Science.gov

Sample records for force systems command

  1. Spacecraft contamination programs within the Air Force Systems Command Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murad, Edmond

    1990-01-01

    Spacecraft contamination programs exist in five independent AFSC organizations: Geophysics Laboratory (GL), Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC), Rome Air Development Center (RADC/OSCE), Wright Research and Development Center (MLBT), Armament Laboratory (ATL/SAI), and Space Systems Division (SSD/OL-AW). In addition, a sizable program exists at Aerospace Corp. These programs are complementary, each effort addressing a specific area of expertise: GL's effort is aimed at addressing the effects of on-orbit contamination; AEDC's effort is aimed at ground simulation and measurement of optical contamination; RADC's effort addresses the accumulation, measurement, and removal of contamination on large optics; MLBT's effort is aimed at understanding the effect of contamination on materials; ATL's effort is aimed at understanding the effect of plume contamination on systems; SSD's effort is confined to the integration of some contamination experiments sponsored by SSD/CLT; and Aerospace Corp.'s effort is aimed at supporting the needs of the using System Program Offices (SPO) in specific areas, such as contamination during ground handling, ascent phase, laboratory measurements aimed at understanding on-orbit contamination, and mass loss and mass gain in on-orbit operations. These programs are described in some detail, with emphasis on GL's program.

  2. 32 CFR 700.1053 - Commander of a task force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commander of a task force. 700.1053 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1053 Commander of a task force. (a) A geographic fleet commander, and any other naval commander, may detail in command of a task force, or other task command, any...

  3. 32 CFR 700.1053 - Commander of a task force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commander of a task force. 700.1053 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1053 Commander of a task force. (a) A geographic fleet commander, and any other naval commander, may detail in command of a task force, or other task command, any...

  4. 32 CFR 700.1053 - Commander of a task force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Commander of a task force. 700.1053 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1053 Commander of a task force. (a) A geographic fleet commander, and any other naval commander, may detail in command of a task force, or other task command, any...

  5. 32 CFR 700.1053 - Commander of a task force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commander of a task force. 700.1053 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1053 Commander of a task force. (a) A geographic fleet commander, and any other naval commander, may detail in command of a task force, or other task command, any...

  6. 32 CFR 700.1053 - Commander of a task force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Commander of a task force. 700.1053 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1053 Commander of a task force. (a) A geographic fleet commander, and any other naval commander, may detail in command of a task force, or other task command, any...

  7. Network command processing system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nam, Yon-Woo; Murphy, Lisa D.

    1993-01-01

    The Network Command Processing System (NCPS) developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ground Network (GN) stations is a spacecraft command system utilizing a MULTIBUS I/68030 microprocessor. This system was developed and implemented at ground stations worldwide to provide a Project Operations Control Center (POCC) with command capability for support of spacecraft operations such as the LANDSAT, Shuttle, Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, and Nimbus-7. The NCPS consolidates multiple modulation schemes for supporting various manned/unmanned orbital platforms. The NCPS interacts with the POCC and a local operator to process configuration requests, generate modulated uplink sequences, and inform users of the ground command link status. This paper presents the system functional description, hardware description, and the software design.

  8. 3 CFR - Disestablishment of United States Joint Forces Command

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disestablishment of United States Joint Forces... of United States Joint Forces Command Memorandum for the Secretary of Defense Pursuant to my... States Joint Forces Command, effective on a date to be determined by the Secretary of Defense. I...

  9. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Blast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Blast Deflector Fences, Northeast & Southwest sides of Operational Apron, Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  10. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Operational ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Operational & Hangar Access Aprons, Spanning length of northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  11. 76 FR 1975 - Disestablishment of United States Joint Forces Command

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ..., 2011 [FR Doc. 2011-590 Filed 1-10-11; 11:15 am] Billing code 5000-04-P ... Memorandum of January 6, 2011--Disestablishment of United States Joint Forces Command #0; #0; #0... of United States Joint Forces Command Memorandum for the Secretary of Defense Pursuant to...

  12. The SAS-3 delayed command system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    To meet the requirements arising from the increased complexity of the power, attitude control and telemetry systems, a full redundant high-performance control section with delayed command capability was designed for the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3). The relay command system of SAS-3 is characterized by 56 bystate relay commands, with capability for handling up to 64 commands in future versions. The 'short' data command service of SAS-1 and SAS-2 consisting of shifting 24-bit words to two users was expanded to five users and augmented with a 'long load' data command service (up to 4080 bits) used to program the telemetry system and the delayed command subsystem. The inclusion of a delayed command service ensures a program of up to 30 relay or short data commands to be loaded for execution at designated times. The design and system operation of the SAS-3 command section are analyzed, with special attention given to the delayed command subsystem.

  13. Voice command weapons launching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, H. E.

    1984-09-01

    This abstract discloses a voice-controlled weapons launching system for use by a pilot of an aircraft against a plurality of simultaneously appearing (i.e., existing) targets, such as two or more aggressor aircraft (or tanks, or the like) attacking more aggressor aircraft. The system includes, in combination, a voice controlled input device linked to and controlling a computer; apparatus (such as a television camera, receiver, and display), linked to and actuated by the computer by a voice command from the pilot, for acquiring and displaying an image of the multi-target area; a laser, linked to and actuated by the computer by a voice command from the pilot to point to (and to lock on to) any one of the plurality of targets, with the laser emitting a beam toward the designated (i.e., selected) target; and a plurality of laser beam-rider missiles, with a different missile being launched toward and attacking each different designated target by riding the laser beam to that target. Unlike the prior art, the system allows the pilot to use his hands full-time to fly and to control the aircraft, while also permitting him to launch each different missile in rapid sequence by giving a two-word spoken command after he has visually selected each target of the plurality of targets, thereby making it possible for the pilot of a single defender aircraft to prevail against the plurality of simultaneously attacking aircraft, or tanks, or the like.

  14. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle Refueling Station, Northeast of AGE Storage Facility at far northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  15. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic Fluid Buildings, Northeast of Looking Glass Avenue at southwest side of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  16. 32 CFR 724.407 - Commander, Naval Reserve Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commander, Naval Reserve Force. 724.407 Section 724.407 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Reserve Force. Manages Naval Reserve resources. Responsible for providing limited support to...

  17. 32 CFR 724.407 - Commander, Naval Reserve Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commander, Naval Reserve Force. 724.407 Section 724.407 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Reserve Force. Manages Naval Reserve resources. Responsible for providing limited support to...

  18. 32 CFR 724.407 - Commander, Naval Reserve Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commander, Naval Reserve Force. 724.407 Section 724.407 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Reserve Force. Manages Naval Reserve resources. Responsible for providing limited support to...

  19. 32 CFR 724.407 - Commander, Naval Reserve Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Commander, Naval Reserve Force. 724.407 Section 724.407 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Reserve Force. Manages Naval Reserve resources. Responsible for providing limited support to...

  20. 32 CFR 724.407 - Commander, Naval Reserve Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Commander, Naval Reserve Force. 724.407 Section 724.407 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Reserve Force. Manages Naval Reserve resources. Responsible for providing limited support to...

  1. Waveform command shaping control of multimode systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhazza, Khaled A.; Masoud, Ziyad N.

    2016-02-01

    A method for eliminating residual vibrations in multimode systems is presented using a command shaping technique. The proposed command shaping technique captures two main advantages. Namely, the independence of the time length of the shaped command from the resonant frequencies of the system, and the ability to generate the command profile without a full system model. Experiments on systems with partial models represented by their resonant frequencies show that shaped command profiles generated using actual measured resonant frequencies of a system outperform those based on mathematical models. This feature of the proposed command shaping technique makes it very attractive for complicated multimode systems where mathematical models are difficult to build. Profiles of the proposed shaped command are simple and do not require intensive calculations. Performance of the proposed shaped command is validated using numerical simulations and experiments. Numerical simulations prove that the shaped commands are capable of completely eliminating residual vibrations of multimode systems. Experiments show that residual vibration elimination depends on the level of accuracy of the measured resonant frequencies of the system.

  2. 14 CFR 417.303 - Command control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... flight termination system used for each launch. (f) Electromagnetic interference. Each command control system component must function within the electromagnetic environment to which it is exposed. A command... must prevent electromagnetic interference. (g) Command transmitter failover. A command control...

  3. 14 CFR 417.303 - Command control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... flight termination system used for each launch. (f) Electromagnetic interference. Each command control system component must function within the electromagnetic environment to which it is exposed. A command... must prevent electromagnetic interference. (g) Command transmitter failover. A command control...

  4. 14 CFR 417.303 - Command control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... flight termination system used for each launch. (f) Electromagnetic interference. Each command control system component must function within the electromagnetic environment to which it is exposed. A command... must prevent electromagnetic interference. (g) Command transmitter failover. A command control...

  5. 14 CFR 417.303 - Command control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... flight termination system used for each launch. (f) Electromagnetic interference. Each command control system component must function within the electromagnetic environment to which it is exposed. A command... must prevent electromagnetic interference. (g) Command transmitter failover. A command control...

  6. A simulated force generator with an adaptive command structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanes, P. Jeff

    2006-05-01

    The Force Laydown Automated Generator (FLAG) is a script-driven behavior model that automatically creates military formations from the platoon level up to division level for use in simulations built on the FLAMES simulation framework. The script allows users to define formation command structure, command relationships, vehicle type and equipment, and behaviors. We have used it to automatically generate more than 3000 units in a single simulation. Currently, FLAG is used in the Air Force Research Laboratory Munitions Directorate (AFRL/MN) to assist their Comprehensive Analysis Process (CAP). It produces a reasonable threat laydown of red forces for testing their blue concept weapons. Our success in the application of FLAG leads us to believe that it offers an invaluable potential for use in training environments and other applications that need a large number of reactive, adaptive forces - red or blue.

  7. Spacecraft command and control using expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, Scott; Grieser, William H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a product called the Intelligent Mission Toolkit (IMT), which was created to meet the changing demands of the spacecraft command and control market. IMT is a command and control system built upon an expert system. Its primary functions are to send commands to the spacecraft and process telemetry data received from the spacecraft. It also controls the ground equipment used to support the system, such as encryption gear, and telemetry front-end equipment. Add-on modules allow IMT to control antennas and antenna interface equipment. The design philosophy for IMT is to utilize available commercial products wherever possible. IMT utilizes Gensym's G2 Real-time Expert System as the core of the system. G2 is responsible for overall system control, spacecraft commanding control, and spacecraft telemetry analysis and display. Other commercial products incorporated into IMT include the SYBASE relational database management system and Loral Test and Integration Systems' System 500 for telemetry front-end processing.

  8. Terrain Commander: a next-generation remote surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneral, Henry J.

    2003-09-01

    Terrain Commander is a fully automated forward observation post that provides the most advanced capability in surveillance and remote situational awareness. The Terrain Commander system was selected by the Australian Government for its NINOX Phase IIB Unattended Ground Sensor Program with the first systems delivered in August of 2002. Terrain Commander offers next generation target detection using multi-spectral peripheral sensors coupled with autonomous day/night image capture and processing. Subsequent intelligence is sent back through satellite communications with unlimited range to a highly sophisticated central monitoring station. The system can "stakeout" remote locations clandestinely for 24 hours a day for months at a time. With its fully integrated SATCOM system, almost any site in the world can be monitored from virtually any other location in the world. Terrain Commander automatically detects and discriminates intruders by precisely cueing its advanced EO subsystem. The system provides target detection capabilities with minimal nuisance alarms combined with the positive visual identification that authorities demand before committing a response. Terrain Commander uses an advanced beamforming acoustic sensor and a distributed array of seismic, magnetic and passive infrared sensors to detect, capture images and accurately track vehicles and personnel. Terrain Commander has a number of emerging military and non-military applications including border control, physical security, homeland defense, force protection and intelligence gathering. This paper reviews the development, capabilities and mission applications of the Terrain Commander system.

  9. Cognitive Systems Modeling and Analysis of Command and Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norlander, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Military operations, counter-terrorism operations and emergency response often oblige operators and commanders to operate within distributed organizations and systems for safe and effective mission accomplishment. Tactical commanders and operators frequently encounter violent threats and critical demands on cognitive capacity and reaction time. In the future they will make decisions in situations where operational and system characteristics are highly dynamic and non-linear, i.e. minor events, decisions or actions may have serious and irreversible consequences for the entire mission. Commanders and other decision makers must manage true real time properties at all levels; individual operators, stand-alone technical systems, higher-order integrated human-machine systems and joint operations forces alike. Coping with these conditions in performance assessment, system development and operational testing is a challenge for both practitioners and researchers. This paper reports on research from which the results led to a breakthrough: An integrated approach to information-centered systems analysis to support future command and control systems research development. This approach integrates several areas of research into a coherent framework, Action Control Theory (ACT). It comprises measurement techniques and methodological advances that facilitate a more accurate and deeper understanding of the operational environment, its agents, actors and effectors, generating new and updated models. This in turn generates theoretical advances. Some good examples of successful approaches are found in the research areas of cognitive systems engineering, systems theory, and psychophysiology, and in the fields of dynamic, distributed decision making and naturalistic decision making.

  10. Test Telemetry And Command System (TTACS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogel, Alvin J.

    1994-11-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a multimission Test Telemetry and Command System (TTACS) which provides a multimission telemetry and command data system in a spacecraft test environment. TTACS reuses, in the spacecraft test environment, components of the same data system used for flight operations; no new software is developed for the spacecraft test environment. Additionally, the TTACS is transportable to any spacecraft test site, including the launch site. The TTACS is currently operational in the Galileo spacecraft testbed; it is also being provided to support the Cassini and Mars Surveyor Program projects. Minimal personnel data system training is required in the transition from pre-launch spacecraft test to post-launch flight operations since test personnel are already familiar with the data system's operation. Additionally, data system components, e.g. data display, can be reused to support spacecraft software development; and the same data system components will again be reused during the spacecraft integration and system test phases. TTACS usage also results in early availability of spacecraft data to data system development and, as a result, early data system development feedback to spacecraft system developers. The TTACS consists of a multimission spacecraft support equipment interface and components of the multimission telemetry and command software adapted for a specific project. The TTACS interfaces to the spacecraft, e.g., Command Data System (CDS), support equipment. The TTACS telemetry interface to the CDS support equipment performs serial (RS-422)-to-ethernet conversion at rates between 1 bps and 1 mbps, telemetry data blocking and header generation, guaranteed data transmission to the telemetry data system, and graphical downlink routing summary and control. The TTACS command interface to the CDS support equipment is nominally a command file transferred in non-real-time via ethernet. The CDS support equipment is responsible for

  11. Test Telemetry And Command System (TTACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogel, Alvin J.

    1994-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a multimission Test Telemetry and Command System (TTACS) which provides a multimission telemetry and command data system in a spacecraft test environment. TTACS reuses, in the spacecraft test environment, components of the same data system used for flight operations; no new software is developed for the spacecraft test environment. Additionally, the TTACS is transportable to any spacecraft test site, including the launch site. The TTACS is currently operational in the Galileo spacecraft testbed; it is also being provided to support the Cassini and Mars Surveyor Program projects. Minimal personnel data system training is required in the transition from pre-launch spacecraft test to post-launch flight operations since test personnel are already familiar with the data system's operation. Additionally, data system components, e.g. data display, can be reused to support spacecraft software development; and the same data system components will again be reused during the spacecraft integration and system test phases. TTACS usage also results in early availability of spacecraft data to data system development and, as a result, early data system development feedback to spacecraft system developers. The TTACS consists of a multimission spacecraft support equipment interface and components of the multimission telemetry and command software adapted for a specific project. The TTACS interfaces to the spacecraft, e.g., Command Data System (CDS), support equipment. The TTACS telemetry interface to the CDS support equipment performs serial (RS-422)-to-ethernet conversion at rates between 1 bps and 1 mbps, telemetry data blocking and header generation, guaranteed data transmission to the telemetry data system, and graphical downlink routing summary and control. The TTACS command interface to the CDS support equipment is nominally a command file transferred in non-real-time via ethernet. The CDS support equipment is responsible for

  12. ISS Update: Station Command and Data Handling System

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kylie Clem interviews ODIN flight controller Amy Brezinski, who monitors and commands the Command and Data Handling System for the International Space Station. Brezinski...

  13. 78 FR 17185 - U.S. Air Force Space Command Notice of Test

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Space Command Notice of Test AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Space Command... inform users of an upcoming event related to the GPS satellite constellation. U.S. Air Force Space... process L2C or L5 CNAV. U.S. Air Force Space Command ] expects to conduct one to two CNAV tests per...

  14. Flextime: A Modified Work Force Scheduling Technique for Selected Headquarters Air Force Logistics Command Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimzey, Reed T.; Prince, Samuel M. O.

    The thesis discusses the advantages and disadvantages of one work force scheduling technique--flextime. The authors were interested in determining if a flextime schedule could be put into effect in a governmental organization such as Headquarters Air Force Logistics Command (AFLC). The study objectives were to determine the feasibility,…

  15. Apollo experience report: Command module uprighting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    A water-landing requirement and two stable flotation attitudes required that a system be developed to ensure that the Apollo command module would always assume an upright flotation attitude. The resolution to the flotation problem and the uprighting concepts, design selection, design changes, development program, qualification, and mission performance are discussed for the uprighting system, which is composed of inflatable bags, compressors, valves, and associated tubing.

  16. Air Force Commanders and Barriers to Entry into a Doctoral Business Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tony; LeMire, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined professionally qualified Air Force commanders' barriers to entry into a business doctoral degree program related to the factors of time, financial means, academics, and motivation. Of the 116 present commanders, 63% were interested in pursuing a doctorate in business. For the commanders interested in obtaining a doctorate…

  17. 32 CFR 724.307 - Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force. 724.307 Section 724.307 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY... § 724.307 Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force. In the case of Navy, the COMNAVRESFOR...

  18. 32 CFR 724.307 - Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force. 724.307 Section 724.307 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY... § 724.307 Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force. In the case of Navy, the COMNAVRESFOR...

  19. 32 CFR 724.307 - Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force. 724.307 Section 724.307 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY... § 724.307 Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force. In the case of Navy, the COMNAVRESFOR...

  20. 32 CFR 724.307 - Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force. 724.307 Section 724.307 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY... § 724.307 Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force. In the case of Navy, the COMNAVRESFOR...

  1. 32 CFR 724.307 - Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force. 724.307 Section 724.307 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY... § 724.307 Functions of the Commander, Naval Reserve Force. In the case of Navy, the COMNAVRESFOR...

  2. The USAF Systems Command and R and D productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchainger, V.

    1985-01-01

    The United States Air Force Systems Command (AFSC) is charged with the development and acquisition of aerospace technology systems. Much of that activity is concerned with space systems development, acquisition, and operations. Heavy emphasis is being placed on productivity in organizational and process functions which will keep aerospace systems on the leading edge of technology, with plans extending capability into the future. The productivity emphasis ranges from people-oriented activities to resource and technological functions which support national aerospace objectives. The AFSC space-related missions is discussed as a special area of productivity efforts.

