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Sample records for follow-up site visits

  1. Follow-Up Visit Patterns in an Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Programme in Zomba, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Rachlis, Beth; Cole, Donald C.; van Lettow, Monique; Escobar, Michael; Muula, Adamson S.; Ahmad, Farah; Orbinski, James; Chan, Adrienne K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying follow-up (FU) visit patterns, and exploring which factors influence them are likely to be useful in determining which patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) may become Lost to Follow-Up (LTFU). Using an operation and implementation research approach, we sought 1) to describe the timing of FU visits amongst patients who have been on ART for shorter and longer periods of time; and 2) to determine the median time to late visits, and 3) to identify specific factors that may be associated with these patterns in Zomba, Malawi. Methods and Findings Using routinely collected programme monitoring data from Zomba District, we performed descriptive analyses on all ART visits among patients who initiated ART between Jan. 1, 2007–June 30, 2010. Based on an expected FU date, each FU visit was classified as early (≥4 day before an expected FU date), on time (3 days before an expected FU date/up to 6 days after an expected FU date), or late (≥7 days after an expected FU date). In total, 7,815 patients with 76417 FU visits were included. Ninety-two percent of patients had ≥2 FU visits. At the majority of visits, patients were either on time or late. The median time to a first late visit among those with 2 or more visits was 216 days (IQR: 128–359). Various patient- and visit-level factors differed significantly across Early, On Time, and Late visit groups including ART adherence and frequency of, and type of side effects. Discussion The majority of patients do not demonstrate consistent FU visit patterns. Individuals were generally on ART for at least 6 months before experiencing their first late visit. Our findings have implications for the development of effective interventions that meet patient needs when they present early and can reduce patient losses to follow-up when they are late. In particular, time-varying visit characteristics need further research. PMID:25033285

  2. Determining the rate of follow-up after hospital emergency department visits for dental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Beau; Adkins, Eric; Finnerty, Nathan M; Robinson, Fonda G

    2016-01-01

    Background Emergency department (ED) visits for dental reasons continue to impact EDs nationwide. This investigation determined the rate of follow-up in an emergency dental clinic (EDC) after hospital ED visits for nontraumatic dental conditions. Methods This prospective investigation reports the number of patients who presented to an ED for nontraumatic dental conditions and the rate of follow-up at an EDC. Upon ED discharge, patients were provided instructions to follow-up for low-cost care at the EDC. Telephone contact was attempted following failed referrals. Descriptive statistics were reported for comparing referral sources and demographic trends. Results Two hundred and forty-seven referrals were made and 31% followed up for definitive treatment at the EDC. More referrals were made on weekends than on weekdays. Failed referrals were unreachable by telephone in 75% of cases. Tooth extraction was the most common treatment rendered in the EDC. Of the ED patients who accessed EDC care, 14% became comprehensive patients in the EDC’s regular dental clinic. Conclusion Less than one-third of ED referrals to the EDC followed up for definitive care when provided an opportunity to do so, and 75% of referrals were unreachable by telephone in the week following the ED dental visit. PMID:27099530

  3. Predictors and Correlates of Follow-up Visit Adherence among Adolescents Receiving Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding

    PubMed Central

    Sysko, Robyn; Hildebrandt, Tom B.; Kaplan, Simona; Brewer, Stephanie K.; Zitsman, Jeffrey L.; Devlin, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adherence behaviors have not been examined among adolescents undergoing laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). In addition, studies of youth receiving bariatric surgery have not considered the influence of psychopathology on postoperative adherence. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate predictors and correlates of adherence to post-surgery visits among a sample of adolescents undergoing LAGB. Setting Psychiatry Department, University Medical Center, United States. Methods Postoperative visits with surgical staff were analyzed over the two years following surgery (n= 101 adolescents). Growth mixture modeling examined trends in adherence. Results A three-class solution provided the best fit to the data. The classes from the final model were characterized by class 1 (61.6%) demonstrating high levels of adherence over the 24 months following LAGB, class 2 (28.5%) showing a more gradual decline in adherence, and class 3 (9.9%) with an accelerated decline in adherence. Higher levels of preoperative depressive symptoms and more preoperative episodes of loss of control over eating decreased the likelihood of adherence. Class 3 adolescents had significantly higher estimated 24-month body mass indices than Classes 1 or 2. Conclusions Variable patterns of follow-up visit adherence were identified among adolescents receiving LAGB, which were predicted by depressive symptoms and loss of control over eating. The trajectory characterized by a rapid decline in adherence to follow-up visits was also associated with less weight loss. PMID:25066443

  4. Outcomes of follow-up visits to chronic nonmalignant pain patients.

    PubMed

    Frich, Liv M H; Sorensen, Jan; Jacobsen, Susanne; Fohlmann, Bente; Højsted, Jette

    2012-12-01

    Follow-up visits by clinical nurse specialists are beneficial for patients with various chronic conditions. It is unknown whether patients with chronic nonmalignant pain can achieve similar benefit. The aim of this study was to assess outcomes of follow-up visits by clinical nurse specialists to chronic nonmalignant pain patients regarding health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain, opioid treatment, quality of sleep, and depression. A total of 102 patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized controlled trial during a 2-year period after discharge from multidisciplinary pain treatment and randomized to intervention or control group. Intervention group patients (n = 52) received home visits every fourth month for 2 years. The findings showed that HRQoL improved generally more in the intervention group. Statistically significant improvements were observed for physical function and bodily pain. Whereas the intervention group maintained the pain level on a visual analog scale, the control group reported more pain. During the observation period, the control group increased dosage of opioids whereas the intervention group maintained stable dosage. No significant effect on quality of life was found. Nurses identified signs of depression in 80% of their patients scoring depression on the simultaneous depression questionnaire, and thereby could refer patients to early treatment. Follow-up visits by clinical nurse specialists appeared to offer positive benefits to patients with chronic nonmalignant pain after discharge from multidisciplinary pain treatment. The intervention improved physical functioning, reduced bodily pain and pain intensity and prevented opioid dosage increase. Most episodes of depression were identified and referred to relevant treatment. PMID:23158704

  5. Replacing Ambulatory Surgical Follow-Up Visits With Mobile App Home Monitoring: Modeling Cost-Effective Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Semple, John L; Coyte, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Background Women’s College Hospital (WCH) offers specialized surgical procedures, including ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Most patients receiving ambulatory surgery have low rates of postoperative events necessitating clinic visits. Increasingly, mobile monitoring and follow-up care is used to overcome the distance patients must travel to receive specialized care at a reduced cost to society. WCH has completed a feasibility study using a mobile app (QoC Health Inc, Toronto) that suggests high patient satisfaction and adequate detection of postoperative complications. Objective The proposed cost-effectiveness study models the replacement of conventional, in-person postoperative follow-up care with mobile app follow-up care following ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Methods This is a societal perspective cost-effectiveness analysis, wherein all costs are assessed irrespective of the payer. The patient/caregiver, health care system, and externally borne costs are calculated within the first postoperative month based on cost information provided by WCH and QoC Health Inc. The effectiveness of telemedicine and conventional follow-up care is measured as successful surgical outcomes at 30-days postoperative, and is modeled based on previous clinical trials containing similar patient populations and surgical risks. Results This costing assumes that 1000 patients are enrolled in bring-your-own-device (BYOD) mobile app follow-up per year and that 1.64 in-person follow-ups are attended in the conventional arm within the first month postoperatively. The total cost difference between mobile app and in-person follow-up care is $245 CAD ($223 USD based on the current exchange rate), with in-person follow-up being more expensive ($381 CAD) than mobile app follow-up care ($136 CAD). This takes into account the total of health care system, patient, and external borne costs. If we examine

  6. Cohort Profile update: The 1993 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort follow-up visits in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Helen; Assunção, Maria CF; Wehrmeister, Fernando C; Oliveira, Isabel O; Barros, Fernando C; Victora, Cesar G; Hallal, Pedro C; Menezes, Ana MB

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we update the profile of the 1993 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort Study, with emphasis on a shift of priority from maternal and child health research topics to four main categories of outcome variables, collected throughout adolescence: (i) mental health; (ii) body composition; (iii) risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCDs); (iv) human capital. We were able to trace 81.3% (n = 4106) of the original cohort at 18 years of age. For the first time, the 18-years visit took place entirely on the university premises, in a clinic equipped with state-of-the-art equipment for the assessment of body composition. We welcome requests for data analyses from outside scientists. For more information, refer to our website (http://www.epidemio-ufpel.org.projetos_de_pesquisas/estudos/coorte_1993) or e-mail the corresponding author. PMID:24729426

  7. Follow up policy after treatment for Hodgkin's disease: too many clinic visits and routine tests? A review of hospital records.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, J. A.; Eardley, A.; Woodman, C.; Crowther, D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effectiveness of routine clinic review in detecting relapse after treatment for Hodgkin's disease. DESIGN: Review of hospital records. SETTING: Regional centre for cancer treatment and research. SUBJECTS: 210 patients with Hodgkin's disease recruited to a chemotherapy trial protocol between 1984 and the end of 1990 who had achieved a complete or partial remission after treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of clinic visits made by patients over the period of observation, the number of relapses occurring during that time, and the route by which relapse was detected. RESULTS: The 210 patients generated 2512 outpatient reviews, and 37 relapses were detected. Thirty relapses (81%) were diagnosed in patients who described symptoms, which in 15 cases had resulted in an earlier appointment being arranged. In only four cases (11%; 95% confidence interval 4% to 25%) was relapse detected as a result of routine physical examination on investigation of a patient who did not have symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Relapse of Hodgkin's disease after treatment is usually detected as a result of the investigation of symptoms rather than by routine screening of asymptomatic patients. It is therefore proposed that the frequency of routine follow up visits should be reduced and greater emphasis placed on patient education. This should underline the importance of symptoms and encourage patients to arrange an earlier appointment if these develop. PMID:9040326

  8. A follow-up study of the community near the McColl waste disposal site.

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, J A; Goldman, L R; Satin, K P; Smith, D F; Vance, W A; Neutra, R R

    1991-01-01

    To assess the effect of interim clean-up measures on the current health of a community, we conducted a follow-up survey of 193 residents living near the McColl waste disposal site and a comparison area located approximately 5 miles from the site. Results from this survey were compared with results from a similar survey conducted 7 years earlier. Odors were detected at least once per week by 32.7% of "high-exposed" respondents in 1988 compared with 68.5% in 1981, but prevalence odds ratios (PORs) comparing symptom reporting between "high-exposed" and comparison-area respondents were greater than that of the 1981 survey for 89% of symptoms. PORs comparing symptom reporting between these two areas were greater than 2.0 for 64% of symptoms assessed in the current survey. Symptoms reported in excess did not represent a single organ system or suggest a mechanism of response. PORs comparing respondents who were very worried about the environment and those reporting no worry were greater than 2.0 for 86% of symptoms. These finding, along with environmental data from the area, suggest that living near the waste disposal site and being very worried about the environment, rather than a toxicologic effect of chemical from the site, explain excess symptom reporting found in this follow-up study. PMID:1954927

  9. Visit-to-Visit Glucose Variability Predicts the Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Type 2 Diabetes: 10-Year Follow-Up of Taiwan Diabetes Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Fei; Li, Tsai-Chung; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of glucose variability using coefficient of variation of fasting plasma glucose (FPG-CV) and coefficient of variation of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c-CV) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 31,841 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes.Patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in National Diabetes Care Management Program, aged ≧30 years, and free of ESRD (n = 31,841) in January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2004 were included. Extended Cox proportional hazards regression models with competing risk of all-cause mortality were used to evaluate risk factors on ESRD incidence. Patients were followed till 2012.After a median follow-up period of 8.23 years, 1642 patients developed ESRD, giving a crude incidence rate of 6.27/1000 person-years (6.36 for men, 6.19 for women). After the multivariate adjustment, both FPG-CV and HbA1c-CV were independent predictors of ESRD with corresponding hazard ratios of 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01, 1.41), 1.24 (95% CI 1.05, 1.46) in HbA1c-CV from fourth to fifth quintile and 1.23 (95% CI 1.03, 1.47) in FPG-CV from fifth quintile.One-year visit-to-visit glucose variability expressed by FPG-CV and HbA1c-CV predicted development of ESRD in patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting therapeutic strategies toward a goal to minimize glucose fluctuation. PMID:26554779

  10. A Five-Year Follow-Up: Teachers' Perceptions of the Benefits of Home Visits for Early Elementary Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, James A.; Mann, Mary Beth; Becker, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate previous research about teachers' perceived benefits of home visits to determine if they remained stable. Furthermore, the investigation sought to find out whether home visits impacted variables often associated with improved school success (i.e., school attendance, academic performance, parent…

  11. An Electronic Health Record-Based Intervention to Increase Follow-up Office Visits and Decrease Rehospitalization in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Field, Terry S.; Ogarek, Jessica; Tjia, Jennifer; Cutrona, Sarah L.; Harrold, Leslie R.; Gagne, Shawn J.; Preusse, Peggy; Donovan, Jennifer L.; Kanaan, Abir O.; Reed, George; Garber, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives We assessed the impact of an electronic health record-based transitional care intervention involving automated alerts to primary care providers and staff when older patients were discharged from the hospital. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting A large multispecialty group practice. Participants Patients aged 65 or older discharged from hospital to home. Intervention In addition to notifying primary care providers about the patient's recent discharge, the system provided information about new drugs added during the inpatient stay, warnings about drug-drug interactions, and recommendations for dose changes and laboratory monitoring of high-risk medications, as well as alerts to the primary care provider's support staff to schedule a post-hospitalization office visit. Measurements An outpatient office visit with a primary care provider following discharge and rehospitalization within 30 days following discharge. Results Of the 1870 discharges in the intervention group, 27.7% had an office visit with a primary care provider within 7 days of discharge. Of the 1,791 discharges in the control group, 28.3% had an office visit with a primary care provider within 7 days of discharge. In the intervention group, 18.8% experienced a rehospitalization within the 30-day period post-discharge compared with 19.9% in the control group. The hazard ratio for an office visit with a primary care physician did not significantly differ between the intervention and control groups. The hazard ratio for rehospitalization in the 30-day period following hospital discharge in the intervention versus the control group was 0.94 (95% confidence interval: 0.81, 1.1). Conclusion We did not demonstrate a significant effect of this electronic health record-based intervention in increasing the timeliness of office visits to primary care providers following hospitalization, or reducing risk of rehospitalization. PMID:24779524

  12. The CACREP Site Visit Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Courtland C.

    2013-01-01

    An important step in the CACREP review process is the campus site visit. The visit involves a team, usually from comparable institutions, coming to a campus for a review of the counselor training program(s). The role of the team is to be the CACREP Board's representative on campus to verify the self-study. In this article, the author reviews…

  13. Outpatient Follow-Up Visit after Hospital Discharge Lowers Risk of Rehospitalization in Patients with Schizophrenia: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Yup; Kim, Kyoung Hoon; Kim, Tae; Kim, Sun Min; Kim, Jong-Woo; Han, Changsu; Song, Ji Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective Non-adherence to medication is a recognized problem in psychiatric patients and may be one of the most challenging aspects of treatment for patients with schizophrenia. Failure of follow-up care after discharge greatly increases non-adherence to prescribed medications, relapse and rehospitalization. However, it is still unknown whether and how much outpatient follow-up visits can mitigate the risk of rehospitalization. Therefore we sought to investigate the continuity and effectiveness of outpatient care after inpatient discharge and its effect on rehospitalization of patients with schizophrenia. Methods Data were extracted from National Health Insurance Claim Database covering the period from 2007 through 2010. We identified 10,246 patients aged 18 years or older who were admitted in psychiatric facilities with the diagnosis of schizophrenia between January 1 and December 31 in 2007. The number of outpatient visits within 60 days after discharge from index admission was defined as the indicator for the continuous care and rehospitalization was inspected during the following 36-month period. Cox's proportional hazard model was used to examine the factors affecting the risk of rehospitalization including the number of outpatient visits, age, sex, comorbidities, antipsychotics, and characteristics of medical institution. Results We found that 12.7% (n=1,327) of the patients visited psychiatric outpatient department once within 60 days after hospital discharge, 34.8% (n=3,626) twice, and 27.8% (n=2,900) more than three times. Patients taking atypical antipsychotics showed higher proportion in 2 or more outpatient visits, whereas patients taking typical antipsychotics showed higher proportion in one or no outpatient visits. Cox hazard ratios of rehospitalization for the factor of 3 or more outpatient visits referenced to that of no follow-up visit were 0.567 (0.428-0.750, 95% confidence interval) within 90 days, 0.673 (0.574-0.789) within 180 days, 0.800 (0

  14. Usability of American Nurses Association State Web Sites: A Follow-up Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gina; Wakefield, Bonnie J; Alexander, Gregory L; Wilson, Melissa A; Becker, Colleen

    2016-05-01

    The American Nurses Association supports professional nurses through Web sites administered by state nursing associations, providing important information for current and potential members. Optimal usability of these Web sites is critical for nurses to obtain the information they seek. Heuristic evaluations are general criteria used to evaluate the usability of technology such as Web sites. A study published in 2014, using heuristic criteria from Nielsen's 10 principles and Health on The Web, evaluated 27 state nursing Web sites to identify usability concerns that could prevent nurses from obtaining accurate information regarding state nursing practice. The purpose of this study is to conduct a second heuristic evaluation to assess for changes in a subset of 12 Web sites. The analysis comparing the evaluation from 2012 to 2014 found that mean scores increased and variance decreased; however, no statistically significant difference was found between the two studies. Scores increased in 2014 for "help users to diagnose, and recover from errors," "match between the system and real world," and "consistency and standards." Scores decreased due to absence of mission statements and identification of intended audience. Ideally, Web site designers will use the feedback from this study and make changes that improve their usability to provide information to nurses. PMID:26950090

  15. A follow-up of cancer incidence among former Finnish dump site residents: 1999–2011

    PubMed Central

    Pukkala, Eero

    2014-01-01

    Background: In an analysis of the years 1976–1998, a 50% excess in cancer incidence was observed among residents in twelve blockhouses in Helsinki, Finland on a former dump area containing industrial and household waste. Objective: To assess cancer risk over a 13-year period 1999–2011 among residents formerly living in houses built on a dump area. Methods: All 1879 persons who ever lived in the former dump area were identified and the number of cancer cases in this population was obtained from the Finnish Cancer Registry. Results: After 5 years of residence at the dump site, the standardized incidence ratio of cancer (all sites combined) was 1.32 (95% CI: 0.94–1.79) in men and 0.53 (95% CI: 0.33–0.82) for women, in comparison with the general Helsinki population (1999–2011). No significant excess cancer risks were found. Conclusions: Residing on a former dump area was not found to result in an increased risk of cancer. PMID:25224807

  16. 2011 Mound Site Groundwater Plume Rebound Exercise and Follow-Up - 13440

    SciTech Connect

    Hooten, Gwendolyn; Cato, Rebecca; Lupton, Greg

    2013-07-01

    The Mound Site facility near Miamisburg, Ohio, opened in 1948 to support early atomic weapons programs. It grew into a research, development, and production facility performing work in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons and energy programs. The plant was in operation until 1995. During the course of operation, an onsite landfill was created. The landfill was located over a finger of a buried valley aquifer, which is a sole drinking water source for much of the Miami Valley. In the 1980's, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were discovered in groundwater at the Mound site. The site was placed on the National Priorities List on November 21, 1989. DOE signed a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Federal Facility Agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The agreement became effective in October 1990. The area that included the landfill was designated Operational Unit 1 (OU-1). In 1995, a Record of Decision was signed that called for the installation and operation of a pump and treatment (P and T) system in order to prevent the VOCs in OU-1 groundwater from being captured by the onsite water production wells. In addition to the P and T system, a soil vapor extraction (SVE) system was installed in 1997 to accelerate removal of VOCs from groundwater in the OU-1 area. The SVE system was successful in removing large amounts of VOCs and continued to operate until 2007, when the amount of VOCs removed became minimal. A rebound study was started in February 2003 to determine how the groundwater system and contaminants would respond to shutting down the P and T system. The rebound test was stopped in February 2004 because predetermined VOC threshold concentrations were exceeded down-gradient of the landfill. The P and T and SVE systems were restarted after the termination of the rebound test. In 2006, the remediation of the Mound site was completed

  17. Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site, Nepal: 2012 follow-up survey and use of skilled birth attendants

    PubMed Central

    Choulagai, Bishnu P.; Aryal, Umesh Raj; Shrestha, Binjwala; Vaidya, Abhinav; Onta, Sharad; Petzold, Max; Krettek, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Background Estimates of disease burden in Nepal are based on cross-sectional studies that provide inadequate epidemiological information to support public health decisions. This study compares the health and demographic indicators at the end of 2012 in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site (JD-HDSS) with the baseline conducted at the end of 2010. We also report on the use of skilled birth attendants (SBAs) and associated factors in the JD-HDSS at the follow-up point. Design We used a structured questionnaire to survey 3,505 households in the JD-HDSS, Bhaktapur, Nepal. To investigate the use of SBAs, we interviewed 434 women who had delivered a baby within the prior 2 years. We compared demographic and health indicators at baseline and follow-up and assessed the association of SBA services with background variables. Results Due to rising in-migration, the total population and number of households in the JD-HDSS increased (13,669 and 2,712 in 2010 vs. 16,918 and 3,505 in 2012). Self-reported morbidity decreased (11.1% vs. 7.1%, respectively), whereas accidents and injuries increased (2.9% vs. 6.5% of overall morbidity, respectively). At follow-up, the proportion of institutional delivery (93.1%) exceeded the national average (36%). Women who accessed antenatal care and used transport (e.g. bus, taxi, motorcycle) to reach a health facility were more likely to access institutional delivery. Conclusions High in-migration increased the total population and number of households in the JD-HDSS, a peri-urban area where most health indicators exceed the national average. Major morbidity conditions (respiratory diseases, fever, gastrointestinal problems, and bone and joint problems) remain unchanged. Further investigation of reasons for increased proportion of accidents and injuries are recommended for their timely prevention. More than 90% of our respondents received adequate antenatal care and used institutional delivery, but only 13.2% accessed adequate

