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Sample records for force microscope cantilevers

  1. Cantilever based optical interfacial force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonander, Jeremy R.; Kim, Byung I.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a cantilever based optical interfacial force microscopy (COIFM) that employs a microactuated silicon cantilever and optical detection method to establish the measurement of the single molecular interactions using the force feedback technique. Through the direct measurement of the COIFM force-distance curves, we have demonstrated that the COIFM is capable of unveiling structural and mechanical information on interfacial water at the single molecular level over all distances between two hydrophilic surfaces.

  2. Precise atomic force microscope cantilever spring constant calibration using a reference cantilever array

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Richard S.; Reitsma, Mark G.

    2007-08-15

    A method for calibrating the stiffness of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is demonstrated using an array of uniform microfabricated reference cantilevers. A series of force-displacement curves was obtained using a commercial AFM test cantilever on the reference cantilever array, and the data were analyzed using an implied Euler-Bernoulli model to extract the test cantilever spring constant from linear regression fitting. The method offers a factor of 5 improvement over the precision of the usual reference cantilever calibration method and, when combined with the Systeme International traceability potential of the cantilever array, can provide very accurate spring constant calibrations.

  3. Lateral force microscope calibration using a modified atomic force microscope cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, M. G.

    2007-10-15

    A proof-of-concept study is presented for a prototype atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and associated calibration procedure that provide a path for quantitative friction measurement using a lateral force microscope (LFM). The calibration procedure is based on the method proposed by Feiler et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 2746 (2000)] but allows for calibration and friction measurements to be carried out in situ and with greater precision. The modified AFM cantilever is equipped with lateral lever arms that facilitate the application of normal and lateral forces, comparable to those acting in a typical LFM friction experiment. The technique allows the user to select acceptable precision via a potentially unlimited number of calibration measurements across the full working range of the LFM photodetector. A microfabricated version of the cantilever would be compatible with typical commercial AFM instrumentation and allow for common AFM techniques such as topography imaging and other surface force measurements to be performed.

  4. Calibrating laser beam deflection systems for use in atomic force microscopes and cantilever sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, L.Y.; Godin, Michel; Laroche, Olivier; Tabard-Cossa, Vincent; Gruetter, Peter

    2006-02-20

    Most atomic force microscopes and cantilever-based sensors use an optical laser beam detection system to monitor cantilever deflections. We have developed a working model that accurately describes the way in which a position sensitive photodetector interprets the deflection of a cantilever in these instruments. This model exactly predicts the numerical relationship between the measured photodetector signal and the actual cantilever deflection. In addition, the model is used to optimize the geometry of such laser deflection systems, which greatly simplifies the use of any cantilever-based instrument that uses a laser beam detection system.

  5. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2014-07-01

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10-100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed. PMID:25085142

  6. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2014-07-01

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10-100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed.

  7. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2014-07-15

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10−100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed.

  8. Simultaneous measurement of normal and friction forces using a cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung I.; Bonander, Jeremy R.; Rasmussen, Jared A.

    2011-05-01

    We measured normal and friction forces simultaneously using a recently developed cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope technique for studies of interfacial structures and mechanical properties of nanoscale materials. We derived how the forces can be incorporated into the detection signal using the classical Euler equation for beams. A lateral modulation with the amplitude of nanometers was applied to create the friction forces between tip and sample. We demonstrated its capability by measuring normal and friction forces of interfacial water at the molecular scale over all distance ranges.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of normal and friction forces using a cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung I; Bonander, Jeremy R; Rasmussen, Jared A

    2011-05-01

    We measured normal and friction forces simultaneously using a recently developed cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope technique for studies of interfacial structures and mechanical properties of nanoscale materials. We derived how the forces can be incorporated into the detection signal using the classical Euler equation for beams. A lateral modulation with the amplitude of nanometers was applied to create the friction forces between tip and sample. We demonstrated its capability by measuring normal and friction forces of interfacial water at the molecular scale over all distance ranges. PMID:21639511

  10. Modular apparatus for electrostatic actuation of common atomic force microscope cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Christian J.; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2015-07-15

    Piezoelectric actuation of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers often suffers from spurious mechanical resonances in the loop between the signal driving the cantilever and the actual tip motion. These spurious resonances can reduce the accuracy of AFM measurements and in some cases completely obscure the cantilever response. To address these limitations, we developed a specialized AFM cantilever holder for electrostatic actuation of AFM cantilevers. The holder contains electrical contacts for the AFM cantilever chip, as well as an electrode (or electrodes) that may be precisely positioned with respect to the back of the cantilever. By controlling the voltages on the AFM cantilever and the actuation electrode(s), an electrostatic force is applied directly to the cantilever, providing a near-ideal transfer function from drive signal to tip motion. We demonstrate both static and dynamic actuations, achieved through the application of direct current and alternating current voltage schemes, respectively. As an example application, we explore contact resonance atomic force microscopy, which is a technique for measuring the mechanical properties of surfaces on the sub-micron length scale. Using multiple electrodes, we also show that the torsional resonances of the AFM cantilever may be excited electrostatically, opening the door for advanced dynamic lateral force measurements with improved accuracy and precision.

  11. Note: Lateral force microscope calibration using multiple location pivot loading of rectangular cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Reitsma, Mark G.

    2010-02-15

    This note outlines a calibration method for atomic force microscope friction measurement that uses the ''pivot'' method of [Bogdanovic et al., Colloids Surf. B 19, 397 (2000)] to generate optical lever sensitivities for known torque applied to rectangular cantilevers. We demonstrate the key calibration parameter to be a linear function of the position at which it is determined along the length of the cantilevers. In this way the optical lever system can be calibrated for cantilever torque by applying loads at locations along the length of a cantilever, away from the integrated tip, so that issues such as tip damage or interference can be avoided.

  12. Intermittent contact interaction between an atomic force microscope cantilever and a nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, I.; Ungewitter, L.; Hartmann, U.

    2012-05-01

    We investigate in theory and experiment the intermittent contact interaction between an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and a nanowire under ambient conditions. The nanowire is modeled as a spring reacting instantaneously to any change of the force between the wire and the cantilever. This implies that the cantilever is subject to an "effective" force-distance relation, containing not only the surface forces but also the deflection of the nanowire. Experimentally, CVD-grown tin oxide nanowires and lithographically structured silicon nanowire arrays were investigated by intermittent contact AFM. By comparison of experimental and simulated distance-dependent resonance curves it is found that the nanowires behave like "fast nanosprings" and that the adhesion force is one of the key factors determining distance-dependent resonance curves. The results are fully applicable to a scenario in which a cantilever equipped by a nanowire interacts with a surface.

  13. Note: Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using only their resonant frequency and quality factor

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2014-11-15

    A simplified method for calibrating atomic force microscope cantilevers was recently proposed by Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012); Sec. III D] that relies solely on the resonant frequency and quality factor of the cantilever in fluid (typically air). This method eliminates the need to measure the hydrodynamic function of the cantilever, which can be time consuming given the wide range of cantilevers now available. Using laser Doppler vibrometry, we rigorously assess the accuracy of this method for a series of commercially available cantilevers and explore its performance under non-ideal conditions. This shows that the simplified method is highly accurate and can be easily implemented to perform fast, robust, and non-invasive spring constant calibration.

  14. Spring constant calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers of arbitrary shape

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Sanelli, Julian A.; Adamson, Brian D.; Bieske, Evan J.; Monty, Jason P.; Marusic, Ivan; Wei Xingzhan; Mulvaney, Paul; Crawford, Simon A.; Friend, James R.

    2012-10-15

    The spring constant of an atomic force microscope cantilever is often needed for quantitative measurements. The calibration method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] for a rectangular cantilever requires measurement of the resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (typically air), and knowledge of its plan view dimensions. This intrinsically uses the hydrodynamic function for a cantilever of rectangular plan view geometry. Here, we present hydrodynamic functions for a series of irregular and non-rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers that are commonly used in practice. Cantilever geometries of arrow shape, small aspect ratio rectangular, quasi-rectangular, irregular rectangular, non-ideal trapezoidal cross sections, and V-shape are all studied. This enables the spring constants of all these cantilevers to be accurately and routinely determined through measurement of their resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (such as air). An approximate formulation of the hydrodynamic function for microcantilevers of arbitrary geometry is also proposed. Implementation of the method and its performance in the presence of uncertainties and non-idealities is discussed, together with conversion factors for the static and dynamic spring constants of these cantilevers. These results are expected to be of particular value to the design and application of micro- and nanomechanical systems in general.

  15. Characterizing the free and surface-coupled vibrations of heated-tip atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Killgore, Jason P; Tung, Ryan C; Hurley, Donna C

    2014-08-29

    Combining heated-tip atomic force microscopy (HT-AFM) with quantitative methods for determining surface mechanical properties, such as contact resonance force microscopy, creates an avenue for nanoscale thermomechanical property characterization. For nanomechanical methods that employ an atomic force microscope cantilever's vibrational modes, it is essential to understand how the vibrations of the U-shaped HT-AFM cantilever differ from those of a more traditional rectangular lever, for which analytical techniques are better developed. Here we show, with a combination of finite element analysis (FEA) and experiments, that the HT-AFM cantilever exhibits many more readily-excited vibrational modes over typical AFM frequencies compared to a rectangular cantilever. The arms of U-shaped HT-AFM cantilevers exhibit two distinct forms of flexural vibrations that differ depending on whether the two arms are vibrating in-phase or out-of-phase with one another. The in-phase vibrations are qualitatively similar to flexural vibrations in rectangular cantilevers and generally show larger sensitivity to surface stiffness changes than the out-of-phase vibrations. Vibration types can be identified from their frequency and by considering vibration amplitudes in the horizontal and vertical channels of the AFM at different laser spot positions on the cantilever. For identifying contact resonance vibrational modes, we also consider the sensitivity of the resonant frequencies to a change in applied force and hence to tip-sample contact stiffness. Finally, we assess how existing analytical models can be used to accurately predict contact stiffness from contact-resonance HT-AFM results. A simple two-parameter Euler-Bernoulli beam model provided good agreement with FEA for in-phase modes up to a contact stiffness 500 times the cantilever spring constant. By providing insight into cantilever vibrations and exploring the potential of current analysis techniques, our results lay the groundwork

  16. A direct micropipette-based calibration method for atomic force microscope cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoyu; Yu, Yan; Yao, Da-Kang; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we describe a direct method for calibrating atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers with the micropipette aspiration technique (MAT). A closely fitting polystyrene bead inside a micropipette is driven by precisely controlled hydrostatic pressures to apply known loads on the sharp tip of AFM cantilevers, thus providing a calibration at the most functionally relevant position. The new method is capable of calibrating cantilevers with spring constants ranging from 0.01 to hundreds of newtons per meter. Under appropriate loading conditions, this new method yields measurement accuracy and precision both within 10%, with higher performance for softer cantilevers. Furthermore, this method may greatly enhance the accuracy and precision of calibration for colloidal probes. PMID:19566228

  17. Calibration of the lateral spring constant of atomic force microscope cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yunpeng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Linyan; Fu, Xing

    2015-10-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) is very useful in nano-scale force measurement. Lateral force is typically used in nanoscratch and surface friction measurement based on AFM. As one of the most important parameters to obtain lateral force, the lateral spring constant of AFM cantilever probe is of great significance and needs to be quantitative calibrated. Lateral torsion and lateral force of the cantilever are two parameters need to be measured in lateral spring constant calibration. In this article, we develop a calibration system and introduce a calibration method using an AFM head and an electromagnetic balance. An aluminium column with a known angel on top is placed on the weighing pan of the balance. The cantilever is precisely positioned in the AFM head, then approaches and bends on the aluminium column. During this procedure, the bending force and the lateral torsion of the cantilever are synchronously measured by the balance and an optical lever system, respectively. Then the lateral spring constant is calculated with a formula. By using this method, three kinds of rectangular cantilever are calibrated. The relative standard deviations of the calibration results are smaller than 2%.

  18. Atomic force microscope cantilever spring constant evaluation for higher mode oscillations: A kinetostatic method

    SciTech Connect

    Tseytlin, Yakov M.

    2008-02-15

    Our previous study of the particle mass sensor has shown a large ratio (up to thousands) between the spring constants of a rectangular cantilever in higher mode vibration and at the static bending or natural mode vibration. This has been proven by us through the derived nodal point position equation. That solution is good for a cantilever with the free end in noncontact regime and the probe shifted from the end to an effective section and contacting a soft object. Our further research shows that the same nodal position equation with the proper frequency equations may be used for the same spring constant ratio estimation if the vibrating at higher mode cantilever's free end has a significant additional mass clamped to it or that end is in permanent contact with an elastic or hard measurand object (reference cantilever). However, in the latter case, the spring constant ratio is much smaller (in tens) than in other mentioned cases at equal higher (up to fourth) vibration modes. We also present the spring constant ratio for a vibrating at higher eigenmode V-shaped cantilever, which is now in wide use for atomic force microscopy. The received results on the spring constant ratio are in good (within a few percent) agreement with the theoretical and experimental data published by other researchers. The knowledge of a possible spring constant transformation is important for the proper calibration and use of an atomic force microscope with vibrating cantilever in the higher eigenmodes for measurement and imaging with enlarged resolution.

  19. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E.

    2014-09-01

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5-10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100-500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  20. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E.

    2014-09-15

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5–10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100–500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  1. Note: Improved calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using multiple reference cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2015-05-15

    Overall precision of the simplified calibration method in J. E. Sader et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012), Sec. III D, is dominated by the spring constant of the reference cantilever. The question arises: How does one take measurements from multiple reference cantilevers, and combine these results, to improve uncertainty of the reference cantilever’s spring constant and hence the overall precision of the method? This question is addressed in this note. Its answer enables manufacturers to specify of a single set of data for the spring constant, resonant frequency, and quality factor, from measurements on multiple reference cantilevers. With this data set, users can trivially calibrate cantilevers of the same type.

  2. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-01-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers. PMID:26510769

  3. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  4. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-01-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers. PMID:26510769

  5. Calibration of the effective spring constant of ultra-short cantilevers for a high-speed atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yun-Peng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Lin-Yan; Zhang, Jun-Ming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiao-Dong

    2015-06-01

    Ultra-short cantilevers are a new type of cantilever designed for the next generation of high-speed atomic force microscope (HS-AFM). Ultra-short cantilevers have smaller dimensions and higher resonant frequency than conventional AFM cantilevers. Moreover, their geometry may also be different from the conventional beam-shape or V-shape. These changes increase the difficulty of determining the spring constant for ultra-short cantilevers, and hence limit the accuracy and precision of force measurement based on a HS-AFM. This paper presents an experimental method to calibrate the effective spring constant of ultra-short cantilevers. By using a home-made AFM head, the cantilever is bent against an electromagnetic compensation balance under servo control. Meanwhile the bending force and the cantilever deflection are synchronously measured by the balance and the optical lever in the AFM head, respectively. Then the effective spring constant is simply determined as the ratio of the force to the corresponding deflection. Four ultra-short trapezoid shape cantilevers were calibrated using this method. A quantitative uncertainty analysis showed that the combined relative standard uncertainty of the calibration result is less than 2%, which is better than the uncertainty of any previously reported techniques.

  6. Paramagnetic and ferromagnetic resonance imaging with a tip-on-cantilever magnetic resonance force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wago, K.; Botkin, D.; Yannoni, C. S.; Rugar, D.

    1998-05-01

    A magnetic resonance force microscope with a "tip-on-cantilever" configuration was used to compare imaging characteristics of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic samples. Three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real-space magnetization image to be successfully reconstructed. In contrast to the EPR case, ferromagnetic resonance imaging of a micron-scale yttrium iron garnet sample showed no significant line broadening despite the strong field gradient (˜10 G/μm). Two-dimensional force maps revealed spatial dependence of magnetostatic and magnetoelastic modes.

  7. Topography imaging with a heated atomic force microscope cantilever in tapping mode

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Keunhan; Lee, Jungchul; Zhang, Zhuomin M.; King, William P.

    2007-04-15

    This article describes tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a heated AFM cantilever. The electrical and thermal responses of the cantilever were investigated while the cantilever oscillated in free space or was in intermittent contact with a surface. The cantilever oscillates at its mechanical resonant frequency, 70.36 kHz, which is much faster than its thermal time constant of 300 {mu}s, and so the cantilever operates in thermal steady state. The thermal impedance between the cantilever heater and the sample was measured through the cantilever temperature signal. Topographical imaging was performed on silicon calibration gratings of height 20 and 100 nm. The obtained topography sensitivity is as high as 200 {mu}V/nm and the resolution is as good as 0.5 nm/Hz{sup 1/2}, depending on the cantilever power. The cantilever heating power ranges 0-7 mW, which corresponds to a temperature range of 25-700 deg. C. The imaging was performed entirely using the cantilever thermal signal and no laser or other optics was required. As in conventional AFM, the tapping mode operation demonstrated here can suppress imaging artifacts and enable imaging of soft samples.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers immersed in liquids based on the modified couple stress theory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haw-Long; Chang, Win-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The modified couple stress theory is adopted to study the sensitivity of a rectangular atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever immersed in acetone, water, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and 1-butanol. The theory contains a material length scale parameter and considers the size effect in the analysis. However, this parameter is difficult to obtain via experimental measurements. In this study, a conjugate gradient method for the parameter estimation of the frequency equation is presented. The optimal method provides a quantitative approach for estimating the material length scale parameter based on the modified couple stress theory. The results show that the material length scale parameter of the AFM cantilever immersed in acetone, CCl4, water, and 1-butanol is 0, 25, 116.3, and 471 nm, respectively. In addition, the vibration sensitivities of the AFM cantilever immersed in these liquids are investigated. The results are useful for the design of AFM cantilevers immersed in liquids. PMID:26402914

  9. Study of thermal and acoustic noise interferences in low stiffness atomic force microscope cantilevers and characterization of their dynamic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Boudaoud, Mokrane; Haddab, Yassine; Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2012-01-15

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool for the measurement of forces at the micro/nano scale when calibrated cantilevers are used. Besides many existing calibration techniques, the thermal calibration is one of the simplest and fastest methods for the dynamic characterization of an AFM cantilever. This method is efficient provided that the Brownian motion (thermal noise) is the most important source of excitation during the calibration process. Otherwise, the value of spring constant is underestimated. This paper investigates noise interference ranges in low stiffness AFM cantilevers taking into account thermal fluctuations and acoustic pressures as two main sources of noise. As a result, a preliminary knowledge about the conditions in which thermal fluctuations and acoustic pressures have closely the same effect on the AFM cantilever (noise interference) is provided with both theoretical and experimental arguments. Consequently, beyond the noise interference range, commercial low stiffness AFM cantilevers are calibrated in two ways: using the thermal noise (in a wide temperature range) and acoustic pressures generated by a loudspeaker. We then demonstrate that acoustic noises can also be used for an efficient characterization and calibration of low stiffness AFM cantilevers. The accuracy of the acoustic characterization is evaluated by comparison with results from the thermal calibration.

  10. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied – in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry – neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  11. On eigenmodes, stiffness, and sensitivity of atomic force microscope cantilevers in air versus liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kiracofe, Daniel; Raman, Arvind

    2010-02-15

    The effect of hydrodynamic loading on the eigenmode shapes, modal stiffnesses, and optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) microcantilevers is investigated by measuring the vibrations of such microcantilevers in air and water using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. It is found that for rectangular tipless microcantilevers, the measured fundamental and higher eigenmodes and their equivalent stiffnesses are nearly identical in air and in water. However, for microcantilevers with a tip mass or for picket shaped cantilevers, there is a marked difference in the second (and higher) eigenmode shapes between air and water that leads to a large decrease in their modal stiffness in water as compared to air as well as a decrease in their optical lever sensitivity. These results are explained in terms of hydrodynamic interactions of microcantilevers with nonuniform mass distribution. The results clearly demonstrate that tip mass and hydrodynamic loading must be taken into account in stiffness calibration and optical lever sensitivity calibration while using higher-order eigenmodes in dynamic AFM.

  12. A pressure gauge based on gas density measurement from analysis of the thermal noise of an atomic force microscope cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Dongjin; Ducker, William A.; Paul, Mark R.

    2012-05-15

    We describe a gas-density gauge based on the analysis of the thermally-driven fluctuations of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever. The fluctuations are modeled as a ring-down of a simple harmonic oscillator, which allows fitting of the resonance frequency and damping of the cantilever, which in turn yields the gas density. The pressure is obtained from the density using the known equation of state. In the range 10-220 kPa, the pressure readings from the cantilever gauge deviate by an average of only about 5% from pressure readings on a commercial gauge. The theoretical description we use to determine the pressure from the cantilever motion is based upon the continuum hypothesis, which sets a minimum pressure for our analysis. It is anticipated that the cantilever gauge could be extended to measure lower pressures given a molecular theoretical description. Alternatively, the gauge could be calibrated for use in the non-continuum range. Our measurement technique is similar to previous AFM cantilever measurements, but the analysis produces improved accuracy.

  13. Accurate measurement of Atomic Force Microscope cantilever deflection excluding tip-surface contact with application to force calibration.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Ashley D; Blanch, Adam J; Quinton, Jamie S; Gibson, Christopher T

    2013-08-01

    calibrate the cantilever spring constant using the thermal noise method, allowing complete force calibration to be accurately performed without tip-sample contact. PMID:23685172

  14. Viscoelastic properties of single polysaccharide molecules determined by analysis of thermally driven oscillations of an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Masaru; Byrne, Katherine; Khatri, Bhavin; McLeish, Tom C B; Radford, Sheena E; Smith, D Alastair

    2004-10-12

    We report on single molecule measurements of the viscoelastic properties of the polysaccharide dextran using a new approach which involves acquiring the power spectral density of the thermal noise of an atomic force microscope cantilever while holding the single molecule of interest under force-clamp conditions. The attractiveness of this approach when compared with techniques which use forced oscillations under constant loading rate conditions is that it is a near-equilibrium measure of mechanical response which provides a more relevant probe of thermally driven biomolecular dynamics. Using a simple harmonic oscillator model of the cantilever-molecule system and by subtracting the response of the free cantilever taking into account hydrodynamic effects, the effective damping zetamol and elastic constant kmol of a single molecule are obtained. The molecular elasticity measured by this new technique shows a dependence on applied force that reflects the chair-boat conformational transition of the pyranose rings of the dextran molecule which is in good agreement with values obtained directly from the gradient of a conventional constant loading rate force-extension curve. The molecular damping is also seen to follow a nontrivial dependence on loading which we suggest indicates that it is internal friction and not work done on the solvent that is the dominant dissipative process. PMID:15461521

  15. Temperature and non-linear response of cantilever-type mechanical oscillators used in atomic force microscopes with interferometric detection

    SciTech Connect

    Fläschner, G.; Ruschmeier, K.; Schwarz, A. Wiesendanger, R.; Bakhtiari, M. R.; Thorwart, M.