  3. Marine Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS) Field Development System-1 (FDS-1) assessment: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, L.W.; Hunt, S.T.; Savage, S.F. ); McLaughlin, P.D.; Shepdard, A.P.; Worl, J.C. )

    1992-04-01

    The United State Marine Corps (USMC) is continuing the development and fielding of the Marine Corps Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS), a system which exists in varying states of development, fielding, or modernization. MTACCS is currently composed of the following components: Tactical Combat Operations System (TCO) for ground command and control (C2), Intelligence Analysis System (IAS) with a Genser terminal connected to a TCO workstation for intelligence C2, Marine Integrated Personnel System (MIPS) and a TCO workstation using the Marine Combat Personnel System (MCPERS) software for personnel C2, Marine Integrated Logistics System (MILOGS) which is composed of the Landing Force Asset Distribution System (LFADS), the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) II, and a TCO terminal using the Marine Combat Logistics System (MCLOG) for logistics C2, Marine Corps Fire Support System (MCFSS) for fire support C2, and Advanced Tactical Air Command Central (ATACC) and the Improved Direct Air Support Central for aviation C2.

  4. Command and Control Architectures for Autonomous Micro-Robotic Forces - FY-2000 Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dudenhoeffer, Donald Dean

    2001-04-01

    Advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and micro-technologies will soon give rise to production of large-scale forces of autonomous micro-robots with systems of innate behaviors and with capabilities of self-organization and real world tasking. Such organizations have been compared to schools of fish, flocks of birds, herds of animals, swarms of insects, and military squadrons. While these systems are envisioned as maintaining a high degree of autonomy, it is important to understand the relationship of man with such machines. In moving from research studies to the practical deployment of large-scale numbers of robots, one of critical pieces that must be explored is the command and control architecture for humans to re-task and also inject global knowledge, experience, and intuition into the force. Tele-operation should not be the goal, but rather a level of adjustable autonomy and high-level control. If a herd of sheep is comparable to the collective of robots, then the human element is comparable to the shepherd pulling in strays and guiding the herd in the direction of greener pastures. This report addresses the issues and development of command and control for largescale numbers of autonomous robots deployed as a collective force.

  5. 14 CFR 417.303 - Command control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Command control system requirements. 417.303 Section 417.303 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety System § 417.303 Command control system requirements. (a) General....

  6. 14 CFR 417.305 - Command control system testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Command control system testing. 417.305 Section 417.305 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety System § 417.305 Command control system testing. (a) General. (1) A...

  7. 14 CFR 417.305 - Command control system testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Command control system testing. 417.305 Section 417.305 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety System § 417.305 Command control system testing. (a) General. (1) A...

  8. 14 CFR 417.305 - Command control system testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Command control system testing. 417.305 Section 417.305 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety System § 417.305 Command control system testing. (a) General. (1) A...

  9. 14 CFR 417.305 - Command control system testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Command control system testing. 417.305 Section 417.305 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety System § 417.305 Command control system testing. (a) General. (1) A...

  10. NASIS data base management system: IBM 360 TSS implementation. Volume 5: Retrieval command system reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The retrieval command subsystem reference manual for the NASA Aerospace Safety Information System (NASIS) is presented. The command subsystem may be operated conversationally or in the batch mode. Retrieval commands are categorized into search-oriented and output-oriented commands. The characteristics of ancillary commands and their application are reported.

  11. Command Line Image Processing System (CLIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleagle, S. R.; Meyers, G. L.; Kulinski, R. G.

    1985-06-01

    An interactive image processing language (CLIPS) has been developed for use in an image processing environment. CLIPS uses a simple syntax with extensive on-line help to allow even the most naive user perform complex image processing tasks. In addition, CLIPS functions as an interpretive language complete with data structures and program control statements. CLIPS statements fall into one of three categories: command, control,and utility statements. Command statements are expressions comprised of intrinsic functions and/or arithmetic operators which act directly on image or user defined data. Some examples of CLIPS intrinsic functions are ROTATE, FILTER AND EXPONENT. Control statements allow a structured programming style through the use of statements such as DO WHILE and IF-THEN - ELSE. Utility statements such as DEFINE, READ, and WRITE, support I/O and user defined data structures. Since CLIPS uses a table driven parser, it is easily adapted to any environment. New commands may be added to CLIPS by writing the procedure in a high level language such as Pascal or FORTRAN and inserting the syntax for that command into the table. However, CLIPS was designed by incorporating most imaging operations into the language as intrinsic functions. CLIPS allows the user to generate new procedures easily with these powerful functions in an interactive or off line fashion using a text editor. The fact that CLIPS can be used to generate complex procedures quickly or perform basic image processing functions interactively makes it a valuable tool in any image processing environment.

  12. Advanced Command Destruct System (ACDS) Enhanced Flight Termination System (EFTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tow, David

    2009-01-01

    NASA Dryden started working towards a single vehicle enhanced flight termination system (EFTS) in January 2008. NASA and AFFTC combined their efforts to work towards final operating capability for multiple vehicle and multiple missions simultaneously, to be completed by the end of 2011. Initially, the system was developed to support one vehicle and one frequency per mission for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at NASA Dryden. By May 2008 95% of design and hardware builds were completed, however, NASA Dryden's change of software safety scope and requirements caused delays after May 2008. This presentation reviews the initial and final operating capabilities for the Advanced Command Destruct System (ACDS), including command controller and configuration software development. A requirements summary is also provided.

  13. Air Force Logistics Command (AFLC) solar thermal plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The plant proved its capability to deliver the desired energy product in a USAF industrial environment. The collector proved capable of energy conversion at insolation levels up to 25% below design minimum. The plant and the project were negatively affected by severe winter weather, with total insolation during the test period 60 percent less than the expected value. Environmental effects reduced plant availability to 55 percent. Only five, minimally good operating days were experienced during the test period. The subsequent lack of performance data prohibits the drawing of general conclusions regarding system performance. System operability was rated generally high. The only inhibiting factor was the difficulty in procuring replacement parts for rapid repair under USAF stockage and procurement policies. No inherently serious system failures were recorded, although a thermostatic valve malfunction in the freeze protection system ultimately took 30 days to repair.

  14. Apollo Command and Service Module Propulsion Systems Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the Apollo Command and Service Module (CSM) propulsion systems is provided. The systems for CSM propulsion and control are defined, the times during the mission when each system is used are listed, and, the basic components and operation of the service propulsion system, SM reaction control system and CM reaction control system are described.

  15. Network, system, and status software enhancements for the autonomously managed electrical power system breadboard. Volume 3: Commands specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, James W.

    1990-01-01

    This volume (3 of 4) contains the specification for the command language for the AMPS system. The volume contains a requirements specification for the operating system and commands and a design specification for the operating system and command. The operating system and commands sits on top of the protocol. The commands are an extension of the present set of AMPS commands in that the commands are more compact, allow multiple sub-commands to be bundled into one command, and have provisions for identifying the sender and the intended receiver. The commands make no change to the actual software that implement the commands.

  16. Survey of Command Execution Systems for NASA Spacecraft and Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Vandi; Jonsson, Ari; Simmons, Reid; Estlin, Tara; Levinson, Rich

    2005-01-01

    NASA spacecraft and robots operate at long distances from Earth Command sequences generated manually, or by automated planners on Earth, must eventually be executed autonomously onboard the spacecraft or robot. Software systems that execute commands onboard are known variously as execution systems, virtual machines, or sequence engines. Every robotic system requires some sort of execution system, but the level of autonomy and type of control they are designed for varies greatly. This paper presents a survey of execution systems with a focus on systems relevant to NASA missions.

  17. Marine Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS), Field Development System-1 (FDS-1) assessment: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, L W; Hunt, S T; Savage, S F; McLaughlin, P D; Shepard, A P; Worl, J C

    1992-04-01

    The following appendices contain the detailed analysis data for the questionnaires and various FDS-1 after action reports submitted to the Marine Corps Systems Command (MARCORSYSCOM) Marine Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS) Systems' Engineer.

  18. Integrated command, control, communications and computation system functional architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, C. G.; Gilbert, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    The functional architecture for an integrated command, control, communications, and computation system applicable to the command and control portion of the NASA End-to-End Data. System is described including the downlink data processing and analysis functions required to support the uplink processes. The functional architecture is composed of four elements: (1) the functional hierarchy which provides the decomposition and allocation of the command and control functions to the system elements; (2) the key system features which summarize the major system capabilities; (3) the operational activity threads which illustrate the interrelationahip between the system elements; and (4) the interfaces which illustrate those elements that originate or generate data and those elements that use the data. The interfaces also provide a description of the data and the data utilization and access techniques.

  19. Marine Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS) Field Development System-1 (FDS-1) assessment: Final report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, L.W.; Hunt, S.T.; Savage, S.F.; McLaughlin, P.D.; Shepdard, A.P.; Worl, J.C.

    1992-04-01

    The United State Marine Corps (USMC) is continuing the development and fielding of the Marine Corps Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS), a system which exists in varying states of development, fielding, or modernization. MTACCS is currently composed of the following components: Tactical Combat Operations System (TCO) for ground command and control (C2), Intelligence Analysis System (IAS) with a Genser terminal connected to a TCO workstation for intelligence C2, Marine Integrated Personnel System (MIPS) and a TCO workstation using the Marine Combat Personnel System (MCPERS) software for personnel C2, Marine Integrated Logistics System (MILOGS) which is composed of the Landing Force Asset Distribution System (LFADS), the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) II, and a TCO terminal using the Marine Combat Logistics System (MCLOG) for logistics C2, Marine Corps Fire Support System (MCFSS) for fire support C2, and Advanced Tactical Air Command Central (ATACC) and the Improved Direct Air Support Central for aviation C2.

  20. Fuel cell system logic for differentiating between rapid and normal shutdown commands

    DOEpatents

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    A method of controlling the operation of a fuel cell system wherein each shutdown command for the system is subjected to decision logic which determines whether the command should be a normal shutdown command or rapid shutdown command. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a normal shutdown command, then the system is shutdown in a normal step-by-step process in which the hydrogen stream is consumed within the system. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a rapid shutdown command, the hydrogen stream is removed from the system either by dumping to atmosphere or routing to storage.

  1. Satellite Telemetry and Command using Big LEO Mobile Telecommunications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huegel, Fred

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with satellite telemetry and command using Big LEO mobile telecommunications systems are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Commercial Satellite system overviews: Globalstar, ICO, and Iridium; 2) System capabilities and cost reduction; 3) Satellite constellations and contact limitations; 4) Capabilities of Globalstar, ICO and Iridium with emphasis on Globalstar; and 5) Flight transceiver issues and security.

  2. Flight test evaluation of a separate surface attitude command control system on a Beech 99 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, S. W.; Jenks, G. E.; Roskam, J.; Stone, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint NASA/university/industry program was conducted to flight evaluate a potentially low cost separate surface implementation of attitude command in a Beech 99 airplane. Saturation of the separate surfaces was the primary cause of many problems during development. Six experienced professional pilots made simulated instrument flight evaluations in light-to-moderate turbulence. They were favorably impressed with the system, particularly with the elimination of control force transients that accompanied configuration changes. For ride quality, quantitative data showed that the attitude command control system resulted in all cases of airplane motion being removed from the uncomfortable ride region.

  3. Adjustable impedance, force feedback and command language aids for telerobotics (parts 1-4 of an 8-part MIT progress report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Thomas B.; Raju, G. Jagganath; Buzan, Forrest T.; Yared, Wael; Park, Jong

    1989-01-01

    Projects recently completed or in progress at MIT Man-Machine Systems Laboratory are summarized. (1) A 2-part impedance network model of a single degree of freedom remote manipulation system is presented in which a human operator at the master port interacts with a task object at the slave port in a remote location is presented. (2) The extension of the predictor concept to include force feedback and dynamic modeling of the manipulator and the environment is addressed. (3) A system was constructed to infer intent from the operator's commands and the teleoperation context, and generalize this information to interpret future commands. (4) A command language system is being designed that is robust, easy to learn, and has more natural man-machine communication. A general telerobot problem selected as an important command language context is finding a collision-free path for a robot.

  4. VHF command system study. [spectral analysis of GSFC VHF-PSK and VHF-FSK Command Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, T. H.; Geist, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions are provided to specific problems arising in the GSFC VHF-PSK and VHF-FSK Command Systems in support of establishment and maintenance of Data Systems Standards. Signal structures which incorporate transmission on the uplink of a clock along with the PSK or FSK data are considered. Strategies are developed for allocating power between the clock and data, and spectral analyses are performed. Bit error probability and other probabilities pertinent to correct transmission of command messages are calculated. Biphase PCM/PM and PCM/FM are considered as candidate modulation techniques on the telemetry downlink, with application to command verification. Comparative performance of PCM/PM and PSK systems is given special attention, including implementation considerations. Gain in bit error performance due to coding is also considered.

  5. Extension to distributed annotation system: Summary and summaryplot commands.

    PubMed

    Chrysostomou, Charalambos; Brookes, Anthony J

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the development of high-throughput sequencing technologies provided an effective way to generate data from entire genomes and test variants from thousands of individuals. The information acquired from analysing the data generated from high-throughput sequencing technologies provided useful insights into applications like whole-exome sequencing and targeted sequencing to discover the genetic cause of complex diseases and drug responses. The Distributed Annotation System (DAS) is one of the proposed solution developed to share and unify biological data from multiple local and remote DAS annotation servers. The researchers can use DAS to request data from federated or centralised databases and integrate them into a unified view. Furthermore, with the use of Reference DAS servers, structural and sequence data can be used to accompany annotation data, for the pursue of new knowledge for a particular feature or region. In this paper, two additional commands, summary and summary-plot commands, to the existing DAS protocol are proposed and implemented. The proposed commands were created in order to give the users the capabilities to request a summary of features for a particular region of interest. The summary command was created in order to extend the capabilities of the current DAS protocol, while the summaryplot command was created to provide a more user-friendly alternative to standard XML DAS responses. Finally, three examples are presented based on the GENCODE annotation data. PMID:26738065

  6. Standard operating procedure for air quality stationary source management at Air Force installations in the Air Force Materiel Command

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, C.M.; Ryckman, S.J.

    1997-12-31

    To sustain compliance and avoid future enforcement actions associated with air quality stationary sources and to provide installation commanders with a certification process for Title V permitting, and Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for Stationary Source Management has been developed. The SOP consists of two major sections: Stationary Source Planning and Administration, and Stationary Source Operations These two main sections are further subdivided into twelve subsections which delineate requirements (e.g. maintaining inventories, applying for and maintaining permits, keeping records, reporting and certifying compliance) and assign ownership of processes and responsibilities (e.g. appointing a manager/alternate for each identified stationary air source). In addition, the SOP suggests training that should be provided from operator to commander levels to ensure that all personnel involved with a stationary air source are aware of their responsibilities. Implementation of the SOP should provide for the essential control necessary for installation commanders to eliminate stationary air source non-compliance and to certify compliance in accordance with the Title V Operating Permit requirements. This paper will discuss: the background and purpose for the SOPs content, the twelve subsections of the SOP, the success of implementation at various installations, the relevance or the recommended training, the success of negotiating with various labor unions for SOP implementation and the success of the SOP in reference to its intended purpose.

  7. Analysis, design, and testing of a low cost, direct force command linear proof mass actuator for structural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.; Shelley, Stuart; Jacobson, Mark

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the design, analysis, and test of a low cost, linear proof mass actuator for vibration control is presented. The actuator is based on a linear induction coil from a large computer disk drive. Such disk drives are readily available and provide the linear actuator, current feedback amplifier, and power supply for a highly effective, yet inexpensive, experimental laboratory actuator. The device is implemented as a force command input system, and the performance is virtually the same as other, more sophisticated, linear proof mass systems.

  8. Incident Command Systems: Because Life Happens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Gayle; Moore, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Preparing for every possible contingency seems daunting, but with teamwork and some help from the government, it's almost do-able. There is a great system out there that will help business professionals and educators develop a strong, effective emergency preparedness plan. If they haven't done a good job of implementing a solid emergency response…

  9. A Friendly Command, Control, and Information System for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, John T.; Duric, Nebojsa; Sjulin, Michael; Slezak, Scott; Westpfahl, David

    Virtually real user interfaces and device independent communications systems provide a robust, secure and efficient means for remote control of telescopes, data transfer, and interaction among personnel at distant sites. A variety of techniques has been implemented for remote operation of telescopes. This paper describes a new system incorporating secured, compacted, simultaneous information transfer of multiple data types, robust command structure and a user interface which pre-tests commands for security. Testing is accomplished by manipulating and displaying planned allowable motions using a virtual telescope and instrument before real hardware executes the desired motions. Embedded in this system is the ability to create efficient interfaces for all classes of users, data and system security, error correction and multiple forms of data compression. The system results from a merger of a military command and control system and a control system for robots operating in hazardous environments. Both systems were developed by Sandia National Laboratories. The merged system is proposed to enable elementary school children to access remotely operable telescopes and other assets of the LodeStar Project, which provides science education and research capability throughout New Mexico. The definition and constraints on the system are appropriate for its use by the professional astronomical community, as well, perhaps as a standard control and communications system supported, in part, within the national laboratories. In this paper we discuss implementation of the prototype system, its features, and its constraints, particularly with respect to bandwidth limitations.

  10. Expert system for spacecraft command and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. E.

    The application of AI techniques to the automation of ground control functions in the defense satellite communication system (DSCS) is described. The aim of this effort is to lower the vulnerability of the DSCS to attack; a first step is the design of software for spacecraft maintenance and control. The benefits of automation and the need for high-level implementation are reviewed. A knowledge-based or expert approach was chosen to automate telemetry-interpretation, trend-analysis, anomaly-resolution, and status-maintenance functions now performed solely by operators; and a design concept was developed to meet the requirements of extendability, simplicity, and explicitness. Rule-based and logic-based knowledge-representation schemes, and data-driven and goal-driven control strategies are compared. The programming tools developed by the different organizations participating in the AI effort are indicated in a table.

  11. Spaceport Command and Control System User Interface Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huesman, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System will be the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's newest system for launching commercial and government owned spacecraft. It's a large system with many parts all in need of testing. To improve upon testing already done by NASA engineers, the Engineering Directorate, Electrical Division (NE-E) of Kennedy Space Center has hired a group of interns each of the last few semesters to develop novel ways of improving the testing process.