  18. Changes in health care utilisation following a reform involving choice and privatisation in Swedish primary care: a five-year follow-up of GP-visits

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The organisation of Swedish primary health care has changed following introduction of free choice of provider for the population in combination with freedom of establishment for private primary care providers. Our aim was to investigate changes in individual health care utilisation following choice and privatisation in Swedish primary care from an equity perspective, in subgroups defined by age, gender and family income. Methods The study is based on register data years 2007 – 2011 from the Skåne Regional Council (population 1.2 million) regarding individual health care utilisation in the form of visits to general practitioner (GP). Health utilisation data was matched with data about individual’s age, gender and family income provided by Statistics Sweden. Multilevel, logistic regression models were constructed to analyse changes in health utilisation in different subgroups and the probability of a GP-visit before and after reform. Results Health care utilisation in terms of both number of individuals that had visited a GP and number of GP-visits per capita increased in all defined subgroups, but to a varying degree. Multilevel logistic regression showed that individuals of both genders aged above 64 and belonging to a family with an income above median had more advantage of the reform, OR 1.25-1.29. Conclusions Reforms involving choice and privatisation in Swedish primary health care improved access to GP-visits generally, but more so for individuals belonging to a family with income above the median. PMID:24171894

  19. Can municipality-based post-discharge follow-up visits including a general practitioner reduce early readmission among the fragile elderly (65+ years old)? A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Fokdal, Sara; Gjørup, Thomas; Taylor, Rod S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate how municipality-based post-discharge follow-up visits including a general practitioner and municipal nurse affect early readmission among high-risk older people discharged from a hospital department of internal medicine. Design and setting. Centrally randomized single-centre pragmatic controlled trial comparing intervention and usual care with investigator-blinded outcome assessment. Intervention. The intervention was home visits with a general practitioner and municipal nurse within seven days of discharge focusing on medication, rehabilitation plan, functional level, and need for further health care initiatives. The visit was concluded by planning one or two further visits. Controls received standard health care services. Patients. People aged 65 + years discharged from Holbæk University Hospital, Denmark, in 2012 considered at high risk of readmission. Main outcome measures. The primary outcome was readmission within 30 days. Secondary outcomes at 30 and 180 days included readmission, primary health care, and municipal services. Outcomes were register-based and analysis used the intention-to-treat principle. Results. A total of 270 and 261 patients were randomized to intervention and control groups, respectively. The groups were similar in baseline characteristics. In all 149 planned discharge follow-up visits were carried out (55%). Within 30 days, 24% of the intervention group and 23% of the control group were readmitted (p = 0.93). No significant differences were found for any other secondary outcomes except that the intervention group received more municipal nursing services. Conclusion. This municipality-based follow-up intervention was only feasible in half the planned visits. The intervention as delivered had no effect on readmission or subsequent use of primary or secondary health care services. PMID:26059872

  20. 48 CFR 52.236-27 - Site Visit (Construction).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Site Visit (Construction....236-27 Site Visit (Construction). As prescribed in 36.523, insert a provision substantially the same as the following: Site Visit (Construction) (FEB 1995) (a) The clauses at 52.236-2, Differing...

  1. Prescribed Fire: The Influence of Site Visits on Citizen Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toman, Eric; Shindler, Bruce; Reed, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    This research employed a panel design to measure the effect of site visits on public perceptions of prescribed fire. On-site survey questions were devised to compare answers to a mail questionnaire previously completed by the same respondents. Questions were designed to examine how site visits influence public opinion and affect acceptance of…

  2. Changes in AIDS case reporting after hospital site visits.

    PubMed Central

    Fife, D; McAnaney, J; Rahman, M A

    1991-01-01

    In an effort to improve AIDS case reporting, site visits (meetings with hospital staff to encourage reporting) were made to all Philadelphia hospitals. Comparisons of hospitals visited during a 7-week period with hospitals not visited during that period indicated that the site visits were followed by a marked increase in case reports. No similar increase was observed at the comparison hospitals. The increased reporting was accompanied by an increased lag time from diagnosis to report, suggesting that the additional reports at visited hospitals were the result of the identification of previously missed cases rather than a speedup of reporting. Cases reported after the visits were more likely to have white-collar occupations or private medical insurance than were those reported before the visits. PMID:1746665

  3. Designing a Marketing Course with Field Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Doren, Doris; Corrigan, Hope Bober

    2008-01-01

    A key goal of including field site visits in marketing courses is to give business students increased interaction with industry professionals and community leaders. Site visits give students a concrete idea of how different marketing disciplines work in the business world. Business students gain greater insight into a career in marketing from this…

  4. Corrections Education Evaluation System Project. Site Visit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Orville; And Others

    Site visits to five correctional institutions in Wisconsin were conducted as part of the development of an evaluation model for the competency-based vocational education (CBVE) project for the Wisconsin Correctional System. The evaluators' perceptions of the CBVE system are presented with recommendations for improvement. Site visits were conducted…

  5. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel...

  6. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel...

  7. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel...

  8. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel...

  9. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel...

  10. Transdiagnostic Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Patients With Eating Disorders: A Two-Site Trial With 60-Week Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Fairburn, Christopher G.; Cooper, Zafra; Doll, Helen A.; O’Connor, Marianne E.; Bohn, Kristin; Hawker, Deborah M.; Wales, Jackie A.; Palmer, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare two cognitive-behavioral treatments for outpatients with eating disorders, one focusing solely on eating disorder features and the other a more complex treatment that also addresses mood intolerance, clinical perfectionism, low self-esteem, or interpersonal difficulties. Method A total of 154 patients who had a DSM-IV eating disorder but were not markedly underweight (body mass index over 17.5), were enrolled in a two-site randomized controlled trial involving 20 weeks of treatment and a 60-week closed period of follow-up. The control condition was an 8-week waiting list period preceding treatment. Outcomes were measured by independent assessors who were blind to treatment condition. Results Patients in the waiting list control condition exhibited little change in symptom severity, whereas those in the two treatment conditions exhibited substantial and equivalent change, which was well maintained during follow-up. At the 60-week follow-up assessment, 51.3% of the sample had a level of eating disorder features less than one standard deviation above the community mean. Treatment outcome did not depend on eating disorder diagnosis. Patients with marked mood intolerance, clinical perfectionism, low self-esteem, or interpersonal difficulties appeared to respond better to the more complex treatment, with the reverse pattern evident among the remaining patients. Conclusions These two transdiagnostic treatments appear to be suitable for the majority of outpatients with an eating disorder. The simpler treatment may best be viewed as the default version, with the more complex treatment reserved for patients with marked additional psychopathology of the type targeted by the treatment. PMID:19074978

  11. [Follow-up of endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Tristan; Siegerth, François; Monteil, Jacques; Jammet, Isabelle; Saidi, Nadira; Tubiana-Mathieu, Nicole; Aubard, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Available data on appropriate follow-up in endometrial cancer highlight the need of well-conducted studies. Most recurrences tend to occur within three years and involve symptoms. Routine tests are not advocated without symptoms. In case of suspicious recurrence, TEP/CT seems to be the most sensitive and specific method. There is limited evidence to decide whether follow-up schedules with multiple visits result in survival benefits. An appropriate follow-up should be discussed based upon the risk of recurrence. Counselling on the potential symptoms of recurrence should be a major aim. PMID:25025796

  12. Predictors of Cosmetic Outcome Following MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy: A Single-Institution Experience of 100 Patients With Two Years of Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Dragun, Anthony E. . E-mail: dragun@radonc.musc.edu; Harper, Jennifer L.; Jenrette, Joseph M.; Sinha, Debajyoti; Cole, David J.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To identify the factors that predict for excellent cosmesis in patients who receive MammoSite breast brachytherapy (MBT). Methods and Materials: One hundred patients with Stage 0, I, or II adenocarcinoma of the breast underwent adjuvant therapy using MBT. A dose of 34 Gy, delivered in 10 fractions twice daily, was prescribed to 1-cm depth using {sup 192}Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Patients were assessed for acute toxicity on the day of therapy completion, 4 weeks after therapy, and at least every 3 months by radiation, surgical, and/or medical oncologists. All available data were reviewed for documentation of cosmesis and rated using the Harvard Scale. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 6 months (median = 24 months). Results: Of 100 patients treated, 90 had adequate data and follow-up. Cosmesis was excellent in 62 (68.9%), good in 19 (21.1%), fair in 8 (8.9%), and poor in 1 (1.1%) patient. Using stepwise logistic regression, the factors that predicted for excellent cosmesis were as follows: the absence vs. presence of infection (p = 0.017), and the absence vs. presence of acute skin toxicity (p = 0.026). There was a statistically significant association between acute skin toxicity (present vs. absent) and balloon-to-skin distance (<8 vs. >8 mm, p = 0.001). Factors that did not predict for cosmesis were age, balloon placement technique, balloon volume, catheter days in situ, subcutaneous toxicity, and chemotherapy or hormonal therapy. Conclusions: The acute and late-term toxicity profiles of MBT have been acceptable. Cosmetic outcome is improved by proper patient selection and infection prevention.

  13. Russian research capabilities: Findings of site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, D.W.

    1994-02-01

    In June 1993, a proposal was presented to the International Environmental Institute (IEI) in Kennewick, Washington, to establish cooperation and coordination to further pursue the interests of the United States of America and the Republic of Russia in the application and promotion of environmental technology; characterization, treatment, handling, isolation, and disposal of hazardous and radioactive materials; conversion of defense sites to other purposes; and technology transfer, cooperative programs, joint technology development and contractual research. In response to this proposal, IEI and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) jointly provided funding to send Dr. Dennis W. Wester on a fact-finding mission to Novosibirsk, Moscow, and St. Petersburg, Russia. The trip covered a period of eight weeks, six of which were spent in Novosibirsk and adjoining or related cities and one of which was spent in each of Moscow and St. Petersburg. The general objectives of the trip were to establish a basis for cooperation between IEI and the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) for future coordination of mutual interests and objectives such as technology acquisition, development, demonstration, application, and commercialization; use of capabilities and assets developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the RAS; and expediting of cooperative agreements, personnel exchanges, joint ventures and other contractual relationships. The particular objectives of this trip were to evaluate the capabilities of the RAS to satisfy the technology needs associated with the cleanup of the Hanford Site and similar sites in the U.S. and to evaluate the expediency of establishing an IEI presence in Russia.

  14. Site Visit to Calvert County, Maryland ARC Family Support Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bersani, Hank A., Jr.

    The site visit report describes the Family Support Services program run by the Calvert County (Maryland) Association for Retarded Citizens. The program's goal is to prevent any person 21 years of age or younger from being institutionalized. It provides respite care services, specialized family support, and integrated day care for approximately 50…

  15. Site Visit Report: Seven Counties Services, Louisville, Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racino, Julie Ann

    The report describes a site visit to the Seven Counties Services Region in Kentucky to identify and document promising practices for serving people with severe disabilities in integrated community-based services. The regional agency serves Jefferson, Oldham, Henry, Trimble, Spencer, Bullitt and Shelby Counties. Regional service priorities have…

  16. 76 FR 76168 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Regulatory Site Visit Training Program AGENCY: Food and Drug... Training Program (RSVP). This training program is intended to give CBER regulatory review, compliance, and... INFORMATION CONTACT: Lonnie W. Henderson, Division of Manufacturers Assistance and Training, Center...

  17. 76 FR 4919 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Regulatory Site Visit Training Program AGENCY: Food and Drug... Training Program (RSVP). This training program is intended to give CBER regulatory review, compliance, and... INFORMATION CONTACT: Lonnie W. Henderson, Division of Manufacturers Assistance and Training, Center...

  18. 75 FR 6404 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Training Program AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... participation in its Regulatory Site Visit Training Program (RSVP). This training program is intended to give.... Henderson, Division of Manufacturers Assistance and Training, Center for Biologics Evaluation and...

  19. Lost to follow-up among pregnant women in a multi-site community based maternal and newborn health registry: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background It is important when conducting epidemiologic studies to closely monitor lost to follow up (LTFU) rates. A high LTFU rate may lead to incomplete study results which in turn can introduce bias to the trial or study, threatening the validity of the findings. There is scarce information on LTFU in prospective community-based perinatal epidemiological studies. This paper reports the rates of LTFU, describes socio-demographic characteristics, and pregnancy/delivery outcomes of mothers LTFU in a large community-based pregnancy registry study. Methods Data were from a prospective, population-based observational study of the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research Maternal Newborn Health Registry (MNHR). This is a multi-centre, international study in which pregnant women were enrolled in mid-pregnancy, followed through parturition and 42 days post-delivery. Risk for LTFU was calculated within a 95%CI. Results A total of 282,626 subjects were enrolled in this study, of which 4,893 were lost to follow-up. Overall, there was a 1.7% LTFU to follow up rate. Factors associated with a higher LTFU included mothers who did not know their last menstrual period (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1, 4.4), maternal age of < 20 years (RR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1, 1.3), women with no formal education (RR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1, 1.4), and attending a government clinic for antenatal care (RR 2.0, 95% CI 1.4, 2.8). Post-natal factors associated with a higher LTFU rate included a newborn with feeding problems (RR 1.6, 94% CI 1.2, 2.2). Conclusions The LTFU rate in this community-based registry was low (1.7%). Maternal age, maternal level of education, pregnancy status at enrollment and using a government facility for ANC are factors associated with being LTFU. Strategies to ensure representation and high retention in community studies are important to informing progress toward public health goals. Trial registration Registration at the Clinicaltrials.gov (ID# NCT01073475). PMID:26062899

  20. Hanford/Tomsk reciprocal site visit: Plutonium agreement compliance talks

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, R.A.; Sorenson, R.; Six, D.; Schiegel, S.C.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of the visit to Hanford Site was to: demonstrate equipment, technology, and methods for calculating Pu production, measuring integrated reactor power, and storing and safeguarding PuO{sub 2}; demonstrate the shutdown of Hanford production reactors; and foster openness and transparency of Hanford operations. The first day`s visit was an introduction to Hanford and a review of the history of the reactors. The second day consisted of discussions on the production reactors, reprocessing operations, and PuO{sub 2} storage. The group divided on the third day to tour facilities. Group A toured the N reactor, K-West reactor, K-West Basins, B reactor, and participated in a demonstration and discussion of reactor modeling computer codes. Group B toured the Hanford Pu Storage Facility, 200-East Area, N-cell (oxide loadout station), the Automated Storage Facility, and the Nondestructive Assay Measurement System. Group discussions were held during the last day of the visit, which included scheduling of a US visit to Russia.

  1. Remotely operated excavator needs assessment/site visit summary

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, J.; Haller, S.; Worsley, R.; King, M.

    1992-12-02

    The Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration requested an assessment of soil excavation needs relative to soil remediation. The following list identifies the DOE sites assessed: Mound Laboratory, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Nevada Test Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, and Fernald Site. The reviewed sites fall into one or more of the following three categories: production, EPA National Priorities List, or CERCLA (superfund) designation. Only three of the sites appear to have the need for a remotely operated excavator rope. Hanford and Idaho Falls have areas of high-level radioactive contamination either buried or in/under buildings. The Fernald site has a need for remote operated equipment of different types. It is their feeling that remote equipment can be used to remove the health dangers to humans by removing them from the area. Most interviewees stated that characterization technologies needs are more immediate concern over excavation. In addition, the sites do not have similar geographic conditions which would aid in the development of a generic precision excavator. The sites visited were not ready to utilize or provide the required design information necessary to draft a performance specification. This creates a strong case against the development of one type of ROPE for use at these sites. Assuming soil characterization technology/methodology is improved sufficiently to allow accurate and real time field characterization then development of a precision excavator might be pursued based on FEMP needs, since the FEMP`s sole scope of work is remediation. The excavator could then be used/tested and then later modified for other sites as warranted.

  2. 48 CFR 1352.270-71 - Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.270-71 Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1370.102, insert the following provision: Pre-Bid/Pre-Proposal Conference and Site Visit (APR 2010) (a) The... conference and site visit. 1352.270-71 Section 1352.270-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  3. 48 CFR 1352.270-71 - Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.270-71 Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1370.102, insert the following provision: Pre-Bid/Pre-Proposal Conference and Site Visit (APR 2010) (a) The... conference and site visit. 1352.270-71 Section 1352.270-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  4. 48 CFR 1352.270-71 - Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.270-71 Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1370.102, insert the following provision: Pre-Bid/Pre-Proposal Conference and Site Visit (APR 2010) (a) The... conference and site visit. 1352.270-71 Section 1352.270-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  5. 48 CFR 1352.270-71 - Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.270-71 Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1370.102, insert the following provision: Pre-Bid/Pre-Proposal Conference and Site Visit (APR 2010) (a) The... conference and site visit. 1352.270-71 Section 1352.270-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  6. 48 CFR 1352.270-71 - Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.270-71 Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1370.102, insert the following provision: Pre-Bid/Pre-Proposal Conference and Site Visit (APR 2010) (a) The... conference and site visit. 1352.270-71 Section 1352.270-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  7. Hyper Cold Systems follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, Jean Claude; Beltrando, Gerard; Cacault, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The follow up of intense precipitation system is a key information for climate studies. Whereas some rainfall measurement series cover more than one century they cannot retrieve these phenomena in their spatial and temporal continuity. The geostationary satellite data offer a good trade-off between the length of data series and the retrieval accuracy. However a difficulty arise from ambiguous interpretation of the lone infrared signal in nephanalysis. Hence the tropopause temperature is used as a proxy to characterize extreme precipitation event. That does not mean that the more intense rain-rate will be always collocated with the coldest temperature but that most of these intense events is produced by systems whose a part is colder than tropopause. Computations have been carried out on 38 months of MSG and Meteosat/IODC. System follow up is achieved by a simple 3D connexity algorithm, the time being considered as the third dimension. This algorithm produce three dimension clusters from where the main system parameters can be easily extracted. Thus the systems can be classified trajectory characteristic (duration, speed ans size variation). A drawback of this simple threshold method relies is some over-segmentation. In most of case the bias is minor as unconnected clusters are small and short-lived. However an aggregating algorithm have been developed to retrieve the most complex system trajectories. To assess the efficiency of this method three regional studies are displayed: the North African Maghreb, the West African Sahel and the Indian Ocean. On Maghreb, the location of system initialization shows a dramatic difference between the eastern and western parts. Whereas in Tunisia a significant part of these systems are generated on sea and most have no clear relation with relief, the Morocco is mainly characterized with land initiated system with a strong orographic effect on system triggering. Another difference relies on the low level wind shear impact which

  8. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, Jan-Albert

    2015-01-15

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  9. Number of distinct sites visited by N random walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larralde, Hernan; Trunfio, Paul; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Weiss, George H.

    1992-05-01

    We study the number of distinct sites visited by N random walkers after t steps SN(t) under the condition that all the walkers are initially at the origin. We derive asymptotic expressions for the mean number of distinct sites in one, two, and three dimensions. We find that passes through several growth regimes; at short times ~td (regime I), for tx<~(t ln[N S1(t)/td/2])d/2 (regime II), and for t>>tx', ~NS1(t) (regime III). The crossover times are tx~ln N for all dimensions, and tx'~∞, exp N, and N2 for one, two, and three dimensions, respectively. We show that in regimes II and III satisfies a scaling relation of the form ~td/2f(x), with x≡N/td/2. We also obtain asymptotic results for the complete probability distribution of SN(t) for the one-dimensional case in the limit of large N and t.