    2015-03-23

    The sensitivity of atomic force microscopes is fundamentally limited by the cantilever temperature, which can be, in principle, determined by measuring its thermal spectrum and applying the equipartition theorem. However, the mechanical response can be affected by the light field inside the cavity of a Fabry-Perot interferometer due to light absorption, radiation pressure, photothermal forces, and laser noise. By evaluating the optomechanical Hamiltonian, we are able to explain the peculiar distance dependence of the mechanical quality factor as well as the appearance of thermal spectra with symmetrical Lorentzian as well as asymmetrical Fano line shapes. Our results can be applied to any type of mechanical oscillator in an interferometer-based detection system.

  16. Stability enhancement of an atomic force microscope for long-term force measurement including cantilever modification for whole cell deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weafer, P. P.; McGarry, J. P.; van Es, M. H.; Kilpatrick, J. I.; Ronan, W.; Nolan, D. R.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2012-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used in the study of both morphology and mechanical properties of living cells under physiologically relevant conditions. However, quantitative experiments on timescales of minutes to hours are generally limited by thermal drift in the instrument, particularly in the vertical (z) direction. In addition, we demonstrate the necessity to remove all air-liquid interfaces within the system for measurements in liquid environments, which may otherwise result in perturbations in the measured deflection. These effects severely limit the use of AFM as a practical tool for the study of long-term cell behavior, where precise knowledge of the tip-sample distance is a crucial requirement. Here we present a readily implementable, cost effective method of minimizing z-drift and liquid instabilities by utilizing active temperature control combined with a customized fluid cell system. Long-term whole cell mechanical measurements were performed using this stabilized AFM by attaching a large sphere to a cantilever in order to approximate a parallel plate system. An extensive examination of the effects of sphere attachment on AFM data is presented. Profiling of cantilever bending during substrate indentation revealed that the optical lever assumption of free ended cantilevering is inappropriate when sphere constraining occurs, which applies an additional torque to the cantilevers "free" end. Here we present the steps required to accurately determine force-indentation measurements for such a scenario. Combining these readily implementable modifications, we demonstrate the ability to investigate long-term whole cell mechanics by performing strain controlled cyclic deformation of single osteoblasts.

  17. Viscoelastic measurements of single molecules on a millisecond time scale by magnetically driven oscillation of an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Masaru; Byrne, Katherine; Khatri, Bhavin S; Mcleish, Tom C B; Radford, Sheena E; Smith, D Alastair

    2005-05-10

    The dynamical nature of biomolecular systems means that knowledge of their viscoelastic behavior is important in fully understanding function. The linear viscoelastic response can be derived from an analysis of Brownian motion. However, this is a slow measurement and technically demanding for many molecular systems of interest. To address this issue, we have developed a simple method for measuring the full linear viscoelastic response of single molecules based on magnetically driven oscillations of an atomic force microscope cantilever. The cantilever oscillation frequency is periodically swept through the system resonance in less than 200 ms allowing the power spectrum to be obtained rapidly and analyzed with a suitable model. The technique has been evaluated using dextran, a polysaccharide commonly used as a test system for single molecule mechanical manipulation experiments. The monomer stiffness and friction constants were compared with those derived from other methods. Excellent agreement is obtained indicating that the new method accurately and, most importantly, rapidly provides the viscoelastic response of a single molecule between the tip and substrate. The method will be a useful tool for studying systems that change their structure and dynamic response on a time scale of 100-200 ms, such as protein folding and unfolding under applied force. PMID:16032901

  18. Analyzing the Effect of Capillary Force on Vibrational Performance of the Cantilever of an Atomic Force Microscope in Tapping Mode with Double Piezoelectric Layers in an Air Environment.

    PubMed

    Nahavandi, Amir; Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the effects of forces exerted on the cantilever probe tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM). These forces vary according to the separation distance between the probe tip and the surface of the sample being examined. Hence, at a distance away from the surface (farther than d(on)), these forces have an attractive nature and are of Van der Waals type, and when the probe tip is situated in the range of a₀≤ d(ts) ≤ d(on), the capillary force is added to the Van der Waals force. At a distance of d(ts) ≤ a₀, the Van der Waals and capillary forces remain constant at intermolecular distances, and the contact repulsive force repels the probe tip from the surface of sample. The capillary force emerges due to the contact of thin water films with a thickness of h(c) which have accumulated on the sample and probe. Under environmental conditions a layer of water or hydrocarbon often forms between the probe tip and sample. The capillary meniscus can grow until the rate of evaporation equals the rate of condensation. For each of the above forces, different models are presented. The smoothness or roughness of the surfaces and the geometry of the cantilever tip have a significant effect on the modeling of forces applied on the probe tip. Van der Waals and the repulsive forces are considered to be the same in all the simulations, and only the capillary force is altered in order to evaluate the role of this force in the AFM-based modeling. Therefore, in view of the remarkable advantages of the piezoelectric microcantilever and also the extensive applications of the tapping mode, we investigate vibrational motion of the piezoelectric microcantilever in the tapping mode. The cantilever mentioned is entirely covered by two piezoelectric layers that carry out both the actuation of the probe tip and the measuringof its position. PMID:26324257

  19. Laser-induced thermal expansion of a scanning tunneling microscope tip measured with an atomic force microscope cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, R.; Koch, M.; Feldmann, J.

    1998-10-01

    We investigate the transient thermal expansion of a scanning tunneling microscope tip after excitation with intense femtosecond laser pulses. The expansion dynamics are measured electrically by monitoring the time-resolved tunneling current and mechanically by use of an atomic force microscope. The tip expansion reaches values as high as 15 nm and exceeds the typical working distance of a scanning tunneling microscope by far. This results in a mechanical contact between tunneling tip and surface leading to surface modifications on a nanometer scale. Our findings clarify the mechanism of the recently proposed focusing of laser radiation in the near field of a tip technique [J. Jersch and K. Dickmann, Appl. Phys. Lett. 68, 868 (1996)] for nanostructuring.

  20. Method of mechanical holding of cantilever chip for tip-scan high-speed atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio

    2015-06-15

    In tip-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) that scans a cantilever chip in the three dimensions, the chip body is held on the Z-scanner with a holder. However, this holding is not easy for high-speed (HS) AFM because the holder that should have a small mass has to be able to clamp the cantilever chip firmly without deteriorating the Z-scanner’s fast performance, and because repeated exchange of cantilever chips should not damage the Z-scanner. This is one of the reasons that tip-scan HS-AFM has not been established, despite its advantages over sample stage-scan HS-AFM. Here, we present a novel method of cantilever chip holding which meets all conditions required for tip-scan HS-AFM. The superior performance of this novel chip holding mechanism is demonstrated by imaging of the α{sub 3}β{sub 3} subcomplex of F{sub 1}-ATPase in dynamic action at ∼7 frames/s.

  1. Low temperature scanning force microscopy using piezoresistive cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiser, P.; Koblischka, M. R.; Hartmann, U.

    2015-08-01

    A low temperature dynamic scanning force microscope has been constructed using commercially available piezoresistive cantilevers that can be coated with a ferromagnetic material for MFM application. The setup is able to work in a temperature range from room temperature down to 1.5 K. The performance of the piezoresistive cantilevers has been investigated under different working conditions. Topographic as well as magnetic images of a magnetite thin film sample have been taken at 50 and 4.2 K confirming the proper operation of the microscope at cryogenic temperatures. Furthermore, force-distance-curves taken on thin lead films at 4.2 K demonstrate the levitation forces between the magnetized cantilever tip and the superconducting films. Flux lines were generated by the magnetized cantilever tip itself when approaching the sample. It has also been shown that the microscope is sensitive to the detection of single magnetic flux lines penetrating the lead films.

  2. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  3. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  4. Exploiting cantilever curvature for noise reduction in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Labuda, Aleksander; Grütter, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Optical beam deflection is a widely used method for detecting the deflection of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. This paper presents a first order derivation for the angular detection noise density which determines the lower limit for deflection sensing. Surprisingly, the cantilever radius of curvature, commonly not considered, plays a crucial role and can be exploited to decrease angular detection noise. We demonstrate a reduction in angular detection shot noise of more than an order of magnitude on a home-built AFM with a commercial 450 μm long cantilever by exploiting the optical properties of the cantilever curvature caused by the reflective gold coating. Lastly, we demonstrate how cantilever curvature can be responsible for up to 45% of the variability in the measured sensitivity of cantilevers on commercially available AFMs. PMID:21280834

  5. Cantilevers orthodontics forces measured by fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Neblyssa; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Valmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    Fibers Bragg Gratings were used to evaluate the transmission of the forces generates by orthodontic mechanic based one and two cantilevers used to move molars to the upright position. The results showed levels forces of approximately 0,14N near to the root of the molar with one and two cantilevers.

  6. Prototype cantilevers for quantitative lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, Mark G.; Gates, Richard S.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Cook, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    Prototype cantilevers are presented that enable quantitative surface force measurements using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ''hammerhead'' cantilevers facilitate precise optical lever system calibrations for cantilever flexure and torsion, enabling quantifiable adhesion measurements and friction measurements by lateral force microscopy (LFM). Critically, a single hammerhead cantilever of known flexural stiffness and probe length dimension can be used to perform both a system calibration as well as surface force measurements in situ, which greatly increases force measurement precision and accuracy. During LFM calibration mode, a hammerhead cantilever allows an optical lever ''torque sensitivity'' to be generated for the quantification of LFM friction forces. Precise calibrations were performed on two different AFM instruments, in which torque sensitivity values were specified with sub-percent relative uncertainty. To examine the potential for accurate lateral force measurements using the prototype cantilevers, finite element analysis predicted measurement errors of a few percent or less, which could be reduced via refinement of calibration methodology or cantilever design. The cantilevers are compatible with commercial AFM instrumentation and can be used for other AFM techniques such as contact imaging and dynamic mode measurements.

  7. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-21

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  8. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-04-15

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  9. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Goodman, Miriam B.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or “clamps” the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of μN force and nm up to tens of μm displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode. PMID:21529009

  10. Resonance response of scanning force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.; Allison, D.P. ); Huang, A. )

    1994-08-01

    A variational method is used to calculate the deflection and the fundamental and harmonic resonance frequencies of commercial V-shaped and rectangular atomic force microscopy cantilevers. The effective mass of V-shaped cantilevers is roughly half that calculated for the equivalent rectangular cantilevers. Damping by environmental gases, including air, nitrogen, argon, and helium, affects the frequency of maximum response and to a much greater degree the quality factor [ital Q]. Helium has the lowest viscosity, resulting in the highest [ital Q], and thus provides the best sensitivity in noncontact force microscopy. Damping in liquids is dominated by an increase in effective mass of the cantilever due to an added mass of the liquid being dragged with that cantilever.

  11. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  12. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  13. Self-driving capacitive cantilevers for high-frequency atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Keith A.; Yang, Benjamin H.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple way to actuate an atomic force microscope cantilever at high frequencies by electrically driving a thin-film capacitor on its surface. Capacitive driving directly actuates the vibrational mode of the cantilever, removing the effects of unwanted mechanical modes present in conventional driving systems and removing the need for a drive piezoelectric. Practical vibration amplitudes are attainable at drive voltages <5 V. We capacitively drive the first mechanical resonance of a tapping mode cantilever (243 kHz) and a high-frequency cantilever (1.5 MHz) with vibration amplitudes in agreement with our model of capacitive driving.

  14. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Zeno; Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds. PMID:26199849

  15. Finite element modeling of atomic force microscopy cantilever dynamics during video rate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Howard-Knight, J. P.; Hobbs, J. K.

    2011-04-01

    A dynamic finite element model has been constructed to simulate the behavior of low spring constant atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers used for imaging at high speed without active feedback as in VideoAFM. The model is tested against experimental data collected at 20 frame/s and good agreement is found. The complex dynamics of the cantilever, consisting of traveling waves coming from the tip sample interaction, reflecting off the cantilever-substrate junction, and interfering with new waves created at the tip, are revealed. The construction of the image from this resulting nonequilibrium cantilever deflection is also examined. Transient tip-sample forces are found to reach values up to 260 nN on a calibration grid sample, and the maximum forces do not always correspond to the position of steepest features as a result of energy stored in the cantilever.

  16. Resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Cantrell, Sean A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope and methodology called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features.

  17. Macroscopic model of scanning force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Guerra-Vela, Claudio; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2004-10-05

    A macroscopic version of the Scanning Force Microscope is described. It consists of a cantilever under the influence of external forces, which mimic the tip-sample interactions. The use of this piece of equipment is threefold. First, it serves as direct way to understand the parts and functions of the Scanning Force Microscope, and thus it is effectively used as an instructional tool. Second, due to its large size, it allows for simple measurements of applied forces and parameters that define the state of motion of the system. This information, in turn, serves to compare the interaction forces with the reconstructed ones, which cannot be done directly with the standard microscopic set up. Third, it provides a kinematics method to non-destructively measure elastic constants of materials, such as Young's and shear modules, with special application for brittle materials.

  18. Enhanced quality factors and force sensitivity by attaching magnetic beads to cantilevers for atomic force microscopy in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoof, Sebastian; Nand Gosvami, Nitya; Hoogenboom, Bart W.

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid remains complicated due to the strong viscous damping of the cantilever resonance. Here, we show that a high-quality resonance (Q >20) can be achieved in aqueous solution by attaching a microgram-bead at the end of the nanogram-cantilever. The resulting increase in cantilever mass causes the resonance frequency to drop significantly. However, the force sensitivity—as expressed via the minimum detectable force gradient—is hardly affected, because of the enhanced quality factor. Through the enhancement of the quality factor, the attached bead also reduces the relative importance of noise in the deflection detector. It can thus yield an improved signal-to-noise ratio when this detector noise is significant. We describe and analyze these effects for a set-up that includes magnetic actuation of the cantilevers and that can be easily implemented in any AFM system that is compatible with an inverted optical microscope.

  19. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  20. The poor man's scanning force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-Vela, Claudio; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2002-03-01

    The Macroscope (Zypman F R and Guerra-Vela C 2001 Eur. J. Phys. 22 17-30), an educational large-scale version of a scanning force microscope's cantilever-tip system, is used in the presence of nonlinear forces. This paper presents quantitative experimental evidence confirming the validity of the beam model (BM) (Eppel S J, Todd B A and Zypman F R 2000 Materials Issues and Modeling for Device Nanofabrication ed L Merhari et al (Pittsburgh, PA: Materials Research Society) pp 584, 189) as a proper reconstruction algorithm. As a teaching laboratory experiment, the force measurements are first done directly with a variety of dynamometer-like setups. Subsequently, the measurements are performed indirectly with the Macroscope from the cantilever resonant frequency shifts and the BM algorithm. Two central results of this work lie in its ability to compare forces obtained by traditional algorithms with known forces, and to illustrate in a hands-on fashion the principles behind the working of a scanning force microscope.

  1. Cantilevers and tips for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tortonese, M

    1997-01-01

    The cantilever and the tip are at the centerpiece of the AFM. Properties such as the cantilever stiffness and resonant frequency, tip shape and sharpness, and material characteristics determine the mode of operation of the AFM and the type of experiments and measurements that can be performed. The possibility of batch fabricating cantilevers has permitted the fabrication and characterization of specialized tips for a variety of experiments. We believe that the use of new materials and tip shapes will allow new applications for the AFM in the future. PMID:9086369

  2. Force spectroscopy with a large dynamic range using small cantilevers and an array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2002-04-01

    The important characteristics of a detector for force spectroscopy measurements are sensitivity, linearity and dynamic range. The commonly used two-segment detector that measures the position of a light beam reflected from the force-sensing cantilever in an atomic force microscope becomes nonlinear when the beam shifts significantly onto one of the segments. For a detection setup optimized for high sensitivity, such as needed for the use with small cantilevers, it is shown both experimentally and theoretically that the dynamic range extends to an upper detection limit of only about 115 nm in cantilever deflection if <10% nonlinearity is required. A detector is presented that circumvents that limitation. This detector is based on a linear arrangement of multiple photodiode segments that are read out individually. With such an array detector, the irradiance distribution of the reflected beam is measured. The reflected beam not only shifts in position but also deforms when the cantilever deflects because the bent cantilever acts as a curved mirror. The mean of the distribution, however, is a linear function of cantilever deflection in both theory and experiment. An array detector is consequently well suited for force measurements for which both high sensitivity and a large dynamic range are required.

  3. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  4. Improved single molecule force spectroscopy using micromachined cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Bull, Matthew S; Sullan, Ruby May A; Li, Hongbin; Perkins, Thomas T

    2014-05-27

    Enhancing the short-term force precision of atomic force microscopy (AFM) while maintaining excellent long-term force stability would result in improved performance across multiple AFM modalities, including single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). SMFS is a powerful method to probe the nanometer-scale dynamics and energetics of biomolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins). The folding and unfolding rates of such macromolecules are sensitive to sub-pN changes in force. Recently, we demonstrated sub-pN stability over a broad bandwidth (Δf = 0.01-16 Hz) by removing the gold coating from a 100 μm long cantilever. However, this stability came at the cost of increased short-term force noise, decreased temporal response, and poor sensitivity. Here, we avoided these compromises while retaining excellent force stability by modifying a short (L = 40 μm) cantilever with a focused ion beam. Our process led to a ∼10-fold reduction in both a cantilever's stiffness and its hydrodynamic drag near a surface. We also preserved the benefits of a highly reflective cantilever while mitigating gold-coating induced long-term drift. As a result, we extended AFM's sub-pN bandwidth by a factor of ∼50 to span five decades of bandwidth (Δf ≈ 0.01-1000 Hz). Measurements of mechanically stretching individual proteins showed improved force precision coupled with state-of-the-art force stability and no significant loss in temporal resolution compared to the stiffer, unmodified cantilever. Finally, these cantilevers were robust and were reused for SFMS over multiple days. Hence, we expect these responsive, yet stable, cantilevers to broadly benefit diverse AFM-based studies. PMID:24670198

  5. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Measuring energies with an Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, J.; Díez-Pérez, I.; Sanz, F.; Fraxedas, J.

    2006-04-01

    The elastic and plastic response of ordered inorganic, organic and biological materials involving nanometer-scale volumes in the nano- and low micronewton force range can be characterized by means of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) using ultrasharp cantilever tips with radius R typically below 10 nm. Because the plastic onset can be easily identified, the maximal accumulated elastic energy can be directly determined from the force curves (force F vs. penetration δ curves), thus giving a realistic estimate of the characteristic energies of the materials. We illustrate the ability of AFMs to determine such energies with the case example of the molecular organic metal TTF-TCNQ (TTF = tetrathiafulvalene, TCNQ = tetracyanoquinodimethane), where the enthalpy of sublimation is obtained.

  7. Forced Vibrations of a Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is "downwards", i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping…

  8. Vertical electrostatic force in MEMS cantilever IR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezadad, Imen; Boroumand Azad, Javaneh; Smith, Evan M.; Alhasan, Ammar; Peale, Robert E.

    2014-06-01

    A MEMS cantilever IR detector that repetitively lifts from the surface under the influence of a saw-tooth electrostatic force, where the contact duty cycle is a measure of the absorbed IR radiation, is analyzed. The design is comprised of three parallel conducting plates. Fixed buried and surface plates are held at opposite potential. A moveable cantilever is biased the same as the surface plate. Calculations based on energy methods with position-dependent capacity and electrostatic induction coefficients demonstrate the upward sign of the force on the cantilever and determine the force magnitude. 2D finite element method calculations of the local fields confirm the sign of the force and determine its distribution across the cantilever. The upward force is maximized when the surface plate is slightly larger than the other two. The electrostatic repulsion is compared with Casimir sticking force to determine the maximum useful contact area. MEMS devices were fabricated and the vertical displacement of the cantilever was observed in a number of experiments. The approach may be applied also to MEMS actuators and micromirrors.

  9. Nanoscale thermal processing using a heated atomic force microscope tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Brent A.

    This dissertation aims to advance the current state of use of silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers with integrated heaters. To this end, the research consists of two primary thrusts---demonstrating new applications for the cantilevers, and advancing the current state of understanding of their thermal and mechanical behavior to enable further applications. Among new applications, two are described. In the first application, the cantilevers are used for nanoscale material deposition, using heat to modulate the delivery of material from the nanoscale tip. In the second application, the cantilever performs thermal analysis with nanoscale spatial resolution, enabling thermal characterization of near surface and composite interphase regions that cannot be measured with bulk analysis techniques. The second thrust of the research seeks to address fundamental questions concerning the precision use of heated cantilevers. Efforts to this end include characterizing the mechanical, electrical, and thermal behavior of the cantilevers, and optimizing calibration methodology. A technique is developed for calibrating the cantilever spring constant while operating at elevated temperature. Finally, an analytical model is developed for the heat flow in the cantilever tip and relevant dimensionless numbers that govern the relative importance of the various components of the thermal environment are identified. The dimensionless numbers permit exploration of the sensitivity of the tip-substrate interface temperature to the environmental conditions.

  10. Intrinsic dissipation in atomic force microscopy cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Zypman, Fredy

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we build a practical modification to the standard Euler-Bernoulli equation for flexural modes of cantilever vibrations most relevant for operation of AFM in high vacuum conditions. This is done by the study of a new internal dissipation term into the Euler-Bernoulli equation. This term remains valid in ultra-high vacuum, and becomes particularly relevant when viscous dissipation with the fluid environment becomes negligible. We derive a compact explicit equation for the quality factor versus pressure for all the flexural modes. This expression is used to compare with corresponding extant high vacuum experiments. We demonstrate that a single internal dissipation parameter and a single viscosity parameter provide enough information to reproduce the first three experimental flexural resonances at all pressures. The new term introduced here has a mesoscopic origin in the relative motion between adjacent layers in the cantilever. PMID:21741914

  11. Lead zirconate titanate cantilever for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Y.; Fujii, T.; Watanabe, S.; Tonoli, A.; Carabelli, S.; Yamada, H.; Bleuler, H.

    1999-02-01

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy with frequency modulation detection is a promising technique for surface observation with true atomic resolution. The piezoelectric material itself can be an actuator and sensor of the oscillating probe simultaneously, without the need for additional electro-mechanical transducers or other measurement systems. A vertical resolution of 0.01 nm rms has been achieved using a microfabricated cantilever with lead zirconate titanate thin film in noncontact mode frequency modulation detection. The cantilever also has a sharpened pyramidal stylus with a radius of about 10 nm for noncontact atomic force microscopy.

