMID:24425548

  2. How are those “lost to follow-up” patients really doing? A compliance comparison in arthroplasty patients

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung Keun; Geller, Jeffrey A; Jr, David A Patrick; Wang, Wenbao; Macaulay, William

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether there is a functional difference between patients who actively follow-up in the office (OFU) and those who are non-compliant with office follow-up visits (NFU). METHODS: We reviewed a consecutive group of 588 patients, who had undergone total joint arthroplasty (TJA), for compliance and functional outcomes at one to two years post-operatively. All patients were given verbal instructions by the primary surgeon to return at one year for routine follow-up visits. Patients that were compliant with the instructions at one year were placed in the OFU cohort, while those who were non-compliant were placed in the NFU cohort. Survey mailings and telephone interviews were utilized to obtain complete follow-up for the cohort. A ?2 test and an unpaired t test were used for comparison of baseline characteristics. Analysis of covariance was used to compare the mean clinical outcomes after controlling for confounding variables. RESULTS: Complete follow-up data was collected on 554 of the 588 total patients (93%), with 75.5% of patients assigned to the OFU cohort and 24.5% assigned to the NFU cohort. We found significant differences between the cohorts with the OFU group having a higher mean age (P = 0.026) and a greater proportion of females (P = 0.041). No significant differences were found in either the SF12 or WOMAC scores at baseline or at 12 mo postoperative. CONCLUSION: Patients who are compliant to routine follow-up visits at one to two years post-operation do not experience better patient reported outcomes than those that are non-compliant. Additionally, after TJA, older women are more likely to be compliant in following surgeon instructions with regard to follow-up office care. PMID:25621220

  3. Linking Outdoor School with the Home Environment. A Follow-Up Resource Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Wallace H.; Gilfillan, Warren C.

    A source of ideas and direction for follow-up to the Multnomah County Outdoor School program, the guide identifies concepts generally common to all outdoor school sites from year to year: the water cycle; watershed; water as a habitat for plants and animals, an oxygen supplier, and a producer of usable power; sun energy; plants as producers and…

  4. Go ahead, visit those web sites, you can`t get hurt, can you?

    SciTech Connect

    Rothfuss, J.S.; Parrett, J.W.

    1997-02-01

    Browsing (surfing) the World Wide Web (the web) has exploded onto the Internet with an unprecedented popularity. Fueled by massive acceptance, the web client/server technology is leaping forward with a speed that competes with no other software technology. The primary force behind this phenomenon is the simplicity of the web browsing experience. People who have never touched a computer before can now perform sophisticated network tasks with a simple point-and-click. Unfortunately, this simplicity gives many, if not most, web wanderers the impression that the web browser is risk free, nothing more than a high powered television. This misconception is dangerous by creating the myth that a user visiting a web site is immune from subversive or malicious intent. While many want you to believe that surfing the web is as simple as using any other household appliance, it is not like surfing television channels, it is bi-directional. You can learn a lot of useful information from web sites. But, either directly or indirectly, others can also learn quite a bit about you. Of even more concern is a web sites` potential ability to exert control over the local computer. This paper tries to consolidate some of the current concerns that you should consider as you jump into the surf.

  5. Comprehensive primary care follow-up for premature infants.

    PubMed

    McCourt, M F; Griffin, C M

    2000-01-01

    Advances in perinatal and neonatal care have led to an increased incidence of survival of premature infants. Although most premature infants have normal outcomes, they are at increased risk for morbidity and mortality and require comprehensive primary care follow-up after they are discharged from the hospital. This article will review guidelines for general follow-up of premature infants and the associated problems related to prematurity. General follow-up is performed by the pediatric nurse practitioner, with subspecialty consultant referrals as needed. Knowledge of the problems of prematurity and treatment regimes will assist the pediatric nurse practitioner in providing high-quality care to these high-risk infants. PMID:11112919

  6. Posttreatment Follow-Up of Brucellosis by PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Morata, Pilar; Queipo-Ortuño, María Isabel; Reguera, José María; García-Ordoñez, Miguel Angel; Pichardo, Cristina; Colmenero, Juan de Dios

    1999-01-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of a peripheral blood PCR assay in the posttreatment follow-up of brucellosis, a cohort of 30 patients was studied by means of blood cultures, rose Bengal, seroagglutination, Coombs' antibrucella tests, and PCR assay at the time of diagnosis, at the end of treatment, and 2, 4, and 6 months later. Of the 29 patients whose PCR assays were initially positive, 28 (96.5%) were negative at the conclusion of the treatment. PCR was positive for the two patients who had relapses and negative for another four who had suspected but unconfirmed relapses. PCR was negative for 98.3% of the follow-up samples from those patients who had a favorable evolution. In conclusion, PCR appears to be a very useful technique, not only for the initial diagnosis of the disease, but also for posttreatment follow-up and the early detection of relapses. PMID:10565954

  7. Shaky drawing: what is the rate of decline during prospective follow-up of essential tremor?

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D; Michalec, Monica; Gillman, Art

    2014-01-01

    Objective Few studies have attempted to estimate the rate of decline over time in essential tremor (ET). The study objectives were to: (1) measure change, deriving a single summary measure for the entire group, and relate it to a commonly used clinical rating scale (ie, yearly change in points on that scale); (2) to assess change as a function of baseline clinical characteristics and (3) to answer the basic clinical question—is change perceptible/obvious during the follow-up of ET cases? Setting Prospective collection of longitudinal data on ET cases enrolled in a study of the environmental epidemiology of ET at Columbia University Medical Center (2000–2008). Participants 116 unselected ET cases. Interventions Each case underwent the same evaluation at baseline and during one follow-up visit (mean follow-up interval (range)=5.8 (1.4–12.4) years). Primary and secondary outcome measures We assessed tremor during a commonly affected daily activity—drawing (ie, spirography), quantifying tremor using a simple, standardised 10-point rating scale developed by Bain and Findley. Results The Bain and Findley spiral score increased at an average rate of 0.12±0.23 points per year (maximum=1 point/year). In cases who had been followed for ?5?years, the change was obvious—a blinded neurologist was able to correctly order their spirals (baseline vs follow-up) in three-fourth of cases. The rate of change was higher in cases with versus without familial ET (p=0.01). Conclusions Tremor in ET is slowly progressive; yet in the majority of cases, a clear difference in handwritten spirals was visible with a follow-up interval of five or more years. There may be differences between familial and non-familial ET in the rate of progression. These clinical data are intended to aid in the prognostic discussions that treating physicians have with their patients with ET. PMID:24722199

  8. Cancer of the Cervix: A 20 Year Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Donald C.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-nine cases of carcinoma in situ of the cervix were detected during less than ten years of private family practice, using routine Pap smears as a case finding technique. In 20 years' follow up of those patients, one patient developed recurrent invasive cancer and died. These results are in keeping with others from the recent literature. These patients should be followed closely because there is significant mortality from recurrence of carcinoma. The family physician is in an excellent position for case finding and early diagnosis because of the long natural history of cancer of the cervix. This approach, coupled with appropriate follow up, can prevent much human suffering. PMID:21297752

  9. Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses strategy: compliance with referral and follow-up recommendations in Gezira State, Sudan.

    PubMed Central

    al Fadil, Sumaia Mohammed; Alrahman, Samira Hamid Abd; Cousens, Simon; Bustreo, Flavia; Shadoul, Ahmed; Farhoud, Suzanne; el Hassan, Samia Mohamed

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the extent to which families follow referral and follow-up recommendations given in accordance with the Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) strategy and the factors that influence families' responses to such recommendations. METHODS: Children aged 2 months-5 years who presented to an IMCI-trained health worker in Massalamia Health Area, Sudan, were recruited. Children with an IMCI classification that indicated the need for referral or follow-up were traced to determine whether the family complied with the referral or follow-up recommendation. Caretakers were interviewed to find out why they had or had not complied. Focus group discussions were held with health workers, caretakers, and community members. FINDINGS: Overall, 5745 children were enrolled. Of these, 162 (3%) were considered to be in need of urgent referral: 53 (33%) attended a hospital on the day of the referral, with a further 37 (23%) visiting the hospital later than the day of referral. About half of families cited cost as the reason for not visiting a hospital. A total of 1197 (21%) children were classified as needing follow-up. Compliance with a follow-up recommendation was 44% (529 children). Almost 165 (90%) of caretakers who were aware of and did not comply with follow-up, said they had not done so because the child was better. Compliance increased with the caretaker's level of education, if drugs were provided during the first visit, and if the follow-up period was short (2 or 5 days). CONCLUSION: In Massalamia--a resource-constrained environment in which IMCI implementation was well received by the community--only about half of children judged to be in need of urgent referral were taken for that care within 24 hours. Most children in need of follow-up received their first treatment dose in the health facility. This aspect of IMCI was commented upon favourably by caretakers, and it may encourage them to return for follow-up. Rates of return might also improve if return visits for children currently asked to return after 14 or 30 days were scheduled earlier. PMID:14758430

  10. Natural history of herpes zoster: late follow-up of 3.9 years (n=43) and 7.7 years (n=10).

    PubMed

    Reda, Haatem; Greene, Kaitlin; Rice, Frank L; Rowbotham, Michael C; Petersen, Karin L

    2013-10-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a common complication after herpes zoster (HZ). Subjects who completed a longitudinal observational 6-month study (4 visits) of the natural history of HZ were recontacted for 2 additional follow-up visits that included pain and sensory symptom assessment, quantitative sensory testing, capsaicin response test, and 3-mm punch skin biopsies in HZ-affected, mirror-image, and control skin sites. Forty-three subjects (14 with PHN at 6 months) of the original 94 subjects in the cohort were comprehensively assessed at a median 3.9 years after HZ onset (visit 5), and 10 subjects underwent a final assessment at a median 7.7 years after HZ onset (visit 6). At 3.9 years, none of the 29 subjects who had been pain free at 6 months had a recurrence of pain. Only 2 of the 14 subjects with PHN at 6 months still had pain at 3.9 years. One subject with PHN at 6 months was free of symptoms at 3.9 years but had very mild pain at 7.7 years. Sensory function continued on a path toward normalization, but was still abnormal in many subjects, especially those who met criteria for PHN at 6 months. Even at 7.7 years, reinnervation of HZ-affected skin was not apparent. PMID:23719573

  11. 2008 Survey Responses and Follow-Up Status Legend

    E-print Network

    Gering, Jon C.

    X Researching Research the need to upgrade to Windows Vista X Active Help Desk Improvements Ensure consistency of technology in the classrooms X X Active Media Services Improvements Review check-out and return2008 Survey Responses and Follow-Up Status Legend: Complete Active Planning Researching Holding

  12. Student & Employer Follow-Up Studies for 1988-89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsen, Marie

    In 1990, a follow-up study was conducted of former students of Lane Community College (LCC) and their employers. The survey targeted three groups of former LCC students: all 1988-89 graduates who earned degrees or certificates, all no-formal-award leavers with 70 or more credits, and all early leavers who had earned less than 70 credits while…

  13. Sexually Abstinent Adolescents: An 18-Month Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinn-Pike, Lynn; Berger, Thomas J.; Hewett, John; Oleson, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    This study was a longitudinal follow-up of 697 early adolescents from 20 schools in Missouri, investigating students who, in 1997, indicated on a survey of sexual attitudes and behaviors that they had not had sexual intercourse. They completed the Reasons for Abstinence Scale (RAS) by identifying those items that were reasons why they had not had…

  14. Screening and follow up of vulval skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Eva, Lois J

    2012-04-01

    Vulval squamous cell carcinoma is relatively rare; however, up to 20% of women have significant vulval symptoms during their lifetime. Formal screening programmes for vulval disease have not been established. The evidence for the use of vulval cytology and vulvoscopy is reviewed. No randomised-controlled trials have compared follow-up regimens, and although a few consensus documents have been published, formal guidelines are lacking in Grade A evidence. With increasing pressure on healthcare resources, the possibility of identifying high-risk groups to optimise the use of follow up in specialist clinics is explored. Vulval disease is uncommon and there is no evidence that screening would decrease incidence. If high-risk groups can be identified, follow up should take place in specialised vulval clinics with experienced clinicians who are trained in vulval disease. Women with uncomplicated vulval conditions should be discharged to patient-initiated follow up or primary care. Central to the reduction of mortality and morbidity is increased awareness of vulval conditions among women and improved education of healthcare professionals, with particular understanding of the importance of physical examination. PMID:22189088

  15. Trident Technical College 1999 Graduate Follow-Up Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1999 graduate follow-up survey report. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job satisfaction, job…

  16. Trident Technical College 1998 Graduate Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1998 graduate follow-up survey report of 915 TTC graduates. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job were obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job…

  17. Matching Methods for Selection of Participants for Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Lalongo, Nicholas S.

    2010-01-01

    This work examines ways to make the best use of limited resources when selecting individuals to follow up in a longitudinal study estimating causal effects. In the setting under consideration, covariate information is available for all individuals but outcomes have not yet been collected and may be expensive to gather, and thus only a subset of…

  18. Follow-Up Report: 2005 Placements of 2004 NDUS Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Debra; Dunn, Eddie; Hillman, Mike; Morth, Tom; Schepp, Julie; Padilla, Gina

    2007-01-01

    Some of the questions most frequently asked of the North Dakota University System relate to the status of graduates and program completers of state educational institutions. Follow-up Information on North Dakota Education and Training (FINDET) is a consortium of several state agencies formed to provide answers to those questions. This report,…

  19. BeppoSAX Attitude Operations for GRB Follow Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Libero, C.; Gennaro, G.; Pastor, C. L.; Stornelli, M.

    1999-01-01

    This poster describes the attitude dynamics software, Attitude and Orbit Control Ground Support System (AOCGSS), which was developed by TELESPAZIO and integrated in the Operations Control Centre (OCC), in order to support the on ground operations of the Attitude & Orbit Control Subsystem (AOCS). In particular its involvement during the operations performed to carry out the Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) Follow Up is described.

  20. FOLLOW UP STUDY OF CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Follow-Up Study involves locating and interviewing a group of young adults who, as 10-year-old children, were included in the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Study, an investigation of the prevalence and risk factors for developmental disabilities that was con...

  1. Dynamic Assessment Practice: Some Suggestions for Ensuring Follow up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeomans, Jane

    2008-01-01

    This article examines tensions in Dynamic Assessment (DA) practice that relate ways in which its findings can be followed up and made accessible to school staff, by examining how process skill interventions can be implemented in the context of a content-focussed curriculum. It briefly outlines some of the theoretical and methodological…

  2. Original article Serological and biochemical follow-up in cattle

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Serological and biochemical follow-up in cattle naturally infected with Fasciola enzyme activities. © Inra/Elsovier, Paris. Fasciola hepatica / cattle / natural infection-mail: kbossaeri@ulg.ac.be #12;Résumé - Suivi sérologique et biochimique d'une infestation naturelle par Fasciola

  3. Hepatocellular carcinoma after ablation: the imaging follow-up scheme.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin-Na; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei

    2013-02-14

    Percutaneous ablation using thermal or chemical methods has been widely used in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Nowadays, contrast-enhanced imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) are widely used to evaluate local treatment response after ablation therapies. CEUS is gaining increasing attention due to its characteristics including real-time scanning, easy performance, lack of radiation, wide availability, and lack of allergy reactions. Several studies have documented that CEUS is comparable to CT or MRI in evaluating local treatment efficacy within 1 mo of treatment. However, little information is available regarding the role of CEUS in the follow-up assessment after first successful ablation treatment. Zheng et al found that in comparison with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT), the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and overall accuracy of CEUS in detecting local tumor progression (LTP) were 67.5%, 97.4%, 81.8%, 94.4% and 92.3%, respectively, and were 77.7%, 92.0%, 92.4%, 76.7% and 84.0%, respectively for the detection of new intrahepatic recurrence. They concluded that the sensitivity of CEUS in detecting LTP and new intrahepatic recurrence after ablation is relatively low in comparison with CECT, and CEUS cannot replace CECT in the follow-up assessment after percutaneous ablation for HCC. These results are meaningful and instructive, and indicated that in the follow-up period, the use of CEUS alone is not sufficient. In this commentary, we discuss the discordance between CT and CEUS, as well as the underlying mechanisms involved. We propose the combined use of CT and CEUS which will reduce false positive and negative results in both modalities. We also discuss future issues, such as an evidence-based ideal imaging follow-up scheme, and a cost-effectiveness analysis of this imaging follow-up scheme. PMID:23429970

  4. Prediction of resting cardiovascular functioning in youth with family histories of essential hypertension: a 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Treiber, F A; Turner, J R; Davis, H; Strong, W B

    1997-01-01

    Two hundred forty-six children (96 Whites, of whom 51 were males; 150 African- Americans, of whom 69 were males) with a familial history of essential hypertension (EH) were re-evaluated 5 years after an initial evaluation. During the initial visit anthropometric, demographic, and resting cardiovascular (CV) parameters (designated initial baseline levels) were assessed. These CV parameters (systolic and diastolic blood pressure [BP], heart rate, cardiac output index [CI], and total peripheral resistance index [TPRI] were also measured during postural challenge, a video game challenge, and a cold pressor task. At follow-up, resting CV parameters were again evaluated, and designated as follow-up resting levels. Moderate temporal stability (r range = .43-.56) was observed for all resting CV parameters. Mean stress responses for each CV parameter for all 3 stressors during the initial visit were positively related to the respective CV follow-up resting level. BP stress responses to postural change and video game challenge to be significant independent predictors of future resting BP after controlling for standard EH risk factors. Follow-up resting CI was not predicted by any stress responses, whereas follow-up resting TPRI was predicted by TPRI responses to the video game after controlling for standard Eh risk factors. These results contrast with those from an earlier 1-year follow-up, where stress responses for neither CI nor TPRI predicted follow-up resting levels. It appears that, as children get older, TPRI stress responses play a stronger role in vasoconstrictive function. PMID:16250719

  5. Partial trisomy 21: A fifty-year follow-up visit.

    PubMed

    Hamm, J Austin; Carroll, Andrew J; Mikhail, Fady M; Korf, Bruce R; Finley, Wayne H

    2015-07-01

    We describe a clinical encounter with family members that carry a balanced translocation involving chromosomes 15 and 21 roughly 50?years after the proband was diagnosed with partial trisomy 21 due to an unbalanced translocation. We discuss how these chromosomal rearrangements have impacted the lives of these individuals, and how they responded to revisiting their diagnoses after using updated cytogenetic techniques including high resolution chromosome banding and array comparative genomic hybridization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25944586

  6. Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Exposure Assessments: An Analysis of 14 Site Visits.

    PubMed

    Dahm, Matthew M; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Evans, Douglas E; Birch, M Eileen; Fernback, Joseph E; Deddens, James A

    2015-07-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the potential for wide-ranging health effects that could result from exposure to carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanofibers (CNF). In response, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) set a recommended exposure limit (REL) for CNT and CNF: 1 µg m(-3) as an 8-h time weighted average (TWA) of elemental carbon (EC) for the respirable size fraction. The purpose of this study was to conduct an industrywide exposure assessment among US CNT and CNF manufacturers and users. Fourteen total sites were visited to assess exposures to CNT (13 sites) and CNF (1 site). Personal breathing zone (PBZ) and area samples were collected for both the inhalable and respirable mass concentration of EC, using NIOSH Method 5040. Inhalable PBZ samples were collected at nine sites while at the remaining five sites both respirable and inhalable PBZ samples were collected side-by-side. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) PBZ and area samples were also collected at the inhalable size fraction and analyzed to quantify and size CNT and CNF agglomerate and fibrous exposures. Respirable EC PBZ concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 2.94 µg m(-3) with a geometric mean (GM) of 0.34 µg m(-3) and an 8-h TWA of 0.16 µg m(-3). PBZ samples at the inhalable size fraction for EC ranged from 0.01 to 79.57 µg m(-3) with a GM of 1.21 µg m(-3). PBZ samples analyzed by TEM showed concentrations ranging from 0.0001 to 1.613 CNT or CNF-structures per cm(3) with a GM of 0.008 and an 8-h TWA concentration of 0.003. The most common CNT structure sizes were found to be larger agglomerates in the 2-5 µm range as well as agglomerates >5 µm. A statistically significant correlation was observed between the inhalable samples for the mass of EC and structure counts by TEM (Spearman ? = 0.39, P < 0.0001). Overall, EC PBZ and area TWA samples were below the NIOSH REL (96% were <1 ?g m(-3) at the respirable size fraction), while 30% of the inhalable PBZ EC samples were found to be >1 ?g m(-3). Until more information is known about health effects associated with larger agglomerates, it seems prudent to assess worker exposure to airborne CNT and CNF materials by monitoring EC at both the respirable and inhalable size fractions. Concurrent TEM samples should be collected to confirm the presence of CNT and CNF. PMID:25851309

  7. Medium term follow up of the Biodynamic neck sparing prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Molfetta, Luigi; Capozzi, Michele; Caldo, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Hip resurfacing (HR) and neck sparing prostheses (NSP) have been advocated for the treatment of arthritis in younger patients. Some complications following HR have been documented in the recent literature, but NSP are not yet supported by clinical follow-up studies of sufficient duration. We present an assessment of the neck sparing "Biodynamic" prosthesis. 153 patients were evaluated in a longitudinal cohort prospective study, with survival analysis, clinical score and radiographic assessment of stability and osteointegration at 41.8 months average follow up. Survival and clinical outcome were similar to most traditional prostheses in the literature. On radiographic analysis we recorded good neck preservation and osteointegration. Only two stem failures were recorded. Poor clinical outcome was related to misalignment of prostheses implanted during the 'learning curve'. The NSP system described may be a good alternative to HR for younger patients. The system is characterized by good survival and clinical and radiographic outcome combined with bone stock preservation. PMID:21279964

  8. Low frequency follow up of SN 1996aq with GMRT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sayan Chakraborti; Poonam Chandra; Alak Ray

    2009-01-01

    We report on the follow up observations of SN 1996aq with the GMRT in 1280 MHz and 325 MHz bands, centered on 2009 March 20 (18:45 UT) and 22 (17:45 UT) respectively. The SN is detected in both observations, consistent with our previously reported position (S. Chakraborti et al. 2009, ATEL #1974). The measured fluxes are 1.05+\\/-0.09 mJy and 3.21+\\/-0.68

  9. Language-Impaired Preschoolers: A Follow-Up Into Adolescence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan E. Stothard; Margaret J. Snowling; D. V. M. Bishop; Barry B. Chipchase; Carole A. Kaplan

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports a longitudinal follow-up of 71 adolescents with a preschool history of speech-language impairment, originally studied by Bishop and Edmundson (1987). These children had been subdivided at 4 years into those with nonverbal IQ 2 SD below the mean (General Delay group), and those with normal nonverbal intelligence (SLI group). At age 5;6 the SLI group was subdi-

  10. A three-year follow-up of family therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David K. Wellisch; G. Kelton Ro-Trock

    1980-01-01

    A 3-year follow-up of a family therapy focusing on adolescents was done. Twenty-four of 28 families were contacted by telephone interviews with the mothers. Nine variables were assessed with a trend shown toward the deterioration of previously superior effects of short-term family therapy with 57% of the family therapy group identified patients versus 20% of the individual therapy group identified

  11. Benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis--25 years of follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Putterman, C.; Keidar, S.; Brook, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Only 70 cases of recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis have been reported in the literature since the original description of this entity in 1959. The benign nature of the disease has been questioned, some authors suggesting progression to biliary cirrhosis. We report our follow-up of one such patient for over 25 years with no adverse physical consequences or histological deterioration. Sequential liver biopsies were obtained during this period. A conservative approach to diagnosis and treatment is therefore indicated. PMID:3684838

  12. Student selection process: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Lucci, J A; Brockway, J A

    1980-01-01

    This is a follow-up study of the 20 junior students admitted into an occupational therapy educational program under a selection process described in a previous article in AJOT in 1974. It reports the outcome resulting from the use of the selection process and t test findings between the upper ten ranked students and the remaining lower ranked students. Academic achievements and employment patterns of the 19 students completing the program are presented. PMID:7369074

  13. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Dumas; J. M. Visy; C. Belin; A. Gaston; D. Goldlust; M. Dumas

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied\\u000a 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after\\u000a each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8–48

  14. Cancer physicians' attitudes toward colorectal cancer follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. C. Earle; E. Grunfeld; D. Coyle; M. C. Cripps; H. S. Stern

    2003-01-01

    Results: One hundred and sixty practitioners (58%) returned completed surveys. Most recommended clinical assessments every 3-4 months in the first 2 years including carcino-embryonic antigen testing, gradually decreasing in frequency over 5 years. Ninety per cent recommend a surveillance colonoscopy in the first year. The majority felt that specialist involvement in follow-up was important because of the increased oppor- tunities

  15. Education On Prehospital Pain Management: A Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    French, Scott C.; Chan, Shu B.; Ramaker, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The most common reason patients seek medical attention is pain. However, there may be significant delays in initiating prehospital pain therapy. In a 2001 quality improvement (QI) study, we demonstrated improvement in paramedic knowledge, perceptions, and management of pain. This follow-up study examines the impact of this QI program, repeated educational intervention (EI), and effectiveness of a new pain management standard operating procedure. Methods: 176 paramedics from 10 urban and suburban fire departments and two private ambulance services participated in a 3-hour EI. A survey was performed prior to the EI and repeated one month after the EI. We reviewed emergency medical services (EMS) runs with pain complaints prior to the EI and one month after the EI. Follow-up results were compared to our prior study. We performed data analysis using descriptive statistics and chi-square tests. Results: The authors reviewed 352 surveys and 438 EMS runs with pain complaints. Using the same survey questions, even before the EI, 2007 paramedics demonstrated significant improvement in the knowledge (18.2%; 95% CI 8.9%, 27.9%), perceptions (9.2%; 95% CI 6.5%, 11.9%), and management of pain (13.8%; 95% CI 11.3%, 16.2%) compared to 2001. Following EI in 2007, there were no significant improvements in the baseline knowledge (0%; 95% CI 5.3%, 5.3%) but significant improvements in the perceptions of pain principles (6.4%; 95% CI 3.9%, 9.0%) and the management of pain (14.7%; 95% CI 11.4%, 18.0%). Conclusion: In this follow up study, paramedics’ baseline knowledge, perceptions, and management of pain have all improved from 6 years ago. Following a repeat educational intervention, paramedics further improved their field management of pain suggesting paramedics will still benefit from both initial and also ongoing continuing education on the topic of pain management. PMID:23599840

  16. Adiposis dolorosa (Dercum's disease): 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Brodovsky, S; Westreich, M; Leibowitz, A; Schwartz, Y

    1994-12-01

    Adiposis dolorosa is a disease characterized by painful, subcutaneous fatty tumors. This disorder usually occurs in obese, postmenopausal women and is associated with weakness and mental disturbances such as depression, confusion, lethargy, and dementia. The cause is unknown, and there is no specific treatment. Pain may be relieved by steroids, intravenous lidocaine, or analgesics. Surgical treatment consists of excision or liposuction of the painful masses. We present two cases of adiposis dolorosa in men, with a follow-up of more than 10 years. PMID:7880063

  17. Follow-up problems with fixed appliances in pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Ari, Timucin

    2015-03-01

    Fixed appliances are commonly used in managing early orthodontic problems. Despite their widespread use, they have the potential to impinge on the soft tissues, interfere with the eruption of adjacent teeth and become dislodged or broken. These two case reports present the poor outcomes of fixed appliance treatments if the patient fails to attend follow-up appointments. A successful outcome of treatment with fixed appliances depends upon proper patient selection and the communication skills of the dentist to help patients/parents understand the importance of regular checkups. PMID:25928968

  18. Root Resorption a 6-Year Follow-up Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Caroline; Closs, Luciane; Barletta, Fernando; Reston, Eduardo; Tovo, Maximiano F; Lambert, Paula

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical course of a pediatric patient developing cervical external root resorption (CERR). An 11-year old male patient had sustained dental trauma and was diagnosed with crown fracture affecting the incisal and middle thirds of the maxillary right permanent central incisor and the maxillary right permanent lateral incisor with pulp exposure and CERR after 24 months. Diagnosis and treatment of CERR are a challenge for dental practitioners. In this case, preservation of natural dentition is shown as a successful treatment in a 6-year follow-up. PMID:25870717

  19. Rothmund-thomson syndrome: a 13-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-González, Guillermo Antonio; Martínez-Cabriales, Sylvia Aideé; Hernández-Juárez, Aideé Alejandra; de Jesús Lugo-Trampe, José; Espinoza-González, Nelly Alejandra; Gómez-Flores, Minerva; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder presenting with poikiloderma and other clinical features, affecting the bones and eyes and, in type II RTS, presenting an increased risk for malignancy. With about 300 cases reported so far, we present a 13-year follow-up including clinical images, X-rays and genetic analysis. A 13-month-old female started with a facial rash with blisters on her cheeks and limbs at the age of 3 months along with congenital hypoplastic thumbs, frontal bossing and fine hair, eyebrows and eyelashes. The patient was lost to follow-up and returned 12 years later with palmoplantar hyperkeratotic lesions, short stature, disseminated poikiloderma and sparse scalp hair, with absence of eyelashes and eyebrows. Radiographic analysis showed radial ray defect, absence of the thumb and three wrist carpal bones, and reduced bone density. Gene sequencing for the RECQL4 helicase gene revealed a mutation on each allele. RTS is a rare disease, and in this patient we observed the evolution of her skin lesions and other clinical features, which were important for the classification of type II RTS. The next years will provide even more information on this rare disease. PMID:25120469

  20. Scoliosis follow-up using noninvasive trunk surface acquisition.

    PubMed

    Adankon, Mathias M; Chihab, Najat; Dansereau, Jean; Labelle, Hubert; Cheriet, Farida

    2013-08-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a musculoskeletal pathology. It is a complex spinal curvature in a 3-D space that also affects the appearance of the trunk. The clinical follow-up of AIS is decisive for its management. Currently, the Cobb angle, which is measured from full spine radiography, is the most common indicator of the scoliosis progression. However, cumulative exposure to X-rays radiation increases the risk for certain cancers. Thus, a noninvasive method for the identification of the scoliosis progression from trunk shape analysis would be helpful. In this study, a statistical model is built from a set of healthy subjects using independent component analysis and genetic algorithm. Based on this model, a representation of each scoliotic trunk from a set of AIS patients is computed and the difference between two successive acquisitions is used to determine if the scoliosis has progressed or not. This study was conducted on 58 subjects comprising 28 healthy subjects and 30 AIS patients who had trunk surface acquisitions in upright standing posture. The model detects 93% of the progressive cases and 80% of the nonprogressive cases. Thus, the rate of false negatives, representing the proportion of undetected progressions, is very low, only 7%. This study shows that it is possible to perform a scoliotic patient's follow-up using 3-D trunk image analysis, which is based on a noninvasive acquisition technique. PMID:23508244

  1. Gastric and Duodenal Stents: Follow-Up and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto Pabon, Isabel Teresa; Paul Diaz, Laura [Vascular and Interventional Radiology Department, Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Ctra de Toledo km. 12500, E-28905 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Ruiz de Adana, Juan Carlos; Lopez Herrero, Julio [Digestive Surgery Department, Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Ctra de Toledo km. 12500, E-28905 Getafe, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of self-expanding metallic stents in treating inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses during follow-up and to evaluate the complications encountered.Methods: A total of 31 patients suffering from gastroduodenal obstruction (29 malignant, 2 benign) were treated with a self-expanding metallic stent (Wallstent). In 24 cases insertion was by the peroral route, in seven cases via gastrostomy.Results: All the strictures were successfully negotiated under fluoroscopic guidance without having to resort to endoscopy. A total of 27 patients (87%) were able to resume a regular diet, a soft diet, or a liquid diet orally. Complications included one case of stent malpositioning, one case of leakage of ascitic fluid through the gastrostomy orifice, one case of perforation and fistula to the biliary tree, and two cases of hematemesis. In two patients (6%) additional stents were implanted to improve patency. In all patients follow-up was maintained until death. Recurrence of symptoms immediately before death occurred in seven cases (23%). Mean survival time of patients was 13.3 weeks (SE {+-} 4.6).Conclusions: The deployment of gastroduodenal stents resulted in good palliation of inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses. Certain technical aspects, e.g., adaptation of stents to bowel morphology, is critical to proper stent function and avoidance of complications.

  2. Percutaneous closure of secundum type atrial septal defects: More than 5-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Snijder, Roel JR; Suttorp, Maarten J; Berg, Jurriën M Ten; Post, Martijn C

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate long-term efficacy of two different devices more than five years after percutaneous atrial septal defect (ASD) closure in adults. METHODS: All patients who underwent percutaneous closure of an ASD in the St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands, between February 1998 and December 2006 were included. Percutaneous closure took place under general anaesthesia and transesophageal echocardiographic monitoring. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) was performed 24 h post-procedure to visualize the device position and to look for residual shunting using color Doppler. All complications were registered. All patients were invited for an outpatient visit and contrast TTE more than 5-years after closure. Efficacy was based on the presence of a residual right-to-left shunt (RLS), graded as minimal, moderate or severe. The presence of a residual left-to-right shunt (LRS) was diagnosed using color Doppler, and was not graded. Descriptive statistics were used for patients’ characteristics. Univariate analysis was used to identify predictors for residual shunting. RESULTS: In total, 104 patients (mean age 45.5 ± 17.1 years) underwent percutaneous ASD closure using an Amplatzer device (ASO) in 76 patients and a Cardioseal/Starflex device (CS/SF) in 28 patients. The mean follow-up was 6.4 ± 3.4 years. Device migration occurred in 4 patients of whom two cases occurred during the index hospitalization (1 ASO, 1 CS/SF). The other 2 cases of device migration occurred during the first 6 mo of follow-up (2 CS/SF). The recurrent thrombo-embolic event rate was similar in both groups: 0.4% per follow-up year. More than 12 mo post-ASD closure and latest follow-up, new-onset supraventricular tachyarrhythmia’s occurred in 3.9% and 0% for the ASO and CS/SF group, respectively. The RLS rate at latest follow-up was 17.4% (minimal 10.9%, moderate 2.2%, severe 4.3%) and 45.5% (minimal 27.3%, moderate 18.2%, severe 0%) for the ASO- and CS/SF groups, respectively. There was no residual LRS in both groups. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous ASD closure has good long-term safety and efficacy profiles. The residual RLS rate seems to be high more than 5 years after closure, especially in the CS/SF. Residual LRS was not observed. PMID:25810815

  3. Small game water troughs in a Spanish agrarian pseudo steppe: visits and water site choice by wild fauna

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vicente R. Gaudioso Lacasa; Carlos Sánchez García-Abad; Raquel Prieto Martín; Daniel J. Bartolomé Rodríguez; José A. Pérez Garrido; Marta E. Alonso de La Varga

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the visits of wild fauna, the influence of vegetal cover and fencing at water site election, and consumption\\u000a tendency in water troughs designed for small game species distributed in an agricultural Mediterranean area during the summers\\u000a from 2002 to 2005. Red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa), lagomorphs (Oryctolagus cuniculus, Lepus granatensis), and other autochthonous species (birds and wild canids)

  4. West Foster Creek 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    A follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the West Foster Creek (Smith acquisition) wildlife mitigation site in May 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance and maintain the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The West Foster Creek 2007 follow-up HEP survey generated 2,981.96 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for a 34% increase (+751.34 HUs) above baseline HU credit (the 1999 baseline HEP survey generated 2,230.62 habitat units or 1.13 HUs per acre). The 2007 follow-up HEP analysis yielded 1,380.26 sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) habitat units, 879.40 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) HUs, and 722.29 western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) habitat units. Mule deer and sharp-tailed grouse habitat units increased by 346.42 HUs and 470.62 HUs respectively over baseline (1999) survey results due largely to cessation of livestock grazing and subsequent passive restoration. In contrast, the western meadowlark generated slightly fewer habitat units in 2007 (-67.31) than in 1999, because of increased shrub cover, which lowers habitat suitability for that species.