  10. The value of crime scene and site visitation by forensic psychologists and psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Mohandie, Kris; Meloy, J Reid

    2013-05-01

    Site visits and crime scene visitation by forensic psychologists and psychiatrists may enhance the accuracy and credibility of their forensic work in criminal, civil, and other important contexts. This ethically sound technique of after-the-fact data collection and verification offers numerous potential benefits to the forensic mental health professional: clarifying the subject's actions, assessing the reliability of witness reports, identifying contextual determinants of behavior, and more fully illuminating subject motivation and decision-making. Limitations and suggested guidelines for conducting site visits are offered. Guidelines include preplanning, arranging for an informed guide to accompany and narrate the visit, and conducting the site visit prior to forensic examinations. PMID:23550941

  11. Improving pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Dana; Williams, Elizabeth; Margolis, Peter; Ruschman, Jennifer; Bick, Julianne; Saeed, Shehzad; Opipari, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) care through participation in the ImproveCareNow (ICN) Network has improved outcomes for pediatric patients with IBD, but under the current care model, our improvements have plateaued. Current ICN model care guidelines recommend health supervision visits every six months. We identified a gap in our practice's ability to ensure either a routine six month follow-up or a rapid follow-up after a disease flare, and a significant number of patients with active disease status during a six month period lacked timely reassessment after interventions or medication changes. Telemedicine provides an alternative method of care delivery to address these gaps, but has had limited use in patients with IBD. A multi-step approach to offer alternative follow-up care options via telemedicine was developed with potential impact on remission rates and quality of life. Short term goals of the pilot were to improve telemedicine access for patients with IBD were to 1) increase the percent of patients with active disease with a follow-up completed within two months of a visit from 40% to 70%, 2) increase the percent of patients with a visit scheduled within two months of their last sick visit from 20% to 70% (interim measure), 3) increase the number of eVisits from zero visits per month to two visits per month during pilot phase, 4) increase electronic communication with patients from zero messages per month to 200 messages per month, 5) no change in complications or adverse events (defined as an unplanned visit or ED (emergency department) encounter within 30 days of an eVisit. The expected outcomes of the e-visit model were to: maintain baseline care standards and health screening capabilities, improve access to care, and provide equivalent care delivery (no increase in the number of unplanned clinical encounters). Using the IHI model for improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act) we have seen a progressive increase in the rate of patient signups

  12. Improving pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Dana; Williams, Elizabeth; Margolis, Peter; Ruschman, Jennifer; Bick, Julianne; Saeed, Shehzad; Opipari, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) care through participation in the ImproveCareNow (ICN) Network has improved outcomes for pediatric patients with IBD, but under the current care model, our improvements have plateaued. Current ICN model care guidelines recommend health supervision visits every six months. We identified a gap in our practice's ability to ensure either a routine six month follow-up or a rapid follow-up after a disease flare, and a significant number of patients with active disease status during a six month period lacked timely reassessment after interventions or medication changes. Telemedicine provides an alternative method of care delivery to address these gaps, but has had limited use in patients with IBD. A multi-step approach to offer alternative follow-up care options via telemedicine was developed with potential impact on remission rates and quality of life. Short term goals of the pilot were to improve telemedicine access for patients with IBD were to 1) increase the percent of patients with active disease with a follow-up completed within two months of a visit from 40% to 70%, 2) increase the percent of patients with a visit scheduled within two months of their last sick visit from 20% to 70% (interim measure), 3) increase the number of eVisits from zero visits per month to two visits per month during pilot phase, 4) increase electronic communication with patients from zero messages per month to 200 messages per month, 5) no change in complications or adverse events (defined as an unplanned visit or ED (emergency department) encounter within 30 days of an eVisit. The expected outcomes of the e-visit model were to: maintain baseline care standards and health screening capabilities, improve access to care, and provide equivalent care delivery (no increase in the number of unplanned clinical encounters). Using the IHI model for improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act) we have seen a progressive increase in the rate of patient signups

  13. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Greenstreet, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to sites in the Canary Islands and Tibet is planned for 2016.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1) and several hundred targets are now being followed-up per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO Portal which will allow

  14. Study of New Youth Initiatives in Apprenticeship. Interim Report. Volume 2: Site Visit Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CSR, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This second volume of the interim report provides detailed case study reports on each of the eight Youth Apprenticeship Projects. (Volume 1, an overview of data from the site visits, is available separately as CE 032 791.) Discussion areas covered in each site visit report are local context/operational environment, administrative information,…

  15. 77 FR 44675 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Site Visit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Register on April 20, 2012 (77 FR 23764). Interested parties are encouraged to send comments to the OMB...: Site Visit Data Collection Request for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funded Grants; Job..., ``Site Visit Data Collection Request for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funded Grants;...

  16. Determining Virtual Environment "Fit": The Relationship between Navigation Style in a Virtual Field Trip, Student Self-Reported Desire to Visit the Field Trip Site in the Real World, and the Purposes of Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutwiler, M. Shane; Lin, Ming-Chao; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a follow-up analysis of the data reported in Lin et al. ("Learn Media Technol." doi: 10.1080/17439884.2011.629660 , 2011), we investigated the relationship between student use of a virtual field trip (VFT) system and the probability of students reporting wanting to visit the national park site upon which the VFT was modeled,…

  17. Results of Medium Seventeen Years' Follow-Up after Laparoscopic Choledochotomy for Ductal Stones

    PubMed Central

    Quaresima, Silvia; Balla, Andrea; Guerrieri, Mario; Campagnacci, Roberto; D'Ambrosio, Giancarlo; Lezoche, Emanuele; Paganini, Alessandro M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. In a previously published article the authors reported the long-term follow-up results in 138 consecutive patients with gallstones and common bile duct (CBD) stones who underwent laparoscopic transverse choledochotomy (TC) with T-tube biliary drainage and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Aim of this study is to evaluate the results at up to 23 years of follow-up in the same series. Methods. One hundred twenty-one patients are the object of the present study. Patients were evaluated by clinical visit, blood assay, and abdominal ultrasound. Symptomatic patients underwent cholangio-MRI, followed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) as required. Results. Out of 121 patients, 61 elderly patients died from unrelated causes. Fourteen patients were lost to follow-up. In the 46 remaining patients, ductal stone recurrence occurred in one case (2,1%) successfully managed by ERCP with endoscopic sphincterotomy. At a mean follow-up of 17.1 years no other patients showed signs of bile stasis and no patient showed any imaging evidence of CBD stricture at the site of choledochotomy. Conclusions. Laparoscopic transverse choledochotomy with routine T-tube biliary drainage during LC has proven to be safe and effective at up to 23 years of follow-up, with no evidence of CBD stricture when the procedure is performed with a correct technique. PMID:26880900

  18. Visiting the Site of Death: Experiences of the Bereaved after the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristensen, Pal; Tonnessen, Arnfinn; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined how many bereaved relatives of Norwegian tourists who perished in the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami had visited the site of death and the most important outcome from the visit. We conducted in-depth interviews (n = 110) and used self-report questionnaires (Impact of Event Scale--Revised, Inventory of Complicated Grief, and…

  19. Follow-up Cost Study. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baugh, Ronald C.

    This report presents data on the costs of follow-up studies, based on 29 separate follow-up studies conducted by eight public community/junior colleges in Texas. The purpose of this study, conducted by Navarro College as a subcontractor of Project FOLLOW-UP, was to provide data and information regarding the cost of follow-up studies that would be…

  20. Francoise, a Fifteen-Year Follow Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rondal, J. A.; Elbouz, M.; Ylieff, M.; Docquier, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on a 15-year follow-up of the linguistic and cognitive profile of a woman with standard trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). The follow-up found recent rapid deterioration in receptive and productive language skills. However, basic phonological and morphosyntactic skills are preserved. Her changing profile mirrors that found in aging…

  1. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Pope, Jenny; Bond, Alan; Retief, Francois

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  2. Cancer follow-up care. Patients' perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; MacDonald, Ian; Tatemichi, Sue

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess family physicians' and specialists' involvement in cancer follow-up care and how this involvement is perceived by cancer patients. DESIGN: Self-administered survey. SETTING: A health region in New Brunswick. PARTICIPANTS: A nonprobability cluster sample of 183 participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients' perceptions of cancer follow-up care. RESULTS: More than a third of participants (36%) were not sure which physician was in charge of their cancer follow-up care. As part of follow-up care, 80% of participants wanted counseling from their family physicians, but only 20% received it. About a third of participants (32%) were not satisfied with the follow-up care provided by their family physicians. In contrast, only 18% of participants were dissatisfied with the follow-up care provided by specialists. Older participants were more satisfied with cancer follow-up care than younger participants. CONCLUSION: Cancer follow-up care is increasingly becoming part of family physicians' practices. Family physicians need to develop an approach that addresses patients' needs, particularly in the area of emotional support. PMID:12901486

  3. Historical Visit to the Site of the Canard River Skirmishes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutter, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Reports on a field trip by secondary school history students to Fort Malden National Historic Site in Canada. Describes the use of primary sources and battlefield sites to help students understand historical perspective and interpretation. Includes discussion questions for students and recommendations for implementation. (CFR)

  4. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; Palmer, Elizabeth; Heggy, Essam; Jurgens, Frank; Kennedy, Tim; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Lundy, Mike; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Wheeler, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  5. Strategy and results of East Asian GRB FOllow-up Network (EAFON) follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Y.; Eafon Team

    We have established Japan-Taiwan-China collaboration on GRBs study in the East-Asian region since 2004 This serves as valuable additions to the world-wide optical and infrared follow-up network because the East-Asia region is otherwise blank for the network We have been carrying out imaging and spectroscopic follow-up observations by Lulin Taiwan Kiso Japan WIDGET Japan and Xinglong China Using Xinglong and Kiso we can locate candidates and obtain early time spectra of afterglows While WIDGET provides early time observations before the burst the high-time resolution for multi-band light curves will be obtained by Lulin With the data from these sites we will obtain detailed information of light curve and redshift of GRBs which are important to understand the mechanism of afterglows Utilizing East Asian GRB Follow-up Observation Network EAFON we have observed 56 GRB optical afterglows and detected 15 early optical afterglow behavior including two short GRBs in multi-bands Based on these observations we have obtained 3 major results 1 first long term monitoring of short GRB afterglow from sim 0 1 days after the burst 2 two components in early optical afterglow 3 catch about 30 high redshift GRB candidates In this meeting we will present mainly report early a common feature of long GRB early afterglow We have found a common feature in long GRB early afterglow light curves These early light curves show re-brightening and or plateau phase around 0 1 days 2 4hours after bursts Combined with other prompt

  6. Visiting the site of death: experiences of the bereaved after the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Pål; Tønnessen, Arnfinn; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined how many bereaved relatives of Norwegian tourists who perished in the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami had visited the site of death and the most important outcome from the visit. We conducted in-depth interviews (n = 110) and used self-report questionnaires (Impact of Event Scale-Revised, Inventory of Complicated Grief and General Health Questionnaire) in a total of 130 first-degree family members 2 years post-disaster. Results showed that the majority of participants (n = 113; 87%) had visited the site of death. The most important outcome was gaining an increased understanding of what occurred (61%) and a feeling of closeness to the deceased (27%). Those who had visited the site of death reported lower avoidance behavior and higher degree of acceptance of the loss than non-visitors. Although this could be a cause as well as a consequence of the visit, visiting the site of death may be an important part of the support offered to bereaved families after experiencing a disaster loss. PMID:24567999

  7. Understanding the Experience of CACREP On-Site Visiting Review Team Chairpersons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minor, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the experience of CACREP on-site review team members provides insight into the phenomenon of four counselor educators who have each served as a CACREP on-site visiting review team chairperson a minimum of three times. In total, the participants had been within the counselor education field for approximately 95 years and active within…

  8. Secret Apartheid III: Follow Up to Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Chapter of Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, New York.

    The New York Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) studies of public schools continue with this report on course work for gifted students and public middle school students in general. Fourteen ACORN volunteers made 52 visits to 28 schools studied in 1996. Findings from these visits and the review of school system documents…

  9. Diabetic Amyotrophy: A Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Casey, E. B.; Harrison, M. J. G.

    1972-01-01

    A clinical follow-up study of 12 patients with diabetic amyotrophy is reported. Re-examination after an interval indicated that improvement had occurred in all but one instance, and had been maintained over an average follow-up period of four and a half years. Improvement in the neurological syndrome appeared to follow improvement in diabetic control or institution of treatment in those whose diabetes had not previously been diagnosed. Seven patients made a good functional recovery, three no longer having any muscular weakness. Five showed significant residual disability. PMID:5015293

  10. Follow-Up Research on Agoraphobics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Dianne L.

    In vivo exposure is the most commonly used and generally the most effective behavioral treatment for agoraphobia. Follow-up studies are difficult to interpret because additional treatment does not necessarily indicate relapse and non-treatment does not necessarily indicate non-relapse. Relapse rates are difficult to estimate because of lack of…

  11. Follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bournaud, C; Raverot, V

    2015-02-01

    The aim of follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (CTD) is the assessment of remission, and, in further steps, the early recognition of patients who develop a recurrence. Tools for the follow-up of CTD include the assessment of thyroglobulin and imaging procedures. Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a strong marker of persistent or recurrent disease, but it must be known that Tg antibodies may give falsely low Tg concentration. TSH stimulation, mainly by the mean of recombinant human TSH, improves the sensitivity of Tg determination. New highly sensitive assays may preclude the need for TSH stimulation, at least in some situations. In the last decades, (131)iodine whole body scan gave place to neck ultrasonography (US) as the most performing imaging procedure in the follow-up of CTD. Criteria to identify cervical lymph node suspect of metastasis have been described, and standardized procedures proposed. Finally, the proof of tumoral invasion is brought by cytological analysis of fine needle biopsies of suspicious lymph nodes. (18)FDG PET is a valuable tool for diagnosis and prognosis in metastatic patients, especially with negative (131)I WBS. Initial response to therapy, assessed by Tg determination and neck US, allows re-stratification of the risk of relapse. According to this "reassessed risk", adapted rhythms and modalities of follow-up have been recently proposed. PMID:26826480

  12. 1984 Graduate Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Tyler Community Coll., Chester, VA. Office of Institutional Research.

    A follow-up study is conducted of each graduating class of John Tyler Community College (JTCC) to document student successes in the job market and in pursuit of advanced studies, provide feedback to administrators and faculty for upgrading educational offerings and services, and provide a summary of student opinions to improve services. A…

  13. WCTC Graduate Follow-Up Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waukesha County Technical Coll., Pewaukee, WI.

    This paper reports on a survey of 2001-02 graduates of Waukesha County Technical College (WCTC), Wisconsin. The report indicates 1,257 students were awarded Associate's Degrees, technical diplomas, and apprenticeship certificates by WCTC in 2001-02. Of those graduates, 702 (56%) responded to the Graduate Follow-up Survey. Also, 84% of all…

  14. Employer Follow-Up Survey Report, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    In 1998, Trident Technical College conducted the 1997 Employer Follow-Up Survey to collect information from employers of 1997 graduates. A total of 373 employers of graduates were identified, of which 243 were contacted and interviewed. Findings indicate that employers rate graduates average or above average in most technical and personal skills.…

  15. Pharmacy Student and Preceptor Impressions of Faculty Liaison Visits to Experiential Training Sites

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Maria; Black, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To characterize preceptor and student views about and experiences with faculty liaison visits to practice sites during clinical internships. Methods. A survey was administered at the conclusion of each of the first 3 academic years of a new postbaccalaureate doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Results. Preceptors were satisfied overall with faculty liaison visits, while students initially were not; however, their perception increased in subsequent years. Students felt development of their patient care skills benefited, but less so their interpersonal communication skills. Each year, almost all preceptors indicated faculty liaison visits were helpful in developing and refining their mentorship skills. Conclusion. Faculty liaison visits provided a valuable opportunity to interact and support preceptors and students during advanced pharmacy internships in a nascent PharmD program. PMID:26839424

  16. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Follow-up: Role of Remote Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Linde, Cecilia; Braunschweig, Frieder

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is increasingly used in heart failure treatment and management of these patients imposes significant challenges. Remote monitoring is becoming essential for CRT follow-up and allows close surveillance of device function and patient condition. It is helpful to reduce clinic visits, increase device longevity and provide early detection of device failure. Clinical effects include prevention of appropriate and inappropriate shocks and early detection of arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation. For modification of heart failure the addition of monitoring to CRT by means of device-based multiparameters may help to modify disease progression and improve survival. PMID:26596821

  17. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim A.; Greenstreet, S.; Gomez, E.; Christensen, E.; Larson, S.

    2016-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network size of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and additionally for the discovery of new objects. We are using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1&2) and several hundred targets are now being followed per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO follow-up portal which will allow professionals, amateurs and Citizen Scientists to plan, schedule and analyze NEO imaging and spectroscopy observations and data using the LCOGT Network and to act as a co-ordination hub for the NEO follow-up efforts.

  18. Prompt GRB optical follow-up experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Williams, G; Ables, E; Band, D; Barthelmy, S; Bionta, R; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Hartmann, D; Hurley, K; Kippen, M; Nemiroff, R; Pereira, W; Porrata, R

    2000-11-13

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are brief, randomly located, releases of gamma-ray energy from unknown celestial sources that occur almost daily. The study of GRBs has undergone a revolution in the past three years due to an international effort of follow-up observations of coordinates provided by Beppo/SAX and IPN GRB. These follow-up observations have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances and interact with surrounding material as described by the fireball model. However, prompt optical counterparts have only been seen in one case and are therefore very rare or much dimmer than the sensitivity of the current instruments. Unlike later time afterglows, prompt optical measurements would provide information on the GRB progenitor. LOTIS is the very first automated and dedicated telescope system that actively utilizes the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) and it attempts to measure simultaneous optical light curve associated with GRBs. After 3 years of running, LOTIS has responded to 75 GRB triggers. The lack of any optical signal in any of the LOTIS images places numerical limits on the surrounding matter density, and other physical parameters in the environment of the GRB progenitor. This paper presents LOTIS results and describes other prompt GRB follow-up experiments including the Super-LOTIS at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

  19. School Site Visits for Community-Based Participatory Research on Healthy Eating

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anisha I.; Bogart, Laura M.; Uyeda, Kimberly E.; Martinez, Homero; Knizewski, Ritamarie; Ryan, Gery W.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Background School nutrition policies are gaining support as a means of addressing childhood obesity. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers an approach for academic and community partners to collaborate to translate obesity-related school policies into practice. Site visits, in which trained observers visit settings to collect multilevel data (e.g., observation, qualitative interviews), may complement other methods that inform health promotion efforts. This paper demonstrates the utility of site visits in the development of an intervention to implement obesity-related policies in Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) middle schools. Methods In 2006, trained observers visited four LAUSD middle schools. Observers mapped cafeteria layout; observed food/beverage offerings, student consumption, waste patterns, and duration of cafeteria lines; spoke with school staff and students; and collected relevant documents. Data were examined for common themes and patterns. Results Food and beverages sold in study schools met LAUSD nutritional guidelines, and nearly all observed students had time to eat most or all of their meal. Some LAUSD policies were not implemented, including posting nutritional information for cafeteria food, marketing school meals to improve student participation in the National School Lunch Program, and serving a variety of fruits and vegetables. Cafeteria understaffing and cost were obstacles to policy implementation. Conclusions Site visits were a valuable methodology for evaluating the implementation of school district obesity-related policies and contributed to the development of a CBPR intervention to translate school food policies into practice. Future CBPR studies may consider site visits in their toolbox of formative research methods. PMID:19896033

  20. Follow-up imaging after pediatric pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Arora, Sohrab; Mittal, Varun; Patidar, Nitesh; Sureka, Sanjoy Kumar; Ansari, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The duration, methods and frequency of radiographic follow-up after pediatric pyeloplasty is not well-defined. We prospectively evaluated a cohort of children undergoing pyeloplasty to determine the method for follow-up. Methods: Between 2000 and 2008, children undergoing pyeloplasty for unilateral ureteropelvic junction obstruction were evaluated for this study. All patients were evaluated preoperatively with protocol ultrasound (USG) and diuretic renal scan (RS). On the basis of preoperative split renal function (SRF), these patients were divided into four groups – Group I: SRF > 40%, Group II: SRF 30–39%, Group III: SRF 20–29%, and Group IV: SRF 10–19%. In follow-up, USG and RS were done at 3 months and repeated at 6 months, 1 year, and then yearly after surgery for a minimum period of 5 years. Improvement, stability, or worsening of hydronephrosis was based on the changes in anteroposterior (AP) diameter of pelvis and caliectasis on USG. Absolute increase in split renal function (SRF) >5% was considered significant. Failure was defined as increase in AP diameter of pelvis and decrease in cortical thickness on 3 consecutive USG, t½ >20 min with obstructive drainage on RS and/or symptomatic patient. Results: 145 children were included in the study. Their mean age was 3.26 years and mean follow-up was 7.5 years. Pre- and post-operative SRF remain unchanged within 5% range in 35 of 41 patients (85%) in Group I. While 9 of 20 patients (45%) in Group II, 23 of 50 patients (46%) in Group III, and 14 of 34 patients (41%) in Group IV exhibited changes >5% after surgery. 5 patients failed, 2 in Group III, and 3 in Group IV. None of the patients deteriorated in Group I and II. Conclusion: After pyeloplasty in children with a baseline split GFR >30%, if a diuretic renogram and USG performed 3 months postoperatively shows nonobstructive drainage with t½ <20 min and decreased hydronephrosis, no further follow-up is required. PMID:27555681

  1. White-tailed Deer Visitation Rates at Medicated Bait Sites in Southern Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has been found on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) complicating eradication efforts of the USDA’s Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program. Our objective was to assess patterns of deer visitation to medicated bait sites used to treat...

  2. Appendix B: Site Visit Reports. Assessment of Research Needs for Coal Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, S.S.

    1983-05-01

    This section contains edited copies of site-visit and other reports prepared by CCAWG members. Some of the hand-out materials prepared by DOE contractors and others are included (without explication) to permit readers the construction of a coherent picture of work in progress.

  3. Female Faculty Members in University Chemistry Departments: Observations and Conclusions Based on Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Sally; Dixon, Felicia F.; Foster, Natalie; Kuck, Valerie J.; McCarthy, Deborah A.; Tooney, Nancy M.; Buckner, Janine P.; Nolan, Susan A.; Marzabadi, Cecilia H.