  12. Compact cantilever force probe for plasma pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C. A. F.

    2007-12-15

    A simple, compact cantilever force probe (CFP) has been developed for plasma pressure measurements. It is based on the pull-in phenomenon well known in microelectromechanical-system electrostatic actuators. The probe consists of a thin (25 {mu}m) titanium foil cantilever (38 mm of length and 14 mm of width) and a fixed electrode separated by a 0.75 mm gap. The probe is shielded by brass box and enclosed into boron nitride housing with a 9 mm diameter window for exposing part of cantilever surface to the plasma. When the voltage is applied between the cantilever and the electrode, an attractive electrostatic force is counterbalanced by cantilever restoring spring force. At some threshold (pull-in) voltage the system becomes unstable and the cantilever abruptly pulls toward the fixed electrode until breakdown occurs between them. The threshold voltage is sensitive to an additional externally applied force, while a simple detection of breakdown occurrence can be used to measure that threshold voltage value. The sensitivity to externally applied forces obtained during calibration is 0.28 V/{mu}N (17.8 V/Pa for pressure). However, the resolution of the measurements is {+-}0.014 mN ({+-}0.22 Pa) due to the statistical scattering in measured pull-in voltages. The diagnostic temporal resolution is {approx}10 ms, being determined by the dynamics of pull-in process. The probe has been tested in the tokamak ISTTOK edge plasma, and a plasma force of {approx}0.07 mN (plasma pressure {approx}1.1 Pa) has been obtained near the leading edge of the limiter. This value is in a reasonable agreement with the estimations using local plasma parameters measured by electrical probes. The use of the described CFP is limited by a heat flux of Q{approx}10{sup 6} W/m{sup 2} due to uncontrollable rise of the cantilever temperature ({delta}T{approx}20 deg. C) during CFP response time.

  13. Shear force microscopy using piezoresistive cantilevers in surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotszalk, Teodor; Kopiec, Daniel; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Janus, Paweł; Grabiec, Piotr; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-09-01

    In this article we describe application of piezoresistive cantilevers in surface investigations carried out with the use of shear force microscopy (ShFM). The novel piezoresistive cantilevers integrate a Wheatstone piezoresistive bridge was used to detect the cantilever deflection, thermal deflection detector and planar tip protruding out of the spring beam. Because the planar tip deflection can be detected and controlled electronically the described technology is very flexible and can be applied in many surface investigations. In this article we will present operation theory of the described solution, experimental setup, methods for calibration of the tip deflection detection and actuation The analysis will be illustrated with example results of topography measurements performed using the described technology.

  14. Contractile cell forces deform macroscopic cantilevers and quantify biomaterial performance.

    PubMed

    Allenstein, U; Mayr, S G; Zink, M

    2015-07-01

    Cells require adhesion to survive, proliferate and migrate, as well as for wound healing and many other functions. The strength of contractile cell forces on an underlying surface is a highly relevant quantity to measure the affinity of cells to a rigid surface with and without coating. Here we show with experimental and theoretical studies that these forces create surface stresses that are sufficient to induce measurable bending of macroscopic cantilevers. Since contractile forces are linked to the formation of focal contacts, results give information on adhesion promoting qualities and allow a comparison of very diverse materials. In exemplary studies, in vitro fibroblast adhesion on the magnetic shape memory alloy Fe-Pd and on the l-lysine derived plasma-functionalized polymer PPLL was determined. We show that cells on Fe-Pd are able to induce surface stresses three times as high as on pure titanium cantilevers. A further increase was observed for PPLL, where the contractile forces are four times higher than on the titanium reference. In addition, we performed finite element simulations on the beam bending to back up the calculation of contractile forces from cantilever bending under non-homogenous surface stress. Our findings consolidate the role of contractile forces as a meaningful measure of biomaterial performance. PMID:26027952

  15. Precise and direct method for the measurement of the torsion spring constant of the atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarząbek, D. M.

    2015-01-15

    A direct method for the evaluation of the torsional spring constants of the atomic force microscope cantilevers is presented in this paper. The method uses a nanoindenter to apply forces at the long axis of the cantilever and in the certain distance from it. The torque vs torsion relation is then evaluated by the comparison of the results of the indentations experiments at different positions on the cantilever. Next, this relation is used for the precise determination of the torsional spring constant of the cantilever. The statistical analysis shows that the standard deviation of the calibration measurements is equal to approximately 1%. Furthermore, a simple method for calibration of the photodetector’s lateral response is proposed. The overall procedure of the lateral calibration constant determination has the accuracy approximately equal to 10%.

  16. Self-sensing piezoresistive cantilever and its magnetic force microscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Ando, Kazunori; Shirakawabe, Yoshiharu

    2002-05-01

    A newly developed Si self-sensing piezoresistive cantilever is presented. Si piezoresistive cantilevers for scanning microscopy are fabricated by Si micro-machining technique. The sensitivity of the piezoresistive cantilever is comparable to the current laser detecting system. Topographic images are successfully obtained with the piezoresistive cantilever and some comparisons are made with the laser detecting system. Furthermore, the magnetic film (Co-Cr-Pt) is coated on the tip of the piezoresistive cantilever for magnetic force microscopy (MFM) application. The magnetic images are successfully obtained with the self-sensing MFM piezoresistive cantilever. The self-sensing piezoresistive cantilevers have been successfully applied in scanning probe microscopy and MFM. PMID:12211485

  17. Coaxial atomic force microscope tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. A.; Aguilar, J. A.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate coaxial atomic force microscope (AFM) tweezers that can trap and place small objects using dielectrophoresis (DEP). An attractive force is generated at the tip of a coaxial AFM probe by applying a radio frequency voltage between the center conductor and a grounded shield; the origin of the force is found to be DEP by measuring the pull-off force versus applied voltage. We show that the coaxial AFM tweezers can perform three-dimensional assembly by picking up a specified silica microsphere, imaging with the microsphere at the end of the tip, and placing it at a target destination.

  18. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Gates, Richard S.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Smith, Douglas T.; Cook, Robert F.

    2013-11-15

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  19. Viscous drag measurements utilizing microfabricated cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Oden, P.I.; Chen, G.Y.; Steele, R.A.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.

    1996-06-01

    The influence of viscous drag forces on cantilevers is investigated using standard atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. Viscosity effects on several geometrically different cantilevers manifest themselves as variations in resonance frequencies, quality factors, and cantilever response amplitudes. With this novel measurement, a single cantilever can be used to measure viscosities ranging from {eta}=10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup 2} g/cms. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Laser Actuation of Cantilevers for Picometre Amplitude Dynamic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Drew R.; Tayati, Ponlawat; An, Hongjie; Lam, Ping Koy; Craig, Vincent S. J.; Senden, Tim J.

    2014-01-01

    As nanoscale and molecular devices become reality, the ability to probe materials on these scales is increasing in importance. To address this, we have developed a dynamic force microscopy technique where the flexure of the microcantilever is excited using an intensity modulated laser beam to achieve modulation on the picoscale. The flexure arises from thermally induced bending through differential expansion and the conservation of momentum when the photons are reflected and absorbed by the cantilever. In this study, we investigated the photothermal and photon pressure responses of monolithic and layered cantilevers using a modulated laser in air and immersed in water. The developed photon actuation technique is applied to the stretching of single polymer chains. PMID:24993548

  1. Laser actuation of cantilevers for picometre amplitude dynamic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Evans, Drew R; Tayati, Ponlawat; An, Hongjie; Lam, Ping Koy; Craig, Vincent S J; Senden, Tim J

    2014-01-01

    As nanoscale and molecular devices become reality, the ability to probe materials on these scales is increasing in importance. To address this, we have developed a dynamic force microscopy technique where the flexure of the microcantilever is excited using an intensity modulated laser beam to achieve modulation on the picoscale. The flexure arises from thermally induced bending through differential expansion and the conservation of momentum when the photons are reflected and absorbed by the cantilever. In this study, we investigated the photothermal and photon pressure responses of monolithic and layered cantilevers using a modulated laser in air and immersed in water. The developed photon actuation technique is applied to the stretching of single polymer chains. PMID:24993548

  2. Correction of the viscous drag induced errors in macromolecular manipulation experiments using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runcong; Roman, Marisa; Yang, Guoliang

    2010-06-01

    We describe a method to correct the errors induced by viscous drag on the cantilever in macromolecular manipulation experiments using the atomic force microscope. The cantilever experiences a viscous drag force in these experiments because of its motion relative to the surrounding liquid. This viscous force superimposes onto the force generated by the macromolecule under study, causing ambiguity in the experimental data. To remove this artifact, we analyzed the motions of the cantilever and the liquid in macromolecular manipulation experiments, and developed a novel model to treat the viscous drag on the cantilever as the superposition of the viscous force on a static cantilever in a moving liquid and that on a bending cantilever in a static liquid. The viscous force was measured under both conditions and the results were used to correct the viscous drag induced errors from the experimental data. The method will be useful for many other cantilever based techniques, especially when high viscosity and high cantilever speed are involved. PMID:20590242

  3. Correction of the viscous drag induced errors in macromolecular manipulation experiments using atomic force microscope

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runcong; Roman, Marisa; Yang, Guoliang

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method to correct the errors induced by viscous drag on the cantilever in macromolecular manipulation experiments using the atomic force microscope. The cantilever experiences a viscous drag force in these experiments because of its motion relative to the surrounding liquid. This viscous force superimposes onto the force generated by the macromolecule under study, causing ambiguity in the experimental data. To remove this artifact, we analyzed the motions of the cantilever and the liquid in macromolecular manipulation experiments, and developed a novel model to treat the viscous drag on the cantilever as the superposition of the viscous force on a static cantilever in a moving liquid and that on a bending cantilever in a static liquid. The viscous force was measured under both conditions and the results were used to correct the viscous drag induced errors from the experimental data. The method will be useful for many other cantilever based techniques, especially when high viscosity and high cantilever speed are involved. PMID:20590242

  4. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-15

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17 fm/{radical}(Hz) by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  5. Small cantilevers for atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viani, M. B.; Schaffer, T. E.; Chand, A.; Smith, B. L.; Hansma, P. K.; Wendman, M.

    1998-03-01

    Small cantilevers offer new possibilities for high speed/low noise atomic force microscopy of soft, biological samples. We have used a novel process to fabricate metallic cantilevers that should maximize reflectivity and minimize thermal bending. We have fabricated and measured the properties of aluminum, nickel, silver, and 14-karat gold cantilevers that are 3-12 um long, 1-4 um wide, and 60-300 nm thick and have resonant frequencies of 0.5-2 MHz and spring constants of 0.1-3 N/m. We also have fabricated small cantilevers with ultra-low spring constants (1-10 mN/m) out of silicon nitride and used them for force spectroscopy of DNA. This work was supported by grant numbers NSF-DMR9622169 and NSF-DMR9632716 from the Materials Research Division of the National Science Foundation and by grant number DAAH04-96-1-004 from the Army Research Office.

  6. Implementation of Akiyama probe in low temperature magnetic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, Paul; Wu, Weida

    Exotic phenomena often call for high sensitivity scanning probe microscopic techniques working at extremely low temperatures. Specifically, it is of great fundamental interest to detect the weak magnetic signals in a range of interesting systems such as, quantum anomalous Hall, skyrmion, heavy-fermion, and multiferroic systems. To this end, we are developing low temperature magnetic force microscope (MFM) using a self-sensing cantilever called Akiyama-probe (A-probe). The main advantage of this specific probe is its extremely low power-dissipation compared to other self-sensing (e.g. piezoresistive) cantilevers for low temperature application. We will present progress of the implementation of A-probe and preliminary results under various conditions. This work is supported by DOE BES under Award DE-SC0008147.

  7. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans.

    PubMed

    Meier, Tobias; Förste, Alexander; Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meyners, Dirk; Gröger, Roland; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Schimmel, Thomas; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm(3) is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm(3). In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers. PMID:25821686

  8. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans

    PubMed Central

    Förste, Alexander; Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meyners, Dirk; Gröger, Roland; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Schimmel, Thomas; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Summary We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm3 is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm3. In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers. PMID:25821686

  9. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: Theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction

    SciTech Connect

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A.; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

  10. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction.

    PubMed

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A; Loring, Roger F

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers. PMID:24320286

  11. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-01

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  12. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  13. Quantitative comparison of two independent lateral force calibration techniques for the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Barkley, Sarice S.; Cannara, Rachel J.; Deng Zhao; Gates, Richard S.; Reitsma, Mark G.

    2012-02-15

    Two independent lateral-force calibration methods for the atomic force microscope (AFM)--the hammerhead (HH) technique and the diamagnetic lateral force calibrator (D-LFC)--are systematically compared and found to agree to within 5% or less, but with precision limited to about 15%, using four different tee-shaped HH reference probes. The limitations of each method, both of which offer independent yet feasible paths toward traceable accuracy, are discussed and investigated. We find that stiff cantilevers may produce inconsistent D-LFC values through the application of excessively high normal loads. In addition, D-LFC results vary when the method is implemented using different modes of AFM feedback control, constant height and constant force modes, where the latter is more consistent with the HH method and closer to typical experimental conditions. Specifically, for the D-LFC apparatus used here, calibration in constant height mode introduced errors up to 14 %. In constant force mode using a relatively stiff cantilever, we observed an {approx_equal} 4 % systematic error per {mu}N of applied load for loads {<=} 1 {mu}N. The issue of excessive load typically emerges for cantilevers whose flexural spring constant is large compared with the normal spring constant of the D-LFC setup (such that relatively small cantilever flexural displacements produce relatively large loads). Overall, the HH method carries a larger uncertainty, which is dominated by uncertainty in measurement of the flexural spring constant of the HH cantilever as well as in the effective length dimension of the cantilever probe. The D-LFC method relies on fewer parameters and thus has fewer uncertainties associated with it. We thus show that it is the preferred method of the two, as long as care is taken to perform the calibration in constant force mode with low applied loads.

  14. Hyperbaric Hydrothermal Atomic Force Microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2003-07-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  15. Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2002-01-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  16. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Karcı, Özgür; Dede, Münir

    2014-10-01

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ~12 fm/√Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  17. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution.

    PubMed

    Karcı, Özgür; Dede, Münir; Oral, Ahmet

    2014-10-01

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ∼12 fm/√Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system. PMID:25362401

  18. Localized Spectroscopy using a Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, Giorgio; Lin, Qiong; Mouaziz, Schahrazede; Hunkeler, Andreas; Degen, Christian; Meier, Urban; Brugger, Juerger; Meier, Beat

    2006-03-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) constitutes a promising next-generation magnetic resonance detection device at room temperature. A MRFM observes nuclear (or electron) spin magnetization as a force, which occurs when a paramagnetic sample is polarized in inhomogeneous static magnetic field (10E5 T/m) and a high frequency drives the cantilever on-resonance by a cyclic adiabatic modulation, which make able to measure T1 rho. In this contribution, we combine the MRFM with spin-echo spectroscopy to add spectral resolution to NMR signals of micro-scale objects at room temperature. First experimental spectra recorded with the amplitude detection technique from a sample of barium chlorate monohydrate and ammonium sulfate single crystals mounted on a non commercial cantilever show resolution of 2μm and a sensitivity of 10E13 spins. The new microscope, which uses the frequency detection down to m-Hz resolution and the annealed non-commercials cantilevers, which have Q factor up to 250000 at room temperature, improve the sensitivity to 10E9 spins. This new setup and a new measurement technique should make able to measure T1.

  19. High-speed atomic force microscope based on an astigmatic detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, H.-S.; Chen, Y.-H.; Hwu, E.-T.; Chang, C.-S.; Hwang, I.-S.; Ding, R.-F.; Huang, H.-F.; Wang, W.-M.; Huang, K.-Y.

    2014-10-15

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) enables visualizing dynamic behaviors of biological molecules under physiological conditions at a temporal resolution of 1s or shorter. A small cantilever with a high resonance frequency is crucial in increasing the scan speed. However, detecting mechanical resonances of small cantilevers is technically challenging. In this study, we constructed an atomic force microscope using a digital versatile disc (DVD) pickup head to detect cantilever deflections. In addition, a flexure-guided scanner and a sinusoidal scan method were implemented. In this work, we imaged a grating sample in air by using a regular cantilever and a small cantilever with a resonance frequency of 5.5 MHz. Poor tracking was seen at the scan rate of 50 line/s when a cantilever for regular AFM imaging was used. Using a small cantilever at the scan rate of 100 line/s revealed no significant degradation in the topographic images. The results indicate that a smaller cantilever can achieve a higher scan rate and superior force sensitivity. This work shows the potential for using a DVD pickup head in future HS-AFM technology.

  20. Surface effect on the nonlinear forced vibration of cantilevered nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, H. L.; Zhao, D. M.; Zou, J. J.; Wang, L.

    2016-06-01

    The nonlinear forced vibration behavior of a cantilevered nanobeam is investigated in this paper, essentially considering the effect due to the surface elastic layer. The governing equation of motion for the nano-cantilever is derived, with consideration of the geometrical nonlinearity and the effects of additional flexural rigidity and residual stress of the surface layer. Then, the nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) is discretized into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) by means of the Galerkin's technique. It is observed that surface effects on the natural frequency of the nanobeam is of significance, especially for the case when the aspect ratio of the nanobeam is large. The nonlinear resonant dynamics of the nanobeam system is evaluated by varying the excitation frequency around the fundamental resonance, showing that the nanobeam would display hardening-type behavior and hence the frequency-response curves bend to the right in the presence of positive residual surface stress. However, with the negative residual surface stress, this hardening-type behavior can be shifted to a softening-type one which becomes even more evident with increase of the aspect ratio parameter. It is also demonstrated that the combined effects of the residual stress and aspect ratio on the maximum amplitude of the nanobeam may be pronounced.

  1. Simultaneous normal and torsional force measurement by cantilever surface contour analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumanchik, Lee; Schmitz, Tony; Pratt, Jon

    2011-05-01

    This study presents an alternative to the current Hooke's law-based force relation between rectangular cantilever deflection and applied force. In the new approach, a transduction constant is presented that (1) includes no cross-talk between torsion and normal force components, (2) is independent of the load application point, and (3) does not depend on the cantilever beam length. Rather than measuring the cantilever deformation at a single point (such as the tip location), it is measured at multiple adjacent points using scanning white light interferometry to provide a three-dimensional description of the cantilever deformation during loading. This measurement, processed by a force relation based on a superposition of deflections derived from Euler-Bernoulli bending theory and St Venant's torsion theory, provides the vertical, axial, and torsional force components simultaneously. Experimental results are compared to force predictions for the vertical and torsional components using macro-scale cantilevers under mass loading. An uncertainty analysis is also provided.

  2. A calibration method for lateral forces for use with colloidal probe force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Quintanilla, M. A. S.; Goddard, D. T.

    2008-02-15

    A calibration method is described for colloidal probe cantilevers that enables friction force measurements obtained using lateral force microscopy (LFM) to be quantified. The method is an adaptation of the lever method of Feiler et al. [A. Feiler, P. Attard, and I. Larson, Rev. Sci. Instum. 71, 2746 (2000)] and uses the advantageous positioning of probe particles that are usually offset from the central axis of the cantilever. The main sources of error in the calibration method are assessed, in particular, the potential misalignment of the long axis of the cantilever that ideally should be perpendicular to the photodiode detector. When this is not taken into account, the misalignment is shown to have a significant effect on the cantilever torsional stiffness but not on the lateral photodiode sensitivity. Also, because the friction signal is affected by the topography of the substrate, the method presented is valid only against flat substrates. Two types of particles, 20 {mu}m glass beads and UO{sub 3} agglomerates attached to silicon tapping mode cantilevers were used to test the method against substrates including glass, cleaved mica, and UO{sub 2} single crystals. Comparisons with the lateral compliance method of Cain et al. [R. G. Cain, S. Biggs, and N. W. Page, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 227, 55 (2000)] are also made.

  3. High-speed tapping-mode atomic force microscopy using a Q-controlled regular cantilever acting as the actuator: Proof-of-principle experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Balantekin, M.; Satır, S.; Torello, D.; Değertekin, F. L.

    2014-12-15

    We present the proof-of-principle experiments of a high-speed actuation method to be used in tapping-mode atomic force microscopes (AFM). In this method, we do not employ a piezotube actuator to move the tip or the sample as in conventional AFM systems, but, we utilize a Q-controlled eigenmode of a cantilever to perform the fast actuation. We show that the actuation speed can be increased even with a regular cantilever.

  4. High bandwidth deflection readout for atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Steininger, Juergen; Bibl, Matthias; Yoo, Han Woong; Schitter, Georg

    2015-10-01

    This contribution presents the systematic design of a high bandwidth deflection readout mechanism for atomic force microscopes. The widely used optical beam deflection method is revised by adding a focusing lens between the cantilever and the quadrant photodetector (QPD). This allows the utilization of QPDs with a small active area resulting in an increased detection bandwidth due to the reduced junction capacitance. Furthermore the additional lens can compensate a cross talk between a compensating z-movement of the cantilever and the deflection readout. Scaling effects are analyzed to get the optimal spot size for the given geometry of the QPD. The laser power is tuned to maximize the signal to noise ratio without limiting the bandwidth by local saturation effects. The systematic approach results in a measured -3 dB detection bandwidth of 64.5 MHz at a deflection noise density of 62fm/√Hz. PMID:26520960

  5. High bandwidth deflection readout for atomic force microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steininger, Juergen; Bibl, Matthias; Yoo, Han Woong; Schitter, Georg

    2015-10-01

    This contribution presents the systematic design of a high bandwidth deflection readout mechanism for atomic force microscopes. The widely used optical beam deflection method is revised by adding a focusing lens between the cantilever and the quadrant photodetector (QPD). This allows the utilization of QPDs with a small active area resulting in an increased detection bandwidth due to the reduced junction capacitance. Furthermore the additional lens can compensate a cross talk between a compensating z-movement of the cantilever and the deflection readout. Scaling effects are analyzed to get the optimal spot size for the given geometry of the QPD. The laser power is tuned to maximize the signal to noise ratio without limiting the bandwidth by local saturation effects. The systematic approach results in a measured -3 dB detection bandwidth of 64.5 MHz at a deflection noise density of 62 fm / √{ Hz } .

  6. Silicon cantilever functionalization for cellulose-specific chemical force imaging of switchgrass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Ida; Evans, Barbara R.; Foston, Marcus B.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-05-08

    A method for direct functionalization of silicon and silicon nitride cantilevers with bifunctional silanes was tested with model surfaces to determine adhesive forces for different hydrogen-bonding chemistries. Application for biomass surface characterization was tested by mapping switchgrass and isolated switchgrass cellulose in topographic and force-volume mode using a cellulose-specific cantilever.