  5. Medulloblastoma in infants and children: computed tomographic follow-up after treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Glass, J.P.; van Eys, J.; Wallace, S.

    1985-03-01

    Thirty-six proven cases of medulloblastoma were reviewed by serial CT follow-up examinations from 4 months to 10 years, 2 months after the initial diagnosis, with a mean follow-up time of 3 years, 9 months. The tumor recurred at the primary site in 20 cases (56%). Leptomeningeal metastasis was demonstrated on CT in 14 cases (39%); seven of these patients also presented with solid subarachnoid metastases. Thirteen patients (36%) showed evidence of severe brain atrophy, which was confined to the posterior fossa in seven of the 13. Calcification resulting from mineralizing microangiopathy developed in five cases (14%), including three patients who had had extensive dystrophic calcification in the corticomedullary junction and the deep-seated nuclei of the cerebrum and cerebellum. The patterns of tumor recurrence in the posterior fossa that is severely deformed by surgery and other treatment modalities and leptomeningeal spread of tumor are discussed.

  6. The association between quality of HIV care, loss to follow-up and mortality in pediatric and adolescent patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ojikutu, Bisola; Higgins-Biddle, Molly; Greeson, Dana; Phelps, Benjamin R; Amzel, Anouk; Okechukwu, Emeka; Kolapo, Usman; Cabral, Howard; Cooper, Ellen; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2014-01-01

    Access to pediatric HIV treatment in resource-limited settings has risen significantly. However, little is known about the quality of care that pediatric or adolescent patients receive. The objective of this study is to explore quality of HIV care and treatment in Nigeria and to determine the association between quality of care, loss-to-follow-up and mortality. A retrospective cohort study was conducted including patients ?18 years of age who initiated ART between November 2002 and December 2011 at 23 sites across 10 states. 1,516 patients were included. A quality score comprised of 6 process indicators was calculated for each patient. More than half of patients (55.5%) were found to have a high quality score, using the median score as the cut-off. Most patients were screened for tuberculosis at entry into care (81.3%), had adherence measurement and counseling at their last visit (88.7% and 89.7% respectively), and were prescribed co-trimoxazole at some point during enrollment in care (98.8%). Thirty-seven percent received a CD4 count in the six months prior to chart review. Mortality within 90 days of ART initiation was 1.9%. A total of 4.2% of patients died during the period of follow-up (mean: 27 months) with 19.0% lost to follow-up. In multivariate regression analyses, weight for age z-score (Adjusted Hazard Ratio (AHR): 0.90; 95% CI: 0.85, 0.95) and high quality indicator score (compared a low score, AHR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.26, 0.73) had a protective effect on mortality. Patients with a high quality score were less likely to be lost to follow-up (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 0.42; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.56), compared to those with low score. These findings indicate that providing high quality care to children and adolescents living with HIV is important to improve outcomes, including lowering loss to follow-up and decreasing mortality in this age group. PMID:25075742

  7. Long-term Follow-up After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Puzziferri, Nancy; Roshek, Thomas B.; Mayo, Helen G.; Gallagher, Ryan; Belle, Steven H.; Livingston, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Bariatric surgery is an accepted treatment for obesity. Despite extensive literature, few studies report long-term follow-up in cohorts with adequate retention rates. OBJECTIVE To assess the quality of evidence and treatment effectiveness 2 years after bariatric procedures for weight loss, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in severely obese adults. EVIDENCE REVIEW MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were searched from 1946 through May 15, 2014. Search terms included bariatric surgery, individual bariatric procedures, and obesity. Studies were included if they described outcomes for gastric bypass, gastric band, or sleeve gastrectomy performed on patients with a body mass index of 35 or greater, had more than 2 years of outcome information, and had follow-up measures for at least 80% of the initial cohort. Two investigators reviewed each study and a third resolved study inclusion disagreements. FINDINGS Of 7371 clinical studies reviewed, 29 studies (0.4%, 7971 patients) met inclusion criteria. All gastric bypass studies (6 prospective cohorts, 5 retrospective cohorts) and sleeve gastrectomy studies (2 retrospective cohorts) had 95% confidence intervals for the reported mean, median, or both exceeding 50% excess weight loss. This amount of excess weight loss occurred in 31% of gastric band studies (9 prospective cohorts, 5 retrospective cohorts). The mean sample-size–weighted percentage of excess weight loss for gastric bypass was 65.7% (n = 3544) vs 45.0% (n = 4109) for gastric band. Nine studies measured comorbidity improvement. For type 2 diabetes (glycated hemoglobin <6.5% without medication), sample-size–weighted remission rates were 66.7% for gastric bypass (n = 428) and 28.6% for gastric band (n = 96). For hypertension (blood pressure <140/90 mm Hg without medication), remission rates were 38.2% for gastric bypass (n = 808) and 17.4% for gastric band (n = 247). For hyperlipidemia (cholesterol <200 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein >40 mg/dL, low-density lipoprotein <160 mg/dL, and triglycerides <200 mg/dL), remission rates were 60.4% for gastric bypass (n = 477) and 22.7% for gastric band (n = 97). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Very few bariatric surgery studies report long-term results with sufficient patient follow-up to minimize biased results. Gastric bypass has better outcomes than gastric band procedures for long-term weight loss, type 2 diabetes control and remission, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Insufficient evidence exists regarding long-term outcomes for gastric sleeve resections. PMID:25182102

  8. Telephonic Consultation and follow-up in Diabetics: Impact on Metabolic Profile, Quality of Life, and Patient Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Rupinderjeet; Kajal, Krishan Singh; Kaur, Amarpreet; Singh, Paramdeep

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM), being a long-term condition, requires consistent blood glucose monitoring and adjustment of doses of the antidiabetic drugs and insulin. Telehealth is an emerging field that can have a positive impact on the management of this disease. Aim: The aim was to study the impact of the frequency of consultation and follow-up on telephone of diagnosed follow-up patients of DM on glycemic and metabolic profiles, the patients' compliance, and their quality of life (QoL), and to compare the effectiveness of different modes of follow-up. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty patients were enrolled from the outpatient department (OPD) including both type 1 and type 2 DM patients who had already been diagnosed and were on treatment. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups, each consisting of 40 subjects, according to the mode of follow-up: A (rare, i.e., less frequent outpatient visits), B (moderate, i.e., more frequent outpatient visits), and C (frequent, i.e., more frequent outpatient visits with weekly telephonic consultation). Metabolic profiles and the QoL were monitored. The patients' compliance with and adherence to the treatment, and dietary and exercise advice were assessed. Results: The patients' compliance with and adherence to the treatment was higher in group C, followed by groups B and A. There was a net decrease in adverse events, with an increase in the frequency of follow-up. Changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) suggested a positive impact of weekly telephonic consultation. The lipid profile was also positively affected, with maximum improvement being in high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) and triglycerides. There was an improvement in the QoL domains pertaining to physical health and endurance in patients with higher frequency of follow-ups. There was no effect on emotional or mental health. There was an overall deterioration of the financial domain, being most marked in group B. The treatment satisfaction questionnaire showed better results in the telephone intervention group. Conclusion: Telephonic consultation can be a useful measure to improve the follow-up and management of patients with DM.

  9. The Preschool Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Treatment Study (PATS) 6-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Mark A.; Yershova, Kseniya; Lazzaretto, Deborah; Paykina, Natalya; Yenokyan, Gayane; Greenhill, Laurence; Abikoff, Howard; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wigal, Tim; McCracken, James T.; Kollins, Scott H.; Murray, Desiree W.; Wigal, Sharon; Kastelic, Elizabeth; McGough, James J.; dosReis, Susan; Bauzó-Rosario, Audrey; Stehli, Annamarie; Posner, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical course of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom severity and diagnosis from ages 3–5 to 9–12 years during a 6-year follow-up after the original Preschool ADHD Treatment Study (PATS). Method 207 participants (75% male) from the original PATS, assessed at Baseline (mean age 4.4 years, when all met criteria for ADHD) and 3-months later (prior to medication treatment), were re-evaluated in three follow-up assessment visits (Year 3, mean age 7.4 years; Year 4, 8.3 years and Year 6, 10.4 years). Parents and teachers rated symptom severity and clinicians established psychiatric diagnoses. Analyses examined longitudinal changes in symptom severity and ADHD diagnosis. Results Parent- and teacher-rated symptom severity decreased from Baseline to Year 3 but remained relatively stable and in the moderate-to-severe clinical range through Year 6. Girls showed generally steeper decreases in symptom T-scores. At Year 6, 89% (160/180) of remaining participants met ADHD symptom and impairment diagnostic criteria. Comorbidity of oppositional defiant disorder and/or conduct disorder was associated with a 30% higher risk of having an ADHD diagnosis at Year 6 in the multiple logistic model. Medication status during follow-up, on vs. off, did not predict symptom severity change from Year 3 to Year 6 after adjustment for other variables. Conclusions ADHD in preschoolers is a relatively stable diagnosis over a 6-year period. The course is generally chronic, with high symptom severity and impairment, in very young children with moderate-to-severe ADHD, despite treatment with medication. Development of more effective ADHD intervention strategies is needed for this age group. PMID:23452683

  10. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. PMID:24709048

  11. Follow-up study to assess the use and performance of household filters in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Peletz, Rachel; Simuyandi, Michelo; Simunyama, Martin; Sarenje, Kelvin; Kelly, Paul; Clasen, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Effective household water treatment can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease if used correctly and consistently over time. One year after completion of a randomized controlled study of water filters among households in Zambia with children < 2 years old and mothers who were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, we conducted a follow-up study to assess use and performance of new filters distributed at the conclusion of the study; 90% of participating households met the criteria for current users, and 75% of participating households had stored water with lower levels of fecal contamination than source water. Microbiologically, the filters continued to perform well, removing an average of 99.0% of fecal indicator bacteria. Although this study provides some encouraging evidence about the potential to maintain high uptake and filter performance, even in the absence of regular household visits, additional research is necessary to assess whether these results can be achieved over longer periods and with larger populations. PMID:24100635

  12. Submillimeter Follow-up of WISE-selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Cutri, Roc; Evans, Neal J., II; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lake, Sean; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam; Weiner, Benjamin; Wright, Edward L.; Yan, Lin

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (~1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 ?m, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 ?m. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 ?m, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 ?m, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 1013 L ?. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  13. Developmental follow-up of hyperventilated neonates: preliminary observations.

    PubMed

    Brett, C; Dekle, M; Leonard, C H; Clark, C; Sniderman, S; Roth, R; Ballard, R; Clyman, R

    1981-10-01

    A group of 13 newborn infants greater than 37 weeks' gestation were selected to be hyperventilated because of severe hypoxemia refractory to conventional mechanical ventilation, ie, failure to maintain PaO2 greater than 50 torr with an FIO2 of 1.0, despite PaCO2 less than or equal to 40 torr and pH greater than or equal to 7.40. Eleven survived; nine were available for follow-up evaluations. As a group, the nine infants were exposed to a PaCO2 less than or equal to 20 torr for 51.8 +/- 11.8 (mean +/- SEM) hours, to PaCO2 less than or equal to 15 torr for 11.8 +/- 3.3 hours, to a pH greater than 7.50 for 64.4 +/- 18.6 hours, and to a pH greater than or equal to 7.60 for 6.1 +/- 2.9 hours. One infant was lost to follow-up after a normal assessment at nine months. the other eight infants (seven AGA, one markedly SGA) were at least 1 1/4 years old at the time of evaluation. The seven AGA infants had a normal developmental quotient (mean 110 [range 96-130] by Stanford-Binet or Bayley assessment); the one SGA infant had a Bayley score of 89. All eight had normal neurologic examinations. These preliminary findings are reassuring with respect to neurologic and developmental outcome following prolonged hyperventilation. PMID:7322695

  14. Follow up of focal narrowing of retinal arterioles in glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Papastathopoulos, K.; Jonas, J.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To evaluate whether focal narrowing of retinal arterioles increases with progressive glaucomatous optic neuropathy.?METHODS—Focal narrowing of retinal arterioles and area of neuroretinal rim were morphometrically evaluated on colour stereo optic disc photographs of 59 patients with primary open angle glaucoma, 22 patients with normal pressure glaucoma, 11 patients with secondary open angle glaucoma, and 31 patients with ocular hypertension. Minimum follow up was 8 months. Focal arteriolar narrowing was quantified by calculating the ratio of the vessel width in the broadest to the narrowest vessel part.?RESULTS—In the subgroup of patients with progressive glaucomatous optic nerve damage (n=37), focal narrowing of retinal arterioles increased significantly (p<0.005) with decreasing neuroretinal rim area. In the subgroup of patients with stable appearance of the optic disc (n=86), focal narrowing of retinal arterioles did not change significantly (p=0.79). The positive correlation between increasing focal thinning of retinal arterioles and progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy was present, although not statistically significant, in all the glaucoma subtypes examined. The location of focal thinning of retinal arterioles did not change in the follow up.?CONCLUSIONS—Focal narrowing of retinal arterioles increases significantly with progressive glaucomatous optic neuropathy, independent of the type of glaucoma. It is stable in patients with non-progressive glaucoma. The findings agree with previous reports on a higher degree of focal arteriole narrowing in eyes with pronounced optic nerve damage in comparison with those with moderate optic nerve atrophy or normal eyes. In the clinical management of patients with glaucoma, in some eyes, increasing focal arteriole narrowing may suggest progression of disease.?? Keywords: focal narrowing; retinal arterioles; glaucoma PMID:10365034

  15. Unilateral proptosis in thyroid eye disease with subsequent contralateral involvement: retrospective follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this retrospective follow-up study is to evaluate the prevalence of patients with thyroid eye disease presenting with apparent unilateral proptosis and determine the occurrence of exophthalmos in contralateral non-proptotic eye over the time. Associated features with this event were evaluated. Methods A cohort of 655 consecutive patients affected by thyroid eye disease with a minimum follow-up of 10 years was reviewed. Exophthalmos was assessed by using both Hertel exophthalmometer and computed tomography (CT). The influence of age, gender, hormonal status and of different therapies such as corticosteroids, radiotherapy and surgical decompression on this disease progression was evaluated. Results A total of 89 patients (13.5%) (95% confidence interval [CI] 15%-10%) had clinical evidence of unilateral exophthalmos at the first visit. Among these, 13 patients (14%) (95% CI 22%-7%) developed subsequent contralateral exophthalmos. The increase of protrusion ranged from 2 to 7 mm (mean of 4.2). The time of onset varied from 6 months to 7 years (mean time: 29 months). Smoking status, young age and surgical decompression are significantly associated with development of contralateral proptosis (p< .05). Conclusions Asymmetric thyroid eye disease with the appearance of unilateral exophthalmos at the initial examination is a fairly frequent event, while subsequent contralateral proptosis occurs less commonly. However, physicians should be aware that young patients, particularly if smokers, undergoing orbital decompression in one eye may need further surgery on contralateral side over time. PMID:23721066

  16. Goddard Robotic Telescope - Optical Follow-up of GRBs and Coordinated Observations of AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Wallace, C. A.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2010-01-01

    Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will occur or when Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) flaring activity starts, follow-up/monitoring ground telescopes must be located as uniformly as possible all over the world in order to collect data simultaneously with Fermi and Swift detections. However, there is a distinct gap in follow-up coverage of telescopes in the eastern U.S. region based on the operations of Swift. Motivated by this fact, we have constructed a 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up Swift/Fermi GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) AGN. Our telescope system consists of off-the-shelf hardware. With the focal reducer, we are able to match the field of view of Swift narrow instruments (20' x 20'). We started scientific observations in mid-November 2008 and GRT has been fully remotely operated since August 2009. The 3(sigma) upper limit in a 30-second exposure in the R filter is approx.15.4 mag; however, we can reach to approx.18 mag in a 600-second exposures. Due to the weather condition at the telescope site. our observing efficiency is 30-40%, on average.

  17. Long-Term Follow-Up of Percutaneous Balloon Angioplasty in Adult Aortic Coarctation

    SciTech Connect

    Paddon, Alex J.; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Ettles, Duncan F.; Travis, Simon J.; Dyet, John F. [Radiology Department, Hull Royal Infirmary, Anlaby Road, Kingston upon Hull HU3 2JZ (United Kingdom)

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: To assess long-term outcomes following percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of congenital aortic coarctation in adults.Methods: Seventeen patients underwent PTA for symptomatic adult coarctation of the aorta. Sixteen patients, with a mean age of 28 years (range 15-60 years), were reviewed at a mean interval after angioplasty of 7.3 years (range 1.5-11 years). Assessment included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler echocardiography, and clinical examination. Current clinical measurements were compared with pre- and immediate post-angioplasty measurements.Results: At follow-up 16 patients were alive and well. The patient not included in follow-up had undergone surgical repair and excision of the coarctation segment following PTA. Mean brachial systolic blood pressure for the group decreased from 174 mmHg before angioplasty to 130 mmHg at follow-up (p 0.0001). The mean gradient had fallen significantly from 50.9 to 17.8 at follow-up (p = 0.001). The average number of antihypertensive drugs required per patient decreased from 0.56 to 0.31 (p = 0.234). No significant residual stenoses or restenoses were seen at MRI. Small but clinically insignificant residual pressure gradients were recorded in all patients using Doppler echocardiography. Complications included one transient ischemic attack at 5 days, one external iliac dissection requiring stent insertion, and a further patient who developed a false aneurysm close to the coarctation site at 12 months which subsequently required surgical excision.Conclusion: PTA of adult coarctation is safe and effective in the long term. Although primary stenting has recently been advocated in the treatment of this condition, our results suggest that PTA remains the treatment of choice.

  18. Lung Tumors Treated With Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation: Computed Tomography Imaging Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: palussiere@bergonie.org; Marcet, Benjamin; Descat, Edouard [Institut Bergonie, Regional Cancer Center, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Deschamps, Frederic; Rao, Pramod [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Ravaud, Alain [Hopital Saint-Andre, Department of Medical Oncology (France); Brouste, Veronique [Institut Bergonie, Department of Biostatistics (France); Baere, Thierry de [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the morphologic evolution of lung tumors treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) by way of computed tomography (CT) images and to investigate patterns of incomplete RFA at the site of ablation. Materials and Methods: One hundred eighty-nine patients with 350 lung tumors treated with RFA underwent CT imaging at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. CT findings were interpreted separately by two reviewers with consensus. Five different radiologic patterns were predefined: fibrosis, cavitation, nodule, atelectasis, and disappearance. The appearance of the treated area was evaluated at each follow-up CT using the predefined patterns. Results: At 1 year after treatment, the most common evolutions were fibrosis (50.5%) or nodules (44.8%). Differences were noted depending on the initial size of the tumor, with fibrosis occurring more frequently for tumors <2 cm (58.6% vs. 22.9%, P = 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}). Cavitation and atelectasis were less frequent patterns (2.4% and 1.4%, respectively, at 1 year). Tumor location (intraparenchymatous, with pleural contact <50% or >50%) was not significantly correlated with follow-up image pattern. Local tumor progressions were observed with each type of evolution. At 1 year, 12 local recurrences were noted: 2 cavitations, which represented 40% of the cavitations noted at 1 year; 2 fibroses (1.9%); 7 nodules (7.4%); and 1 atelectasis (33.3%). Conclusion: After RFA of lung tumors, follow-up CT scans show that the shape of the treatment zone can evolve in five different patterns. None of these patterns, however, can confirm the absence of further local tumor progression at subsequent follow-up.

  19. Bilateral sacrospinous fixation without hysterectomy: 18-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    ?entürk, Mehmet Baki; Güraslan, Hakan; Çakmak, Yusuf; Ekin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of bilateral sacrospinous fixation (SSF), which was performed with surgical mesh interposition and bilateral vaginal repair. Material and Methods Twenty-two patients underwent SSF between 2010 and 2012, and the results were evaluated retrospectively. The results at preoperative and postoperative 6th, 12th, and 18th months of the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12) were compared using Friedman and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests. Values of p<0.05 and <0.01 were considered statistically significant. Results According to the POP-Q, significant healing was observed on all vaginal vault points (p=0.001), and no prolapse was observed until the 18-month follow-up stage. There were also prominent patients who felt satisfactory with respect to their sexual life according to PISQ-12 (p=0.001). Conclusion This technique appears to provide an adequate clinical resolution, and it may be the primary surgical option for women with pelvic organ prolapse.

  20. Continued Astrometric Follow-up Of Near-Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spahr, Timothy; Johnson, Lindley (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    As the grant periods overlapped, some of this information below will also be present on the previous final report. During the period May 1 2004 to April 30 2005, approximately 100 NEOs fainter than V = 20 were observed on separate nights from the 1.2-m telescope at Mt. Hopkins. Additionally, a few comets were targeted, including astrometric support of the Deep Impact mission by observing comet P/Tempel 1. Kyle Smalley was again employed as an independent contractor, and he was trained in use of the telescope, performed several remote observing runs on his own, and has now begun critical software support of the observing program. Code to automatically operate the telescope, given a target list, is approximately 90% done. During the first observing run scheduled in late September or early October, this code will be tested at on the telescope. It is probable that the 1.2m telescope will be run automatically all night without any interruption from the observer for anything during this time. Additional work on selecting which NEO targets to observe is progressing, with a beta-release of a simple target selection web page. Additionally, two-night objects with the potential of being NEOs have been extracted on a routine basis during this last grant cycle. These will also be added to a web page to facilitate additional astrometric follow-up.

  1. IRS Follow-up of Sources in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, James R.; Roellig, Thomas; Buckalew, Brent; Gehrz, Robert D.; McQuinn, Kristy; Polomski, Elisha; Roellig, Thomas L.; Woodward, Charles

    2006-05-01

    We are currently engaged in a Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) program (PID 5) to obtain MIPS and IRAC maps of M33 that will provide a global perspective on star formation, stellar evolution, and chemical evolution in the interstellar medium in a spiral galaxy. Combined with ground-based observations, these maps will provide a unified set of images that relate the locations of chemical enrichment, gas available to form stars, star formation, and evolved stars. We are proposing here to perform IRS spectroscopy using all of the IRS modules to follow-up on five embedded compact HII clusters which are located at various distances ranging up to 3.5 kpc from the center of M33. The low-resolution data will be particularly useful in identifying broad-band solid-state features, while the high-resolution module observations will be used to measure the strength of fine-structure emission lines, providing a wealth of information on the excitation levels and electron densities in the targets, without the complicating effects of extinction that hampers optical studies of these highly-enshrouded objects. Our proposed observations will allow important new insight into how star formation environments change across the face of the spiral galaxy M33.

  2. Diagnosis, treatment and follow up of neonatal arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Binneto?lu, Fatih Köksal; Babao?lu, Kadir; Altun, Gürkan; Türker, Gülcan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective This study aimed to evaluate the aetiology, spectrum, course and outcomes of neonates with arrhythmias observed in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit from 2007 to 2012. Methods Neonates with rhythm problems were included. The results of electrocardiography (ECG), Holter ECG, echocardiography and biochemical analysis were evaluated. The long-term results of follow up were reviewed. Results Forty-five patients were male (68%) and 21 (32%) were female. Fifty-five patients (83.3%) were term, 11 (16.6%) were preterm, and 34% were diagnosed in the prenatal period. Twenty cases (30.3%) had congenital heart disease. Twenty-three patients (34.8%) were diagnosed during the foetal period. The most common arrhythmias were supraventricular ectopic beats and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) at 39.3 and 22.7%, respectively. SVT recurred in five patients after the neonatal period. Conclusion Supraventricular ectopic beats and SVT were the most common arrhythmias during the neonatal period. Although the prognosis of arrhythmias in the neonatal period is relatively good, regular monitoring is required. PMID:24844549

  3. Follow up study of workers manufacturing chrysotile asbestos cement products.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M J; Winter, P D; Pannett, B; Powell, C A

    1986-01-01

    A cohort study has been carried out of 2167 subjects employed between 1941 and 1983 at an asbestos cement factory in England. The production process incorporated the use of chrysotile asbestos fibre only, except for a small amount of amosite during four months in 1976. Measured airborne fibre concentrations available since 1970 from personal samplers showed mean levels below 1 fibre/ml, although higher levels had probably occurred previously in certain areas of the factory. No excess of lung cancer was observed in the mortality follow up by comparison with either national or local death rates, and analyses of subgroups of the workforce by job, exposure level, duration of employment, duration since entry, or calendar years of employment gave no real suggestion of an asbestos related excess for this cause of death. There was one death from pleural mesothelioma and one with asbestosis mentioned as an associated cause on the death certificate, but neither is thought to be linked to asbestos exposure at this factory. Other suggested asbestos related cancers, such as laryngeal and gastrointestinal, did not show raised risks. Although the durations of exposure were short in this study, the findings are consistent with two other studies of workers exposed to low concentrations of chrysotile fibre in the manufacture of asbestos cement products which reported no excess mortality. PMID:3024695

  4. Asthma increase among farmers: a 12-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory disease is a well known health hazard for farmers, but the long-term prognosis is less well known. This is a 12-year follow-up of an investigation of Swedish farmers, most of them dairy farmers. A questionnaire was mailed to all 418 farmers who were alive of the farmers originally participating in 1982. They were invited to an interview, spirometry, and blood sampling. Ninety-one per cent (380) of the farmers, 321 men and 59 women, responded to the questionnaire. The mean age was 56 years for the men and 55 years for the women. Of the group, 10% were smokers, 25% ex-smokers, and 65% had never smoked. The population estimate for asthma in the farmers was 8.9% in 1994 compared to 2% in 1982, and to 5.4%–6.6% in the general population in the region in 1982. Of the asthmatic subjects, one-third had positive RAST tests (radioallergosorbent tests). Almost 90% of the new onset asthma cases since 1982 had non-IgE-mediated asthma. Most of the IgE-mediated asthmatics had had symptoms for many years, while 70% of the non-IgE-mediated asthmatic farmers had no or only wheezing with colds 1982. Two new cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis were identified, and 7.3% had experienced inhalation fever during the last 12 years. In general, individuals with asthma and chronic bronchitis who had left farming were in better health in 1994 as compared to 1982. In conclusion, farmers have an enhanced risk to develop asthma increasing with age. Asthma in farmers is often non-IgE-mediated. PMID:20812893

  5. Driver Behaviour Questionnaire: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Türker; Lajunen, Timo; Summala, Heikki

    2006-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate time-across stability of different factor solutions (two to six factors) of the Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ) and to examine the changes on self-reported driving pattern in a follow-up sample (n=622) after three years of the first responses. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated that there was a significant change between Time 1 and Time 2 scores in six items of the DBQ. Drivers reported less competitiveness while driving at Time 2 but more speeding, drinking and driving, driving to wrong destinations and having no recollection of the road just travelled. Significant Time x Sex x Age interactions were found in change scores of four items. Young males and middle-aged female drivers emerged as a group of drivers who changed their self-reported driving pattern over three years. Additionally, sex, age or both had main effects on scores of 21 items. Males and young drivers reported more violations than females and older drivers, whereas female drivers reported more errors and lapses. After running possible factor solutions with Tucker's Phi agreement coefficients, the results indicated that the four- and two-factor solutions were the most stable and interpretable ones. The two-factor solution showed better time-across stability than the four-factor structure did, although the factor solutions found at Time 1 and Time 2 were not as identical as expected. Separate analysis revealed that drivers who had high annual mileage at Time 1 and Time 2 showed the strongest two-factor time-across stability. The test-retest reliability was 0.50 for errors, 0.76 for violations and 0.61 for the whole scale. PMID:16310749

  6. Clinical follow up of uniparental disomy 16: First data

    SciTech Connect

    Dworniczak, B.; Koppers, B.; Bogdanova, N. [Univ. of Muenster (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Following the introduction of the concept of uniparental disomy (UPD) in 1980 by Engel this segregational anomaly is reported in an ever increasing number of patients. So far, several groups of individuals with an increased risk for UPD have been identified including abnormal carriers of familial balanced translocations or centric fusions, carriers of mosaic trisomies, and fetuses after prenatal diagnosis of confined placental mosaicism. A major pathogenetic mechanism appears to be post-meiotic chromosome loss in trisomic conceptuses. UPD was repeatedly observed in the fetus after diagnosis of mosaic or non-mosaic trisomies in the placenta which are usually considered {open_quotes}lethal{close_quotes} (i.e. trisomies 15 and 16). In an ongoing study to determine the incidence and clinical consequences of UPD we investigated the parental origin of chromosomes in the disomic cell line after prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism for various trisomies (e.g. 2, 7, 14, 15, and 16). At present, two maternal disomies 16 and one maternal disomy 15 were identified. Severe intrauterine growth retardation was a common symptome which, however, was also present in some but not all mosaics with a biparental origin of the chromosomes in question. While prognosis is clear in some instances (i.e. UPD 15) counseling can be extremely difficult in others, when imprinting effects and homozygosity for unknown recessive traits present in a parent have to be considered. To assess the clinical significance, detailed follow-up studies of proven cases of uniparental disomies are essential. First data of two cases with UPD 16 are presented.

  7. [Analysis of Rupture during Follow-up of Unruptured Aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinya; Inoue, Mizuho; Uchida, Hiroki; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Saito, Atsushi; Kon, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2015-06-01

    Object:To elucidate clinical aspects of ruptured aneurysms, we retrospectively investigated associations between risk factors and ruptured and unruptured cases during conservative management. Methods:Two hundred and twenty-nine patients with 291 unruptured cerebral aneurysms treated between 2000 and 2012 were analyzed. Mean duration of observation was 62 months(1183.4 person-years). We investigated the following six risk factors: history of subarachnoid hemorrhage;multiplicity;location of aneurysms;aneurysm size ?5mm;bleb or irregular forms;and follow-up period <1 year. Results:Twenty-two aneurysms in 22 patients(19 women;86.4%)ruptured during this study. The annual rate of rupture was 1.86%. In ruptured cases, mean age was 66.7 years. According to univariate analysis, aneurysm size?5mm(p=0.000), bleb or irregular form(p=0.006)and duration of observation<1 year(p=0.000)were significantly associated with aneurysmal rupture. In multivariate analysis of these factors, aneurysm size?5mm(p=0.0188;odds ratio(OR), 3.4;95% confidence interval(CI), 1.2-9.7)and duration of observation<1 year(p=0.006;OR, 5.0;95% CI, 1.6-14.9)represented independent risk factors for aneurysm rupture. Conclusions:The results of this study were almost the same as those of the UCAS Japan study. In addition, duration of observation <1 year was a risk factor for aneurysm rupture. When we decide on surgical treatment after considering factors such as aneurysm size, form, and surgical risk, surgery should be performed as soon as possible. PMID:26015380

  8. Schizophrenia and quality of life: a one-year follow-up in four EU countries

    PubMed Central

    Kovess-Masféty, Viviane; Xavier, Miguel; Moreno Kustner, Berta; Suchocka, Agnieszka; Sevilla-Dedieu, Christine; Dubuis, Jacques; Lacalmontie, Elisabeth; Pellet, Jacques; Roelandt, Jean-Luc; Walsh, Dermot

    2006-01-01

    Background This article systematically monitors the quality of life (QOL) of patients with schizophrenia from seven different sites across four European countries: France, Ireland, Portugal and Spain. Methods A one-year prospective cohort study was carried out. Inclusion criteria for patients were: a clinical lifetime diagnosis of schizophrenia according to ICD-10 (F20) diagnostic criteria for research, age between 18 and 65 years and at least one contact with mental health services in 1993. Data concerning QOL were recorded in seven sites from four countries: France, Portugal, Ireland and Spain, and were obtained using the Baker and Intagliata scale. At baseline, 339 patients answered the QOL questionnaire. At one-year follow-up, Spain could not participate, so only 263 patients were contacted and 219 agreed to take part. QOL was compared across centres by areas and according to a global index. QOL was correlated with presence of clinical and social problems, needs for care and interventions provided during the one-year follow-up. Results We did not find any link between gender and QOL. There were some significant differences between centres concerning many items. What is more, these differences were relative: in Lisbon where the lowest level of satisfaction was recorded, people were satisfied with food but highly dissatisfied with finances, whereas in St Etienne, where the highest level of satisfaction was recorded, people were less satisfied with food when they were more satisfied with finances. The evolution in one year among those respondents who took part in the follow-up (excluding the subjects from Granada) showed different patterns depending on the items. Conclusion The four countries have different resources and patients live in rather different conditions. However, the main differences as far as their QOL is concerned very much depend on extra-psychiatric variables, principally marital status and income. PMID:16984637

  9. Adjusting Mortality for Loss to Follow-Up: Analysis of Five ART Programmes in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yiannoutsos, Constantin; Weigel, Ralf; Wood, Robin; Messou, Eugène; Boulle, Andrew; Egger, Matthias; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evaluation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) programmes in sub-Saharan Africa is difficult because many patients are lost to follow-up. Outcomes in these patients are generally unknown but studies tracing patients have shown mortality to be high. We adjusted programme-level mortality in the first year of antiretroviral treatment (ART) for excess mortality in patients lost to follow-up. Methods and Findings Treatment-naïve patients starting combination ART in five programmes in Côte d'Ivoire, Kenya, Malawi and South Africa were eligible. Patients whose last visit was at least nine months before the closure of the database were considered lost to follow-up. We filled missing survival times in these patients by multiple imputation, using estimates of mortality from studies that traced patients lost to follow-up. Data were analyzed using Weibull models, adjusting for age, sex, ART regimen, CD4 cell count, clinical stage and treatment programme. A total of 15,915 HIV-infected patients (median CD4 cell count 110 cells/µL, median age 35 years, 68% female) were included; 1,001 (6.3%) were known to have died and 1,285 (14.3%) were lost to follow-up in the first year of ART. Crude estimates of mortality at one year ranged from 5.7% (95% CI 4.9–6.5%) to 10.9% (9.6–12.4%) across the five programmes. Estimated mortality hazard ratios comparing patients lost to follow-up with those remaining in care ranged from 6 to 23. Adjusted estimates based on these hazard ratios ranged from 10.2% (8.9–11.6%) to 16.9% (15.0–19.1%), with relative increases in mortality ranging from 27% to 73% across programmes. Conclusions Naïve survival analysis ignoring excess mortality in patients lost to follow-up may greatly underestimate overall mortality, and bias ART programme evaluations. Adjusted mortality estimates can be obtained based on excess mortality rates in patients lost to follow-up. PMID:21152392

  10. Psychological type: a 32-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bradway, K; Detloff, W

    1996-10-01

    This study is a follow-up to three previous studies of psychological type published in this Journal in 1964, 1976 and 1978 by Bradway, Bradway and Detloff, and Bradway and Joseph Wheelwright. Participants in all of our studies were limited to Jungian analysts and candidates. Participants of the first two studies and of the current study were from California; participants of the 1978 study included the participants from the previous study plus persons attending the 1974 International Congress in London. In 1993 we sent letters to the 232 current analysts and candidates in the San Francisco and Los Angeles C.G. Jung Institutes, as well as to the nine participants in our 1974 study who were no longer members of the Institutes but could be located, asking them to fill out a questionnaire that included self-typing, and to self-administer the Gray-Wheelwrights Jungian Type Survey (GW). The response rate was high: 196 or 81% of the 241 persons to whom we sent letters returned filled-in questionnaires and GWs; all 67 or 100% of the participants in the 1974 study who could be located returned the filled-in material. Eight of those 67 had also been in the 1961 study. The current study provides data on the changes in psychological type over time, in some instances over a period of 32 years. It added for the first time a consideration of analysts' rating of themselves as primarily clinically or symbolically orientated, and a survey of analyst opinions as to the determinants of psychological type. Summarizing the results: A smaller percentage of analysts typed themselves as intuitive thinking than in 1961; the percentages of congruence between self-typing and the Gray-Wheelwrights scores in the three dimensions (introvert/extravert, sensation/intuition, and thinking/feeling) in 1961, 1974 and 1993 are between 76% and 96%; changes in typology from 1961 to 1993 occur more frequently in the younger age group than in the older age group; 65% of the participants considered the distinction between clinical and symbolic important, but only 41% rated themselves as either primarily clinically oriented or symbolically oriented with essentially no relationship between that orientation and typology; a sub-study of typology of partners within this study does not support the concept that opposites marry; according to the opinion of this group of analysts and candidates as to the determinants of adult typology, genetics (chromosomes) is distinctly the strongest contributor with family dynamics a not-very-close next contributor. PMID:8962536

  11. A prospective follow-up study of first-episode acute transient psychotic disorder in Latvia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute and transient psychotic disorder (ATPD) has been described as an acute psychosis with brief onset and polymorphous symptomatology (WHO, 1993). The study of ATPD is growing increasingly relevant as scientists start an active discussion of the possibility of changing the ATPD classification in the next International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). The aims of this study were to describe the clinical features of the index episode of ATPD in patients in Latvia, to analyse the stability and longitudinal changes of the diagnosis, to explore potential correlations between the sociodemographic and disease characteristics and to describe stressful life events before the first ATPD episode. Methods A prospective follow-up study of all first-time admitted patients from the Riga Centre of Psychiatry and Addiction Disorders who fulfilled the ICD-10 criteria for ATPD (WHO, 1993) during the 15-month period from 9 January 2010 to 30 March 2011 and followed up until 31 October 2012. Stressful life events, demographics and clinical features during the index episode were assessed. Results One hundred two patients were admitted with first-episode ATPD. The majority were females (60.7%). Over an average 26.5-month follow-up period, 59.8% of the patients were not readmitted. The overall stability rate of ATPD diagnosis in our sample was 67.4% (p?=?0.0001). In the subgroup of patients who were readmitted, 70.7% had their diagnosis converted to schizophrenia in subsequent visits. Stressful life events before the first episode were found in 49.0% of first-episode ATPD patients. Thought disorder was found to be the strongest statistically significant predictor of ATPD diagnosis conversation to schizophrenia (odds ratio 4.3), with high Wald's criterion (9.435) in binary logistic regression. Conclusions ATPD is prevalent in Latvia, with rather high overall stability rate. Combining these data from first-episode ATPD patients in Latvia with data from other countries may help predict the development of the disease and provide a basis for potential changes to ICD-11. PMID:24502369

  12. Mortality patterns among workers exposed to acrylamide: 1994 follow up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. M. Marsh; L. J. Lucas; A. O. Youk; L. C. Schall

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update the mortality experience of a cohort of 8508 workers with potential exposure to acrylamide at three plants in the United States from 1984-94. METHODS: Analyses of standardised mortality ratios (SMR) with national and local rates and relative risk (RR) regression modelling were performed to assess site specific cancer risks by demographic and work history factors, and exposure

  13. Heavy vehicle industry site visits: comments from companies and conclusions from technical committee

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.