  12. Man-portable command, communication, and control systems for the next generation of unmanned field systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobus, Charles J.; Mitchell, Brian T.; Jacobus, Heidi N.; Watts, Russell C.; Taylor, Mark J.; Salazar, Alfonso

    1993-05-01

    New generations of military unmanned systems on the ground, at sea, and in the air will be driven by man-portable command units. In past efforts we implemented several prototypes of such units which provided display and capture of up to four video input channels, provided 4 color LCD screens and a larger status display LCD screen, provided drive input through two joysticks, and, through software, supported a flexible 'virtual' driver's interface. We have also performed additional trade analysis of prototype systems incorporating force feedback and extensive image-oriented processing facilities applied to man-controlled robotic control systems. This prior work has resulted in a database of practical design guidelines and a new generation of hardened compact robotic command center which is being designed and built to provide more advanced video capture, display, and interfacing features, supercomputer level computational performance, and ergonomic features for hard field use. In this paper we will summarize some past work and will project current performance to features likely to be common across most unmanned systems command, control, and communications subsystems of the near future.

  13. Tone based command system for reception of very weak signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokulic, Robert Steven (Inventor); Jensen, James Robert (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    This disclosure presents a communication receiver system for spacecraft that includes an open loop receiver adapted to receive a communication signal. An ultrastable oscillator (USO) and a tone detector are connected to the open loop receiver. The open loop receiver translates the communication signal to an intermediate frequency signal using a highly stable reference frequency from the USO. The tone detector extracts commands from the communication signal by evaluating the difference between tones of the communication signal.

  14. Advanced Command Destruct System (ACDS) Enhanced Flight Termination System (EFTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tow, David K.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides information on the development, integration, and operational usage of the Enhanced Flight Termination System (EFTS) at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and Air Force Flight Test Center. The presentation will describe the efforts completed to certify the system and acquire approval for operational usage, the efforts to integrate the system into the NASA Dryden existing flight termination infrastructure, and the operational support of aircraft with EFTS at Edwards AFB.

  15. Re-engineering the Multimission Command System at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Scott; Biesiadecki, Jeff; Cox, Nagin; Murphy, Susan C.; Reeve, Tim

    1994-01-01

    The Operations Engineering Lab (OEL) at JPL has developed the multimission command system as part of JPL's Advanced Multimission Operations System. The command system provides an advanced multimission environment for secure, concurrent commanding of multiple spacecraft. The command functions include real-time command generation, command translation and radiation, status reporting, some remote control of Deep Space Network antenna functions, and command file management. The mission-independent architecture has allowed easy adaptation to new flight projects and the system currently supports all JPL planetary missions (Voyager, Galileo, Magellan, Ulysses, Mars Pathfinder, and CASSINI). This paper will discuss the design and implementation of the command software, especially trade-offs and lessons learned from practical operational use. The lessons learned have resulted in a re-engineering of the command system, especially in its user interface and new automation capabilities. The redesign has allowed streamlining of command operations with significant improvements in productivity and ease of use. In addition, the new system has provided a command capability that works equally well for real-time operations and within a spacecraft testbed. This paper will also discuss new development work including a multimission command database toolkit, a universal command translator for sequencing and real-time commands, and incorporation of telecommand capabilities for new missions.

  16. Systematic method for the condition assessment of central heating plants in Air Force Logistics Command. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Starmack, G.J.

    1990-09-01

    Air Force Logistics Command (AFLC), facing decreasing funds and aging utility systems, needed a method to objectively rate its central heating plants. Such a rating system would be used to compare heating plants throughout the command to identify potential problem areas and prioritize major repair projects. This thesis used a Delphi questionnaire to gather opinions from heating plant experts in order to identify and prioritize components considered most critical to overall plant operation. In addition, the experts suggested measurements which could be used to evaluate component conditions. By combining expert opinions and reading from technical literature, component model rating schemes were developed for AFLC's steam and high temperature hot water plants. Based on measurements and observations of critical components in the plant, a score between 0 and 100 is assigned to each component (for example, condensate piping, deaerator, etc.), each plant subsystem (distribution system, water treatment system, etc.), and to the plant as a whole. These component model rating schemes and the resultant overall condition index scores will enable AFLC to focus their management attention and allocate needed resources to the plants in greatest need of repair.

  17. Central Command Architecture for High Order Autonomous Unmanned Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieber, Chad Michael

    This dissertation describes a High-Order Central Command (HOCC) architecture and presents a flight demonstration where a single user coordinates 4 unmanned fixed-wing aircraft. HOCC decouples the user from control of individual vehicles, eliminating human limits on the size of the system, and uses a non-iterative sequence of algorithms that permit easy estimation of how computational complexity scales. The Hungarian algorithm used to solve a min-sum assignment with a one-task planning horizon becomes the limiting complexity, scaling at O(x3) where x is the larger number of vehicles or tasks in the assignment. This method is shown to have a unique property of creating non-intersecting routes which is used to drastically reduce the computational cost of deconflicting planned routes. Results from several demonstration flights are presented where a single user commands a system of 4 fixed-wing aircraft. The results confirm that autonomous flight of a large number of UAVs is a bona fide engineering sub-discipline, which is expected to be of interest to engineers who will find its utility in the aviation industry and in other emerging markets.

  18. An emergency command recognizer for voiced system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterlind, P.; Johnston, Waymon L.

    1987-10-01

    An algorithm for accepting speaker-independent voiced input, aimed especially at accommodating emergency acoustic commands, is described. The algorithm is directed toward correctly identifying commands from speaker-independent acoustic input using machine recognition of common, standarized phonemic input, using these recognized sounds to reconstruct entire words and phrases. Speaker-dependent phonemes are not used during the command reconstruction process, so that speaker idiosyncracies are accommodated. Machine recognition extends to voice pitch and emotional tension characteristics.

  19. "A Fiberoptic Local-Area-Network Solution For Tactical Command And Control Systems"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasak, Weldon; Pfister, Gerhard

    1983-11-01

    This paper examines key network requirements for the elements of distributed tactical command and control system. System concepts are evolved that support implementation solutions with emphasis on advanced technologies. Mobile command and control elements of ground and air forces are becoming more vulnerable in an ever increasing threat environment. This vulnerability is caused by the employment of these elements in a manner characterized by functional and physical centralization. A command and control unit typically consists of a centralized operations center surrounded by closely clustered communications and surveillance equipments. Because these elements have different deployment and employment requirements, the command and control unit is not optimized in terms of survivability, mobility, effectiveness, and operational flexibility. In recent years, convincing arguments have been put forth to the effect that distributed operations centers, redundantly structured communication functions, and netted surveillance systems can provide the necessary attributes to be effective in the advanced threat environment. Current technology does not meet the requirements of such a system. A local area network provides a power interconnection mechanism for the distributed elements of the command and control system. The requirements are for a rapid, efficient, and reliable means of transferring voice and data communications between elements. The topology of such a network must primarily consider survivability and reliability of communications interchanges with special emphasis on continued operations under degraded conditions. When such conditions occur, e.g., the result of combat attrition, a complete command and control capability should remain even though it may be at somewhat of a reduced capacity. The interconnection medium for the local area network should be immune to external disruptions, e.g., EMI, EMP, or C3CM, and should have a wide transmission bandwidth with a minimum

  20. Spaceport Command and Control System - Support Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tremblay, Shayne

    2016-01-01

    The Information Architecture Support (IAS) Team, the component of the Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) that is in charge of all the pre-runtime data, was in need of some report features to be added to their internal web application, Information Architecture (IA). Development of these reports is crucial for the speed and productivity of the development team, as they are needed to quickly and efficiently make specific and complicated data requests against the massive IA database. These reports were being put on the back burner, as other development of IA was prioritized over them, but the need for them resulted in internships being created to fill this need. The creation of these reports required learning Ruby on Rails development, along with related web technologies, and they will continue to serve IAS and other support software teams and their IA data needs.

  1. Man/terminal interaction evaluation of computer operating system command and control service concepts. [in Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodson, D. W.; Shields, N. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The Experiment Computer Operating System (ECOS) of the Spacelab will allow the onboard Payload Specialist to command experiment devices and display information relative to the performance of experiments. Three candidate ECOS command and control service concepts were reviewed and laboratory data on operator performance was taken for each concept. The command and control service concepts evaluated included a dedicated operator's menu display from which all command inputs were issued, a dedicated command key concept with which command inputs could be issued from any display, and a multi-display concept in which command inputs were issued from several dedicated function displays. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed in terms of training, operational errors, task performance time, and subjective comments of system operators.

  2. Air Force Space Command satellite orbit predictor using parallel virtual machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Susan K.

    1993-12-01

    Parallel computing is the wave of the future. As the need for computational power increases, one processor is no longer sufficient to achieve the speed necessary to solve today's complex problems. The Air Force Space Command (AFSPACEOM) tracks approximately 8000 satellites daily; the model used by the AFSPACECOM, SGP4, (Simplified General Perturbation Model Four), has been the operational model since 1976. This thesis contains a detailed discussion of the mathematical theory of the SGP4 model. The tracking of a satellite requires extensive calculations. The satellite can be tracked more efficiently with parallel processing techniques. The principles developed are applicable to a Naval ship tracking multiple incoming threats; the increase in the speed of processing incoming data would result in personnel being informed faster and thus allow more time for better decisions during combat. Three parallel algorithms applied to SGP4 for implementations on a Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) are developed. PVM is a small software package that allows a network of computer workstations to appear as a single large distributed-memory parallel computer. This thesis contains a description of several algorithms for the implementation on PVM to track satellites, the optimal number of workstations, and methods of distributing data.

  3. Air compliance through pollution prevention at Air Force Materiel Command facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Kolpa, R.; Ryckman, S.J. Jr.; Smith, A.E.

    1999-03-19

    Options for air compliance through pollution prevention (P2) have been identified at 14 facilities of the US Air Force Materiel Command, ranging from depots with significant light industrial activity to laboratories. Previous P2 efforts concentrated on reducing hazardous and solid wastes, with any reduction in air impacts generally being a collateral benefit. This work focused on reducing air emissions and air compliance vulnerabilities. P2 options were identified in three stages. First, potentially applicable P2 options were identified from Internet and published information. Attention was given to identifying the types of sources to which an option could be applied, the option's state of development, and constraints that could limit its application. Traditional P2 options involving technology or equipment changes and material substitution were considered. In addition, newer approaches based on administrative ''controls'' were considered. These included inserting P2 into operating permits in exchange for administrative relief, privatization, derating boilers, and reducing an installation's potential to emit and compliance vulnerability by separating sources not under the Air Force's ''common control.'' Next, criteria and toxic emissions inventories by source category were prepared from inventory data supplied by facilities. The major problems at this stage were differences in the levels of detail provided by facilities and in the categories used by different installations. Emitting categories were matched to P2 option categories to identify candidate options. Candidates were screened to account for local regulations and technical information about sources in the inventories. When possible, emission reductions were estimated to help facility personnel prioritize options. Some options identified are being actively pursued by facilities to determine their site-specific feasibility. Although much work has been done to implement material substitution programs, this

  4. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  5. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  6. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  7. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  8. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  9. IT Security Support for the Spaceport Command Control System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varise, Brian

    2014-01-01

    My job title is IT Security support for the Spaceport Command & Control System Development. As a cyber-security analyst it is my job to ensure NASA's information stays safe from cyber threats, such as, viruses, malware and denial-of-service attacks by establishing and enforcing system access controls. Security is very important in the world of technology and it is used everywhere from personal computers to giant networks ran by Government agencies worldwide. Without constant monitoring analysis, businesses, public organizations and government agencies are vulnerable to potential harmful infiltration of their computer information system. It is my responsibility to ensure authorized access by examining improper access, reporting violations, revoke access, monitor information request by new programming and recommend improvements. My department oversees the Launch Control System and networks. An audit will be conducted for the LCS based on compliance with the Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) and The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). I recently finished analyzing the SANS top 20 critical controls to give cost effective recommendations on various software and hardware products for compliance. Upon my completion of this internship, I will have successfully completed my duties as well as gain knowledge that will be helpful to my career in the future as a Cyber Security Analyst.

  10. Development of the Macro Command Editing Executive System for Factory Workers-Oriented Programless Visual Inspection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anezaki, Takashi; Wakitani, Kouichi; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Kubo, Hiroyasu

    Because visual inspection systems are difficult to tune, they create many problems for the kaizen process. This results in increased development costs and time to assure that the inspection systems function properly. In order to improve inspection system development, we designed an easy-tuning system called a “Program-less” visual inspection system. The ROI macro command which consisted of eight kinds of shape recognition macro commands and decision, operation, control commands was built. Furthermore, the macro command editing executive system was developed by the operation of only the GUI without editing source program. The validity of the ROI macro command was proved by the application of 488 places.

  11. Integrated command, control, communication and computation system design study. Summary of tasks performed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A summary of tasks performed on an integrated command, control, communication, and computation system design study is given. The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System command and control system study, an automated real-time operations study, and image processing work are discussed.

  12. Moving base simulation evaluation of translational rate command systems for STOVL aircraft in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, James A.; Stortz, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    Using a generalized simulation model, a moving-base simulation of a lift-fan short takeoff/vertical landing fighter aircraft has been conducted on the Vertical Motion Simulator at Ames Research Center. Objectives of the experiment were to determine the influence of system bandwidth and phase delay on flying qualities for translational rate command and vertical velocity command systems. Assessments were made for precision hover control and for landings aboard an LPH type amphibious assault ship in the presence of winds and rough seas. Results obtained define the boundaries between satisfactory and adequate flying qualities for these design features for longitudinal and lateral translational rate command and for vertical velocity command.

  13. IT Security Support for Spaceport Command and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLain, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    During the fall 2013 semester, I worked at the Kennedy Space Center as an IT Security Intern in support of the Spaceport Command and Control System under the guidance of the IT Security Lead Engineer. Some of my responsibilities included assisting with security plan documentation collection, system hardware and software inventory, and malicious code and malware scanning. Throughout the semester, I had the opportunity to work on a wide range of security related projects. However, there are three projects in particular that stand out. The first project I completed was updating a large interactive spreadsheet that details the SANS Institutes Top 20 Critical Security Controls. My task was to add in all of the new commercial of the shelf (COTS) software listed on the SANS website that can be used to meet their Top 20 controls. In total, there are 153 unique security tools listed by SANS that meet one or more of their 20 controls. My second project was the creation of a database that will allow my mentor to keep track of the work done by the contractors that report to him in a more efficient manner by recording events as they occur throughout the quarter. Lastly, I expanded upon a security assessment of the Linux machines being used on center that I began last semester. To do this, I used a vulnerability and configuration tool that scans hosts remotely through the network and presents the user with an abundance of information detailing each machines configuration. The experience I gained from working on each of these projects has been invaluable, and I look forward to returning in the spring semester to continue working with the IT Security team.

  14. Force/Torque Display For Telerobotic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Marion A.

    1989-01-01

    Pictorial cathode-ray-tube (CRT) display of force and/or torque (F/T) data for telerobotic systems used as output monitor from multiaxis sensor or as command display. Relative positions of two circles represent forces and torques acting on object, derived from signals from F/T sensor composed of strain gauges. Graphical presentation generated on two different graphics systems, one in color and one in black and white. High-level programming facilitates use of additional convenient features in software extending usefulness of sensor data and display. Useful in laboratory experiments, monitoring performance of automated system and for present data on status of system to operator at control station.

  15. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy

    1997-01-01

    This research project examined the effects of consonance between cockpit displays and alerting system as a technique to encourage pilots to conform to alerting system commands. An experiment used the task of collision avoidance during closely spaced parallel approaches as a case study, building upon previous experiments which identified instances of non-conformance and conflicts between the alerting criteria preferred by pilots, compared to that used by alerting systems. Using a workstation based, part-task simulator, each of 45 subjects completed 45 experiment runs. In each run, the subjects were told they were flying an approach. Their primary task was to keep their wings level despite turbulence through the use of a sidestick. The sidestick commands did not affect the path of the aircraft, however, so that consistent approach paths were be followed. Their secondary task was to indicate when an aircraft on a parallel approach is blundering towards them, as evidenced by the traffic display. Subjects were asked to press different buttons indicating whether they feel an avoidance maneuver is required by the traffic situation or not. At the completion of each run, subjects were asked to rate their confidence in their decision and, if appropriate, to rate the timeliness of automatic alerts when had been given. Three different automatic alert conditions were tested. The "No Automatic Alerts Given" condition is self-explanatory. In the "Automatic Alerts Based on NTZ Criteria" condition, an automatic alert was given when the NTZ criteria was triggered; this criteria is consistent with subject reactions in other studies, in which subjects were found to react, on average, when the other aircraft was 1350 min to the side of the own aircraft. In the "Automatic Alerts Based on MIT Criteria" condition, an automatic alert was given when the MIT criteria was triggered; this criteria was developed by Carpenter and Kuchar for parallel approaches to have better performance, at the

  16. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 247 - DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review System... OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES AND CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE PUBLICATIONS Pt. 247, App. E Appendix E to Part 247—DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine...

  17. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 247 - DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review System... OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES AND CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE PUBLICATIONS Pt. 247, App. E Appendix E to Part 247—DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine...

  18. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 247 - DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review System... OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES AND CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE PUBLICATIONS Pt. 247, App. E Appendix E to Part 247—DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine...

  19. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 247 - DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review System... OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES AND CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE PUBLICATIONS Pt. 247, App. E Appendix E to Part 247—DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine...

  20. An operations and command systems for the extreme ultraviolet explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscettola, Nicola; Korsmeyer, David J.; Olson, Eric C.; Wong, Gary

    1994-01-01

    About 40% of the budget of a scientific spacecraft mission is usually consumed by Mission Operations & Data Analysis (MO&DA) with MO driving these costs. In the current practice, MO is separated from spacecraft design and comes in focus relatively late in the mission life cycle. As a result, spacecraft may be designed that are very difficult to operate. NASA centers have extensive MO expertise but often lessons learned in one mission are not exploited for other parallel or future missions. A significant reduction of MO costs is essential to ensure a continuing and growing access to space for the scientific community. We are addressing some of these issues with a highly automated payload operations and command system for an existing mission, the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE). EUVE is currently operated jointly by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), responsible for spacecraft operations, and the Center for Extreme Ultraviolet Astrophysics (CEA) of the University of California, Berkeley, which controls the telescopes and scientific instruments aboard the satellite. The new automated system is being developed by a team including personnel from the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Center for EUV Astrophysics (CEA). An important goal of the project is to provide AI-based technology that can be easily operated by nonspecialists in AI. Another important goal is the reusability of the techniques for other missions. Models of the EUVE spacecraft need to be built both for planning/scheduling and for monitoring. In both cases, our modeling tools allow the assembly of a spacecraft model from separate sub-models of the various spacecraft subsystems. These sub-models are reusable; therefore, building mission operations systems for another small satellite mission will require choosing pre-existing modules, reparametrizing them with respect to the actual satellite telemetry information, and reassembling them in a new model. We

  1. Apollo experience report. Guidance and control systems: Command and service module stabilization and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littleton, O. P.