    2011-01-01

    Oral interviews in focus groups and written surveys were conducted with 877 men and women, including administrators, faculty members, postdoctoral associates, and graduate students, during one-day site visits to chemistry and chemical engineering departments at 28 Ph.D.-granting institutions. This report is a preliminary review of the perceptions…

  4. Preparing for a Successful Psychiatry Residency Review Committee Site Visit: A Guide for New Training Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Shashi K.; Bhatia, Subhash C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: New residency training directors are often faced with multiple competing tasks such as meeting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Psychiatry Program Requirements and achieving successful completion of residency review committee (RRC) site visits. For many years, the authors have presented workshops on this…

  5. [Guidelines for the follow up of patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Tarazona, S; Rueda Esteban, S; Alfonso Diego, J; Barrio Gómez de Agüero, M I; Callejón Callejón, A; Cortell Aznar, I; de la Serna Blázquez, O; Domingo Miró, X; García García, M L; García Hernández, G; Luna Paredes, C; Mesa Medina, O; Moreno Galdó, A; Moreno Requena, L; Pérez Pérez, G; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sánchez Solís de Querol, M; Torrent Vernetta, A; Valdesoiro Navarrete, L; Vilella Sabaté, M

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common complication of preterm birth, and remains a major problem in pediatric pulmonology units. The decision of discharging from the Neonatal Unit should be based on a thorough assessment of the condition of the patient and compliance with certain requirements, including respiratory and nutritional stability, and caregiver education on disease management. For proper control of the disease, a schedule of visits and complementary tests should be established prior to discharge, and guidelines for prevention of exacerbations and appropriate treatment should be applied. In this paper, the Working Group in Perinatal Respiratory Diseases of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonology proposes a protocol to serve as a reference for the follow up of patients with BPD among different centers and health care settings. Key factors to consider when planning discharge from the Neonatal Unit and during follow up are reviewed. Recommendations on treatment and prevention of complications are then discussed. The final section of this guide aims to provide a specific schedule for follow-up and diagnostic interventions to be performed in patients with BPD. PMID:26089228

  6. Trazodone for Alzheimer's disease: a naturalistic follow-up study.

    PubMed

    López-Pousa, Secundino; Garre-Olmo, Josep; Vilalta-Franch, Joan; Turon-Estrada, Antoni; Pericot-Nierga, Imma

    2008-01-01

    This study intended to provide a patient profile for trazodone (a triazolopyridine-derivative of phenylpiperazine) prescription in everyday clinical practice in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and to describe clinical evaluation and the impact on caregiver burden at a 6-month follow-up. A naturalistic, prospective and observational study was performed, with a 6-month follow-up in 396 patients with probable AD, according to the NINCDS-ARDRA criteria. At the baseline and at the 6-month visit, patients were administered the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) to determine their Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD), and the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) to assess the impact on caregiver burden. Trazodone was prescribed for 6.1% of patients. With respect to the baseline visit, the untreated group showed an increased global NPI score (3.1 points; 95% CI=1.9-4.2; p=0.001) and ZBI score (2.2 points; 95% CI=0.9-3.4; p=0.001). At 6 months, the global NPI and ZBI scores remained unchanged for the treated group. The treated group showed a significant reduction in the NPI irritability subscale score (2.1 points; 95% CI=0.4-3.7; p=0.015). In the clinical practice, trazodone treatment was prescribed for patients with irritability, agitation and disinhibition. After 6 months, patients treated with trazodone exhibited no increase in BPSD frequency or severity, nor was an increase noted in the caregiver burden. PMID:17897735

  7. Determining Virtual Environment "Fit": The Relationship Between Navigation Style in a Virtual Field Trip, Student Self-Reported Desire to Visit the Field Trip Site in the Real World, and the Purposes of Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutwiler, M. Shane; Lin, Ming-Chao; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a follow-up analysis of the data reported in Lin et al. (Learn Media Technol. doi: 10.1080/17439884.2011.629660, 2011), we investigated the relationship between student use of a virtual field trip (VFT) system and the probability of students reporting wanting to visit the national park site upon which the VFT was modeled, controlling for content knowledge and prior visits to the park. Students who were able to navigate the VFT in teams were more likely than their peers who had the system demonstrated by a teacher to want to visit the national park. In addition, students with higher pre-intervention content knowledge were more likely to want to visit the national park than their peers with lower pre-test scores, in both the teacher demonstration and student co-navigation conditions.

  8. NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook is issued pursuant to the requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-50, Audit Follow-up, dated September 29, 1982. It sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for use when considering reports issued by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), other executive branch audit organizations, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), and the General Accounting Office (GAO). It is intended to: specify principal roles; strengthen the procedures for management decisions (resolution) on audit findings and corrective action on audit report recommendations; emphasize the importance of monitoring agreed upon corrective actions to assure actual accomplishment; and foster the use of audit reports as effective tools of management. A flow chart depicting the NASA audit and management decision process is in Appendix A. This handbook is a controlled handbook issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution channels.

  9. Oligometastases Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Long-Term Follow-Up of Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Michael T.; Katz, Alan W.; Zhang Hong; Okunieff, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term survival and tumor control outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for metastases limited in number and extent. Methods and Materials: We prospectively analyzed the long-term overall survival (OS) and cancer control outcomes of 121 patients with five or fewer clinically detectable metastases, from any primary site, metastatic to one to three organ sites, and treated with SBRT. Freedom from widespread distant metastasis (FFDM) was defined as metastatic disease not amenable to local therapy (i.e., resection or SBRT). Prognostic variables were assessed using log-rank and Cox regression analyses. Results: For breast cancer patients, the median follow-up was 4.5 years (7.1 years for 16 of 39 patients alive at the last follow-up visit). The 2-year OS, FFDM, and local control (LC) rate was 74%, 52%, and 87%, respectively. The 6-year OS, FFDM, and LC rate was 47%, 36%, and 87%, respectively. From the multivariate analyses, the variables of bone metastases (p = .057) and one vs. more than one metastasis (p = .055) were associated with a fourfold and threefold reduced hazard of death, respectively. None of the 17 bone lesions from breast cancer recurred after SBRT vs. 10 of 68 lesions from other organs that recurred (p = .095). For patients with nonbreast cancers, the median follow-up was 1.7 years (7.3 years for 7 of 82 patients alive at the last follow-up visit). The 2-year OS, FFDM, and LC rate was 39%, 28%, and 74%, respectively. The 6-year OS, FFDM, and LC rate was 9%, 13%, and 65%, respectively. For nonbreast cancers, a greater SBRT target volume was significantly adverse for OS (p = .012) and lesion LC (p < .0001). Patients whose metastatic lesions, before SBRT, demonstrated radiographic progression after systemic therapy experienced significantly worse OS compared with patients with stable or regressing disease. Conclusions: Select patients with limited metastases treated with SBRT are long-term survivors. Future

  10. The impact of national cultural distance on the number of foreign Web site visits by U.S. households.

    PubMed

    Beugelsdijk, Sjoerd; Slangen, Arjen

    2010-04-01

    We investigate how national cultural distance, defined as the extent to which the shared values and norms in one country differ from those in another, affect the number of Web site visits. Based on a sample of 2,654 U.S. households visiting Web sites in 38 countries over 25 different Web site categories, we find that cultural distance has a negative and significant effect on the number of taste-related foreign Web site visits. In the case of Web sites containing sexually explicit material, we obtain a significantly positive effect of cultural distance. Our findings suggest that cultural distance can be both a source of attraction and a source of repulsion in explaining the number of Web site visits depending on the nature of the Web site. PMID:20528279

  11. Predictors of donor follow-up after living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert S; Smith, Abigail R; Dew, Mary Amanda; Gillespie, Brenda W; Hill-Callahan, Peg; Ladner, Daniela P

    2014-08-01

    Donor safety in living liver donation is of paramount importance; however, information on long-term outcomes is limited by incomplete follow-up. We sought to ascertain factors that predicted postdonation follow-up in 456 living liver donors in the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study. Completed donor follow-up was defined as physical, phone, or laboratory contact at a given time point. Univariate and multivariate mixed effects logistic regression models, using donor and recipient demographic and clinical data and donor quality-of-life data, were developed to predict completed follow-up. Ninety percent of the donors completed their follow-up in the first 3 months, and 83% completed their follow-up at year 1; rates of completed follow-up ranged from 57% to 72% in years 2 to 7 and from 41% to 56% in years 8 to 10. The probability of completed follow-up in the first year was higher for white donors [odds ratio (OR) = 3.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.25-8.58] but lower for donors whose recipients had hepatitis C virus or hepatocellular carcinoma (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.17-0.69). After the first year, an older age at donation predicted more complete follow-up. There were significant center differences at all time points (OR range = 0.29-10.11), with center variability in both returns for in-center visits and the use of phone/long-distance visits. Donor follow-up in the first year after donation was excellent but decreased with time. Predictors of follow-up varied with the time since donation. In conclusion, adapting best center practices (enhanced through the use of telephones and social media) to maintain contact with donors represents a significant opportunity to gain valuable information about long-term donor outcomes. PMID:24824858

  12. DISSS/PSDB - Personnel Security Database Modernization Project: Compilation of data gathered from DOE Operations Office`s site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.; Sweeney, D.

    1995-03-15

    This document is a compilation of the information gathered from visits to the DOE Operations Offices. The purpose of these visits was to gather requirements for the modernization of the personnel security database. The initial phase of visits were to sites which had known local systems to augment CPCI. They were; Rocky Flats, Richland, Las Vegas, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, and Oakland. The second phase of site visits were to; Headquarters, Schenectady, Pittsburgh, Idaho Falls, Chicago, and Albuquerque. We also visited the NRC. At each site we reviewed the current clearance process in use at the field office. If the site had a local personnel security database (PSDB), we also reviewed the current PSDB processing. Each meeting was began with the a discussion on the purpose of the meeting and the background of the redesign effort.

  13. Vibration white finger: a follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Ekenvall, L; Carlsson, A

    1987-01-01

    To study the course of vibration white finger (VWF) 55 men were re-examined three and a half to six years after the first examination. The patients were interviewed and finger systolic pressure after general body and local finger cooling was measured. The test results at the two examinations were compared. At the follow up examination some patients experienced a subjective improvement of VWF symptoms but not until more than three years had passed after they had stopped working with vibrating tools. To study the effect of diminished cold exposure on subjective symptoms, vibration exposed outdoor workers who changed to unexposed indoor work were studied separately. In this subgroup also improvement was reported only when more than three years has passed after the change of work, indicating that diminished cold exposure is not the primary explanation for the improvement. The cold provocation test, however, showed no tendency towards a diminished reaction of the vessels to cooling. Patients who continue to work with vibrating tools report a subjective increase in symptoms. This subjective impairment was reflected in an increased reaction to cold as measured in the cold provocation test. PMID:3620371

  14. Improving Lunar Exploration with Robotic Follow-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, T.; Bualat, M.; Deans, M.; Heggy E.; Helper, M.; Hodges, K.; Lee, P.

    2011-01-01

    We are investigating how augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity can improve lunar exploration. Robotic "follow-up" might involve: completing geology observations; making tedious or long-duration measurements of a target site or feature; curating samples in-situ; and performing unskilled, labor-intensive work. To study this technique, we have begun conducting a series of lunar analog field tests at Haughton Crater (Canada). Motivation: In most field geology studies on Earth, explorers often find themselves left with a set of observations they would have liked to make, or samples they would have liked to take, if only they had been able to stay longer in the field. For planetary field geology, we can imagine mobile robots - perhaps teleoperated vehicles previously used for manned exploration or dedicated planetary rovers - being deployed to perform such follow-up activities [1].

  15. Course Withdrawal Follow-Up. TEX-SIS Follow-Up, Volume 3, #1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavapai County Community Coll. District, Prescott, AZ.

    In spring 1982, a survey was conducted at Yavapai College to determine reasons for student course withdrawal. A TEX-SIS follow-up questionnaire was mailed to all 525 students who had dropped one or two courses, asking them to indicate their reasons for dropping the course(s) and if they felt discussion with a counselor would have been beneficial,…

  16. A computer-based monitoring system for follow-up of elevated blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Barnett, G O; Winickoff, R N; Morgan, M M; Zielstorff, R D

    1983-04-01

    An automated surveillance system utilizing a computer-based medical record system (COSTAR) was designed to improve the follow-up of patients with newly identified elevated diastolic blood pressure. A population of patients was selected where, in the 6-month period following the initial measurement of an elevated diastolic blood pressure, there were fewer than two visits during which blood pressure was recorded. In a randomized controlled clinical trial, this poor follow-up population was divided into two groups, with computer-generated reminders being automatically generated for only patients in the experimental group. Follow-up was significantly improved in the group receiving the reminders, both in terms of rate of follow-up attempted or achieved by the responsible physician and in the repeated recording of blood pressure. We conclude that a computer-based reminder system improves follow-up of newly discovered elevation in diastolic blood pressure. PMID:6341724

  17. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor Office... § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  18. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  19. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  20. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  1. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  2. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor... Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  3. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  4. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  5. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  6. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  7. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor... Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  8. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor Office... § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  9. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  10. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor... Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  11. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  12. Digital dermoscopic follow-up of 1544 melanocytic nevi.

    PubMed

    Rotaru, Maria; Nati, Angelica-Elena; Avrămoiu, Ioan; Grosu, Florin; Mălăescu, Gheorghe Dan

    2015-01-01

    The use of dermatoscopy increases melanocytic nevi diagnostic accuracy, and is important for dermoscopic monitoring of atypical lesions, allowing to find significant changes in the earliest stage. Dermoscopic diagnosis of melanocytic nevi type in a group of patients and their follow-up with the assessment of changes occurred during dermoscopic monitoring. Dermoscopically, we followed the nevic size and pattern, the color and pigment distribution. Follow-up visits were scheduled depending on the type of the melanocytic lesions and the patient's compliance. The nevi that have shown significant dermoscopic changes were excised and histopathologically examined. The study was performed on a group of 92 patients, mostly females (56.5%), mean age of 29.1 years. Of the total of 1544 melanocytic nevi examined, 27.4% were atypical and 72.6% common nevi. The average dermoscopic examination interval was 14.1 months. During monitoring, 35.5% atypical nevi and 22.5% common nevi have modified, especially changes in pigmentation and color (31% atypical nevi and 9.9% common nevi) and the appearance of new dermoscopic structures (12.7% atypical nevi and common nevi 8.5%). Of the total nevi monitored, 3% showed significant changes and were excised and examined pathologically, without diagnose of any malignant transformation. In our study, dermoscopic changes appeared in atypical as well as in common nevi. The dermoscopic monitoring of melanocytic-pigmented lesions remains an accessible method of assessment the evolution of nevi and can reduce the risk of appearance of malignant melanoma in the general population. PMID:26743296

  13. Longest follow-up of in situ working Bjork Shiley valve: 42-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Soofi, Muhammad A; Ignaszewski, Maya T; Ashton, Thomas H; Miyagishima, Robert T

    2016-03-01

    The Bjork Shiley valve (BSV) is considered as the pioneer among modern disc valves, and eventually evolved into a reliable prosthesis after considerable research and multiple modifications. Various case reports have been published with follow-up of different types of BSV. We are reporting the longest follow-up ever published of a plano-convex type of BSV. Our patient's valve was implanted in 1973 due to a congenital bicuspid aortic valve with concomitant severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis, discovered at the age of 27. She presented with exertional dyspnoea, syncope and chest pain; however, her cardiovascular status remained stable and these symptoms abated after successful valve replacement at the age of 34. She is now 77 years old with no limitations in her activities and is able to walk a few miles most days of the week. Her echocardiograms throughout the decades have shown acceptable gradients across the aortic prosthesis without evidence of haemolysis. Our case report includes a summary of the patient with a discussion of the evidence that supports the durability of the original plano-convex BSV. PMID:26686528

  14. Follow-up of Patients with New Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices: Are Experts’ Recommendations Implemented in Routine Clinical Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khatib, Sana M.; Mi, Xiaojuan; Wilkoff, Bruce L.; Qualls, Laura G.; Frazier-Mills, Camille; Setoguchi, Soko; Hess, Paul L.; Curtis, Lesley H.

    2013-01-01

    Background A 2008 expert consensus statement outlined the minimum frequency of follow-up of patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Methods and Results We studied 38,055 Medicare beneficiaries who received a new CIED between January 1, 2005, and June 30, 2009. The main outcome measure was variation of follow-up by patient factors and year of device implantation. We determined the number of patients who were eligible for and attended an in-person CIED follow-up visit within 2 to 12 weeks, 0 to 16 weeks, and 1 year after implantation. Among eligible patients, 42.4% had an initial in-person visit within 2 to 12 weeks. This visit was significantly more common among white patients than black patients and patients of other races (43.0% vs 36.8% vs 40.5%; P < .001). Follow-up within 2 to 12 weeks improved from 40.3% in 2005 to 55.1% in 2009 (P < .001 for trend). The rate of follow-up within 0 to 16 weeks was 65.1% and improved considerably from 2005 to 2009 (62.3% to 79.6%; P < .001 for trend). Within 1 year, 78.0% of the overall population had at least 1 in-person CIED follow-up visit. Conclusions Although most Medicare beneficiaries who received a new CIED between 2005 and 2009 did not have an initial in-person CIED follow-up visit within 2 to 12 weeks after device implantation, the rate of initial follow-up improved appreciably over time. This CIED follow-up visit was significantly more common in white patients than patients of other races. PMID:23264436

  15. Employer Follow-up Data Summary--1976-77. Tex-SIS FOLLOW-UP; Postsecondary Student Follow-up Management Information System. Monograph 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The Tex-SIS Follow-up system Employer Follow-up Survey involved four Texas community colleges, providing a statewide composite of employer data on the competency of occupational/technical graduates. The mailing list for prospective survey participants was derived from occupational/technical graduates' responses to a survey conducted in 1975-76. A…

  16. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Follow-up questionnaire data set contains information concerning the activities within the household during the sampling week. The information is from 402 follow-up questionnaires for 80 households across 6 cycles. The Follow-up Questionnaire specifically addressed the time ...

  17. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577.10... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFECT AND NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up... manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this section. The scope, timing, form,...

  18. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section...

  19. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section...

  20. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section...

  1. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section...) BOATING SAFETY DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who makes an initial report required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified mail within...

  2. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section...) BOATING SAFETY DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who makes an initial report required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified mail within...

  3. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577.10... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFECT AND NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up... manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this section. The scope, timing, form,...

  4. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577.10... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFECT AND NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up... manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this section. The scope, timing, form,...

  5. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577.10... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFECT AND NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up... manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this section. The scope, timing, form,...

  6. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section...

  7. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section...) BOATING SAFETY DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who makes an initial report required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified mail within...

  8. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section...

  9. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section...) BOATING SAFETY DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who makes an initial report required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified mail within...

  10. 2 CFR 200.511 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 200.511 Section...-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all audit findings... submitted to the FAC; (ii) The Federal agency or pass-through entity is not currently following up with...

  11. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section...) BOATING SAFETY DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who makes an initial report required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified mail within...

  12. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577.10... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFECT AND NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up... manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this section. The scope, timing, form,...

  13. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and

  14. A delay differential equation model for dengue transmission with regular visits to a mosquito breeding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaacob, Y.; Yeak, S. H.; Lim, R. S.; Soewono, E.

    2015-03-01

    Dengue disease has been known as one of widely transmitted vector-borne diseases which potentially affects millions of people throughout the world especially in tropical and sub-tropical countries. One of the main factors contributing in the complication of the transmission process is the mobility of people in which people may get infection in the places far from their home. Here we construct a delay differential equation model for dengue transmission in a closed population where regular visits of people to a mosquito breeding site out of their residency such as traditional market take place daily. Basic reproductive ratio of the system is obtained and depends on the ratio between the outgoing rates of susceptible human and infective human. It is shown that the increase of mobility with different variation of mobility rates may contribute to different level of basic reproductive ratio as well as different level of outbreaks.

  15. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    in need of further data. The higher priority is given to Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) and Virtual Impactors (VIs), recoveries of NEOs in the second opposition and also follow-up astrometry of radar or mission targets, special follow-up requests and follow-up astrometry of other unusual objects (comets, bright TNOs) including analysis of cometary features of suspected bodies, and also search for new asteroids, especially NEOs as well as other objects showing unusual motion. The KLENOT Telescope is located at the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic (Central Europe), at geographical position: latitude 14° 17' 17'' E, longitude 48° 51' 48''N, elevation 1068 meters above sea level, in a rather dark site in the middle of the Protected Landscape Area Blanský les. Average number of clear nights per year about 120. Our IAU/MPC code is 246 KLENOT Project Advantages: • full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team • quick changes in an observing plan possible, even during an observing night • long-term NEO activities at Klet (since 1992) • experienced observers/measurers visually validate each moving object candidate • real-time processing of targeted objects KLENOT Next Generation Telescope technical data (since 2013): • new computer controlled paralactic mount • 1.06-m f/3 main mirror (Zeiss) • four lenses primary focus corrector • 1.06-m f/2.7 optical system • CCD camera FLI ProLine PL230 • chip e2v 2048 × 2048 pixels, pixel size 15 microns, Peltier cooling • FOV 37 × 37 arcminutes, image scale 1.1 arcseconds per pixel • limiting magnitude m V=21.5 mag. for 120-sec exposure time KLENOT Project First Phase Results(2002-2008) total of 52,658 astrometric measurements of 5,867 bodies, it contains: • 13,342 astrometric measurements of 1,369 NEAs (MPC,NEODys) • confirmation and astrometry of 623 NEAs from NEOCP (MPECs) • recoveries of 4 comets and 16 NEAs (including 196P/Tichý) • astrometry of 157 Virtual

  16. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    in need of further data. The higher priority is given to Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) and Virtual Impactors (VIs), recoveries of NEOs in the second opposition and also follow-up astrometry of radar or mission targets, special follow-up requests and follow-up astrometry of other unusual objects (comets, bright TNOs) including analysis of cometary features of suspected bodies, and also search for new asteroids, especially NEOs as well as other objects showing unusual motion. The KLENOT Telescope is located at the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic (Central Europe), at geographical position: latitude 14° 17' 17'' E, longitude 48° 51' 48''N, elevation 1068 meters above sea level, in a rather dark site in the middle of the Protected Landscape Area Blanský les. Average number of clear nights per year about 120. Our IAU/MPC code is 246 KLENOT Project Advantages: • full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team • quick changes in an observing plan possible, even during an observing night • long-term NEO activities at Klet (since 1992) • experienced observers/measurers visually validate each moving object candidate • real-time processing of targeted objects KLENOT Next Generation Telescope technical data (since 2013): • new computer controlled paralactic mount • 1.06-m f/3 main mirror (Zeiss) • four lenses primary focus corrector • 1.06-m f/2.7 optical system • CCD camera FLI ProLine PL230 • chip e2v 2048 × 2048 pixels, pixel size 15 microns, Peltier cooling • FOV 37 × 37 arcminutes, image scale 1.1 arcseconds per pixel • limiting magnitude m V=21.5 mag. for 120-sec exposure time KLENOT Project First Phase Results(2002-2008) total of 52,658 astrometric measurements of 5,867 bodies, it contains: • 13,342 astrometric measurements of 1,369 NEAs (MPC,NEODys) • confirmation and astrometry of 623 NEAs from NEOCP (MPECs) • recoveries of 4 comets and 16 NEAs (including 196P/Tichý) • astrometry of 157 Virtual

  17. Go ahead, visit those web sites, you can`t get hurt, can you?

    SciTech Connect

    Rothfuss, J.S.; Parrett, J.W.