  7. Silicon cantilever functionalization for cellulose-specific chemical force imaging of switchgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ida; Evans, Barbara R; Foston, Marcus B; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2015-01-01

    A method for direct functionalization of silicon and silicon nitride cantilevers with bifunctional silanes was tested with model surfaces to determine adhesive forces for different hydrogen-bonding chemistries. Application for biomass surface characterization was tested by mapping switchgrass and isolated switchgrass cellulose in topographic and force-volume mode using a cellulose-specific cantilever.

  8. Piezoresistive cantilever working in a shear force mode for in situ characterization of exposed micro- and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowski, Andrzej; Kopiec, Daniel; Janus, Paweł; Ekwińska, Magdalena; Płuska, Mariusz; Grabiec, Piotr; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method of characterization micro- and nanostructures defined in a photolithography process. To implement this method a measurement system composed of an atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a system for maskless lithography was developed. This integration enables exposed patterns to be examined in situ, without any necessity for a developing process. The microscope works in a shear force mode, uses a cantilever with a piezoresistive method of detecting deflection and can be used for measuring surfaces with high aspect ratio by applying an appropriate technology of sharpening in a focused ion beam process. The cantilever fabrication process, its calibration and examination procedures are presented. Finally, the AFM images of structures scanned directly after exposure are shown.

  9. Radiation pressure excitation of Low Temperature Atomic Force & Magnetic Force Microscope (LT-AFM/MFM) for Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karci, Ozgur; Celik, Umit; Oral, Ahmet; NanoMagnetics Instruments Ltd. Team; Middle East Tech Univ Team

    2015-03-01

    We describe a novel method for excitation of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilevers by means of radiation pressure for imaging in an AFM for the first time. Piezo excitation is the most common method for cantilever excitation, but it may cause spurious resonance peaks. A fiber optic interferometer with 1310 nm laser was used both to measure the deflection of cantilever and apply a force to the cantilever in a LT-AFM/MFM from NanoMagnetics Instruments. The laser power was modulated at the cantilever`s resonance frequency by a digital Phase Lock Loop (PLL). The force exerted by the radiation pressure on a perfectly reflecting surface by a laser beam of power P is F = 2P/c. We typically modulate the laser beam by ~ 800 μW and obtain 10nm oscillation amplitude with Q ~ 8,000 at 2.5x10-4 mbar. The cantilever's stiffness can be accurately calibrated by using the radiation pressure. We have demonstrated performance of the radiation pressure excitation in AFM/MFM by imaging a hard disk sample between 4-300K and Abrikosov vortex lattice in BSCCO single crystal at 4K to for the first time.

  10. Note: Spring constant calibration of nanosurface-engineered atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Ergincan, O. Palasantzas, G.; Kooi, B. J.

    2014-02-15

    The determination of the dynamic spring constant (k{sub d}) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers is of crucial importance for converting cantilever deflection to accurate force data. Indeed, the non-destructive, fast, and accurate measurement method of the cantilever dynamic spring constant by Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012)] is confirmed here for plane geometry but surface modified cantilevers. It is found that the measured spring constants (k{sub eff}, the dynamic one k{sub d}), and the calculated (k{sub d,1}) are in good agreement within less than 10% error.

  11. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A.

    2014-04-15

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  12. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields. PMID:24784614

  13. Thermal writing using a heated atomic force microscope tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamin, H. J.

    1996-07-01

    Resistive heating of an atomic force microscope tip was used to perform thermally induced surface modifications. Heating was achieved by dissipating power in the legs of an electrically conducting silicon cantilever. Temperatures of up to 170 °C were obtained using 40 mW of input power. Electrical measurements used to monitor the temperature showed thermal time constants of 0.35-0.45 ms, depending on whether the tip was in contact with a substrate. The heated tip was used to demonstrate thermomechanical writing on a polycarbonate substrate, as well as thermal writing of an optical phase change material.

  14. A variable temperature ultrahigh vacuum atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Q.; Vollmer, R.; Carpick, R.W.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.

    1995-11-01

    A new atomic force microscope (AFM) that operates in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) is described. The sample is held fixed with spring clamps while the AMF cantilever and deflection sensor are scanned above it. Thus, the sample is easily coupled to a liquid nitrogen cooled thermal reservoir which allows AFM operation from {approx}100 K to room temperature. AFM operation above room temperature is also possible. The microscope head is capable of coarse {ital x}-{ital y} positioning over millimeter distances so that AFM images can be taken virtually anywhere upon a macroscopic sample. The optical beam deflection scheme is used for detection, allowing simultaneous normal and lateral force measurements. The sample can be transferred from the AFM stage to a low energy electron diffraction/Auger electron spectrometer stage for surface analysis. Atomic lattice resolution AFM images taken in UHV are presented at 110, 296, and 430 K. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  15. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  16. Differential force microscope for long time-scale biophysical measurements

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Jason L.; Parekh, Sapun H.; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Liu, Allen P.; Bustamante, Carlos; Footer, Matthew J.; Theriot, Julie A.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Force microscopy techniques including optical trapping, magnetic tweezers, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have facilitated quantification of forces and distances on the molecular scale. However, sensitivity and stability limitations have prevented the application of these techniques to biophysical systems that generate large forces over long times, such as actin filament networks. Growth of actin networks drives cellular shape change and generates nano-Newtons of force over time scales of minutes to hours, and consequently network growth properties have been difficult to study. Here, we present an AFM-based differential force microscope with integrated epifluorescence imaging in which two adjacent cantilevers on the same rigid support are used to provide increased measurement stability. We demonstrate 14 nm displacement control over measurement times of 3 hours and apply the instrument to quantify actin network growth in vitro under controlled loads. By measuring both network length and total network fluorescence simultaneously, we show that the average cross-sectional density of the growing network remains constant under static loads. The differential force microscope presented here provides a sensitive method for quantifying force and displacement with long time-scale stability that is useful for measurements of slow biophysical processes in whole cells or in reconstituted molecular systems in vitro. PMID:17477674

  17. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  18. A homemade atomic force microscope based on a quartz tuning fork for undergraduate instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingzi; Zhang, Liwen; Shan, Guanqiao; Song, Zihang; Yang, Rui; Li, Hua; Qian, Jianqiang

    2016-06-01

    Atomic force microscopes are a key tool in nanotechnology that overcome the limitations of optical microscopes and provide imaging capabilities with nanoscale resolution. We have developed an atomic force microscope that uses an inexpensive quartz tuning fork as a micro cantilever. Because of its ease of operation and its open structure, it can be easily customized by students. Due to its low costs, it is possible that every student in the course has access to one setup, allowing all students to obtain deep insights into nanotechnology and to understand the principles of atomic force microscopy.

  19. Direct measurement of single-molecule visco-elasticity in atomic force microscope force-extension experiments.

    PubMed

    Bippes, Christian A; Humphris, Andrew D L; Stark, Martin; Müller, Daniel J; Janovjak, Harald

    2006-02-01

    Measuring the visco-elastic properties of biological macromolecules constitutes an important step towards the understanding of dynamic biological processes, such as cell adhesion, muscle function, or plant cell wall stability. Force spectroscopy techniques based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) are increasingly used to study the complex visco-elastic response of (bio-)molecules on a single-molecule level. These experiments either require that the AFM cantilever is actively oscillated or that the molecule is clamped at constant force to monitor thermal cantilever motion. Here we demonstrate that the visco-elasticity of single bio-molecules can readily be extracted from the Brownian cantilever motion during conventional force-extension measurements. It is shown that the characteristics of the cantilever determine the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and time resolution. Using a small cantilever, the visco-elastic properties of single dextran molecules were resolved with a time resolution of 8.3 ms. The presented approach can be directly applied to probe the dynamic response of complex bio-molecular systems or proteins in force-extension experiments. PMID:16237549

  20. Selective nano-patterning of graphene using a heated atomic force microscope tip

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young-Soo; Wu, Xuan; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we introduce a selective thermochemical nano-patterning method of graphene on insulating substrates. A tiny heater formed at the end of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is optimized by a finite element method. The cantilever device is fabricated using conventional micromachining processes. After preliminary tests of the cantilever device, nano-patterning experiments are conducted with various conducting and insulating samples. The results indicate that faster scanning speed and higher contact force are desirable to reduce the sizes of nano-patterns. With the experimental condition of 1 μm/s and 24 mW, the heated AFM tip generates a graphene oxide layer of 3.6 nm height and 363 nm width, on a 300 nm thick SiO{sub 2} layer, with a tip contact force of 100 nN.

  1. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  2. Relative surface charge density mapping with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, W F; Hoh, J H

    1999-01-01

    An experimental approach for producing relative charge density maps of biological surfaces using the atomic force microscope is presented. This approach, called D minus D (D-D) mapping, uses isoforce surfaces collected at different salt concentrations to remove topography and isolate electrostatic contributions to the tip-sample interaction force. This approach is quantitative for surface potentials below 25 mV, and does not require prior knowledge of the cantilever spring constant, tip radius, or tip charge. In addition, D-D mapping does not require tip-sample contact. The performance of D-D mapping is demonstrated on surfaces of constant charge and varying topography (mechanically roughened mica and stacked bilayers of dipalmitolphosphatidylserine), a surface of varying charge and varying topography (patches of dipalmitolphosphatidylcholine on mica), and bacteriorhopsin membranes adsorbed to mica. PMID:9876166

  3. Cell force measurements in 3D microfabricated environments based on compliant cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Mattia; Gadhari, Neha; Boero, Giovanni; Chiquet, Matthias; Brugger, Jürgen

    2014-01-21

    We report the fabrication, functionalization and testing of microdevices for cell culture and cell traction force measurements in three-dimensions (3D). The devices are composed of bent cantilevers patterned with cell-adhesive spots not lying on the same plane, and thus suspending cells in 3D. The cantilevers are soft enough to undergo micrometric deflections when cells pull on them, allowing cell forces to be measured by means of optical microscopy. Since individual cantilevers are mechanically independent of each other, cell traction forces are determined directly from cantilever deflections. This proves the potential of these new devices as a tool for the quantification of cell mechanics in a system with well-defined 3D geometry and mechanical properties. PMID:24217771

  4. Blocked force measurement of an electro-active paper actuator using a cantilevered force transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Gyu-young; Kim, Heung Soo; Kim, Jaehwan

    2008-04-01

    The blocked force of an electro-active paper (EAPap) actuator was measured by a custom-built force transducer. The tip deflection of the force transducer was measured and converted into force using a simple Euler beam model. Since the blocked force is the maximum force generated at the tip of a bending actuator without displacement, the blocked force was found from the measured force of the transducer by extrapolating it. The force transducer was made from a thin steel cantilever beam and calibrated using a linear stage and a micro-balance. The measured maximum free bending displacement of the EAPap actuator was 4.4 mm and the blocked force was 224 µN under 350 V mm-1 AC electric field and 33 µN under DC electric field with the same field strength. When an AC electric field was applied to the actuator, the generated blocked force of the EAPap was about 700% larger than that caused by DC excitation. The proposed blocked force measurement is accurate down to a micro-Newton resolution under DC as well as AC electric fields.

  5. Long reach cantilevers for sub-cellular force measurements.

    PubMed

    Paneru, Govind; Thapa, Prem S; McBride, Sean P; Ramm, Adam; Law, Bruce M; Flanders, Bret N

    2012-11-16

    Maneuverable, high aspect ratio poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT) fibers are fabricated for use as cellular force probes that can interface with individual pseudopod adhesive contact sites without forming unintentional secondary contacts to the cell. The straight fibers have lengths between 5 and 40 μm and spring constants in the 0.07-23.2 nN μm(-1) range. The spring constants of these fibers were measured directly using an atomic force microscope (AFM). These AFM measurements corroborate determinations based on the transverse vibrational resonance frequencies of the fibers, which is a more convenient method. These fibers are employed to characterize the time dependent forces exerted at adhesive contacts between apical pseudopods of highly migratory D. discoideum cells and the PEDOT fibers, finding an average terminal force of 3.1 ± 2.7 nN and lifetime of 23.4 ± 18.5 s to be associated with these contacts. PMID:23085541

  6. Quantitative measurement of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, H.; Hong, S.; No, K.

    2011-01-01

    A simple quantitative measurement procedure of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy is presented. This technique enables one to determine the corresponding lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity (LIOLS) of the cantilever on the given sample. Piezoelectric coefficient, d{sub 31} of BaTiO{sub 3} single crystal (-81.62 {+-} 40.22 pm/V) which was calculated using the estimated LIOLS was in good agreement with the reported value in literature.

  7. MIDAS: Lessons learned from the first spaceborne atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Mark Stephen; Arends, Herman; Butler, Bart; Gavira, Jose; Jeszenszky, Harald; Mannel, Thurid; Romstedt, Jens; Schmied, Roland; Torkar, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System (MIDAS) atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta orbiter was the first such instrument launched into space in 2004. Designed only a few years after the technique was invented, MIDAS is currently orbiting comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko and producing the highest resolution 3D images of cometary dust ever made in situ. After more than a year of continuous operation much experience has been gained with this novel instrument. Coupled with operations of the Flight Spare and advances in terrestrial AFM a set of "lessons learned" has been produced, cumulating in recommendations for future spaceborne atomic force microscopes. The majority of the design could be reused as-is, or with incremental upgrades to include more modern components (e.g. the processor). Key additional recommendations are to incorporate an optical microscope to aid the search for particles and image registration, to include a variety of cantilevers (with different spring constants) and a variety of tip geometries.

  8. Force sensing submicrometer thick cantilevers with ultra-thin piezoresistors by rapid thermal diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gel, M.; Shimoyama, I.

    2004-03-01

    One of the most important requirements for a cantilever-type sensor to obtain high force sensitivity is small thickness. By using current micromachining technology it is possible to produce cantilevers of submicrometer thickness. Where self-sensing piezoresistive cantilevers with submicrometer thickness are concerned, it is necessary to use a technology which can create ultra-thin (<100 nm) piezoresistors on a cantilever surface. This work demonstrates for the first time the application of a relatively simple, rapid thermal diffusion method by using spin-on glass film to fabricate sub-100 nm piezoresistors on an ultra-thin single-crystal silicon cantilever. Compared to other shallow junction fabrication methods, which involve implantation or deposition of a doped layer, this method is advantageous since no damage is created in the crystal structure and no toxic gas or hazardous material is used during the process. Besides, this technique can be applied by using low-cost rapid annealers, which can be readily found in most laboratories. By using this method, piezoresistive cantilevers with stiffness in the range of 0.001 N m-1 with sub-100 nm thick piezoresistors are fabricated, and a complete characterization of the fabricated cantilevers is performed.

  9. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, G. J.; Zalm, D. J. van der; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Rost, M. J.

    2015-03-15

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  10. Gating mechanosensitive channels in bacteria with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, Renata; Miller, Samantha; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Third Institute of Physics Team; School of Medical Sciences Collaboration

    The regulation of growth and integrity of bacteria is critically linked to mechanical stress. Bacteria typically maintain a high difference of osmotic pressure (turgor pressure) with respect to the environment. This pressure difference (on the order of 1 atm) is supported by the cell envelope, a composite of lipid membranes and a rigid cell wall. Turgor pressure is controlled by the ratio of osmolytes inside and outside bacteria and thus, can abruptly increase upon osmotic downshock. For structural integrity bacteria rely on the mechanical stability of the cell wall and on the action of mechanosensitive (MS) channels: membrane proteins that release solutes in response to stress in the cell envelope. We here present experimental data on MS channels gating. We activate channels by indenting living bacteria with the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). We compare responses of wild-type and mutant bacteria in which some or all MS channels have been eliminated.

  11. The mapping of yeast's G-protein coupled receptor with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Musashi; Miyachi, Yusuke; Ishii, Jun; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-03-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) can measure the adhesion force between a sample and a cantilever while simultaneously applying a rupture force during the imaging of a sample. An AFM should be useful in targeting specific proteins on a cell surface. The present study proposes the use of an AFM to measure the adhesion force between targeting receptors and their ligands, and to map the targeting receptors. In this study, Ste2p, one of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), was chosen as the target receptor. The specific force between Ste2p on a yeast cell surface and a cantilever modified with its ligand, α-factor, was measured and found to be approximately 250 pN. In addition, through continuous measuring of the cell surface, a mapping of the receptors on the cell surface could be performed, which indicated the differences in the Ste2p expression levels. Therefore, the proposed AFM system is accurate for cell diagnosis.

  12. A method for atomic force microscopy cantilever stiffness calibration under heavy fluid loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Scott J.; Cole, Daniel G.; Clark, Robert L.

    2009-12-15

    This work presents a method for force calibration of rectangular atomic force microscopy (AFM) microcantilevers under heavy fluid loading. Theoretical modeling of the thermal response of microcantilevers is discussed including a fluid-structure interaction model of the cantilever-fluid system that incorporates the results of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. This model is curve fit to the measured thermal response of a cantilever in de-ionized water and a cost function is used to quantify the difference between the theoretical model and measured data. The curve fit is performed in a way that restricts the search space to parameters that reflect heavy fluid loading conditions. The resulting fitting parameters are used to calibrate the cantilever. For comparison, cantilevers are calibrated using Sader's method in air and the thermal noise method in both air and water. For a set of eight cantilevers ranging in stiffness from 0.050 to 5.8 N/m, the maximum difference between Sader's calibration performed in air and the new method performed in water was 9.4%. A set of three cantilevers that violate the aspect ratio assumption associated with the fluid loading model (length-to-width ratios less than 3.5) ranged in stiffness from 0.85 to 4.7 N/m and yielded differences as high as 17.8%.

  13. Electrothermally driven high-frequency piezoresistive SiC cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekri, R.; Cambril, E.; Couraud, L.; Bernardi, L.; Madouri, A.; Portail, M.; Chassagne, T.; Moisson, C.; Zielinski, M.; Jiao, S.; Michaud, J.-F.; Alquier, D.; Bouloc, J.; Nony, L.; Bocquet, F.; Loppacher, C.

    2014-08-07

    Cantilevers with resonance frequency ranging from 1 MHz to 100 MHz have been developed for dynamic atomic force microscopy. These sensors are fabricated from 3C-SiC epilayers grown on Si(100) substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. They use an on-chip method both for driving and sensing the displacement of the cantilever. A first gold metallic loop deposited on top of the cantilever is used to drive its oscillation by electrothermal actuation. The sensing of this oscillation is performed by monitoring the resistance of a second Au loop. This metallic piezoresistive detection method has distinct advantages relative to more common semiconductor-based schemes. The optimization, design, fabrication, and characteristics of these cantilevers are discussed.

  14. Flexural Vibration Test of a Cantilever Beam with a Force Sensor: Fast Determination of Young's Modulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and very inexpensive undergraduate laboratory experiment for fast determination of Young's modulus at moderate temperatures with the aid of a force sensor. A strip-shaped specimen rigidly bolted to the force sensor forms a clamped-free cantilever beam. Placed in a furnace, it is subjected to free-bending vibrations followed by…

  15. Single cell adhesion force measurement for cell viability identification using an AFM cantilever-based micro putter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Kojima, Masaru; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-11-01

    Fast and sensitive cell viability identification is a key point for single cell analysis. To address this issue, this paper reports a novel single cell viability identification method based on the measurement of single cell shear adhesion force using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever-based micro putter. Viable and nonviable yeast cells are prepared and put onto three kinds of substrate surfaces, i.e. tungsten probe, gold and ITO substrate surfaces. A micro putter is fabricated from the AFM cantilever by focused ion beam etching technique. The spring constant of the micro putter is calibrated using the nanomanipulation approach. The shear adhesion force between the single viable or nonviable cell and each substrate is measured using the micro putter based on the nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. The adhesion force is calculated based on the deflection of the micro putter beam. The results show that the adhesion force of the viable cell to the substrate is much larger than that of the nonviable cell. This identification method is label free, fast, sensitive and can give quantitative results at the single cell level.

  16. Atomic Force Microscopy in Dynamic Mode with Displacement Current Detection in Double Cantilever Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Falk; Müller, Anne‑Dorothea; Hietschold, Michael; Gessner, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    A cantilever array for dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) is presented, the vertical displacement of which is analyzed by the detection of displacement currents in the electrodes. Each cantilever in the array consists of an actuation part that allows an independent vertical movement, and a sensor part. The lateral distance between the tips of the different cantilevers is fixed to 10 μm. When operated as an actuator, a voltage is applied between the silicon membrane and the underlaying electrode. Due to the resulting coulomb forces, the vertical position of the tip is controllable. The reaction time in this mode is shorter than the response time of a piezostack. The sensor part, on the other hand, allows the device to work in dynamic mode without a laser deflection system. The vertical resolution achieved is below 1 nm. The dependence of force distance curves on the excitation amplitude is shown.