    1974-01-01

    The concepts, design, development, testing, and flight results of the command and service module stabilization and control system are discussed. The period of time covered was from November 1961 to December 1972. Also included are a functional description of the system, a discussion of the major problems, and recommendations for future programs.

  2. Intelligent Command and Control Systems for Satellite Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1999-01-01

    This grant, Intelligent Command and Control Systems for Satellite Ground Operations, funded by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, has spanned almost a decade. During this time, it has supported a broad range of research addressing the changing needs of NASA operations. It is important to note that many of NASA's evolving needs, for example, use of automation to drastically reduce (e.g., 70%) operations costs, are similar requirements in both government and private sectors. Initially the research addressed the appropriate use of emerging and inexpensive computational technologies, such as X Windows, graphics, and color, together with COTS (commercial-off-the-shelf) hardware and software such as standard Unix workstations to re-engineer satellite operations centers. The first phase of research supported by this grant explored the development of principled design methodologies to make effective use of emerging and inexpensive technologies. The ultimate performance measures for new designs were whether or not they increased system effectiveness while decreasing costs. GT-MOCA (The Georgia Tech Mission Operations Cooperative Associate) and GT-VITA (Georgia Tech Visual and Inspectable Tutor and Assistant), whose latter stages were supported by this research, explored model-based design of collaborative operations teams and the design of intelligent tutoring systems, respectively. Implemented in proof-of-concept form for satellite operations, empirical evaluations of both, using satellite operators for the former and personnel involved in satellite control operations for the latter, demonstrated unequivocally the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed modeling and design strategy underlying both research efforts. The proof-of-concept implementation of GT-MOCA showed that the methodology could specify software requirements that enabled a human-computer operations team to perform without any significant performance differences from the standard two-person satellite

  3. User guide to a command and control system; a part of a prelaunch wind monitoring program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowgill, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    A set of programs called Command and Control System (CCS), intended as a user manual, is described for the operation of CCS by the personnel supporting the wind monitoring portion of the launch mission. Wind data obtained by tracking balloons is sent by electronic means using telephone lines to other locations. Steering commands are computed from a system called ADDJUST for the on-board computer and relays this data. Data are received and automatically stored in a microprocessor, then via a real time program transferred to the UNIVAC 1100/40 computer. At this point the data is available to be used by the Command and Control system.

  4. Operation Ivy. Report of commander, Task Group 132. 1. Pacific Proving Grounds. Joint Task Force 132

    SciTech Connect

    Burriss, S.W.

    1984-10-31

    The mission of the Task Group included the responsibilities to conduct experimental measurement programs on Shots Mike and King and to conduct the radiological safety program. Programs were established to make radiochemical analysis of bomb debris; to follow the progress of the nuclear reaction; to make neutron, gamma-ray, blast, thermal radiation, and electromagnetic measurements; and to make a preliminary geophysical and marine survey of the test area. The organizational structure and command relations to accomplish the mission are outlined.

  5. High-reliability teams and situation awareness: implementing a hospital emergency incident command system.

    PubMed

    Autrey, Pamela; Moss, Jacqueline

    2006-02-01

    To enhance disaster preparedness, hospitals are beginning to implement the Hospital Emergency Incident Command System. Although Hospital Emergency Incident Command System provides a template for disaster preparation, its successful implementation requires an understanding of situation awareness (SA) and high-reliability teams. The authors present the concept of SA and how this concept relates to team reliability in dynamic environments. Then strategies for increasing SA and team reliability through education, training, and improved communication systems are discussed. PMID:16528147

  6. On-Command Force and Torque Impeding Devices (OC-FTID) Using ERF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Various machines have been developed to address the need for countermeasures of bone and muscle deterioration when humans operate over extended time in space. Even though these machines are in use, each of them has many limitations that need to be addressed in an effort to prepare for human missions to distant bodies in the solar system. An exercise exoskeleton was conceived that performs on-demand resistivity by inducing force and torque impedance via ElectroRheological Fluid (ERF). The resistive elements consist of pistons that are moving inside ERF-filled cylinders or a donut-shaped cavity, and the fluid flows through the piston when the piston is moved. Tests of the operation of ERF against load showed the feasibility of this approach. ERF properties of high yield stress, low current density, and fast response (less than one millisecond) offer essential characteristics for the construction of the exoskeleton. ERFs can apply very high electrically controlled resistive forces or torque while their size (weight and geometric parameters) can be very small. Their long life and ability to function in a wide temperature range (from -40 to 200 C) allows for their use in extreme environments. ERFs are also nonabrasive, non-toxic, and nonpolluting (meet health and safety regulations). The technology is applicable as a compact exercise machine for astronauts' countermeasure of microgravity, an exercise machine for sport, or as a device for rehabilitation of patients with limb issues.

  7. The evolution of electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurran, W. R. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A history is presented of the major electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems used at ETR in support of Apollo-Saturn and its forerunner vehicles launched under the jurisdiction of the Kennedy Space Center and its forerunner organizations.

  8. Control logic to track the outputs of a command generator or randomly forced target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trankle, T. L.; Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for synthesizing time-invariant control logic to cause the outputs of a linear plant to track the outputs of an unforced (or randomly forced) linear dynamic system. The control logic uses feed-forward of the reference system state variables and feedback of the plant state variables. The feed-forward gains are obtained from the solution of a linear algebraic matrix equation of the Liapunov type. The feedback gains are the usual regulator gains, determined to stabilize (or augment the stability of) the plant, possibly including integral control. The method is applied here to the design of control logic for a second-order servomechanism to follow a linearly increasing (ramp) signal, an unstable third-order system with two controls to track two separate ramp signals, and a sixth-order system with two controls to track a constant signal and an exponentially decreasing signal (aircraft landing-flare or glide-slope-capture with constant velocity).

  9. An intelligent automated command and control system for spacecraft mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffel, A. William

    1994-01-01

    The Intelligent Command and Control (ICC) System research project is intended to provide the technology base necessary for producing an intelligent automated command and control (C&C) system capable of performing all the ground control C&C functions currently performed by Mission Operations Center (MOC) project Flight Operations Team (FOT). The ICC research accomplishments to date, details of the ICC, and the planned outcome of the ICC research, mentioned above, are discussed in detail.

  10. Experience Of A US Air Force Surgical And Critical Care Team Deployed In Support Of Special Operations Command Africa.

    PubMed

    Delmonaco, Brian L; Baker, Aaron; Clay, Jared; Kilbourn, James

    2016-01-01

    An eight-person team of conventional US Air Force (USAF) medical providers deployed to support US Special Operations Forces (SOF) in North and West Africa for the first time in November 2014. The predeployment training, operations while deployed, and lessons learned from the challenges of performing surgery and medical evacuations in the remote desert environment of Chad and Niger on the continent of Africa are described. The vast area of operations and far-forward posture of these teams requires cooperation between partner African nations, the French military, and SOF to make these medical teams effective providers of surgical and critical care in Africa. The continuous deployment of conventional USAF medical providers since 2014 in support of US Special Operations Command Africa is challenging and will benefit from more medical teams and effective air assets to provide casualty evacuation across the vast area of operations. PMID:27045506

  11. Method and apparatus for creating time-optimal commands for linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Timothy D. (Inventor); Seering, Warren P. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system for and method of determining an input command profile for substantially any dynamic system that can be modeled as a linear system, the input command profile for transitioning an output of the dynamic system from one state to another state. The present invention involves identifying characteristics of the dynamic system, selecting a command profile which defines an input to the dynamic system based on the identified characteristics, wherein the command profile comprises one or more pulses which rise and fall at switch times, imposing a plurality of constraints on the dynamic system, at least one of the constraints being defined in terms of the switch times, and determining the switch times for the input to the dynamic system based on the command profile and the plurality of constraints. The characteristics may be related to poles and zeros of the dynamic system, and the plurality of constraints may include a dynamics cancellation constraint which specifies that the input moves the dynamic system from a first state to a second state such that the dynamic system remains substantially at the second state.

  12. A High Efficiency System for Science Instrument Commanding for the Mars Global Surveyor Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jr., R. N. Brooks

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission will return to Mars to re- cover most of the science lost when the ill fated Mars Observer space- craft suffered a catastrophic anomaly in its propulsion system and did not go into orbit. Described in detail are the methods employed by the MGS Sequence Team to accelerate science command processing by using standard command generation process and standard UNIX control scripts.

  13. Intelligent systems and advanced user interfaces for design, operation, and maintenance of command management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, William J.; Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    Historically, command management systems (CMS) have been large and expensive spacecraft-specific software systems that were costly to build, operate, and maintain. Current and emerging hardware, software, and user interface technologies may offer an opportunity to facilitate the initial formulation and design of a spacecraft-specific CMS as well as to develop a more generic CMS system. New technologies, in addition to a core CMS common to a range of spacecraft, may facilitate the training and enhance the efficiency of CMS operations. Current mission operations center (MOC) hardware and software include Unix workstations, the C/C++ programming languages, and an X window interface. This configuration provides the power and flexibility to support sophisticated and intelligent user interfaces that exploit state-of-the-art technologies in human-machine interaction, artificial intelligence, and software engineering. One of the goals of this research is to explore the extent to which technologies developed in the research laboratory can be productively applied in a complex system such as spacecraft command management. Initial examination of some of these issues in CMS design and operation suggests that application of technologies such as intelligent planning, case-based reasoning, human-machine systems design and analysis tools (e.g., operator and designer models), and human-computer interaction tools (e.g., graphics, visualization, and animation) may provide significant savings in the design, operation, and maintenance of the CMS for a specific spacecraft as well as continuity for CMS design and development across spacecraft. The first six months of this research saw a broad investigation by Georgia Tech researchers into the function, design, and operation of current and planned command management systems at Goddard Space Flight Center. As the first step, the researchers attempted to understand the current and anticipated horizons of command management systems at Goddard

  14. Methods and Systems for Authorizing an Effector Command in an Integrated Modular Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, Dean E. (Inventor); Ahrendt, Terry J. (Inventor); Moore, Tim (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and systems are provided for authorizing a command of an integrated modular environment in which a plurality of partitions control actions of a plurality of effectors is provided. A first identifier, a second identifier, and a third identifier are determined. The first identifier identifies a first partition of the plurality of partitions from which the command originated. The second identifier identifies a first effector of the plurality of effectors for which the command is intended. The third identifier identifies a second partition of the plurality of partitions that is responsible for controlling the first effector. The first identifier and the third identifier are compared to determine whether the first partition is the same as the second partition for authorization of the command.

  15. 14 CFR 135.105 - Exception to second in command requirement: Approval for use of autopilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exception to second in command requirement... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.105 Exception to second in command requirement... second in command, if it is equipped with an operative approved autopilot system and the use of...

  16. 14 CFR 135.105 - Exception to second in command requirement: Approval for use of autopilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exception to second in command requirement... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.105 Exception to second in command requirement... second in command, if it is equipped with an operative approved autopilot system and the use of...

  17. 14 CFR 135.105 - Exception to second in command requirement: Approval for use of autopilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exception to second in command requirement... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.105 Exception to second in command requirement... second in command, if it is equipped with an operative approved autopilot system and the use of...

  18. 14 CFR 135.105 - Exception to second in command requirement: Approval for use of autopilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exception to second in command requirement... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.105 Exception to second in command requirement... second in command, if it is equipped with an operative approved autopilot system and the use of...

  19. TRICCS: A proposed teleoperator/robot integrated command and control system for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Robotic systems will play an increasingly important role in space operations. An integrated command and control system based on the requirements of space-related applications and incorporating features necessary for the evolution of advanced goal-directed robotic systems is described. These features include: interaction with a world model or domain knowledge base, sensor feedback, multiple-arm capability and concurrent operations. The system makes maximum use of manual interaction at all levels for debug, monitoring, and operational reliability. It is shown that the robotic command and control system may most advantageously be implemented as packages and tasks in Ada.

  20. A novel framework for command and control of networked sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Genshe; Tian, Zhi; Shen, Dan; Blasch, Erik; Pham, Khanh

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a highly innovative advanced command and control framework for sensor networks used for future Integrated Fire Control (IFC). The primary goal is to enable and enhance target detection, validation, and mitigation for future military operations by graphical game theory and advanced knowledge information fusion infrastructures. The problem is approached by representing distributed sensor and weapon systems as generic warfare resources which must be optimized in order to achieve the operational benefits afforded by enabling a system of systems. This paper addresses the importance of achieving a Network Centric Warfare (NCW) foundation of information superiority-shared, accurate, and timely situational awareness upon which advanced automated management aids for IFC can be built. The approach uses the Data Fusion Information Group (DFIG) Fusion hierarchy of Level 0 through Level 4 to fuse the input data into assessments for the enemy target system threats in a battlespace to which military force is being applied. Compact graph models are employed across all levels of the fusion hierarchy to accomplish integrative data fusion and information flow control, as well as cross-layer sensor management. The functional block at each fusion level will have a set of innovative algorithms that not only exploit the corresponding graph model in a computationally efficient manner, but also permit combined functional experiments across levels by virtue of the unifying graphical model approach.

  1. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy Ruth; Hansman, R. John; Corker, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Cockpit alerting systems monitor potentially hazardous situations, both inside and outside the aircraft. When a hazard is projected to occur, the alerting system displays alerts and/or command decisions to the pilot. However, pilots have been observed to not conform to alerting system commands by delaying their response or by not following the automatic commands exactly. This non-conformance to the automatic alerting system can reduce its benefit. Therefore, a need exists to understand the causes and effects of pilot non-conformance in order to develop automatic alerting systems whose commands the pilots are more likely to follow. These considerations were examined through flight simulator evaluations of the collision avoidance task during closely spaced parallel approaches. This task provided a useful case-study because the effects of non-conformance can be significant, given the time-critical nature of the task. A preliminary evaluation of alerting systems identified non-conformance in over 40% of the cases and a corresponding drop in collision avoidance performance. A follow-on experiment found subjects' alerting and maneuver selection criteria were consistent with different strategies than those used by automatic systems, indicating the pilot may potentially disagree with the alerting system if the pilot attempts to verify automatic alerts and commanded avoidance maneuvers. A final experiment found supporting automatic alerts with the explicit display of its underlying criteria resulted in more consistent subject reactions. In light of these experimental results, a general discussion of pilot non-conformance is provided. Contributing factors in pilot non-conformance include a lack of confidence in the automatic system and mismatches between the alerting system's commands and the pilots' own decisions based on the information available to them. The effects of non-conformance on system performance are discussed. Possible methods of reconciling mismatches are

  2. A force commanded impedance control for a robot finger with uncertain kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Doulgeri, Z.; Arimoto, Suguru

    1999-10-01

    The authors consider the problem of impedance control for the physical interaction between the soft tip of a robot finger, where the nonlinear characteristics of the reproducing force and the finger dynamic parameters are unknown, and a rigid object or environment under kinematic uncertainties arising from both uncertain contact point location and uncertain rigid object geometry. An adaptive controller is proposed, and the asymptotic stability of the force regulation problem is shown for the planar case even when finger kinematics and rigid surface orientation are uncertain. Confirmation of the theoretical findings is done through simulation of a 3-degree-of-freedom planar robotic finger.

  3. High angle of attack flying qualities criteria for longitudinal rate command systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David J.; Citurs, Kevin D.; Davidson, John B.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate flying qualities requirements of alternate pitch command systems for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack. Flying qualities design guidelines have already been developed for angle of attack command systems at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, so this research fills a similar need for rate command systems. Flying qualities tasks that require post-stall maneuvering were tested during piloted simulations in the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Manned Air Combat Simulation facility. A generic fighter aircraft model was used to test angle of attack rate and pitch rate command systems for longitudinal gross acquisition and tracking tasks at high angle of attack. A wide range of longitudinal dynamic variations were tested at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack. Pilot comments, Cooper-Harper ratings, and pilot induced oscillation ratings were taken from five pilots from NASA, USN, CAF, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. This data was used to form longitudinal design guidelines for rate command systems at high angle of attack. These criteria provide control law design guidance for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack, low speed flight conditions. Additional time history analyses were conducted using the longitudinal gross acquisition data to look at potential agility measures of merit and correlate agility usage to flying qualities boundaries. This paper presents an overview of this research.

  4. A self-learning rule base for command following in dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Wei K.; Lee, Hon-Mun; Parlos, Alexander

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a self-learning Rule Base for command following in dynamical systems is presented. The learning is accomplished though reinforcement learning using an associative memory called SAM. The main advantage of SAM is that it is a function approximator with explicit storage of training samples. A learning algorithm patterned after the dynamic programming is proposed. Two artificially created, unstable dynamical systems are used for testing, and the Rule Base was used to generate a feedback control to improve the command following ability of the otherwise uncontrolled systems. The numerical results are very encouraging. The controlled systems exhibit a more stable behavior and a better capability to follow reference commands. The rules resulting from the reinforcement learning are explicitly stored and they can be modified or augmented by human experts. Due to overlapping storage scheme of SAM, the stored rules are similar to fuzzy rules.

  5. Force Modulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  6. Apollo experience report: Command and service module environmental control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samonski, F. H., Jr.; Tucker, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive review is presented of the design philosophy of the Apollo environmental control system together with the development history of the total system and of selected components within the system. In particular, discussions are presented relative to the development history and to the problems associated with the equipment cooling coldplates, the evaporator and its electronic control system, and the space radiator system used for rejection of the spacecraft thermal loads. Apollo flight experience and operational difficulties associated with the spacecraft water system and the waste management system are discussed in detail to provide definition of the problem and the corrective action taken when applicable.

  7. Command-wide teleradiology for U.S. armed forces in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Seong K.; Bryant, Gordon V.; Young, Harold; Sheehy, Monet R.; Willis, Charles E.; Goeringer, Fred

    1992-07-01

    There are 17 U.S. military medical treatment facilities scattered in the Republic of Korea to provide health care for approximately 40,000 U.S. troops and their dependents. Only three Army and one Air Force radiologist are assigned for radiological diagnosis. In some areas, report turn-around time can be as long as two weeks. An extensive teleradiology network is planned as part of an MDIS implementation program to improve the quality of radiological service overcoming the distance and time barriers.

  8. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1997-01-01

    Pilot non-conformance to alerting system commands has been noted in general and to a TCAS-like collision avoidance system in a previous experiment. This paper details two experiments studying collision avoidance during closely-spaced parallel approaches in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), and specifically examining possible causal factors of, and design solutions to, pilot non-conformance.

  9. Employment of Command and Control Systems within the U.S. Marine Corps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify potential barriers to the effective employment of command and control (C2) systems to enhance warfighter readiness. Five research hypotheses guided this study, which addressed the perception of the effective employment of Marine Corps C2 systems based on demographic characteristics, which included:…

  10. Telecommunication systems engineering. [Book on tracking, command, telemetry, data acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.; Simon, M. K.