    1997-02-01

    Browsing (surfing) the World Wide Web (the web) has exploded onto the Internet with an unprecedented popularity. Fueled by massive acceptance, the web client/server technology is leaping forward with a speed that competes with no other software technology. The primary force behind this phenomenon is the simplicity of the web browsing experience. People who have never touched a computer before can now perform sophisticated network tasks with a simple point-and-click. Unfortunately, this simplicity gives many, if not most, web wanderers the impression that the web browser is risk free, nothing more than a high powered television. This misconception is dangerous by creating the myth that a user visiting a web site is immune from subversive or malicious intent. While many want you to believe that surfing the web is as simple as using any other household appliance, it is not like surfing television channels, it is bi-directional. You can learn a lot of useful information from web sites. But, either directly or indirectly, others can also learn quite a bit about you. Of even more concern is a web sites` potential ability to exert control over the local computer. This paper tries to consolidate some of the current concerns that you should consider as you jump into the surf.

  18. The LCOGT near-Earth-object follow-up network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, T.

    2014-07-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network is a planned homogeneous network that will eventually consist of over 35 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres [1]. This network is versatile and designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to do long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make the LCOGT network ideal for follow-up and characterization of a wide range of solar-system objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper-belt objects, comets) and in particular near-Earth objects (NEOs). There are 3 classes to the telescope resources: 2-meter aperture, 1-meter aperture and 0.4-meter aperture. We have been operating our two 2-meter telescopes since 2005 and began a specific program of NEO follow-up for the Pan-STARRS survey in October 2010. The combination of all-sky access, large aperture, rapid response, robotic operation and good site conditions allows us to provide time-critical follow-up astrometry and photometry on newly discovered objects and faint objects as they recede from the Earth, allowing the orbital arc to be extended and preventing loss of objects. These telescope resources have greatly increased as LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment, designated as ''Version 1.0'', with the installation, commissioning and ongoing operation of nine 1-meter telescopes. These are distributed among four sites with one 1-meter at McDonald Observatory (Texas), three telescopes at Cerro Tololo (Chile), three telescopes at SAAO (South Africa) and the final two telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). In addition to the 1-meter network, the scheduling and control system for the two 2-meter telescopes have been upgraded and unified with that of the 1-meter network to provide a coherent robotic telescopic network. The telescope network is now operating and observations are being executed remotely and

  19. Long-Term Follow-Up of Iliac Wallstents

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, Ricardo; Carreira, Jose Martin Gude, Francisco; Gorriz, Elias; Gallardo, Laura; Pardo, Maria Dolores; Hermida, Maria

    2004-11-15

    We evaluated the long-term results of the iliac artery stent placement for the treatment of patients with intermittent claudication. From November 1988 to December 1998, 303 legs were treated with metal stents in 259 patients with iliac occlusive arterial disease in a follow-up study approved by the institutional review board. Stenoses (n = 162) were treated after failed angioplasty and occlusions (n = 141) were treated with primary stent placement. According to Fontaine's clinical classification of chronic ischemia, 266 (88%) legs presented stage IIB, 14 (5%) stage III, and 23 (7%) stage IV. In all legs, self-expandable stents (Wallstent) were implanted. The patients were followed up with clinical examination, ankle brachial- index examination measurement and intravenous angiography. The data were analyzed using the univariate analysis (Kaplan-Meier method) and multivariate analysis (Cox proportional model). The primary endpoint of the study was the identification of restenosis or reoclusion of the stenting arterial segment and a secondary endpoint that was an identification of the risk factors of restenosis and reoclusion. The mean {+-} SD ankle-brachial index pre-, post-procedure, and in the last control was 0.58 {+-} 0.18, 0.90 {+-} 0.23, and 0.86 {+-} 0.24, respectively. Primary cumulative patency rates were 70% {+-} 4 after 5 years, and 65% {+-} 5 after 7 years, and secondary patency rates were 92% {+-} 2 after 5 years, and 87% {+-} 4 after 9 years. Immediate complications in the first 24 hours appeared in 12 (4%) legs, thrombosis in 5 legs, 3 legs presented with distal embolism, 2 thrombi at the access site and pseudo aneurysm and artery rupture in 1 leg. A patient died in the first 24 hours. Within 30 days after the procedure seven complications, 3 thromboses and 4 stenosis appeared. During follow-up, 42 (16%) patients died of other causes. The main causes of death were cardiac disease (39%), cerebrovascular disease (15%), cancer (7%), respiratory diseases

  20. Visiting Holocaust-Related Sites with Medical Students as an Aid in Teaching Medical Ethics.

    PubMed

    González-López, Esteban; Ríos-Cortés, Rosa

    2016-05-01

    During the Nazi period numerous doctors and nurses played a nefarious role. In Germany they were responsible for the sterilization and killing of disabled persons. Furthermore, the Nazi doctors used concentration camp inmates as guinea pigs in medical experiments for military or racial purposes. A study of the collaboration of doctors with National Socialism exemplifies behavior that must be avoided. Combining medical teaching with lessons from the Holocaust could be a way to transmit Medical Ethics to doctors, nurses and students. The authors describe a study tour with medical students to Poland, to the largest Nazi extermination camp, Auschwitz, and to the city of Krakow. The tour is the final component of a formal course entitled: "The Holocaust, a Reflection from Medicine" at the Autónoma University of Madrid, Spain. Visiting sites related to the Holocaust, the killing centers and the sites where medical experiments were conducted has a singular meaning for medical students. Tolerance, non-discrimination, and the value of human life can be both learnt and taught at the very place where such values were utterly absent. PMID:27430079

  1. Follow-up skeletal survey use by child abuse pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Harper, Nancy S; Lewis, Terri; Eddleman, Sonja; Lindberg, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal survey is frequently used to identify occult fractures in young children with concern for physical abuse. Because skeletal survey is relatively insensitive for some abusive fractures, a follow-up skeletal survey (FUSS) may be undertaken at least 10-14 days after the initial skeletal survey to improve sensitivity for healing fractures. This was a prospectively planned secondary analysis of a prospective, observational study of 2,890 children who underwent subspecialty evaluation for suspected child physical abuse at 1 of 19 centers. Our objective was to determine variability between sites in rates of FUSS recommendation, completion and fracture identification among the 2,049 participants who had an initial SS. Among children with an initial skeletal survey, the rate of FUSS recommendation for sites ranged from 20% to 97%; the rate of FUSS completion ranged from 10% to 100%. Among sites completing at least 10 FUSS, rates of new fracture identification ranged from 8% to 28%. Among completed FUSS, new fractures were more likely to be identified in younger children, children with higher initial level of concern for abuse, and those with a fracture or cutaneous injury identified in the initial evaluation. The current variability in FUSS utilization is not explained by variability in occult fracture prevalence. Specific guidelines for FUSS utilization are needed. PMID:26342432

  2. Rationale and design of the health economics evaluation registry for remote follow-up: TARIFF

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Renato P.; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Padeletti, Luigi; Sagone, Antonio; Vicentini, Alfredo; Vincenti, Antonio; Morichelli, Loredana; Cavallaro, Ciro; Ricciardi, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Leonida; Fusco, Antonio; Rovaris, Giovanni; Silvestri, Paolo; Guidotto, Tiziana; Pollastrelli, Annalisa; Santini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Aims The aims of the study are to develop a cost-minimization analysis from the hospital perspective and a cost-effectiveness analysis from the third payer standpoint, based on direct estimates of costs and QOL associated with remote follow-ups, using Merlin@home and Merlin.net, compared with standard ambulatory follow-ups, in the management of ICD and CRT-D recipients. Methods and results Remote monitoring systems can replace ambulatory follow-ups, sparing human and economic resources, and increasing patient safety. TARIFF is a prospective, controlled, observational study aimed at measuring the direct and indirect costs and quality of life (QOL) of all participants by a 1-year economic evaluation. A detailed set of hospitalized and ambulatory healthcare costs and losses of productivity that could be directly influenced by the different means of follow-ups will be collected. The study consists of two phases, each including 100 patients, to measure the economic resources consumed during the first phase, associated with standard ambulatory follow-ups, vs. the second phase, associated with remote follow-ups. Conclusion Remote monitoring systems enable caregivers to better ensure patient safety and the healthcare to limit costs. TARIFF will allow defining the economic value of remote ICD follow-ups for Italian hospitals, third payers, and patients. The TARIFF study, based on a cost-minimization analysis, directly comparing remote follow-up with standard ambulatory visits, will validate the cost effectiveness of the Merlin.net technology, and define a proper reimbursement schedule applicable for the Italian healthcare system. Trial registration: NCT01075516. PMID:22544910

  3. Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Exposure Assessments: An Analysis of 14 Site Visits

    PubMed Central

    Dahm, Matthew M.; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K.; Evans, Douglas E.; Birch, M. Eileen; Fernback, Joseph E.; Deddens, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the potential for wide-ranging health effects that could result from exposure to carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanofibers (CNF). In response, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) set a recommended exposure limit (REL) for CNT and CNF: 1 µg m−3 as an 8-h time weighted average (TWA) of elemental carbon (EC) for the respirable size fraction. The purpose of this study was to conduct an industrywide exposure assessment among US CNT and CNF manufacturers and users. Fourteen total sites were visited to assess exposures to CNT (13 sites) and CNF (1 site). Personal breathing zone (PBZ) and area samples were collected for both the inhalable and respirable mass concentration of EC, using NIOSH Method 5040. Inhalable PBZ samples were collected at nine sites while at the remaining five sites both respirable and inhalable PBZ samples were collected side-by-side. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) PBZ and area samples were also collected at the inhalable size fraction and analyzed to quantify and size CNT and CNF agglomerate and fibrous exposures. Respirable EC PBZ concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 2.94 µg m−3 with a geometric mean (GM) of 0.34 µg m−3 and an 8-h TWA of 0.16 µg m−3. PBZ samples at the inhalable size fraction for EC ranged from 0.01 to 79.57 µg m−3 with a GM of 1.21 µg m−3. PBZ samples analyzed by TEM showed concentrations ranging from 0.0001 to 1.613 CNT or CNF-structures per cm3 with a GM of 0.008 and an 8-h TWA concentration of 0.003. The most common CNT structure sizes were found to be larger agglomerates in the 2–5 µm range as well as agglomerates >5 µm. A statistically significant correlation was observed between the inhalable samples for the mass of EC and structure counts by TEM (Spearman ρ = 0.39, P < 0.0001). Overall, EC PBZ and area TWA samples were below the NIOSH REL (96% were <1 μg m−3 at the respirable size fraction), while 30% of the inhalable PBZ EC

  4. Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Exposure Assessments: An Analysis of 14 Site Visits.

    PubMed

    Dahm, Matthew M; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Evans, Douglas E; Birch, M Eileen; Fernback, Joseph E; Deddens, James A

    2015-07-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the potential for wide-ranging health effects that could result from exposure to carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanofibers (CNF). In response, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) set a recommended exposure limit (REL) for CNT and CNF: 1 µg m(-3) as an 8-h time weighted average (TWA) of elemental carbon (EC) for the respirable size fraction. The purpose of this study was to conduct an industrywide exposure assessment among US CNT and CNF manufacturers and users. Fourteen total sites were visited to assess exposures to CNT (13 sites) and CNF (1 site). Personal breathing zone (PBZ) and area samples were collected for both the inhalable and respirable mass concentration of EC, using NIOSH Method 5040. Inhalable PBZ samples were collected at nine sites while at the remaining five sites both respirable and inhalable PBZ samples were collected side-by-side. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) PBZ and area samples were also collected at the inhalable size fraction and analyzed to quantify and size CNT and CNF agglomerate and fibrous exposures. Respirable EC PBZ concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 2.94 µg m(-3) with a geometric mean (GM) of 0.34 µg m(-3) and an 8-h TWA of 0.16 µg m(-3). PBZ samples at the inhalable size fraction for EC ranged from 0.01 to 79.57 µg m(-3) with a GM of 1.21 µg m(-3). PBZ samples analyzed by TEM showed concentrations ranging from 0.0001 to 1.613 CNT or CNF-structures per cm(3) with a GM of 0.008 and an 8-h TWA concentration of 0.003. The most common CNT structure sizes were found to be larger agglomerates in the 2-5 µm range as well as agglomerates >5 µm. A statistically significant correlation was observed between the inhalable samples for the mass of EC and structure counts by TEM (Spearman ρ = 0.39, P < 0.0001). Overall, EC PBZ and area TWA samples were below the NIOSH REL (96% were <1 μg m(-3) at the respirable size fraction), while 30% of the inhalable PBZ EC

  5. Impact of clinical follow-up and diagnostic testing on intervention for tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    House, Aswathy Vaikom; Danford, David A; Spicer, Robert L; Kutty, Shelby

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our purpose was to evaluate yield of tools commonly advocated for surveillance of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Methods All patients (pts) with TOF, seen at any time from 1/2008 to 9/2013 in an academic cardiology practice were studied. At the first and each subsequent outpatient visit, the use of tools including history and physical (H&P), ECG, Holter (HOL), echocardiogram (Echo), MR or CT (MR-CT) and stress testing (STR) were noted. Recommendations for intervention (INT) and for time to next follow-up were recorded; rationale for each INT with attribution to one or more tools was identified. Results There were 213 pts (mean 11.5 years, 130 male) who had 916 visits, 123 of which (13.4%) were associated with 138 INTs (47 surgical, 54 catheter-mediated, 37 other medical). Recommended follow-up interval was 9.44±6.5 months, actual mean follow-up interval was 11.7 months. All 916 (100%) patient visits had a H&P which contributed to 47.2% of INT decisions. Echo was performed in 652 (71.2%) of visits, and contributed to 53.7% of INTs. MR-CT was obtained in 129 (14.1%) of visits, and contributed to 30.1% of INTs. ECG was applied in 137 (15%) visits, and contributed to 1.6% of INTs. HOL was obtained in 188 (20.5%) visits, and contributed to 11.3% of INTs. STR was performed at 101 (11%) of visits, and contributed to 8.9% of INTs. Conclusions INTs are common in repaired TOF, but when visits average every 11–12 months, most visits do not result in INT. H&P, Echo and HOL were the most frequently applied screens, and all frequently yielded relevant information to guide INT decisions. STR and MR/CT were applied as targeted testing and in this limited, non-screening role had high relevance for INT. There was low utilisation of ECG and major impact on INT was not demonstrated. Risk stratification in TOF may be possible, and could result in more efficient surveillance and targeted testing. PMID:25973212

  6. Internet-Based Medical Visit and Diagnosis for Common Medical Problems: Experience of First User Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Shevchik, Grant J.; Paone, Suzanne; Martich, G. Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Internet-based medical visits, or “structured e-Visits,” allow patients to report symptoms and seek diagnosis and treatment from their doctor over a secure Web site, without calling or visiting the physician's office. While acceptability of e-Visits has been investigated, outcomes associated with e-Visits, that is, whether patients receiving diagnoses receive appropriate care or need to return to the doctor, remain unexplored. Materials and Methods: The first 156 e-Visit users from a large family medicine practice were surveyed regarding their experience with the e-Visit and e-Visit outcomes. In addition, medical records for patients making e-Visits were reviewed to examine need for follow-up care within 7 days. Results: Interviews were completed with 121 patients (77.6% participation). The most common type of e-Visit was for “other” symptoms or concerns (37%), followed by sinus/cold symptoms (35%). Back pain, urinary symptoms, cough, diarrhea, conjunctivitis, and vaginal irritation were each less frequent (<10%). A majority, 61% completed e-Visits with their own physician. The majority of patients (57.0%) reported receipt of a diagnosis without need for follow-up beyond a prescription; 75% of patients thought the e-Visit was as good as or better than an in-person visit, and only 11.6% felt that their concerns or questions were incompletely addressed. In a review of medical records, 16.9% had a follow-up visit within 7 days, mostly for the same condition. Four of these were on the same day as the e-Visit, including one emergency department visit. Conclusions: Outcomes for the e-Visit suggest that it is an appropriate and potentially cost-saving addition to in-person delivery of primary care. PMID:21457013

  7. Sports injuries in women: a one-year prospective follow-up study at an outpatient sports clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Kannus, P; Niittymäki, S; Järvinen, M

    1987-01-01

    A one-year prospective follow-up study of all patients visiting Tampere Research Station of Sports Medicine (TRSSM) was carried out in order to determine the specific features of women's sports injuries compared to those of men. During this period 334 women (31%) and 745 men (69%) visited the station. Women were significantly younger than men and the ten most usual sports events causing the injury differed from those of men. In women acute dislocations, contusions, and fractures were significantly less common in men, while women had more frequent stress-related sports injuries. In both sexes the most common sites of trouble were knee, ankle, and lower back, but in women as opposed to men, the metatarsal area, the toes, and the sole were among the ten most usual sites of the injury. Fourteen women (4%) and 49 men (6%) required operative treatment of the injury. The knee was the most common site of operation in both sexes, in women significantly more frequently than in men. PMID:3580728

  8. Graduate Follow-Up Studies: How Useful Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedley, Rande H.; Olson, George H.

    Follow-up surveys may fall prey to several sources of bias and error, among them lack of control over independent variables, lack of item validity and reliability, sampling biases, and observation bias. Two follow-up studies have been dissected to expose inherent limitations: the Texas Education Product Study (TEPS) and Project TALENT. The…

  9. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt analysis... the railroad receives notification of the results of the toxicological analysis, any provision...

  10. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt...

  11. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt...

  12. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt...

  13. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt...

  14. 76 FR 38383 - Albany Engineering Corporation, Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Notice of Site Visit and Technical Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Albany Engineering Corporation, Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Notice of Site Visit and Technical Meeting On July 12, 2011, Office of Energy Projects staff will participate in a...

  15. 76 FR 51022 - Juneau Hydropower, Inc.; Notice of Scoping Meeting and Site Visit and Soliciting Scoping Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Juneau Hydropower, Inc.; Notice of Scoping Meeting and Site Visit and.... Applicant: Juneau Hydropower, Inc. d. Name of Project: Sweetheart Lake Hydroelectric Project. e. Location.... 791(a)-825(r). g. Applicant Contact: Duff Mitchell, Business Manager, Juneau Hydropower, Inc.,...

  16. A Study of Program Management Procedures in the Campus-Based and Basic Grant Programs. Site Visit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Richard, Ed.; Puma, Michael, Ed.

    Site visits to a sample of 173 colleges, universities, vocational-technical schools, and other postsecondary institutions--conducted to examine the procedures used to manage federal Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) and campus-based student financial assistance programs--are summarized. This report deals only with the conduct of the…

  17. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  18. Follow-up after gastrectomy for cancer: results of an international web round table.