  17. Analysis of dynamic cantilever behavior in tapping mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenqi; Zhang, Guang-Ming; Murphy, Mark F; Lilley, Francis; Harvey, David M; Burton, David R

    2015-10-01

    Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides phase images in addition to height and amplitude images. Although the behavior of tapping mode AFM has been investigated using mathematical modeling, comprehensive understanding of the behavior of tapping mode AFM still poses a significant challenge to the AFM community, involving issues such as the correct interpretation of the phase images. In this paper, the cantilever's dynamic behavior in tapping mode AFM is studied through a three dimensional finite element method. The cantilever's dynamic displacement responses are firstly obtained via simulation under different tip-sample separations, and for different tip-sample interaction forces, such as elastic force, adhesion force, viscosity force, and the van der Waals force, which correspond to the cantilever's action upon various different representative computer-generated test samples. Simulated results show that the dynamic cantilever displacement response can be divided into three zones: a free vibration zone, a transition zone, and a contact vibration zone. Phase trajectory, phase shift, transition time, pseudo stable amplitude, and frequency changes are then analyzed from the dynamic displacement responses that are obtained. Finally, experiments are carried out on a real AFM system to support the findings of the simulations. PMID:26303510

  18. Investigation of polymer derived ceramics cantilevers for application of high speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chia-Yun

    High speed Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a wide variety of applications ranging from nanomanufacturing to biophysics. In order to have higher scanning speed of certain AFM modes, high resonant frequency cantilevers are needed; therefore, the goal of this research is to investigate using polymer derived ceramics for possible applications in making high resonant frequency AFM cantilevers using complex cross sections. The polymer derived ceramic that will be studied, is silicon carbide. Polymer derived ceramics offer a potentially more economic fabrication approach for MEMS due to their relatively low processing temperatures and ease of complex shape design. Photolithography was used to make the desired cantilever shapes with micron scale size followed by a wet etching process to release the cantilevers from the substrates. The whole manufacturing process we use borrow well-developed techniques from the semiconducting industry, and as such this project also could offer the opportunity to reduce the fabrication cost of AFM cantilevers and MEMS in general. The characteristics of silicon carbide made from the precursor polymer, SMP-10 (Starfire Systems), were studied. In order to produce high qualities of silicon carbide cantilevers, where the major concern is defects, proper process parameters needed to be determined. Films of polymer derived ceramics often have defects due to shrinkage during the conversion process. Thus control of defects was a central issue in this study. A second, related concern was preventing oxidation; the polymer derived ceramics we chose is easily oxidized during processing. Establishing an environment without oxygen in the whole process was a significant challenge in the project. The optimization of the parameters for using photolithography and wet etching process was the final and central goal of the project; well established techniques used in microfabrication were modified for use in making the cantilever in the project. The techniques

  19. Design optimization of piezoresistive cantilevers for force sensing in air and water

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C.; Park, Sung-Jin; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2009-01-01

    Piezoresistive cantilevers fabricated from doped silicon or metal films are commonly used for force, topography, and chemical sensing at the micro- and macroscales. Proper design is required to optimize the achievable resolution by maximizing sensitivity while simultaneously minimizing the integrated noise over the bandwidth of interest. Existing analytical design methods are insufficient for modeling complex dopant profiles, design constraints, and nonlinear phenomena such as damping in fluid. Here we present an optimization method based on an analytical piezoresistive cantilever model. We use an existing iterative optimizer to minimimize a performance goal, such as minimum detectable force. The design tool is available as open source software. Optimal cantilever design and performance are found to strongly depend on the measurement bandwidth and the constraints applied. We discuss results for silicon piezoresistors fabricated by epitaxy and diffusion, but the method can be applied to any dopant profile or material which can be modeled in a similar fashion or extended to other microelectromechanical systems. PMID:19865512

  20. First Atomic Force Microscope Image from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This calibration image presents three-dimensional data from the atomic force microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, showing surface details of a substrate on the microscope station's sample wheel. It will be used as an aid for interpreting later images that will show shapes of minuscule Martian soil particles.

    The area imaged by the microscope is 40 microns by 40 microns, small enough to fit on an eyelash. The grooves in this substrate are 14 microns (0.00055 inch) apart, from center to center. The vertical dimension is exaggerated in the image to make surface details more visible. The grooves are 300 nanometers (0.00001 inch) deep.

    This is the first atomic force microscope image recorded on another planet. It was taken on July 9, 2008, during the 44th Martian day, or sol, of the Phoenix mission since landing.

    Phoenix's Swiss-made atomic force microscope builds an image of the surface shape of a particle by sensing it with a sharp tip at the end of a spring, all microfabricated out of a silicon wafer. A strain gauge records how far the spring flexes to follow the contour of the surface. It can provide details of soil-particle shapes smaller than one-hundredth the width of a human hair. This is about 20 times smaller than what can be resolved with Phoenix's optical microscope, which has provided much higher-magnification imaging than anything seen on Mars previously. Both microscopes are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer.

  1. An Atomic Force Microscope with Dual Actuation Capability for Biomolecular Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevim, Semih; Shamsudhin, Naveen; Ozer, Sevil; Feng, Luying; Fakhraee, Arielle; Ergeneman, Olgaç; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J.; Torun, Hamdi

    2016-06-01

    We report a modular atomic force microscope (AFM) design for biomolecular experiments. The AFM head uses readily available components and incorporates deflection-based optics and a piezotube-based cantilever actuator. Jetted-polymers have been used in the mechanical assembly, which allows rapid manufacturing. In addition, a FeCo-tipped electromagnet provides high-force cantilever actuation with vertical magnetic fields up to 0.55 T. Magnetic field calibration has been performed with a micro-hall sensor, which corresponds well with results from finite element magnetostatics simulations. An integrated force resolution of 1.82 and 2.98 pN, in air and in DI water, respectively was achieved in 1 kHz bandwidth with commercially available cantilevers made of Silicon Nitride. The controller and user interface are implemented on modular hardware to ensure scalability. The AFM can be operated in different modes, such as molecular pulling or force-clamp, by actuating the cantilever with the available actuators. The electromagnetic and piezoelectric actuation capabilities have been demonstrated in unbinding experiments of the biotin-streptavidin complex.

  2. An Atomic Force Microscope with Dual Actuation Capability for Biomolecular Experiments.

    PubMed

    Sevim, Semih; Shamsudhin, Naveen; Ozer, Sevil; Feng, Luying; Fakhraee, Arielle; Ergeneman, Olgaç; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J; Torun, Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    We report a modular atomic force microscope (AFM) design for biomolecular experiments. The AFM head uses readily available components and incorporates deflection-based optics and a piezotube-based cantilever actuator. Jetted-polymers have been used in the mechanical assembly, which allows rapid manufacturing. In addition, a FeCo-tipped electromagnet provides high-force cantilever actuation with vertical magnetic fields up to 0.55 T. Magnetic field calibration has been performed with a micro-hall sensor, which corresponds well with results from finite element magnetostatics simulations. An integrated force resolution of 1.82 and 2.98 pN, in air and in DI water, respectively was achieved in 1 kHz bandwidth with commercially available cantilevers made of Silicon Nitride. The controller and user interface are implemented on modular hardware to ensure scalability. The AFM can be operated in different modes, such as molecular pulling or force-clamp, by actuating the cantilever with the available actuators. The electromagnetic and piezoelectric actuation capabilities have been demonstrated in unbinding experiments of the biotin-streptavidin complex. PMID:27273214

  3. An Atomic Force Microscope with Dual Actuation Capability for Biomolecular Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sevim, Semih; Shamsudhin, Naveen; Ozer, Sevil; Feng, Luying; Fakhraee, Arielle; Ergeneman, Olgaç; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J.; Torun, Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    We report a modular atomic force microscope (AFM) design for biomolecular experiments. The AFM head uses readily available components and incorporates deflection-based optics and a piezotube-based cantilever actuator. Jetted-polymers have been used in the mechanical assembly, which allows rapid manufacturing. In addition, a FeCo-tipped electromagnet provides high-force cantilever actuation with vertical magnetic fields up to 0.55 T. Magnetic field calibration has been performed with a micro-hall sensor, which corresponds well with results from finite element magnetostatics simulations. An integrated force resolution of 1.82 and 2.98 pN, in air and in DI water, respectively was achieved in 1 kHz bandwidth with commercially available cantilevers made of Silicon Nitride. The controller and user interface are implemented on modular hardware to ensure scalability. The AFM can be operated in different modes, such as molecular pulling or force-clamp, by actuating the cantilever with the available actuators. The electromagnetic and piezoelectric actuation capabilities have been demonstrated in unbinding experiments of the biotin-streptavidin complex. PMID:27273214

  4. High-speed atomic force microscopy for large scan sizes using small cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2010-06-01

    We present a high-speed atomic force microscope that exhibits a number of practical advantages over previous designs. Its central component is a high-speed scanner with a maximum scan size of 23 µm × 23 µm and a conveniently large sample stage area (6.5 mm × 6.5 mm). In combination with small cantilevers, image rates of up to 46 images s - 1 in air and 13 images s - 1 in liquid are reached under z-feedback control. By large scan size imaging of collagen fibrils in air, sample velocities of 8.8 mm s - 1 in the xy-direction and 11 mm s - 1 in the z-direction are reached. To provide optimized imaging conditions for both large and small scan sizes, a modular scanner design allows easily exchanging the x- and y-piezos. The scanner is therefore also suited for investigations on the molecular and atomic scale, which is demonstrated by imaging the step dynamics of a calcite surface during dissolution and the hexagonal lattice of a mica surface in liquid.

  5. Nanometer-scale flow of molten polyethylene from a heated atomic force microscope tip.

    PubMed

    Felts, Jonathan R; Somnath, Suhas; Ewoldt, Randy H; King, William P

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the nanometer-scale flow of molten polyethylene from a heated atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever tip during thermal dip-pen nanolithography (tDPN). Polymer nanostructures were written for cantilever tip temperatures and substrate temperatures controlled over the range 100-260 °C and while the tip was either moving with speed 0.5-2.0 µm s(-1) or stationary and heated for 0.1-100 s. We find that polymer flow depends on surface capillary forces and not on shear between tip and substrate. The polymer mass flow rate is sensitive to the temperature-dependent polymer viscosity. The polymer flow is governed by thermal Marangoni forces and non-equilibrium wetting dynamics caused by a solidification front within the feature. PMID:22551550

  6. Nanometer-scale flow of molten polyethylene from a heated atomic force microscope tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felts, Jonathan R.; Somnath, Suhas; Ewoldt, Randy H.; King, William P.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the nanometer-scale flow of molten polyethylene from a heated atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever tip during thermal dip-pen nanolithography (tDPN). Polymer nanostructures were written for cantilever tip temperatures and substrate temperatures controlled over the range 100-260 °C and while the tip was either moving with speed 0.5-2.0 µm s-1 or stationary and heated for 0.1-100 s. We find that polymer flow depends on surface capillary forces and not on shear between tip and substrate. The polymer mass flow rate is sensitive to the temperature-dependent polymer viscosity. The polymer flow is governed by thermal Marangoni forces and non-equilibrium wetting dynamics caused by a solidification front within the feature.

  7. Phase imaging of moving DNA molecules and DNA molecules replicated in the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Argaman, M; Golan, R; Thomson, N H; Hansma, H G

    1997-01-01

    Phase imaging with a tapping mode atomic force microscope (AFM) has many advantages for imaging moving DNA and DNA-enzyme complexes in aqueous buffers at molecular resolution. In phase images molecules can be resolved at higher scan rates and lower forces than in height images from the AFM. Higher scan rates make it possible to image faster processes. At lower forces the molecules are imaged more gently. Moving DNA molecules are also resolved more clearly in phase images than in height images. Phase images in tapping mode AFM show the phase difference between oscillation of the piezoelectric crystal that drives the cantilever and oscillation of the cantilever as it interacts with the sample surface. Phase images presented here show moving DNA molecules that have been replicated with Sequenase in the AFM and DNA molecules tethered in complexes with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. PMID:9336471

  8. Forced response of a cantilever beam with a dry friction damper attached. I - Theory. II - Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.; Schwartz, H. B.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the forced vibration response of a cantilevered beam with Coulomb damping nonlinearity is described. Viscous damping in the beam is neglected. Beam and dry friction damper configurations of interest for applications to turbine blade vibrations are considered. It is shown that the basic phenomena found by Dowell (1983) for a simply supported beam with an attached dry friction damper of specific geometry also apply to a cantilevered beam and a more general representation of the dry friction damper and its associated mass and stiffness.

  9. Effect of Centrifugal Force on the Elastic Curve of a Vibrating Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkinson, Scott H; Eatherton, Laurel J; Millenson, Morton B

    1948-01-01

    A study was made to determine the effect of rotation on the dynamic-stress distribution in vibrating cantilever beams. The results of a mathematical analysis are presented together with experimental results obtained by means of stroboscopic photographs and strain gages. The theoretical analysis was confined to uniform cantilever beams; the experimental work was extended to include a tapered cantilever beam to simulate an aircraft propeller blade. Calculations were made on nondimensional basis for second and third mode vibration; the experiments were conducted on beams of various lengths, materials, and cross sections for second-mode vibration. From this investigation it was concluded that high vibratory-stress positions are unaffected by the addition of centrifugal force. Nonrotating vibration surveys of blades therefore are valuable in predicting high vibratory-stress locations under operating conditions.

  10. Self-sensing atomic force microscopy cantilevers based on tunnel magnetoresistance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Meier, Tobias; Rott, Karsten; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Hölscher, Hendrik; Meyners, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    Here, we introduce self-sensing cantilevers for atomic force microscopy (AFM) based on tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors. These TMR sensors are integrated into the AFM cantilevers and consist of a magnetically stable layer and a sensing magnetostrictive CoFeB layer separated by a MgO tunneling barrier and can be as small as 10 μm × 10 μm. Their TMR values and resistance-area products are about 121% and 61 kΩμm2, respectively. A comparison of AFM data simultaneously obtained with a self-sensing cantilever with a 37 μm × 37 μm large TMR sensor and the conventional optical beam deflection method revealed the same data quality.

  11. Fast atomic force microscopy with self-transduced, self-sensing cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Angelov, Tihomir; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2015-07-01

    The conventional optical lever detection technique involves optical components and their precise mechanical alignment. An additional technical limit is the weight of the optical system in cases where a top-scanner is used with high-speed and high-precision metrology. An alternative represents the application of self-actuated atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers with integrated two-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG) piezoresistive deflection sensors. A significant improvement in the performance of such cantilevers with respect to deflection sensitivity and temperature stability has been achieved by using an integrated Wheatstone bridge configuration. Due to employing effective crosstalk isolation and temperature drift compensation, the performance of these cantilevers was significantly improved. In order to enhance the speed of AFM measurements, we present an adaptive scanning speed procedure. Examples of AFM measurements with a high scanning speed (up to 200 lines/s) committed to advanced lithography process development are shown.

  12. Large deflections of a cantilever beam subjected to a follower force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsman, B. S.

    2007-07-01

    The large-deflection problem of a non-uniform spring-hinged cantilever beam under a tip-concentrated follower force is considered. The angle of inclination of the force with respect to the deformed axis of the beam remains unchanged during deformation. The mathematical formulation of this problem yields a nonlinear two-point boundary-value problem which is reduced to an initial-value problem by change of variables. The resulting problem can be solved without iterations. It is shown that there exist no critical loads in the Euler sense (divergence) for any flexural-stiffness distribution and angle of inclination of the follower force. The load-displacement characteristics of a uniform cantilever under a follower force normal to the deformed beam axis are presented.

  13. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  14. Imaging cells with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Butt, H J; Wolff, E K; Gould, S A; Dixon Northern, B; Peterson, C M; Hansma, P K

    1990-01-01

    Different types of cells have been imaged with the atomic force microscope. The morphology of the archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium in its dry state was revealed. On a leaf of the small Indian tree Lagerstroemia subcostata a stoma was imaged. The lower side of a water lily leaf was imaged in water showing features down to 12 nm. Finally, fixed red and white blood cells were imaged in buffer showing features down to 8 nm. The images demonstrate that atomic force microscopy can provide high-resolution images of cell surfaces under physiological conditions. PMID:2100150

  15. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-01

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed. PMID:26964007

  16. A scanning force microscope for simultaneous force and patch-clamp measurements on living cell tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, M. G.; Öffner, W.; Wittmann, H.; Flösser, H.; Schaar, H.; Häberle, W.; Pralle, A.; Ruppersberg, J. P.; Hörber, J. K. H.

    1997-06-01

    For the investigation of mechanosensitive ion channels of living cells it is of great interest to apply very local forces in the piconewton range and to measure, simultaneously, ion currents down to 1 pA. Scanning force microscopy (SFM) is a suitable technique, that allows the application of such small forces with a lateral resolution in the range of 10 nm. We developed a novel type of experimental setup, because no existing SFM, home built or commercial, allows a simultaneous investigation of ion currents and mechanical properties of living cells. The construction consists of a SFM that is combined with an upright infrared differential interference contrast (DIC) video microscope and a conventional patch-clamp setup. Instead of the object, the force sensor is scanned to prevent relative movements between the patch pipette and the patched cell. The deflection of the SFM cantilever is detected with the so-called optical deflection method through the objective of the optical microscope. In opposite to common optical setups the laser beam was not focused on the force sensor. The presented optic creates a parallel laser beam between the objective and the SFM cantilever, which allows a vertical displacement of the sensor without any changes of the detector signal. For the three-dimensional positioning of the specimen chamber a two-axis translation stage including a vertical piezoelectric translation device was developed. The SFM tip is fixed on a combined lateral and vertical translation stage including a piezoelectric tube scanner for three-dimensional fine positioning. Thus the instrument enables an easy approach of the SFM tip to any optically identified cell structure. The head stage of the patch-clamp electronics and the patch pipette are directly fixed on the specimen stage. This prevents relative movements between patched cells and patch pipette during the approach to the SFM tip. The three-axis positioning of the patch pipette is done by a compact hydraulic

  17. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever.

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M

    2016-09-21

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model. PMID:27420398

  18. Asymmetric post-flutter oscillations of a cantilever due to a dynamic follower force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, Vahid; Kharazmi, Ehsan; Mukherjee, Ranjan

    2015-03-01

    Flutter instability of a cantilever beam subjected to a follower force of constant magnitude is well understood: the beam oscillates with increasing amplitude when the force is larger than the critical load. Post-flutter analysis, similar to previous efforts, shows that the addition of damping results in steady-state oscillations. These oscillations are symmetric, but addition of a slope-dependent term to the magnitude of the follower force results in asymmetry. These asymmetric oscillations are investigated in this paper: the Ritz-Galerkin method is used to obtain a finite degree-of-freedom model of the cantilever and the method of multiple scales is used to analytically predict the amplitude and asymmetry of the oscillations. Numerical simulation results indicate a close match with analytically predicted results.

  19. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model.

  20. High-sensitivity noncontact atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope (nc AFM/STM) operating at subangstrom oscillation amplitudes for atomic resolution imaging and force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oral, A.; Grimble, R. A.; Özer, H. Ö.; Pethica, J. B.

    2003-08-01

    We describe a new, highly sensitive noncontact atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) with subangstrom oscillation amplitudes for atomic resolution imaging and force-distance spectroscopy. A novel fiber interferometer with ˜4×10-4 Å/√Hz noise level is employed to detect cantilever displacements. Subangstrom oscillation amplitude is applied to the lever at a frequency well below the resonance and changes in the oscillation amplitude due to tip-sample force interactions are measured with a lock-in amplifier. Quantitative force gradient images can be obtained simultaneously with the STM topography. Employment of subangstrom oscillation amplitudes lets us perform force-distance measurements, which reveal very short-range force interactions, consistent with the theory. Performance of the microscope is demonstrated with quantitative atomic resolution images of Si(111)(7×7) and force-distance curves showing short interaction range, all obtained with <0.25 Å lever oscillation amplitude. Our technique is not limited to UHV only and operation under liquids and air is feasible.

  1. Single DNA molecule grafting and manipulation using a combined atomic force microscope and an optical tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivashankar, G. V.; Libchaber, A.

    1997-12-01

    In this letter, we report on spatially selecting and grafting a DNA-tethered bead to an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever, using an optical tweezer. To quantify this technique, we measure force versus extension of a single DNA molecule using AFM. For such studies, we have developed a micromanipulation approach by combining an AFM, an optical tweezer, and visualization setup. The ability to select a single DNA polymer and specifically graft it to a localized position on a substrate opens up new possibilities in biosensors and bioelectronic devices.

  2. Terabit-per-square-inch data storage with the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, E. B.; Manalis, S. R.; Fang, H.; Dai, H.; Matsumoto, K.; Minne, S. C.; Hunt, T.; Quate, C. F.

    1999-11-01

    An areal density of 1.6 Tbits/in.2 has been achieved by anodically oxidizing titanium with the atomic force microscope (AFM). This density was made possible by (1) single-wall carbon nanotubes selectively grown on an AFM cantilever, (2) atomically flat titanium surfaces on α-Al2O3 (1012), and (3) atomic scale force and position control with the tapping-mode AFM. By combining these elements, 8 nm bits on 20 nm pitch are written at a rate of 5 kbit/s at room temperature in air.

  3. Simulating atomic force microscope images with density functional theory: The role of nonclassical contributions to the force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffhauser, Philipp; Kümmel, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    We discuss a scheme for calculating atomic force microscope images within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). As in earlier works [T. L. Chan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 176101 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.176101; M. Kim and J. R. Chelikowsky, Appl. Surf. Sci. 303, 163 (2014), 10.1016/j.apsusc.2014.02.127] we do not simulate the cantilever explicitly, but consider it as a polarizable object. We go beyond previous studies by discussing the role of exchange and correlation effects; i.e., we approximately take into account the Pauli interaction between sample and cantilever. The good agreement that we find when comparing our calculated images to experimental images for the difficult case of the 8-hydroxyquinoline molecule demonstrates that exchange-correlation effects can play an important role in the DFT-based interpretation of AFM images.

  4. Closed-form solution for a cantilevered sectorial plate subjected to a tip concentrated force.

    PubMed

    Christy, Carl W; Weggel, David C; Smelser, R E

    2016-01-01

    A closed-form solution is presented for a cantilevered sectorial plate subjected to a tip concentrated force. Since the particular solution for this problem was not found in the literature, it is derived here. Deflections from the total solution (particular plus homogeneous solutions) are compared to those from a finite element analysis and are found to be in excellent agreement, producing an error within approximately 0.08 %. Normalized closed-form deflections and slopes at the fixed support, resulting from an approximate enforcement of the boundary conditions there, deviate from zero by <0.08 %. Finally, the total closed-form solutions for a cantilevered sectorial plate subjected to independent applications of a tip concentrated force, a tip bending moment, and a tip twisting moment, are compiled. PMID:27390653

  5. Long range metrological atomic force microscope with versatile measuring head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mingzhen; Gao, Sitian; Li, Qi; Li, Wei; Shi, Yushu; Tao, Xingfu

    2013-01-01

    A long range metrological atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed at NIM. It aims to realize a maximum measurement volume of 50mm×50mm×2mm with an uncertainty of a few tens of nanometers in the whole range. In compliance with Abbe Principle, the instrument is designed as a sample-scanning type. The sample is moved by a 6-DOF piezostage in combination with a hybrid slide-air bearing stage for long scanning range. Homodyne interferometers with four passes attached to a metrological frame measure relative displacement between the probe and sample thus the instrument is directly traceable to the SI. An AFM head is developed as the measuring head for the instrument. Considering accuracy and dynamic performance of the instrument, it is designed to be capable of scanning perpendicularly in a range of 5μm×5μm×5μm with a 3-DOF piezostage. Optical beam deflection method is used and a minimum of components are mounted on the moving part. A novel design is devised so that the photodetector is only sensitive to the deflection of cantilever, but not the displacement of the head. Moving manner of the head varies with scanning range and mode of the instrument. Results of different measurements are demonstrated, showing the excellent performance of the instrument.