    1973-01-01

    Telecommunication network concepts are discussed together with carrier-tracking loops employing the phase-lock principle, phase and Doppler measurements in two-way phase-coherent tracking systems, range measurements by phase-coherent techniques, and questions of phase-coherent detection with perfect reference signals and with noisy reference signals. The design of one-way and two-way phase-coherent communication systems is considered, giving attention to the optimal design of single-channel systems, the design of two-channel systems, and the design of multichannel systems. Other topics explored include the design and the performance of phase-coherent systems preceded by band-pass limiters, symbol synchronization and its effects on data detection, noncoherent communication over the Gaussian channel, and tracking loops with improved performance.

  11. Flight test evaluation of a separate surface attitude command control system on a Beech 99 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, S. W.; Jenks, G. E.; Roskam, J.; Stone, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint NASA/university/industry program was conducted to flight evaluate a potentially low cost separate surface implementation of attitude command in a Beech 99 airplane. Saturation of the separate surfaces was the primary cause of many problems during development. Six experienced professional pilots who made simulated instrument flight evaluations experienced improvements in airplane handling qualities in the presence of turbulence and a reduction in pilot workload. For ride quality, quantitative data show that the attitude command control system results in all cases of airplane motion being removed from the uncomfortable ride region.

  12. 14 CFR 417.305 - Command control system testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... procedural deviations and how to react to test failures. (3) If hardware or software is redesigned or replaced with a different hardware or software that is not identical to the original, the system must undergo all acceptance testing and analysis with the new hardware or software and all preflight...

  13. School Crisis Teams within an Incident Command System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Amanda B.; Brock, Stephen E.; Reeves, Melissa A.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the increasing attention given to the need for schools to be prepared to respond in a variety of crisis situations, there is a lack of information about how to coordinate with multiple agencies following a crisis. This article describes the U. S. Department of Homeland Security's (2004) National Incident Management System and its Incident…

  14. Future Air Force systems.

    PubMed

    Tremaine, S A

    1986-10-01

    Planning for the future is under way in earnest at the Aeronautical Systems Division (ASD) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It has been statistically established that it takes from 14-16 years from the generation of a new system idea to enter into engineering development. With this unpleasing, but realistic, schedule in mind, ASD has, during the last 3 years, been initiating long-term planning projects that are pre-starts for new system ideas. They are generated from throughout the Air Force and are locally managed and funded. Through this process, which spans from 12-14 months, specific and revolutionary new ideas for the systems of the future are generated. This article addresses more than a dozen specific new ideas in work at ASD today. These ideas range from a need to replace the C-130 type aircraft after the year 2000 to planning a follow-on to the B-18 well into the 21st century. Among other specific projects are investigation into an immortal fighter intended to be free of reliability and maintenance demands for an especially long period of operation, a new training system and advanced trainer to replace the T-38, a transatmospheric vehicle that could operate in the 100,000-500,000 foot flight region (30,480-152,400 m), and a new means of defending against hostile cruise missile launchers and cruise missiles. Other ideas are also addressed. The article concludes with emphasis on systems that can operate hypersonically in and out of the known atmosphere and greater use of airbreathing propulsion systems operating between Mach 3 and Mach 6. PMID:3778403

  15. An Automated Publishing System for the Naval Education and Training Command. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, F. Laurence

    This study analyzes the alternatives for meeting the publishing needs of the Naval Education and Training Command in the 1980s. The use of current, state-of-the-art equipment, including text editors, phototypesetters, and graphic scanners is explored, and five alternatives to the current publishing system are proposed. Based on an economic…

  16. Astronaut Andrew M. Allen, mission commander, sets up systems for a television downlink on the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 ONBOARD VIEW --- Astronaut Andrew M. Allen, mission commander, sets up systems for a television downlink on the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Allen was joined by four other astronauts and an international payload specialist for more than 16 days of research aboard Columbia. The photograph was taken with a 70mm handheld camera.

  17. Force Limit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  18. Simulation and simulator development of a separate surface attitude command control system for light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the simulation philosophy and process used in the development of a Separate Surface Attitude Command control system (SSAC) for a Beech Model 99 Airliner. The intent of this system is to provide complete three axes stability augmentation at low cost and without the need for system redundancy. The system, although aimed at the general aviation market, also has applications to certain military airplanes as well as to miniature submarines.

  19. Multi-community command and control systems in law enforcement: An introductory planning guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, R. L.; Garcia, E. A.; Kennedy, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    A set of planning guidelines for multi-community command and control systems in law enforcement is presented. Essential characteristics and applications of these systems are outlined. Requirements analysis, system concept design, implementation planning, and performance and cost modeling are described and demonstrated with numerous examples. Program management techniques and joint powers agreements for multicommunity programs are discussed in detail. A description of a typical multi-community computer-aided dispatch system is appended.

  20. Collaborative air/ground command and control for responsive persistent ISR operations using unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordower, Rick; Dixon, Lee; Lynch, Nick

    2010-04-01

    "The foundation for integrating ISR planning and direction is the information network, including the appropriate ISR services and applications oriented toward the [commanders] needs. By combining global visibility of available information and intelligence needs with the tools to maximize platform/sensor/target management, the network will improve efficiency and maximize persistence. Inherent within this concept is the idea of integrating and synchronizing a mix of sensing systems and platforms rather than relying on a single system. The second concept embedded within this concept is the ability to capture the activity/information as it occurs rather than forensically reconstructing after the fact. This requires the ability for the [commander] to adjust collection priorities of the entire collection suite to a level appropriate to the activity of interest. Individual sensors, platforms and exploitation nodes will become more efficient as part of an integrated system. Implementing this fully integrated ISR Enterprise will result in improved persistence, and ultimately better ISR for the warfighter."[3] Over the last 6 years, SAIC has been working with CERDEC and AMRDEC to introduce Battle Command aids supporting (semi) autonomous execution and collaboration of unmanned assets. This paper presents an operational context and a distributed command and control architecture aiming to reduce workload and increase Persistent ISR effectiveness. This architecture has been implemented and demonstrated in field tests and as part of FY'09 C4ISR OTM testbed.

  1. Intelligent command and control systems for satellite ground operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1994-01-01

    The Georgia Tech portion of the Intelligent Control Center project includes several complementary activities. Two major activities entail thesis level research; the other activities are either support activities or preliminary explorations (e.g., task analyses) to support the research. The first research activity is the development of principles for the design of active interfaces to support monitoring during real-time supports. It is well known that as the operator's task becomes less active, i.e., more monitoring and less active control, there is concern that the operator will be less involved and less able to rapidly identify anomalous or failure situations. The research project to design active monitoring interfaces is an attempt to remediate this undesirable side-effect of increasingly automated control systems that still depend ultimately on operator supervision. The second research activity is the exploration of the use of case-based reasoning as a way to accumulate operator experience and make it available in computational form.

  2. Cold war historic properties of the 21st Space Wing Air Force Space Command

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffecker, J.F.; Whorton, M.; Buechler, C.R.

    1996-03-01

    A Legacy-funded inventory and evaluation of facilities dating to the Cold War era was conducted for the USAF 21{sup ST} Space Wing (AFSPC). The mission of the Wing includes early warning of missile launches and detection and tracking of space objects. The political and military strategic context for these facilities was developed through an overview of Cold War history, subdivided into four major periods: (1) origins of the conflict, (2) confrontation and crisis, (3) sustained superpower balance based on mutual deterrence, and (4) renewed confrontation and collapse of the Soviet Union. The enormous importance of early warning systems in maintaining the balance of power between the USA and the Soviet Union is discussed in more detail as a subset of the general context of the Cold War history to provide additional background for evaluating the 21{sup ST} Space Wing systems. In addition, a history of each installation was prepared and placed in the context of the broader history of the Cold War. For instance, the effort to develop a credible nuclear threat in the early 1950s is represented by the construction of Thule AB as a forward bomber base in 1951. The growing concern with a Soviet ICBM threat in the late 1950s is reflected in the construction of BMEWS at Thule AB and Clear AS during 1958-1961. Development of an antiballistic missile (ABM) system, subsequently abandoned during the 1970s, is represented by the Safeguard System at Cavalier AS. The U.S. response to the Soviet submarine-launched missile capability during the 1970s is embodied in the deployment of phased-array radar systems to cover the ocean flanks of North America at Cape Cod AS (and later at Eldorado AS). The establishment of AFSPC at Peterson AFB in 1982 reflects the increased strategic importance of space in the later phases of the Cold War. A set of recommendations regarding NRHP eligibility and management of Cold War historic properties was developed as part of the inventory.

  3. A framework for the Subaru Telescope observation control system based on the command design pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Eric; Bon, Bruce; Inagaki, Takeshi; Streeper, Sam

    2008-08-01

    Subaru Telescope is developing a second-generation Observation Control System that specifically addresses some of the deficiencies of the current Subaru OCS. One area of concern is better extensibility: the current system uses a custom language for implementing commands with a complex macro processing subsystem written in C. It is laborious to improve the language and awkward for scientists to extend and use standard programming techniques. Our Generation 2 OCS provides a lightweight, object-oriented task framework based on the Command design pattern. The framework provides a base task class that abstracts services for processing status and other common infrastructure activities. Upon this are built and provided a set of "atomic" tasks for telescope and instrument commands. A set of "container" tasks based on common sequential and concurrent command processing paradigms is also included. Since all tasks share the same exact interface, it is straightforward to build up compound tasks by plugging simple tasks into container tasks and container tasks into other containers, and so forth. In this way various advanced astronomical workflows can be readily created, with well controlled behaviors. In addition, since tasks are written in Python, it is easy for astronomers to subclass and extend the standard observatory tasks with their own custom extensions and behaviors, in a high-level, full-featured programming language. In this talk we will provide an overview of the task framework design and present preliminary results on the use of the framework during two separate engineering runs.

  4. Intelligent Systems and Advanced User Interfaces for Design, Operation, and Maintenance of Command Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1998-01-01

    Historically Command Management Systems (CMS) have been large, expensive, spacecraft-specific software systems that were costly to build, operate, and maintain. Current and emerging hardware, software, and user interface technologies may offer an opportunity to facilitate the initial formulation and design of a spacecraft-specific CMS as well as a to develop a more generic or a set of core components for CMS systems. Current MOC (mission operations center) hardware and software include Unix workstations, the C/C++ and Java programming languages, and X and Java window interfaces representations. This configuration provides the power and flexibility to support sophisticated systems and intelligent user interfaces that exploit state-of-the-art technologies in human-machine systems engineering, decision making, artificial intelligence, and software engineering. One of the goals of this research is to explore the extent to which technologies developed in the research laboratory can be productively applied in a complex system such as spacecraft command management. Initial examination of some of the issues in CMS design and operation suggests that application of technologies such as intelligent planning, case-based reasoning, design and analysis tools from a human-machine systems engineering point of view (e.g., operator and designer models) and human-computer interaction tools, (e.g., graphics, visualization, and animation), may provide significant savings in the design, operation, and maintenance of a spacecraft-specific CMS as well as continuity for CMS design and development across spacecraft with varying needs. The savings in this case is in software reuse at all stages of the software engineering process.

  5. NASIS data base management system - IBM 360/370 OS MVT implementation. 5: Retrieval command system reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The retrieval command subsystem reference manual for the NASA Aerospace Safety Information System (NASIS) is presented. The output oriented classification of retrieval commands provides the user with the ability to review a set of data items for verification or inspection as a typewriter or CRT terminal and to print a set of data on a remote printer. Predefined and user-definable data formatting are available for both output media.

  6. A decision support system for the Military Airlift Command, the Airlift Deployment Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, R.D.; Harrison, I.G.

    1989-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is assisting the Military Airlift Command (MAC) with the development of the Airlift Deployment Analysis System (ADANS). ADANS will improve MAC's automated capabilities for scheduling peacetime airlift missions, deliberate planning, execution planning, and analysis of the airlift system. ADANS will consist of four subsystems: airlift planning and scheduling algorithms, database management, user interface, and communications. This paper describes MAC's current airlift planning and scheduling operations, the current automated systems used to develop airlift schedules and plans, approaches to developing ADANS, and major improvements that will result from the implementation of ADANS. This report is based on a series of in-depth interviews and working sessions that were conducted with MAC staff, a review of airlift scheduling literature, and the ongoing research effort at ORNL for the ADANS project. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Tools for automating spacecraft ground systems: The Intelligent Command and Control (ICC) approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffel, A. William; Mclean, David

    1996-01-01

    The practical application of scripting languages and World Wide Web tools to the support of spacecraft ground system automation, is reported on. The mission activities and the automation tools used at the Goddard Space Flight Center (MD) are reviewed. The use of the Tool Command Language (TCL) and the Practical Extraction and Report Language (PERL) scripting tools for automating mission operations is discussed together with the application of different tools for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory ground system.

  8. Review of Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Tools for Verifying Command and Control Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Michael L.; Bonanne, Kevin H.; Favretto, Jeffrey A.; Jackson, Maddalena M.; Jones, Stephanie L.; Mackey, Ryan M.; Sarrel, Marc A.; Simpson, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Standing Review Board (SRB) requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conduct an independent review of the plan developed by Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) for identifying models and emulators to create a tool(s) to verify their command and control software. The NESC was requested to identify any issues or weaknesses in the GSDO plan. This document contains the outcome of the NESC review.

  9. Limiting vibration in systems with constant amplitude actuators through command preshaping. M.S Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Keith Eric

    1994-01-01

    The basic concepts of command preshaping were taken and adapted to the framework of systems with constant amplitude (on-off) actuators. In this context, pulse sequences were developed which help to attenuate vibration in flexible systems with high robustness to errors in frequency identification. Sequences containing impulses of different magnitudes were approximated by sequences containing pulses of different durations. The effects of variation in pulse width on this approximation were examined. Sequences capable of minimizing loads induced in flexible systems during execution of commands were also investigated. The usefulness of these techniques in real-world situations was verified by application to a high fidelity simulation of the space shuttle. Results showed that constant amplitude preshaping techniques offer a substantial improvement in vibration reduction over both the standard and upgraded shuttle control methods and may be mission enabling for use of the shuttle with extremely massive payloads.

  10. Suitability of Agent Technology for Military Command and Control in the Future Combat System Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Potok, TE

    2003-02-13

    The U.S. Army is faced with the challenge of dramatically improving its war fighting capability through advanced technologies. Any new technology must provide significant improvement over existing technologies, yet be reliable enough to provide a fielded system. The focus of this paper is to assess the novelty and maturity of agent technology for use in the Future Combat System (FCS). The FCS concept represents the U.S. Army's ''mounted'' form of the Objective Force. This concept of vehicles, communications, and weaponry is viewed as a ''system of systems'' which includes net-centric command and control (C{sup 2}) capabilities. This networked C{sup 2} is an important transformation from the historically centralized, or platform-based, C{sup 2} function since a centralized command architecture may become a decision-making and execution bottleneck, particularly as the pace of war accelerates. A mechanism to ensure an effective network-centric C{sup 2} capacity (combining intelligence gathering and analysis available at lower levels in the military hierarchy) is needed. Achieving a networked C{sup 2} capability will require breakthroughs in current software technology. Many have proposed the use of agent technology as a potential solution. Agents are an emerging technology, and it is not yet clear whether it is suitable for addressing the networked C{sup 2} challenge, particularly in satisfying battlespace scalability, mobility, and security expectations. We have developed a set of software requirements for FCS based on military requirements for this system. We have then evaluated these software requirements against current computer science technology. This analysis provides a set of limitations in the current technology when applied to the FCS challenge. Agent technology is compared against this set of limitations to provide a means of assessing the novelty of agent technology in an FCS environment. From this analysis we find that existing technologies will not

  11. The Integration of COTS/GOTS within NASA's HST Command and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfarr, Thomas; Reis, James E.; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's mission critical Hubble Space Telescope (HST) command and control system has been re-engineered with COTS/GOTS and minimal custom code. This paper focuses on the design of this new HST Control Center System (CCS) and the lessons learned throughout its development. CCS currently utilizes 31 COTS/GOTS products with an additional 12 million lines of custom glueware code; the new CCS exceeds the capabilities of the original system while significantly reducing the lines of custom code by more than 50%. The lifecycle of COTS/GOTS products will be examined including the pack-age selection process, evaluation process, and integration process. The advantages, disadvantages, issues, concerns, and lessons teamed for integrating COTS/GOTS into the NASA's mission critical HST CCS will be examined in detail. Command and control systems designed with traditional custom code development efforts will be compared with command and control systems designed with new development techniques relying heavily on COTS/COTS integration. This paper will reveal the many hidden costs of COTS/GOTS solutions when compared to traditional custom code development efforts; this paper will show the high cost of COTS/GOTS solutions including training expenses, consulting fees, and long-term maintenance expenses.

  12. Modeling the data systems role of the scientist (for the NEEDS Command and Control Task)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hei, D. J., Jr.; Winter, W. J., Jr.; Brookes, R.; Locke, M.

    1981-01-01

    Research was conducted into the command and control activities of the scientists for five space missions: International Ultraviolet Explorer, Solar Maximum Mission, International Sun-Earth Explorer, High-Energy Astronomy Observatory 1, and Atmospheric Explorer 5. A basis for developing a generalized description of the scientists' activities was obtained. Because of this characteristic, it was decided that a series of flowcharts would be used. This set of flowcharts constitutes a model of the scientists' activities within the total data system. The model was developed through three levels of detail. The first is general and provides a conceptual framework for discussing the system. The second identifies major functions and should provide a fundamental understanding of the scientists' command and control activities. The third level expands the major functions into a more detailed description.

  13. Design of an all-attitude flight control system to execute commanded bank angles and angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgin, G. H.; Eggleston, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    A flight control system for use in air-to-air combat simulation was designed. The input to the flight control system are commanded bank angle and angle of attack, the output are commands to the control surface actuators such that the commanded values will be achieved in near minimum time and sideslip is controlled to remain small. For the longitudinal direction, a conventional linear control system with gains scheduled as a function of dynamic pressure is employed. For the lateral direction, a novel control system, consisting of a linear portion for small bank angle errors and a bang-bang control system for large errors and error rates is employed.

  14. Supporting command and control training functions in the emergency management domain using cognitive systems engineering.

    PubMed

    Ntuen, Celestine A; Balogun, Obafemi; Boyle, Edward; Turner, Amy

    The design and implementation of MERMAIDS, a computer-based training system in the domain of emergency command and control, is described. The research investigates the use of cognitive systems engineering and information management tools for modelling and representing training knowledge of emergency system operators. We propose a decision-centric human-computer interface as a new method of supporting computer-based modelling in the domain of emergency systems. Several interacting themes in information management relevant to emergency response planning are discussed. PMID:17008263

  15. A Systems Modeling Approach for Risk Management of Command File Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshkat, Leila

    2012-01-01

    The main cause of commanding errors is often (but not always) due to procedures. Either lack of maturity in the processes, incompleteness of requirements or lack of compliance to these procedures. Other causes of commanding errors include lack of understanding of system states, inadequate communication, and making hasty changes in standard procedures in response to an unexpected event. In general, it's important to look at the big picture prior to making corrective actions. In the case of errors traced back to procedures, considering the reliability of the process as a metric during its' design may help to reduce risk. This metric is obtained by using data from Nuclear Industry regarding human reliability. A structured method for the collection of anomaly data will help the operator think systematically about the anomaly and facilitate risk management. Formal models can be used for risk based design and risk management. A generic set of models can be customized for a broad range of missions.