    PubMed

    Baiocchi, Gian Luca; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Marrelli, Daniele; Pacelli, Fabio; Morgagni, Paolo; Roviello, Franco; De Manzoni, Giovanni

    2014-09-14

    Oncological follow-up after radical gastrectomy for cancer still represents a discrepancy in the field, with many retrospective series demonstrating that early diagnosis of recurrence does not result in an improvement in patient survival; yet, many centers with high quality of care still provide routine patient follow-up after surgery by clinical and instrumental controls. This was the topic for a web round table entitled "Rationale and limits of oncological follow-up after gastrectomy for cancer" that was launched one year before the 10(th) International Gastric Cancer Congress. Authors having specific expertise were invited to comment on their previous publications to provide the subject for an open debate. During a three-month-long discussion, 32 authors from 12 countries participated, and 2299 people visited the dedicated web page. Substantial differences emerged between the participants: authors from Japan, South Korea, Italy, Brazil, Germany and France currently engage in instrumental follow-up, whereas authors from Eastern Europe, Peru and India do not, and British and American surgeons practice it in a rather limited manner or in the context of experimental studies. Although endoscopy is still considered useful by most authors, all the authors recognized that computed tomography scanning is the method of choice to detect recurrence; however, many limit follow-up to clinical and biochemical examinations, and acknowledge the lack of improved survival with early detection. PMID:25232232

  19. Partial trisomy 21: a fifty-year follow-up visit.

    PubMed

    Hamm, J Austin; Carroll, Andrew J; Mikhail, Fady M; Korf, Bruce R; Finley, Wayne H

    2015-07-01

    We describe a clinical encounter with family members that carry a balanced translocation involving chromosomes 15 and 21 roughly 50 years after the proband was diagnosed with partial trisomy 21 due to an unbalanced translocation. We discuss how these chromosomal rearrangements have impacted the lives of these individuals, and how they responded to revisiting their diagnoses after using updated cytogenetic techniques including high resolution chromosome banding and array comparative genomic hybridization. PMID:25944586

  20. Short-Term Follow-Up of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, June; Jabara, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    A follow-up questionnaire was mailed to 144 narcotic addict veterans approximately six months after termination from treatment at a multimodality drug program. It was found that 75 percent continued to use drugs, and 38 percent became readdicted. (Author)

  1. Follow-Up and Feed-Back Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cripwell, Kenneth R.

    1968-01-01

    Presented and discussed are a series of suggestions and examples concerned with improving ETV and ITV programs through feedback and increasing their effectiveness through the use of follow-up materials in the classroom. (LS)

  2. Women with abnormal screening mammography lost to follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Chen, Guan-Ru; Hung, Shou-Hung; Liu, Yi-Lien; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Cheng, Shao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer has the highest incidence among all cancers for women in Taiwan. The current screening policy in Taiwan suggested a biennial mammography for all women 40 to 69 years of age. A recommendation for additional testing is recommended for women with a BI-RADS result of 0 or 4; a request made via postal mail. Approximately 20% of high-risk patients do not receive additional follow-up. Therefore, we aimed to explore the causes of these patients being lost to follow-up, despite an abnormal mammogram. Two questionnaires were designed separately according to the conceptual framework of the Health Belief Model. Study participants, women who received a screening mammography at the National Taiwan University Hospital in 2011 with a BI-RAD of 0 or 4, were interviewed via telephone. The dependent variable was receipt of follow-up or not. The analyses were performed by using χ2 tests and logistic regression models. In total, 528 women were enrolled in the study: 51.2% in BI-RADS 0 group and 56.6% in BI-RADS 4, respectively. In the BI-RADS 0 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the most likely causes to be physician suggestion, health implications, and concerns regarding breast cancer. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited a lack of time and a perception of good personal health as primary reasons. In the BI-RADS 4 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the physician's recommendation and a recognition of the importance of follow-up examinations. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited having received follow-up at another hospital and a desire for a second opinion. In the BI-RADS 0 group, multivariate analysis showed that patients with higher scores in the “perceived benefits” domain were statistically more likely to receive a follow-up examination. There was no significant difference in perceived threats, perceived barriers, action cues, or self-efficacy between

  3. Evaluating an outreach service for paediatric burns follow up.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Chesney, Amy; Brown, Liz; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2015-09-01

    Complications following paediatric burns are well documented and care needs to be taken to ensure the appropriate follow up of these patients. Historically this has meant follow up into adulthood however this is often not necessary. The centralisation of burns services in the UK means that patients and their parents may have to travel significant distances to receive this follow up care. To optimise our burns service we have introduced a burns outreach service to enable the patients to be treated closer to home. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the introduction of the burns outreach service and within this environment define the optimum length of time needed to follow up these patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 100 consecutive paediatric burns patients who underwent surgical management of their burn. During the follow up period there were 43 complications in 32 patients (32%). These included adverse scarring (either hypertrophic or keloid), delayed healing (taking >1 month to heal) and contractures (utilising either splinting or surgical correction). Fifty-nine percent of these complications occurred within 6 months of injury and all occurred within 18 months. Size of burn was directly correlated to the risk of developing a complication. The outreach service reduced the distance the patient needs to travel for follow up by more than 50%. There was also a significant financial benefit for the service as the follow up clinics were on average 50% cheaper with burns outreach than burns physician. Burns outreach is a feasible service that not only benefits the patients but also is cheaper for the burns service. The optimum length of follow up for paediatric burns in 18 months, after which if there have not been any complications they can be discharged. PMID:26036205

  4. SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE NATIONAL ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION PROGRAM/NATIONAL TRENDS NETWORK (NADP/NTN) SITE VISITATION PROGRAM FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1987 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 1988

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides technical assistance to the NADP/NTN network through a site visitation program. esearch Triangle Institute, as contractor to EPA, conducts these visits. f deficiencies or nonstandard procedures are noted, the site operator an...

  5. Factors Associated with Follow-Up Attendance among Rape Victims Seen in Acute Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Doyanne; Peterson, Roselyn; Berliner, Lucy; Stewart, Terri; Russo, Joan; Whiteside, Lauren; Zatzick, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rape is associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and related comorbidities. Most victims do not obtain treatment for these conditions. Acute care medical settings are well-positioned to link patients to services; however, difficulty engaging victims and low attendance at provided follow-up appointments is well documented. Identifying factors associated with follow-up can inform engagement and linkage strategies. Method Administrative, patient self-report, and provider observational data from Harborview Medical Center were combined for the analysis. Using logistic regression, we examined factors associated with follow-up health service utilization after seeking services for rape in the emergency department. Results Of the 521 diverse female (n=476) and male (n=45) rape victims, 28% attended the recommended medical/counseling follow-up appointment. In the final (adjusted) logistic regression model, having a developmental or other disability (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.21-0.77), having a current mental illness (OR=0.25, 95% CI=0.13-0.49), and being assaulted in public (OR=0.50, 95% CI=0.28-0.87) were uniquely associated with reduced odds of attending the follow-up. Having a prior mental health condition (OR= 3.02 95% CI=1.86-4.91), a completed SANE examination (OR=2.97, 95% CI=1.84-4.81), and social support available to help cope with the assault (OR=3.54, 95% CI=1.76-7.11) were associated with an increased odds of attending the follow-up. Conclusions Findings point to relevant characteristics ascertained at the acute care medical visit for rape that may be used to identify victims less likely to obtain posttraumatic medical and mental health services. Efforts to improve service linkage among these patients is warranted and may require alternative models to engage these patients to support posttraumatic recovery. PMID:26168030

  6. Revisiting High School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagel, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    NACAC's anniversary is a great time to follow up on an article on high school visits, a topic of ongoing discussion in every admission and guidance office. The article highlights a variety of potential good outcomes that can be derived from collaborative interactions. Sadly, however, admission representatives are apt to be described by the…

  7. Effect of Health Literacy on Research Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Leak, Cardella; Goggins, Kathryn; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Theobald, Cecelia; Donato, Katharine M; Bell, Susan P; Schnelle, John; Kripalani, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has not examined the effect of health literacy on research subjects' completion of scheduled research follow-up. This article evaluates patient factors associated with incomplete research follow-up at three time points after enrollment in a large, hospital-based prospective cohort study. Predictor variables included health literacy, age, race, gender, education, employment status, difficulty paying bills, hospital diagnosis, length of stay, self-reported global health status, depression, perceived health competence, medication adherence, and health care system distrust. In a sample of 2,042 patients, multivariable models demonstrated that lower health literacy and younger age were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of completing research follow-up interviews at 2-3 days, 30 days, and 90 days after hospital discharge. In addition, patients who had less education, were currently employed, and had moderate financial stress were less likely to complete 90-day follow-up. This study is the first to demonstrate that lower health literacy is a significant predictor of incomplete research follow-up. PMID:26513035

  8. The role of routine follow-up after gynecological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kew, F M; Roberts, A P; Cruickshank, D J

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this article was to determine the evidence base for routine follow-up after gynecological malignancy. Only articles with a survival analysis were included. Relevant articles were identified by a comprehensive literature search of the main biomedical databases, hand searching of references of selected articles, and expert spotting of relevant journals and proceedings of international meetings. A two-stage extraction of data was undertaken. No prospective trials were identified. Twenty-nine retrospective case series analyses and one poster presentation met the inclusion criteria. Eight articles and one letter on endometrial cancer, six articles and one poster presentation on cervical cancer, and two articles in vulval cancer were reviewed. Only one article in endometrial cancer showed any survival benefit from routine follow-up, but it was of very poor methodologic quality. Two articles found a survival benefit from routine follow-up after cervical cancer. The two articles on vulval cancer did not find any survival benefit from routine review. There is no prospective research on the benefits of routine follow-up after gynecological cancer. Retrospective evidence calls in to question the benefit of universal follow-up. Prospective research is urgently needed. PMID:15882163

  9. Cohort follow-up: the 21st century procedures.

    PubMed

    Bahr, Debra E; Hughes, Therese; Aldrich, Timothy E; Silver, Kenneth Z; Brion, Gall M

    2009-01-01

    The basic logic of designing an occupational cohort study has changed little since William R. Gaffey outlined the issues of follow-up, measurement of exposure, and analysis of data. However, many new avenues of tracking workers for epidemiological studies have been developed since Gaffey wrote his paper in 1973. Many disease registries also perform follow-up of subjects for vital status determination, so the procedures used with this process are common to the two applications. This article speaks to cohort construction for this occupational research as well as describes the 2007 methods for vital status follow-up. Rises in concern about work-related disease risks and the scientific resources for performing these studies coincided with the computer revolution. Government and private sources of data on vital status have changed in several ways over the 35 years since Gaffey's seminal paper. Some systems make the process of follow-up more rapid and productive, and some barriers have been imposed as societal concerns for privacy have risen. We describe the process of linking 5 sources of data to compile a roster of 6,820 workers employed at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant from 1953 to 2003. The record linkage processes achieved a final death cohort of 1672 deaths--the ascertainment of these deaths (by time period) was 1379 (1979-2003) and 293 (1953-1978); follow-up then was 100% for this cohort. PMID:19670694

  10. Mineral licks: motivational factors for visitation and accompanying disease risk at communal use sites of elk and deer.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Michael J; Phillips, Gregory E; Fischer, Justin W; Burke, Patrick W; Seward, Nathan W; Stahl, Randal S; Nichols, Tracy A; Wunder, Bruce A; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2014-12-01

    Free-ranging cervids acquire most of their essential minerals through forage consumption, though occasionally seek other sources to account for seasonal mineral deficiencies. Mineral sources occur as natural geological deposits (i.e., licks) or as anthropogenic mineral supplements. In both scenarios, these sources commonly serve as focal sites for visitation. We monitored 11 licks in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado, using trail cameras to quantify daily visitation indices (DVI) and soil consumption indices (SCI) for Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) during summer 2006 and documented elk, mule deer, and moose (Alces alces) visiting licks. Additionally, soil samples were collected, and mineral concentrations were compared to discern levels that explain rates of visitation. Relationships between response variables; DVI and SCI, and explanatory variables; elevation class, moisture class, period of study, and concentrations of minerals were examined. We found that DVI and SCI were greatest at two wet, low-elevation licks exhibiting relatively high concentrations of manganese and sodium. Because cervids are known to seek Na from soils, we suggest our observed association of Mn with DVI and SCI was a likely consequence of deer and elk seeking supplemental dietary Na. Additionally, highly utilized licks such as these provide an area of concentrated cervid occupation and interaction, thus increasing risk for environmental transmission of infectious pathogens such as chronic wasting disease, which has been shown to be shed in the saliva, urine, and feces of infected cervids. PMID:24711146

  11. Endocrine dysfunction following traumatic brain injury: a 5-year follow-up nationwide-based study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei-Hsun; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wang, Ting-Chung; Kuo, Ting-Yu; Cheng, Chun-Yu; Yang, Yao-Hsu

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic endocrine dysfunction is a complication of traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there is lack of long-term follow-up and large sample size studies. This study included patients suffering from TBI registered in the Health Insurance Database. Endocrine disorders were identified using the ICD codes: 244 (acquired hypothyroidism), 253 (pituitary dysfunction), 255 (disorders of the adrenal glands), 258 (polyglandular dysfunction), and 259 (other endocrine disorders) with at least three outpatient visits within 1 year or one admission diagnosis. Overall, 156,945 insured subjects were included in the final analysis. The 1- and 5-year incidence rates of post-traumatic endocrinopathies were 0.4% and 2%, respectively. The risks of developing a common endocrinopathy (p < 0.001) or pituitary dysfunction (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in patients with a TBI history. Patients with a skull bone fracture had a higher risk of developing pituitary dysfunction at the 1-year follow up (p value < 0.001). At the 5-year follow up, the association between intracranial hemorrhage and pituitary dysfunction (p value: 0.002) was significant. The risk of developing endocrine dysfunction after TBI increased during the entire 5-year follow-up period. Skull bone fracture and intracranial hemorrhage may be associated with short and long-term post-traumatic pituitary dysfunction, respectively. PMID:27608606

  12. Endocrine dysfunction following traumatic brain injury: a 5-year follow-up nationwide-based study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Hsun; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wang, Ting-Chung; Kuo, Ting-Yu; Cheng, Chun-Yu; Yang, Yao-Hsu

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic endocrine dysfunction is a complication of traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there is lack of long-term follow-up and large sample size studies. This study included patients suffering from TBI registered in the Health Insurance Database. Endocrine disorders were identified using the ICD codes: 244 (acquired hypothyroidism), 253 (pituitary dysfunction), 255 (disorders of the adrenal glands), 258 (polyglandular dysfunction), and 259 (other endocrine disorders) with at least three outpatient visits within 1 year or one admission diagnosis. Overall, 156,945 insured subjects were included in the final analysis. The 1- and 5-year incidence rates of post-traumatic endocrinopathies were 0.4% and 2%, respectively. The risks of developing a common endocrinopathy (p < 0.001) or pituitary dysfunction (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in patients with a TBI history. Patients with a skull bone fracture had a higher risk of developing pituitary dysfunction at the 1-year follow up (p value < 0.001). At the 5-year follow up, the association between intracranial hemorrhage and pituitary dysfunction (p value: 0.002) was significant. The risk of developing endocrine dysfunction after TBI increased during the entire 5-year follow-up period. Skull bone fracture and intracranial hemorrhage may be associated with short and long-term post-traumatic pituitary dysfunction, respectively. PMID:27608606

  13. Suicide Prevention and Follow-Up Services: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Behrooz; Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh; Alavi, Kaveh; Khaleghparast, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Previous suicide attempt is the most important predictor of death by suicide. Thus preventive interventions after attempting to suicide is essential to prevent reattempts. This paper attempts to determine whether phone preventive interventions or other vehicles (postal cards, email and case management) are effective in reattempt prevention and health promotion after discharge by providing an overview of studies on suicide reattempts. The research investigated in this review conducted from 1995 to 2014. A total of 26 cases related to the aim of this research were derived from 36 English articles with the aforementioned keywords Research shows that providing comprehensive aids, social support, and follow-up after discharge can significantly prevent suicide reattempts. Several studies showed that follow-up support (phone calls, crisis cards, mails, postal cards.) after discharge can significantly decrease the risk of suicide. More randomized controlled trials (RCT) are required to determine what factors of follow-up are more effective than other methods. PMID:26652085

  14. Follow-Up of Pulmonary Hypertension With Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wright, Leah M; Dwyer, Nathan; Celermajer, David; Kritharides, Len; Marwick, Thomas H

    2016-06-01

    Individual patient response to effective therapies for pulmonary hypertension (PAH) is variable and difficult to quantify. Consequently, management decisions regarding initiation and continuation of therapy are highly dependent on the results of investigations. Registry data show that changes in cardiac index, mean right atrial pressure, and mean pulmonary artery pressure have the greatest influence on survival. It is recognized that pulmonary artery pressure (PASP) responses to PAH-specific drugs are heterogeneous. However, follow-up testing is strongly focused on assessing changes in PASP and functional status (6-min walk). The goals of therapy, which should be highlighted in follow-up imaging, include not only reduction of PASP, decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance, and improvements in right ventricular function, cardiac output, and tricuspid regurgitation. This paper reviews the echocardiographic follow-up of pulmonary hypertension, and especially focuses on right ventricular function-a major determinant of outcome, for which reliable echocardiographic assessment has become more feasible. PMID:27282440

  15. Suicide Prevention and Follow-Up Services: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Behrooz; Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh; Alavi, Kaveh; Khaleghparast, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Previous suicide attempt is the most important predictor of death by suicide. Thus preventive interventions after attempting to suicide is essential to prevent reattempts. This paper attempts to determine whether phone preventive interventions or other vehicles (postal cards, email and case management) are effective in reattempt prevention and health promotion after discharge by providing an overview of studies on suicide reattempts. The research investigated in this review conducted from 1995 to 2014. A total of 26 cases related to the aim of this research were derived from 36 English articles with the aforementioned keywords Research shows that providing comprehensive aids, social support, and follow-up after discharge can significantly prevent suicide reattempts. Several studies showed that follow-up support (phone calls, crisis cards, mails, postal cards.) after discharge can significantly decrease the risk of suicide. More randomized controlled trials (RCT) are required to determine what factors of follow-up are more effective than other methods. PMID:26652085

  16. Multiple traumatic injury to maxillary incisors in an adolescent female: treatment outcome with two years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Biagi, Roberto; Cardarelli, Filippo; Storti, Ennio; Majorana, Alessandra; Farronato, Giampietro

    2013-01-01

    Number, type and severity of dental injuries per patient differ according to the patient's age and the cause of accident. The trauma group resulting from pedestrian-, bicycle-, and car-related injuries is usually dominated by multiple dental injuries, injuries to the supporting bone and soft-tissue injuries. This report describes a case of a 16.2-year-old female who suffered traumatic injuries to her permanent maxillary incisors after a car accident. Concussion of tooth 12, extrusive luxation of tooth 11, avulsion of tooth 21 and subluxation with complicated crown fracture of tooth 22 were observed at the emergency visit 75 minutes after the trauma. Tooth 21 was dry stored for 15 minutes, then in milk for 60 minutes. The treatment plan according to IADT guidelines was performed with the satisfaction of the dentists and the patient. After 1 year follow- up a replacement root resorption of tooth 21 was diagnosed; it was then considered severe at the time of the 2 year control visit. Educational programs are essential to optimize the treatment outcome both at the accident site and also at the dental office. PMID:23991273

  17. Long-term Follow-up of Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in Osteoporotic Compression Fracture: Minimum of 5 Years Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hwan; Yoo, Si Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Study Design This was designed as a retrospective study. Purpose We assessed the radiographic and clinical outcome of patients who underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) in osteoporotic compression fractures with a minimum of 5 years follow-up. Overview of Literature Percutaneous vertebroplasty is effective surgical method for treating osteoporotic compression fracture. Methods Between January 2000 and August 2005, 159 patients were treated with PVP for osteoporotic compression fracture at our department; 43 patients died during follow-up, and 69 patients (121 vertebras) were available for follow-up for over 5 years. We analyzed the clinical and radiologic outcome including cement feature. Results The mean follow-up period was 5.7 years. Clinical outcome by mean visual analogue scale (VAS) score revealed a decreased 4.9 points perioperatively. A decreased score was maintained over 5 years in 46% of patients. A new adjacent vertebral fracture was documented by 33 vertebral bodies in 22 patients. During the follow-up period, 43 patients (38%) in 112 patients died. Anterior body heig ht in the last follow-up was improved about 0.3 mm compared with the preprocedural value, but was not statistically significant. Also, the focal kyphotic angle was reduced from 12.3° at the preprocedural state to 11.7° at the postprocedural state, but was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Conclusions PVP for osteoporotic compression fracture is an efficient procedure for pain relief by long term follow-up. The cement injected vertebrae showed stable radiologic progression without significant changes in vertebral height or kyphotic angle. PMID:22439082

  18. Partial pneumoencephalography in following-up pituitary tumours 1

    PubMed Central

    Olmsted, William W.; Wilson, Gabriel H.; Rand, Robert W.; Gartland, John P.

    1974-01-01

    The `limited' pneumoencephalogram has been used with excellent success at UCLA for the continuing follow-up of pituitary tumours. It is most useful in following nonsecretory adenomas since tumour regrowth can occur in the absence of clinical signs and symptoms. Total serial pneumoencephalography has not been accepted previously for follow-up of pituitary tumours since there is a significant morbidity. The `limited' pneumoencephalogram of the diseased area drastically reduces the morbidity of the procedure so that the patients are willing to undergo serial studies on an outpatient basis. Images PMID:4844132

  19. Follow-up of eROSITA and Euclid Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiprich, T.

    2016-06-01

    In the near future, eROSITA and Euclid will elevate galaxy cluster and cosmology studies to an unprecedented level. Through large area surveys, they will generate huge galaxy cluster samples. Rich science will be enabled through detailed follow-up observations of systematically selected subsamples. In particular, X-ray follow-up will be crucial and XMM-Newton could play the leading role. In this talk, examples for the science enabled and possible strategies for such XMM-Newton observations will be outlined.

  20. Diabetes after infectious hepatitis: a follow-up study.

    PubMed Central

    Oli, J M; Nwokolo, C

    1979-01-01

    Eleven patients (nine men, one woman, and one girl) aged 11-62 years who developed diabetes mellitus after an attack of infectious hepatitis during the Eastern Nigerian epidemic of 1970-2 were followed up for two to nine years. One patient aged 60 years remained diabetic after the original illness. In the remaining 10 patients the diabetes remitted after three to nine months (mean 6.7 months) but in four it recurred after a remission lasting one and a half to four years (mean 2.6 years). Results of this follow-up study seem to confirm that the pancreas is sometimes permanently damaged during infectious hepatitis. PMID:435884

  1. Group anxiety management: effectiveness, perceived helpfulness and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cadbury, S; Childs-Clark, A; Sandhu, S

    1990-05-01

    An evaluation was conducted on out-patient cognitive-behavioural anxiety management groups. Twenty-nine clients assessed before and after the group and at three-month follow-up showed significant improvement on self-report measures. A further follow-up on 21 clients, conducted by an independent assessor at an average of 11 months, showed greater improvement with time. Clients also rated how helpful they had found non-specific therapeutic factors, and specific anxiety management techniques. 'Universality' was the most helpful non-specific factor, and 'the explanation of anxiety' was the most helpful technique. PMID:2364206

  2. [Long-term follow-up in patients with spinal cord injury - prevention and comprehensive care].