    1998-02-01

    This report documents the results of several visits with industry as part of the Department of Energy (DOE), office of Transportation Technology, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology, supported Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamics Project. The purpose of the DOE Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamics Project is to use government resources to bring the aerodynamic expertise available in government organizations and academia to bear in assisting the heavy vehicle industry to reduce aerodynamic drag on trucks. The obvious payback from this investment is the reduction in fuel usage and derivative reduction in the US's dependence on foreign oil imports. This report covers 2 projects: (1) The stated purpose of Project 1 was to provide near-term impact through emphasis on existing tools and capabilities and to focus on the trailer drag problem. (2) The stated purpose of Project 2 was to provide the tools necessary to accomplish the longer term goal of a fully-integrated, aerodynamic tractor-trailer combination.

  14. Educational Goals and Student Flow: Model for Institutional Student Flow and Follow-up. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Duane

    This report details the development and implementation of a follow-up system, by Western Texas Community College (WTCC) as a subcontractor for Project FOLLOW-UP, relating student flow patterns to educational goals. Phase I of this project involved establishment of a data base which included elements designed to reveal an adequate picture of…

  15. Adults with Congenital Heart Trouble Need Follow-Up, Experts Say

    MedlinePLUS

    ... html Adults With Congenital Heart Trouble Need Follow-Up, Experts Say New American Heart Association guidelines outline ... been 'fixed' and they don't need follow-up," said Bhatt, director of the Adult Congenital Heart ...

  16. 77 FR 69896 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Follow-Up...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ...Request; Follow-Up Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact Evaluation...Follow-Up Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact Evaluation...American Recovery Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Green Jobs and Health Care Grants Impact...

  17. Cervical spine involvement in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis - MRI follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To describe MRI and clinical findings in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with cervical spine involvement at onset and follow-up under therapy. Methods 13 patients with signs of cervical spine involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis with a median disease duration of 1.7 years were included in the study. Clinical records and MR images were retrospectively analyzed according to symptoms and findings concerning the cervical spine. Results At the onset of cervical spine involvement all patients showed limited range of motion, whereas only 5 of them complained of pain. In MR images joint hyperintensity, contrast enhancement, malalignment, ankylosis, erosion and narrowing of the spinal canal at cranio-cervical junction were found at 28, 32, 15, 2, 2 and 3 sites in 12 (93%), 13 (100%), 8 (62%), 2 (15%), 2 and 3 (20%) patients respectively. 3 of the 5 patients with pain (60%) showed ankylosis, erosions or narrowing of the spinal canal at cranio-cervical junction on MRI. At follow-up - after a median disease duration of cervical spine arthritis of 2.1 years and a variable duration of treatment with methotrexate (all patients) and biological agents (12 patients) - joint hyperintensity, enhancement and malalignment decreased to 15, 19 and 6 sites in 10 (77%), 11 (85%) and 3 (20%) patients respectively whereas ankylosis, erosion and narrowing of the spinal canal at cranio-cervical junction increased to 7, 6 and 4 sites in 3 (20%), 4 (31%) and 4 patients respectively. Pain was no longer reported, but 9 of 13 (69%) patients still had a limited range of motion with 6 of them (46%) showing skeletal changes on MRI. Conclusions This first MRI based follow-up study shows that cervical spine arthritis can follow a severe disease course in juvenile arthritis. While malalignments and inflammation sites decreased osseous changes with erosions, ankylosis, and narrowing of the spinal canal increased under treatment despite only minor subjective complaints. Therefore close MRI monitoring of these patients appears to be reasonable. PMID:24593886

  18. Predictors of Follow-Up Completion Among Runaway Substance-Abusing Adolescents and their Primary Caretakers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rikki Patton; Natasha Slesnick; Denitza Bantchevska; Xiamei Guo; Yunhwan Kim

    2011-01-01

    Follow-up rates reported among longitudinal studies that focus on runaway adolescents and their families are relatively low.\\u000a Identifying factors associated with follow-up completion might be useful for improving follow-up rates and therefore study\\u000a validity. The present study explored how individual- and family-level constructs, as well as research project activities,\\u000a influence the follow-up completion rate among runaway adolescents (N = 140) and their

  19. USFS Administrative Tour The Aspen FACE site hosted a visit of some 36 senior

    E-print Network

    of the document, which is due out later this year. Percy Heads IUFRO Task Force on Carbon Sequestration Kevin of foresters about carbon sequestration in the world's forests. The Task Force web site is: http

  20. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Follow-up Questionnaire data set provides information concerning the activities within the household during the sampling week. The information is from 201 Follow-up Questionnaires for 91 households. Medication and supplemental dietary information is provided. The Follow-up...

  1. 49 CFR 655.47 - Follow-up testing after returning to duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Follow-up testing after returning to duty. 655...Types of Testing § 655.47 Follow-up testing after returning to duty. An employer shall conduct follow-up testing of each employee who returns to...

  2. 49 CFR 655.47 - Follow-up testing after returning to duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Follow-up testing after returning to duty. 655...Types of Testing § 655.47 Follow-up testing after returning to duty. An employer shall conduct follow-up testing of each employee who returns to...

  3. 20 CFR 664.450 - What are follow-up services for youth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are follow-up services for youth? 664.450 Section 664...and Parameters § 664.450 What are follow-up services for youth? (a) Follow-up services for youth may include: (1) The...

  4. 20 CFR 672.325 - What timeframes apply for follow-up services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false What timeframes apply for follow-up services? 672.325 Section 672.325 Employees...Requirements § 672.325 What timeframes apply for follow-up services? Follow-up services must be provided to all YouthBuild...

  5. 20 CFR 672.325 - What timeframes apply for follow-up services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false What timeframes apply for follow-up services? 672.325 Section 672.325 Employees...Requirements § 672.325 What timeframes apply for follow-up services? Follow-up services must be provided to all YouthBuild...

  6. 20 CFR 664.450 - What are follow-up services for youth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are follow-up services for youth? 664.450 Section 664...and Parameters § 664.450 What are follow-up services for youth? (a) Follow-up services for youth may include: (1) The...

  7. 20 CFR 664.450 - What are follow-up services for youth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are follow-up services for youth? 664.450 Section 664...and Parameters § 664.450 What are follow-up services for youth? (a) Follow-up services for youth may include: (1) The...

  8. 49 CFR 655.47 - Follow-up testing after returning to duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Follow-up testing after returning to duty. 655...Types of Testing § 655.47 Follow-up testing after returning to duty. An employer shall conduct follow-up testing of each employee who returns to...

  9. 20 CFR 672.325 - What timeframes apply for follow-up services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false What timeframes apply for follow-up services? 672.325 Section 672.325 Employees...Requirements § 672.325 What timeframes apply for follow-up services? Follow-up services must be provided to all YouthBuild...

  10. 49 CFR 655.47 - Follow-up testing after returning to duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Follow-up testing after returning to duty. 655...Types of Testing § 655.47 Follow-up testing after returning to duty. An employer shall conduct follow-up testing of each employee who returns to...

  11. Taking a Second Look at Heat Illness in MICASA, Follow Up 2

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Taking a Second Look at Heat Illness in MICASA, Follow Up 2 Alondra Vega Western Center farm worker households from the city of Mendota · It began in 2006-2007 and the study had two follow up interviews since then. · Questions regarding heat illness were implemented in the first follow-up

  12. 20 CFR 664.450 - What are follow-up services for youth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are follow-up services for youth? 664.450 Section 664...and Parameters § 664.450 What are follow-up services for youth? (a) Follow-up services for youth may include: (1) The...

  13. 49 CFR 655.47 - Follow-up testing after returning to duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Follow-up testing after returning to duty. 655...Types of Testing § 655.47 Follow-up testing after returning to duty. An employer shall conduct follow-up testing of each employee who returns to...

  14. Cohort profile update: 2004 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort Study. Body composition, mental health and genetic assessment at the 6 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Santos, Iná S; Barros, Aluísio J D; Matijasevich, Alicia; Zanini, Roberta; Chrestani Cesar, Maria Aurora; Camargo-Figuera, Fabio Alberto; Oliveira, Isabel O; Barros, Fernando C; Victora, Cesar G

    2014-10-01

    This is an update of the 2004 Pelotas Birth Cohort profile, originally published in 2011. In view of the high prevalence of overweight and mental health problems among Brazilian children, together with the availability of state-of-the-art equipment to assess body composition and diagnostic tests for mental health in childhood, the main outcomes measured in the fifth follow-up (mean age 6.8 years) included child body composition, mental health and cognitive ability. A total of 3722 (90.2%) of the original mothers/carers were interviewed and their children examined in a clinic where they underwent whole-body dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), air displacement plethysmography and a 3D photonic scan. Saliva samples for DNA were obtained. Clinical psychologists applied the Development and Well-Being Assessment questionnaire and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to all children. Results are being compared with those of the two earlier cohorts to assess the health effects of economic growth and full implementation of public policies aimed at reducing social inequalities in the past 30 years. For further information visit the programme website at [http://www.epidemio-ufpel.org.br/site/content/coorte_2004/questionarios.php]. Applications to use the data should be made by contacting 2004 cohort researchers and filling in the application form available at [http://www.epidemio-ufpel.org.br/site/content/estudos/formularios.php]. PMID:25063002

  15. The 49th hour: analysis of a follow-up medication and vaccine dispensing field test.

    PubMed

    Puerini, Raymond; Caum, Jessica; Francis, Natalie; Alles, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax response plans, exercises, and assessments over the past decade have focused almost exclusively on the first 48 hours of the public health response following a jurisdiction-wide exposure and provision of an initial 10-day supply of antibiotics from the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS). But mass dispensing of the subsequent 50-day course of antibiotics and administration of the 3-dose vaccine series have received considerably less attention, although these follow-up activities may prove even more complex. In 2014, the Philadelphia Department of Public Health (PDPH) made its first foray into this next frontier of mass prophylaxis planning by: (1) researching patient safety and adherence considerations relevant to the antibiotics in the SNS; (2) designing a model for a second-visit antibiotic and vaccine point of dispensing (POD), including development of an enhanced screening protocol that assumes a higher level of medical responsibility; and (3) field testing this model during a real seasonal influenza vaccination clinic to assess throughput and accuracy and to evaluate the resources needed to operationalize this model. While the observations and data presented here provide some framework for local long-term mass prophylaxis planning efforts, many areas remain undefined, including the distribution of responsibilities among the public health and healthcare communities to ensure patient safety. In addition to presenting findings, the larger intent of this article is to initiate a dialogue with other stakeholders at the local, state, and federal levels to advance long-term mass prophylaxis planning. PMID:25812429

  16. The NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities Site Visit Program: Observations About Institutional Oversight of Recombinant and Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecule Research

    PubMed Central

    Bayha, Ryan; Harris, Kathryn L.; Shipp, Allan C.; Corrigan-Curay, Jacqueline; Wolinetz, Carrie D.

    2015-01-01

    Institutions that receive National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding for research involving recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid molecules are required, as a term and condition of their funding, to comply with the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules (NIH Guidelines) (NIH, 2013). Under the NIH Guidelines, institutions must establish and register an Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) with the NIH. The IBC is then responsible for reviewing and approving research projects subject to the NIH Guidelines. The IBC review of projects involving recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid molecules is critical to ensuring that such research is conducted in a safe and responsible manner. In 2006, staff from NIH began conducting educational site visits to institutions that had an IBC registered with NIH. The purpose of these site visits is to assist IBCs with their institutional programs of oversight for recombinant or synthetic nucleic molecules. Based on our findings, the site visit program has been beneficial to institutional biosafety programs. The information gathered during the site visits has allowed NIH to tailor its educational materials to help institutions address their oversight challenges. Additionally, since NIH’s visits are primarily educational in nature, we have been able to foster a positive environment in which IBC members and staff feel comfortable reaching out to NIH for advice and assistance.

  17. Persistent asthma due to isocyanates. A follow-up study of subjects with occupational asthma due to toluene diisocyanate (TDI)

    SciTech Connect

    Mapp, C.E.; Corona, P.C.; De Marzo, N.; Fabbri, L.

    1988-06-01

    Thirty-five subjects with occupational asthma due to toluene diisocyanate (TDI) exposure were examined. All the subjects were studied with inhalation challenges with TDI and with methacholine. TDI asthma was documented by a positive inhalation challenge to low levels of TDI. Airway responsiveness to methacholine was in the range of asthmatic patients at the time of diagnosis. After an average follow-up interval of 10 months, all the subjects were re-examined. Of the 35 subjects examined, 30 subjects (85.7%) left the workplace, and 5 remained in the same job. Twenty-seven subjects (77.1%) continued to have asthmatic attacks requiring medication for relief of symptoms. At follow-up examination, TDI asthma was documented by a positive inhalation challenge to TDI in 27 subjects. Of these 27 TDI reactors, 22 subjects were removed from occupational exposure to TDI. The TDI reactors had persistent respiratory symptoms and airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. At follow-up visit, 8 subjects (22.9%) lost sensitization to TDI; 5 subjects (62.5%) in this group had also normal airway responsiveness to methacholine after removal from exposure. Only 1 subject among the TDI nonreactors complained of mild respiratory symptoms. At diagnosis, there were no significant differences between subjects who recovered and those who did not with regard to age, smoking habits, atopy, duration of exposure to isocyanates, duration of symptoms, baseline FEV1 (% pred), and baseline airway responsiveness to methacholine.

  18. Guidelines for Setting Up a Model Visitation Site for Demonstration of Collaborative Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Devi

    California's Education Transition Center has developed a network of exemplary collaborative transition programs which agree to provide site visitors with information about school, community, and private programs that can improve school-to-adult-life transition services for "at risk" students. This document contains guidelines prepared to assist…

  19. Geomorphic stability field reconnaissance site visit, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, December 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-05-01

    To license the Canonsburg site, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has required that geomorphic stability be demonstrated for the stream banks and slopes around the perimeter of the site for 200 years. Based on a study of the stream channel and slopes, it has been determined that due to recent human intervention, the required geomorphic stability cannot now be achieved without installation of erosion protection works and continued monitoring of the site. The Pittsburgh District Corps of Engineers has plans to channelize Chartiers Creek and install erosion protection rock within the next 5 or 6 years, if local government agencies raise the necessary matching funds. Much of the stream bank and slope adjacent to the ``fenced in`` western area of the site is anticipated to remain geomorphically stable for more than 20 years, but less than 200 years without human intervention. Therefore in much of this area, the Corps of Engineers will have adequate time to perform its work without jeopardizing the integrity of the controlled area. In contrast, two approximately 200-foot (ft) (60-meter [m]) long portions of the stream channel located north-northwest of the encapsulation area are subject to active stream erosion that threatens the integrity of the controlled area. These areas should be fixed by installation of erosion protection rock within the next 2 years.

  20. Methods for successful follow-up of elusive urban populations: an ethnographic approach with homeless men.

    PubMed Central

    Conover, S.; Berkman, A.; Gheith, A.; Jahiel, R.; Stanley, D.; Geller, P. A.; Valencia, E.; Susser, E.

    1997-01-01

    Public health is paying increasing attention to elusive urban populations such as the homeless, street drug users, and illegal immigrants. Yet, valid data on the health of these populations remain scarce; longitudinal research, in particular, has been hampered by poor follow-up rates. This paper reports on the follow-up methods used in two randomized clinical trials among one such population, namely, homeless men with mental illness. Each of the two trials achieved virtually complete follow-up over 18 months. The authors describe the ethnographic approach to follow-up used in these trials and elaborate its application to four components of the follow-up: training interviewers, tracking participants, administering the research office, and conducting assessments. The ethnographic follow-up method is adaptable to other studies and other settings, and may provide a replicable model for achieving high follow-up rates in urban epidemiologic studies. PMID:9211004

  1. Parental visiting and foster care reunification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rae Newton; William Ganger

    1996-01-01

    Parental visiting has long been a crucial factor in reunification decisions for children in foster care. The purposes of the present study, part of a larger follow-up investigation of permanency planning for children in foster care, were to correlate parental visiting with permanency planning outcomes and to develop a logistic regression model predicting family reunification. Findings show that the majority

  2. Loss to follow-up of stable antiretroviral therapy patients in a decentralized down-referral model of care in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Cara; Osih, Regina; Jaffer, Ambereen

    2011-12-01

    A retrospective record review was conducted for patients down referred to primary health care facilities between 2007 and 2009 to assess the rate and reported reasons for loss to follow-up among stable antiretroviral patients in a down-referral model of care in Johannesburg, South Africa. Missing patients were traced telephonically. Of 3361 patients down referred, 4.11% were lost to follow-up. Most patients who were lost to follow-up were lost at the transfer stage between initiation and maintenance sites. Decentralization and nurse management of ART should be prioritized to increase access to and retention in HIV/AIDS care. PMID:21857353

  3. The role of the neonatal nurse practitioner in post NICU follow-up.

    PubMed

    Beal, J A; Tiani, T B; Saia, T A; Rothstein, E E

    1999-06-01

    This descriptive correlational study explored the role of neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) in postneonatal intensive care unit follow-up. A random sample of 505 NNPs completed a researcher-developed instrument pretested for reliability and validity. There was overwhelming agreement (96%) that a role exists for NNPs in follow-up. In total, 52% felt qualified to provide follow-up and 22% were currently in the role. NNPs with previous primary care experience (P = 0.010) were more involved in follow-up. NNPs with additional certification (P = 0.016) or previous primary care experience (P = 0.003) felt more qualified to provide follow-up care. Facilitators and barriers to the role were identified by NNPs providing follow-up care. PMID:10633667

  4. Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia: follow-up for cancer incidence and mortality.

    PubMed

    Rahu, Kaja; Auvinen, Anssi; Hakulinen, Timo; Tekkel, Mare; Inskip, Peter D; Bromet, Evelyn J; Boice, John D; Rahu, Mati

    2013-06-01

    This study examined cancer incidence (1986-2008) and mortality (1986-2011) among the Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers in comparison with the Estonian male population. The cohort of 4810 men was followed through nationwide population, mortality and cancer registries. Cancer and death risks were measured by standardised incidence ratio (SIR) and standardised mortality ratio (SMR), respectively. Poisson regression was used to analyse the effects of year of arrival, duration of stay and time since return on cancer and death risks. The SIR for all cancers was 1.06 with 95% confidence interval 0.93-1.20 (232 cases). Elevated risks were found for cancers of the pharynx, the oesophagus and the joint category of alcohol-related sites. No clear evidence of an increased risk of thyroid cancer, leukaemia or radiation-related cancer sites combined was apparent. The SMR for all causes of death was 1.02 with 95% confidence interval 0.96-1.08 (1018 deaths). Excess mortality was observed for mouth and pharynx cancer, alcohol-related cancer sites together and suicide. Duration of stay rather than year of arrival was associated with increased mortality. Twenty-six years of follow-up of this cohort indicates no definite health effects attributable to radiation, but the elevated suicide risk has persisted. PMID:23532116

  5. M.A. English or Technical Writing Graduate Certificate: How to Get Started Please visit the following sites to learn more about our Graduate Programs.

    E-print Network

    Selmic, Sandra

    M.A. English or Technical Writing Graduate Certificate: How to Get Started Greetings! Please visit the following sites to learn more about our Graduate Programs. The best place to begin is by reading the Graduate English Handbook Current tuition and fee rates are available through Louisiana Tech's Comptroller

  6. The Essen Stroke Risk Score in One-Year Follow-Up Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabine Fitzek; Lutz Leistritz; Otto W. Witte; Peter U. Heuschmann; Clemens Fitzek

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: We aimed to validate the usefulness of the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS) to predict stroke recurrence in a hospital-based follow-up study. Methods: We followed up 730 consecutive patients admitted to a neurological stroke unit in Berlin, Germany, with ischemic stroke (IS) or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The mean follow-up time was 13.4 months (SD 5.9). We

  7. Lost but Not Forgotten: Attrition and Follow-up in the Indonesia Family Life Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Duncan Thomas; Elizabeth Frankenberg; James P. Smith

    2001-01-01

    Data from three waves of the Indonesia Family Life Survey (IFLS) are used to examine follow-up and attrition in the context of a large scale panel survey conducted in a low-income setting. Household-level attrition between the baseline and first follow-up four years later is less than 6 percent; the cumulative attrition between the baseline and second follow-up after a five-year

  8. Biopsy follow-up in patients with isolated atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) in prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Leone, Luca; Lacetera, Vito; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cantoro, Ubaldo; Conti, Alessandro; Sbrollini, Giulia; Quaresima, Luigi; Mariani, Luciana; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Galosi, Andrea Benedetto

    2014-12-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer (PCA) was evaluated in 155 patients with isolated Atypical Small Acinar Proliferation (ASAP) found on initial prostate biopsy, after a medium-term follow-up (40 months) with at least one re-biopsy. Clinical and histological data were analysed. Cancer was detected in 81 of 155 (52.3%). The cancer detection rate was 71.6%, 91.3%, 97.5%, 100% at the 1st re-biopsy, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th rebiopsy respectively. At the uni- and multivariate analyses, prostate volume (? 30 cc), transition zone volume (? 10 cc), small core length at the initial biopsy (? 10 mm) and few number of cores at initial biopsy (? 8) are predictive of cancer. Furthermore, tumour characteristics on the whole surgical specimens was assessed in 30 men: 13 of 30 (43 %) had clinically relevant cancer (volume > 0.5 ml or/and Gleason score ? 7, or pT3). Most of relevant cancers were detected in the distal apex, anterior gland and midline. These anatomical sites could be under-sampled at the initial biopsy using the transrectal approach. Our data suggest that follow-up biopsy is recommended in all cases of isolated ASAP detected after biopsy using endfire transrectal probe. The re-biopsy strategy should increase the number of cores (or a saturation biopsy), focusing on area of ASAP in the initial biopsy, but also including the under-sampled areas (anterior gland, distal apex and midline) to detect clinically relevant cancers. PMID:25641465

  9. Endoscopic follow-up of positive fecal occult blood testing in the Ontario FOBT Project

    PubMed Central

    Paszat, Lawrence; Rabeneck, Linda; Kiefer, Lori; Mai, Verna; Ritvo, Paul; Sullivan, Terry

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Ontario FOBT Project is a pilot study of fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) for colorectal cancer screening conducted among age-eligible volunteers (50 to 75 years) in 12 of 37 public health regions in Ontario. METHODS: Volunteers responded to invitations from primary care practitioners (PCPs) in six regions, and from public health programs in the remaining regions. FOBT collection kits were distributed from routine laboratory specimen collection sites, to which completed kits were returned. Results were sent to PCPs in all 12 regions, with copies sent to the study office at Cancer Care Ontario (Toronto, Ontario). Follow-up of positive results was at the discretion of the PCPs. The study files contained the unique Ontario Health Insurance Numbers, the date of the analyses, the number of satisfactory slides and the results for each slide. The Ontario Health Insurance Numbers were encrypted for each participant, and along with the study file, were linked to medical billing claims, hospital records and aggregate demographic data. RESULTS: Among participants with positive results (men 3.5% and women 2.2%), the median time from date of FOBT analysis to date of colonoscopy was 121 days among men and 202 days among women. At the end of follow-up, after positive FOBT (six to 17 months), 73% of men and 56% of women had proceeded to colonoscopy. CONCLUSION: Although colonoscopy appeared to be acceptable to the majority of participants with positive FOBT, accessibility problems was the likely explanation for lengthy intervals between the date of positive FOBT and its performance. Differences between the experiences of men and women require further investigation. PMID:17571172

  10. Culture-independent pilot study of microbiota colonizing open fractures and association with severity, mechanism, location, and complication from presentation to early outpatient follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hannigan, Geoffrey D; Hodkinson, Brendan P; McGinnis, Kelly; Tyldsley, Amanda S; Anari, Jason B; Horan, Annamarie D; Grice, Elizabeth A; Mehta, Samir

    2014-04-01

    Precise identification of bacteria associated with post-injury infection, co-morbidities, and outcomes could have a tremendous impact in the management and treatment of open fractures. We characterized microbiota colonizing open fractures using culture-independent, high-throughput DNA sequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes, and analyzed those communities with respect to injury mechanism, severity, anatomical site, and infectious complications. Thirty subjects presenting to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania for acute care of open fractures were enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Microbiota was collected from wound center and adjacent skin upon presentation to the emergency department, intraoperatively, and at two outpatient follow-up visits at approximately 25 and 50 days following initial presentation. Bacterial community composition and diversity colonizing open fracture wounds became increasingly similar to adjacent skin microbiota with healing. Mechanism of injury, severity, complication, and location were all associated with various aspects of microbiota diversity and composition. The results of this pilot study demonstrate the diversity and dynamism of the open fracture microbiota, and their relationship to clinical variables. Validation of these preliminary findings in larger cohorts may lead to the identification of microbiome-based biomarkers of complication risk and/or to aid in management and treatment of open fractures. PMID:24395335

  11. Predictive values of GPs’ suspicion of serious disease: a population-based follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Hjertholm, Peter; Moth, Grete; Ingeman, Mads Lind; Vedsted, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge is sparse on the prevalence of suspicion of cancer and other serious diseases in general practice. Likewise, little is known about the possible implications of this suspicion on future healthcare use and diagnoses. Aim To study the prevalence of GPs’ suspicions of cancer or other serious diseases and analyse how this suspicion predicted the patients’ healthcare use and diagnoses of serious disease. Design and setting Prospective population-based cohort study of 4518 patients consulting 404 GPs in a mix of urban, semi-urban and rural practices in Central Denmark Region during 2008–2009. Method The GPs registered consultations in 1 work day, including information on their suspicion of the presence of cancer or another serious disease. The patients were followed up for use of healthcare services and new diagnoses through the use of national registers. Results Prevalence of suspicion was 5.7%. Suspicion was associated with an increase in referrals (prevalence ratio [PR] = 2.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.22 to 2.96), especially for diagnostic imaging (PR = 3.95, 95% CI = 2.80 to 5.57), increased risk of a new diagnosis of cancer or another serious disease within 2 months (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.93 to 4.62) — especially for cancer (HR = 7.55, 95% CI = 2.66 to 21.39) — and increased use of general practice (relative risk [RR] = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.24) and hospital visits (RR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.62 to 2.23). The positive predictive value of a GP suspicion was 9.8% (95% CI = 6.4 to 14.1) for cancer or another serious disease within 2 months. Conclusion A GP suspicion of serious disease warrants further investigation, and the organisation of the healthcare system should ensure direct access from the primary sector to specialised tests. PMID:24868072

  12. Supported local implementation of clinical guidelines in psychiatry: a two-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The gap between evidence-based guidelines for clinical care and their use in medical settings is well recognized and widespread. Only a few implementation studies of psychiatric guidelines have been carried out, and there is a lack of studies on their long-term effects. The aim of this study was to measure compliance to clinical guidelines for treatment of patients with depression and patients with suicidal behaviours, two years after an actively supported implementation. Methods Six psychiatric clinics in Stockholm, Sweden, participated in an implementation of the guidelines. The guidelines were actively implemented at four of them, and the other two only received the guidelines and served as controls. The implementation activities included local implementation teams, seminars, regular feedback, and academic outreach visits. Compliance to guidelines was measured using quality indicators derived from the guidelines. At baseline, measurements of quality indicators, part of the guidelines, were abstracted from medical records in order to analyze the gap between clinical guidelines and current practice. On the basis of this, a series of seminars was conducted to introduce the guidelines according to local needs. Local multidisciplinary teams were established to monitor the process. Data collection took place after 6, 12, and 24 months and a total of 2,165 patient records were included in the study. Results The documentation of the quality indicators improved from baseline in the four clinics with an active implementation, whereas there were no changes, or a decline, in the two control clinics. The increase was recorded at six months, and persisted over 12 and 24 months. Conclusions Compliance to the guidelines increased after active implementation and was sustained over the two-year follow-up. These results indicate that active local implementation of clinical guidelines involving clinicians can change behaviour and maintain compliance. PMID:20181013

  13. Home?Based Walking Exercise in Peripheral Artery Disease: 12?Month Follow?up of the Goals Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Criqui, Michael H.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zhao, Lihui; Liu, Kiang; Domanchuk, Kathryn; Spring, Bonnie; Tian, Lu; Kibbe, Melina; Liao, Yihua; Lloyd Jones, Donald; Rejeski, W. Jack

    2014-01-01

    Background We studied whether a 6?month group?mediated cognitive behavioral (GMCB) intervention for peripheral artery disease (PAD) participants, which promoted home?based walking exercise, improved 6?minute walk and other outcomes at 12?month follow?up, 6 months after completing the intervention, compared to a control group. Methods and Results We randomized PAD participants to a GMCB intervention or a control group. During phase I (months 1 to 6), the intervention used group support and self?regulatory skills during weekly on?site meetings to help participants adhere to home?based exercise. The control group received weekly on?site lectures on topics unrelated to exercise. Primary outcomes were measured at the end of phase I. During phase II (months 7 to 12), each group received telephone contact. Compared to controls, participants randomized to the intervention increased their 6?minute walk distance from baseline to 12?month follow?up, (from 355.4 to 381.9 m in the intervention versus 353.1 to 345.6 m in the control group; mean difference=+34.1 m; 95% confidence interval [CI]=+14.6, +53.5; P<0.001) and their Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ) speed score (from 36.1 to 46.5 in the intervention group versus 34.9 to 36.5 in the control group; mean difference =+8.8; 95% CI=+1.6, +16.1; P=0.018). Change in the WIQ distance score was not different between the 2 groups at 12?month follow?up (P=0.139). Conclusions A weekly on?site GMCB intervention that promoted home?based walking exercise intervention for people with PAD demonstrated continued benefit at 12?month follow?up, 6 months after the GMCB intervention was completed. Clinical Trial Registration URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00693940. PMID:24850615

  14. The Impact of Smoking on Clinical Outcomes After First Episode Psychosis: Longer-Term Outcome Findings From the EPPIC 800 Follow-Up Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Berk; Lisa P. Henry; Kathryn S. Elkins; Susy M. Harrigan; Meredith G. Harris; Helen Herrman; Henry J. Jackson; Patrick D. McGorry

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the impact of tobacco smoking on longer-term outcomes following a first episode of psychosis. METHODS: Data on 193 individuals were collected as part of a prospective follow-up visit of a cohort of patients after a mean of 7.5 years (SD = 0.8) after first treatment presentation. Primary outcome measures were positive and negative psychotic

  15. X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified VHE gamma-ray sources

    E-print Network

    Gerd Pühlhofer

    2008-11-23

    A large fraction of the recently discovered Galactic Very High Energy (VHE) source population remains unidentified to date. VHE gamma-ray emission traces high energy particles in these sources, but for example in case of hadronic processes also the gas density at the emission site. Moreover, the particles have sufficiently long lifetimes to be able to escape from their acceleration sites. Therefore, the gamma-ray sources or at least the areas of maximum surface brightness are in many cases spatially offset from the actual accelerators. A promising way to identify the objects in which the particles are accelerated seems to be to search for emission signatures of the acceleration process (like emission from shock-heated plasma). Also the particles themselves (through primary or secondary synchrotron emission) can be traced in lower wavebands. Those signatures are best visible in the X-ray band, and current X-ray observatories are well suited to conduct such follow-up observations. Some aspects of the current status of these investigations are reviewed.

  16. 41 CFR 102-2.105 - What information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis? 102-2.105 Section 102-2.105...information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis? In your follow-up analysis, provide information that may include,...

  17. 41 CFR 102-2.105 - What information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis? 102-2.105 Section 102-2.105...information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis? In your follow-up analysis, provide information that may include,...

  18. 41 CFR 102-2.105 - What information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis? 102-2.105 Section 102-2.105...information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis? In your follow-up analysis, provide information that may include,...

  19. 41 CFR 102-2.105 - What information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis? 102-2.105 Section 102-2.105...information must agencies include in their follow-up analysis? In your follow-up analysis, provide information that may include,...