  6. Sharp Tips on the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows the eight sharp tips of the NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The microscope maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with one of the tips at the end of a beam. For the AFM image taken, the tip at the end of the upper right beam was used. The tip pointing up in the enlarged image is the size of a smoke particle at its base, or 2 microns. This image was taken with a scanning electron microscope before Phoenix launched on August 4, 2007.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium in collaboration with Imperial College London.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  7. Atomic force microscopy of confined liquids using the thermal bending fluctuations of the cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2013-06-01

    We use atomic force microscopy to measure the distance-dependent solvation forces and the dissipation across liquid films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) confined between a silicon tip and a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate without active excitation of the cantilever. By analyzing the thermal bending fluctuations, we minimize possible nonlinearities of the tip-substrate interaction due to finite excitation amplitudes because these fluctuations are smaller than the typical 1 Å, which is much smaller than the characteristic interaction length. Moreover, we avoid the need to determine the phase lag between cantilever excitation and response, which suffers from complications due to hydrodynamic coupling between cantilever and fluid. Consistent results, and especially high-quality dissipation data, are obtained by analyzing the power spectrum and the time autocorrelation of the force fluctuations. We validate our approach by determining the bulk viscosity of OMCTS using tips with a radius of approximately 1 μm at tip-substrate separations >5 nm. For sharp tips we consistently find an exponentially decaying oscillatory tip-substrate interaction stiffness as well as a clearly nonmonotonic variation of the dissipation for tip-substrate distances up to 8 and 6 nm, respectively. Both observations are in line with the results of recent simulations which relate them to distance-dependent transitions of the molecular structure in the liquid.

  8. Atomic force microscopy of confined liquids using the thermal bending fluctuations of the cantilever.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2013-06-01

    We use atomic force microscopy to measure the distance-dependent solvation forces and the dissipation across liquid films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) confined between a silicon tip and a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate without active excitation of the cantilever. By analyzing the thermal bending fluctuations, we minimize possible nonlinearities of the tip-substrate interaction due to finite excitation amplitudes because these fluctuations are smaller than the typical 1 Å, which is much smaller than the characteristic interaction length. Moreover, we avoid the need to determine the phase lag between cantilever excitation and response, which suffers from complications due to hydrodynamic coupling between cantilever and fluid. Consistent results, and especially high-quality dissipation data, are obtained by analyzing the power spectrum and the time autocorrelation of the force fluctuations. We validate our approach by determining the bulk viscosity of OMCTS using tips with a radius of approximately 1 μm at tip-substrate separations >5 nm. For sharp tips we consistently find an exponentially decaying oscillatory tip-substrate interaction stiffness as well as a clearly nonmonotonic variation of the dissipation for tip-substrate distances up to 8 and 6 nm, respectively. Both observations are in line with the results of recent simulations which relate them to distance-dependent transitions of the molecular structure in the liquid. PMID:23848696

  9. Optical and mechanical detection of near-field light by atomic force microscopy using a piezoelectric cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Kei; Watanabe, Shunji; Fujii, Toru; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM) system with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) using a microfabricated force-sensing cantilever with a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film. Both optical and mechanical detection techniques were adopted in SNOM to detect scattered light induced by the interaction of the PZT cantilever tip apex and evanescent light, and SNOM images were obtained for each detection scheme. The mechanical detection technique did allow for a clear observation of the light scattered from the PZT cantilever without the interference observed by the optical detection technique, which used an objective lens, a pinhole, and a photomultiplier tube.

  10. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations. PMID:26684144

  11. Modeling rectangular cantilevers during torsion and deflection for application to frictional force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Victor C; Beaulieu, Luc Y

    2009-06-01

    A numerical and experimental analysis of the optical beam deflection system used to monitor microcantilevers subjected to simultaneous deflection and twisting such as in lateral or frictional force microscopy was performed. This study focused on two optical beam deflection orientations where in the first case the optical beam and the detector are at a right angle to the length of the cantilever and the second case, which is the more standard orientation, the optical beam is parallel to the length of the lever. This study finds that it is possible to model the twist and the deflection separately and treat each motion independently. Simulations have shown that the above-mentioned systems are equivalent in accuracy and sensitivity for monitoring the simultaneous twist and deflection of cantilevers. PMID:19460183

  12. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations.

  13. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon; Raman, Arvind

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7-20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force-distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials. This work is a partial contribution of the USDA Forest Service and NIST, agencies of the US government, and is not subject to copyright.

  14. Note: Seesaw actuation of atomic force microscope probes for improved imaging bandwidth and displacement range

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, H.; Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-08-15

    The authors describe a method of actuation for atomic force microscope (AFM) probes to improve imaging speed and displacement range simultaneously. Unlike conventional piezoelectric tube actuation, the proposed method involves a lever and fulcrum ''seesaw'' like actuation mechanism that uses a small, fast piezoelectric transducer. The lever arm of the seesaw mechanism increases the apparent displacement range by an adjustable gain factor, overcoming the standard tradeoff between imaging speed and displacement range. Experimental characterization of a cantilever holder implementing the method is provided together with comparative line scans obtained with contact mode imaging. An imaging bandwidth of 30 kHz in air with the current setup was demonstrated.

  15. Optical beam deflection noncontact atomic force microscope optimized with three-dimensional beam adjustment mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Kousuke; Ochi, Taketoshi; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ashino, Makoto; Sugawara, Yasuhiro; Suehira, Nobuhito; Morita, Seizo

    2000-01-01

    We present a design and performance of an optical beam deflection noncontact atomic force microscope (nc-AFM). The optical deflection detection system can be optimized by the three-dimensional beam position adjustment mechanism (the slider which mounts laser diode module, the spherical rotors with mirror and the cylinder which mounts quadrant photodiode) using inertial stepping motors in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The samples and cantilevers are easily exchanged in UHV. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated with the atomically resolved nc-AFM images for various surfaces such as Si(111)7×7, Cu(111), TiO2(110), and thymine/highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  16. Nanostethoscopy: A new mode of operation of the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, A.; Holzrichter, J.F.; Balhorn, R.; Siekaus, W.J.

    1994-02-01

    The authors introduce a new mode of operation of the atomic force microscope (AFM). This detection scheme, a {open_quotes}Nano-Stethoscope{close_quotes}. Involves using the atomic force microscope in a novel acoustic mode not generally recognized. The Nano-Stethoscope uses the conventional scanning feature to locate a desired site, positions the AFM microscope tip over the site, holds the cantilever stationary (in x and v) and records the tip`s z-motion as a function of time. The tip/cantilever system thus functions as a micro-motion detector to respond to characteristic {open_quotes}pulsations{close_quotes}, nano-configurational chances, or any other event that influences the position of the tip as a function of time. The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of using the tip of an AFM in this manner in a biological system with a measurement of the vibrations of an emerging shrimp egg nauplius ({approximately}3 {mu}m. -10 Hz) and on the Angstrom scale in a non-biological system i.e.. the thermal expansion of metal interconnect lines on a microelectronic circuit.

  17. Internal resonance in forced vibration of coupled cantilevers subjected to magnetic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Qun; Zhang, Guo-Ce; Ding, Hu

    2015-10-01

    Forced vibration is investigated for two elastically connected cantilevers, under harmonic base excitation. One of the cantilevers is with a tip magnet repelled by a magnet fixed on the base. The cantilevers are uniform viscoelastic beams constituted by the Kelvin model. The system is formulated as a set of two linear partial differential equations with nonlinear boundary conditions. The method of multiple scales is developed to analyze the effects of internal resonances on the steady-state responses to external excitations in the nonlinear boundary problem of the partial differential equations. In the presence of 2:1 internal resonance, both the first and the second primary resonances are examined in detail. The analytical frequency-amplitude response relationships are derived from the solvability conditions. It is found that the frequency-amplitude response curves reveal typical nonlinear phenomena such as jumping and hysteresis in both primary resonances as well as saturation in the second primary resonance. The frequency-amplitude response curves may be converted from hardening-type single-jumping to double-jumpings, and further to softening-type single-jumping by adjusting the distance between two magnets. It is also found that the unstable parts of the frequency-amplitude response curves correspond to quasi-periodic motions. The finite difference scheme is proposed to discretize both the temporal and the spatial variables, and thus the numerical solutions can be calculated. The analytical results are supported by the numerical solutions.

  18. Direct calibration of colloidal probe cantilevers via Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek surface forces in electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiaoting; Willing, Gerold A.

    2008-12-01

    The development of colloidal probe microscopy has made it possible to directly measure the interaction forces between two different surfaces in solution. Cantilever calibration is presently a subject of intense experimental and theoretical interest due to the need for accurate force measurement. We developed a novel and direct calibration method for colloidal probe cantilevers to which a silica microsphere has been previously attached based on fitting experimental force curves for the interaction between the silica sphere and a silica flat in dilute KBr solutions to the theoretical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek force curves using the measured zeta potential of the silica surfaces.

  19. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  20. Dynamically forced cantilever system: A piezo-polymer characterization tool with possible application for micromechanical HF resonator devices

    SciTech Connect

    Schwoediauer, Reinhard

    2005-04-01

    A cantilever system, driven to a dynamically forced oscillation by a small piezoelectric specimen is presented as a simple and accurate tool to determine the converse dynamic piezocoefficient up to several kHz. The piezoelectric sample is mounted on top of a reflective cantilever where it is free to oscillate without any mechanical constraint. A Nomarsky-interferometer detects the induced cantilever displacement. The presented technique is especially suited for a precise characterization of small and soft piezoelectric polymer-samples with rough surfaces. The capability of the dynamically forced cantilever principle is demonstrated with a LiNbO{sub 3} crystal and with a porous ferroelectretic polypropylene foam. Results from measurements between 400 Hz and 5 kHz were found to be in excellent agreement with published values. Additionally, the dynamically forced cantilever principle may possibly improve the sensitivity of some micromechanical cantilever-sensors and it could also be interesting for the design of enhanced micromechanical high frequency mixer filters. Some ideas about are briefly presented.

  1. Surface science experiments involving the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Sean P.

    Three diverse first author surfaces science experiments conducted by Sean P. McBride1-3 will be discussed in detail and supplemented by secondary co-author projects by Sean P. McBride,4-7 all of which rely heavily on the use of an atomic force microscope (AFM). First, the slip length parameter, b of liquids is investigated using colloidal probe AFM. The slip length describes how easily a fluid flows over an interface. The slip length, with its exact origin unknown and dependencies not overwhelming decided upon by the scientific community, remains a controversial topic. Colloidal probe AFM uses a spherical probe attached to a standard AFM imaging tip driven through a liquid. With the force on this colloidal AFM probe known, and using the simplest homologous series of test liquids, many of the suspected causes and dependencies of the slip length demonstrated in the literature can be suppressed or eliminated. This leaves the measurable trends in the slip length attributed only to the systematically varying physical properties of the different liquids. When conducting these experiments, it was realized that the spring constant, k, of the system depends upon the cantilever geometry of the experiment and therefore should be measured in-situ. This means that the k calibration needs to be performed in the same viscous liquid in which the slip experiments are performed. Current in-situ calibrations in viscous fluids are very limited, thus a new in-situ k calibration method was developed for use in viscous fluids. This new method is based upon the residuals, namely, the difference between experimental force-distance data and Vinogradova slip theory. Next, the AFM's ability to acquire accurate sub nanometer height profiles of structures on interfaces was used to develop a novel experimental technique to measure the line tension parameter, tau, of isolated nanoparticles at the three phase interface in a solid-liquid-vapor system. The tau parameter is a result of excess energy

  2. A metrological large range atomic force microscope with improved performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Gaoliang; Wolff, Helmut; Pohlenz, Frank; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-04-15

    A metrological large range atomic force microscope (Met. LR-AFM) has been set up and improved over the past years at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Being designed as a scanning sample type instrument, the sample is moved in three dimensions by a mechanical ball bearing stage in combination with a compact z-piezostage. Its topography is detected by a position-stationary AFM head. The sample displacement is measured by three embedded miniature homodyne interferometers in the x, y, and z directions. The AFM head is aligned in such a way that its cantilever tip is positioned on the sample surface at the intersection point of the three interferometer measurement beams for satisfying the Abbe measurement principle. In this paper, further improvements of the Met. LR-AFM are reported. A new AFM head using the beam deflection principle has been developed to reduce the influence of parasitic optical interference phenomena. Furthermore, an off-line Heydemann correction method has been applied to reduce the inherent interferometer nonlinearities to less than 0.3 nm (p-v). Versatile scanning functions, for example, radial scanning or local AFM measurement functions, have been implemented to optimize the measurement process. The measurement software is also improved and allows comfortable operations of the instrument via graphical user interface or script-based command sets. The improved Met. LR-AFM is capable of measuring, for instance, the step height, lateral pitch, line width, nanoroughness, and other geometrical parameters of nanostructures. Calibration results of a one-dimensional grating and a set of film thickness standards are demonstrated, showing the excellent metrological performance of the instrument.

  3. A metrological large range atomic force microscope with improved performance.

    PubMed

    Dai, Gaoliang; Wolff, Helmut; Pohlenz, Frank; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-04-01

    A metrological large range atomic force microscope (Met. LR-AFM) has been set up and improved over the past years at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Being designed as a scanning sample type instrument, the sample is moved in three dimensions by a mechanical ball bearing stage in combination with a compact z-piezostage. Its topography is detected by a position-stationary AFM head. The sample displacement is measured by three embedded miniature homodyne interferometers in the x, y, and z directions. The AFM head is aligned in such a way that its cantilever tip is positioned on the sample surface at the intersection point of the three interferometer measurement beams for satisfying the Abbe measurement principle. In this paper, further improvements of the Met. LR-AFM are reported. A new AFM head using the beam deflection principle has been developed to reduce the influence of parasitic optical interference phenomena. Furthermore, an off-line Heydemann correction method has been applied to reduce the inherent interferometer nonlinearities to less than 0.3 nm (p-v). Versatile scanning functions, for example, radial scanning or local AFM measurement functions, have been implemented to optimize the measurement process. The measurement software is also improved and allows comfortable operations of the instrument via graphical user interface or script-based command sets. The improved Met. LR-AFM is capable of measuring, for instance, the step height, lateral pitch, line width, nanoroughness, and other geometrical parameters of nanostructures. Calibration results of a one-dimensional grating and a set of film thickness standards are demonstrated, showing the excellent metrological performance of the instrument. PMID:19405661

  4. A metrological large range atomic force microscope with improved performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Wolff, Helmut; Pohlenz, Frank; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-04-01

    A metrological large range atomic force microscope (Met. LR-AFM) has been set up and improved over the past years at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Being designed as a scanning sample type instrument, the sample is moved in three dimensions by a mechanical ball bearing stage in combination with a compact z-piezostage. Its topography is detected by a position-stationary AFM head. The sample displacement is measured by three embedded miniature homodyne interferometers in the x, y, and z directions. The AFM head is aligned in such a way that its cantilever tip is positioned on the sample surface at the intersection point of the three interferometer measurement beams for satisfying the Abbe measurement principle. In this paper, further improvements of the Met. LR-AFM are reported. A new AFM head using the beam deflection principle has been developed to reduce the influence of parasitic optical interference phenomena. Furthermore, an off-line Heydemann correction method has been applied to reduce the inherent interferometer nonlinearities to less than 0.3 nm (p-v). Versatile scanning functions, for example, radial scanning or local AFM measurement functions, have been implemented to optimize the measurement process. The measurement software is also improved and allows comfortable operations of the instrument via graphical user interface or script-based command sets. The improved Met. LR-AFM is capable of measuring, for instance, the step height, lateral pitch, line width, nanoroughness, and other geometrical parameters of nanostructures. Calibration results of a one-dimensional grating and a set of film thickness standards are demonstrated, showing the excellent metrological performance of the instrument.

  5. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments. PMID:25933864

  6. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  7. Measurement of interaction force between nanoarrayed integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} and immobilized vitronectin on the cantilever tip

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minsu; Yang, Hyun-Kyu; Park, Keun-Hyung; Kang, Dong-Ku; Chang, Soo-Ik Kang, In-Cheol

    2007-11-03

    Protein nanoarrays containing integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} or BSA were fabricated on ProLinker{sup TM}-coated Au surface by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). An atomic force microscope (AFM) tip coated with ProLinker{sup TM} was modified by vitronectin. We measured the interaction force between nanoarrayed integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} or BSA and immobilized vitronectin on the cantilever tip by employing tethering-unbinding method. The unbinding force between integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} and vitronectin (1087 {+-} 62 pN) was much higher than that of between BSA and vitronectin (643 {+-} 74 pN). These results demonstrate that one can distinguish a specific protein interaction from non-specific interactions by means of force measurement on the molecular interactions between the nanoarrayed protein and its interacting protein on the AFM tip.

  8. Stability considerations and implementation of cantilevers allowing dynamic force microscopy with optimal resolution: the qPlus sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, F. J.; Hembacher, S.; Herz, M.; Schiller, Ch; Mannhart, J.

    2004-02-01

    In frequency modulation atomic force microscopy, the stiffness, quality factor and oscillation amplitude of the cantilever are important parameters. While the first atomic resolution results were obtained with amplitudes of a few hundred ångstrom, it has subsequently been shown that smaller amplitudes should result in a better signal-to-noise ratio and an increased sensitivity to the short-range components of the tip-sample interaction. Stable oscillation at small amplitudes is possible if the product of stiffness and amplitude and the energy stored in the oscillating cantilever are large enough. For small amplitudes, stability can be achieved by using stiff cantilevers. Here, we discuss the physical requirements for small amplitude operation and present design criteria and technical details of the qPlus sensor, a self-sensing cantilever with large stiffness that allows small amplitude operation.

  9. Nanometer-scale free surface flow of molten polyethylene from a heated atomic force microscope tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewoldt, Randy; Felts, Jonathan; Somnath, Suhas; King, William

    2012-11-01

    We experimentally investigate nanometer-scale free surface flow of molten polyethylene from a heated atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever, a nanofabrication process known as thermal dip-pen nanolithography (tDPN). Fluid is deposited from the AFM tip onto non-porous substrates whether the tip is moving or fixed. We find that polymer flow depends on surface capillary forces and not on shear between tip and substrate. The polymer mass flow rate is sensitive to the temperature-dependent polymer viscosity. Additionally, the flow rate increases when a temperature gradient exists between the tip and substrate. We hypothesize that the polymer flow is governed by thermal Marangoni forces and non-equilibrium wetting dynamics caused by a solidification front within the feature.

  10. Comparison of Paramagnetic and Ferromagnetic Resonance Imaging with an Improved Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wago, K.; Botkin, D.; Yannoni, C. S.; Rugar, D.

    1998-03-01

    A magnetic resonance force microscope with an improved ``tip-on-cantilever'' configuration was used to compare imaging characteristics of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic samples. Three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real-space magnetization image to be successfully reconstructed. In contrast to the EPR case, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) imaging of a micron-scale yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sample showed no significant line broadening despite the strong field gradient ( ~ 10 G/μm). Two-dimensional force maps revealed spatial dependence of magnetostatic and magnetoelastic modes.

  11. Measuring Energies at the Nanometer-Scale of Molecular Organic Materials with an Atomic Force Microscope: TTF-TCNQ as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraxedas, J.; Langer, J.; Díez, I.; Sanz, F.

    2006-02-01

    The elastic response of molecular organic materials to external mechanical nanoindentations in the nano- and low micronewton force range can be characterized using ultrasharp cantilever tips of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Because clear distinction between elastic and plastic deformation is achieved, the maximal accumulated elastic energy can be directly determined from the force vs. penetration curves, giving an estimate of the characteristic energies of the materials.

  12. Measurement of GHz range magnetic field distribution near a coplanar waveguide using a beating field-type magnetic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Y.; Fukushima, M.; Arai, K.; Yanagi, K.; Shimada, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the measurement of microscopic radio frequency (RF) field distribution with a magnetic force microscope (MFM) tip exploring the beat signal from a coplanar waveguide (CPW) with a signal line as fine as 5 μm and a ground line of 50 μm. To produce a beating field in close proximity to the CPW, two RF currents with slightly different frequencies are supplied, where one is the signal current with a fixed frequency of 1.1 GHz and the other is the reference. The reference is adjusted to produce a beat with a frequency near the cantilever mechanical resonance frequency. Thus, the mechanical resonance of the cantilever excited by the beat field includes information about the 1.1 GHz field distribution from the CPW signal current. Detection of a beating field with a MFM tip can provide very high resolutions of the RF field distribution in the proximity of RF circuit component.

  13. Physical microscopic model of proteins under force.

    PubMed

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2012-06-14

    Nature has evolved proteins to counteract forces applied on living cells, and has designed proteins that can sense forces. One can appreciate Nature's ingenuity in evolving these proteins to be highly sensitive to force and to have a high dynamic force range at which they operate. To achieve this level of sensitivity, many of these proteins are composed of multiple domains and linking peptides connecting these domains, each of them having their own force response regimes. Here, using a simple model of a protein, we address the question of how each individual domain responds to force. We also ask how multidomain proteins respond to forces. We find that the end-to-end distance of individual domains under force scales linearly with force. In multidomain proteins, we find that the force response has a rich range: at low force, extension is predominantly governed by "weaker" linking peptides or domain intermediates, while at higher force, the extension is governed by unfolding of individual domains. Overall, the force extension curve comprises multiple sigmoidal transitions governed by unfolding of linking peptides and domains. Our study provides a basic framework for the understanding of protein response to force, and allows for interpretation experiments in which force is used to study the mechanical properties of multidomain proteins. PMID:22375559

  14. Optimizing 1-μs-Resolution Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy on a Commercial Atomic Force Microscope.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Devin T; Faulk, Jaevyn K; Sanders, Aric W; Bull, Matthew S; Walder, Robert; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Sousa, Marcelo C; Perkins, Thomas T

    2015-10-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is widely used to mechanically measure the folding and unfolding of proteins. However, the temporal resolution of a standard commercial cantilever is 50-1000 μs, masking rapid transitions and short-lived intermediates. Recently, SMFS with 0.7-μs temporal resolution was achieved using an ultrashort (L = 9 μm) cantilever on a custom-built, high-speed AFM. By micromachining such cantilevers with a focused ion beam, we optimized them for SMFS rather than tapping-mode imaging. To enhance usability and throughput, we detected the modified cantilevers on a commercial AFM retrofitted with a detection laser system featuring a 3-μm circular spot size. Moreover, individual cantilevers were reused over multiple days. The improved capabilities of the modified cantilevers for SMFS were showcased by unfolding a polyprotein, a popular biophysical assay. Specifically, these cantilevers maintained a 1-μs response time while eliminating cantilever ringing (Q ≅ 0.5). We therefore expect such cantilevers, along with the instrumentational improvements to detect them on a commercial AFM, to accelerate high-precision AFM-based SMFS studies. PMID:26421945

  15. Single Dimer E-Cadherin Interaction Forces Characterized Using Modified AFM Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnitsky, Robert; Drees, Frauke; Nelson, W. James; Kenny, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    In tissue monolayers, adhesion between cells is accomplished chiefly through the action of [Ca++] dependent cadherin proteins. E-cadherin molecules coalesce into large plaques on contacting membranes of adjacent cells. Using specialized AFM cantilevers functionalized with tethered E-cadherin proteins, we studied the interaction forces of trans dimers from the single bond level through to the higher surface densities found in plaques, with pico-Newton force resolution. The measurements demonstrated the dependence of E-cadherin homoassociation on surface protein density. Previous in-vivo studies established the role of Ca++ in E-cadherin adhesion in whole cells. Advances in AFM force spectroscopy allowed us to characterize the unbinding process under force loads, and to differentiate single and multiple molecular binding events. The data correlates the dependence of E-cadherin adhesion at a molecular level to [Ca++], revealing interaction details that cannot be observed using whole-cell studies. This work is supported by NSF (XYZ on a Chip Program) CMS-9980838, NIH (GMB5227), and the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation.