  16. 13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, undated - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  17. 7. General view of command center, building 501, looking west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. General view of command center, building 501, looking west - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  18. 6. General view of command center, building 501, looking east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. General view of command center, building 501, looking east - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  19. A nonlinear trajectory command generator for a digital flight-control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicolani, L. S.; Weissenberger, S.

    1978-01-01

    Operational application of the command generator (CG) was examined in detail in a simulation of a flight control system with the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft. The basic repertoire of single axis maneuvers and operational constraints are discussed, and the system behavior is tested on a rigorous STOL approach path and as affected by various approximations in the CG synthesis and types of disturbances found in the operational environment. The simulation results indicate that a satisfactory nonlinear system with general maneuvering capabilities throughout the flight envelope was developed which satisfies the basic design objectives while maintaining a practicable degree of simplicity.

  20. Integrated Training System for Air Force On-the-Job Training: Specification Development. Final Technical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Stuart B.; And Others.

    The Air Force conducted this study for two purposes: (1) to define the system of Air Force On-the-Job Training (OJT); and (2) to prepare a set of functional specifications for an integrated, base-level OJT evaluation and management system with linkages to the Major Commands and Air Staff. The study was conducted in four phases. During the first…

  1. Entropic force and entanglement system

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Kim, Yong-Wan

    2010-05-15

    We introduce the isothermal cavity, static holographic screen, and accelerating surface as holographic screen to study the entropic force in the presence of the Schwarzschild black hole. These may merge to provide a consistent holographic screen to define the entropic force on the stretched horizon near the event horizon. Considering the similarity between the stretched horizon of black hole and the entanglement system, we may define the entropic force in the entanglement system without referring to the source mass.

  2. A design proposal of a certain missile tactical command system based on Beidou satellite communication and GPS positioning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Hao, Yongsheng; Miao, Jian; Zhang, Jianmao

    2007-11-01

    This paper introduced a design proposal of tactical command system that applied to a kind of anti-tank missile carriers. The tactical command system was made up of embedded computer system based on PC104 bus, Linux operating system, digital military map, Beidou satellite communication equipments and GPS positioning equipments. The geographic coordinates was measured by the GPS receiver, the positioning data, commands and information were transmitted real-time between tactical command systems, tactical command systems and command center, by the Beidou satellite communication systems. The Beidou satellite communication equipments and GPS positioning equipments were integrated to an independent module, exchanging data with embedded computer through RS232 serial ports and USB ports. The decision support system software based on information fusion, calculates positioning data, geography information and battle field information synthetically, shows the position of allies and the position of enemy on the military map, and assesses the various threats of different enemy objects, educes a situation assessment and threat assessment.

  3. A distributable, display-device-independent vector graphics system for command and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisbey, R., II; Hollingworth, D.

    1980-07-01

    This report documents a distributable, device-independent vector graphics system developed by ISI for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. It describes the system architecture, communications elements, and a phased implementation strategy. The system supports graphics-based command and control applications in distributed computational environments such as the ARPANET. The system has been in use at ISI and at the Naval Ocean Systems Center (NOSC) in the Advanced Command and Control Architectural Testbed (ACCAT) since January 1977. The principal aim of the development effort is the device-independence of the vector graphics. 'Device-independence' means that graphic application programs can be written without regard to the particular display-device on which the output will ultimately be displayed. This system achieves display-device independence by providing the application program with a set of generic, two dimensional vector graphic primitives by which pictures can be described and interacted with at the application level. The particular graphics model used structures pictures as sets of subpictures that are absolute-transformed-segments, as defined by Newman and Sproull.

  4. Detonation command and control

    DOEpatents

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2016-05-31

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link there between. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  5. Detonation command and control

    DOEpatents

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2015-11-10

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link therebetween. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  6. Options for improving computing and data system support for HQ USTRANSCOM (Headquarters, US Transportation Command) deployment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    The Decision Systems Research Section of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is assisting the Deployment Systems Division of the Headquarters, US Transportation Command (HQ USTRANSCOM) with an evaluation of options for improving the computing and data systems support for deliberate and time-critical joint deployment planning. USTRANSCOM, which is a unified command (i.e., personnel are drawn from all the services), was created in the fall of 1987 to consolidate the functions of the former military transportation operating agencies (the Military Airlift Command, the Military Traffic Management Command, and the Military Sealift Command). An important factor in the creation of USTRANSCOM was the possibility of achieving more efficient joint deployment planning through consolidation of the computing and data systems used by the command's strategic mobility planners and operation center personnel. This report, the third in a series to be produced in the course of ORNL studies for USTRANSCOM, presents options for improving automation support for HQ USTRANSCOM deployment planning. The study covered methods for improving data concepts used in deployment databases, recommendations for extending the life of the Joint Deployment system, and alternatives for integrating HQ USTRANSCOM planning support with systems at MAC, MTMC, and MSC. 36 refs.

  7. Stable Direct Adaptive Control of Linear Infinite-dimensional Systems Using a Command Generator Tracker Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, M. J.; Kaufman, H.; Wen, J.

    1985-01-01

    A command generator tracker approach to model following contol of linear distributed parameter systems (DPS) whose dynamics are described on infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces is presented. This method generates finite dimensional controllers capable of exponentially stable tracking of the reference trajectories when certain ideal trajectories are known to exist for the open loop DPS; we present conditions for the existence of these ideal trajectories. An adaptive version of this type of controller is also presented and shown to achieve (in some cases, asymptotically) stable finite dimensional control of the infinite dimensional DPS.

  8. TRAVEL WITH COMMANDER QUALICIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Commander Qualicia is a cartoon character created for an on-line training course that describes the quality system for the National Exposure Research Laboratory. In the training, which was developed by the QA staff and graphics/IT support contractors, Commander Qualicia and the ...

  9. Helicopter force-feel and stability augmentation system with parallel servo-actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoh, Roger H. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A force-feel system is implemented by mechanically coupling a servo-actuator to and in parallel with a flight control system. The servo-actuator consists of an electric motor, a gearing device, and a clutch. A commanded cockpit-flight-controller position is achieved by pilot actuation of a trim-switch. The position of the cockpit-flight-controller is compared with the commanded position to form a first error which is processed by a shaping function to correlate the first error with a commanded force at the cockpit-flight-controller. The commanded force on the cockpit-flight-controller provides centering forces and improved control feel for the pilot. In an embodiment, the force-feel system is used as the basic element of stability augmentation system (SAS). The SAS provides a stabilization signal that is compared with the commanded position to form a second error signal. The first error is summed with the second error for processing by the shaping function.

  10. Flight investigation of a vertical-velocity command system for VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. R.; Niessen, F. R.; Yenni, K. R.; Person, L. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A flight investigation was undertaken to assess the potential benefits afforded by a vertical-velocity command system (VVCS) for VTOL (vertical take-off and landing) aircraft. This augmentation system was conceived primarily as a means of lowering pilot workload during decelerating approaches to a hover and/or landing under category III instrument meteorological conditions. The scope of the investigation included a determination of acceptable system parameters, a visual flight evaluation, and an instrument flight evaluation which employed a 10 deg, decelerating, simulated instrument approach task. The results indicated that the VVCS, which decouples the pitch and vertical degrees of freedom, provides more accurate glide-path tracking and a lower pilot workload than does the unaugmented system.

  11. An overview of the Hubble Space Telescope command and data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clubb, Jerry; Ingels, Frank

    1987-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) will be an orbiting observatory which will extend the capability of large earth-based observatories to view the universe by approximately 350 times in volume and approximately seven times in distance. The HST program, which includes the Orbiting Observatory, the Space Telescope Science Institute, and the Space Telescope Operations Control Center, is supported by the Space Shuttle, the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System, and the NASA Communications Network. This paper describes the Command and Data Management System for the HST spacecraft, including flexibility, operation modes, and end-to-end data flow paths used to meet stringent synchronization and data quality requirements. The results of system tests indicate that the use of concatenated coding techiques consisting of both block and convolutional codes as a protection against random and burst errors has been successful. Diagrams of the HST data system are included.

  12. 78 FR 63459 - Names of Members of the Performance Review Board for the Department of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... President--Gen Shelton, Commander, Air Force Space Command 2. Lt Gen Pawlikowski, Commander, Space & Missile Systems Center 3. Lt Gen Otto, Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance...

  13. Artificial intelligence technology assessment for the US Army Depot System Command

    SciTech Connect

    Pennock, K A

    1991-07-01

    This assessment of artificial intelligence (AI) has been prepared for the US Army's Depot System Command (DESCOM) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The report describes several of the more promising AI technologies, focusing primarily on knowledge-based systems because they have been more successful in commercial applications than any other AI technique. The report also identifies potential Depot applications in the areas of procedural support, scheduling and planning, automated inspection, training, diagnostics, and robotic systems. One of the principal objectives of the report is to help decisionmakers within DESCOM to evaluate AI as a possible tool for solving individual depot problems. The report identifies a number of factors that should be considered in such evaluations. 22 refs.

  14. Cyber Security for the Spaceport Command and Control System: Vulnerability Management and Compliance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunawan, Ryan A.

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of the Internet, the number of malicious threats to organizations is continually increasing. In June of 2015, the United States Office of Personnel Management (OPM) had a data breach resulting in the compromise of millions of government employee records. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is not exempt from these attacks. Cyber security is becoming a critical facet to the discussion of moving forward with projects. The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) project at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) aims to develop the launch control system for the next generation launch vehicle in the coming decades. There are many ways to increase the security of the network it uses, from vulnerability management to ensuring operating system images are compliant with securely configured baselines recommended by the United States Government.

  15. Sentinel: An Expert System Decision Aid For A Command, Control And Communications Operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobat, Daniel L.; Rogers, Steven K.; Cross, Stephen E.

    1986-03-01

    The growing complexity and quantity of information used in command, control and communications (C3) networks makes it essential to reduce the workload on the operators of these networks. SENTINEL is an expert system which functions as a decision aid for the strategic missile warning officer, using a simulation of a C3 network that involves multiple missile launches and up to 20 countries. In this research, a blackboard model expert system using rule bases and object oriented programming techniques was developed that permits SENTINEL to deal with uncertainty and offer several layers of explanation. SENTINEL deals with uncertainty by using Cohen's endorsement theory and the pattern recognition techniques of feature sets and prototypes. SENTINEL analyzes the causes of reported events into higher level, yet less precise forms to offer an abstract layer of explanation. The results are applicable to further expert system or decision aid development for C3 networks.

  16. Robot Command Interface Using an Audio-Visual Speech Recognition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Alexánder; Gómez, Juan; Prieto, Flavio; Redarce, Tanneguy

    In recent years audio-visual speech recognition has emerged as an active field of research thanks to advances in pattern recognition, signal processing and machine vision. Its ultimate goal is to allow human-computer communication using voice, taking into account the visual information contained in the audio-visual speech signal. This document presents a command's automatic recognition system using audio-visual information. The system is expected to control the laparoscopic robot da Vinci. The audio signal is treated using the Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients parametrization method. Besides, features based on the points that define the mouth's outer contour according to the MPEG-4 standard are used in order to extract the visual speech information.

  17. Forced Oscillations for Hybrid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshankov, B.

    2009-11-01

    The hybrid system in the paper means a mechanical system which consists from two parts with different structure—a part with distributed parameters and a part with discrete parameters. More concrete the forced longitudinal oscillations of a rod connected with a simple oscillator are considered. The oscillations of the separate parts of the system are very well known. It turned out that the oscillations of this hybrid system propose some difficulties when investigating. The paper proposes an approach to overcome these difficulties.

  18. 14 CFR 135.105 - Exception to second in command requirement: Approval for use of autopilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... second in command, if it is equipped with an operative approved autopilot system and the use of that...: Approval for use of autopilot system. 135.105 Section 135.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: Approval for use of autopilot system. (a) Except as provided in §§ 135.99 and 135.111, unless two...

  19. System design of the Pioneer Venus spacecraft. Volume 8: Command/data handling subsystems studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesely, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    Study tasks for the command and data handling subsystems have been directed to: (1) determining ground data systems, (GDS) interfaces and deep space network (DSN) changes, if required, (2) defining subsystem requirements, (3) surveying existing hardware that could be used or modified to meet subsystem requirements, and (4) establishing a baseline design. Study of the existing GDS led to the conclusion that the Viking configuration GDS can be used with only minor changes required for the Pioneer Venus baseline. Those changes required are associated with providing a predetection recording capability used during probe entry and descent. Subsystem requirements were first formulated with sufficient latitude so that surveys of existing hardware could lead to low cost hardware which, in turn, could modify more narrowly defined subsystem requirements.

  20. SOA approach to battle command: simulation interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayott, Gregory; Self, Mid; Miller, Gordon J.; McDonnell, Joseph S.

    2010-04-01

    NVESD is developing a Sensor Data and Management Services (SDMS) Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) that provides an innovative approach to achieve seamless application functionality across simulation and battle command systems. In 2010, CERDEC will conduct a SDMS Battle Command demonstration that will highlight the SDMS SOA capability to couple simulation applications to existing Battle Command systems. The demonstration will leverage RDECOM MATREX simulation tools and TRADOC Maneuver Support Battle Laboratory Virtual Base Defense Operations Center facilities. The battle command systems are those specific to the operation of a base defense operations center in support of force protection missions. The SDMS SOA consists of four components that will be discussed. An Asset Management Service (AMS) will automatically discover the existence, state, and interface definition required to interact with a named asset (sensor or a sensor platform, a process such as level-1 fusion, or an interface to a sensor or other network endpoint). A Streaming Video Service (SVS) will automatically discover the existence, state, and interfaces required to interact with a named video stream, and abstract the consumers of the video stream from the originating device. A Task Manager Service (TMS) will be used to automatically discover the existence of a named mission task, and will interpret, translate and transmit a mission command for the blue force unit(s) described in a mission order. JC3IEDM data objects, and software development kit (SDK), will be utilized as the basic data object definition for implemented web services.

  1. CHeCS Commanding Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jamie

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) commanding hardware. It includes information on the hardware status, commanding plan, and command training status with specific information the EV-CPDS 2 and 3, TEPC, MEC, and T2

  2. Transportation Command, Control, Communication and Information Systems (C3I): ?Lifting the Lid of Pandora's Box?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, D. F. H.

    Integrated Command, Control, Communication and Information (C3I) Systems have developed a language of their own, drawing heavily on acronyms and information technology terminology, resulting in the impression being given to the uninitiated that either a black art is being practised or at least there is a mystique unknown in other complex systems. No master plan or model exists for C3I systems, and their very existence is predicated primarily on the need to fulfil two basic requirements. First, they exist where there is a need at the highest level of management of an international or national authority, or of a large company, or of a large organization, to exercise real-time optimum use of the total and diverse resources available to the corporate body in pursuit of its mission, charter or commercial goal. Secondly, at the lowest level, C3I systems exist to help an individual, or a machine, or a sensor, to perform a given task or rôle more effectively. The integration of emergency services and the operation of large modern transportation systems are among the civilian systems that stand to gain most from the use of integrated C3I systems.

  3. Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems recommendation for space data system standards: Telecommand. Part 2.1: Command operation procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This recommendation contains the detailed specification of the logic required to carry out the Command Operations Procedures of the Transfer Layer. The Recommendation for Telecommand--Part 2, Data Routing Service contains the standard data structures and data communication procedures used by the intermediate telecommand system layers (the Transfer and Segmentation Layers). In particular, it contains a brief description of the Command Operations Procedures (COP) within the Transfer Layer. This recommendation contains the detailed definition of the COP's in the form of state tables, along with definitions of the terms used. It is assumed that the reader of this document is familiar with the data structures and terminology of part 2. In case of conflict between the description of the COP's in part 2 and in this recommendation, the definition in this recommendation will take precedence. In particular, this document supersedes section 4.3.3.1 through 4.3.3.4 of part 2.

  4. Forces in rotary motion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilsch, Markus K.; Elliott, Gregory K.

    2008-09-01

    In many coating chambers substrates are moved by simple or planetary rotary motion systems. Isaac Newton already taught that an object in uniform motion tends to stay in uniform motion unless acted upon by a net external force. To move a substrate on a rotary trajectory, centripetal and gravitational forces must act upon the substrate. The substrate must be somehow confined. Confinement options range from firm attachment to a fixture to loose placement in a pocket. Depending on the rotary motion pattern, a loosely held substrate may slide once against a confinement boundary and then stay, or may constantly slide around. 'Rattling around' may be undesirable as it could lead to edge destruction, debris formation, precession of the substrate, and other adverse effects. Firm attachment is advantageous in most cases, but often adds process complexity. We examine the forces present on substrates in typical rotary motion systems and discuss the implications of different confinement methods.

  5. Kennedy Space Center's Command and Control System - "Toasters to Rocket Ships"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lougheed, Kirk; Mako, Cheryle

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the history of the development of the command and control system at Kennedy Space Center. From a system that could be brought to Florida in the trunk of a car in the 1950's. Including the development of larger and more complex launch vehicles with the Apollo program where human launch controllers managed the launch process with a hardware only system that required a dedicated human interface to perform every function until the Apollo vehicle lifted off from the pad. Through the development of the digital computer that interfaced with ground launch processing systems with the Space Shuttle program. Finally, showing the future control room being developed to control the missions to return to the moon and Mars, which will maximize the use of Commercial-Off-The Shelf (COTS) hardware and software which was standards based and not tied to a single vendor. The system is designed to be flexible and adaptable to support the requirements of future spacecraft and launch vehicles.

  6. Autonomous satellite command and control: A comparison with other military systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruchten, Robert J.; Todd, Wayne

    1988-01-01

    Existing satellite concepts of operation depend on readily available experts and are extremely manpower intensive. Areas of expertise required include mission planning, mission data interpretation, telemetry monitoring, and anomaly resolution. The concepts of operation have envolved to their current state in part because space systems have tended to be treated more as research and development assets rather than as operational assets. These methods of satellite command and control will be inadequate in the future because of the availability, survivability, and capability of human experts. Because space systems have extremely high reliability and limited access, they offer challenges not found in other military systems. Thus, automation techniques used elsewhere are not necessarily applicable to space systems. A program to make satellites much more autonomous has been developed, using a variety of advanced software techniques. The problem the program is addressing, some possible solutions, the goals of the Rome Air Development Center (RADC) program, the rationale as to why the goals are reasonable, and the current program status are discussed. Also presented are some of the concepts used in the program and how they differ from more traditional approaches.