  20. Immediate and follow-up findings after stent treatment for severe coarctation of aorta

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José Suárez de Lezo; Manuel Pan; Miguel Romero; Alfonso Medina; José Segura; Mercedes Lafuente; Djordje Pavlovic; Enrique Hernández; Francisco Melián; José Espada

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that stents implanted at the aorta become incorporated within the aortic wall and can be further expanded in growing animals. Few clinical studies have shown that the stent repair of severe coarctation of aorta provides excellent initial results, and little is known on the follow-up of these patients. We assessed the immediate and follow-up results obtained

  1. The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Yang, Raymond K.; Pettit, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of…

  2. Development and Initial Results of a Longitudinal Secondary Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Benjamin

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the literature and difficulties of school follow-up studies. Describes the purpose, design, and methodology of the Peel Secondary Follow-up study. Shows how results from the first round of the study raise important issues about students' expectations and how they are or are not borne out. (SB)

  3. A Research on Students' Needs for Follow-Up Curriculum of College English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Jie; Liu, Hengying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Increased universities and colleges offer the undergraduates with more follow-up courses with the further reform in college English education in China. An investigation on self-evaluation, difficulty, and willingness of undergraduates in learning English further was made in order to design more appropriate and adaptable follow-up courses. This…

  4. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations C Appendix C to...1356, App. C Appendix C to Part 1356—Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite...

  5. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations C Appendix C to...1356, App. C Appendix C to Part 1356—Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite...

  6. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations C Appendix C to...1356, App. C Appendix C to Part 1356—Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite...

  7. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations C Appendix C to...1356, App. C Appendix C to Part 1356—Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite...

  8. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations C Appendix C to...1356, App. C Appendix C to Part 1356—Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite...

  9. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--FOOD FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Follow-up Questionnaire data set provides information on the eating patterns and the food identification and preparation methods that occurred during the period the food sample was taken. The information is for 86 Food Follow-up Questionnaires for 86 households. In the...

  10. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--FOOD FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Follow-up Questionnaire data set provides information on the eating patterns and the food identification and preparation methods that occurred during the period the food sample was taken. The information is for 179 Food Follow-up Questionnaires for 179 households. In t...

  11. Automatic Identification of Critical Follow-Up Recommendation Sentences in Radiology Reports

    E-print Network

    Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    Automatic Identification of Critical Follow-Up Recommendation Sentences in Radiology Reports Identification of Critical Follow-Up Recommendation Sentences in Radiology Reports Meliha Yetisgen-Yildiz, PhD1 Informatics, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 2 Department of Radiology, School

  12. SUIVI MEDICAL DE SALARIES EXPOSES AU BERYLLIUM : Medical follow-up of beryllium -exposed workers

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 SUIVI MEDICAL DE SALARIES EXPOSES AU BERYLLIUM : Medical follow-up of beryllium - exposed workers-up of beryllium-exposed workers. Method: a medical follow-up of workers from a factory machining beryllium (Be) either plain or as an alloy started in 2001. Be Lymphocyte Proliferation Tests (LPT) were performed

  13. System Characteristic Opinion Study (SCOS-DELPHI). Project FOLLOW-UP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Jeannene

    Using the Delphi technique, the staff of Project FOLLOW-UP surveyed community college educators in Texas to determine desirable characteristics and uniformity of terminology and definitions for a proposed statewide student follow-up management information system for Texas community colleges. Of 234 individuals invited to become Delphi panel…

  14. Follow-Up Survey, Graduates of 1993-1994, Macomb Community College. Project #94-069.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Judith

    As part of a program of graduate follow-up studies, Macomb Community College (MCC), in Michigan, regularly conducts surveys of graduates or certificate earners 1, 3, and 5 years after their departure from the college. For the 1-year follow-up of the class of 1993-94, surveys were sent to all 2,808 alumni requesting information on characteristics,…

  15. 36 CFR 1239.26 - What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report...1239.26 What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report...transmission of the final report. NARA may take up to 60 days to review and comment on...

  16. 36 CFR 1239.26 - What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report...1239.26 What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report...transmission of the final report. NARA may take up to 60 days to review and comment on...

  17. 36 CFR 1239.26 - What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report...1239.26 What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report...transmission of the final report. NARA may take up to 60 days to review and comment on...

  18. 25 CFR 26.36 - What follow-up service is available after I complete training?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What follow-up service is available after I complete training? 26.36 Section...TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.36 What follow-up service is available after I complete training? Job...

  19. 36 CFR 1239.26 - What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report...1239.26 What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report...transmission of the final report. NARA may take up to 60 days to review and comment on...

  20. 36 CFR 1239.26 - What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 true What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report...1239.26 What are an agency's follow up obligations for an inspection report...transmission of the final report. NARA may take up to 60 days to review and comment on...

  1. 41 CFR 102-2.110 - When must agencies provide their follow-up letters?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false When must agencies provide their follow-up letters? 102-2.110 Section 102-2.110 Public Contracts... § 102-2.110 When must agencies provide their follow-up letters? (a) For an individual deviation, once the...

  2. Thirty-Month Follow-Up of Drinking Moderation Training for Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walitzer, Kimberly S.; Connors, Gerard J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the durability of a group-based drinking moderation training for heavily drinking women reporting low physical dependence on alcohol. A 30-month follow-up of participants was conducted based on a previous study of 144 women randomly assigned to treatment conditions (G. J. Connors & K. S. Walitzer, 2001). Thirty-month follow-up

  3. [Shared responsibility for follow-up of breast cancer patients. Experience of the Institut Curie].

    PubMed

    Chargari, Cyrus; Kirova, Youlia; Bollet, Marc; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Dendale, Rémi; Rizand, Philippe; de la Rochefordiere, Anne; Fourquet, Alain; Campana, François

    2008-11-01

    Routine follow-up of breast cancer patients in specialist clinics is standard practice. This follow-up involves regularly scheduled breast cancer check-ups during the disease-free period, in order to detect recurrence. However, demands on specialist resources rise with the increase in the prevalence of diagnosed breast cancer. Since September 2004, it was proposed in our Institut an alternative routine follow-up schedule. Some patients who are in remission for more than 5 years will be deferred to their general practitioner or gynaecologist for follow-up schedule, alternatively with their referent practitioner from the institut (oncologist, radiation oncologist, or surgeon). We herein present the preliminary results of this strategy, and demonstrate that partially transferring primary responsibility for follow-up does not compromise its quality. PMID:19036676

  4. The effect of follow-up inspections on critical violations identified during restaurant inspections.

    PubMed

    Waters, A Blake; VanDerslice, James; Porucznik, Christina; Kim, Jaewhan; Durrant, Lynne; DeLegge, Royal

    2015-06-01

    Follow-up inspections are recommended by the Food and Drug Administration as a tool to verify corrections to violations cited during restaurant inspections. The effectiveness of follow-up inspections as a tool in reducing critical violations is unknown, however. The purpose of the authors' study was to assess whether a serious violation that leads to a follow-up inspection reduces the probability of specific critical violations occurring during the next routine inspection. Outcome measures included poor personal hygiene, improper holding temperatures, substandard equipment cleanliness, potential cross contamination, and improper sanitizer concentration. The risk of having a violation increased for all targeted critical violations during inspections conducted after a follow-up inspection compared to restaurant inspections without a prior follow-up, when adjusting for restaurant type, inspector experience, and season. PMID:26058216

  5. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Ishveen; Chopra, Avijeet

    2014-01-01

    Background Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs) and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an understanding of the goals of follow-up care, and unique psychosocial aspects of care for these patients. The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies focusing on follow-up care in BCSs from the patient’s and physician’s perspective or from patterns of care and to integrate primary empirical evidence on the different aspects of follow-up care from these studies. Methods A comprehensive literature review and evaluation was conducted for all relevant publications in English from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2013 using electronic databases. Studies were included in the final review if they focused on BCS’s preferences and perceptions, physician’s perceptions, patterns of care, and effectiveness of follow-up care. Results A total of 47 studies assessing the different aspects of follow-up care were included in the review, with a majority of studies (n=13) evaluating the pattern of follow-up care in BCSs, followed by studies focusing on BCS’s perceptions (n=9) and preferences (n=9). Most of the studies reported variations in recommended frequency, duration, and intensity of follow-up care as well as frequency of mammogram screening. In addition, variations were noted in patient preferences for type of health care provider (specialist versus non-specialist). Further, BCSs perceived a lack of psychosocial support and information for management of side effects. Conclusion The studies reviewed, conducted in a range of settings, reflect variations in different aspects of follow-up care. Further, this review also provides useful insight into the unique concerns and needs of BCSs for follow-up care. Thus, clinicians and decision-makers need to understand BCS’s preferences in providing appropriate follow-up care tailored specifically for each patient. PMID:25210481

  6. Twenty-four Years of Follow-Up for a Hanford Plutonium Wound Case

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Antonio, Cheryl L.; Medina-Del Valle, Fernando

    2010-10-01

    A 1985 plutonium puncture wound resulted in the initial deposition of 48 kBq of transuranic alpha activity, primarily 239Pu and 241Am, in a worker’s right index finger. Surgical excisions in the week following reduced the long-term residual wound activity to 5.4 kBq, and 164 DTPA chelation therapy administrations over a 17-month period resulted in urinary excretion of about 7 kBq. The case was published in 1988, but now 20 additional years of follow-up data are available. Annual bioassay measurements have included wound counts, skeleton counts, liver counts, lung counts, axillary lymph node counts, and urinalyses for plutonium and 241Am. These measurements have shown relatively stable levels of 241Am at the wound site, with gradually increasing amounts of 241Am detected in the skeleton. Liver counts has shown erratic detection of 241Am, and lung counts indicate 241Am as shine from the axillary lymph nodes and skeleton. Urine excretion of 239Pu since termination of chelation therapy has typically ranged from 10 to 20 mBq d-1, with 241Am excretion being about 10% of that for 239Pu. In addition, the worker has undergone annual routine medical exams, which have not identified any adverse health effects associated with the intake.

  7. A NEPA follow-up study of DOE loan guarantee fuel ethanol plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Eddlemon, G.K.; Miller, R.L.; Webb, J.W.

    1989-04-01

    This study was implemented to examine and characterize the actual environmental impacts of three fuel ethanol plants constructed under the US Department of Energy, Office of Alcohol Fuels Loan Guarantee Program, and to compare actual impacts with those predicted about six years ago in environmental assessments (EAs) prepared for these facilities. The objective of the program, established under the Energy Security Act of 1980, was to conserve petroleum resources by promoting the use of fuel ethanol in motor vehicles. The plants were designed to produce fuel-grade ethanol for blending with gasoline and reflect differentfeedstocks, processes, fuel sources, and site locations. Although two of the facilities as constructed differed substantially from those assessed previously, actual environmental impacts generally occurred in the areas predicted by the EAs. Major impacts not anticipated include odor from air emissions, effects of wastewater discharge on operation of a municipal sewage treatment plant, possible classification of treated wastewater from a molasses-based process as a nuisance, and habitat losses from both vegetation removal and unforeseen construction of barge terminals. In all cases, impacts were judged to be not significantn the final outcome, either because plant management (or other involved parties) took corrective action or because the resources affected in these particular cases were not important. Mitigation measures reliedon in the EAs to limit adverse impacts to insignificant levels were implemented and were required by permit condition, law, or regulation. Future follow-up studies would benefit from the availability of ambientmonitoring data to more thoroughly characterize actual impacts.

  8. Two year follow up of pulmonary function values among welders in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Erkinjuntti-Pekka..., R.; Slater, T.; Cheng, S.; Fishwick, D.; Bradshaw, L.; Kimbell-, D; Dronfield, L.; Pearce, N.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine whether welding is a risk factor for an accelerated decline in pulmonary function. METHODS: 2 Year follow up of pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms among 54 welders and 38 non- welders in eight New Zealand welding sites. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in age, height, smoking habits, ethnicity, or total time in industrial work between welders and non-welders. No overall differences were noted in the changes of pulmonary function variables between the two study groups. However, when the comparison was restricted to smokers, welders had a significantly greater (p = 0.02) annual decline (88.8 ml) in FEV1 than non-welders, who had a slight non-significant annual increase (34.2 ml). Also, welders without respiratory protection or local exhaust ventilation while welding had a greater annual decline both in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) than welders with protection (p = 0.001 and 0.04, respectively). Among welders a significant association was found between the acute across shift change and the annual decline in FEV1. Chronic bronchitis was more common among welders (24%) than non-welders (5%). Only one welder (2%) but eight non- welders (21%) reported having asthma. CONCLUSIONS: Welders who smoked and welders working without local exhaust ventilation or respiratory protection have an increased risk of accelerated decline in FEV1.   PMID:10472307

  9. Interventional Radiology in the Diagnosis, Management, and Follow-Up of Pseudoaneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, A. N.; McGrath, F. P.; Lee, M. J., E-mail: mlee@rcsi.i [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Academic Radiology (Ireland)

    2009-01-15

    Arterial wall disruption, as a consequence of inflammation/infection, trauma (penetrating or blunt), or iatrogenic causes, may result in pseudoaneurysm formation. Currently, iatrogenic causes are increasing as a result of the growth of endovascular intervention. The frequency of other causes also seems to be increasing, but this may simply be the result of increased diagnosis by better imaging techniques, such as multidetector contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Clinically, pseudoaneurysms may be silent, may present with local or systemic signs, or can rupture with catastrophic consequences. Open surgical repair, previously the mainstay of treatment, has largely been replaced by image-guided occlusion methods. On the basis of an experience of over 100 pseudoaneurysms, treatments at various anatomical sites, imaging modalities used for accurate diagnosis, current changing therapeutic options for pseudoaneurysm management, approved embolization agents, and clinical follow-up requirements to ensure adequate treatment will be discussed. Image-guided direct percutaneous and endovascular embolization of pseudoaneurysms are established treatment options with favorable success rates and minimal morbidity. The pendulum has now swung from invasive surgical repair of pseudoaneurysms to that of image-guided interventional radiology.

  10. Computer-assisted follow-up register for the north-east of Scotland.

    PubMed

    Hedley, A J; Scott, A M; Weir, R D; Crooks, J

    1970-02-28

    An automated follow-up register for the detection of iatrogenic thyroid disease has been established as a joint venture between the general practitioners in the north-east of Scotland and the thyroid clinic of Aberdeen General Hospitals.The data-processing operations in the system are handled by an International Computers Limited 4/50 computer. Patients are followed up at predetermined intervals and the system has been designed to process, screen, and store clinical and biochemical follow-up data and report results to the patients, general practitioners, and the hospital records department. PMID:4907814

  11. Improved Newborn Hearing Screening Follow-up Results in More Infants Identified

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Suhana; Gaffney, Marcus; Eichwald, John

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal research suggests that efforts at the national, state, and local levels are leading to improved follow-up and data reporting. Data now support the assumption that the number of deaf or hard-of-hearing infants identified through newborn hearing screening increases with a reduction in the number of infants lost to follow-up. Documenting the receipt of services has made a noticeable impact on reducing lost to follow-up rates and early identification of infants with hearing loss; however, continued improvement and monitoring of services are still needed. PMID:23803975

  12. Loss to follow-up of adults in public HIV care systems in Mozambique: Identifying obstacles to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Micek, Mark A; Gimbel-Sherr, Kenneth; Baptista, Alberto João; Matediana, Eduardo; Montoya, Pablo; Pfeiffer, James; Melo, Armando; Gimbel-Sherr, Sarah; Johnson, Wendy; Gloyd, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) has expanded dramatically in resource-limited settings. Evaluating loss to follow-up from HIV testing through post-ART care can help identify obstacles to care. Methods Routine data was analyzed for adults receiving services in two public HIV care systems in central Mozambique. The proportion of people passing through the following steps was determined: (1) HIV testing, (2) enrollment at an ART clinic, (3) CD4 testing, (4) starting ART if eligible, and (5) adhering to ART. Results During the 12-month study period (2004–2005), an estimated 23,430 adults were tested for HIV, and 7,005 (29.9%) were HIV-positive. Only 3,956 (56.5%) of those HIV-positive enrolled at an ART clinic ?30 days after testing. CD4 testing was obtained in 77.1% ?30 days of enrollment. Of 1,506 eligible for ART, 471 (31.3%) started ART ?90 days after CD4 testing. Of 382 with ?180 days of potential follow-up time on ART, 317 (83.0%) had pharmacy-based adherence rates ?90%. Discussion Substantial drop-offs were observed for each step between HIV testing and treatment, but were highest for referral from HIV testing to treatment sites and for starting ART. Interventions are needed to improve follow-up and ensure that people benefit from available HIV services. PMID:19550350

  13. Community-based infant hearing screening in a developing country: parental uptake of follow-up services

    PubMed Central

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Akinyemi, Oladele O

    2009-01-01

    Background Universal newborn hearing screening is now considered an essential public health care for the early detection of disabling life-long childhood hearing impairment globally. However, like any health interventions in early childhood, parental support and participation is essential for achieving satisfactory uptake of services. This study set out to determine maternal/infant socio-demographic factors associated with follow-up compliance in community-based infant hearing screening programmes in a developing country. Methods After health educational/counselling sessions, infants attending routine childhood immunisation clinics at four primary care centres were enrolled into a two-stage infant hearing screening programme consisting of a first-stage screening with transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions and second-stage screening with automated auditory brainstem response. Infants referred after the second-stage screening were scheduled for diagnostic evaluation within three months. Maternal and infant factors associated with completion of the hearing screening protocol were determined with multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results No mother declined participation during the study period. A total of 285 out of 2,003 eligible infants were referred after the first-stage screening out of which 148 (51.9%) did not return for the second-stage, while 32 (39.0%) of the 82 infants scheduled for diagnostic evaluation defaulted. Mothers who delivered outside hospitals were significantly more likely to return for follow-up screening than those who delivered in hospitals (Odds ratio: 1.62; 95% confidence intervals: 0.98 – 2.70; p = 0.062). No other factors correlated with follow-up compliance for screening and diagnostic services. Conclusion Place of delivery was the only factor that correlated albeit marginally with infant hearing screening compliance in this population. The likely influence of issues such as the number of return visits for follow-up services, ineffective tracking system and the prevailing unfavourable cultural perception towards childhood deafness on non-compliance independently or through these factors warrant further investigation. PMID:19236718

  14. 20 CFR 664.450 - What are follow-up services for youth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...a) Follow-up services for youth may include: (1) The leadership development and supportive service activities listed in...12) months at the State or Local Board's discretion. The types of services provided and the duration of services must be...

  15. 48 CFR 2027.305-3 - Follow-up by Government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...COPYRIGHTS Patent Rights Under Government Contracts 2027.305-3 Follow-up by Government. (a) The contracting officer...the contract or reflected in the contract price to the Government, nor were any royalties or...

  16. 48 CFR 2027.305-3 - Follow-up by Government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...COPYRIGHTS Patent Rights Under Government Contracts 2027.305-3 Follow-up by Government. (a) The contracting officer...the contract or reflected in the contract price to the Government, nor were any royalties or...

  17. 48 CFR 2027.305-3 - Follow-up by Government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...COPYRIGHTS Patent Rights Under Government Contracts 2027.305-3 Follow-up by Government. (a) The contracting officer...the contract or reflected in the contract price to the Government, nor were any royalties or...

  18. 48 CFR 2027.305-3 - Follow-up by Government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...COPYRIGHTS Patent Rights Under Government Contracts 2027.305-3 Follow-up by Government. (a) The contracting officer...the contract or reflected in the contract price to the Government, nor were any royalties or...

  19. SWIFT FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF CANDIDATE GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENT EVENTS

    E-print Network

    Fridriksson, J. K.

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency ...

  20. Doppler echocardiography during the follow-up of hematological patients undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marra, Francesco; Galderisi, Maurizio; Camera, Andrea; Rinaldi, Ciro R; Innelli, Pasquale; Rotoli, Bruno; de Divitiis, Oreste

    2007-01-18

    Our retrospective experience underscores the ability of Doppler echocardiography to detect the cardiotoxicity of chemotherapy (functional and pericardial abnormalities, heart involvement) and points out the need for an accurate echocardiographic follow-up of hematologic patients. PMID:16626820

  1. 30 CFR 62.173 - Follow-up evaluation when an audiogram is invalid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...MINE HEALTH REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.173 Follow-up...aggravated by the miner's occupational exposure to noise or the wearing of hearing...unrelated to the miner's occupational exposure to noise or the wearing of...

  2. Recurrent mandibular supplemental premolars: a case report with 5 year follow up and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Nirmala, S V S G; Chilamakuri, Sandeep; Challa, Ramasubba Reddy; Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Gokhale, Neeraj

    2015-02-01

    A 12-year-old girl reported for a routine dental checkup. Radiographic survey disclosed the presence of two developing structures resembling premolars one on either side of the mandible in premolar region, which were of supplemental type and surgical removal of supernumerary premolars facilitated eruption of the left second premolar. On six months follow-up, there was radiographic evidence of another supernumerary premolar in the left side of mandible that is left in situ, patient is on regular follow-up. This emphasizes the importance of thorough clinical and radiographic examination, early diagnosis and follow-up of the developing dentition in children. The patient has been followed-up from the age of 12 year to 17 year. This paper describes a case of recurrent supplemental supernumerary premolars in the mandible along with review of literature. PMID:25859530

  3. Follow-up of low-risk patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma: a European perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Schlumberger; Gertrud Berg; Ohad Cohen; Leonidas Duntas; Francois Jamar; Barbara Jarzab; Eduard Limbert; Peter Lind; Furio Pacini; Christoph Reiners; Franco Sanchez Franco; S. Toft; Wilmar M Wiersinga

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Because differentiated (follicular and papillary) thyroid cancer (DTC) may recur years after initial treatment, the follow-up of patients with DTC is long term. However, this population has chan- ged, with more individuals being discovered at an earlier stage of the disease, so that previous follow-up protocols based mostly on data from high-risk patients no longer apply. We sought to

  4. Impact of Patient Follow-Up on Weight Loss after Bariatric Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy Shen; Giovanni Dugay; Kavitha Rajaram; Izumi Cabrera; Niccole Siegel; Christine J. Ren

    2004-01-01

    Background: Postoperative follow-up after bariatric surgery is important. Because of the need for adjustments, follow-up after\\u000a gastric banding may have a greater impact on weight loss than after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.We reviewed all patients at 1\\u000a year after these two operations. Methods: During the first year after surgery, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB)\\u000a patients were followed every 4 weeks and

  5. Views of breast and colorectal cancer survivors on their routine follow-up care

    PubMed Central

    Urquhart, R.; Folkes, A.; Babineau, J.; Grunfeld, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Our understanding of optimum health care delivery for cancer survivors is limited by the lack of a patient-centred perspective. The objectives of the present study were to explore the views of breast and colorectal cancer survivors on their routine follow-up care, with respect to needs, preferences, and quality of follow-up, and their views on cancer specialist– compared with family physician (fp)–led follow-up care. Methods In Nova Scotia, Canada, 23 cancer survivors (13 breast, 10 colorectal) participated in either a focus group or a one-on-one interview. Participants were asked to reflect upon their lives as cancer survivors and on the type and quality of care and support they received during the follow-up period. Each focus group or interview was transcribed verbatim, and the transcripts were audited and subjected to a thematic analysis. Results Six themes were identified: My care is my responsibilityHow I receive information on follow-up careI have many care needsI want to be prepared and informedThe role of my fp in my cancer experience and follow-up careThe role of media Survivors often characterized the post–primary treatment experience as lacking in information and preparation for follow-up and providing inadequate support to address many of the care needs prevalent in survivor populations. Despite valuing fp participation in follow-up care, many survivors continued to receive comfort and reassurance from specialist care. Conclusions Our findings point to the need to implement strategies that better prepare breast cancer and colorectal cancer survivors for post-treatment care and that reassure survivors of the ability of their fp to provide quality care during this period. PMID:23300354

  6. Social impact follow-up in Quebec, Canada: 25 years of environmental impact assessment practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurie Lavallée; Pierre André

    2005-01-01

    Quebec, Canada, has 25years background in EIA and follow-up. However, the broadcasting of social impact follow-up results seems neglected by various stakeholders. Proponents (parapublic organizations and private industries), the provincial government, universities and local community groups have developed the capacity to carry out such studies, but only few reports are easily accessible to the public. This paper reports on the

  7. Follow-up care for cancer survivors: the views of clinicians

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D M Greenfield; K Absolom; C Eiser; S J Walters; G Michel; B W Hancock; J A Snowden; R E Coleman

    2009-01-01

    Background:Evidence for the efficacy of late effects surveillance in adult cancer survivors is lacking and there is little agreement among clinicians on appropriate follow-up care.Methods:We report the views of both cancer experts and general practitioners (GPs) on long-term follow-up provision for cancer survivors, focussing on the 18–45 years age group. A total of 421 cancer experts (36% haematologists, 33% oncologists,

  8. Predictors of ADHD Persistence in Girls at 5Year Follow-Up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Mick; Deirdre Byrne; Ronna Fried; Michael Monuteaux; Stephen V. Faraone; Joseph Biederman

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to examine the age-dependent remission from ADHD in girls transitioning through childhood into adolescence and early adulthood. Method: We conducted a 5-year prospective follow-up study of 123 girls with ADHD and 106 non-ADHD control girls aged between 6 and 17 years at ascertainment. ADHD was considered persistent at follow-up if participants met

  9. How persistent is ADHD? A controlled 10-year follow-up study of boys with ADHD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Biederman; Carter R. Petty; Maggie Evans; Jacqueline Small; Stephen V. Faraone

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the age-dependent persistence of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in boys transitioning from adolescence into early adulthood attending to different definitions of persistence. We conducted a 10-year follow-up study (mean follow-up time=11years) of 110 boys with ADHD and 105 non-ADHD controls. Both groups were 6–17years of age at ascertainment. ADHD was considered

  10. Clinical experience of marketed Levetiracetam in an epilepsy clinic—a one year follow up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TIM BETTS; HELEN YARROW; LYN GREENHILL; MARY BARRETT

    2003-01-01

    Levetiracetam is a new anti-convulsant with impressive pivotal trial credentials. We examined its effectiveness in refractory clinic patients with epilepsy with a year’s follow up. Six months after initiation 32% of the patients were seizure free, and 26% at one year.By the end of the 12 months follow up 77% of patients were still taking the drug, having gained benefit

  11. Phylloides tumours of the breast: best practice for follow-up.

    PubMed

    Mylvaganam, Senthurun; Toro, Clare; Frank, Lucinda; Vestey, Sarah; Thrush, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Phylloides tumours are rare fibroepithelial breast tumours accounting for 1 % of breast cancers. No UK guidance exists on the assessment, treatment and follow-up of these patients. To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the clinical core biopsy compared to the gold standard excision biopsy and determine the current follow-up practice and recurrence rate of phylloides tumours across two UK hospital trusts. Multicentre retrospective analysis of all cases of phylloides tumours over 6 years at Worcestershire Acute NHS Trust (WANHST) and Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Trust (GHNHST). 94 Patients included. Mean age 48 years. Mean clinical and radiological size of lesions 31.7 and 35.4 mm, respectively, preoperative core biopsy sensitivity was 87 % for WANHST and 74 % for GHNHST with a positive predictive value of 90 and 100 %, respectively. 29 Different follow-up regimes were observed from the practice of the 10 surgeons observed following diagnosis and resection of tumours. The follow-up length ranged from discharge following one post-operative clinic attendance to 5-year clinical and/or radiological follow-up. 4 Benign and 2 malignant recurrent phylloides tumours were seen. All benign recurrences were local and found independently of follow-up. The earliest benign phylloides recurrence was at 6 years and the latest at 10 years. There is no standard follow-up of benign or malignant phylloides tumours. This study suggests that in the benign group, the risk of recurrence is small. We advocate no routine follow-up of benign phylloides tumours. PMID:25575495

  12. Children's reactions to Hurricane Andrew: A forty-four month follow-up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicole Renee Vincent

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about children's long-term adjustment following a disaster. Thus, the current study was conducted as a 44-month follow-up investigation, examining children's reactions to Hurricane Andrew over time. Previous data collection was conducted at 3, 7, and 10 months post-hurricane with a sample of 442 children. Subjects at follow-up were a subset of the original sample, consisting of 43

  13. Localized prostate cancer and 30 years of follow-up in a population-based setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Adolfsson; H Oksanen; JO Salo; G Steineck

    2000-01-01

    Some patients with a histopathological diagnosis of prostate cancer have a tumour that behaves benignly during long-term follow-up. The proportion of patients with such a tumour is unknown, as is the fraction who die of prostate cancer between 10 and 20 y of follow-up. All men aged 45–84 y obtaining a diagnosis of prostate cancer between 1965 and 1993 and

  14. Techniques for Minimizing Radiation Exposure During Evaluation, Surgical Treatment, and Follow-up of Urinary Lithiasis.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Javier L; Baldwin, D Duane

    2015-07-01

    Patients receive significant radiation exposure during the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of urinary stone disease. This radiation exposure may result in patient harm and is believed to contribute to the risk for malignancy. This review will present current information to allow surgeons to optimize their diagnostic, treatment, and follow-up regimens to allow optimal care of stone disease patients at the lowest radiation dose possible. PMID:26025493

  15. Follow up of patients presenting with fatigue to an infectious diseases clinic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Sharpe; K. Hawton; V. Seagroatt; G. Pasvol

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the symptomatic and functional status during follow up of patients referred to hospital with unexplained fatigue and to identify patient variables associated with persistent functional impairment. DESIGN--Follow up by postal questionnaire six weeks to four years (median 1 year) after initial clinical assessment of patients referred to hospital during 1984-8. SETTING--Infectious diseases outpatient clinic in a teaching hospital.

  16. Clinical and electroencephalographic follow-up after a first unprovoked seizure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Isabel B Winckler; Newra T Rotta

    2004-01-01

    We studied the role of clinical and electroencephalographic factors in the follow-up of children and adolescents after a first unprovoked seizure, and their correlation with recurrence and risk for epilepsy. We conducted a 24-month follow-up of 109 patients aged 1 month to 16 years who had a first unprovoked seizure. We analyzed the characteristics of the first seizure, perinatal history,

  17. Starting Point Bias in Dichotomous Choice Valuation with Follow-Up Questioning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph A. Herriges; Jason F. Shogren

    1996-01-01

    Follow-up questions are frequently used to improve the efficiency of dichotomous choice contingent valuation questionnaires. However, a number of authors (e.g., [12, 16]) have noted a significant difference between the WTP distributions implied by initial and follow-up question responses. This paper investigates starting point bias as one explanation for the phenomenon. We develop a model of starting point bias in

  18. A cognitive-behavioral approach to substance abuse prevention: One-year follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GILBERT J. BOTVIN; ELI BAKER; ANNE D. FILAZZOLA; ELIZABETH M. BOTVIN

    1990-01-01

    This study presents one-year follow-up data from an evaluation study testing the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral substance abuse prevention approach which emphasizes the teaching of social resistance skills within the larger context of an intervention designed to enhance general social and personal competence. The follow-up study involved 998 eighth graders from 10 suburban New York junior high schools. Two schools

  19. Celiac Disease and the Transition from Childhood to Adulthood: A 28Year Follow-Up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clare O'Leary; Peter Wieneke; Mary Healy; Cornelius Cronin; Paud O'Regan; Fergus Shanahan

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:Follow-up of celiac disease diagnosed in childhood is variable or nonexistent after transition to adulthood. Outcome, continuity of care, and adherence to a gluten-free diet are poorly documented. We report a 28-yr follow-up of 50 adults in whom the original childhood diagnosis could be confirmed.METHODS:Original pediatric charts were reviewed, and subjects were invited to undergo dietary evaluation, measurement of bone

  20. Living with faecal incontinence: a 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mary

    2015-03-01

    Faecal incontinence (FI) is a taboo subject, and people living with it can feel stigmatised. This article reports on a 10-year qualitative follow-up to an initial constructivist-grounded theory project, investigating living with FI. This article will also look back at the initial study and the 5-year follow-up study undertaken. The research examines the challenges associated with living with FI and different ways of managing the condition, including the importance of social support. PMID:25757581

  1. Adminstrative issues in the follow-up treatment of insanity acquittees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stuart B. Silver; Christiane Tellefsen

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses issues in the community-based management of forensic patients. Community acceptance and safety demand\\u000a a careful system of follow-up treatment for insanity acquittees. Many studies have examined the recidivism of this population,\\u000a but few have dealt with administrative strategies to manage their care as outpatients. In this paper, we discuss our experiences\\u000a in developing systems for follow-up care

  2. The Irish DAFNE Study Protocol: A cluster randomised trial of group versus individual follow-up after structured education for Type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dinneen, Seán F; O' Hara, Mary Clare; Byrne, Molly; Newell, John; Daly, Lisa; O' Shea, Donal; Smith, Diarmuid

    2009-01-01

    Background Structured education programmes for individuals with Type 1 diabetes have become a recognised means of delivering the knowledge and skills necessary for optimal self-management of the condition. The Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) programme has been shown to improve biomedical (HbA1c and rates of severe hypoglycaemia) and psychosocial outcomes for up to 12 months following course delivery. The optimal way to support DAFNE graduates and maintain the benefits of the programme has not been established. We aimed to compare 2 different methods of follow-up of DAFNE graduates in a pragmatic clinical trial delivered in busy diabetes clinics on the island of Ireland. Methods Six participating centres were cluster randomised to deliver either group follow-up or a return to traditional one-to-one clinic visits. In the intervention arm group follow-up was delivered at 6 and 12 months post DAFNE training according to a curriculum developed for the study. In the control arm patients were seen individually in diabetes clinics as part of routine care. Study outcomes included HbA1c levels, self-reported rates of severe hypoglycaemia, body weight and measures of diabetes wellbeing and quality of life. These were measured at 6, 12 and 18 months after recruitment. Generalisability (external validity) was maximised by recruiting study participants from existing DAFNE waiting lists in each centre, by using broad inclusion criteria (including HbA1c values less than 13 percent with no lower limit) and by using existing clinic staff to deliver the training and follow-up. Internal validity and treatment fidelity were maximised by quality assuring the training of all DAFNE educators, by external peer review of the group follow-up sessions and by striving for full attendance at follow-up visits. Assays of HbA1c were undertaken in a central laboratory. Discussion This pragmatic clinical trial evaluating group follow-up after a structured education programme has been designed to have broad generalisability. The results should inform how best to manage the well educated patient with Type 1 diabetes in the real world of clinical practice Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN79759174 PMID:19775465

  3. Barbershops as hypertension detection, referral, and follow-up centers for black men.

    PubMed

    Hess, Paul L; Reingold, Jason S; Jones, Jennifer; Fellman, Melissa A; Knowles, Premere; Ravenell, Joseph E; Kim, Stacey; Raju, Jamie; Ruger, Erica; Clark, Sharonda; Okoro, Chibuike; Ogunji, Ore; Knowles, Patricia; Leonard, David; Wilson, Ruth P; Haley, Robert W; Ferdinand, Keith C; Freeman, Anne; Victor, Ronald G

    2007-05-01

    Barbershops constitute potential sites for community health promotion programs targeting hypertension (HTN) in black men, but such programs have not been evaluated previously. Here we conducted 2 nonrandomized feasibility studies to determine whether an enhanced intervention program of continuous blood pressure (BP) monitoring and peer-based health messaging in a barbershop lowers BP more than standard screening and health education (study 1) and can be implemented by barbers rather than research personnel (study 2). In study 1, we measured changes in HTN treatment and BP in regular barbershop customers with poorly controlled HTN assigned for 8 months to either an enhanced intervention group (n=36) or a contemporaneous comparison group (n=27). Groups were similar at baseline. BP fell by 16+/-3/9+/-2 mm Hg in the enhanced intervention group but was unchanged in the comparison group (P<0.0001, adjusted for age and body mass index). HTN treatment and control increased from 47% to 92% (P<0.001) and 19% to 58% (P<0.001), respectively, in the enhanced intervention group, whereas both remained unchanged in the comparison group. In study 2, barbers were trained to administer the enhanced intervention continuously for 14 months to the entire adult black male clientele (n=321) in 1 shop. Six barbers recorded 8953 BP checks during 11 066 haircuts, thus demonstrating a high degree of intervention fidelity. Furthermore, among 107 regular customers with HTN, treatment and control increased progressively with increasing intervention exposure (P<0.01). Taken together, these data suggest that black-owned barbershops can be transformed into effective HTN detection, referral, and follow-up centers. Further research is warranted. PMID:17404187

  4. Relocation of ventricular catheter trough ventriculostomy due to congenital unilateral hydrocephalus: Nine year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Zoran, Milenkovic J.; Biljana, Stevanovic S.; Ivana, Markovic P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Congenital unilateral hydrocephalus is an uncommon entity occurring almost exclusively in children. Atresia, stenosis, membranous occlusion and even functional obstruction of the foramen of Monro have been described to be the main cause of this type of hydrocephalus. There are two options available in the surgical management of unilateral hydrocephalus: one is the placement of shunt CSF diversion from the dilated ventricle and the other is fenestration of the occluded foramen of Monro or septum pellucidum by endoscopy or by stereotactic method. Migration of the ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt in or out of ventricles is not so uncommon, but the relocation of the ventricular tip of a catheter from the ventricle into the quadrigeminal cisterns and superior vermis in association with ventriculostomy is extremely rare. Spontaneous ventriculostomy is a rare event and results from spontaneous rupture of a ventricle into the subarachnoid space. Case Description: A 5½-month-old baby with a right-sided congenital unilateral hydrocephalus underwent a VP shunt andhad experienced an uneventful outcome. Four years later on an MR imaging examination, the tip of the ventricular catheter passing through the medial wall of the ventricle and the quadrigeminal cistern was found to be situated in the superior vermis. During the follow-up period, there were no neurological difficulties. The cognitive and motor skill development corresponded well with the child's age. It transpired that the hydrocephalic ventricle reduced its size dramatically to normal. Conclusion: We have described the extremely rare site of the relocation of the ventricular catheter after the treatment of the congenital unilateral hydrocephalus by VP shunting. Spontaneous ventriculostomy as a rare phenomenon may be the explanation of the relocation of the ventricular catheter. PMID:22059136

  5. [Gender dysphoria in children and adolescents - treatment guidelines and follow-up study].