    PubMed

    Spreyermann, Regula; Michel, Franz

    2014-01-15

    Patients with spinal cord injuries suffer not only from sensory and motor deficits, but from failure of the autonomic nerve system which in consequence involves many organs and metabolic pathways. These deficits lead to a different approach to these patients and their medical, psychological and social problems. Three examples will illustrate the different approaches to typical medical problems of these patients. Regularly ambulatory long term follow up visits in specialized centres in close collaboration with general practitioners help to diminish complications and rehospitalisations. Facing the now ageing population with a spinal cord injury we need evidence based guidelines in follow up and preventive strategies for these patients. We updated these recommendations recently. The brochure is available on the webside oft he swiss society of paraplegia www.ssop.ch. PMID:24425548

  3. Exploring socio-economic conditions and poor follow-up rates of HIV-exposed infants in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jones, S A; Sherman, G G; Varga, C A

    2005-05-01

    In 2002, more than 280,000 HIV-exposed babies were born in South Africa. According to international PMTCT guidelines, these children require follow-up to 12 months of age. Worldwide, the high loss to follow-up rates experienced by PMTCT programs precludes them from identifying and managing HIV-infected children. Socio-economic factors have been identified as potential contributors to poor follow-up. A small descriptive study to examine socio-economic circumstances of women attending the Coronation Women and Children's Hospital PMTCT program was undertaken. Cross-sectional data from 176 women, interviewed at their infants' 12-month visit, was collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. Socio-economic factors such as poverty, geographical relocation and a lack of paternal support may affect the capacity of families to comply with the PMTCT follow-up program. Fifty-seven percent of mothers were unemployed, 25% of fathers did not support their children and only 58% of children remained resident in Johannesburg at the 12-month visit. The lack of follow-up of HIV-infected children denies them access to adequate medical care. Understanding the socio-economic factors that affect the ability of communities to comply with PMTCT programs will assist resource-poor countries in devising strategies to achieve follow-up of HIV-exposed infants. PMID:16036232

  4. Popularity of less frequent follow up for breast cancer in randomised study: initial findings from the hotline study.

    PubMed Central

    Gulliford, T.; Opomu, M.; Wilson, E.; Hanham, I.; Epstein, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the experiences of patients with breast cancer who were conventionally monitored with those in whom routine follow up was restricted to the time of mammography. DESIGN: Randomisation to conventional schedule of clinic visits or to visits only after mammography. Both cohorts received identical mammography and were invited to telephone for immediate appointments if they detected symptoms. SETTING: Combined breast clinic, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital. SUBJECTS: 211 eligible outpatients with a history of breast cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Acceptability of randomisation, interim use of telephone and general practitioner, satisfaction with allocation to follow up. RESULTS: Of 211 eligible patients, 196 (93%) opted for randomisation in the study. Of these, 55 were under 50 years, 78 were diagnosed fewer than five years before, 90 had stage T2-4 tumours, and 71 had involved axillary nodes. Patients who did not participate were more likely to be under 50 years, to be two to five years after diagnosis, and to have had aggressive primary disease. Twice as many patients in both groups expressed a preference for reducing rather than increasing follow up. No increased use of local practitioner services or telephone triage was apparent in the cohort randomised to less frequent follow up by specialists. CONCLUSIONS: Reducing the frequency of routine follow up has so far proved popular among patients with breast cancer at standard risk in this cohort. A multicentre study is needed to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of routine follow up with respect to disease outcomes. PMID:9022429

  5. Long-term results of viscocanalostomy and phacoviscocanalostomy: a twelve-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Gunenc, Uzeyir; Ozturk, Taylan; Arikan, Gul; Kocak, Nilufer

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety results of viscocanalostomy and phacoviscocanalostomy. METHODS The charts of 49 glaucoma patients who underwent viscocanalostomy or phacoviscocanalostomy surgery between February 1999 and August 2004 were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-one eyes of 21 glaucoma patients who underwent filtering procedure with a postoperative follow-up of at least 5y were included in the study. Results of complete ophthalmologic examinations were recorded and statistically analyzed. Long-term surgical outcome was defined as an overall success when intraocular pressure (IOP) was found as ≤20 mm Hg with or without antiglaucomatous medication at the last follow-up visit, while it was defined as a complete success when IOP was measured ≤20 mm Hg without antiglaucomatous medication. RESULTS Mean age was 68.1±9.6y (range: 32-81y). Mean follow-up time was 101.5±27.3mo (range: 60-144mo). Viscocanalostomy was performed in 8 eyes (25.8%) and phacoviscocanalostomy was performed in 23 eyes (74.2%). The mean preoperative IOP was 23.1±7.6 mm Hg with 2.1±1.0 medications, while mean IOP was 16.8±3.8 mm Hg with 0.9±1.1 medication at the last follow-up visit. Both the IOP decrease and the reduction in the antiglaucomatous medication were statistically significant (P<0.001 and P<0.001). No case required further glaucoma surgery. Overall success and complete success were found as 87.1% and 51.6%, respectively. Complete success rate was statistically higher in phacoviscocanalostomy group compared with the viscocanalostomy group (P=0.031), however there was no significant difference in overall success rate between two groups (P=0.072). CONCLUSION Both viscocanalostomy and phacoviscocanalostomy provide good IOP reduction in the long-term period. PMID:26682166

  6. School's in Session: Visitation Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulbert, Barbara T.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a parent program at Dryden Middle School in New York in which parents attend school for the entire day with their children. Includes information on parent orientation, structure of the visit, and students' reactions to parental visitation. Notes the importance of publicity, preparation, organization, and follow-up activities for program…

  7. Trident Technical College 1998 Graduate Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1998 graduate follow-up survey report of 915 TTC graduates. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job were obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job…

  8. Trident Technical College 1999 Graduate Follow-Up Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1999 graduate follow-up survey report. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job satisfaction, job…

  9. Factors Associated with Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Laura J.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Wordlaw-Stintson, Lashawn; Vidal, Adriana; Smith, Jennifer S.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding the gaps in knowledge about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, transmission, and health consequences and factors associated with the knowledge gap is an essential first step for the development of interventions to improve adherence to follow-up among women with abnormal Pap smears. Purpose: To examine the relationship…

  10. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  11. Clouston Syndrome: 25-year follow-up of a patient.

    PubMed

    Trídico, Lívia Arroyo; Antonio, João Roberto; Pozetti, Eurides Maria de Oliveira; Rosa, Ana Maria Mendes; Antonio, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Clouston syndrome is a rare genodermatosis that affects skin and annexes. It is a form of ectodermal dysplasia characterized by generalized hypotrichosis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and nail dystrophy. This paper reports a 25-year follow-up of a patient with Clouston syndrome, from childhood to adulthood, monitoring diagnosis and clinical course of the disease. PMID:26734875

  12. Clouston Syndrome: 25-year follow-up of a patient*

    PubMed Central

    Trídico, Lívia Arroyo; Antonio, João Roberto; Pozetti, Eurides Maria de Oliveira; Rosa, Ana Maria Mendes; Antonio, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Clouston syndrome is a rare genodermatosis that affects skin and annexes. It is a form of ectodermal dysplasia characterized by generalized hypotrichosis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and nail dystrophy. This paper reports a 25-year follow-up of a patient with Clouston syndrome, from childhood to adulthood, monitoring diagnosis and clinical course of the disease. PMID:26734875

  13. Follow-Up Study of Pupils with Differing Preschool Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Robert V.; DeFord, Edward F.

    A follow-up study of the Early Childhood Education Project (ECEP) was conducted in Richmond, Virginia to determine the effects of preschool experiences on selected aspects of pupil performance at the beginning and completion of grade 1. EPEC is a Head Start type program organized for the regular school year. The sample was divided into three…

  14. Career Counseling and Follow-up Study, Spring 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Heights Adult School, San Francisco, CA.

    This follow-up study of participants in the Career Workshop of the Pacific Heights Adult School is based on 117 responses to 453 questionnaires mailed in the Spring of 1971. Responses were analyzed by categories and numerical responses to the questions asked. The categories were: age, education, employment, occupations, occupations and education,…

  15. South Dakota Vocational Education Follow-Up. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawley, Malcolm J.

    As the third phase of a project designed to develop a system for statewide follow-up of postsecondary vocational education, a study was conducted to develop instruments that would provide data for the employability assessment of the graduates from vocational programs. The instruments were designed to answer two questions: Are the students prepared…

  16. Extended Follow-Up | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI supports the continued follow-up of participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) to strengthen the PLCO as a valuable resource for molecular epidemiologic research as well as provide long-term data on the trial’s primary endpoints. |

  17. Follow-Up Report: 2005 Placements of 2004 NDUS Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Debra; Dunn, Eddie; Hillman, Mike; Morth, Tom; Schepp, Julie; Padilla, Gina

    2007-01-01

    Some of the questions most frequently asked of the North Dakota University System relate to the status of graduates and program completers of state educational institutions. Follow-up Information on North Dakota Education and Training (FINDET) is a consortium of several state agencies formed to provide answers to those questions. This report,…

  18. Wide Angle Mobility Light (WAML) Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shull, L. E.; Kuyk, T.

    1990-01-01

    A follow-up study of an earlier report on the Wide Angle Mobility Light (WAML) was conducted to analyze the various applications of the device and its reliability. Results indicate high client satisfaction with WAML among test subjects (26 blind male veterans with night blindness, age 32 to 68). (Author/PB)

  19. FOUR YEAR FOLLOW-UP OF FIRST EPISODE MANIC PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Khess, Christoday R.J.; Das, Jnanamay; Akhtar, Sayeed

    1997-01-01

    51 patients who were admitted for their first manic episode were followed up for 4 years after discharge from the hospital. 32 (62.7%) patients came for regular follow-ups whereas 19 (37.3%) patients did not come for any follow up. 19 (59.4%) patients out of the 32 patients had subsequent recurrences. 8 (25.0%) patients had a single recurrence only, whereas 11 (34.4%) patients had multiple recurrences. In total, 31 (74.19%) recurrences occurred in 4 years, out of which 23 (25.81%) recurrences were for mania and only 8 for depression. 46.88% patients had relapsed at the end of the first year and by the third year all 19 (59.4%) patients had relapsed. The chances of having a depressive episode was highest in the first six months after recovery from manic episode. Patients with a family history of bipolar illness had a more deleterious course. Poor drug compliance was a factor associated with greater relapse rates. Amongst the patients receiving regular medication, the patients who were on lithium had the best outcome. 48.8% patients had subsequent admissions in the four year follow up. Patients with late age of onset and substance abuse had required greater number of admissions. PMID:21584064

  20. Sexually Abstinent Adolescents: An 18-Month Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinn-Pike, Lynn; Berger, Thomas J.; Hewett, John; Oleson, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    This study was a longitudinal follow-up of 697 early adolescents from 20 schools in Missouri, investigating students who, in 1997, indicated on a survey of sexual attitudes and behaviors that they had not had sexual intercourse. They completed the Reasons for Abstinence Scale (RAS) by identifying those items that were reasons why they had not had…

  1. Three Year Follow-Up of 1974 Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Mary Kathryne

    To evaluate the long-term benefits of attendance at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC), a three-year follow-up study was conducted of the 620 1974 graduates (324 transfer and 296 occupational students). Each graduate was sent a questionnaire collecting information on involvement with MVCC after graduation, present educational status,…

  2. Matching Methods for Selection of Participants for Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Lalongo, Nicholas S.

    2010-01-01

    This work examines ways to make the best use of limited resources when selecting individuals to follow up in a longitudinal study estimating causal effects. In the setting under consideration, covariate information is available for all individuals but outcomes have not yet been collected and may be expensive to gather, and thus only a subset of…

  3. Academic Resilience in Retrospect: Following up a Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Erik E.

    2008-01-01

    In a unique follow-up study, Hispanic (Dominican American) students identified as resilient 10 years ago were reinterviewed to assess their interim progress, and explore how their educational and professional achievements have evolved over time. By having the students reflect on their beliefs a decade ago and how those beliefs have evolved in…

  4. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  5. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  6. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  7. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  8. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  9. A Follow-up Study of Secretarial Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gell, Robert L.; Bleil, David F.

    To determine how effectively the Secretarial Studies Department's program was meeting the needs of its students, a follow-up study was conducted of former Montgomery Community College Secretarial Studies students. The survey sought to determine, in particular, if the students had secured employment that was related to their course work at the…

  10. Follow-Up of the Fall 1990 FTIC Cohort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Patricia

    Drawing from data provided by the Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program (FETPIP), this series of reports provides follow-up information on FTIC students entering Tallahassee Community College (TCC) in fall 1990. The four reports compare students based on race, entry level test pass rates, full-/part-time status, and grade…

  11. Follow-Up of 1984 Entrants. Research Report Number 60.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seboda, Barbara L.

    In 1988, a follow-up mail survey was conducted of 1984 entrants at Howard Community College (HCC) in Maryland to determine their educational and career achievements subsequent to their community college experience and to assess the effectiveness of the college from the students' perspective. Questionnaires were sent to all 1,160 student who…

  12. Brevard District Plan for Placement and Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Olive W.

    The Brevard District Plan for placement and follow-up is intended for all secondary students, including dropouts, disadvantaged, adult students, and graduates. The areas of placement may be in gainful employment, educational institutions, or a combination of both. The plan specifies procedures for implementing placement and stipulates the type of…

  13. FOLLOW UP STUDY OF CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Follow-Up Study involves locating and interviewing a group of young adults who, as 10-year-old children, were included in the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Study, an investigation of the prevalence and risk factors for developmental disabilities that was con...

  14. Records for the number of distinct sites visited by a random walk on the fully connected lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turban, Loïc

    2015-11-01

    We consider a random walk on the fully connected lattice with N sites and study the time evolution of the number of distinct sites s visited by the walker on a subset with n sites. A record value v is obtained for s at a record time t when the walker visits a site of the subset for the first time. The record time t is a partial covering time when v\\lt n and a total covering time when v = n. The probability distributions for the number of records s, the record value v and the record (covering) time t, involving r-Stirling numbers, are obtained using generating function techniques. The mean values, variances and skewnesses are deduced from the generating functions. In the scaling limit the probability distributions for s and v lead to the same Gaussian density. The fluctuations of the record time t are also Gaussian at partial covering, when n-v={{O}}(n). They are distributed according to the type-I Gumbel extreme-value distribution at total covering, when v = n. A discrete sequence of generalized Gumbel distributions, indexed by n-v, is obtained at almost total covering, when n-v={{O}}(1). These generalized Gumbel distributions are crossing over to the Gaussian distribution when n - v increases.

  15. Linking Outdoor School with the Home Environment. A Follow-Up Resource Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Wallace H.; Gilfillan, Warren C.

    A source of ideas and direction for follow-up to the Multnomah County Outdoor School program, the guide identifies concepts generally common to all outdoor school sites from year to year: the water cycle; watershed; water as a habitat for plants and animals, an oxygen supplier, and a producer of usable power; sun energy; plants as producers and…

  16. KLENOT Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Milos; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal; Tichy, Milos

    2015-08-01

    Near Earth Object (NEO) research is important not only as a great challenge for science but also as an important challenge for planetary defense. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind.The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of NEOs since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO distribution. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008.The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013.The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation.Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry.The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. More than 8000 of minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to February 2015.The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have the large potential to

  17. Nurse led follow up and conventional medical follow up in management of patients with lung cancer: randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sally; Corner, Jessica; Haviland, Jo; Wells, Mary; Salmon, Emma; Normand, Charles; Brada, Mike; O'Brien, Mary; Smith, Ian

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of nurse led follow up in the management of patients with lung cancer. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Specialist cancer hospital and three cancer units in southeastern England. Participants 203 patients with lung cancer who had completed their initial treatment and were expected to survive for at least 3 months. Intervention Nurse led follow up of outpatients compared with conventional medical follow up. Outcome measures Quality of life, patients' satisfaction, general practitioners' satisfaction, survival, symptom-free survival, progression-free survival, use of resources, and comparison of costs. Results Patient acceptability of nurse led follow up was high: 75% (203/271) of eligible patients consented to participate. Patients who received the intervention had less severe dyspnoea at 3 months (P=0.03) and had better scores for emotional functioning (P=0.03) and less peripheral neuropathy (P=0.05) at 12 months. Intervention group patients scored significantly better in most satisfaction subscales at 3, 6, and 12 months (P<0.01 for all subscales at 3 months). No significant differences in general practitioners' overall satisfaction were seen between the two groups. No differences were seen in survival or rates of objective progression, although nurses recorded progression of symptoms sooner than doctors (P=0.01). Intervention patients were more likely to die at home rather than in a hospital or hospice (P=0.04), attended fewer consultations with a hospital doctor during the first 3 months (P=0.004), had fewer radiographs during the first 6 months (P=0.04), and had more radiotherapy within the first 3 months (P=0.01). No other differences were seen between the two groups in terms of the use of resources. Conclusion Nurse led follow up was acceptable to lung cancer patients and general practitioners and led to positive outcomes. What is already known on this topicMost patients with cancer are routinely seen in

  18. Is follow-up capacity the current NHS bottleneck?

    PubMed

    Allder, Steven; Walley, Paul; Silvester, Kate

    2011-02-01

    Capacity and demand theory suggests that the presence of a queue is not necessarily an indication of a shortage of capacity in a system. It is much more likely that either there is a demand and capacity variation that creates queues or there is a delay designed into the system. A shortage of capacity is only really indicated where a backlog is not stable and continues to grow. In this article, data are taken from one NHS trust that provides evidence for a continually growing backlog for follow-up outpatient services. It is believed that these data are representative of most locations within the NHS in England and therefore suggest an immediate shortage in effective follow-up capacity. To avoid compromise to patient care, the problem will have to be addressed before the situation becomes unmanageable. The paper highlights options to reduce or deflect demand or to increase effective capacity. PMID:21404781

  19. [Densitometric follow-up of algodystrophy using computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Lindecken, K D; Krawzak, H W; Strosche, H; Kukulies, R; Schmidt, W G

    1987-01-01

    Clinical and radiological findings obtained from diagnosis and follow-up examination of post-traumatic algodystrophy (Morbus Sudeck) are very much open to subjective interpretation. Decisive importance is attributed not only to alteration of soft tissue but also to typical distribution patterns and severity of bone demineralisation. No objectifiable and quantifiable have so far become available for proper assessment but are urgently desirable in view of the great number of therapeutic approaches. Densitometry integrated with computed tomography was applied to nine patients with algodystrophy of hand or foot in the region of spongy bones to determine absorption values which were then compared with those on the clinically intact side. Significant differences between sides proved to be objectifiable and were quantifiable measures by which demineralisation of the effected extremity could be assessed. Repeated examinations were undertaken for follow-up through a period up to nine months. PMID:3630448

  20. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed. PMID:24290154

  1. A GP's duty to follow up test results.

    PubMed

    Bird, Sara

    2003-01-01

    Medical negligence claims alleging 'failure to diagnose' are a common cause of claims against general practitioners. In these claims there is often an underlying weakness in the GP's test result and patient tracking systems. This article discusses the duty of care of a GP to follow up patients and their test results. Guidance is provided on how to establish an effective test result tracking system in order to minimise the possibility of a claim arising from 'failure to diagnose'. PMID:12647659

  2. Photometric Follow-up of Transients from the PQ Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, A.; Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Donalek, C.; Glikman, E.; Graham, M. J.; Williams, R.; Steele, I.; Clay, N.; Brown, T.; Allan, A.; Saunders, E.; Naylor, T.; Nugent, P. E.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Bauer, A.; Scalzo, R.; Elman, N.; Jerke, J.

    2007-10-01

    We have obtained photometric follow-up for the three transients discovered by the PQ survey (Drake et al. Atel #1234, Djorgovski et al. Atel #1240) with the Faulkes Telescope North (FTN) in collaboration with the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Liverpool John Moores University and Exeter University. Each transient was observed in two 180 second R-band exposures. The following magnitudes were obtained on 2007-10-11.

  3. A Follow-up Study: The Registered Nurses Program, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondwros, Jerry M.

    Twenty-seven (77.1%) of the thirty-five 1977 graduates of the South Georgia Colleges' Division of Nursing responded to a follow-up survey, producing the following information: (1) 17 were employed full-time, two were employed part-time, and eight were unemployed; (2) 88.9% agreed they were prepared adequately for the state board examination; (3)…

  4. The Doctorate in Education. Volume IV, Follow-UP Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, H. Glenn; And Others

    A study was conducted (follow-up to SP 004 600) of the 1,186 recipients of the Ed.D. and Ph.D. degrees in education in the United States in 1958. Questionnaire data was collected to investigate 5-year career development and job satisfaction plus ability and achievement (as measured by high school graduating class rank, intelligence test scores,…

  5. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  6. Benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis--25 years of follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Putterman, C.; Keidar, S.; Brook, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Only 70 cases of recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis have been reported in the literature since the original description of this entity in 1959. The benign nature of the disease has been questioned, some authors suggesting progression to biliary cirrhosis. We report our follow-up of one such patient for over 25 years with no adverse physical consequences or histological deterioration. Sequential liver biopsies were obtained during this period. A conservative approach to diagnosis and treatment is therefore indicated. PMID:3684838

  7. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M. Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of {>=}70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS.