  16. Tip Effect of the Tapping Mode of Atomic Force Microscope in Viscous Fluid Environments.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hua-Ju; Shih, Po-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscope with applicable types of operation in a liquid environment is widely used to scan the contours of biological specimens. The contact mode of operation allows a tip to touch a specimen directly but sometimes it damages the specimen; thus, a tapping mode of operation may replace the contact mode. The tapping mode triggers the cantilever of the microscope approximately at resonance frequencies, and so the tip periodically knocks the specimen. It is well known that the cantilever induces extra liquid pressure that leads to drift in the resonance frequency. Studies have noted that the heights of protein surfaces measured via the tapping mode of an atomic force microscope are ~25% smaller than those measured by other methods. This discrepancy may be attributable to the induced superficial hydrodynamic pressure, which is worth investigating. In this paper, we introduce a semi-analytical method to analyze the pressure distribution of various tip geometries. According to our analysis, the maximum hydrodynamic pressure on the specimen caused by a cone-shaped tip is ~0.5 Pa, which can, for example, pre-deform a cell by several nanometers in compression before the tip taps it. Moreover, the pressure calculated on the surface of the specimen is 20 times larger than the pressure without considering the tip effect; these results have not been motioned in other papers. Dominating factors, such as surface heights of protein surface, mechanical stiffness of protein increasing with loading velocity, and radius of tip affecting the local pressure of specimen, are also addressed in this study. PMID:26225979

  17. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-15

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  18. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  19. Probing mechanical properties of living cells by atomic force microscopy with blunted pyramidal cantilever tips.

    PubMed

    Rico, Félix; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Gavara, Núria; Farré, Ramon; Rotger, Mar; Navajas, Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the acquisition of high-resolution images and the measurement of mechanical properties of living cells under physiological conditions. AFM cantilevers with blunted pyramidal tips are commonly used to obtain images of living cells. Measurement of mechanical properties with these tips requires a contact model that takes into account their blunted geometry. The aim of this work was to develop a contact model of a blunted pyramidal tip and to assess the suitability of pyramidal tips for probing mechanical properties of soft gels and living cells. We developed a contact model of a blunted pyramidal tip indenting an elastic half-space. We measured Young's modulus (E) and the complex shear modulus (G*= G' +i G" ) of agarose gels and A549 alveolar epithelial cells with pyramidal tips and compared them with those obtained with spherical tips. The gels exhibited an elastic behavior with almost coincident loading and unloading force curves and negligible values of G". E fell sharply with indentation up to approximately 300 nm , showing a linear regime for deeper indentations. A similar indentation dependence of E with twofold lower values at the linear regime was obtained with the spherical tip fitted with Hertz's model. The dependence of E on indentation in cells paralleled that found in gels. Cells exhibited viscoelastic behavior with G"/G' approximately 1/4 . Pyramidal tips commonly used for AFM imaging are suitable for probing mechanical properties of soft gels and living cells. PMID:16196611

  20. Understanding interferometry for micro-cantilever displacement detection.

    PubMed

    von Schmidsfeld, Alexander; Nörenberg, Tobias; Temmen, Matthias; Reichling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Interferometric displacement detection in a cantilever-based non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) operated in ultra-high vacuum is demonstrated for the Michelson and Fabry-Pérot modes of operation. Each mode is addressed by appropriately adjusting the distance between the fiber end delivering and collecting light and a highly reflective micro-cantilever, both together forming the interferometric cavity. For a precise measurement of the cantilever displacement, the relative positioning of fiber and cantilever is of critical importance. We describe a systematic approach for accurate alignment as well as the implications of deficient fiber-cantilever configurations. In the Fabry-Pérot regime, the displacement noise spectral density strongly decreases with decreasing distance between the fiber-end and the cantilever, yielding a noise floor of 24 fm/Hz(0.5) under optimum conditions. PMID:27547601

  1. Understanding interferometry for micro-cantilever displacement detection

    PubMed Central

    Nörenberg, Tobias; Temmen, Matthias; Reichling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary Interferometric displacement detection in a cantilever-based non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) operated in ultra-high vacuum is demonstrated for the Michelson and Fabry–Pérot modes of operation. Each mode is addressed by appropriately adjusting the distance between the fiber end delivering and collecting light and a highly reflective micro-cantilever, both together forming the interferometric cavity. For a precise measurement of the cantilever displacement, the relative positioning of fiber and cantilever is of critical importance. We describe a systematic approach for accurate alignment as well as the implications of deficient fiber–cantilever configurations. In the Fabry–Pérot regime, the displacement noise spectral density strongly decreases with decreasing distance between the fiber-end and the cantilever, yielding a noise floor of 24 fm/Hz0.5 under optimum conditions. PMID:27547601

  2. Construction of a 3He magnetic force microscope with a vector magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinho; Yang, Ilkyu; Kim, Yun Won; Shin, Dongwoo; Jeong, Juyoung; Wulferding, Dirk; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2016-02-01

    We constructed a 3He magnetic force microscope operating at the base temperature of 300 mK under a vector magnetic field of 2-2-9 T in the x-y-z direction. Fiber optic interferometry as a detection scheme is employed in which two home-built fiber walkers are used for the alignment between the cantilever and the optical fiber. The noise level of the laser interferometer is close to its thermodynamic limit. The capabilities of the sub-Kelvin and vector field are demonstrated by imaging the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity in a ferromagnetic superconductor (ErNi2B2C) at T = 500 mK and by probing a dipole shape of a single Abrikosov vortex with an in-plane tip magnetization.

  3. Real time drift measurement for colloidal probe atomic force microscope: a visual sensing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuliang Bi, Shusheng; Wang, Huimin

    2014-05-15

    Drift has long been an issue in atomic force microscope (AFM) systems and limits their ability to make long time period measurements. In this study, a new method is proposed to directly measure and compensate for the drift between AFM cantilevers and sample surfaces in AFM systems. This was achieved by simultaneously measuring z positions for beads at the end of an AFM colloidal probe and on sample surface through an off-focus image processing based visual sensing method. The working principle and system configuration are presented. Experiments were conducted to validate the real time drift measurement and compensation. The implication of the proposed method for regular AFM measurements is discussed. We believe that this technique provides a practical and efficient approach for AFM experiments requiring long time period measurement.

  4. Atomic force microscope, molecular imaging, and analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Godon, Christian; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Image visibility is a central issue in analyzing all kinds of microscopic images. An increase of intensity contrast helps to raise the image visibility, thereby to reveal fine image features. Accordingly, a proper evaluation of results with current imaging parameters can be used for feedback on future imaging experiments. In this work, we have applied the Laplacian function of image intensity as either an additive component (Laplacian mask) or a multiplying factor (Laplacian weight) for enhancing image contrast of high-resolution AFM images of two molecular systems, an unknown protein imaged in air, provided by AFM COST Action TD1002 (http://www.afm4nanomedbio.eu/), and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) particles imaged in liquid. Based on both visual inspection and quantitative representation of contrast measurements, we found that the Laplacian weight is more effective than the Laplacian mask for the unknown protein, whereas for the TMV system the strengthened Laplacian mask is superior to the Laplacian weight. The present results indicate that a mathematical function, as exemplified by the Laplacian function, may yield varied processing effects with different operations. To interpret the diversity of molecular structure and topology in images, an explicit expression for processing procedures should be included in scientific reports alongside instrumental setups. PMID:26224520

  5. 3D finite element analysis of electrostatic deflection and shielding of commercial and FIB-modified cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy: II. Rectangular shaped cantilevers with asymmetric pyramidal tips.

    PubMed

    Valdrè, Giovanni; Moro, Daniele

    2008-10-01

    This paper deals with an application of 3D finite element analysis to the electrostatic interaction between (i) a commercial rectangular shaped cantilever (with an integrated anisotropic pyramidal tip) and a conductive sample, when a voltage difference is applied between them, and (ii) a focused ion beam (FIB) modified cantilever in order to realize a probe with reduced parasitic electrostatic force. The 3D modelling of their electrostatic deflection was realized by using multiphysics finite element analysis software and applied to the real geometry of the cantilevers and probes as used in conventional electric and Kelvin force microscopy to evaluate the contribution of the various part of a cantilever to the total force, and derive practical criteria to optimize the probe performances. We report also on the simulation of electrostatic shielding of nanometric features, in order to quantitatively evaluate an alternative way of reducing the systematic error caused by the cantilever-to-sample capacitive coupling. Finally, a quantitative comparison between the performances of rectangular and triangular cantilevers (part I of this work) is reported. PMID:21832618

  6. Atomic force microscope based near-field imaging for probing cell surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Sina

    Near-membrane and trans-membrane proteins and their interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) can yield valuable information about cell dynamics. However, advances in the field of nanoscale cellular processes have been hindered, in part, due to limits imposed by current technology. In this work, a novel evanescent field (EF) imaging technique is designed, modeled, created and tested for near-field imaging in the apical surface of cells. This technique and Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) were used to investigate interactions between integrins on the cell surface and the ECM protein, fibronectin. The goal was to monitor changes in the integrin density at the cell surface as a function of clustering after binding to fibronectin on the microsphere surface. For the EF technique, quantum dot (QD)-embedded polystyrene microspheres were used to couple light into whispering gallery modes (WGMs) inside the microspheres; the resulting EF at the surface of the microsphere was used as a near-field excitation source with ~50 nm axial resolution for exciting fluorescently-labeled integrins. For FRET measurements (~10 nm axial resolution), QDs (donors) were coated on the surface of microspheres and energy transfer to red fluorescent protein (RFP)-integrin constructs (acceptors) studied. In both techniques, the QD-modified microspheres were mounted on atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, functionalized with fibronectin, and brought into contact with fluorescently-labeled HeLa or vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. The results obtained from both methods show the clustering and activity of the integrins and are in good agreement with each other. Amsterdam discrete dipole approximation (ADDA) was used to study the effects of inhomogeneous surrounding refractive index on the quality factor and position of the WGMs due to the attachment of a microsphere to an AFM cantilever. WGMs of various QD-embedded microspheres mounted on AFM cantilevers were experimentally

  7. Atomic-resolution imaging in liquid by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy using small cantilevers with megahertz-order resonance frequencies.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, T; Onishi, K; Kobayashi, N; Matsuki, A; Asakawa, H

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we have investigated the performance of liquid-environment FM-AFM with various cantilevers having different dimensions from theoretical and experimental aspects. The results show that reduction of the cantilever dimensions provides improvement in the minimum detectable force as long as the tip height is sufficiently long compared with the width of the cantilever. However, we also found two important issues to be overcome to achieve this theoretically expected performance. The stable photothermal excitation of a small cantilever requires much higher pointing stability of the exciting laser beam than that for a long cantilever. We present a way to satisfy this stringent requirement using a temperature controlled laser diode module and a polarization-maintaining optical fiber. Another issue is associated with the tip. While a small carbon tip formed by electron beam deposition (EBD) is desirable for small cantilevers, we found that an EBD tip is not suitable for atomic-scale applications due to the weak tip-sample interaction. Here we show that the tip-sample interaction can be greatly enhanced by coating the tip with Si. With these improvements, we demonstrate atomic-resolution imaging of mica in liquid using a small cantilever with a megahertz-order resonance frequency. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the improvement in the minimum detectable force obtained by the small cantilever in measurements of oscillatory hydration forces. PMID:22421199

  8. Photothermal excitation setup for a modified commercial atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Holger; Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kühnle, Angelika; Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2014-02-15

    High-resolution imaging in liquids using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy is known to suffer from additional peaks in the resonance spectrum that are unrelated to the cantilever resonance. These unwanted peaks are caused by acoustic modes of the liquid and the setup arising from the indirect oscillation excitation by a piezoelectric transducer. Photothermal excitation has been identified as a suitable method for exciting the cantilever in a direct manner. Here, we present a simple design for implementing photothermal excitation in a modified Multimode scan head from Bruker. Our approach is based on adding a few components only to keep the modifications as simple as possible and to maintain the low noise level of the original setup with a typical deflection noise density of about 15 fm/√(Hz) measured in aqueous solution. The success of the modification is illustrated by a comparison of the resonance spectra obtained with piezoelectric and photothermal excitation. The performance of the systems is demonstrated by presenting high-resolution images on bare calcite in liquid as well as organic adsorbates (Alizarin Red S) on calcite with simultaneous atomic resolution of the underlying calcite substrate.

  9. Photothermal excitation setup for a modified commercial atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Holger; Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kühnle, Angelika

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution imaging in liquids using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy is known to suffer from additional peaks in the resonance spectrum that are unrelated to the cantilever resonance. These unwanted peaks are caused by acoustic modes of the liquid and the setup arising from the indirect oscillation excitation by a piezoelectric transducer. Photothermal excitation has been identified as a suitable method for exciting the cantilever in a direct manner. Here, we present a simple design for implementing photothermal excitation in a modified Multimode scan head from Bruker. Our approach is based on adding a few components only to keep the modifications as simple as possible and to maintain the low noise level of the original setup with a typical deflection noise density of about 15 fm/sqrt{Hz} measured in aqueous solution. The success of the modification is illustrated by a comparison of the resonance spectra obtained with piezoelectric and photothermal excitation. The performance of the systems is demonstrated by presenting high-resolution images on bare calcite in liquid as well as organic adsorbates (Alizarin Red S) on calcite with simultaneous atomic resolution of the underlying calcite substrate.

  10. 3D finite element analysis of electrostatic deflection of commercial and FIB-modified cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy: I. Triangular shaped cantilevers with symmetric pyramidal tips.

    PubMed

    Valdrè, Giovanni; Moro, Daniele

    2008-10-01

    The investigation of the nanoscale distribution of electrostatic forces on material surfaces is of paramount importance for the development of nanotechnology, since these confined forces govern many physical processes on which a large number of technological applications are based. For instance, electric force microscopy (EFM) and micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) are technologies based on an electrostatic interaction between a cantilever and a specimen. In the present work we report on a 3D finite element analysis of the electrostatic deflection of cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy. A commercial triangular shaped cantilever with a symmetric pyramidal tip was modelled. In addition, the cantilever was modified by a focused ion beam (FIB) in order to reduce its parasitic electrostatic force, and its behaviour was studied by computation analysis. 3D modelling of the electrostatic deflection was realized by using a multiphysics finite element analysis software and it was applied to the real geometry of the cantilevers and probes obtained by using basic CAD tools. The results of the modelling are in good agreement with experimental data. PMID:21832617

  11. 3D finite element analysis of electrostatic deflection of commercial and FIB-modified cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy: I. Triangular shaped cantilevers with symmetric pyramidal tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdrè, Giovanni; Moro, Daniele

    2008-10-01

    The investigation of the nanoscale distribution of electrostatic forces on material surfaces is of paramount importance for the development of nanotechnology, since these confined forces govern many physical processes on which a large number of technological applications are based. For instance, electric force microscopy (EFM) and micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) are technologies based on an electrostatic interaction between a cantilever and a specimen. In the present work we report on a 3D finite element analysis of the electrostatic deflection of cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy. A commercial triangular shaped cantilever with a symmetric pyramidal tip was modelled. In addition, the cantilever was modified by a focused ion beam (FIB) in order to reduce its parasitic electrostatic force, and its behaviour was studied by computation analysis. 3D modelling of the electrostatic deflection was realized by using a multiphysics finite element analysis software and it was applied to the real geometry of the cantilevers and probes obtained by using basic CAD tools. The results of the modelling are in good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Photothermal excitation and laser Doppler velocimetry of higher cantilever vibration modes for dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Shuhei; Kobayashi, Dai; Sakurada, Takeo; Nakazawa, Tomonori; Hoshi, Yasuo; Kawakatsu, Hideki

    2008-12-15

    The authors present an optically based method combining photothermal excitation and laser Doppler velocimetry of higher cantilever vibration modes for dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquid. The frequency spectrum of a silicon cantilever measured in water over frequencies ranging up to 10 MHz shows that the method allows us to excite and detect higher modes, from fundamental to fifth flexural, without enhancing spurious resonances. By reducing the tip oscillation amplitude using higher modes, the average tip-sample force gradient due to chemical bonds is effectively increased to achieve high-spatial-resolution imaging in liquid. The method's performance is demonstrated by atomic resolution imaging of a mica surface in water obtained using the second flexural mode with a small tip amplitude of 99 pm; individual atoms on the surface with small height differences of up to 60 pm are clearly resolved.

  13. Scanning Capacitace Microscope/Atomic Force Microscope/Scanning Tunneling Microscope Study of Ion-Implanted Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiye, Hideto; Kawami, Hiroshi; Izawa, Michiyoshi; Yoshimura, Masamichi; Yao, Takafumi

    1995-06-01

    We have investigated the local electrical properties of ion-implanted Si using a combined scanning capacitance microscope (SCaM)/atomic force microscope (AFM)/scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with special attention paid to the effect of annealing. The STM image shows that the as-implanted area is insulating, while the unimplanted area is conductive, in an unannealed sample. Both STM and SCaM images clearly indicate that the implanted area is conductive with n-type behavior after annealing. However, the unimplanted area did not show p-type behavior but slightly n-type behavior due to the diffusion of P impurities during annealing.

  14. Tip localization of an atomic force microscope in transmission microscopy with nanoscale precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Fabian; Heucke, Stephan F.; Pippig, Diana A.; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2015-03-01

    Since the atomic force microscope (AFM) has evolved into a general purpose platform for mechanical experiments at the nanoscale, the need for a simple and generally applicable localization of the AFM cantilever in the reference frame of an optical microscope has grown. Molecular manipulations like in single molecule cut and paste or force spectroscopy as well as tip mediated nanolithography are prominent examples for the broad variety of applications implemented to date. In contrast to the different kinds of superresolution microscopy where fluorescence is used to localize the emitter, we, here, employ the absorbance of the tip to localize its position in transmission microscopy. We show that in a low aperture illumination, the tip causes a significant reduction of the intensity in the image plane of the microscope objective when it is closer than a few hundred nm. By independently varying the z-position of the sample slide, we could verify that this diffraction limited image of the tip is not caused by a near field effect but is rather caused by the absorbance of the transmitted light in the low apex needle-like tip. We localized the centroid position of this tip image with a precision of better than 6 nm and used it in a feedback loop to position the tip into nano-apertures of 110 nm radius. Single-molecule force spectroscopy traces on the unfolding of individual green fluorescent proteins within the nano-apertures showed that their center positions were repeatedly approached with very high fidelity leaving the specific handle chemistry on the tip's surface unimpaired.

  15. Tip localization of an atomic force microscope in transmission microscopy with nanoscale precision

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Fabian; Pippig, Diana A. Gaub, Hermann E.; Heucke, Stephan F.

    2015-03-15

    Since the atomic force microscope (AFM) has evolved into a general purpose platform for mechanical experiments at the nanoscale, the need for a simple and generally applicable localization of the AFM cantilever in the reference frame of an optical microscope has grown. Molecular manipulations like in single molecule cut and paste or force spectroscopy as well as tip mediated nanolithography are prominent examples for the broad variety of applications implemented to date. In contrast to the different kinds of superresolution microscopy where fluorescence is used to localize the emitter, we, here, employ the absorbance of the tip to localize its position in transmission microscopy. We show that in a low aperture illumination, the tip causes a significant reduction of the intensity in the image plane of the microscope objective when it is closer than a few hundred nm. By independently varying the z-position of the sample slide, we could verify that this diffraction limited image of the tip is not caused by a near field effect but is rather caused by the absorbance of the transmitted light in the low apex needle-like tip. We localized the centroid position of this tip image with a precision of better than 6 nm and used it in a feedback loop to position the tip into nano-apertures of 110 nm radius. Single-molecule force spectroscopy traces on the unfolding of individual green fluorescent proteins within the nano-apertures showed that their center positions were repeatedly approached with very high fidelity leaving the specific handle chemistry on the tip’s surface unimpaired.

  16. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip–surface interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borysov, Stanislav S.; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2014-10-29

    Here we present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip–surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip–surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode.

  17. Effect of cantilever nonlinearity in nanoscale tensile testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Weiqiang; Guo, Zaoyang; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2007-02-01

    Microcantilevers are widely used in micro-/nanoscale mechanics studies. The nonlinear response of a cantilever at large deflection is sometimes overlooked. A general study of cantilever beam nonlinearity under a variety of loading conditions was performed with analytical and finite element analyses. Analytical equations for the applied load and the cantilever deflection were obtained. The cantilever nonlinearity was found to increase with increasing cantilever deflection and/or angle of loading. Tensile tests were performed on templated carbon nanotubes (TCNTs) with a custom-made nanomanipulator inside a scanning electron microscope. Atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers were used to load the TCNTs and sense the force. During the tests the AFM cantilevers were loaded to relatively large deflections with nonvertical loads applied at the AFM tip. Based on the slope and the loading angle measurements, the breaking forces of the TCNTs were obtained through numerical integration of the analytical equations. A comparison was made between the load results obtained from linear and nonlinear analyses. The linear analysis was found to underestimate the applied load by up to 15%.