    PubMed

    Meyenburg, Bernd; Kröger, Anne; Neugebauer, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Treatment guidelines for transidentity in children and adolescents are presently under discussion. We present an overview of the various treatment modalities. Further, follow-up data on children and adolescents referred for gender-identity problems are presented. Of the 84 patients seen for the first time more than 3 years before follow-up, 37 mailed in the completed questionnaires. In addition, 33 patients agreed to answer some short follow-up questions. We assessed steps of treatment, gender role, psychopathology, and psychotherapy. We compared differences in psychopathology in patients with vs. without gender role change and in patients with intense vs. less intense psychotherapy. A total of 22 patients had completely changed gender role, and some had started hormonal treatment und sex reassignment surgery. Most patients were satisfied with the treatment results. All patients showed less psychopathology on follow-up, independent of role change or intensity of psychotherapy. In general, the patients reported little psychopathology. Our follow-up results support the present treatment approach. In patients with little psychopathology, low-frequency supportive treatment appears sufficient to obtain safe judgement on hormonal of surgical treatment. PMID:25536896

  6. Applicable Railroad Commission rules regarding notification, cleanup, and follow up reporting of inland crude spills

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.M. [Houston District Office, TX (United States)

    1996-08-01

    There are a myriad of regulations, both federal, state, and local dealing with spill notification cleanup, and follow up reporting. This paper describes the applicable Railroad Commission (RRC) Oil and Gas Division Rules and Regulations requiring notification, cleanup, and follow up reporting of inland crude oil spills in the state of Texas. Statewide Rule (SWR) titled {open_quotes}water protection{close_quotes} requires that {open_quotes}no person conducting activities subject to the regulation of RRC may cause or allow pollution of the surface or subsurface water in the state{close_quotes}. SWR 20 titled {open_quotes}notification of fire, breaks, leaks, or blowouts{close_quotes}, requires immediate notice of a fire, leak, spill, or break from production facilities to the appropriate district office and follow up written reporting. SWR 71 titled {open_quotes}Pipeline Tariffs{close_quotes} requires pipeline companies to give immediate notice of spills and fires to the appropriate district office along with follow up reports. SWR 91 titled {open_quotes}Cleanup of soil contaminated by a crude oil spill{close_quotes} requires notification, cleanup, and follow up reporting requirements for crude oil spills.

  7. A follow-up study of neurobehavioral functions in welders exposed to manganese.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, Dag G; Chashchin, Maxim; Bast-Pettersen, Rita; Zibarev, Evgenij; Thomassen, Yngvar; Chashchin, Valery

    2015-03-01

    Welders may be exposed to high amounts of manganese (Mn). In this study 63 welders and 65 referents were followed up with neurobehavioral tests approximately 6 years after the initial examination at baseline. The welders were exposed to the geometric mean (GM) Mn concentration of 116?g/m(3) at baseline and 148?g/m(3) at follow-up. Their mean duration of employments as welders was 19.5 years at follow-up. Being exposed as a welder was associated with a decline between baseline and follow-up in the performance on the Static Steadiness Test, Finger Tapping Test and Grooved Pegboard Test. However, the decline was also associated with having high concentrations of carbohydrate deficient transferrin in serum (sCDT), indicating high alcohol consumption. When subjects with sCDT above the upper reference limit of the laboratory (?1.7%) were excluded from the analyses, no difference in the decline in performance was observed between welders and referents for any of the applied neurobehavioral tests. Three welders had developed bradykinesia at follow-up, as assessed by a substantial decline in their Finger Tapping Test performance. They had also experienced a severe decline in Foot Tapping, Grooved Pegboard and Postural Sway Test scores (while blindfolded), while postural tremor as assessed with the CATSYS Tremor 7.0 was normal. Their neurobehavioral test performance at baseline 6 years previously had been normal. PMID:25579701

  8. Factors Associated with Loss-to-Follow-Up during Behavioral Interventions and HIV Testing Cohort among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Nanjing, China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weiming; Huan, Xiping; Zhang, Ye; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Li, Jianjun; Liu, Xiaoyan; Mahapatra, Sanchita; Yan, Hongjing; Fu, Gengfeng; Zhao, Jinkou; Gu, Chenghua; Detels, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background Behavioral interventions (BIs) remained the cornerstone of HIV prevention in resource-limited settings. One of the major concerns for such efforts is the loss-to-follow-up (LTFU) that threatens almost every HIV control program involving high-risk population groups. Methods To evaluate the factors associated with LTFU during BIs and HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM), 410 HIV sero-negatives MSM were recruited using respondent driven sampling (RDS) in Nanjing, China during 2008, they were further followed for 18 months. At baseline and each follow-up visits, each participant was counseled about various HIV risk-reductions BIs at a designated sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic. Results Among 410 participants recruited at baseline, altogether 221 (53.9%) were LTFU at the 18-month follow-up visit. Overall, 46 participants were found to be positive for syphilis infection at baseline while 13 participants were HIV sero-converted during the follow-up period. Increasing age was less (Adjusted Odds Ratio(aOR) of 0.90, 95% confidence Interval (CI) 0.86–0.94) and official residency of provinces other than Nanjing (AOR of 2.49, 95%CI 1.32–4.71), lower level of education (AOR of 2.01, 95%CI 1.10–3.66) and small social network size (AOR of 1.75, 95%CI 1.09–2.80) were more likely to be associated with higher odds of LTFU. Conclusion To improve retention in the programs for HIV control, counseling and testing among MSM in Nanjing, focused intensified intervention targeting those who were more likely to be LTFU, especially the young, less educated, unofficial residents of Nanjing who had smaller social network size, might be helpful. PMID:25559678

  9. Do smoke alarms still function a year after installation? A follow-up of the get-alarmed campaign.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Corleen J; Jones, Alma R; Davis, Mary Kidd; Caplan, Lee S

    2004-04-01

    The Get-Alarmed Campaign Follow-up Study was the second phase of an initiative to assure that homes of families at high risk of fire-related injury and death had functioning smoke alarms. Smoke alarms and/or batteries were installed in over 94 percent of 454 participating households in Schley and Henry Counties, Georgia, in 2000. Before the study began, 60.6 percent of these homes had smoke alarms, but only 36.6 percent had functioning smoke alarms. The follow-up study was designed to determine the experiences of participants with smoke alarms and whether participating households had functioning smoke alarms a year after baseline. Participants were phoned or visited and asked about their experiences with smoke alarms since the baseline study. During the interview, they were asked to test a smoke alarm, the results of which could frequently be heard. Respondents included 237 from Schley County and 113 from Henry County, for an overall 77.1 percent response rate. While 80.3 percent of respondents had a smoke alarm that was heard by the interviewer when it was tested, 6.6 percent reported that their smoke alarm had been disabled or had a dead battery. Over 75 percent of respondents had smoke alarm sound offs in the prior year, predominately due to cooking smoke, but only about 5 percent reported removing the battery or otherwise disabling it to prevent sound offs. However, the measures taken may render a household unprotected at a critical time. Efforts to increase protection with smoke alarms should be augmented with programs to insure adequate and timely testing and maintenance of existing smoke alarms. PMID:15065735

  10. Lack of compliance: a challenge for digital dermoscopy follow-up*

    PubMed Central

    Gadens, Guilherme Augusto

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Digital dermoscopy is the gold standard follow-up method for patients with high risk for developing cutaneous malignant melanoma. By comparing the same lesion at different moments, it allows early detection of subtle changes that could suggest the diagnosis of melanoma. Thus, it is clear that the test must be repeated after a period of time, according to time intervals determined by the evaluator. OBJECTIVES To evaluate adherence of patients to follow-up examinations using digital dermoscopy. METHOD Retrospective analysis of 36 patients who underwent digital dermoscopic examination and total-body photography in a private medical center between September 2010 and January 2013. RESULTS Only 25% of the patients returned for followup evaluations. CONCLUSIONS Low adherence to digital dermoscopy follow-up could compromise the efficacy of this valuable method. This lack of adherence represents a challenge for the evaluator. PMID:24770499

  11. A new era of sub-millimeter GRB afterglow follow-ups with the Greenland Telescope

    E-print Network

    Urata, Yuji; Asada, Keiichi; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Makoto; Ho, Paul T P

    2015-01-01

    A planned rapid submillimeter (submm) Gamma Ray Burst (GRBs) follow-up observations conducted using the Greenland Telescope (GLT) is presented. The GLT is a 12-m submm telescope to be located at the top of the Greenland ice sheet, where the high-altitude and dry weather porvides excellent conditions for observations at submm wavelengths. With its combination of wavelength window and rapid responding system, the GLT will explore new insights on GRBs. Summarizing the current achievements of submm GRB follow-ups, we identify the following three scientific goals regarding GRBs: (1) systematic detection of bright submm emissions originating from reverse shock (RS) in the early afterglow phase, (2) characterization of forward shock and RS emissions by capturing their peak flux and frequencies and performing continuous monitoring, and (3) detections of GRBs as a result of the explosion of first-generation stars result of GRBs at a high redshift through systematic rapid follow ups. The light curves and spectra calcul...

  12. What Happens Next? Follow-Up From the Children's Toddler School Program

    PubMed Central

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Corsello, Christina; Mahrer, Nicole E.

    2010-01-01

    This study was a follow-up of a group of 29 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders at age 2 who attended an inclusive toddler program until age 3. Children ranged in age from 4 to 12 years at the time of the parent survey and follow-up testing. The majority of children were placed in a special education (noninclusive) preschool class, but among the children who were in elementary school at the time of follow-up, 63% were in general education classroom placement. Diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders remained stable, socialization skills remained a weakness, and child-related parental stress remained high despite average cognitive and language skills in the majority of children. Social skill development and support remained a service need. PMID:21113315

  13. A multidisciplinary consensus document on follow-up strategies for patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Roberta; Oltrona Visconti, Luigi; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Filippi, Alessandro; Pedretti, Roberto; Lettieri, Corrado; Buffoli, Francesca; Campana, Marco; Capodanno, Davide; Castiglioni, Battistina; Cattaneo, Maria Grazia; Colombo, Paola; De Luca, Leonardo; De Servi, Stefano; Ferlini, Marco; Limbruno, Ugo; Nassiacos, Daniele; Piccaluga, Emanuela; Raisaro, Arturo; Ravizza, PierFranco; Senni, Michele; Tabaglio, Erminio; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Trabattoni, Daniela; Zadra, Alessandro; Riccio, Carmine; Bedogni, Francesco; Febo, Oreste; Brignoli, Ovidio; Ceravolo, Roberto; Sardella, Gennaro; Bongo, Sante; Faggiano, Pompilio; Cricelli, Claudio; Greco, Cesare; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Berti, Sergio; Bovenzi, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The number of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) is increasing worldwide. Follow-up strategies after PCI are extremely heterogeneous and can greatly affect the cost of medical care. Of note, clinical evaluations and non-invasive exams are often performed to low risk patients. In the present consensus document, practical advises are provided with respect to a tailored follow-up strategy on the basis of patients' risk profile. Three strategies follow-up have been defined and types and timing of clinical and instrumental evaluations are reported. Clinical and interventional cardiologists, cardiac rehabilitators, and general practitioners, who are in charge to manage post-PCI patients, equally contributed to the creation of the present document. PMID:25380511

  14. Timeliness of abnormal screening and diagnostic mammography follow-up at facilities serving vulnerable women

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, L. Elizabeth; Walker, Rod; Hubbard, Rebecca; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether timeliness of follow-up after abnormal mammography differs at facilities serving vulnerable populations such as women with limited education or income, in rural areas, and racial/ethnic minorities is unknown. Methods We examined receipt of diagnostic evaluation following abnormal mammography using 1998-2006 Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium-linked Medicare claims. We compared whether time to recommended breast imaging or biopsy depended on whether women attended facilities serving vulnerable populations. We characterized a facility by the proportion of mammograms performed on women with limited education or income, in rural areas, or racial/ethnic minorities. Results We analyzed 30,874 abnormal screening examinations recommended for follow-up imaging across 142 facilities and 10,049 abnormal diagnostic examinations recommended for biopsy across 114 facilities. Women at facilities serving populations with less education or more racial/ethnic minorities had lower rates of follow-up imaging (4-5% difference, p<0.05), and women at facilities serving more rural and low income populations had lower rates of biopsy (4-5% difference, p<0.05). Women undergoing biopsy at facilities serving vulnerable populations had longer times until biopsy than those at facilities serving non-vulnerable populations (21.6 days vs. 15.6 days; 95% CI for mean difference 4.1-7.7). The proportion of women receiving recommended imaging within 11 months and biopsy within 3 months varied across facilities (interquartile range 85.5%-96.5% for imaging and 79.4%-87.3% for biopsy). Conclusions Among Medicare recipients, follow-up rates were slightly lower at facilities serving vulnerable populations, and among those women who returned for diagnostic evaluation, time to follow-up was slightly longer at facilities that served vulnerable population. Interventions should target variability in follow-up rates across facilities, and evaluate effectiveness particularly at facilities serving vulnerable populations. PMID:23358386

  15. Dietary changes in Vietnamese marriage immigrant women: The KoGES follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji-Yun; Lee, Hakim; Ko, Ahra; Han, Chan-Jung; Chung, Hye Won

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The immigrant population has grown considerably in South Korea since the early 1990s due to international marriages. Dietary changes in immigrants are an important issue, because they are related to health and disease patterns. This study was conducted to compare changes in dietary intake between baseline and follow-up periods. SUBJECTS/METHODS Two hundreds thirty three Vietnamese female married immigrants. Baseline data were collected during 2006-2009, and the follow-up data were collected during 2008 and 2010. Food consumption was assessed using a 1-day 24-hour recall. RESULTS The amount of the total food consumed (P < 0.001) including that of cereals (P = 0.004), vegetables (P = 0.003), and fruits (P = 0.002) decreased at follow-up compared to that at baseline, whereas consumption of milk and dairy products increased (P = 0.004). Accordingly, the overall energy and nutrient intake decreased at follow-up, including carbohydrates (P = 0.012), protein (P = 0.021), fiber (P = 0.008), iron (P = 0.009), zinc (P = 0.006), and folate (P = 0.002). Among various anthropometric and biochemical variables, mean skeletal muscle mass decreased (P = 0.012), plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol increased, (P = 0.020) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein decreased at follow-up (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS A long-term follow-up study is needed to investigate the association between changes in food and nutrient intake and anthropometric and biochemical variables in these Vietnamese female marriage immigrants. PMID:24944778

  16. A predictive scoring instrument for tuberculosis lost to follow-up outcome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment is troublesome, due to long therapy duration, quick therapeutic response which allows the patient to disregard about the rest of their treatment and the lack of motivation on behalf of the patient for improved. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system to predict the probability of lost to follow-up outcome in TB patients as a way to identify patients suitable for directly observed treatments (DOT) and other interventions to improve adherence. Methods Two prospective cohorts, were used to develop and validate a logistic regression model. A scoring system was constructed, based on the coefficients of factors associated with a lost to follow-up outcome. The probability of lost to follow-up outcome associated with each score was calculated. Predictions in both cohorts were tested using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC). Results The best model to predict lost to follow-up outcome included the following characteristics: immigration (1 point value), living alone (1 point) or in an institution (2 points), previous anti-TB treatment (2 points), poor patient understanding (2 points), intravenous drugs use (IDU) (4 points) or unknown IDU status (1 point). Scores of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 points were associated with a lost to follow-up probability of 2,2% 5,4% 9,9%, 16,4%, 15%, and 28%, respectively. The ROC curve for the validation group demonstrated a good fit (AUC: 0,67 [95% CI; 0,65-0,70]). Conclusion This model has a good capacity to predict a lost to follow-up outcome. Its use could help TB Programs to determine which patients are good candidates for DOT and other strategies to improve TB treatment adherence. PMID:22938040

  17. Online follow-up of individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease using a patient-reported outcomes instrument: results of an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) never visit their general practitioner. Therefore, prospective data about GERD and its natural history in the general population are scarce. The aims of this study were to assess symptoms over time and consultation reasons in an Internet population with GERD. Methods Visitors (18–79 years) to a GERD information website who completed the GerdQ self-assessment questionnaire were invited to participate. Follow-up GerdQ questionnaires were sent after 4, 12 and 24 weeks, and those who had a total GerdQ score???8 and responded to at least the baseline and 4-week questionnaires (within 2–7 weeks) were included in the analyses. Outcome in proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and non-PPI users was classified as symptom improvement, symptom persistence/stable symptoms, or symptom relapse according to GerdQ scores. Results A total of 403 non-PPI users (mean age 48 years, 40% male) and 304 PPI users (mean age 51 years, 41% male) were included. After 24 weeks, symptom improvement was present in 66% of non-PPI users (45/68) and 8% of PPI users (6/73), while persisting symptoms were reported by 24% (16/68) and 89% (65/73) respectively (baseline symptoms did not influence outcome at 24 weeks). Fifty-five percent of PPI users (116/210) and 37% of non-PPI users (76/207) who intended to visit a healthcare practitioner, performed one or more healthcare visits in the interim. Most frequently reported reason for consultation was persistence of symptoms. Conclusions GERD symptoms were persistent in the majority of PPI users during our 24-week follow-up, while almost two thirds of non-PPI users reported symptom improvement. Online follow-up of an Internet population with GERD is feasible. PMID:24083342

  18. Long-term follow up of renal anastomosing hemangioma mimicking renal angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Isabel; Pichler, Renate; Schäfer, Georg; Zelger, Bernhard; Zelger, Bettina; Aigner, Friedrich; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    Anastomosing hemangioma of the kidney is a very rare neoplasm, currently 19 cases have been reported in the literature. First described in 2009, histopathologically anastomosing hemangioma is similar to aggressive angiosarcoma. No long-term follow-up data of anastomosing hemangioma have been described yet. Here, we present the case of a healthy 56-year-old man diagnosed in 2002 with a 7?×?5-cm anastomosing hemangioma mimicking an aggressive renal angiosarcoma. The patient underwent nephrectomy and has been followed up disease free for 13?years. PMID:24650180

  19. Discovery and Follow-up of High Energy Transients with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Swift Team

    2013-01-01

    The Swift mission lives in the time domain, observing transients every day. It is an international space mission from the US, UK and Italy that detects transients in the hard X-ray band and autonomously slews for sensitive X-ray and optical follow-up. Source coordinates can also be rapidly sent up to the satellite for follow-up of transients detected by other observatories. Targets of interest include GRBs, supernovae, tidal disruption events, AGN flares, galactic transients and flare stars. Much is being learned about these sources. Also interesting are the odd-ball events observed every year that defy classification.

  20. Follow-up study using iodine-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging in a patient with neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikekubo, K.; Habuchi, Y.; Jeong, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Saiki, Y.; Ito, H.; Hino, M.; Higa, T.

    1986-11-01

    A new radiopharmaceutical, I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-131 MIBG) was used to determine the location and to follow-up tumors in a 13-month-old girl with neuroblastoma. I-131 MIBG imaging revealed both a primary abdominal tumor and a distant metastatic orbital tumor. Follow-up study with I-131 MIBG imaging demonstrated significant resolution of tumors after external radiotherapy and chemotherapy. I-131 MIBG imaging is a simple, safe, and specific method of determining the location of tumors and also is clinically useful in the evaluation and management of patients with neuroblastoma.

  1. Diagnosis delay and follow-up strategies in colorectal cancer. Prognosis implications: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Controversy exists with regard to the impact that the different components of diagnosis delay may have on the degree of invasion and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. The follow-up strategies after treatment also vary considerably. The aims of this study are: a) to determine if the symptoms-to-diagnosis interval and the treatment delay modify the survival of patients with colorectal cancer, and b) to determine if different follow-up strategies are associated with a higher survival rate. Methods/Design Multi-centre study with prospective follow-up in five regions in Spain (Galicia, Balearic Islands, Catalonia, Aragón and Valencia) during the period 2010-2012. Incident cases are included with anatomopathological confirmation of colorectal cancer (International Classification of Diseases 9th revision codes 153-154) that formed a part of a previous study (n = 953). At the time of diagnosis, each patient was given a structured interview. Their clinical records will be reviewed during the follow-up period in order to obtain information on the explorations and tests carried out after treatment, and the progress of these patients. Symptoms-to-diagnosis interval is defined as the time calculated from the diagnosis of cancer and the first symptoms attributed to cancer. Treatment delay is defined as the time elapsed between diagnosis and treatment. In non-metastatic patients treated with curative intention, information will be obtained during the follow-up period on consultations performed in the digestive, surgery and oncology departments, as well as the endoscopies, tumour markers and imaging procedures carried out. Local recurrence, development of metastases in the follow-up, appearance of a new tumour and mortality will be included as outcome variables. Actuarial survival analysis with Kaplan-Meier curves, Cox regression and competitive risk survival analysis will be performed. Discussion This study will make it possible to verify if the different components of delay have an impact on survival rate in colon cancer and rectal cancer. In consequence, this multi-centre study will be able to detect the variability present in the follow-up of patients with colorectal cancer, and if this variability modifies the prognosis. Ideally, this study could determine which follow-up strategies are associated with a better prognosis in colorectal cancer. PMID:20920369

  2. Counselling improves follow-up HIV testing at Week 6 for HIV postexposure prophylaxis recipients.

    PubMed

    Farrugia Parsons, Bianca; Fisher, Kate; Cordery, Damien; Couldwell, Deborah

    2013-07-01

    Demographic and clinical variables of clients attending a sexual health centre in western Sydney from 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2011 were examined to determine if nonoccupational HIV postexposure prophylaxis (NPEP) was being dispensed according to national guidelines,(1) and to identify factors associated with completion of follow-up. The results showed that 95.8% of antiretroviral prescriptions were consistent with national guidelines.(1) Consultation with a social worker significantly improved attendance for six week follow up serology (P=0.027). PMID:23557699

  3. Follow-up study on upper extremity bracing of children with severe athetosis.

    PubMed

    Largent, P; Waylett, J

    1975-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a follow-up evaluation of a bracing program for severely athetoid, mentally retarded children. Bracing to improve upper extremity control was started in 1968 and was described in a 1971 AJOT article. The follow-up study was done in order to provide criteria for selecting patients in future bracing programs, to identify the type of motion problems that could be successfully braced, and to determine the bracing configurations most effecive in aiding arm control. PMID:1180315

  4. Measuring the Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening: The Importance of Follow-Up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Etzioni; Elizabeth M. Yano; Lisa V. Rubenstein; Martin L. Lee; Clifford Y. Ko; Robert H. Brook; Patricia H. Parkerton; Steven M. Asch

    2006-01-01

    \\u000a Purpose  As evidence mounts for effectiveness, an increasing proportion of the United States population undergoes colorectal cancer\\u000a screening. However, relatively little is known about rates of follow-up after abnormal results from initial screening tests.\\u000a This study examines patterns of colorectal cancer screening and follow-up within the nation's largest integrated health care\\u000a system: the Veterans Health Administration.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We obtained information about patients

  5. Evaluation of an intensive strategy for follow-up and surveillance of primary breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanuella Joseph; Micheline Hyacinthe; Gary H. Lyman; Carl Busch; LaTara Demps; Douglas S. Reintgen; Charles E. Cox

    1998-01-01

    Background: Controversies over the frequency and intensity of the follow-up care of breast cancer patients exist. Some physicians have\\u000a adopted an intensive approach to follow-up care that consists of frequent laboratory tests and routine imaging studies, including\\u000a chest radiographs, bone scans, and CT scans, whereas others have established a minimalist approach consisting of only history,\\u000a physical examinations, and mammograms.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objectives:

  6. The Long-Term Clinical Follow-Up and Natural History of Men with Adult-Onset Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Andrew A.; Hayes, Frances J.; Plummer, Lacey; Pitteloud, Nelly; Crowley, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Context and Objective: Adult-onset idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (AHH) is a rare disorder characterized by an isolated failure of gonadotropin secretion occurring after an otherwise normal sexual maturation in men. This study aims to examine the etiology and long-term natural history of this disorder. Design and Setting: Long-term follow up, including detailed clinical, biochemical, and genetic examinations, were performed and compared with those at diagnosis. Patients: Patients included 10 men with AHH [serum testosterone (T) <125 ng/dl]. Interventions: Overnight neuroendocrine studies, semen fluid analyses, and genetic screening were performed (KAL1, FGFR1, PROK2, PROKR2, NELF, TAC3, TACR3, and GNRH1) over a decade of longitudinal follow up. Results: Follow-up evaluations were conducted 10.6 ± 5.9 yr after initial studies and revealed that the clinical characteristics and seminal fluid analyses of AHH men (body mass index, 28.8 ± 4.1 vs. 27.0 ± 4.3 kg/m2; testicular volume, 18 ± 6 vs. 19 ± 6 ml) do not change over a decade with no spontaneous reversals. Several men exhibited some variability in their endogenous GnRH-induced LH secretory patterns, including emergence of endogenous pulsatility in three individuals. However, all remained hypogonadal (T ?130 ng/dl). A single heterozygous DNA sequence change in PROKR2 (V317L) was identified, although this rare sequence variant did not prove to be functionally abnormal in vitro. Seven days of pulsatile GnRH therapy in this subject nearly normalized his serum T, supporting that the site of the defect is hypothalamic and not pituitary. Conclusions: 1) AHH in men appears to be a long-lasting condition. 2) Although minor changes in the abnormal pattern of endogenous GnRH-induced LH secretion occurred in some AHH patients, all remained frankly hypogonadal. PMID:20591981

  7. 77 FR 59984 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Placement Verification and Follow-Up of Job Corps...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ...for Placement Verification and Follow-Up of Job Corps Participants; Extension Without Revisions...the Placement Verification and Follow-up of Job Corps Participants, using post-center surveys of Job Corps graduates and former enrollees...

  8. Clinical and Radiological Long-Term Follow-up After Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik [Odense University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Denmark)], E-mail: anders1@dadlnet.dk; Kjeldsen, Anette D. [Odense University Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology (Denmark)

    2006-02-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical and radiological long-term results of embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and to assess the quality of life after treatment. A clinical follow-up was undertaken after 67 months (mean) in 35 consecutive patients with 106 PAVMs. Outcome parameters at follow-up were PaO{sub 2} and patients' satisfaction. During follow-up, the patients had a clinical examination, measurement of arterial blood gases, chest X-ray, and contrast echocardiography performed and were asked to fill in a questionnaire exploring experience of the treatment and subjective effect of treatment on physical and social functioning. A significant rise in oxygenation of the blood after embolization was measured. In 77% of the patients symptoms improved, and 71% felt better performance. In eight patients, one of the PAVMs was found insufficiently embolized or recanalized at follow-up angiography and therefore were re-embolized. Endovascular embolization for PAVMs is effective. Clinical parameters and quality of life improved significantly. Regular clinical controls after therapy are necessary to discover insufficiently embolized, recanalized or new PAVMs.

  9. Motor Development Programs for School-Aged Handicapped Students: A Follow-Up Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melograno, Vincent; Loovis, E. Michael

    The purpose of this 1988 follow-up study was to augment findings previously obtained in a comprehensive needs assessment regarding appropriate physical education programming for mainstreamed students. The current educational needs of elementary and secondary public school teachers were determined. Information was sought on teachers' experience,…

  10. Follow up study of 70 patients with renal artery stenosis treated by percutaneous transluminal dilatation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G G Geyskes; C B Puylaert; H Y Oei; E J Mees

    1983-01-01

    Between April 1978 and April 1981, 70 patients with hypertension and renal artery stenosis were treated by percutaneous transluminal arterial dilatation. Selection of the patients was based solely on arteriographic criteria. Arteriography after dilatation showed considerable widening of the stenosed area in all patients. In 65 patients the effect of treatment on the blood pressure was assessed during follow up

  11. New Neuromuscular Symptoms in Patients with Old Poliomyelitis: A Three-Year Follow-Up Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marinos C. Dalakas

    1986-01-01

    Fourteen survivors of paralytic poliomyelitis experienced new symptoms after years of stability. Seven patients had lost functional capacity, with joint pain, instability and recurrent falls, but were again stable and remained essentially unchanged during a 3-year follow-up period. Seven others had late postpoliomyelitis muscular atrophy (PPMA) with new weakness, wasting, fasciculations and myalgia in muscles originally spared or seemingly recovered.

  12. Generalized Eruptive Keratoacanthoma of Grzybowski: Follow-Up of the Original Description and 50Year Retrospect

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert A. Schwartz; Stefania Jablonska

    2002-01-01

    We report a follow-up of the original case of eruptive multiple keratoacanthoma (KA) described by Grzybowski in 1950 which did not show malignant transformation within 16 years after the onset of the disease in spite of a very widespread cutaneous involvement. There was no associated internal malignancy or any systemic disease either, and the patient died of a myocardial infarction

  13. Four-Year Follow-Up of the Community Intervention "10 000 Steps Ghent"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Cocker, Katrien A.; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse M.; Brown, Wendy J.; Cardon, Greet M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the 4-year follow-up effects of the "10 000 steps Ghent" project, which had shown increases in pedometer steps after the first year of implementation (2005-06). All adults who had participated in 2005-06 (n = 866) were recontacted in 2009 and invited to complete the International Physical Activity…

  14. Follow-Up Study of 1992 Nursing Graduates. Volume XXII, Number 15, March 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, John A.; Meltesen, Cal

    In an attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of its nursing program, William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) (Illinois) conducted a follow-up study of 1992 nursing graduates or alumni. In spring 1993, a survey instrument, inquiring about employment status, future educational plans, and evaluation of their experience at WRHC, was mailed to all 142 WRHC…

  15. Two- to four-year histological follow-up of gastric mucosa after Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Tepes, B; Kavcic, B; Zaletel, L K; Gubina, M; Ihan, A; Poljak, M; Krizman, I

    1999-05-01

    In a 2- to 4-year prospective study, the reversibility of gastritis after Helicobacter pylori eradication was analysed. Sixty-three H. pylori-positive, chronic duodenal ulcer patients were studied after the successful eradication of bacteria in the period from 1990 to 1993. H. pylori eradication was obtained by triple antimicrobial regimens (colloidal bismuth subcitrate, amoxycillin, and metronidazole) applied for at least 14 days. The criteria for eradication were the absence of bacteria from two antral and two body of stomach biopsies stained with haematoxylin, eosin, and Warthin Starry, and a negative antral biopsy culture. The same diagnostic procedures were repeated, at regular follow-up endoscopies, each year for up to 4 years. Neutrophil-granulocyte infiltration of gastric mucosa disappeared in 2 months after bacterial eradication. Mononuclear cellular infiltration was disappearing with statistical significance up to the second year and normal mucosa was observed in the majority of patients in the fourth year of follow-up. Degeneratively changed lymphoid aggregates were also present in the fourth year in the antrum (12.5 per cent of patients) and in the body of stomach (14 per cent of patients). There was no significant change in antral intestinal metaplasia during the 4 years of follow-up. Antral atrophy declined significantly in the period from 1 to 3 years of follow-up. In conclusion, 3-4 years are needed for gastric mucosa to become normal after H. pylori eradication, although some residual lymphoid aggregates persist even after that period. PMID:10398136

  16. Sources of Validity Evidence for Educational and Psychological Tests: A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cizek, Gregory J.; Bowen, Daniel; Church, Keri

    2010-01-01

    This study followed up on previous work that examined the incidence of reporting evidence based on test consequences in "Mental Measurements Yearbook". In the present study, additional possible outlets for what has been called "consequential validity" evidence were investigated, including all articles published in the past 10 years in several…

  17. SIS (Student Information System) Postsecondary Student Follow-Up: Pilot Implementation Project, Winter 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whatcom Community Coll., Bellingham, WA.

    A pilot study was conducted to determine the applicability of Student Information System (SIS) data collection instruments to the operations, programs, and services of Whatcom Community College (WCC). The study centered on Subsystem I (student's educational intent) and Subsystem II (withdrawal follow-up) since the five other subsystems of SIS used…

  18. Transition Follow-Up System Development for Youth with Disabilities: Stakeholders' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Youn-Young

    2014-01-01

    In this study I examined in depth the perspectives of stakeholders in Manitoba on the development and implementation of a transition follow-up system (TFS) for youth with disabilities. I conducted focus groups and individual interviews with a total of 76 stakeholders and obtained qualitative data. The stakeholders who participated in this study…

  19. FOLLOW-UP OF ELEMENTARY FRENCH PROGRAM ON TV, AN EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TARRANT, WARREN J.

    ELEVEN THIRD-GRADE CLASSES IN SCHENECTADY, N.Y., WATCHED A 15-MINUTE TELEVISION PROGRAM IN ELEMENTARY FRENCH TWICE A WEEK DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR. TO ANALYZE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DIFFERENT TEACHERS PROVIDING THE FOLLOW-UP INSTRUCTION OF THE TV PROGRAMS, FOUR GROUPS OF STUDENTS WERE ASSIGNED TO TEACHERS RANGING FROM NATIVE FRENCH WITH CONSIDERABLE…

  20. Fifteen-Year Follow-Up of Thyroid Status in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V.; Ninan, S.; Haque, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The natural history of thyroid function in adults with Down syndrome is relatively unknown with limited long-term follow-up data. Method: This study investigated annual thyroid function tests in 200 adults with Down syndrome over a 15-year period. Results: For healthy adults with Down syndrome there is a gradual increase in thyroxine…

  1. FOLLOW-UP OF PATIENTS RECEIVING DIAGNOSTIC DOSES OF 131 IODINE DURING CHILDHOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the data collection methodology and procedures of a follow-up survey conducted of persons under 16 years old who received diagnostic Iodine 131 for evaluation of thyroid function at nine clinical centers prior to December 31, 1960. The intent of this data col...