  7. Design and Flight Tests of an Adaptive Control System Employing Normal-Acceleration Command

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, Water E.; McLean, John D.; Hegarty, Daniel M.; Heinle, Donovan R.

    1961-01-01

    An adaptive control system employing normal-acceleration command has been designed with the aid of an analog computer and has been flight tested. The design of the system was based on the concept of using a mathematical model in combination with a high gain and a limiter. The study was undertaken to investigate the application of a system of this type to the task of maintaining nearly constant dynamic longitudinal response of a piloted airplane over the flight envelope without relying on air data measurements for gain adjustment. The range of flight conditions investigated was between Mach numbers of 0.36 and 1.15 and altitudes of 10,000 and 40,000 feet. The final adaptive system configuration was derived from analog computer tests, in which the physical airplane control system and much of the control circuitry were included in the loop. The method employed to generate the feedback signals resulted in a model whose characteristics varied somewhat with changes in flight condition. Flight results showed that the system limited the variation in longitudinal natural frequency of the adaptive airplane to about half that of the basic airplane and that, for the subsonic cases, the damping ratio was maintained between 0.56 and 0.69. The system also automatically compensated for the transonic trim change. Objectionable features of the system were an exaggerated sensitivity of pitch attitude to gust disturbances, abnormally large pitch attitude response for a given pilot input at low speeds, and an initial delay in normal-acceleration response to pilot control at all flight conditions. The adaptive system chatter of +/-0.05 to +/-0.10 of elevon at about 9 cycles per second (resulting in a maximum airplane normal-acceleration response of from +/-0.025 g to +/- 0.035 g) was considered by the pilots to be mildly objectionable but tolerable.

  8. Mobile Agents: A Distributed Voice-Commanded Sensory and Robotic System for Surface EVA Assistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Alena, Rick; Crawford, Sekou; Dowding, John; Graham, Jeff; Kaskiris, Charis; Tyree, Kim S.; vanHoof, Ronnie

    2003-01-01

    A model-based, distributed architecture integrates diverse components in a system designed for lunar and planetary surface operations: spacesuit biosensors, cameras, GPS, and a robotic assistant. The system transmits data and assists communication between the extra-vehicular activity (EVA) astronauts, the crew in a local habitat, and a remote mission support team. Software processes ("agents"), implemented in a system called Brahms, run on multiple, mobile platforms, including the spacesuit backpacks, all-terrain vehicles, and robot. These "mobile agents" interpret and transform available data to help people and robotic systems coordinate their actions to make operations more safe and efficient. Different types of agents relate platforms to each other ("proxy agents"), devices to software ("comm agents"), and people to the system ("personal agents"). A state-of-the-art spoken dialogue interface enables people to communicate with their personal agents, supporting a speech-driven navigation and scheduling tool, field observation record, and rover command system. An important aspect of the engineering methodology involves first simulating the entire hardware and software system in Brahms, and then configuring the agents into a runtime system. Design of mobile agent functionality has been based on ethnographic observation of scientists working in Mars analog settings in the High Canadian Arctic on Devon Island and the southeast Utah desert. The Mobile Agents system is developed iteratively in the context of use, with people doing authentic work. This paper provides a brief introduction to the architecture and emphasizes the method of empirical requirements analysis, through which observation, modeling, design, and testing are integrated in simulated EVA operations.

  9. The evolution of shortcomings in Incident Command System: Revisions have allowed critical management functions to atrophy.

    PubMed

    Stambler, Kimberly S; Barbera, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    The original Incident Command System (ICS) was created through the federally funded Firefighting Resources of Southern California Organized for Potential Emergencies (FIRESCOPE) program. Initially developed as one element of multiagency coordination for managing severe wildfires, the FIRESCOPE ICS guidance was adopted and evolved through increasingly routine wildl and firefighting. It then was modified for all hazards for the fire service. Only later, through the National Incident Management System (NIMS), was ICS officially adopted for all hazards and all responders. Over this multidecade evolution, the current NIMS ICS version became simplified in several key areas compared to the original, robust FIRESCOPE ICS. NIMS ICS is now promulgated as guidance for managing today's novel, complex, and lengthy disasters involving multidisciplinary response but experiences recurrent problems in key functions. This article examines the history of the subtle, yet critical differences in current ICS compared to the original system design, and focuses on information dissemination and intermediate, long-range and contingency planning. ICS transitions resulted in simplification and consolidation of positions and functions, without recognizing and maintaining critical position tasks necessary for managing complex, extended incidents. PMID:26750813

  10. The Integration of COTS/GOTS within NASA's HST Command and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfarr, Thomas; Reis, James E.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's mission critical Hubble Space Telescope (HST) command and control system has been re-engineered with commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS/GOTS) and minimal custom code. This paper focuses on the design of this new HST Control Center System (CCS) and the lessons learned throughout its development. CCS currently utilizes more than 30 COTS/GOTS products with an additional 1/2 million lines of custom glueware code; the new CCS exceeds the capabilities of the original system while significantly reducing the lines of custom code by more than 50%. The lifecycle of COTS/GOTS products will be examined including the package selection process, evaluation process, and integration process. The advantages, disadvantages, issues, concerns, and lessons learned for integrating COTS/GOTS into the NASA's mission critical HST CCS will be examined in detail. This paper will reveal the many hidden costs of COTS/GOTS solutions when compared to traditional custom code development efforts; this paper will show the high cost of COTS/GOTS solutions including training expenses, consulting fees, and long-term maintenance expenses.

  11. 63. Aerial view of SAC command post construction, looking west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. Aerial view of SAC command post construction, looking west - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  12. 67. Aerial view of SAC command post, building 500, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. Aerial view of SAC command post, building 500, looking northeast, undated - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  13. 62. Aerial view of SAC command post, building 500, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. Aerial view of SAC command post, building 500, looking east - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  14. 68. Aerial view of SAC command post, building 500, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. Aerial view of SAC command post, building 500, looking northeast, spring, 1957 - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  15. SciBox, an Integrated Instrument and Spacecraft Planning and Commanding System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, T. H.; Murchie, S. L.; Bedini, P. D.; Nair, H.; McGovern, J. A.

    2012-10-01

    SciBox is a revolutionary, proven approach to planning and sequencing orbital science observations. It automates searching for and selecting observing opportunities, construction of sequences, conflict resolution, sequence validation and commanding.

  16. U.S. Army Missile Command imaging infrared system simulation (IIRSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; Dunavant, Teri S.

    1996-05-01

    The ability to thoroughly exercise and accurately predict the missile and/or submunition hardware and on-board software in a laboratory environment has always been preferred to reduce the number and costs of actual flight tests, to increase the probability of success of flight test using hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation, and help assure the U.S. Army is a `smart' buyer. The U.S. Army Missile Command, responsible for providing all the simulation support for the U.S. Army's guided missiles and submunitions, has developed a HWIL Simulation Facility that supports several HWIL techniques including real time, closed-loop, `seeker-in-the-loop', `processor-in-the-loop', and `man-in-the-loop'. This paper provides an overview of the development, operation, and usage of one such HWIL facility called the Imaging Infrared System Simulation. The major technological components used to develop the IIRSS are presented individually and integrated as an integration and performance-level HWIL system simulation.

  17. Commanding Constellations (Pipeline Architecture)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Tim; Condron, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Providing ground command software for constellations of spacecraft is a challenging problem. Reliable command delivery requires a feedback loop; for a constellation there will likely be an independent feedback loop for each constellation member. Each command must be sent via the proper Ground Station, which may change from one contact to the next (and may be different for different members). Dynamic configuration of the ground command software is usually required (e.g. directives to configure each member's feedback loop and assign the appropriate Ground Station). For testing purposes, there must be a way to insert command data at any level in the protocol stack. The Pipeline architecture described in this paper can support all these capabilities with a sequence of software modules (the pipeline), and a single self-identifying message format (for all types of command data and configuration directives). The Pipeline architecture is quite simple, yet it can solve some complex problems. The resulting solutions are conceptually simple, and therefore, reliable. They are also modular, and therefore, easy to distribute and extend. We first used the Pipeline architecture to design a CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) Ground Telecommand system (to command one spacecraft at a time with a fixed Ground Station interface). This pipeline was later extended to include gateways to any of several Ground Stations. The resulting pipeline was then extended to handle a small constellation of spacecraft. The use of the Pipeline architecture allowed us to easily handle the increasing complexity. This paper will describe the Pipeline architecture, show how it was used to solve each of the above commanding situations, and how it can easily be extended to handle larger constellations.

  18. Development of an expert system prototype for determining software functional requirements for command management activities at NASA Goddard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, J.

    1986-01-01

    The development of an expert system prototype for software functional requirement determination for NASA Goddard's Command Management System, as part of its process of transforming general requests into specific near-earth satellite commands, is described. The present knowledge base was formulated through interactions with domain experts, and was then linked to the existing Knowledge Engineering Systems (KES) expert system application generator. Steps in the knowledge-base development include problem-oriented attribute hierarchy development, knowledge management approach determination, and knowledge base encoding. The KES Parser and Inspector, in addition to backcasting and analogical mapping, were used to validate the expert system-derived requirements for one of the major functions of a spacecraft, the solar Maximum Mission. Knowledge refinement, evaluation, and implementation procedures of the expert system were then accomplished.

  19. SciBox, an end-to-end automated science planning and commanding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Teck H.; Murchie, Scott L.; Bedini, Peter D.; Steele, R. Josh; Skura, Joseph P.; Nguyen, Lillian; Nair, Hari; Lucks, Michael; Berman, Alice F.; McGovern, James A.; Turner, F. Scott

    2014-01-01

    SciBox is a new technology for planning and commanding science operations for Earth-orbital and planetary space missions. It has been incrementally developed since 2001 and demonstrated on several spaceflight projects. The technology has matured to the point that it is now being used to plan and command all orbital science operations for the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission to Mercury. SciBox encompasses the derivation of observing sequences from science objectives, the scheduling of those sequences, the generation of spacecraft and instrument commands, and the validation of those commands prior to uploading to the spacecraft. Although the process is automated, science and observing requirements are incorporated at each step by a series of rules and parameters to optimize observing opportunities, which are tested and validated through simulation and review. Except for limited special operations and tests, there is no manual scheduling of observations or construction of command sequences. SciBox reduces the lead time for operations planning by shortening the time-consuming coordination process, reduces cost by automating the labor-intensive processes of human-in-the-loop adjudication of observing priorities, reduces operations risk by systematically checking constraints, and maximizes science return by fully evaluating the trade space of observing opportunities to meet MESSENGER science priorities within spacecraft recorder, downlink, scheduling, and orbital-geometry constraints.

  20. Automatic force balance calibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, Alice T. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A system for automatically calibrating force balances is provided. The invention uses a reference balance aligned with the balance being calibrated to provide superior accuracy while minimizing the time required to complete the calibration. The reference balance and the test balance are rigidly attached together with closely aligned moment centers. Loads placed on the system equally effect each balance, and the differences in the readings of the two balances can be used to generate the calibration matrix for the test balance. Since the accuracy of the test calibration is determined by the accuracy of the reference balance and current technology allows for reference balances to be calibrated to within .+-.0.05%, the entire system has an accuracy of a .+-.0.2%. The entire apparatus is relatively small and can be mounted on a movable base for easy transport between test locations. The system can also accept a wide variety of reference balances, thus allowing calibration under diverse load and size requirements.

  1. Automatic force balance calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Alice T.

    1995-05-01

    A system for automatically calibrating force balances is provided. The invention uses a reference balance aligned with the balance being calibrated to provide superior accuracy while minimizing the time required to complete the calibration. The reference balance and the test balance are rigidly attached together with closely aligned moment centers. Loads placed on the system equally effect each balance, and the differences in the readings of the two balances can be used to generate the calibration matrix for the test balance. Since the accuracy of the test calibration is determined by the accuracy of the reference balance and current technology allows for reference balances to be calibrated to within +/-0.05% the entire system has an accuracy of +/-0.2%. The entire apparatus is relatively small and can be mounted on a movable base for easy transport between test locations. The system can also accept a wide variety of reference balances, thus allowing calibration under diverse load and size requirements.

  2. Hospital incident command system (HICS) performance in Iran; decision making during disasters

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospitals are cornerstones for health care in a community and must continue to function in the face of a disaster. The Hospital Incident Command System (HICS) is a method by which the hospital operates when an emergency is declared. Hospitals are often ill equipped to evaluate the strengths and vulnerabilities of their own management systems before the occurrence of an actual disaster. The main objective of this study was to measure the decision making performance according to HICS job actions sheets using tabletop exercises. Methods This observational study was conducted between May 1st 2008 and August 31st 2009. Twenty three Iranian hospitals were included. A tabletop exercise was developed for each hospital which in turn was based on the highest probable risk. The job action sheets of the HICS were used as measurements of performance. Each indicator was considered as 1, 2 or 3 in accordance with the HICS. Fair performance was determined as < 40%; intermediate as 41-70%; high as 71-100% of the maximum score of 192. Descriptive statistics, T-test, and Univariate Analysis of Variance were used. Results None of the participating hospitals had a hospital disaster management plan. The performance according to HICS was intermediate for 83% (n = 19) of the participating hospitals. No hospital had a high level of performance. The performance level for the individual sections was intermediate or fair, except for the logistic and finance sections which demonstrated a higher level of performance. The public hospitals had overall higher performances than university hospitals (P = 0.04). Conclusions The decision making performance in the Iranian hospitals, as measured during table top exercises and using the indicators proposed by HICS was intermediate to poor. In addition, this study demonstrates that the HICS job action sheets can be used as a template for measuring the hospital response. Simulations can be used to assess preparedness, but the correlation with

  3. Use of modern control theory in military command and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Timothy E.

    2001-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of modern control theoretic approaches in military command and control. The military enterprise is a highly dynamic and nonlinear environment. The desire on the part of military commanders to operate at faster operational tempos while still maintaining a stable and robust system, naturally leads to the consideration of a control theoretic approach to providing decision aids. I will present a brief history of the science of command and control of military forces and discuss how modern control theory might be applied to air operations.

  4. Automatic Command Sequence Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladded, Roy; Khanampompan, Teerapat

    2007-01-01

    Automatic Sequence Generator (Autogen) Version 3.0 software automatically generates command sequences for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and several other JPL spacecraft operated by the multi-mission support team. Autogen uses standard JPL sequencing tools like APGEN, ASP, SEQGEN, and the DOM database to automate the generation of uplink command products, Spacecraft Command Message Format (SCMF) files, and the corresponding ground command products, DSN Keywords Files (DKF). Autogen supports all the major multi-mission mission phases including the cruise, aerobraking, mapping/science, and relay mission phases. Autogen is a Perl script, which functions within the mission operations UNIX environment. It consists of two parts: a set of model files and the autogen Perl script. Autogen encodes the behaviors of the system into a model and encodes algorithms for context sensitive customizations of the modeled behaviors. The model includes knowledge of different mission phases and how the resultant command products must differ for these phases. The executable software portion of Autogen, automates the setup and use of APGEN for constructing a spacecraft activity sequence file (SASF). The setup includes file retrieval through the DOM (Distributed Object Manager), an object database used to store project files. This step retrieves all the needed input files for generating the command products. Depending on the mission phase, Autogen also uses the ASP (Automated Sequence Processor) and SEQGEN to generate the command product sent to the spacecraft. Autogen also provides the means for customizing sequences through the use of configuration files. By automating the majority of the sequencing generation process, Autogen eliminates many sequence generation errors commonly introduced by manually constructing spacecraft command sequences. Through the layering of commands into the sequence by a series of scheduling algorithms, users are able to rapidly and reliably construct the

  5. Development of the command data system and ground software for the SEDSAT-1 microsatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, B. Earl

    1996-01-01

    SEDSAT-1 is designed to be a low cost scientific satellite which is to be used to perform a minimum of five tasks which include: (1) the acquisition of a number of important parameters associated with the tethering processes from the payloads perspective (such as accelerations incurred and imaging data of the tether during deployment), (2) to act as a remote sensing platform for making measurements of the Earth's Atmosphere (allowing research to be performed in such areas as vertical lightning observation, visible light spectrography, and cloud cover studies, (3) to act as a general purpose amateur radio communication satellite relaying information back to earth, (4) to demonstrate the feasibility of the deployment in low earth orbit of advanced technology such as the Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells, Nickel Metal Hydride batteries, and multi-chip module technology and, (5) to support student's active participation in applying the disciplines of engineering and science to space-based hardware platforms. The project includes the Three-axis Accelerometer System, TAS, Experiment which is designed to report the accelerations that the satellite undergoes during the tethering operations and during the second phase of the mission when the free floating satellite comes in contact with orbit debris. The SEASIS (SEDS Earth, Atmosphere, and Space Imaging System) is another SEDSAT experiment designed to provide images of the tether during its deployment and the earth during the second phase of the mission. To control these experiments and virtually all other satellite operations the Command Data System, CDS is employed. This system utilizes a moderate complexity micro-controller controlled by tasks operating under a real-time operating system to dynamically monitor and control the satellite. The scope of this researchers efforts has been in the general area of coordinating and assisting the student researchers with the development of the CDS and ground station interfaces. This

  6. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 247 - DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... E Appendix E to Part 247 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... ENTERPRISE PUBLICATIONS Pt. 247, App. E Appendix E to Part 247—DoD Command Newspaper and Magazine Review... 1 to Appendix E to Part 247—Newspaper and Magazine Reporting Data As required by section H. of...

  7. Cost efficient command management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Theresa; Murphy, C. W.; Kuntz, Jon; Barlett, Tom

    1996-01-01

    The design and implementation of a command management system (CMS) for a NASA control center, is described. The technology innovations implemented in the CMS provide the infrastructure required for operations cost reduction and future development cost reduction through increased operational efficiency and reuse in future missions. The command management design facilitates error-free operations which enables the automation of the routine control center functions and allows for the distribution of scheduling responsibility to the instrument teams. The reusable system was developed using object oriented methodologies.

  8. Evaluation of expert systems - An approach and case study. [of determining software functional requirements for command management of satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, J.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques that were applied in defining an expert system prototype for first-cut evaluations of the software functional requirements of NASA satellite command management activities are described. The prototype was developed using the Knowledge Engineering System. Criteria were selected for evaluating the satellite software before defining the expert system prototype. Application of the prototype system is illustrated in terms of the evaluation procedures used with the COBE satellite to be launched in 1988. The limited number of options which can be considered by the program mandates that biases in the system output must be well understood by the users.

  9. Economy of Command

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medeiros, David Peter

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation proposes a principle of "economy of command", arguing that it provides a simple and natural explanation for some well-known properties of human language syntax. The focus is on the abstract combinatorial system that constructs the hierarchical structure of linguistic expressions, with long-distance dependencies…

  10. Evolvable work-centred support systems for command and control: creating systems users can adapt to meet changing demands.