  18. Development of the magnetic force-induced dual vibration energy harvester using a unimorph cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umaba, M.; Nakamachi, E.; Morita, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a high frequency piezoelectric energy harvester converted from the human low vibrated motion energy was newly developed. This hybrid energy harvester consists of the unimorph piezoelectric cantilever, the pendulum and a pair of permanent magnets. One magnet was attached at the edge of cantilever, and the counterpart magnet at the edge of pendulum. The mechanical energy provided through the human walking motion, which is a typical ubiquitous existence of vibration, is converted to the electric energy via the piezoelectric unimorph cantilever vibration. At first, we studied the energy convert mechanism and analyze the performance of novel energy harvester, where the resonance free vibration of unimorph piezoelectric cantilever generated a high electric power. Next, we equipped the counterpart permanent magnet at the edge of pendulum, which vibrates with a very low frequency caused by the human walking. Then the counterpart magnet was set at the edge of unimorph piezoelectric cantilever, which vibrated with a high frequency. This low-to-high frequency convert "dual vibration system" can be characterized as an enhanced energy harvester. We examined and obtained average values of voltage and power in this system, as 8.31 mV and 0.33 μW. Those results show the possibility to apply for the energy harvester in the portable and implantable Bio-MEMS devices.

  19. Study of adhesive forces on a silicon nanotip by atomic force microscope in contact mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agache, Vincent; Legrand, Bernard; Collard, Dominique; Buchaillot, Lionel

    2002-04-01

    Atomic Force Microscope operating in contact mode is used in this paper for probing the spatial distribution of adhesive forces versus the topography of a silicon nanotip. This nanotip consists in an ultra sha4rp silicon tip with radius less than 15 nm fabricated using a combination of high- resolution electron beam lithography and plasma dry etching. The amplitude of the forces is determined from force versus distance curve measurements. Hence, by determining the contact point and the pull-off force from the force curves, the surface topography and the adhesive forces are simultaneously obtained at various locations on the surface. This paper reports both measurements and the modeling of adhesive forces versus the contact point on the nanotip. As the nanotip is sharper and has got a smaller aperture angle than the employed Atomic Force Microscope tip, the measurements are focused on the nanotip apex.

  20. Adhesive forces investigation on a silicon tip by contact-mode atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agache, Vincent; Legrand, Bernard; Collard, Dominique; Buchaillot, Lionel

    2002-09-01

    An atomic force microscope operating in contact mode is used in this letter for probing the adhesive forces at the apex of a silicon nanotip with typical radius smaller than 15 nm, fabricated using a combination of high-resolution electron beam lithography and plasma dry etching. The amplitude of the forces is deduced from force versus distance curve measurements. By determining the contact point and the pull-off force from the force curves, the surface topography and the adhesive forces are simultaneously obtained at various locations on the surface. This letter reports both measurements and modeling of adhesive forces versus the contact point on the nanotip. As the nanotip is sharper and has a smaller aperture angle than the employed atomic force microscope tip, the measurements are focused on the nanotip apex.

  1. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a permanent magnet on the cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Hammel, P.C.

    1997-02-01

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) is a microscopic 3-D imaging instrument based on a recent proposal to detect magnetic resonance signals mechanically using a micro-mechanical resonator. MRFM has been successfully demonstrated in various magnetic resonance experiments including electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonances and nuclear magnetic resonance. In order to apply this ultra-high, 3-D spatial resolution technique to samples of arbitrary size and shape, the magnetic particle which generates the field gradient {del}{bold B}, (and, therefore, the force {bold F = (m {center_dot} {del}B)} between itself and the spin magnetization {bold m} of the sample) will need to be mounted on the mechanical resonator. Up to the present, all experiments have been performed with the sample mounted on the resonator. This is done, in part, to avoid the spurious response of the mechanical resonator which is generated by the variation of the magnetization of the magnetic particle as the external field is varied.

  2. Characterizing absolute piezoelectric microelectromechanical system displacement using an atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J. Chapman, S.

    2014-08-14

    Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) is a popular tool for the study of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials at the nanometer level. Progress in the development of piezoelectric MEMS fabrication is highlighting the need to characterize absolute displacement at the nanometer and Ångstrom scales, something Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) might do but PFM cannot. Absolute displacement is measured by executing a polarization measurement of the ferroelectric or piezoelectric capacitor in question while monitoring the absolute vertical position of the sample surface with a stationary AFM cantilever. Two issues dominate the execution and precision of such a measurement: (1) the small amplitude of the electrical signal from the AFM at the Ångstrom level and (2) calibration of the AFM. The authors have developed a calibration routine and test technique for mitigating the two issues, making it possible to use an atomic force microscope to measure both the movement of a capacitor surface as well as the motion of a micro-machine structure actuated by that capacitor. The theory, procedures, pitfalls, and results of using an AFM for absolute piezoelectric measurement are provided.

  3. Spanning the scales of granular materials through microscopic force imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodu, Nicolas; Dijksman, Joshua A.; Behringer, Robert P.

    2015-03-01

    If you walk on sand, it supports your weight. How do the disordered forces between particles in sand organize, to keep you from sinking? This simple question is surprisingly difficult to answer experimentally: measuring forces in three dimensions, between deeply buried grains, is challenging. Here we describe experiments in which we have succeeded in measuring forces inside a granular packing subject to controlled deformations. We connect the measured micro-scale forces to the macro-scale packing force response with an averaging, mean field calculation. This calculation explains how the combination of packing structure and contact deformations produce the observed nontrivial mechanical response of the packing, revealing a surprising microscopic particle deformation enhancement mechanism.

  4. Spanning the scales of granular materials through microscopic force imaging

    PubMed Central

    Brodu, Nicolas; Dijksman, Joshua A.; Behringer, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    If you walk on sand, it supports your weight. How do the disordered forces between particles in sand organize, to keep you from sinking? This simple question is surprisingly difficult to answer experimentally: measuring forces in three dimensions, between deeply buried grains, is challenging. Here we describe experiments in which we have succeeded in measuring forces inside a granular packing subject to controlled deformations. We connect the measured micro-scale forces to the macro-scale packing force response with an averaging, mean field calculation. This calculation explains how the combination of packing structure and contact deformations produce the observed nontrivial mechanical response of the packing, revealing a surprising microscopic particle deformation enhancement mechanism. PMID:25739968

  5. Determination of elastic moduli of thin layers of soft material using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Horkay, Ferenc; Maresca, Julia; Kachar, Bechara; Chadwick, Richard S

    2002-01-01

    We address three problems that limit the use of the atomic force microscope when measuring elastic moduli of soft materials at microscopic scales. The first concerns the use of sharp cantilever tips, which typically induce local strains that far exceed the linear material regime. We show that this problem can be alleviated by using microspheres as probes, and we establish the criteria for their use. The second relates to the common use of the Hertz contact mechanics model, which leads to significant errors when applied to thin samples. We develop novel, simple to use corrections to apply for such cases. Samples that are either bonded or not bonded to a rigid substrate are considered. The third problem concerns the difficulty in establishing when contact occurs on a soft material. We obtain error estimates for the elastic modulus resulting from such uncertainty and discuss the sensitivity of the estimation methods to error in contact point. The theoretical and experimental results are compared to macroscopic measurements on poly(vinyl-alcohol) gels. PMID:11964265

  6. Development of a hybrid atomic force microscopic measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system's dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system's good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method. PMID:22368463

  7. Development of a Hybrid Atomic Force Microscopic Measurement System Combined with White Light Scanning Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system’s dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system’s good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method. PMID:22368463

  8. Comparative Surface Studies at Atomic Resolution with Ultrahigh Vacuum Variable-Temperature Atomic Force and Scanning Tunneling Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki; Suzuki; Kitamura; Kersker

    1999-05-01

    : With the ultrahigh vacuum variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (UHV-VT-STM), atomic-level observation has been achieved. An ultrahigh vacuum atomic force microscope (UHV-AFM) has also been developed, with success in obtaining atom images where observation in noncontact (NC) mode with a frequency modulation (FM) detection method was attempted. Using the FM detection method in the constant oscillation amplitude of the cantilever excitation mode, we have obtained atomic-resolution images of Si(111) 7 x 7 structures and Si(100) 2 x 1 structures and other structures together with STM images in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. Also shown here are contact potential difference (CPD) images using the NC-AFM method. PMID:10383993

  9. Comparative Surface Studies at Atomic Resolution with Ultrahigh Vacuum Variable-Temperature Atomic Force and Scanning Tunneling Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwatsuki, Masashi; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Shin-Ich; Kersker, Mike

    1999-05-01

    With the ultrahigh vacuum variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (UHV-VT-STM), atomic-level observation has been achieved. An ultrahigh vacuum atomic force microscope (UHV-AFM) has also been developed, with success in obtaining atom images where observation in noncontact (NC) mode with a frequency modulation (FM) detection method was attempted. Using the FM detection method in the constant oscillation amplitude of the cantilever excitation mode, we have obtained atomic-resolution images of Si(111) 7 × 7 structures and Si(100) 2 × 1 structures and other structures together with STM images in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. Also shown here are contact potential difference (CPD) images using the NC-AFM method.

  10. Atomic force microscope observations of otoconia in the newt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallworth, R.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Campbell, J. B.; Steyger, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    Calcitic and aragonitic otoconia from the Japanese red-bellied newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster, were examined using an atomic force microscope. The surface structure of both otoconial polymorphs consisted of arrays of elements approximately 50 nm in diameter. Elements were generally round and were separated by shallow depressions of no more than 20 nm. The elements are suggested to be single crystals of calcium carbonate. The relationship of these observations to theories of otoconial genesis is discussed.

  11. Glue-free tuning fork shear-force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlschlegel, P.; Toquant, J.; Pohl, D. W.; Hecht, B.

    2006-01-01

    A scanning near-field optical microscope without any glued parts is described. Key elements are the optical fiber probe/tuning fork junction and the piezotube scanner assembly. In both cases, fixation is achieved by means of controlled pressure and elastic deformation. The avoidance of glued connections was found to improve the Q factor of the shear-force sensor as well as to facilitate the replacement of the fiber probe and other parts of the scanner head. We present approach curves and shear-force images that demonstrate the performance and stability of the system.

  12. Probe-Sample Coupling in the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, A.; Pelekhov, D. V.; Roukes, M. L.; Hammel, P. C.

    2002-02-01

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) provides a route to achieving scanned probe magnetic resonance imaging with extremely high spatial resolution. Achieving this capability will require understanding the force exerted on a microscopic magnetic probe by a spatially extended sample over which the probe is scanned. Here we present a detailed analysis of this interaction between probe and sample. We focus on understanding the situation where the micromagnet mounted on the mechanical resonator generates a very inhomogeneous magnetic field and is scanned over a sample with at least one spatial dimension much larger than that of the micromagnet. This situation differs quite significantly from the conditions under which most MRFM experiments have been carried out where the sample is mounted on the mechanical resonator and placed in a rather weak magnetic field gradient. In addition to the concept of a sensitive slice (the spatial region where the magnetic resonance condition is met) it is valuable to map the forces exerted on the probe by spins at various locations; this leads to the concept of the force slice (the region in which spins exert force on the resonator). Results of this analysis, obtained both analytically and numerically, will be qualitatively compared with an initial experimental finding from an EPR-MRFM experiment carried out on DPPH at 4 K.

  13. Probe--sample coupling in the magnetic resonance force microscope.

    PubMed

    Suter, A; Pelekhov, D V; Roukes, M L; Hammel, P C

    2002-02-01

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) provides a route to achieving scanned probe magnetic resonance imaging with extremely high spatial resolution. Achieving this capability will require understanding the force exerted on a microscopic magnetic probe by a spatially extended sample over which the probe is scanned. Here we present a detailed analysis of this interaction between probe and sample. We focus on understanding the situation where the micromagnet mounted on the mechanical resonator generates a very inhomogeneous magnetic field and is scanned over a sample with at least one spatial dimension much larger than that of the micromagnet. This situation differs quite significantly from the conditions under which most MRFM experiments have been carried out where the sample is mounted on the mechanical resonator and placed in a rather weak magnetic field gradient. In addition to the concept of a sensitive slice (the spatial region where the magnetic resonance condition is met) it is valuable to map the forces exerted on the probe by spins at various locations; this leads to the concept of the force slice (the region in which spins exert force on the resonator). Results of this analysis, obtained both analytically and numerically, will be qualitatively compared with an initial experimental finding from an EPR-MRFM experiment carried out on DPPH at 4 K. PMID:11846579

  14. A Homotopy Perturbation-Based Method for Large Deflection of a Cantilever Beam Under a Terminal Follower Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Gang; Lin, Wen-Hui; Liu, Ning

    2012-05-01

    The large deflection problem of a uniform cantilever beam subjected to a terminal concentrated follower force is investigated. The governing equations, which characterize a two-point boundary value problem, are transformed into an initial-value problem. A new algorithm based on the homotopy perturbation method is proposed and applied to the resulting problem and the characteristics of load versus displacement are obtained analytically. The convergence of this method is discussed and the details of load-deflection curves are present. Compared with other existing methods, the present scheme is shown to be highly accurate, while only lower order perturbation is required.

  15. The effective quality factor at low temperatures in dynamic force microscopes with Fabry-Pérot interferometer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Hendrik; Milde, Peter; Zerweck, Ulrich; Eng, Lukas M.; Hoffmann, Regina

    2009-06-01

    The oscillation of a cantilever in ultrahigh vacuum dynamic force microscopy is sometimes measured with the help of a Fabry-Pérot interferometer. We show that the photoinduced forces present in such an interferometer can artificially increase or decrease the effective quality factor of the cantilever. We examine this effect on the basis of a PtIr-coated rectangular silicon cantilever at temperatures between 7.7 and 30 K. By measuring resonance curves we demonstrate that the magnitude of the effective quality factor changes with cantilever-fiber distance, laser power, and temperature.

  16. Contact-free experimental determination of the static flexural spring constant of cantilever sensors using a microfluidic force tool.

    PubMed

    Parkin, John D; Hähner, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Micro- and nanocantilevers are employed in atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS) as sensing elements. They enable nanomechanical measurements, are essential for the characterization of nanomaterials, and form an integral part of many nanoscale devices. Despite the fact that numerous methods described in the literature can be applied to determine the static flexural spring constant of micro- and nanocantilever sensors, experimental techniques that do not require contact between the sensor and a surface at some point during the calibration process are still the exception rather than the rule. We describe a noncontact method using a microfluidic force tool that produces accurate forces and demonstrate that this, in combination with a thermal noise spectrum, can provide the static flexural spring constant for cantilever sensors of different geometric shapes over a wide range of spring constant values (≈0.8-160 N/m). PMID:27335740

  17. Contact-free experimental determination of the static flexural spring constant of cantilever sensors using a microfluidic force tool

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, John D

    2016-01-01

    Summary Micro- and nanocantilevers are employed in atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS) as sensing elements. They enable nanomechanical measurements, are essential for the characterization of nanomaterials, and form an integral part of many nanoscale devices. Despite the fact that numerous methods described in the literature can be applied to determine the static flexural spring constant of micro- and nanocantilever sensors, experimental techniques that do not require contact between the sensor and a surface at some point during the calibration process are still the exception rather than the rule. We describe a noncontact method using a microfluidic force tool that produces accurate forces and demonstrate that this, in combination with a thermal noise spectrum, can provide the static flexural spring constant for cantilever sensors of different geometric shapes over a wide range of spring constant values (≈0.8–160 N/m). PMID:27335740

  18. Nanopipette combined with quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope for force spectroscopy/microscopy and liquid delivery-based nanofabrication

    SciTech Connect

    An, Sangmin; Lee, Kunyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Noh, Haneol; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Manhee; Hong, Mun-Heon; Jhe, Wonho

    2014-03-15

    This paper introduces a nanopipette combined with a quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope system (nanopipette/QTF-AFM), and describes experimental and theoretical investigations of the nanoscale materials used. The system offers several advantages over conventional cantilever-based AFM and QTF-AFM systems, including simple control of the quality factor based on the contact position of the QTF, easy variation of the effective tip diameter, electrical detection, on-demand delivery and patterning of various solutions, and in situ surface characterization after patterning. This tool enables nanoscale liquid delivery and nanofabrication processes without damaging the apex of the tip in various environments, and also offers force spectroscopy and microscopy capabilities.

  19. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Michael; Wolf, Dietrich E

    2016-01-01

    A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively. PMID:27335760

  20. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klocke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively. PMID:27335760

  1. Acoustic Imaging of Ferroelectric Domains in BaTiO3 Single Crystals Using Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Huarong; Shimamura, Kiyoshi; Kannan, Chinna Venkadasamy; Villora, Encarnacion G.; Takekawa, Shunji; Kitamura, Kenji; Yin, Qingrui

    2007-01-01

    An “alternating-force-modulated” atomic force microscope (AFM) operating in the acoustic mode, generated by launching acoustic waves on the piezoelectric transducer that is attached to the cantilever, was used to visualize the ferroelectric domains in barium titanate (BaTiO3) single crystals by detecting acoustic vibrations generated by the tip and transmitted through the sample placed beneath it to the transducer. The acoustic signal was found to reflect locally elastic microstructures at low frequencies, while high-frequency acoustic images revealed strip like domain configurations of internal substructures in BaTiO3 single crystals. The underlying acoustic imaging mechanism using the AFM was discussed in terms of the interaction between the excited acoustic wave and ferroelectric domains.

  2. Bifurcation, chaos, and scan instability in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamical motion at any point on the cantilever of an atomic force microscope can be expressed quite generally as a superposition of simple harmonic oscillators corresponding to the vibrational modes allowed by the cantilever shape. Central to the dynamical equations is the representation of the cantilever-sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients that account for the interaction force "stiffness," the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Renormalization of the cantilever beam model shows that for a given cantilever drive frequency cantilever dynamics can be accurately represented by a single nonlinear mass-spring model with frequency-dependent stiffness and damping coefficients [S. A. Cantrell and J. H. Cantrell, J. Appl. Phys. 110, 094314 (2011)]. Application of the Melnikov method to the renormalized dynamical equation is shown to predict a cascade of period doubling bifurcations with increasing cantilever drive force that terminates in chaos. The threshold value of the drive force necessary to initiate bifurcation is shown to depend strongly on the cantilever setpoint and drive frequency, effective damping coefficient, nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. The model predicts the experimentally observed interruptions of the bifurcation cascade for cantilevers of sufficiently large stiffness. Operational factors leading to the loss of image quality in dynamic atomic force microscopy are addressed, and guidelines for optimizing scan stability are proposed using a quantitative analysis based on system dynamical parameters and choice of feedback loop parameter.

  3. Diagonal control design for atomic force microscope piezoelectric tube nanopositioners.

    PubMed

    Bhikkaji, B; Yong, Y K; Mahmood, I A; Moheimani, S O R

    2013-02-01

    Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are used for generating surface topography of samples at micro to atomic resolutions. Many commercial AFMs use piezoelectric tube nanopositioners for scanning. Scanning rates of these microscopes are hampered by the presence of low frequency resonant modes. When inadvertently excited, these modes lead to high amplitude mechanical vibrations causing the loss of accuracy, while scanning, and eventually to break down of the tube. Feedback control has been used to damp these resonant modes. Thereby, enabling higher scanning rates. Here, a multivariable controller is designed to damp the first resonant mode along both the x and y axis. Exploiting the inherent symmetry in the piezoelectric tube, the multivariable control design problem is recast as independent single-input single-output (SISO) designs. This in conjunction with integral resonant control is used for damping the first resonant mode. PMID:23464216

  4. Waveguide ultrasonic force microscopy at 60 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, K.; Kolosov, O. V.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Wright, O. B.

    2000-04-01

    We present measurements using ultrasonic force microscopy at ˜60 MHz, operating in a "waveguide" mode in which the cantilever base is vibrated and flexural ultrasonic vibrations are launched down the cantilever without exciting any particular cantilever resonance. The nonlinearity of the tip-sample force-distance curve allows the conversion of a modulated ultrasonic frequency into a low frequency vibration of the cantilever, detected in a conventional atomic force microscope. Images of Ge quantum dots on a Si substrate show contrast related to elasticity and adhesion differences, and this is interpreted with the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts model of the force-distance curve.

  5. Nanoindentation of gold nanorods with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischl, B.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.

    2014-12-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to measure mechanical properties of nanoscale objects, which are too small to be studied using a conventional nanoindenter. The contact mechanics at such small scales, in proximity of free surfaces, deviate substantially from simple continuum models. We present results from atomistic computer simulations of the indentation of gold nanorods using a diamond AFM tip and give insight in the atomic scale processes, involving creation and migration of dislocations, leading to the plastic deformation of the sample under load, and explain the force-distance curves observed for different tip apex radii of curvature, as well as different crystallographic structure and orientation of the gold nanorod samples.

  6. Quantitative metallography of structural materials with the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Goeken, M.; Vehoff, H.

    1996-10-15

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) is now a well-established technique for imaging surface topography with high resolution and can be used to study the microstructure of structural materials in a nanometer range. On multiphase materials a contrast in the topographic AFM images is obtained from small height differences between the different phases. Accordingly investigations of microstructures that are prepared to have small height differences between the phases can be done. The AFM needs no vacuum, large specimen areas compared to the small areas in thinned TEM foils can be analyzed. This reduces the costs of the measurements significantly. In addition it is advantageous that all measurements are stored as data files in the computer and therefore quantitative evaluations of the topographic data can be performed directly. The microstructures of different crystalline alloys were investigated with the atomic force microscope. The examples include superalloys (Waspaloy, CMSX-6), martensitic transformed surfaces (NiAlCo), and steels (microalloyed steel, perlitic carbon steel).

  7. Optical detection system for probing cantilever deflections parallel to a sample surface.

    PubMed

    Labuda, A; Brastaviceanu, T; Pavlov, I; Paul, W; Rassier, D E

    2011-01-01

    To date, commercial atomic force microscopes have been optimized for measurements of forces perpendicular to the sample surface. In many applications, sensitive parallel force measurements are desirable. These can be obtained by positioning the cantilever with its long axis perpendicular to the sample: the so-called pendulum geometry. We present a compact optical beam deflection system which solves the geometrical constraint problems involved in focusing a light beam onto a cantilever in the pendulum geometry. We demonstrate the performance of the system on measurements of forces imparted by a muscle myofibril, which is in-plane to a high-magnification objective of an optical microscope. PMID:21280831

  8. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Iglesias, Vanessa; Lewis, David; Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming; Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther; Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C; Lanza, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem. PMID:27587127

  9. A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, A. S.; Higgins, S. R.; Knauss, K. G.; Rosso, K. M.

    2011-01-01

    A high-pressure atomic force microscope(AFM) that enables in situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ~350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO2, precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluidrefractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO3) mineral surface in scCO2; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (101¯4) surface are presented. Finally, this new AFM provides unprecedented in situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid–fluid interfaces under pressure.

  10. A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, Alan S.; Higgins, Steven R.; Knauss, Kevin G.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-04-26

    A high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables in-situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ~ 350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO2, precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluid refractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in-situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO3) mineral surface in scCO2; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (10¯14) surface are presented. This new AFM provides unprecedented in-situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid-fluid interfaces under pressure.