  2. Personality Disorders in People with Learning Disabilities: Follow-Up of a Community Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lidher, J.; Martin, D. M.; Jayaprakash, M. S.; Roy, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: A sample of community-based service users with intellectual disability (ID) was re-examined after 5 years to determine the impact of a diagnosis of personality disorder (PD). Methods: Seventy-five of the original 101 participants were followed up. Of these, 21 people had a PD identified during the original study. Results: Compared with…

  3. The behavioral and emotional correlates of epilepsy in adolescence: a 7-year follow-up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A Sbarra; Sara E Rimm-Kaufman; Robert C Pianta

    2002-01-01

    This 7-year follow-up study examined the behavioral and emotional adjustment of 29 adolescents who experienced regular moderate seizures during middle childhood. Compared with national nonreferred norms on Achenbach checklists, both mothers and adolescents reported clinically significant difficulties in multiple areas regardless of current seizure status. Adolescents who currently experience regular seizures (N=10) reported no differences on psychological outcomes compared with

  4. Characteristics of Women Refusing Follow-up for Tests or Symptoms Suggestive of Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheila Weinmann; Stephen H. Taplin; Joyce Gilbert; Robert K. Beverly; Ann M. Geiger; Marianne Ulcickas Yood; Judy Mouchawar; M. Michele Manos; Jane G. Zapka; Emily Westbrook; William E. Barlow

    2005-01-01

    Background: Delay in diagnosis of breast cancer can occur at several points on the diagnostic pathway. We examined characteristics of women with breast cancer who before diagnosis actively refused recommended follow-up of tests or symptoms suggestive of breast cancer. Methods: We iden- tifi ed women aged 50 years or older diagnosed with late- stage (metastatic disease or tumors ? 3cm

  5. Follow-Up Study of Graduates of the Medical Laboratory Technician Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupel, Claudia

    A follow-up study to discover to what extent the education provided by the Medical Laboratory Technician program at Western Wisconsin Technical Institute has benefited the graduates and their employers was conducted. It was determined that 17 of the first 22 graduates were working successfully as medical laboratory technicians in eight states;…

  6. Relapses of Onychomycosis after Successful Treatment with Systemic Antifungals: A Three-Year Follow-Up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Tosti; B. M. Piraccini; C. Stinchi; M. D. Colombo

    1998-01-01

    Background: Data about relapses of onychomycosis after treatment with the new systemic antifungals vary among the different studies, with figures ranging from 3 to 20% for terbinafine and from 21 to 27% for itraconazole, depending on the follow-up duration. Objective: To determine the prevalence of relapses of onychomycosis cured by terbinafine compared with that of onychomycosis cured by itraconazole. Methods:

  7. Vocational Rehabilitation for Disabled Public Assistance Clients: A Follow up Study of Four Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigg, Charles M.; And Others

    The present report is a follow up study of disabled public assistance clients in four States. It attempts to evaluate the effects of cooperative efforts--between personnel of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Division of Family Services--to intervene in the poverty/dependence cycle of selected disabled welfare applicants and/or recipients. Between…

  8. Six years of following up a glomus jugulare tumor - a case report.

    PubMed

    Stenc Bradvica, Ivanka; Jan?uljak, Davor; Butkovi?-Soldo, Silva; He?imovi?, Ivan

    2012-02-01

    This case report followed up a patient for six years after she had been successfully treated by embolization and gamma knife surgery, while a complete surgical resection was contraindicated because of the high risk of possible mortality outcome. A development of internal hydrocephalus in a subacute postoperative period as a probable postoperative complication related to gamma knife surgery was noted. PMID:22634920

  9. A prospective follow-up study of ECT outcome in older depressed patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry Brodaty; Ian Hickie; Catherine Mason; Leanne Prenter

    2000-01-01

    Background: This study examined the relationship between age and outcome of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Method: This was a naturalistic, prospective follow-up of 81 consecutive in-patients with primary major depression. ECT outcome was compared for three age groups — under 65, 65–74 and 75 years and over — on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), Global Assessment of Functioning scale

  10. Follow-up actions from positive results of in vitro genetic toxicity testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appropriate follow-up actions and decisions are needed when evaluating and interpreting clear positive results obtained in the in vitro assays used in the initial genotoxicity screening battery (i.e., the battery of tests generally required by regulatory authorities) to assist in...

  11. Treatment of Morton's Neuroma with Alcohol Injection Under Sonographic Guidance: Follow-Up of 101 Cases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard J. Hughes; Kaline Ali; Hugh Jones; Sue Kendall; David A. Connell; Hughes RJ

    OBJECTIVE. Morton's neuroma is a common cause of forefoot pain. For this study, we assessed the efficacy of a series of sonographically guided alcohol injections into the lesion. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. One hundred one consecutive patients with Morton's neuroma were included in this prospective series. An average of 4.1 treatments per person were administered, and follow-up images were obtained at

  12. Vocational Graduate, No Formal Award, and Early Leaver Follow-Up Survey Results, 1983-1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Sue A.

    In spring 1984, a follow-up survey was conducted to gather data about the activities and perceptions of Lane Community College (LCC) students after leaving the institution. The survey focused on graduates, "no formal award completers" and "early leavers" of the 50 vocational programs offered at LCC. Overall, 623 former students responded to the…

  13. Long-term follow-up of a behavioral treatment for stuttering in children.

    PubMed Central

    Wagaman, J R; Miltenberger, R G; Woods, D

    1995-01-01

    We report 3.5-year follow-up data from children who participated in a study that evaluated a behavioral treatment for stuttering. Six of 7 subjects continued to be at or below the criterion of 3% stuttered words. Stuttering increased for 1 subject, but remained far below his baseline level. Social validity data are also reported. PMID:7601808

  14. FOLLOW UP STUDY OF CHILDREN WHO PARTICIPATED IN A PREVENTIVE MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZAX, MELVIN; AND OTHERS

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS INVESTIGATION WAS TO FOLLOW-UP, AS SEVENTH GRADERS, TWO GROUPS OF CHILDREN WHO HAD PARTICIPATED IN A PREVENTIVE MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAM IN THE SCHOOL SETTING AND HAD BEEN EVALUATED FOR THEIR POTENTIAL FOR HAVING ADJUSTMENT PROBLEMS. THE SEVENTH GRADE EVALUATIONS WERE COMPREHENSIVE, INCLUDING A VARIETY OF SCHOOL RECORD AND…

  15. Alopecia Areata Increases the Risk of Stroke: a 3-year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Herng-Ching; Kao, Senyeong; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The risk for stroke in alopecia areata (AA) patients is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the risk for subsequent risk of a stroke in AA patients in a large-scale retrospective cohort study. We identified 3231 patients with AA included in the study group from 2004 to 2011 in the "Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000" in Taiwan. We randomly selected 16,155 matched patients as the comparison group. We individually tracked each patient for a 3-year period to identify patients who had received a diagnosis of stroke during the follow-up period. We found that incidence rates of stroke during the 3-year follow-up periods were 5.44 (95% confidence interval (CI)?=?4.03?~?7.20) and 2.75 (95% CI?=?2.30?~?3.27) per 1000 person-years for patients with and those without AA, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio for stroke for those patients with AA was 1.61 (95% CI?=?1.13?~?2.30) within the follow-up period compared to the controls. We concluded that patients with AA were associated with a higher risk of stroke in the 3-year follow-up period. PMID:26114569

  16. ESL Wyss Space Follow Up Chris Johnson Lab Manager/Safety Officer

    E-print Network

    ESL Wyss Space Follow Up Chris Johnson ­ Lab Manager/Safety Officer Team 10 March 2013 SEAS Safety maintained and appear to be safe working environments. Congrats to the safety officers and lab managers. 2 Inspection ESL B-1-2; Mooney, Aizenberg, Vecitis, Lewis, Wyss Institute General remarks 1. Labs are very well

  17. The Utility of Electronic Mail Follow-Ups for Library Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roselle, Ann; Neufeld, Steven

    1998-01-01

    A survey of academic librarians determined that the use of e-mail in the follow-up stage of a library research project using mailed questionnaires was as effective as postal mail in speed and size of response. Discusses additional benefits (interpersonal communication, reduced time and costs) and drawbacks (time spent identifying messages…

  18. A follow-up study of 60 cases of chronic spinal muscular atrophy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Schiffer; F. Brignolio; A. Chiò; M. T. Giordana; P. Meineri; M. G. Rosso; A. Tribolo

    1988-01-01

    60 cases of chronic spinal muscular atrophy (CSMA) were followed-up for a period varying from 5 to 40 years. The neuromuscular impairment was evaluated by Norris’ ALS score, both at the time of last examination and retrospectively at the time of diagnosis. Age at onset of symptoms was the most important factor in the progression of the neuromuscular damage. Monomelic

  19. Adolescents' Declining Motivation to Learn Science: A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder-Weiss, Dana; Fortus, David

    2012-01-01

    This is a mix methods follow-up study in which we reconfirm the findings from an earlier study [Vedder-Weiss & Fortus [2011] "Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 48(2)", 199-216]. The findings indicate that adolescents' declining motivation to learn science, which was found in many previous studies [Galton [2009] "Moving to secondary school:…

  20. Early Referral Follow-Up Project. Final Report, October 1, 1983 to September 30, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Cordelia C.

    The Early Referral and Follow-up Project of the University of Nebraska Medical Center was designed to facilitate developmental assessment and intervention with long-term or repeatedly hospitalized children from birth to 3 years of age. Developmentally delayed children, handicapped children, and children at risk for delays were eligible for…

  1. Purchase intention, purchase behavior and the active solar market: a follow-up study. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. E. Johnston; G. L. Lilien

    1982-01-01

    By following up on some prior respondents to solar surveys, solar energy purchase intentions are related to actual purchase behavior. Also examined is the relationship between attitudinal and demographic variables and trends in intention variables. Two sets of data are analyzed. The first set was collected in the spring of 1980. The method used was an initial telephone survey followed

  2. Randomized Trial of Treatment for Children with Sexual Behavior Problems: Ten-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpentier, Melissa Y.; Silovsky, Jane F.; Chaffin, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This study prospectively follows 135 children 5-12 years of age with sexual behavior problems from a randomized trial comparing a 12-session group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with group play therapy and follows 156 general clinic children with nonsexual behavior problems. Ten-year follow-up data on future juvenile and adult arrests and…

  3. Internet-Delivered Indicated Prevention for Anxiety Disorders: Six-Month Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenardy, Justin; McCafferty, Kelly; Rosa, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    This project aims to conduct a medium-term follow-up to assess the efficacy of a preventive cognitive behavioural intervention delivered via the Internet to individuals at risk of developing anxiety disorders. Previous work on immediate outcome indicated that the program was effective in reducing depression and anxiety-related cognitions.…

  4. 67Ga SPECT/CT in Diagnosis and Follow-up of Acute Bacterial Prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sin-Di; Chiu, Yu-Li; Peng, Nan-Jing

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of 63-year-old man who had urinary tract infection with septic shock, Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia, and bacteriuria. Ga SPECT/CT showed hot uptake in prostate gland, and acute bacterial prostatitis was diagnosed. After antibiotic treatment, follow-up Ga SPECT/CT revealed much less uptake in the prostate gland, suggesting remission of prostatitis. PMID:26018684

  5. Follow Up Study of Female Radio and TV Servicing Apprentices. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Research on Women, Auckland (New Zealand).

    Female program completers and dropouts from a one-year course in radio and television servicing at Auckland Technical Institute (New Zealand) were followed up. Respondents included nine completers from the 1977 course, eight completers from the 1978 course, and three dropouts. Background information showed that 10 completers started the course…

  6. Behavior Problems in Elementary School Children. A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Victor, James B.; Halverson, Charles F., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Two-year follow-up data for an ostensibly normal sample of children (23 males and 25 females in grades 3 through 5) who had been previously characterized on a number of behavior problem dimensions by their teachers and peers were analyzed. (Author/SBH)

  7. First Follow-Up of Special Education Graduates, 1986. Publication No. 525.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfroe, William; And Others

    This is the first follow-up report of a 5-year longitudinal study which examined whether training provided handicapped students in Los Angeles high schools adequately prepares them for the world of work and independent living. Subjects were 253 handicapped (mostly learning disabled (LD), educable retarded (ER), or trainable (TMR) mentally…

  8. Enhanced physical therapy for arm function after stroke: a one year follow up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Sunderland; D Fletcher; L Bradley; D Tinson; R L Hewer; D T Wade

    1994-01-01

    Ninety seven patients with stroke who had participated in a randomised trial of conventional physical therapy nu an enhanced therapy for arm function were followed up at one year. Despite the emphasis of the enhanced therapy approach on continued use of the arm in everyday life, the advantage seen for some patients with enhanced therapy at six months after stroke

  9. Follow-up Study; Non-academic Attrition at Bucks County Community College, 1965-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucks County Community Coll., Newtown, PA. Office of Institutional Research.

    In this follow-up study, information was obtained regarding the educational and employment patterns of students who withdrew from Bucks County Community College, their reasons for withdrawing, and their evaluation of the college's programs and services. The questionnaire used (a copy of which is provided in an appendix) was similar to the one used…

  10. Follow-up Observations of Eclipsing Binary EROS 1017 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, K.-S.; Kang, Y.-W.

    2007-06-01

    We present the second follow-up observations of EROS 1017 located in the central bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud. We developed a program for identifying comparison stars in crowded area. Three comparison stars were selected by using the searching program. Observational errors are estimated to be 0.008 mag and 0.009 mag in B and V, respectively.

  11. Hemicallotasis for medial gonarthrosis: a short-term follow-up of 21 patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Gerdhem; Peter Abdon; Sten Odenbring

    2002-01-01

    We have prospectively evaluated 21 patients (22 knees; 15 men and 6 women) who underwent hemicallotasis osteotomy (HO), using an external fixator, of the proximal tibia due to medial gonarthrosis. Their median age at the time of operation was 52 (range 39-62) years. The follow- up period was 12-28 months. The Hospital for Special Surgery score (HSS) increased from median

  12. The Literacy Profile of Greek Precocious Readers: A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tafa, Eufimia; Manolitsis, George

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this follow-up study was to examine the progress made by 13 Greek-speaking precocious readers in phonological awareness, reading and spelling from the fourth to sixth grades of primary education, and to compare their progress with that of 11 nonprecocious reader classmates. It was hypothesised that because of the linguistic…

  13. Follow-up till age 3–4 of unselected children with sex chromosome abnormalities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johannes Nielsen; Ingelise Sillesen

    1976-01-01

    Follow-up examination of 15 unselected children with aneuploid sex chromosome abnormalities has been made till between the age of 21\\/2 and 5 years. The mental development of the 15 children was in all cases within the normal range, but there was a tendency to some differences compared with their siblings.

  14. Malignant mesothelioma due to environmental exposure to erionite: follow-up of a Turkish emigrant cohort

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Metintas; G. Hillerdal; S. Metintas

    1999-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma due to environmental exposure to erionite: follow-up of a Turkish emigrant cohort. M. Metintas, G. Hillerdal, S. Metintas. #ERS Journals Ltd 1999. ABSTRACT: The incidence of malignant mesothelioma is extremely high in some Turkish villages where there is a low-level environmental exposure to erionite, a fibrous zeolite. The best known example is the village of Karain. However, since

  15. A Follow-up Study of the Effect of Pedagogical Training on Teaching in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postareff, Liisa; Lindblom-Ylanne, Sari; Nevgi, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The present follow-up study examines the effect of university teachers' pedagogical training on approaches to teaching and self-efficacy beliefs measured by Approaches to Teaching Inventory and an additional part measuring motivational strategies. The effect of pedagogical training on teaching is analysed among 35 teachers who had not participated…

  16. Long-term follow-up of zonulo-hyaloido-vitrectomy for pseudophakic malignant glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Madgula, Indira M; Anand, Nitin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report long-term follow-up of zonulo-hyaloido-vitrectomy (ZHV) via anterior approach for pseudophakic malignant glaucoma refractory to medical treatment. Design: Noncomparative case-series. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 9 patients who sought treatment for aqueous humor misdirection refractory to medical treatment were reviewed. All patients underwent anterior vitrectomy, hyaloido-zonulectomy, and peripheral iridectomy (PI) via an anterior approach. Main outcome measures were preoperative and postoperative visual acuity, intraocular pressure, medications, slit-lamp examination, and fundus findings. Results: 10 eyes of 9 patients (7 female, 2 male) who underwent ZHV for refractory pseudophakic malignant glaucoma between 2003 and 2010 were included in this case-series. The mean age of patients was 77.4 ± 9.0 years, mean follow-up duration 50.2 ± 27.2 months. Recurrence of malignant glaucoma was noted in 40% (four cases) after a successful ZHV on long-term follow-up. Conclusions: An anterior segment surgeon can treat malignant glaucoma refractory to medical treatment successfully by vitrectomy, hyaloido-zonulectomy, and PI. This can be done via an anterior approach and patients require long follow-up to rule out a relapse despite a successful outcome in the short term. PMID:25579353

  17. Bipolar Disorder at Prospective Follow-Up of Adults Who Had Prepubertal Major Depressive Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Geller; Betsy Zimerman; M. A. Marlene Williams; James L. Craney

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The authors' goal was to conduct an adult follow- up of subjects who had participated in a study of nortriptyline for childhood depression. Method: The study group represented 100 (90.9%) of the orig- inal 110 subjects and included 72 subjects who had a prepuber- tal diagnosis of major depressive disorder and 28 normal com- parison subjects. Subjects were assessed

  18. Psychopathy, Treatment Behavior, and Recidivism: An Extended Follow-Up of Seto and Barbaree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbaree, Howard E.

    2005-01-01

    Seto and Barbaree reported the unexpected finding that adult male sex offenders who scored higher on psychopathy and exhibited better behavior in treatment were almost four times more likely to commit a new serious offence than other offenders once released. The present study reexamined this sample after a longer follow-up time using more complete…

  19. Follow-Up Study of 1988 Nursing Graduates. Volume XVIII, No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dincher, J.; Meltesen, Cal

    In 1989, a follow-up study of nursing program graduates was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to examine their employment patterns, further education plans, and evaluate particular aspects of their WRHC experience. Questionnaires were mailed to 105 nursing students who graduated in 1988. Results were compared with previous surveys…

  20. Alopecia Areata Increases the Risk of Stroke: a 3-year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Herng-Ching; Kao, Senyeong; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The risk for stroke in alopecia areata (AA) patients is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the risk for subsequent risk of a stroke in AA patients in a large-scale retrospective cohort study. We identified 3231 patients with AA included in the study group from 2004 to 2011 in the “Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000” in Taiwan. We randomly selected 16,155 matched patients as the comparison group. We individually tracked each patient for a 3-year period to identify patients who had received a diagnosis of stroke during the follow-up period. We found that incidence rates of stroke during the 3-year follow-up periods were 5.44 (95% confidence interval (CI)?=?4.03?~?7.20) and 2.75 (95% CI?=?2.30?~?3.27) per 1000 person-years for patients with and those without AA, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio for stroke for those patients with AA was 1.61 (95% CI?=?1.13?~?2.30) within the follow-up period compared to the controls. We concluded that patients with AA were associated with a higher risk of stroke in the 3-year follow-up period. PMID:26114569

  1. High School and Beyond, Third Follow-up (1986). Technical Report 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebring, Penny; And Others

    This report summarizes and documents the major technical aspects of the High School and Beyond (HS&B) third follow-up survey conducted during the spring and summer of 1986. Young persons who, either as sophomores or as seniors, had participated in the base year survey in 1980 were contracted for the fourth time in 1984 and asked to complete…

  2. Perspective Transformation over Time: A 2-Year Follow-up Study of HIV-Positive Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtenay, Bradley C.; Merriam, Sharan; Reeves, Patricia; Baumgartner, Lisa

    2000-01-01

    A follow-up study of 14 of 18 HIV-positive adults showed that their perspective transformation had been maintained 2 years later. Their meaning schemes changed to include a future-oriented perspective, greater attention to self-care, and integration of their HIV-positive status into their self-definition. (SK)

  3. Perceived Levels of Cultural Competence for School Social Workers: A Follow-up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teasley, Martell L.; Archuleta, Adrian; Miller, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report on findings from a follow-up study that examined the relationship among social work education programs, postgraduate professional development, and school social workers' perceived levels of cultural competence in practice with urban minority youth. The initial study demonstrated that African Americans…

  4. A 40Year Follow-up of Patients With Obsessive-compulsive Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gunnar Skoog; Ingmar Skoog

    1999-01-01

    Background: The long-term course of obsessive- compulsive disorder is insufficiently known. We stud- ied the course of this disorder in patients who were followed up for 40 years. Methods: Patients admitted with a diagnosis of obsessive- compulsive disorder to the Department of Psychiatry, Sahl- grenska University Hospital, Goteborg, Sweden, between 1947 and 1953 were examined by an experienced psy- chiatrist

  5. Effects of ball cauterization following loop excision and follow-up colposcopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evangelos Paraskevaidis; George Koliopoulos; Minas Paschopoulos; Kostas Stefanidis; Iordanis Navrozoglou; Dimitrios Lolis

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether central diathermy ball cauterization after loop excision affects satisfactory colposcopy at follow-up.Methods: One hundred one consecutive women with the squamocolumnar junction visible at the ectocervix scheduled for loop excision were assigned alternately into two groups. In group A, diathermy ball cauterization was applied to the entire crater following excision. In group B, cauterization was avoided in

  6. The Effect of Differential Follow-Up on Rearrests: A Critique of Quay and Love.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mrad, David F.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The evaluation of a juvenile diversion program by Quay and Love (1977) is criticized for employing follow-up periods of differing durations. A second article by Quay and Love responds to Mrad's suggestion that the experimental effect was due to a greater post-program exposure time for the control group. (LPG)

  7. Mortality of Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome at Long-term Follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Pierpoint; P. M. McKeigue; A. J. Isaacs; S. H. Wild; H. S. Jacobs

    1998-01-01

    Metabolic disturbances associated with insulin resistance are present in most women with polycystic ovary syndrome. This has led to suggestions that women with polycystic ovary syndrome may be at increased risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. We undertook a long-term follow-up study to test whether cardiovascular mortality is increased in these women. A total of 786 women diagnosed with

  8. Health Sciences New Employee Orientation New Employee Follow-up Checklist and Information

    E-print Network

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Health Sciences New Employee Orientation New Employee Follow-up Checklist and Information SECTION your personal information, signing up for direct deposit, changing our tax withholdings and viewing your earnings statement. To login go to: https://atyourserviceonline.ucop.edu/ayso/ Enroll in Health

  9. Children of Mothers at Psychosocial Risk Growing Up: A Follow up at the Age of 16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsby, Marie; Svedin, Carl Goran; Sydsjo, Gunilla

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to make a 16-year follow-up of children of psychosocial risk mothers as concerns emotional/behavioural problems, self-esteem, life events, and academic grades. Forty-three teenagers (index group) and 61 reference teenagers were personally interviewed and asked to answer the Youth Self-report (YSR), the Self-image…

  10. SPECT, CT, and MRI in head injury: acute abnormalities followed up at six months.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchener, A; Wyper, D J; Patterson, J; Hadley, D M; Wilson, J T; Scott, L C; Jones, M; Teasdale, G M

    1997-01-01

    Neuroimaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using the cerebral blood flow tracer 99Tc(m)-HMPAO has been used to study acute functional alterations after head injury and residual abnormalities at six month follow up in 32 patients. Comparison has been made with anatomical abnormalities defined acutely with CT and on follow up with MRI. SPECT showed slightly more abnormalities than CT in the acute phase (49 regions of abnormally low tracer uptake on SPECT and 45 lesions on CT). Twenty two of the acute SPECT abnormalities were in normal regions on CT. At follow up MRI showed more abnormalities than SPECT (30 on SPECT and 48 on MRI). Ten of the SPECT deficits were in regions with normal MRI. Comparison of the intensity of late and early SPECT deficits showed that only four early deficits deteriorated whereas 28 improved. Only five of 27 lesions seen on both acute SPECT and CT resolved compared with 16 of 22 lesions seen on SPECT but not on CT. Regions of abnormally high tracer uptake were detected in the acute stage in five of the patients. No high focal uptake was evident on follow up. Ten patients with a residual SPECT abnormality and eight with residual MRI lesions were graded clinically in the upper band of good recovery. Images PMID:9219753

  11. Writing for New Readers: A Book on Follow-Up Books. Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhola, H. S.

    The monograph presents the writing of suitable "follow-up" books for new adult readers in developing countries in the dual context of lifelong learning and of support for development by communication. It presents writing for new readers from the perspectives of high level policy makers, reading materials specialists in ministries and directorates,…

  12. Curiosity and Exploratory Behavior in Disadvantaged Children: A Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minuchin, Patricia P.

    In a follow-up study of curiosity and exploratory behavior, subjects were 18 disadvantaged inner-city black children who had been observed at age four in their first year of a Head Start program, and who were now finishing first grade. Data were obtained from teachers, observations in the classrooms, and an individual session with each child. Each…

  13. An investigation of online environments supporting follow-up to professional development for Texas school librarians

    E-print Network

    Green, Mary Elizabeth

    2006-04-12

    deficiencies on the TAKS at their school. At the conclusion of the workshop, school librarians were given the opportunity to participate in an eight-week online follow-up course that supported implementation of in-service themes. The purpose of this study...

  14. A Follow-Up Study of Standing Rock Community College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katus, Jean

    Using personal interviews, telephone interviews, and, when necessary, mailed questionnaires, Standing Rock Community College (SRCC) conducted follow-up surveys with 64 of the 68 students who had graduated from SRCC between May 1976 and December 1979. The interviews or questionnaires solicited information concerning demographic characteristics,…

  15. Considerations in Designing Survey Studies and Follow-Up Systems for Special Education Service Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruininks, Robert H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines considerations for designing a postschool follow-up system in secondary special education, focusing on survey research techniques and special applications of survey methodologies, including data collection techniques, questionnaire construction, sample design and contact, response rates, and tracking procedures. Design and…

  16. Surgical management and follow-up of a complex tracheobronchial injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scot C Schultz; John W Hammon; Charles S Turner; Will F McGuirt; Jean M Nelson

    1999-01-01

    Tracheobronchial trauma is an uncommon condition with potentially devastating consequences. Appropriate pre-, intra-, and postoperative management is mandatory for a satisfactory functional outcome. We report a case of extensive tracheobronchial injury secondary to blunt trauma, which was managed successfully with emergent surgical repair and careful endoscopic follow-up. We review the important management decisions made in this case.

  17. Development and evaluation of a follow up assessment of preterm infants at 5 years of age

    PubMed Central

    de Kleine, M J K; den Ouden, A L; Kollee, L; van der Sanden, M W G N.; Sondaar, M; van Kessel-Feddem..., B J M; Knuijt, S; van Baar, A L; Ilsen, A; Breur-Pieterse, R; Briet, J; Brand, R; Verloove-Vanhoric..., S

    2003-01-01

    Background: Long term follow up shows a high frequency of developmental disturbances in preterm survivors of neonatal intensive care formerly considered non-disabled. Aims: To develop and validate an assessment tool that can help paediatricians to identify before 6 years of age which survivors have developmental disturbances that may interfere with normal education and normal life. Methods: A total of 431 very premature infants, mean gestational age 30.2 weeks, mean birth weight 1276 g, were studied at age 5 years. Children with severe handicaps were excluded. The percentage of children with a correctly identified developmental disturbance in the domains cognition, speech and language development, neuromotor development, and behaviour were determined. Results: The follow up instrument classified 67% as optimal and 33% as at risk or abnormal. Of the children classified as at risk or abnormal, 60% had not been identified at earlier follow up assessments. The combined set of standardised tests identified a further 30% with mild motor, cognitive, or behavioural disturbances. The paediatrician's assessment had a specificity of 88% (95% CI 83–93%), a sensitivity of 48% (95% CI 42–58%), a positive predictive value of 85% (95% CI 78–91%), and a negative predictive value of 55% (95% CI 49–61%). Conclusions: Even after standardised and thorough assessment, paediatricians may overlook impairments for cognitive, motor, and behavioural development. Long term follow up studies that do not include detailed standardised tests for multiple domains, especially fine motor domain, may underestimate developmental problems. PMID:14500304

  18. Nurse led telephone follow up in ovarian cancer: A psychosocial perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Cox; Ellen Bull; Jane Cockle-Hearne; Wendy Knibb; Claire Potter; Sara Faithfull

    2008-01-01

    Survivorship is a relatively new concept in ovarian cancer due to improvements in diagnosis, surgery and chemotherapy. As more women require long term follow up for ovarian cancer the pressure on these services is increased and the question of how best to care for these women needs to be addressed. This paper considers the results of a pilot study of

  19. Comparing Effect Sizes in Follow-Up Studies: ROC Area, Cohen's d , and r

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marnie E. Rice; Grant T. Harris

    2005-01-01

    In order to facilitate comparisons across follow-up studies that have used different measures of effect size, we provide a table of effect size equivalencies for the three most common measures: ROC area (AUC), Cohen's d, and r. We outline why AUC is the preferred measure of predictive or diagnostic accuracy in forensic psychology or psychiatry, and we urge researchers and

  20. Thoracic outlet syndrome: Follow-up on 33 cases with regard to vascular compression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara S. Lutz; Branislav Matejic; Giulio Ingianni

    1998-01-01

    This follow-up study on 33 operations performed for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) proves high efficiency in relieving neurological and arterial symptoms, whereas benefit to venous compression is somewhat less. Twenty-six patients (average age was 36 years) were operated on for TOS, seven of them on both sides. There was a higher incidence in females. All patients showed neurological symptoms. In

  1. Telephone Interview vs. Mass Mailing for Student Follow-Up: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, M. Stephen

    A study was conducted at Los Angeles Pierce College (LAPC) to test the relative reliability of small-sample telephone interviewing and large-sample mailings with postcard and telephone reminders for student follow-up. The study involved conducting a telephone survey of 245 former students who had enrolled at LAPC in four program areas, and a mail…

  2. Psychosis prediction: 12-month follow up of a high-risk (“prodromal”) group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alison R Yung; Lisa J Phillips; Hok Pan Yuen; Shona M Francey; Colleen A McFarlane; Mats Hallgren; Patrick D McGorry

    2003-01-01

    Intervention in the prodromal phase of schizophrenia and related psychoses may result in attenuation, delay or even prevention of the onset of psychosis in some individuals. However, a “prodrome” is difficult to recognise prospectively because of its nonspecific symptoms.This study set out to recruit and follow up subjects at high risk of transition to psychosis with the aim of examining

  3. Two-Stage Revision Arthroplasty for Periprosthetic Hip Infection: Mean Follow-Up of Ten Years

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chi-Chien; Chen, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Han; Hsieh, Pang-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Two-stage revision hip arthroplasty is the gold standard for treatment of patients with chronic periprosthetic joint infection (PJI), but few studies have reported outcomes beyond short-term follow-up. Methods. A total of 155 patients who underwent two-stage revision arthroplasty for chronic PJI in 157 hips were retrospectively enrolled in this study between January 2001 and December 2010. The mean patient age was 57.5 years, the mean prosthetic age was 3.6 years, and the interim interval was 17.8 weeks. These patients were followed up for an average of 9.7 years. Results. At the latest follow-up, 91.7% of the patients were free of infection. The mean Harris hip score improved significantly from 28.3 points before operation to 85.7 points at the latest follow-up. Radiographically, there was aseptic loosening of the stem or acetabular components in 4 patients. In the multivariate survival analysis using a Cox regression model, repeated debridement before final reconstruction, an inadequate interim period, bacteriuria or pyuria, and cirrhosis were found to be the independent risk factors for treatment failure. Conclusion. Our data show that two-stage revision hip arthroplasty provides reliable eradication of infection and durable reconstruction of the joint in patients with PJI caused by a variety of pathogens.

  4. Community acquired bacterial meningitis in Cuba: a follow up of a decade

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio E Pérez; Félix O Dickinson; Misladys Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community acquired Bacterial Meningitis (BM) remains a serious threat to global health. Cuban surveillance system for BM allowed to characterize the main epidemiological features of this group of diseases, as well as to assess the association of some variables with mortality. Results of the BM surveillance in Cuba are presented in this paper. METHODS: A follow up of BM

  5. Evidence-Based Assessment in Case Management to Improve Abnormal Cancer Screen Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vourlekis, Betsy; Ell, Kathleen; Padgett, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe an evidence-based assessment protocol for intensive case management to improve screening diagnostic follow-up developed through a research project in breast and cervical cancer early detection funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Three components of an evidence-based approach to assessment are presented…

  6. Reversible Autism among Congenitally Blind Children? A Controlled Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, R. Peter; Lee, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Background: Atypical forms of autism may yield insights into the development and nature of the syndrome. Methods: We conducted a follow-up study of nine congenitally blind and seven sighted children who, eight years earlier, had satisfied formal diagnostic criteria for autism and had been included in groups matched for chronological age and verbal…

  7. Two-Year Follow-up of a Nonaversive Treatment for Cigarette Smoking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colletti, Gep; Stern, Linda

    1980-01-01

    Meaningful smoking reduction was maintained at follow-up, suggesting the relative efficacy of experiencing one of three maintenance strategies employed. Superior maintenance of smoking reduction was demonstrated by the self-monitoring group relative to the modeling and participant observing groups of the original sample. (Author/BEF)

  8. Loneliness, Social Networks, and Mortality: 18 Years of Follow-up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iecovich, Esther; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Stessman, Jochanan

    2011-01-01

    We examined the influence of changes in loneliness and social support networks upon mortality during 18 years of follow-up among an elderly cohort and determined the gender-specific nature of this relationship. The study is based on data collected from the Jerusalem Longitudinal Study (1990-2008), which has followed a representative sample of 605…

  9. Learning to Teach in the Inner-City: A Follow-up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boger, David; Simms, Richard L.