  8. Neonatal follow-up program: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    H. Sobaih, Badr

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal follow-up program (NFP) is becoming the corner stone of standard, high quality care provided to newborns at risk of future neuorodevelopmental delay. Most of the recognized neonatal intensive care units in the developed countries are adopting NFP as part of their mandatory care for the best long term outcome of high risk infants, especially very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Unfortunately, in the developing and in underdeveloped countries, such early detection and intervention programs are rarely existing, mainly because of the lack of awareness of and exposure to such programs in spite of the increasing numbers of surviving sick newborns due to advancement in neonatal care in these countries. This is a review article to explore the Neonatal follow-up programs looking at historical development, benefts and aims, and standard requirements for successful program development that can be adopted in our countries. In conclusion, proper Neonatal follow-up programs are needed to improve neonatal outcome. Therefore all professionals working in the feld of neonatal care in developing countries should cooperate to create such programs for early detection and hence early intervention for any adverse long term outcome in high-risk newborn infants

  9. A follow-up study of attempted railway suicides.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, I; Arthur, A J; Farmer, R D

    1994-02-01

    This paper reports the subsequent mortality of 94 persons who attempted suicide by jumping in front of London Underground trains between 1977 and 1979. The follow-up period was 10 yr. Despite the apparent seriousness of the method, completion of suicide was not found to be higher than in previous studies of attempted suicide by other methods. By the end of the follow-up period 18 persons had died, nine of natural causes. Coroners' inquests were held for the unnatural deaths. Seven verdicts of suicide and two of accidental death were recorded. Of the nine unnatural deaths four were from multiple injuries, three from drowning, one from asphyxia and one from acute narcotic poisoning. All four multiple injury deaths were women, three of these were from repeated incidents involving London Underground trains. The time interval between the index attempt and eventual death for the suicide/accident group ranged from 1 day to 43 months. For ethical reasons it was not possible to follow-up attempted suicides who were presumed to have remained alive. PMID:8153748

  10. Follow-up of permanent hearing impairment in childhood.

    PubMed

    Della Volpe, A; De Lucia, A; Pastore, V; Bracci Laudiero, L; Buonissimo, I; Ricci, G

    2016-02-01

    Programmes for early childhood childhood hearing impairment identification allows to quickly start the appropriate hearing aid fitting and rehabilitation process; nevertheless, a large number of patients do not join the treatment program. The goal of this article is to present the results of a strategic review of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats connected with the audiologic/prosthetic/language follow-up process of children with bilateral permanent hearing impairment. Involving small children, the follow-up includes the involvement of specialised professionals of a multidisciplinary team and a complex and prolonged multi-faced management. Within the framework of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for Early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", the purpose of this analysis was to propose recommendations that can harmonise criteria for outcome evaluation and provide guidance on the most appropriate assessment methods to be used in the follow-up course of children with permanent hearing impairment. PMID:27054392

  11. Observational Follow-up Study on a Cohort of Children with Severe Pneumonia after Discharge from a Day-care Clinic in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nur H.; Chisti, Mohammod J.; Salam, Mohammed A.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gyr, Niklaus

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Compliance, morbidity, mortality, and hospitalization during fortnightly follow-up were evaluated by an observational study on a cohort of children with severe and very severe pneumonia after day-care treatment at an urban clinic. The primary outcome measures were proportions of success (compliance) and failure (non-compliance) of follow-up visits at the day-care clinic. In total, 251 children were followed up, with median (IQR) age of 5.0 (3.0-9.0) months, and their compliance dropped from 92% at the first to 85% at the sixth visit. Cough (28%), fever (20%), and rapid breathing (13%) were common morbidities. Successful follow-up visits were possible in 180 (95.2%) and 56 (90.3%) of the children with severe and very severe pneumonia respectively. Eleven (4.4%) needed hospitalization, and four (1.6%) died. Majority (≈90%) of the children could be successfully followed up; some failed to attend their scheduled follow-up visits due to hospitalization and death. The common morbidities indicate the importance of follow-up for detecting medical problems and early treatment, thus reducing risk of death. PMID:25076656

  12. Why Are Spine Surgery Patients Lost to Follow-up?

    PubMed Central

    Daffner, Scott D.; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Long-term outcome studies are frequently hindered by a decreasing frequency of patient follow-up with the treating surgeon over time. Whether this attrition represents a “loss of faith” in their index surgeon or the realities of a geographically mobile society has never been assessed in a population of patients undergoing spinal surgery. The purpose of this article is to determine the frequency with which patients who have undergone prior surgery and develop new problems attempt to follow-up with their index spine surgeon. The study design was a population survey. All patients seen at two university-based spine centers over a 3-month period were surveyed regarding prior spine surgery. The questionnaire asked details of the previous operation, whether the patient had sought follow-up with their index surgeon, why the patient did not continue treatment with that surgeon, and whether the patient was satisfied with their prior treatment. Sixty-nine patients completed the survey. Prior operations were lumbar (53 patients) and cervical (16). When asked the reason for not seeing their prior surgeon, 10 patients (15%) stated that they (the patient) had moved and 16 (23%) responded that their surgeon no longer practiced in the area. Thirteen (19%) were unhappy with their previous care, 22 (32%) were seeking a second opinion, and 7 (10%) were told they needed more complex surgery. Thirty-seven (54%) discussed their symptoms with their original surgeon before seeking another surgeon. Although 32 patients (46%) had not discussed their new complaints with their index surgeon, only 3 patients (4%) chose not to return to their prior surgeon despite having the opportunity to do so. Forty-nine patients (71%) were satisfied with their prior surgical care, and 42 patients (61%) would undergo the index operation again. Most of the patients seen at the authors' practices after undergoing prior spine surgery elsewhere failed to follow up with their prior spine surgeon for

  13. Heavy vehicle industry site visits: comments from companies and conclusions from technical committee

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.

    1998-02-01

    This report documents the results of several visits with industry as part of the Department of Energy (DOE), office of Transportation Technology, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology, supported Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamics Project. The purpose of the DOE Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamics Project is to use government resources to bring the aerodynamic expertise available in government organizations and academia to bear in assisting the heavy vehicle industry to reduce aerodynamic drag on trucks. The obvious payback from this investment is the reduction in fuel usage and derivative reduction in the US's dependence on foreign oil imports. This report covers 2 projects: (1) The stated purpose of Project 1 was to provide near-term impact through emphasis on existing tools and capabilities and to focus on the trailer drag problem. (2) The stated purpose of Project 2 was to provide the tools necessary to accomplish the longer term goal of a fully-integrated, aerodynamic tractor-trailer combination.

  14. Remote Monitoring for Follow-up of Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Morichelli, Loredana; Varma, Niraj

    2014-01-01

    Follow-up of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices is challenging due to the increasing number and technical complexity of devices coupled to increasing clinical complexity of patients. Remote monitoring (RM) offers the opportunity to optimise clinic workflow and to improve device monitoring and patient management. Several randomised clinical trials and registries have demonstrated that RM may reduce number of hospital visits, time required for patient follow-up, physician and nurse time, hospital and social costs. Furthermore, patient retention and adherence to follow-up schedule are significantly improved by RM. Continuous wireless monitoring of data stored in the device memory with automatic alerts allows early detection of device malfunctions and of events requiring clinical reaction, such as atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmias and heart failure. Early reaction may improve patient outcome. RM is easy to use and patients showed a high level of acceptance and satisfaction. Implementing RM in daily practice may require changes in clinic workflow. To this purpose, new organisational models have been introduced. In spite of a favourable cost:benefit ratio, RM reimbursement still represents an issue in several European countries. PMID:26835079

  15. Remote Monitoring for Follow-up of Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Renato Pietro; Morichelli, Loredana; Varma, Niraj

    2014-08-01

    Follow-up of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices is challenging due to the increasing number and technical complexity of devices coupled to increasing clinical complexity of patients. Remote monitoring (RM) offers the opportunity to optimise clinic workflow and to improve device monitoring and patient management. Several randomised clinical trials and registries have demonstrated that RM may reduce number of hospital visits, time required for patient follow-up, physician and nurse time, hospital and social costs. Furthermore, patient retention and adherence to follow-up schedule are significantly improved by RM. Continuous wireless monitoring of data stored in the device memory with automatic alerts allows early detection of device malfunctions and of events requiring clinical reaction, such as atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmias and heart failure. Early reaction may improve patient outcome. RM is easy to use and patients showed a high level of acceptance and satisfaction. Implementing RM in daily practice may require changes in clinic workflow. To this purpose, new organisational models have been introduced. In spite of a favourable cost:benefit ratio, RM reimbursement still represents an issue in several European countries. PMID:26835079

  16. Self-Determination Theory and Outpatient Follow-Up After Psychiatric Hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Rebecca K; Bowersox, Nicholas W; Ganoczy, Dara; Valenstein, Marcia; Pfeiffer, Paul N

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether the constructs of self-determination theory-autonomy, competence, and relatedness-are associated with adherence to outpatient follow-up appointments after psychiatric hospitalization. 242 individuals discharged from inpatient psychiatric treatment within the Veterans Health Administration completed surveys assessing self-determination theory constructs as well as measures of depression and barriers to treatment. Medical records were used to count the number of mental health visits and no-shows in the 14 weeks following discharge. Logistic regression models assessed the association between survey items assessing theory constructs and attendance at mental healthcare visits. In multivariate models, none of the self-determination theory factors predicted outpatient follow-up attendance. The constructs of self-determination theory as measured by a single self-report survey may not reliably predict adherence to post-hospital care. Need factors such as depression may be more strongly predictive of treatment adherence. PMID:26319610

  17. Summary report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) site visitation program for the period October 1987 through September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.; Moore, C.E.; Murdoch, R.W.; Shores, R.C.; Ward, D.A.

    1990-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides technical assistance to the NADP/NTN network through a site visitation program. Research Triangle Institute, as contractor to EPA, conducts these visits. If deficiencies or nonstandard procedures are noted, the site operator and supervisor are notified. Brief reports are sent to the EPA Project Officer, the NADP/NTN Quality Assurance Manager, and others. In this way, necessary changes can be made promptly. All NADP.NTN sites were visited in 1985-1986. A second round of visits began in October 1986, with the goal of visiting approximately one-third of the 200 sites each year over the next three years. The document is a summary report of the findings from the 1987-1988 (Fiscal Year 1988) site visitation program to 57 of the sites of the NADP/NTN network. In its present configuration, the network's research and monitoring programs are supported and operated by the U.S. Geological Survey; State Agricultural Experiment Stations; the Departments of Agriculture, the Interior, Commerce, and Energy; and EPA. Additional support is provided by state agencies, public utilities, and industries.

  18. Summary report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) site-visitation program. Rept. for Oct 88-Sep 89

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.; Moore, C.E.; Murdoch, R.W.; Shores, R.C.; Ward, D.A.

    1991-12-01

    The proper collection of precipitation and the accurate measurement of its constituents are important steps in attaining a better understanding of the distribution and effects of acid rain in the United States. One of NAPAP Task Group IV's major programs concerns wet deposition monitoring. One of that program's project, 4A-15, 'Quality Assurance Support for Wet Deposition Monitoring,' is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate the sample collection process and provide technical assistance to the NADP/NTN network through a site visitation program. Research Triangle Institute, as contractor to EPA, conducts these visits. If deficiencies or nonstandard procedures are noted, the site operator and supervisor are notified. Brief reports are sent to the EPA Project Officer, the NADP/NTN Quality Assurance Manager, and others. In this way, necessary changes can be made promptly. All NADP/NTN sites were visited in 1985-1986. A second round of visits began in October 1986, with the goal of visiting approximately one-third of the 200 sites each year over the next three years. The document is a summary report of the findings from the 1988-1989 (Fiscal Year 1989) site visitation program to 72 of the sites of the NADP/NTN network.

  19. Uterine Leiomyomas: Safety and Efficacy of US-guided Suprapubic Transvaginal Radiofrequency Ablation at 1-year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang-Jun; Guo, Qing; Cao, Bing-Sheng; Tan, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Cai, Yu-Ru; Gao, Bu-Lang

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To assess the safety and efficacy of ultrasonography (US)-guided suprapubic transvaginal (ST) radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomas at 1-year follow-up. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this prospective study, and all patients provided informed consent. ST RFA was performed as an outpatient procedure 3 days after menstruation in 51 women (age range, 32-52 years; mean age, 42.2 years) with 62 leiomyomas. The leiomyomas were assessed with conventional and contrast material-enhanced US before and after ST RFA for leiomyoma size, location, and blood flow. All patients were evaluated for postoperative complications, including abdominal pain, injury to surrounding tissues and organs, vaginal bleeding, increased vaginal discharge, fever, dyspnea, and menorrhagia, after ST RFA and at follow-up visits. The leiomyoma volumes, improvement in leiomyoma-related symptoms, effect on quality of life (QOL), and patient satisfaction were assessed and compared before and after ST RFA and at follow-up visits by using statistical analyses. Results Sixty-two leiomyomas were successfully treated with ST RFA until 90% of the leiomyoma was echogenic. At 1-month follow-up, 46 (74%) leiomyomas had no contrast enhancement, five (8%) had peripheral enhancement, eight (13%) had focal enhancement, and three (5%) had scattered enhancement at contrast-enhanced US. At 6-month follow-up, the number of leiomyomas that had no enhancement, peripheral enhancement, focal enhancement, or scattered enhancement was 43 (69%), seven (11%), nine (15%), and three (5%), respectively. The leiomyoma volumes were significantly (P < .05) reduced at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up (from 33.0 cm(3) ± 25.1 [standard deviation] before treatment to 6.8 cm(3) ± 7.7 at 12-month follow-up). The mean percentage volume reduction at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up was 28%, 57%, 63%, and 78%, respectively. The scores for symptoms and QOL

  20. Understanding Patterns of User Visits to Web Sites: Interactive Starfield Visualizations of WWW Log Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochheiser, Harry; Shneiderman, Ben

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of Spotfire, a starfield visualization tool, to generate interactive visualizations of log data, ranging from aggregate views of all Web site hits in a time interval to close-ups that approximate the path of a user through a site. Highlights current efforts and provides examples of the visualizations created in Spotfire.…

  1. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  2. Autism and epilepsy: a retrospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hitoshi

    2007-09-01

    So-called "idiopathic" autism, which exhibited no major complications before diagnosis is well-known as one of the risk factors for epilepsy. This retrospective follow-up study aimed to clarify the characteristics of epilepsy in the autism; onset of seizure, seizure types, EEG findings and epilepsy outcome and the differences as a group between the autism with epilepsy and those without epilepsy. One hundred thirty individuals with autistic disorder or atypical autism diagnosed in childhood were followed up over 10 years and were evaluated almost every year up to 18-35 years of age. Their medical records related to perinatal conditions, IQ, social maturity scores and several factors of epilepsy were reviewed in October 2005. Thirty-three of the follow-up group (25%) exhibited epileptic seizures. The onset of epilepsy was distributed from 8 to 26 years of age. Two types of seizure were observed; partial seizure with secondarily generalized seizure and generalized seizure. Twenty of the epileptics (61%) showed the partial seizure. Although 18% of the non-epileptic group exhibited epileptic discharges on EEG, 68% of the epileptic group revealed epileptiform EEG findings before the onset of epilepsy. No differences were observed concerning the sex ratio, autistic disorder/atypical autism and past history of febrile seizures between the epileptic and non-epileptic groups. Lower IQ, lower social maturity score and higher frequency of prescribed psychotropics were observed in the epileptic group compared to the non-epileptics. Idiopathic autism was confirmed as the high risk factor for epilepsy. Epileptiform EEG findings predict subsequent onset of epileptic seizures in adolescence. Epilepsy is one of negative factors on cognitive, adaptive and behavioral/emotional outcomes for individuals with autism. PMID:17321709

  3. [Follow-up of patients at home after outpatient surgery].

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The patient's discharge and return home are important stages in outpatient surgery. In addition to the call the following day and the support of a family caregiver, a visit by a private practice nurse and a healthcare network can offer extra safeguards. PMID:25065192

  4. Surgical removal of subfoveal choroidal neovascularization in pathologic myopia: a 12-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hera, R; Chiquet, C; Romanet, J P

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the 12-year visual outcomes of patients who underwent surgical removal for subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) attributable to pathologic myopia. This retrospective study included 14 patients, with a mean age of 45.8 years, high myopia (>6 D) and classic subfoveal CNV. They were treated with pars plana vitrectomy and surgical removal of CNV. All patients were followed up every 3 months for 2 years, with visual acuity (VA), fundus examination, and fluorescein angiography and then every year for 5 years. Ten patients underwent a final visit with VA and fundus examination after a minimum 12-year follow-up. The main outcome measurement was VA and the secondary outcome measurement was the lesion size. After 12 years of follow-up, the mean VA did not significantly change over time, with a mean gain of 0.22 logMAR at 1 year, and 0.18, 0.12 and 0.05 at 2, 5 and 12 years, respectively. The anatomical evolution was characterized by a significant enlargement of the lesion size at 5 years. This study showed that final VA after surgical treatment with 12 years of follow-up was poor, due to the significant CNV scar enlargement over time. These results should prompt a prospective randomized study of other medical treatments, particularly anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. PMID:23539478

  5. Profile and follow-up of patients with tuberculosis in a priority city in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jisleny da Cruz; Silva, Marcio Roberto; da Costa, Ronaldo Rodrigues; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cases of tuberculosis and the impact of direct follow-up on the assessment of treatment outcomes. METHODS This open prospective cohort study evaluated 504 cases of tuberculosis reported in the Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação (SINAN – Notifiable Diseases Information System) in Juiz de Fora, MG, Southeastern Brazil, between 2008 and 2009. The incidence of treatment outcomes was compared between a group of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis and directly followed up by monthly consultations during return visits (287) and a patient group for which the information was indirectly collected (217) through the city’s surveillance system. The Chi-square test was used to compare the percentages, with a significance level of 0.05. The relative risk (RR) was used to evaluate the differences in the incidence rate of each type of treatment outcome between the two groups. RESULTS Of the outcomes directly and indirectly evaluated, 18.5% and 3.2% corresponded to treatment default and 3.8% and 0.5% corresponded to treatment failure, respectively. The incidence of treatment default and failure was higher in the group with direct follow-up (p < 0.05) (RR = 5.72, 95%CI 2.65;12.34, and RR = 8.31, 95%CI 1.08;63.92, respectively). CONCLUSIONS A higher incidence of treatment default and failure was observed in the directly followed up group, and most of these cases were neglected by the disease reporting system. Therefore, effective measures are needed to improve the control of tuberculosis and data quality. PMID:25741659

  6. Follow-up of 13 children after ureterosigmoidostomy.

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, N J; van Damme, K J; de Voogt, H J

    1976-01-01

    Follow-up of 13 children who had had a ureterosigmoid anastomosis 3 1/2 to 10 years previously and whose initial urogram had been satisfactory, showed that growth was normal and that there was no serious metabolic disorder. In particular whole-body potassium did not differ significantly from normal values (as given by Langham, 1961). Asymptomatic urinary infection is the chief hazard in these cases but is difficult to diagnose and may lead to progressive dilatation of the ureters. PMID:962364

  7. Long term follow up of neurovascular island flaps.

    PubMed

    Henderson, H P; Reid, D A

    1980-06-01

    The results of a ten year mean follow up of twenty Neurovascular Island Flaps and two Radial Nerve Innervated Cross Finger Flaps are presented. Sensory acuity sufficient for tactile gnosis was achieved in nineteen cases. In only one case had sensory acuity deteriorated since operation. Use of the flap was hampered in one patient by a pre-existing neuroma. Complete sensory reorientation occurred in five patients. Sensory misreference persisted more commonly on dominant hands. It was our impression that Porter's Letter Test revealed the patients making most use of their neurovascular island flaps. The place of neurovascular island flaps in the management of the mutilated hand is discussed. PMID:7409615

  8. Root Resorption a 6-Year Follow-up Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Caroline; Closs, Luciane; Barletta, Fernando; Reston, Eduardo; Tovo, Maximiano F; Lambert, Paula

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical course of a pediatric patient developing cervical external root resorption (CERR). An 11-year old male patient had sustained dental trauma and was diagnosed with crown fracture affecting the incisal and middle thirds of the maxillary right permanent central incisor and the maxillary right permanent lateral incisor with pulp exposure and CERR after 24 months. Diagnosis and treatment of CERR are a challenge for dental practitioners. In this case, preservation of natural dentition is shown as a successful treatment in a 6-year follow-up. PMID:25870717

  9. XMM follow-up observations of two unidentified INTEGRAL sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, M.; Landi, R.; Bassani, L.; Bazzano, A.; Fiocchi, M.; Bird, A. J.; Drave, S. P.

    2012-07-01

    We report the results of X-ray follow-up observations performed with XMM-Newton of two unidentified hard X-ray sources, AX J1753.5-2745 and IGR J17348-2045 listed in the INTEGRAL/IBIS 9-year Galactic Hard X-ray Survey (Krivonos et al. 2012, arXiv:1205.3941) and in 4th IBIS Survey Catalogue (Bird et al. 2010, ApJS, 186, 1) respectively. We assume a conservative XMM positional uncertainty of 5".

  10. Follow-up problems with fixed appliances in pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Ari, Timucin

    2015-03-01

    Fixed appliances are commonly used in managing early orthodontic problems. Despite their widespread use, they have the potential to impinge on the soft tissues, interfere with the eruption of adjacent teeth and become dislodged or broken. These two case reports present the poor outcomes of fixed appliance treatments if the patient fails to attend follow-up appointments. A successful outcome of treatment with fixed appliances depends upon proper patient selection and the communication skills of the dentist to help patients/parents understand the importance of regular checkups. PMID:25928968