    A report is given of the findings of a follow-up study of a field-based program for preparing preservice teachers for inner-city schools. This program moves preservice teacher education from the realm of isolated theoretical instruction toward a realistic clinical approach through the use of a professional semester format. During this semester…

  10. Olfactory Deficits in Patients With Mild Cognitive Impairment Predict Alzheimer's Disease at Follow-Up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. P. Devanand; Kristin S. Michaels-Marston; Xinhua Liu; Gregory H. Pelton; Margarita Padilla; K. Marder; Karen Bell; Yaakov Stern; R. Mayeux

    2000-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the pre- dictive utility of olfactory identification deficits in patients with mild cognitive im- pairment for follow-up diagnosis of prob- able Alzheimer's disease. Method: Ninety outpatients with mild cognitive impairment were examined at 6-month intervals. Matched healthy com- parison subjects (N=45) were examined annually. The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test was given at baseline. Results:

  11. Follow-up Study of the Finances of Chemistry and Physics

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    Follow-up Study of the Finances of Chemistry and Physics Departments in UK Universities An Institute of Physics and Royal Society of Chemistry report | June 2010 #12;Acknowledgements I would like to thank all of the staff in the chemistry and physics departments and the staff in central finance

  12. High Risk Infants Follow-Up: A Case Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Jodeiry, Behzad; Hosseini, Mohammad Baqer; Mirnia, Kayvan; Akrami, Forouzan; Habbibollahi, Abbas; Moazzen, Sara; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background. A follow-up program for high risk infants was initiated in Alzahra Maternity Hospital in Tabriz city, Iran, in 2013. The aim of this paper is to give a brief report of the program. Material and Methods. Two groups of high risk neonates were studied. The first group comprising 509 infants received services in Alzahra Maternity Hospital implemented by the follow-up program. This included a full package for family to look after high risk infant and periodic clinical evaluation at two and four weeks after birth and then two, three, four, five, and six months later again. The second group including 131 infants in Taleqani Maternity Hospital received routine services after birth with no specific follow-up care. Results. Some anthropometric indices showed a significant improvement in the intervention hospital compared to control group. These included the following: head circumference at first and second months; weight in the first, fourth, fifth, and sixth months; and height in sixth month only. Clinical evaluation of infants showed an improvement for some of the medical conditions. Conclusion. Follow-up care program for a minimum of six months after discharge from maternity hospitals may help to avoid adverse and life threatening consequences in high risk infants. PMID:26136787

  13. 12-Month Follow-Up of Fluoxetine and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wilson, G. Terence; Masheb, Robin M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The longer term efficacy of medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED) remains unknown. This study examined the longer term effects of fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) either with fluoxetine (CBT + fluoxetine) or with placebo (CBT + placebo) for BED through 12-month follow-up after completing treatments.…

  14. Three School Based Models for Conducting Follow-up Studies of Teacher Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borich, Gary D.

    The rise of interest in the evaluation of teacher education and training during the decade 1967-1977 is charted; a review of related concepts and studies is presented; and three evaluation models for conducting follow-up studies on training effectiveness are examined. Three issues arising to prominence in the last decade are identified and…

  15. An Exploration of Online Environments Supporting Follow-Up to Face-to-Face Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Marybeth; Cifuentes, Lauren

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examined the effects of online follow-up and online peer interaction following a face-to face professional development workshop on attitudes towards that professional development and completion of a professional development task. School librarians were invited to work online on a three page plan outlining interventions a library…

  16. Follow-Up Study of 1990 Dental Hygiene Graduates. Volume XX, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marianne; Lucas, John A.

    In a continuing effort to measure the quality of their Dental Hygiene program, explore the need for changes, and substantiate the program's goals for accreditation standards, a follow-up study was conducted of the 1990 Dental Hygiene program graduates from William Rainey Harper (WRHC) College in Palatine, Illinois. A survey was mailed to all 30…

  17. Specific active immunotherapy in advanced renal cell carcinoma: A clinical longterm follow-up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Tallberg; H. Tykkä

    1986-01-01

    The results of a 15-year follow-up study on 127 patients with renal cell carcinoma treated with immunotheapy are presented. All patients were suffering from advanced renal cell carcinoma and were treated by palliative nephrectomy and specific active immunotherapy using polymerized autologous tumour tissue with adjuvant and supportive dietary measures. The longest survival time was 164 months. Of the patients nephrectomized

  18. Longitudinal Follow-Up of Children with Autism Receiving Targeted Interventions on Joint Attention and Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasari, Connie; Gulsrud, Amanda; Freeman, Stephanny; Paparella, Tanya; Hellemann, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the cognitive and language outcomes of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) over a 5-year period after receiving targeted early interventions that focused on joint attention and play skills. Method: Forty children from the original study (n = 58) had complete data at the 5-year follow-up. Results: In all,…

  19. The Sexual Adjustment of Coronary Bypass Surgery Patients: A 4-Year Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurer, Shari; Thurer, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    Measured the sexual adjustment of 14 individuals before coronary bypass surgery and both four months and four years afterwards. Results showed that sexual adjustment worsened with the onset of symptomatic coronary artery disease and did not improve at either follow-up interval. (LLL)

  20. Long-Term Follow-up Study of Children Developmentally Retarded by Early Environmental Deprivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujinaga, Tamotsu; And Others

    This paper reports on a 14-year follow-up study of two developmentally retarded Japanese children, a brother and sister, who had been kept shut up in a small shack before being rescued (at ages 5 and 6 respectively). Following birth they consistently suffered malnutrition, maternal deprivation, social isolation from adults, language deprivation,…

  1. A Follow-Up Study of the ABRACADABRA Web-Based Literacy Intervention in Grade 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Stasio, Maria Rosaria; Savage, Robert; Abrami, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the follow-up of a randomised control trial study of the ABRACADABRA web-based literacy intervention that contrasted synthetic versus analytic phonics (Comaskey, Savage & Abrami, 2009) in kindergarten children from urban low-SES backgrounds. Participants who received a "synthetic" phonics+phoneme awareness training (n = 26) or…

  2. Follow-Up Study of Former Students of the Data Processing Program. Volume XVI, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rilki, Ernest; Lucas, John A.

    In spring 1987, a follow-up survey was conducted of former William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) students who had taken five or more data processing courses at the college between 1980 and 1986. The survey focused on the students' employment status and educational intent while attending WRHC, their present employment situation, and their evaluation…

  3. Follow-up of patients with curatively resected colorectal cancer: a practice guideline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alvaro Figueredo; R Bryan Rumble; Jean Maroun; Craig C Earle; Bernard Cummings; Robin McLeod; Lisa Zuraw; Caroline Zwaal

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the literature regarding the impact of follow-up on colorectal cancer patient survival and, in a second phase, recommendations were developed. METHODS: The MEDLINE, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, and abstracts published in the 1997 to 2002 proceedings of the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology were systematically searched for

  4. Universal Definition of Loss to Follow-Up in HIV Treatment Programs: A Statistical Analysis of 111

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Universal Definition of Loss to Follow-Up in HIV Treatment Programs: A Statistical Analysis of 111, Zhou J, et al. (2011) Universal Definition of Loss to Follow-Up in HIV Treatment Programs definition for classifying patients as lost to follow-up (LTFU). We analyzed data from health facilities

  5. Single-centre long-term follow-up of live kidney donors demonstrates preserved kidney function but the necessity of a structured lifelong follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, David; Yamamoto, Shinji; Wadström, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Background The increase of live kidney donation (LKD) demands that we scrutinize its long-term consequences. Socialized medicine in Sweden has allowed us to survey long-term consequences of LKD with a high response rate. Methods Between 1974 and 2008, 455 LKDs were performed; 28 donors were deceased and 14 had moved abroad at the time of the survey. Of the remaining 413, 96% agreed to participate in a retrospective study with laboratory testing and answering a questionnaire. Results Mean age at donation was 49 ± 10 years, and the mean time since nephrectomy was 11 ± 7 years (range 1–33). No death was of renal cause. S-creatinine at follow-up was 93 ± 18 ?mol/L, 28% had treated hypertension, of whom only 52% had BP <140/90. Eleven per cent had spot microalbuminuria, and 1% were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Seventy-one per cent had check-ups at least every second year, but 14% had no check-ups. Eighty per cent would be willing to donate again if it were possible, and only 3% regretted the donation. Conclusion Renal function is well preserved in the long term after donation, no case of end-stage renal disease was identified, and a large majority of our donors would donate again if it were possible. Although rates of microalbuminuria and hypertension were at expected levels, a significant number of donors demonstrated elevated blood pressure levels and inadequate antihypertensive treatment. A relatively large number of donors did not receive regular check-ups. Both of these issues demonstrate the need for a better-structured lifelong follow-up. PMID:24646117

  6. Longitudinal Clinical Trials with Adaptive Choice of Follow-up Time

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Neal O.; Geller, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In longitudinal studies comparing two treatments with a maximum follow-up time there may be interest in examining treatment effects for intermediate follow-up times. One motivation may be to identify the time period with greatest treatment difference when there is a non-monotone treatment effect over time; another motivation may be to make the trial more efficient in terms of time to reach a decision on whether a new treatment is efficacious or not. Here we test the composite null hypothesis of no difference at any follow-up time versus the alternative that there is a difference at at least one follow-up time. The methods are applicable when a few measurements are taken over time, such as in early longitudinal trials or in ancillary studies. Suppose the test statistic Ztk will be used to test the hypothesis of no treatment effect at a fixed follow-up time tk. In this context a common approach is to perform a pilot study on N1 subjects, and evaluate the treatment effect at the fixed time points t1, …, tK and choose t* as the value of tk for which Ztk is maximized. Having chosen t* a second trial can be designed. In a setting with group sequential testing we consider several adaptive alternatives to this approach that treat the pilot and second trial as a seamless, combined entity and evaluate Type I error and power characteristics. The adaptive designs we consider typically have improved power over the common, separate trial approach. PMID:25818116

  7. Survival with congenital heart disease and need for follow up in adult life

    PubMed Central

    Wren, C; O'Sullivan, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To predict the growth in demand for long term follow up of adults with congenital heart disease.?DESIGN—Observed diagnoses of congenital heart disease in infancy and childhood were adjusted for observed infant survival, predicted further survival to age 16 years, underascertainment in older childhood, and predicted need for long term follow up.?SETTING—The resident population of one health region in the UK.?PATIENTS—All confirmed cardiovascular malformations diagnosed in 1985 to 1999 in children born in 1985 to 1994.?RESULTS—1942 cases of congenital heart disease were diagnosed in infancy in a population of 377 310 live births (5.2/1000). 1588 (82%) survived to 1 year and 1514 were predicted to survive to age 16. 605 further diagnoses were made in childhood—678 when adjusted for underascertainment. Thus, 2192 children were predicted to reach age 16, of whom 784 would require long term follow up in adult life. The adult population would comprise 28% complex, 54% significant, and 18% minor congenital heart disease. These figures predict the need for adult follow up of congenital heart disease of over 200 extra cases per 100 000 live births each year or over 1600 extra cases a year every year in the UK.?CONCLUSIONS—The need for follow up of congenital heart disease in adult life is likely to grow linearly, with increasing complexity and increasing need for reinvestigation and reintervention with time. Appropriate provision should be made for adequate manpower, resources, and facilities for care of these patients.???Keywords: adult congenital heart disease; resources; patient survival PMID:11250973

  8. Ergonomic stressors and upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders in automobile manufacturing: a one year follow up study

    PubMed Central

    Punnett, L; Gold, J; Katz, J; Gore, R; Wegman, D

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To estimate the one year cumulative incidence and persistence of upper extremity (UE) soft tissue disorders, in a fixed cohort of automotive manufacturing workers, and to quantify their associations with ergonomic exposures. Methods: At baseline and at follow up, cases of UE musculoskeletal disorders were determined by interviewer administered questionnaire and standardised physical examination of the upper extremities. The interview obtained new data on psychosocial strain and updated the medical and work histories. An index of exposure to ergonomic stressors, obtained at baseline interview, was the primary independent variable. Cumulative incidence and persistence of UE disorders (defined both by symptoms and by physical examination plus symptoms) were analysed in relation to baseline ergonomic exposures, adjusting for other covariates. The incidence of new disorders was modelled using multivariate proportional hazards regression among workers who were not cases in the first year and the prevalence on both occasions was modelled by repeated measures analysis. Results: A total of 820 workers (69% of eligible cohort members) was examined. Follow up varied slightly by department group but not by baseline exposure level or other characteristics. Among the non-cases at baseline, the cumulative incidence of UE disorders was 14% by symptoms and 12% by symptoms plus examination findings. These rates increased with index of physical exposures primarily among subjects who had the same jobs at follow up as at baseline. Increased exposure during follow up increased risk of incidence. The persistence of UE disorders from baseline to follow up examination was nearly 60% and somewhat associated with baseline exposure score. Conclusions: These longitudinal results confirm the previous cross sectional associations of UE musculoskeletal disorders with exposure to combined ergonomic stressors. The exposure-response relation was similar for incident cases defined by symptoms alone and those confirmed by physical examination. PMID:15258272

  9. Long-Term Follow-up of Foamy Viral Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy for Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas R; Tuschong, Laura M; Calvo, Katherine R; Shive, Heather R; Burkholder, Tanya H; Karlsson, Eleanor K; West, Robert R; Russell, David W; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2013-01-01

    The development of leukemia following gammaretroviral vector-mediated gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) has emphasized the need for long-term follow-up in animals treated with hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. In this study, we report the long-term follow-up (4–7 years) of four dogs with canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) treated with foamy viral (FV) vector-mediated gene therapy. All four CLAD dogs previously received nonmyeloablative conditioning with 200 cGy total body irradiation followed by infusion of autologous, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells transduced by a FV vector expressing canine CD18 from an internal Murine Stem Cell Virus (MSCV) promoter. CD18+ leukocyte levels were >2% following infusion of vector-transduced cells leading to ongoing reversal of the CLAD phenotype for >4 years. There was no clinical development of lymphoid or myeloid leukemia in any of the four dogs and integration site analysis did not reveal insertional oncogenesis. These results showing disease correction/amelioration of disease in CLAD without significant adverse events provide support for the use of a FV vector to treat children with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD-1) in a human gene therapy clinical trial. PMID:23531552

  10. Percutaneous interspinous distraction device for the treatment of lumbar spinal canal stenosis: Clinical and radiographic results at 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Chaichankul, Chaiyos; Limthongkul, Worawat

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the In- space (Synthes, Umkirch, Germany) and the correlation between radiographic parameters and clinical outcome in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS). Methods Between June 2009 and May 2013, 56 patients with LSS underwent In-space by one senior surgeon. All of the patients were evaluated both clinically and radiographic measurements before the procedure and each visit at the postoperative follow-up. Preoperative and postoperative X-ray imaging was performed before the procedure and at follow-up to assess the correlation with the clinical outcome. Radiological measurements and clinical outcomes were recorded to establish a relationship between the radiographic parameters and clinical outcome of this procedure. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up. Results The mean VAS score of back pain decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusions Our data suggest that percutaneous interspinous devices are a good alternative to treat LSS. The device offers significant decrease in back pain, leg pain and ODI score with 2-year lasting relief from symptoms. The increased intervertebral foramenal space explains the improvement of leg pain, but the mechanism of back pain relief remains unclear. A very weak correlation between the radiographic changes and improvement of pain was found. PMID:25694917

  11. Results of a randomized controlled trial of a peer mentor HIV/STI prevention intervention for women over an 18 month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Davey-Rothwell, Melissa A; Tobin, Karin; Yang, Cui; Sun, Christina J; Latkin, Carl A

    2011-11-01

    Despite numerous behavioral interventions designed for women, rates of HIV and STIs are increasing. Interventions are needed that reach a large number of at-risk individuals. This study was a randomized clinical trial of a HIV/STI behavioral intervention conducted in Baltimore, MD, USA. Heterosexual women (n = 169) completed a baseline and three semiannual follow-up visits. Participants were randomized into a standard of care comparison condition or a Peer Mentor condition. At the 6-month follow-up, Peer Mentors were less likely to have multiple sex partners [AOR: 0.28 (95% CI: 0.13, 0.63)]. At the 18 month follow-up assessment, Peer Mentors increased their condom use during vaginal [AOR: 0.47 (95% CI: 0.25, 0.87)] and anal sex [AOR: 0.24 (95% CI: 0.09, 0.68)] as well as with main [AOR: 0.41 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.77)] and non-main partners [AOR: 0.33 (95% CI: 0.14, 0.79)]. Peer education is a sustainable approach to change risky sexual behaviors. PMID:21468659

  12. Impact of Visit-to-Visit Variability and Systolic Blood Pressure Control on Subsequent Outcomes in Hypertensive Patients With Coronary Artery Disease (from the HIJ-CREATE Substudy).

    PubMed

    Arashi, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Jun-Ichi; Kawada-Watanabe, Erisa; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2015-07-15

    Although visit-to-visit variability in systolic blood pressure (BP) is a strong predictor of stroke, the impact on subsequent major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in terms of secondary prevention remains unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the prognostic significance of visit-to-visit variability in systolic BP on subsequent MACE in hypertensive patients with CAD. In the Heart Institute of Japan Candesartan Randomised Trial for Evaluation in Coronary Artery Disease, a total of 2,049 hypertensive patients with CAD were enrolled. Incidence of MACEs in addition to biochemistry tests and office BP were determined during follow-up. Achieved BP was defined as the mean value of systolic BP in patients who did not experience MACE and the mean value of systolic BP before MACE in those who experienced MACE during follow-up. In the present study, 1,734 patients had multiple follow-up visits (?3 times) until their final follow-up. During a median follow-up of 4.2 years, the primary outcome occurred in 317 patients (18.3%). Visit-to-visit variability of systolic BP was defined as the SD. Participants were divided into equal quartiles based on the mean systolic BP during follow-up and visit-to-visit variability of systolic BP, respectively. Although there was no relation between visit-to-visit variability of systolic BP and the incidence of MACE, the highest quartile based on mean systolic BP showed a significant relation with subsequent MACE. In conclusion, in hypertensive patients with CAD, inadequate BP control is a strong predictor of subsequent MACE, whereas visit-to-visit variability of systolic BP is not. PMID:25966826

  13. Long-term follow-up of children conceived through assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue-hong; Wang, Ning; Jin, Fan

    2013-05-01

    Children conceived via assisted reproductive technologies (ART) are nowadays a substantial proportion of the population. It is important to follow up these children and evaluate whether they have elevated health risks compared to naturally conceived (NC) children. In recent years there has been a lot of work in this field. This review will summarize what is known about the health of ART-conceived children, encompassing neonatal outcomes, birth defects, growth and gonadal developments, physical health, neurological and neurodevelopmental outcomes, psychosocial developments, risk for cancer, and epigenetic abnormalities. Most of the children conceived after ART are normal. However, there is increasing evidence that ART-conceived children are at higher risk of poor perinatal outcome, birth defects, and epigenetic disorders, and the mechanism(s) leading to these changes have not been elucidated. Continuous follow-up of children after ART is of great importance as they progress through adolescence into adulthood, and new ART techniques are constantly being introduced. PMID:23645173

  14. Diastematomyelia: A Surgical Case with Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Bekki, Hirofumi; Kawano, Osamu; Shiba, Keiichiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-01-01

    Few reports have described the involvement of syringomyelia associated with diastematomyelia in the etiology of neurological deficits. We reported a case with syringomyelia associated with diastematomyelia. A female patient with diastematomyelia was followed up clinically over 14 years. At the age of 8, she developed clubfoot deformity with neurological deterioration. Motor function of the right peroneus demonstrated grade 2 in manual muscle tests. Continuous intracanial bony septum and double cords with independent double dura were observed at upper thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a tethering of the spinal cord and syringomyelia distal to the level of diastematomyelia. Extirpation of the osseum septum and duralplasty were performed surgically. She grew without neurological deterioration during 7 years postoperatively. A long-term followed up case with syringomyelia that was possibly secondary to the tethering of the spinal cord associated with diastematomyelia, and effective treatment with extirpation of the osseum septum and duralplasty was described. PMID:25705341

  15. Regional sympathetic denervation after myocardial infarction: a follow-up study using [123I]MIBG.

    PubMed

    Podio, V; Spinnler, M T; Spandonari, T; Moretti, C; Castellano, G; Bessone, M; Brusca, A

    1995-12-01

    Previous studies in dogs have shown that experimental infarction produces myocardial sympathetic denervation not only in the infarcted area, but also in a region apical to the infarction. In these dogs MIBG myocardial scintigraphy detected denervation but returned to normal in a few months at which time reinnervation was shown to have occurred. Myocardial sympathetic denervation was studied with MIBG scintigraphy in ten patients after their first acute transmural myocardial infarction; scans were repeated at 4 months, one year and 30 months to follow the time course of possible reinnervation. Except during the first 48 hours following the infarction, no therapy except for antiaggregants was administered to the patients; during this follow-up period no cardiac events were seen. One week after infarction, comparison of MIBG images with perfusion scans revealed that the denervated area was larger than the infarcted area; no difference in MIBG uptake by the infarcted myocardium was found during the 30 months follow-up. PMID:9002747

  16. Long-term follow-up of children conceived through assisted reproductive technology*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yue-hong; Wang, Ning; Jin, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Children conceived via assisted reproductive technologies (ART) are nowadays a substantial proportion of the population. It is important to follow up these children and evaluate whether they have elevated health risks compared to naturally conceived (NC) children. In recent years there has been a lot of work in this field. This review will summarize what is known about the health of ART-conceived children, encompassing neonatal outcomes, birth defects, growth and gonadal developments, physical health, neurological and neurodevelopmental outcomes, psychosocial developments, risk for cancer, and epigenetic abnormalities. Most of the children conceived after ART are normal. However, there is increasing evidence that ART-conceived children are at higher risk of poor perinatal outcome, birth defects, and epigenetic disorders, and the mechanism(s) leading to these changes have not been elucidated. Continuous follow-up of children after ART is of great importance as they progress through adolescence into adulthood, and new ART techniques are constantly being introduced. PMID:23645173

  17. Telephone follow-up of patients after radical prostatectomy: a systematic review1

    PubMed Central

    da Mata, Luciana Regina Ferreira; da Silva, Ana Cristina; Pereira, Maria da Graça; de Carvalho, Emilia Campos

    2014-01-01

    Objective to assess and summarize the best scientific evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials about telephone follow-up of patients after radical prostatectomy, based on information about how the phone calls are made and the clinical and psychological effects for the individuals who received this intervention. Method the search was undertaken in the electronic databases Medline, Web of Science, Embase, Cinahl, Lilacs and Cochrane. Among the 368 references found, five were selected. Results two studies tested interventions focused on psychological support and three tested interventions focused on the physical effects of treatment. The psychoeducative intervention to manage the uncertainty about the disease and the treatment revealed statistically significant evidences and reduced the level of uncertainty and anguish it causes. Conclusion the beneficial effects of telephone follow-up could be determined, as a useful tool for the monitoring of post-prostatectomy patients. PMID:26107844

  18. Psychiatric morbidity in disintegrative psychosis and infantile autism: A long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Mouridsen, S E; Rich, B; Isager, T

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the validity of disintegrative psychosis (DP), the authors compared 13 patients given this diagnosis in childhood with a control group of 39 patients with infantile autism (IA) matched for sex, age, IQ and social class on measures of psychiatric morbidity. Almost the same proportion of the two groups had been admitted to a psychiatric hospital during a 22-year follow-up period. However, there was a slight tendency (statistically nonsignificant) for the DP group to utilize the psychiatric health care system more frequently than the IA group. They had more admissions and stayed longer in hospital than patients with IA suggesting that they had more psychiatric symptoms than the IA group. The original IA diagnoses were confirmed fairly consistently during the follow-up period, while the DP group was given more heterogenous diagnoses. No diagnosis of schizophrenia was made in either group. PMID:10364726

  19. MRI in adult patients with aortic coarctation: diagnosis and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, B; Abbas, A; McParland, P; Fitzsimmons, S; Shambrook, J; Peebles, C; Brown, I; Harden, S

    2015-04-01

    Aortic coarctation is a disease that usually presents in infancy; however, a proportion of patients present for the first time in adulthood. These lesions generally require repair with either surgery or interventional techniques. The success of these techniques means that increasing numbers of patients are presenting for follow-up imaging in adulthood, whether their coarctation was initially repaired in infancy or as adults. Thus, the adult presenting to the radiologist for assessment of possible coarctation or follow-up of coarctation repair is not an uncommon scenario. In this review, we present details of the MRI protocols and MRI findings in these patients so that a confident and accurate assessment can be made. PMID:25559379

  20. Four years follow-up after clavicle reconstruction in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Heidt, Christoph; Ziebarth, Kai; Erni, Dominique; Slongo, Theddy; Joeris, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Clavicle reconstruction is a rare operation. In most cases a mid-shaft defect of the clavicle is bridged by using different grafting techniques or musculo-osteous flaps. In some clinical situations where reconstruction is not a suitable option claviculectomy as a salvation procedure has proven to be an acceptable solution. In the paediatric population the challenge of both the cosmetic and the functional result attempting reconstruction of large bone defects is of higher demand. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a successful clavicle reconstruction with a sufficient follow-up using a free vascularised fibula graft in a child. This case provides a technique description, considerations in the paediatric population, an overview of other techniques used, and a long-term follow-up. PMID:25201718

  1. Long-term follow-up after laparoscopic cholecystectomy without routine intraoperative cholangiography.

    PubMed

    Braghetto, I; Debandi, A; Korn, O; Bastias, J

    1998-10-01

    The indications for routine intraoperative cholangiography remain controversial. We present here our recent results concerning the frequency of unknown retained common bile duct stones in 253 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy without intraoperative cholangiography in whom the presence of preoperative choledocholithiasis had been excluded by clinical, biochemical, and ultrasonographic evaluation. These patients were followed up for at least 4 years after surgery with evaluations similar to those made preoperatively. Freedom from symptoms and normal test results were found in 96.8% of patients. Jaundice and abnormal liver function test results were demonstrated in 3.2% of patients, but retained common bile duct stones were found in only 2.3% of patients. We conclude that laparoscopic cholecystectomy without routine intraoperative cholangiography can be performed safely without the discovery of a high percentage of retained common bile duct stones at later follow-up. PMID:9799142

  2. Four-year follow-up of megalencephaly, polymicrogyria, postaxial polydactyly and hydrocephalus (MPPH) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Tara G; Roberts, Kari D

    2013-01-01

    A male infant was born by emergent caesarean section at 39 weeks gestational age secondary to maternal and fetal distress. Initial physical examination was notable for macrocephaly (greater than+2SD), postaxial polydactyly of the hands and facial dysmorphism. Head imaging demonstrated diffuse polymicrogyria without hydrocephalus. All findings were consistent with a diagnosis of megalencephaly, polymicrogyria, postaxial polydactyly and hydrocephalus (MPPH) syndrome. At the 4-year follow-up, megalencephaly persisted without evidence of hydrocephalus. The child was severely delayed with a stable seizure disorder controlled with dual antiepileptic therapy. This case meets the classic criteria for MPPH syndrome, adding to the limited experience with this disease. The 4-year follow-up and absence of hydrocephalus, once thought to be a key diagnostic criterion, adds to our understanding of the long-term sequelae. PMID:24092603

  3. Nine-year follow-up of children with atopic dermatitis by general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent; Ansolabehere, Xavier; Grandfils, Nathalie; Georgescu, Victor; Taieb, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of associated comorbidity and the cost of treatments in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) followed up in primary care settings are poorly known. We carried out a retrospective cohort study on a longitudinal electronic medical records database of patients consulting a panel of general practitioners in France. All subjects with AD diagnosed during the first year of life were selected and matched with infants without the disease according to sex (1,163 vs. 1,163). Subjects were followed up for 9 years. Associated diseases, drug consumptions and available medical costs were detailed. Comparisons between subjects and controls were carried out. Subjects with AD had more comorbidities than others, especially in respiratory and ophthalmic system organs. The number of prescribed treatments in the field of skin diseases as well as overall medical costs (general practitioner consultations and prescribed drugs) were higher among atopic subjects, but differences were attenuated with age. PMID:24662194

  4. Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding: A Prospective 4Year Follow-up Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Miller; E. Hell

    1999-01-01

    Background: A body mass index of ?40 kg\\/m2 represents clinically severe obesity and warrants operative treatment if requested. The adjustable silicone gastric band\\u000a and the Swedish adjustable gastric band are recently produced laparoscopic gastric restrictive devices. The aim of this study\\u000a was to assess all complications linked to both the available gastric bands in a long-term follow-up. Methods: In a

  5. A Follow-Up Study of Girls With Gender Identity Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kelley D. Drummond; Susan J. Bradley; Michele Peterson-Badali; Kenneth J. Zucker

    2008-01-01

    This study provided information on the natural histories of 25 girls with gender identity disorder (GID). Standardized assessment data in childhood (mean age, 8.88 years; range, 3–12 years) and at follow-up (mean age, 23.24 years; range, 15–36 years) were used to evaluate gender identity and sexual orientation. At the assessment in childhood, 60% of the girls met the Diagnostic and

  6. Follow-up of an Exercise-Based Treatment for Children with Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, David; Nicolson, Roderick I.

    2007-01-01

    This study reports the results of a long-term follow-up of an exercise-based approach to dyslexia-related disorders (Reynolds, Nicolson, & Hambly, "Dyslexia," 2003; 9(1): 48-71). In the initial study, children at risk of dyslexia were identified in 3 years of a junior school. One half then undertook a 6 month, home-based exercise programme.…

  7. Spectroscopic Follow-Up Observations of Transiting Planet Candidates Identified by the Kepler Mission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Latham; D. D. Sasselov; A. H. Szentgyorgyi

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission is expected to identify many hundreds of transiting planet candidates in four years of continuous photometric monitoring of 100 square degrees in Cygnus and Lyra. To sort out true planets from eclipsing stellar systems that are masquerading as transiting planets, a variety of follow-up observations are planned. High resolution ground-based spectroscopy at modest signal-to-noise ratio will be

  8. Superficial Thrombophlebitis of the Legs: A Randomized, Controlled, Follow-up Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Belcaro; A. N. Nicolaides; B. M. Errichi; M. R. Cesarone; M. T. De Sanctis; L. Incandela; R. Venniker

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different treatment plans (compression only, early surgery, low-dose subcutaneous heparin [LDSH], low- molecular-weight heparin [LMWH], and oral anticoagulant [OC] treatment) in the management of superficial thrombophlebitis (STP), by considering efficacy and costs in a 6-month, randomized, follow-up trial. Patients with STP, with large varicose veins without any suspected\\/documented

  9. Head injuries in children: a prospective five year follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff, H; Low, M D; Clark, C

    1977-01-01

    A five year follow-up study was conducted with two groups of head-injuried children. 131 younger than 9 years old at time of injury and 100 older than 9 years. The four aspects studied were neuropsychological function, neurological status, EEG status, and school progress. There was an extended recovery process over time, as well as evidence of a differential rate of recovery for the four aspects measured. PMID:591990

  10. Planck early results. IX. XMM-Newton follow-up for validation of Planck cluster candidates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Aghanim; M. Arnaud; M. Ashdown; J. Aumont; C. Baccigalupi; A. Balbi; A. J. Banday; R. B. Barreiro; M. Bartelmann; J. G. Bartlett; E. Battaner; K. Benabed; A. Benoît; J.-P. Bernard; M. Bersanelli; R. Bhatia; J. J. Bock; A. Bonaldi; J. R. Bond; J. Borrill; M. L. Brown; M. Bucher; C. Burigana; P. Cabella; C. M. Cantalupo; J.-F. Cardoso; P. Carvalho; A. Catalano; L. Cayón; A. Challinor; A. Chamballu; L.-Y. Chiang; G. Chon; P. R. Christensen; E. Churazov; D. L. Clements; S. Colafrancesco; S. Colombi; F. Couchot; A. Coulais; B. P. Crill; F. Cuttaia; A. da Silva; H. Dahle; L. Danese; P. de Bernardis; G. de Gasperis; A. de Rosa; G. de Zotti; J. Delabrouille; J.-M. Delouis; F.-X. Désert; J. M. Diego; K. Dolag; S. Donzelli; O. Doré; U. Dörl; M. Douspis; X. Dupac; G. Efstathiou; T. A. Enßlin; F. Finelli; I. Flores-Cacho; O. Forni; M. Frailis; E. Franceschi; S. Fromenteau; S. Galeotta; K. Ganga; R. T. Génova-Santos; M. Giard; G. Giardino; Y. Giraud-Héraud; J. González-Nuevo; R. González-Riestra; K. M. Górski; S. Gratton; A. Gregorio; A. Gruppuso; D. Harrison; P. Heinämäki; S. Henrot-Versillé; C. Hernández-Monteagudo; D. Herranz; S. R. Hildebrandt; E. Hivon; M. Hobson; W. A. Holmes; W. Hovest; R. J. Hoyland; K. M. Huffenberger; G. Hurier; A. H. Jaffe; M. Juvela; E. Keihänen; R. Keskitalo; T. S. Kisner; R. Kneissl; L. Knox; H. Kurki-Suonio; G. Lagache; J.-M. Lamarre; A. Lasenby; R. J. Laureijs; C. R. Lawrence; M. Linden-Vornle; S. Leach; R. Leonardi; A. Liddle; M. Linden-Vørnle; M. López-Caniego; P. M. Lubin; J. F. Macías-Pérez; B. Maffei; D. Maino; N. Mandolesi; R. Mann; M. Maris; F. Marleau; E. Martínez-González; S. Masi; S. Matarrese; F. Matthai; P. Mazzotta; A. Melchiorri; J.-B. Melin; L. Mendes; A. Mennella; S. Mitra; M.-A. Miville-Deschênes; A. Moneti; L. Montier; G. Morgante; D. Mortlock; D. Munshi; A. Murphy; P. Naselsky; P. Natoli; C. B. Netterfield; H. U. Nørgaard-Nielsen; F. Noviello; D. Novikov; I. Novikov; S. Osborne; F. Pajot; F. Pasian; G. Patanchon; O. Perdereau; L. Perotto; F. Perrotta; F. Piacentini; M. Piat; E. Pointecouteau; R. Piffaretti; S. Plaszczynski; G. Polenta; N. Ponthieu; T. Poutanen; G. W. Pratt; G. Prézeau; S. Prunet; J.-L. Puget; R. Rebolo; M. Reinecke; C. Renault; S. Ricciardi; T. Riller; I. Ristorcelli; G. Rocha; C. Rosset; J. A. Rubiño-Martín; B. Rusholme; E. Saar; M. D. Seiffert; D. Santos; B. M. Schaefer; D. Scott; G. F. Smoot; J.-L. Starck; F. Stivoli; V. Stolyarov; R. Sunyaev; J.-F. Sygnet; J. A. Tauber; L. Terenzi; L. Toffolatti; M. Tomasi; J.-P. Torre; M. Tristram; J. Tuovinen; L. Valenziano; L. Vibert; P. Vielva; F. Villa; N. Vittorio; B. D. Wandelt; S. D. M. White; D. Yvon; A. Zacchei; A. Zonca

    2011-01-01

    We present the XMM-Newton follow-up for confirmation of Planck cluster candidates. Twenty-five candidates have been observed to date using snapshot (~10ks) exposures, ten as part of a pilot programme to sample a low range of signal-to-noise ratios (4 < S\\/N 5 candidates. The sensitivity and spatial resolution of XMM-Newton allows unambiguous discrimination between clusters and false candidates. The 4 false

  11. Follow-up design of unexpected enhancing lesions on preoperative MRI of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joo-Yeon; Moon, Jin Hee

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to analyze the characteristics and long-term follow-up results of unexpected enhancing lesions on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of breast cancer patients. METHODS From August 2007 through February 2010, second-look ultrasound (SLUS) was recommended for 84 of 312 breast cancer patients having unexpected enhancing lesions on MRI. SLUS was performed for 85 unexpected enhancing lesions in 72 patients. We performed a retrospective review to determine the size, lesion type, enhancement kinetic curve, and location in relation to the index cancer. We obtained the pathologic outcome of the detected lesions and in case of a negative finding on SLUS, we performed follow-up examinations for at least two years. RESULTS Of 85 unexpected lesions, 72 (85%) were detected on SLUS. In total, 41 lesions (56.9%) were confirmed as malignant and 31 lesions (43.6%) as benign. Cancer rate was statistically higher in lesions having type III enhancement pattern, located at the same quadrant as the index cancer. However, no significant association was observed between the cancer rate and the lesion size and type. None of the 13 negative cases on SLUS developed cancer on follow-up. CONCLUSION In case of unexpected enhancing lesions on preoperative MRI of breast cancer patients, SLUS can be useful to find out the matched lesion. Lesions with type III enhancement pattern or those located at the same quadrant as the index cancer should be considered as a separate cancer. In the absence of any suspicious findings on SLUS, patient may be followed up with confidence. PMID:25430525

  12. A follow-up study of cognitive bias in generalized anxiety disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karin Mogg; Brendan P. Bradley; Neil Millar; Jim White

    1995-01-01

    Patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) without concurrent depression (n = 11) and normal controls (n = 17) were tested twice, about 2 months apart, on a modified Stroop colour-naming task, which presented anxiety-related, depression-related and neutral words in masked and unmasked exposure conditions. GAD patients received cognitive behaviour therapy in the test-retest interval, and were also retested at follow-up,

  13. Polyurethane-Coated Breast Implants Revisited: A 30-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Castel, Nikki; Soon-Sutton, Taylor; Deptula, Peter; Flaherty, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Polyurethane coating of breast implants has been shown to reduce capsular contracture in short-term follow-up studies. This 30-year study is the longest examination of the use of polyurethane-coated implants and their correlation with capsular contracture. Methods This study evaluates the senior surgeon's (F.D.P.) experience with the use of polyurethane-coated implants in aesthetic breast augmentation in 382 patients over 30 years. Follow-up evaluations were conducted for six months after surgery. After the six-month follow-up period, 76 patients returned for reoperation. The gross findings, histology, and associated capsular contracture were noted at the time of explantation. Results No patient during the six-month follow-up period demonstrated capsular contracture. For those who underwent reoperation for capsular contracture, Baker II/III contractures were noted nine to 10 years after surgery and Baker IV contractures were noted 12 to 21 years after surgery. None of the explanted implants had macroscopic evidence of polyurethane, which was only found during the first five years after surgery. The microscopic presence of polyurethane was noted in all capsules up to 30 years after the original operation. Conclusions An inverse correlation was found between the amount of polyurethane coating on the implant and the occurrence of capsular contracture. Increasingly severe capsular contracture was associated with a decreased amount of polyurethane coating on the surface of the implants. No contracture occurred in patients whose implants showed incomplete biodegradation of polyurethane, as indicated by the visible presence of polyurethane coating. We recommend research to find a non-toxic, non-biodegradable synthetic material as an alternative to polyurethane. PMID:25798390

  14. Results from Over One Year of Follow-Up for Absorbable Mesh Insertion in Partial Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Min Young; Lee, Se Kyung; Hur, Sung Mo; Bae, Soo Youn; Choi, Min-Young; Cho, Dong Hui; Kim, Sangmin; Choe, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Han; Kim, Jee Soo; Nam, Seok Jin; Yang, Jung-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Recently, several clinicians have reported the advantages of simplicity and cosmetic satisfaction of absorbable mesh insertion. However, there is insufficient evidence regardint its long-term outcomes. We have investigated the surgical complications and postoperative examination from the oncologic viewpoint. Materials and Methods From February 2008 to March 2009, 34 breast cancer patients underwent curative surgery with absorbable mesh insertion in Samsung Medical Center. Patient characteristics and follow up results including complications, clinical and radiological findings were retrospectively investigated. Results The mean age of the study population was 50.1±8.9 years old (range 31-82) with a mean tumor size of 3±1.8 cm (range 0.8-10.5), and the excised breast tissue showed a mean volume of 156.1±99.8 mL (range 27-550). Over the median follow-up period of 18±4.6 months (range 3-25), mesh associated complications, including severe pain or discomfort, edema, and recurrent fluid collection, occurred in nine patients (26.5%). In three cases (8.8%), recurrent mastitis resulted in mesh removal or surgical intervention. In the postoperative radiologic survey, the most common finding was fluid collection, which occurred in five patients (16.1%), including one case with organizing hematoma. Fat necrosis and microcalcifications were found in three patients (9.7%). Conclusion Absorbable mesh insertion has been established as a technically feasible, time-saving procedure after breast excision. However, the follow-up results showed some noticeable side effects and the oncologic safety of the procedure is unconfirmed. Therefore, we suggest that mesh insertion should be considered only in select cases and should be followed-up carefully. PMID:21786446

  15. Couples therapy: effectiveness of treatment and long-term follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann-Marie Lundblad; Kjell Hansson

    2006-01-01

    Most couples therapy theories are developed and tested in the USA. In this clinical study, we investigated such therapies in a Swedish context. Over 300 couples were enrolled in the study of whom just under half completed the end-of-treatment assessment and just over 40 per cent a two-year follow-up. At the start, the study group displayed severe problems in marital

  16. Functional impairment in body dysmorphic disorder: A prospective, follow-up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katharine A. Phillips; Gene Quinn; Robert L. Stout

    2008-01-01

    Cross-sectional\\/retrospective studies indicate that individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) have markedly impaired psychosocial functioning. However, no study has prospectively examined functioning in BDD. In this study, which is to our knowledge the first prospective study of the course of BDD, psychosocial functioning was assessed at baseline and over 1–3 years (mean=2.7±0.9 years) of follow-up with the Global Assessment of

  17. The Maudsley early onset schizophrenia study. Predictors of psychosocial outcome at 4-year follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nora S. Vyas; Michael Hadjulis; Sophia Frangou

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the contribution of premorbid function, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP), age of onset, severity of symptoms at presentation, and number of subsequent hospitalisations to the outcome of early onset schizophrenia (EOS; onset before 17th birthday). Method Twenty-three EOS patients (mean age at onset 15.16 ± 1.39 years) were re-assessed after a mean interval of 4 ± 1.08 years. At baseline and follow-up clinical

  18. Sequential morphological changes in follow-up CT of pulmonary mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Ji Yung; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Chang Hyun; Goo, Jin Mo; Im, Jung-Gi

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to describe the computed tomography (CT) features of pulmonary mucormycosis including sequential changes between follow-ups. MATERIALS AND METHODS Between June 2001 and May 2011, five patients (three males and two females; median age, 43 years; age range, 13–73 years) who had been pathologically diagnosed with pulmonary mucormycosis constituted our study population. Their clinical and CT features including sequential changes over follow-ups were evaluated retrospectively. RESULTS All patients were immunocompromised due to either hematologic diseases (n=3), diabetes mellitus (n=1), or steroid administration for autoimmune hepatitis (n=1). All patients had symptoms such as fever (n=5), tachycardia (n=1), or pleuritic chest pain (n=1) on admission. Regarding the clinical outcome after treatment, one patient died, and the remaining four recovered from the disease. In terms of initial CT features, the morphologies of pulmonary mucormycosis included a single mass (n=3), consolidation (n=1), or multiple masses (n=1). There were seven pulmonary lesions in total, 3–7 cm in size, which showed a CT halo sign (n=3), reversed-halo sign (n=2), or air-fluid levels (n=2). On follow-up CTs, the lesions of all patients contained necrosis. All three patients with a mass or masses with a CT halo sign on initial CT had a decreased surrounding halo followed by central necrosis, and the lesions gradually decreased in size on recovery. CONCLUSION Pulmonary mucormycosis usually manifests as a mass or masses with a halo or reversed-halo sign on the initial CT scan followed by a decreased extent of surrounding ground-glass opacities with the development of internal necrosis during follow-up. PMID:24047721

  19. Coronary Artery Revascularization Evaluation—A Multicenter Registry With Seven Years of Follow?Up

    PubMed Central

    Kurlansky, Paul; Herbert, Morley; Prince, Syma; Mack, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Data from randomized clinical trials comparing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) may not accurately reflect current clinical practice, in which there is off?label usage of drug?eluting stents (DES). We undertook a prospective registry of coronary revascularization by CABG on? and off?pump and PCI with bare?metal stents (BMSs), DESs, or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) to determine clinical outcomes. Methods and Results All patients undergoing isolated coronary revascularization in 8 community?based hospitals were enrolled. Final follow?up was obtained after 5 years by patient and/or physician contact and the Social Security Death Index. ST?elevation myocardial infarction and salvage patients were excluded. Five or more years of follow?up was obtained on 81.5% (3156) of the eligible patients—968 CABG patients (82.0%) and 2188 PCI patients (81.3%). Overall follow?up was 63.5±27.9 months (median, 79.7 months). The incidence of initial major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) at follow?up for CABG versus PCI was 29.2% versus 41.8% (P<0.001). Analysis of stent subgroups showed more events with BMSs (equivalent to PTCA alone) compared with DESs. All stents had more events than on? or off?pump CABG groups. Using propensity score–matched groups, the odds ratio for CABG to PCI was 0.69 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56 to 0.85; P<0.001) for mortality and 0.58 (95% CI, 0.45 to 0.75; P<0.001) for any MACE. Conclusions In the current era of DES and off?pump surgery, in a community hospital setting, comparable patients undergoing coronary revascularization appear to benefit from improved long?term survival and reduced MACE with CABG versus PCI. PMID:23598273

  20. Clinical legal medicine – community health outreach, results of a follow-up pan-European survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N Gage-Lindner; A Heinemann; D Seifert; J Siemer; K Pschel

    2010-01-01

    In a follow-up 2007\\/2008 to the first pan-European survey of legal medicine contributions to community health responses to gender violence, child and elderly abuse in 2003\\/2004, we investigated strategies legal medicine and forensic nursing are pursuing to provide violence victims low-threshold access to evaluation and documentation of injuries.MethodologyA standardised written questionnaire submitted to n=227 medicolegal experts in 33 European countries.

  1. Occipital condyle fractures: incidence and clinical follow-up at a level 1 trauma centre

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory M. Malham; Helen M. Ackland; Rachel Jones; Owen D. Williamson; Dinesh K. Varma

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the incidence, management, and outcomes of occipital condyle fractures at a level\\u000a 1 trauma center. Blunt trauma patients with occipital condyle fracture admitted to a level 1 trauma center over a 3-year period\\u000a were identified. Prospective clinical and functional follow-up was undertaken, including further radiographic imaging. The\\u000a incidence of occipital condyle fracture

  2. Clinical Coronary In-Stent Restenosis Follow-Up after Treatment and Analyses of Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Barbara Campos Abreu; Nascimento, Guilherme Abreu; Rabelo, Walter; Marino, Marcos Antônio; Marino, Roberto Luiz; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical in-stent restenosis (CISR) is the main limitation of coronary angioplasty with stent implantation. Objective Describe the clinical and angiographic characteristics of CISR and the outcomes over a minimum follow-up of 12 months after its diagnosis and treatment. Methods We analyzed in 110 consecutive patients with CISR the clinical presentation, angiographic characteristics, treatment and combined primary outcomes (cardiovascular death, nonfatal acute myocardial infarction [AMI]) and combined secondary (unstable angina with hospitalization, target vessel revascularization and target lesion revascularization) during a minimal follow-up of one year. Results Mean age was 61 ± 11 years (68.2% males). Clinical presentations included acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in 62.7% and proliferative ISR in 34.5%. CISR was treated with implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) in 36.4%, Bare Metal Stent (BMS) in 23.6%, myocardial revascularization surgery in 18.2%, balloon angioplasty in 15.5% and clinical treatment in 6.4%. During a median follow-up of 19.7 months, the primary outcome occurred in 18 patients, including 6 (5.5%) deaths and 13 (11.8%) AMI events. Twenty-four patients presented a secondary outcome. Predictors of the primary outcome were CISR with DES (HR = 4.36 [1.44–12.85]; p = 0.009) and clinical treatment for CISR (HR = 10.66 [2.53–44.87]; p = 0.001). Treatment of CISR with BMS (HR = 4.08 [1.75–9.48]; p = 0.001) and clinical therapy (HR = 6.29 [1.35–29.38]; p = 0.019) emerged as predictors of a secondary outcome. Conclusion Patients with CISR present in most cases with ACS and with a high frequency of adverse events during a medium-term follow-up. PMID:25651344

  3. Midterm results with primary uncemented total hip replacement: a 7- to 11-year follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George Petrou; Anastasios Kouzoupis; Michael Gavras; Harris Petrou

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed 102 uncemented total hip replacements (THRs) in 90 patients with a mean age of 66 years (range, 33–87 years)\\u000a and with an average postoperative follow-up period of 8.5 years (range, 7–11 years). The patients were prospectively observed\\u000a clinically using the Harris hip score (HHS). The excellent and good results totaled over 90%. We had two serious complications\\u000a treated

  4. Vagus nerve stimulation in patients with catastrophic childhood epilepsy, a 2-year follow-up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. J. M. Majoie; M. W. Berfelo; A. P. Aldenkamp; W. O. Renier; A. G. H. Kessels

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the long-term efficacy and tolerability of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in children with a Lennox-like syndrome. Method: This study was a longitudinal observational prospective cohort analysis. Baseline: 6 months. Follow-up: 24 months. Screening (baseline and every 6 months): MRI (baseline only), EEG, neuropsychological evaluation, ECG and blood sampling for antiepileptic drug levels. Nineteen children are included. Results:

  5. Fifteen-year follow-up of quality of life in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Peter R; Logtenberg, Susan JJ; Groenier, Klaas H; Keers, Joost C; Bilo, Henk JG; Kleefstra, Nanne

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate metabolic control and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) population. METHODS: As part of a prospective cohort study, 283 T1DM patients treated with various insulin treatment modalities including multiple daily injections (MDI) and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) were examined annually. HRQOL was measured using the SF-36 and EuroQol questionnaires. Data regarding HRQOL, glycaemic and metabolic control from baseline and follow-up measures in 2002 and 2010 were analysed. Linear mixed models were used to calculate estimated values and differences between the three moments in time and the three treatment modalities. RESULTS: Significant changes [mean ? (95%CI)] in body mass index [2.4 kg/m2 (1.0, 3.8)], systolic blood pressure [-6.4 mmHg (-11.4, -1.3)] and EuroQol-VAS [-7.3 (-11.4, -3.3)] were observed over time. In 2010, 168 patients were lost to follow-up. Regarding mode of therapy, 52 patients remained on MDI, 28 remained on CSII, and 33 patients switched from MDI to CSII during follow-up. Among patients on MDI, HRQOL decreased significantly over time: mental component summary [-9.8 (-16.3, -3.2)], physical component summary [-8.6 (-15.3, -1.8)] and EuroQol-VAS [-8.1 (-14.0, -2.3)], P < 0.05 for all. For patients using CSII, the EuroQol-VAS decreased [-9.6 (-17.5, -1.7)]. None of the changes over time in HRQOL differed significantly with the changes over time within the other treatment groups. CONCLUSION: No differences with respect to metabolic and HRQOL parameters between the various insulin treatment modalities were observed after 15 years of follow-up in T1DM patients. PMID:25126403

  6. Four-year follow-up of children with low intelligence and ADHD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin Handen

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-six of 30 participants (87%) who took part in a medication study for treatment of ADHD were followed up 2.9 to 4.8 years (Mean = 3.9 years) later. Parent ratings on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist Community (ABC-C) indicated continued problems on the acting-out subscales, and parent assessments on the Stony Brook Checklist-3R showed a high rate of difficulty on domains

  7. Psychopathology and attrition in the Baltimore ECA 15-year follow-up 1981–1996

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Badawi; W. W. Eaton; J. Myllyluoma; L. G. Weimer; J. Gallo

    1999-01-01

    Predictors of non-response were investigated in a 15-year follow-up (1981–1996) of 3,481 individuals in a probability sample\\u000a from the household population of East Baltimore. Demographics (age, sex, race, education, marital status, and unemployment),\\u000a household factors (living arrangements, household income, household size, and number of children), cultural variables (ancestral\\u000a ethnicity and foreign language), social variables (social support and networks, committing felony,

  8. Follow-Up Procedures in EPIC-Germany – Data Quality Aspects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Bergmann; U. Bussas; H. Boeing

    1999-01-01

    With 475,000 participants throughout Europe, EPIC is one of the largest cohort studies investigating the association between diet and cancer and other chronic diseases. The German part of EPIC comprises about 53,000 participants in Potsdam (n = 27,616) and in Heidelberg (n = 25,546). In the German study centers, follow-up started in 1998 and will be continued in 2-year intervals

  9. High tibial osteotomy for varus gonarthrosis: a 10- to 24-year follow-up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ho-Rim Choi; Yukiharu Hasegawa; Seiji Kondo; Takuya Shimizu; Kunio Ida; Hisashi Iwata

    2001-01-01

    .   From January 1976 to December 1990, 66 high tibial osteotomies for medial gonarthrosis were performed in 59 patients. Thirty\\u000a knees of 26 patients (18 women and 8 men) were reviewed after a mean follow-up period of 15.3 years (range, 10–24 years).\\u000a The mean age of these 26 patients was 59 years at the time of operation and 75.5 years

  10. Incidental finding of monoclonal gammopathy in blood donors: a follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    La Raja, Massimo; Barcobello, Monica; Bet, Nicola; Dolfini, Paolo; Florean, Marina; Tomasella, Federica; De Angelis, Vincenzo; Mascaretti, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Background. The incidental finding of monoclonal immunoglobulin in the sera of healthy blood donors is a relatively frequent event and in such cases the subjects are commonly deferred permanently from donating blood. However, no follow-up studies of these cases have been published so far. Materials and methods. Since 2000, all regular blood donors at Trieste Blood Bank have undergone annual screening by serum protein electrophoresis. Cases presenting with monoclonal gammopathy between January 2000 and December 2008 were registered and follow-up was performed until December 2010. Results. Out of 8,197 regular blood donors, monoclonal gammopathy was detected in 104 subjects (1.3%). The median age at detection was 53 years, the median monoclonal protein concentration was 0.2 g/dL and the cumulative follow-up of these cases amounted to 763 person/years. In two cases asymptomatic multiple myeloma was diagnosed within 6 months of detection of the gammopathy and in 14 cases, the monoclonal gammopathy was transient. The remaining 88 cases were classified as having monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Out of these, two events related to monoclonal gammopathy were observed during the follow up: one lymphoma and one light chain deposition nephropathy. Discussion. According to current prognostic staging systems, the majority of blood donors with monoclonal gammopathy were classified as having low-risk MGUS and had a very low incidence of lymphoproliferative diseases. Permanent deferral of blood donors with stable MGUS causes about a 1% loss of potential blood donations and it represents a “precautionary measure” that needs to be substantiated and validated. PMID:22507857

  11. Long-term follow-up and late complications following treatment of pediatric urologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Ardavan; Stock, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    Many pediatric urologic disorders have sequelae that may affect patients well into adulthood. Despite adequate treatment, many patients are at risk for progressive urologic deterioration years after surgical reconstruction. While many pediatric urologists follow their patients years after surgery, screening for late complications is a shared responsibility with primary care providers. This article discusses potential late complications and appropriate follow-up for patients who have a history of ureteral reimplantation, pyeloplasty, hypospadias repair, posterior urethral valve ablation, and intestinal interposition. PMID:21095408

  12. Community-Based Prevention for Suicide in Elderly by Depression Screening and Follow-Up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hirofumi Oyama; Junichi Koida; Tomoe Sakashita; Keiko Kudo

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the outcome of a community-based prevention program against suicides among the elderly aged 65 and over in the Japanese rural town of Joboji (population 7,010), using a quasi-experimental design with two neighboring control areas. During the 10-year implementation of the program based on strategies including screening for depression, follow up with mental

  13. Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada syndrome associated with cutaneous malignant melanoma: an 11-year follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabine Aisenbrey; Christoph Lüke; Helen D. Ayertey; Salvatore Grisanti; Andreas Perniok; Richard Brunner

    2003-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada (VKH) syndrome associated with cutaneous pigmented malignant melanoma (MM) and non-pigmented nodular metastasis after a 10-year recurrence-free interval. Methods Case report with long-term follow-up of 11 years. Ocular examinations included best-corrected visual acuity (ETDRS charts), fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and computer-assisted perimetry. In addition, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing was performed. Results A

  14. Uterine smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP): pathology, follow-up and recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Dall’Asta, Andrea; Gizzo, Salvatore; Musarò, Andrea; Quaranta³, Michela; Noventa, Marco; Migliavacca, Costanza; Sozzi, Giulio; Monica, Michela; Mautone, Daniele; Berretta, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The term smooth uterine muscle of uncertain malignant potential (STUMPs) indicates a group of uterine smooth muscle tumors (SMTs) that cannot be diagnosed unequivocally as benign or malignant. Diagnosis, surgical management, and follow-up of this neoplasm remain controversial, especially in pre-menopausal women with fertility desire, due to the non aggressive behaviour and prolonged survival rate when compared to leiomyosarcomas. However, recurrence is estimated between 8.7% and 11% and may include delayed-recurrences. We reported five cases of uterine masses treated by surgical procedure diagnosed as STUMP on final pathology. Four patients underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy with or without salpingo-oophorectomy. One patient underwent excision of uterine mass and subsequent total abdominal hysterectomy plus bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy after the diagnosis of STUMP. All patients in our study remained recurrence-free to date (with a follow up period ranging from 6 to 81 months). Based on our experience and in consideration of the lack of consensus regarding the malignant potential, diagnostic criteria, gold-standard treatment and follow-up, we believe that close multidisciplinary management is mandatory in the event of STUMP. We suggest that gynaecologist, dedicated pathologist (with high level of expertize in gynaecological pathology) and oncologist should work as a team in the counselling and management of this neoplasm from detection till completion of follow up. Furthermore, we recommend immunohistochemistry to investigate the overexpression of p16 and p53 in order to identify the cohort of patients at increased risk of recurrence who may benefit from more aggressive surgical-oncological strategies. PMID:25550862

  15. Follow-up care of women with an abnormal cytology in a low-resource setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia C Gage; Catterina Ferreccio; Miguel Gonzales; Raul Arroyo; Militza Huiv??n; Sylvia C Robles

    2003-01-01

    Study purpose: We ascertained the follow-up care after an abnormal cytology (Papanicolaou) screening in the San Mart??n region of Perú and assessed the status of women who had not received adequate care. Basic procedures: We identified women with an abnormal cytology and assessed their medical records, laboratory registries, death certificates and interviewed them at home. Re-screening, diagnosis and treatment were

  16. The underlying diseases and follow-up in Taiwanese children screened by urinalysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ching-Yuang Lin; Chia-Chang Hsieh; Wei-Perng Chen; Ling-Yoeu Yang; Hsin-Hui Wang

    2001-01-01

    To date, the underlying diseases and follow-up of Taiwanese children screened by urinalysis have not been reported. The grading\\u000a of urine abnormalities varied from grade A (microscopic hematuria only), grade B (light proteinuria only), grade C (light\\u000a proteinuria and microscopic hematuria) to grade D (heavy proteinuria). From January 1991 to August 1998, 630 students, aged\\u000a 6–15 years and with positive

  17. Psychopathy and Offending From Adolescence to Adulthood: A 10Year Follow-Up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather M. Gretton; Robert D. Hare; Rosalind E. H. Catchpole

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the predictive validity of the Hare Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL:YV; A. E. Forth, D. S. Kosson, & R. D. Hare, 2003) from adolescence to early adulthood. The authors coded the PCL:YV using file information and collected criminal record information over a 10-year follow-up period on 157 boys, ages 12 through 18, referred to Youth Forensic Psychiatric

  18. Long-Term Clinical Follow-Up After Successful Repeat Percutaneous Intervention for Stent Restenosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernhard Reimers; Issam Moussa; Tatsuro Akiyama; Gina Tucci; Massimo Ferraro; Giovanni Martini; Simonetta Blengino; Carlo DI Mario; Antonio Colombo

    1997-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the long-term clinical outcome of successful repeat percutaneous intervention after in-stent restenosis.Background. Recurrence of symptoms and angiographic restenosis after stent implantation are observed in 15% to 35% of cases. Repeat percutaneous treatment for in-stent restenosis has been shown to be safe, with high immediate success, but little is known about the long-term clinical outcome.Methods. Clinical follow-up

  19. Predictors of weight change in men: Results from The Health Professionals Follow-Up Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    EH Coakley; EB Rimm; G Colditz; I Kawachi; W Willett

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Since the prevalence of adult obesity is increasing in the United States, we examined the effect of changing common habits (exercise, TV viewing, smoking and eating habits) on four year change in body weight.DESIGN: A prospective cohort study of US male health professionals with follow-up from 1988–1992. Participants were 19 478 men aged 40–75 in 1986, who were free

  20. Crack Cocaine: A Five-Year Follow-Up Study of Treated Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ribeiro; J. Dunn; R. Sesso; M. S. Lima; R. Laranjeira

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To follow-up a group of 131 crack cocaine users and examine drug use, treatment experience, employment status, involvement in crime and mortality at 2 and 5 years. Methods: Consecutive crack-dependent patients who were admitted to a detoxification unit in São Paulo between 1992 and 1994 were re-interviewed on two occasions: 1995–1996 and 1998–1999. Results: 5 years after treatment information

  1. Computerized follow-up of discrepancies in image interpretation between emergency and radiology departments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eliot Siegel; Georgina Groleau; Bruce Reiner; Thomas Stair

    1998-01-01

    Radiographs are ordered and interpreted for immediate clinical decisions 24 hours a day by emergency physicians (EP’s). The\\u000a Joint Commission for Accreditation of Health Care Organizations requires that all these images be reviewed by radiologists\\u000a and that there be some mechanism for quality improvement (QI) for discrepant readings. There must be a log of discrepancies\\u000a and documentation of follow up

  2. Rigid occlusive titanium barriers for alveolar bone augmentation: two reports with 24-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Engelke, Wilfried; Deccó, Oscar; Cura, Andrea C; Borie, Eduardo; Beltrán, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Titanium barriers have been used for guided bone regeneration in preclinical and preliminary clinical reports as a possible alternative to bone grafting. In two cases with lateral bone defects, rigid titanium barriers were used to provide a secluded space in conjunction with bone substitutes. Sufficient lateral bone volume was generated for implant placement, and no complications were observed during 2 years of follow up. In conclusion, space-making stiff titanium barriers may be applied successfully for lateral alveolar crest augmentation. PMID:24955200

  3. Childhood sexual abuse, parenting and postpartum depression—a 3-year follow-up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Buist; Helen Janson

    2001-01-01

    Objective: This study is the second and final phase of a 3-year follow-up study of women who had been admitted with a major depressive episode in the postpartum period, along with their children and partners where present. The effect of a maternal sexual abuse history on the women’s well-being and child outcome compared to those women without such a history

  4. Effects of art therapy with prison inmates: A follow-up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Gussak

    2006-01-01

    A pilot study conducted to measure the effects of art therapy with prison inmates (Gussak, 2004) demonstrated marked improvement in mood. The results of this study encouraged a quantitative follow-up study the following year. This study used the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale (FEATS) and the Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form (BDI-II) as pre and post-test assessments to assess the effects

  5. Long-term MR follow-up of cerebral lesions in neuro-Behçet's disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Gerber; A. Biondi; D. Dormont; B. Wechsler; C. Marsault

    1996-01-01

    To study the long-term evolution of cerebral lesions in neuro-Behçet's disease, MRI was carried out on 12 patients, with\\u000a follow-up from 1.5 to 6 years (mean 3.5 years). On the first MRI, 66 lesions in all were found; each patient had 1–10 lesions\\u000a (mean 5.5). There were 30 (46 %) lesions in the brain stem, 18 (27 %) in the

  6. Bone recovery after a gluten-free diet: a 5-year follow-up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. KEMPPAINEN; H Kröger; E. JANATUINEN; I. ARNALA; C. LAMBERG-ALLARDT; M Kärkkäinen; V.-M Kosma; R Julkunen; J Jurvelin; E Alhava; M Uusitupa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the recovery of bone disease in celiac patients during 5 years of a gluten-free diet. The study group consisted of 28 newly diagnosed celiac patients (9 men, 19 women) recruited between 1990 and 1991. Six patients withdrew from the 5-year follow-up. Compliance with the gluten-free diet was good: 96% at 1 year

  7. Angio-immunoblastic lymphadenopathy: a case with a 17-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ochshorn, Miriam; Tchetchik, Mordechai; Michalevicz, Rita; Behar, Albert; Seligsohn, Uri

    1982-01-01

    A case of angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy with a 17-year follow-up is reported. The patient, who first presented with benign hypergammaglobulinaemic purpura of Waldenstrom and autoimmune haemolytic anaemia appears to be the longest survivor with this condition reported so far. The marked variations in the clinical course of patients with angio-immunoblastic lymphadenopathy in conjunction with immunological characteristics are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:7122374

  8. One-Year Follow-Up in Stroke Patients Discharged from Rehabilitation Hospital

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefano Paolucci; Maria Grazia Grasso; Gabriella Antonucci; Elio Troisi; Daniela Morelli; Paola Coiro; Maura Bragoni

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate functional status at a 1-year follow-up in consecutive first-stroke patients after discharge from rehabilitation hospital and to identify reliable prognostic factors associated with changes in their abilities. Functional evaluation was made of consecutive patients 1 year after discharge to their own homes. Two multiple logistic regressions (forward stepwise) were performed using both improvement and

  9. Mobility status after inpatient stroke rehabilitation: 1Year follow-up and prognostic factors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefano Paolucci; Maria Grazia Grasso; Gabriella Antonucci; Maura Bragoni; Elio Troisi; Daniela Morelli; Paola Coiro; Domenico De Angelis; Francesco Rizzi

    2001-01-01

    Paolucci S, Grasso MG, Antonucci G, Bragoni M, Troisi E, Morelli D, Coiro P, De Angelis D, Rizzi F. Mobility status after inpatient stroke rehabilitation: 1-year follow-up and prognostic factors. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2001;82:2-8. Objectives: To evaluate the stability of mobility status achieved by stroke patients during hospital rehabilitation treatment over time and to identify reliable prognostic factors associated

  10. Health factors and longevity in men and women: a 26-year follow-up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Axel C. Carlsson; Holger Theobald; Per E. Wändell

    2010-01-01

    Health factors have the power to prevent and postpone diseases and death; however, studies using the same methodology in both\\u000a men and women are sparse. We aimed to study the ability of health factors to prevent mortality in a population-based, 26-year\\u000a follow-up of Swedish men and women. During 1969–70, a health-screening programme was offered to a stratified sample of 3,064

  11. Using Kid Power to Teach Kids about Mental Retardation: A Long Term Follow-Up

    E-print Network

    Turnbull, Amy; Bronicki, G. J. Buzz

    1987-01-01

    JASH copyright 1987 by 1987, Vol. 12, No. 3, 216-217 The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps 216 Using Kid Power to Teach Kids about Mental Retardation: A Long-Term Follow-Up Amy..., I gave an attitude test to kids in two second grade classrooms. Then I taught a 50-min lesson about mental retardation to one of the classes. I gave the attitude test to both classrooms again. The kids in the experimental group that I taught had...

  12. Fifteen-Year Follow-Up of Hand Eczema: Predictive Factors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Birgitta Meding; Karin Wrangsjö; Bengt Järvholm

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors of importance for the long-term prognosis of hand eczema in the general population. In a 15-y follow-up, 868 (78%) individuals with hand eczema, diagnosed and clinically examined in a previous population-based study, answered a postal questionnaire with questions concerning persistence of the disease. In a logistic regression model, the extent of

  13. Two Acute Radiation Hand Injuries with Long-Term Follow-Up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gail L. English

    1996-01-01

    Accidental, excessive radiation exposure of the hands is rare in industry. This report describes two such cases with subsequent long-term follow-up. In the first case, a middle-aged pipefitter received a dose of 2500 rem to the fingers of his left hand and 2000 rem to small areas of his right hand. He was accidentally exposed to this beta radiation while

  14. Follow-up results of 415 patients after endoscopic sinus surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Dursun; Ü. Bay?z; H. Korkmaz; H. Akmansu; K. Uygur

    1998-01-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is a method used with success in the treatment of chronic inflammatory paranasal sinus diseases.\\u000a Between February 1991 and June 1995 the Messerklinger technique for ESS was used in 415 patients who had been pre-operatively\\u000a evaluated in detail according to the staging system used in our clinic. Average post-operative follow-up was 23 months. Our\\u000a general success

  15. Follow-up Observations of SPY White Dwarf + M-Dwarf Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.; Napiwotzki, R.; Marsh, T. R.; Burleigh, M. R.; Dobbie, P. D.; Hogan, E.; Nelemans, G.

    2007-09-01

    We present the results of follow-up observations of white-dwarf + M-dwarf binaries identified using spectra obtained as part of the SPY survey. Spectra of the H? region were obtained with the SPIRAL spectrograph on the AAT telescope. Of the eleven stars observed, seven are binaries with periods in the range 2.8 hours to 7.7 days. We also show that one of our targets, WD 0137-349, has a brown dwarf companion.

  16. Extended Follow-Up Frequently Asked Questions | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial has proven to be a valuable resource for research in cancer prevention and molecular epidemiology. NCI is extending the follow-up of PLCO participants for at least five years in order to strengthen the scientific value of this study in determining if the screening and early detection reduce deaths from prostate cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, and cancers of the colon and rectum.

  17. Evaluation of penile revascularization for erectile dysfunction: a 10-year follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y Vardi; I Gruenwald; U Gedalia; S Nassar; A Engel; Y Har-Shai

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to report long-term success rates for penile revascularization (PR) and investigate factors responsible for failures. During the past 10 y, data were obtained on 52 patients who underwent PR. Surgical technique was selected according to preoperative arteriographic findings. The mean age was 28.5 y and the mean follow-up was 70.8 months. Success was defined

  18. Follow-up of school-age children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George P. Giacoia; Pankaja S. Venkataraman; Kerstin I. West-Wilson; Mary J. Faulkner

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the outcome of school-age children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in terms of nutrition, pulmonary function, and intelligence, and to compare the results with a preterm cohort matched for gestational age and birth weight, and with a term control group.Design: Cross-sectional.Setting: Follow-up clinic at level III neonatal intensive care unit, university-affiliated hospital, Children's Hospital.Subjects: Twelve children who had

  19. FSRQ PKS 1222+216: Optical follow-up from MIRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliyan, K. S.; Chandra, Sunil; Deepti; Matta, Sanya

    2014-06-01

    Following the recent reports on the high state of the FSRQ PKS 1222+216 (also known as 4C+21.35 and 2FGLJ1224.9+2122) at redshift 0.432, in optical (Atel#5921), VHE (Atel#5981) and NIR (Atel#6194), we followed up the source in optical from Mt Abu InfraRed Observatory (MIRO) on June 3, 2014. ...

  20. Mortality in patients with epilepsy: 40 years of follow up in a Dutch cohort study.

    PubMed

    Shackleton, D P; Westendorp, R G; Trenité, D G; Vandenbroucke, J P

    1999-05-01

    To investigate the extent of and the causes of excess mortality in patients with epilepsy, mortality was studied in a cohort of patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy over an extended follow up period. All patients (both inpatients and outpatients) of the Instituut voor Epilepsiebestrijding in Heemstede, the Netherlands between 1953 and 1967 were included in the study. Complete follow up was obtained for 1355 patients, 746 men and 609 women. The mean follow up was 28 years (range 6 months-41 years). In total, 38 665 person years were surveyed, in which 404 patients died. All cause mortality was threefold increased (risk ratio (RR) 3.2; 95%CI 2.9-3. 5), and was only slightly higher for men than for women. Mortality was highest under 20 years of age (RR 7.6; 95%CI 6.5-8.7), and during the first 2 years of follow up (RR 16; 95%CI 12-20). Mortality directly related to epilepsy accounted for 18 of the 53 deaths in the first 2 years after diagnosis, which is equivalent to an incidence rate of 6.8 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 4.1-10). After 2 years 110 of the 351 deaths could be attributed to epilepsy itself, or were epilepsy related, with an incidence rate of 3.1 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 2.5-3.6). The data presented suggest that the increased mortality risk in patients with epilepsy is attributable in part to epilepsy itself, and is predominantly present at younger age and early after diagnosis. However, the absolute risk is moderate. PMID:10209177