    PubMed

    Roth, E; Scott, R; Deutsch, S; Kuper, S; Schmidt, V; Stilson, M; Wampler, J

    2006-06-10

    Military command and control (C2) organizations are complex socio-technical systems which must constantly adapt to meet changing operational requirements. We describe our experiences in developing a work-centred support system (WCSS) to aid weather forecasting and monitoring in a military airlift C2 organization as an illustrative case. As part of the development process we conducted field observations both before and after introduction of the WCSS in their operations centre. A striking finding was the constant changes that operations personnel faced (changes in goals and priorities, changes in scale of operations, changes in team roles and structure, and changes in information sources and systems). We describe the changes in workplace demands that we observed and the modifications we needed to make to the WCSS in response. For today's fielded systems, it is seldom possible to make changes that are responsive to users' changing requirements in a timely manner. We argue for the need to incorporate facilities that enable users to adapt their systems to the changing requirements of work and point to some promising directions towards evolvable work-centred support systems. PMID:16720529

  11. 32 CFR 724.405 - Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Department Discharge Review System § 724.405 Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military... support to the Naval Discharge Review Board and for implementation of departmental discharge review decisions. (See subpart C)....

  12. 32 CFR 724.405 - Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Department Discharge Review System § 724.405 Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military... support to the Naval Discharge Review Board and for implementation of departmental discharge review decisions. (See subpart C)....

  13. 32 CFR 724.405 - Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Department Discharge Review System § 724.405 Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military... support to the Naval Discharge Review Board and for implementation of departmental discharge review decisions. (See subpart C)....

  14. 32 CFR 700.702 - Responsibility and authority of commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authority of commanders. (a) Commanders shall be responsible for the satisfactory accomplishment of the... subordinate commands are fully aware of the importance of strong, dynamic leadership and its relationship to the overall efficiency and readiness of naval forces. Commanders shall exercise positive...

  15. Vectorial Command of Induction Motor Pumping System Supplied by a Photovoltaic Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhlouf, Messaoud; Messai, Feyrouz; Benalla, Hocine

    2011-01-01

    With the continuous decrease of the cost of solar cells, there is an increasing interest and needs in photovoltaic (PV) system applications following standard of living improvements. Water pumping system powered by solar-cell generators are one of the most important applications. The fluctuation of solar energy on one hand, and the necessity to optimise available solar energy on the other, it is useful to develop new efficient and flexible modes to control motors that entrain the pump. A vectorial control of an asynchronous motor fed by a photovoltaic system is proposed. This paper investigates a photovoltaic-electro mechanic chain, composed of a PV generator, DC-AC converter, a vector controlled induction motor and centrifugal pump. The PV generator is forced to operate at its maximum power point by using an appropriate search algorithm integrated in the vector control. The optimization is realized without need to adding a DC-DC converter to the chain. The motor supply is also ensured in all insolation conditions. Simulation results show the effectiveness and feasibility of such an approach.

  16. Safety aspects of spacecraft commanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peccia, N.

    1994-01-01

    The commanding of spacecraft is a potentially hazardous activity for the safety of the spacecraft. Present day control systems contain safety features in their commanding subsystem and in addition, strict procedures are also followed by operations staff. However, problems have occurred on a number of missions as a result of erroneous commanding leading in some cases to spacecraft contingencies and even to near loss of the spacecraft. The problems of checking commands in advance are increased by the tendency in modern spacecraft to use blocked/time-tagged commands and the increased usage of on-board computers, for which commands changing on-board software tables can radically change spacecraft or subsystem behavior. This paper reports on an on-going study. The study aims to improve the approach to safety of spacecraft commanding. It will show how ensuring 'safe' commanding can be carried out more efficiently, and with greater reliability, with the help of knowledge based systems and/or fast simulators. The whole concept will be developed based on the Object-Oriented approach.

  17. Command/telemetry bus general specification for the NOAA-OPQ polar orbiting environmental satellites and EUMETSAT polar satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The document is a reference document in the Instrument Interface Description for NOAA-2000 Instruments (GSFC-S-480-53). The requirements reflect the fact that these instruments must be compatible with a number of different polar orbiting satellite vehicles including the NOAA-OPQ satellites and the EUMETSAT METOP satellites. The instrument payload will interface to the spacecraft via several standardized communication busses. The document defines the multiplex data bus conforming to the MIL-STD-1553B protocol for command and telemetry transfer between a spacecraft system and all instruments.

  18. Integrated AMSU-A Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A): Command List Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauerwaas, R. V.

    1996-01-01

    This report contains a complete list of EOS/AMSU-A commands for all modes of operation and testing with a description of their effects. There are no EOS/AMSU-A critical commands i.e., commands that could damage the instrument in any situation.

  19. Joint force protection advanced security system (JFPASS) "the future of force protection: integrate and automate"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Carlos E.; Fagan, Joe E.

    2009-09-01

    The United States Department of Defense (DoD) defines 'force protection' as "preventive measures taken to mitigate hostile actions against DoD personnel (to include family members), resources, facilities, and critical information." Advanced technologies enable significant improvements in automating and distributing situation awareness, optimizing operator time, and improving sustainability, which enhance protection and lower costs. The JFPASS Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) demonstrates a force protection environment that combines physical security and Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) defense through the application of integrated command and control and data fusion. The JFPASS JCTD provides a layered approach to force protection by integrating traditional sensors used in physical security, such as video cameras, battlefield surveillance radars, unmanned and unattended ground sensors. The optimization of human participation and automation of processes is achieved by employment of unmanned ground vehicles, along with remotely operated lethal and less-than-lethal weapon systems. These capabilities are integrated via a tailorable, user-defined common operational picture display through a data fusion engine operating in the background. The combined systems automate the screening of alarms, manage the information displays, and provide assessment and response measures. The data fusion engine links disparate sensors and systems, and applies tailored logic to focus the assessment of events. It enables timely responses by providing the user with automated and semi-automated decision support tools. The JFPASS JCTD uses standard communication/data exchange protocols, which allow the system to incorporate future sensor technologies or communication networks, while maintaining the ability to communicate with legacy or existing systems.

  20. 106. Air defense command "master plan", base map," RCA Service ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    106. Air defense command "master plan", base map," RCA Service Company tab no. F-1, sheet 1 of 2, dated 22 October, 1965. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  1. System description and applications of the Imaging Infrared Simulation System III at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholes, William J.; Buford, James A.; Harrison, Kenneth R.; Barnette, J. S.

    2000-07-01

    A new imaging infrared hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation laboratory has been added to the already rich set of HWIL assets at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) for evaluation of weapons systems with infrared seekers. This paper provides a system description of the new laboratory, the Imaging Infrared Simulation System III (IIRSS3), and discusses the application of the facility to two different weapon systems.

  2. 32 CFR 724.405 - Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Naval Military Personnel Command. 724.405 Section 724.405 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Principal Elements of the Navy Department Discharge Review System § 724.405 Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval...

  3. 32 CFR 724.405 - Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Naval Military Personnel Command. 724.405 Section 724.405 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Principal Elements of the Navy Department Discharge Review System § 724.405 Commandant of the Marine Corps or the Commander, Naval...

  4. Air Force Training for Instructional Systems Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Ronald R.

    Detailed information is provided about the Air Force Instructional System Development (ISD) Model to supplement the 1979 AECT presentation made in New Orleans. Information of interest to instructional systems designers includes (1) a short overview of the Air Force ISD model, (2) an extended example which demonstrates the Air Training Command…

  5. Space vehicle onboard command encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A flexible onboard encoder system was designed for the space shuttle. The following areas were covered: (1) implementation of the encoder design into hardware to demonstrate the various encoding algorithms/code formats, (2) modulation techniques in a single hardware package to maintain comparable reliability and link integrity of the existing link systems and to integrate the various techniques into a single design using current technology. The primary function of the command encoder is to accept input commands, generated either locally onboard the space shuttle or remotely from the ground, format and encode the commands in accordance with the payload input requirements and appropriately modulate a subcarrier for transmission by the baseband RF modulator. The following information was provided: command encoder system design, brassboard hardware design, test set hardware and system packaging, and software.

  6. Step 1: Human System Integration (HSI) FY05 Pilot-Technology Interface Requirements for Command, Control, and Communications (C3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The document provides the Human System Integration(HSI) high-level functional C3 HSI requirements for the interface to the pilot. Description includes (1) the information required by the pilot to have knowledge C3 system status, and (2) the control capability needed by the pilot to obtain C3 information. Fundamentally, these requirements provide the candidate C3 technology concepts with the necessary human-related elements to make them compatible with human capabilities and limitations. The results of the analysis describe how C3 operations and functions should interface with the pilot to provide the necessary C3 functionality to the UA-pilot system. Requirements and guidelines for C3 are partitioned into three categories: (1) Pilot-Air Traffic Control (ATC) Voice Communications (2) Pilot-ATC Data Communications, and (3) command and control of the unmanned aircraft (UA). Each requirement is stated and is supported with a rationale and associated reference(s).

  7. Task four report: Telemetry, command, and data handling. [communication systems for ATS, SMS, OSO, and ERTS satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An overview of the telemetry, command, and data handling features of four spacecraft developed under GSFC management is presented. Two of these spacecraft ATS and SMS, are designed for geostationary orbit; the other two OSO and ERTS, are designed for low earth orbits. The program time spans for these spacecraft are as shown. The programs are seen to be near contemporary, especially in the 1973, 1974 period. All of the spacecraft listed were developed under GSFC control and are thus subject to the standards set forth in the Aerospace Data System Standard developed by GSFC. These standards must be adhered to by all spacecraft programs under GSFC control or utilizing STDN unless waivers have been granted. The standards were developed to maximize the utilization of the large amount of standard equipment at each STDN ground facility. The standards impose bounds on both the command and telemetry formats to be compatible with the STDN ground station unless valid and acceptable reasons are raised to deviate from these restraints.

  8. Telemetry and command standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Adrian J.; Macmedan, Mervyn L.; Lenhart, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    The first phase of the international Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) efforts toward the definition of standards for space telemetry, spacecraft tracking, and command functions has established a set of standard space communications techniques capable of satisfying almost the entire spectrum of space mission user requirements. This was achieved by focusing on the distinctive problems associated with the space/ground data link, and developing the infrastructural system designated the 'Open Systems Interconnection'. The intrinsically international coordination by CCSDS of development efforts ensures highly flexible mutual support activities by the various national space agencies.

  9. System analysis of force feedback microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Mario S.; Costa, Luca; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2014-02-01

    It was shown recently that the Force Feedback Microscope (FFM) can avoid the jump-to-contact in Atomic force Microscopy even when the cantilevers used are very soft, thus increasing force resolution. In this letter, we explore theoretical aspects of the associated real time control of the tip position. We take into account lever parameters such as the lever characteristics in its environment, spring constant, mass, dissipation coefficient, and the operating conditions such as controller gains and interaction force. We show how the controller parameters are determined so that the FFM functions at its best and estimate the bandwidth of the system under these conditions.

  10. System analysis of force feedback microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Mario S.; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2014-02-07

    It was shown recently that the Force Feedback Microscope (FFM) can avoid the jump-to-contact in Atomic force Microscopy even when the cantilevers used are very soft, thus increasing force resolution. In this letter, we explore theoretical aspects of the associated real time control of the tip position. We take into account lever parameters such as the lever characteristics in its environment, spring constant, mass, dissipation coefficient, and the operating conditions such as controller gains and interaction force. We show how the controller parameters are determined so that the FFM functions at its best and estimate the bandwidth of the system under these conditions.

  11. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-04-15

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  12. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Goodman, Miriam B.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or “clamps” the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of μN force and nm up to tens of μm displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode. PMID:21529009

  13. Casimir forces in systems near jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Justin; Liétor-Santos, Juan-José

    Casimir forces arise when long-ranged fluctuations are geometrically confined between two surfaces. In most cases these fluctuations are quantum or thermal in nature, such as those near a classical critical point, yet this is not a requirement. The T = 0 jamming transition in frictionless, granular systems shares many properties with classical critical points, such as a diverging correlation length, although it has recently been identified as a unique example of a random first-order transition (RFOT). Here we show the existence of Casimir forces between two pinned particles immersed in systems near the frictionless jamming transition. We observe two components to the total force: a short-ranged, depletion force and a long-ranged, repulsive Casimir force. The Casimir force dominates when the pinned particles are much larger than the ambient jammed particles. In this case, we find that particles with the largest forces have the least number of contacts, and that these particles are clustered between the pinned particles, giving rise to a repulsive force which is independent of system preparation and inter-particle potential. We acknowledge support from NSF DMR-1455086.

  14. Research on new dynamic force calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li

    2008-06-01

    Sinusoidal force calibration method based on electrodynamic shaker and interferometric system was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). In that system a load mass are screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition F(t) = ma(t), where m is the total mass acting on the sensing element of the force transducer and a is the time and spatial-dependent acceleration of the mass, which is directly measured by a laser interferometer. This paper will introduce a new dynamic force calibration system developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electrodynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1N to 20kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. A new air bearing system is developed to increase the performance of shakers and an active vibration isolator is used to reduce enviromental disturbance to the interferometric system.

  15. Force regulation in multiple-manipulator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Murphy, Steve H.

    1992-01-01

    A new intuitively appealing interpretation of the internal force in a multiple-arm system is presented. The static gravity-free case is considered where internal force has a well-founded physical meaning. The case is extended to the general dynamic case by removing the inertial force through balancing it with the minimum amount of contact force. The remaining component in the contact force is considered to be the sole contributor to the inertial force. Existing techniques for force control can be used to obtain various stabilizing force set point control laws. Particular attention is given to the motion control strategy for multiple arm systems. Three types of control laws, feedback linearization, arms-as-actuators, and passive control, are addressed. The first two techniques provide simplified control tuning but require much model information. The latter approach is considered to be very robust with respect to the model, but good transient performance is more challenging to obtain. It is suggested to combine one of the model-based approaches with the passive control approach.

  16. Data acquisition and command system for use with a microprocessor-based control chassis. [PIGMI-Pion Generation for Medical Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Martinez, V.A. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The Pion Generation for Medical Irradiations (PIGMI) program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is developing the technology to build smaller, less expensive, and more reliable proton linear accelerators for medical applications, and has designed a powerful, simple, inexpensive, and reliable control and data acquisition system that is central to the program development. The system is a NOVA-3D minicomputer interfaced to several outlying microprocessor-based controllers, which accomplish control and data acquisition through data I/O chasis. The equipment interface chassis, which can issue binary commands, read binary data, issue analog commands, and read timed and untimed analog data is described.

  17. Hydration force fluctuations in hydrophilic planar systems.

    PubMed

    Kanduč, Matej; Netz, Roland R

    2016-03-01

    Utilizing all-atom simulations with explicit solvent, the authors model hydrophilic surfaces interacting across water at a fixed chemical potential. They extract the hydration forces acting between the surfaces and assess force fluctuations as well as interlamellar water number fluctuations. The trends obtained from the simulations are captured by a continuum-based description with effective model parameters. The significance of fluctuations depends on surface hydrophilicity and rigidity. The authors show that the force fluctuations play an important role in kinetic processes in systems with lateral sizes smaller than several tens of nanometers. PMID:26746163

  18. Command and control displays for space vehicle operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Zetocha, Paul; Aleva, Denise

    2010-04-01

    This paper shall examine several command and control facility display architectures supporting space vehicle operations, to include TacSat 2, TacSat 3, STPSat 2, and Communications Navigation Outage Forecasting System (CNOFS), located within the Research Development Test & Evaluation Support Complex (RSC) Satellite Operations Center 97 (SOC-97) at Kirtland Air Force Base. A principal focus is to provide an understanding for the general design class of displays currently supporting space vehicle command and control, e.g., custom, commercial-off-the-shelf, or ruggedized commercial-off-the-shelf, and more specifically, what manner of display performance capabilities, e.g., active area, resolution, luminance, contrast ratio, frame/refresh rate, temperature range, shock/vibration, etc., are needed for particular aspects of space vehicle command and control. Another focus shall be to address the types of command and control functions performed for each of these systems, to include how operators interact with the displays, e.g., joystick, trackball, keyboard/mouse, as well as the kinds of information needed or displayed for each function. [Comparison with other known command and control facilities, such as Cheyenne Mountain and NORAD Operations Center, shall be made.] Future, anticipated display systems shall be discussed.

  19. Assessment of Alternative Interfaces for Manual Commanding of Spacecraft Systems: Compatibility with Flexible Allocation Policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, Dorrit Owen; Schreckenghost, Debra; Miri, Pardis

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts will be responsible for executing a much larger body of procedures as human exploration moves further from Earth and Mission Control. Efficient, reliable methods for executing these procedures, including manual, automated, and mixed execution will be important. Our interface integrates step-by-step instruction with the means for execution. The research reported here compared manual execution using the new system to a system analogous to the manual-only system currently in use on the International Space Station, to assess whether user performance in manual operations would be as good or better with the new than with the legacy system. The system used also allows flexible automated execution. The system and our data lay the foundation for integrating automated execution into the flow of procedures designed for humans. In our formative study, we found speed and accuracy of manual procedure execution was better using the new, integrated interface over the legacy design.

  20. Cyber Threat Assessment of Uplink and Commanding System for Mission Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Adans Y.; Tan, Kymie M. C.; Cilloniz-Bicchi, Ferner; Faris, Grant

    2014-01-01

    Most of today's Mission Operations Systems (MOS) rely on Ground Data System (GDS) segment to mitigate cyber security risks. Unfortunately, IT security design is done separately from the design of GDS' mission operational capabilities. This incoherent practice leaves many security vulnerabilities in the system without any notice. This paper describes a new way to system engineering MOS, to include cyber threat risk assessments throughout the MOS development cycle, without this, it is impossible to design a dependable and reliable MOS to meet today's rapid changing cyber threat environment.

  1. [Development of telepathology systems between different types of terminals based on the standard for image collaboration command protocol].

    PubMed

    Tofukuji, Ikuo; Nakagawa, Shuji; Suzuki, Akitoshi; Saito, Makoto; Hara, Shigeji; Tsuchihashi, Yasunari; Shiraishi, Taizo; Ooshiro, Mariko; Sawai, Takashi; Kaihara, Shigekoto

    2003-01-01

    In Japan telepathology systems have been developed in medical or pathological environment such as a shortage and an uneven distribution of pathologists. More than 100 telepathology terminals are working mainly for intraoperative quick diagnosis. They cannot communicate with different types each other. In March 2000 the Medical Information System Development Center(MEDIS-DC) successfully demonstrated the interconnection between different types of telepathology terminals based on the Standard for Image Collaboration Command Protocol (SICCP). Nikon, NTTdata and Olympus had joined the development. In February 2002 MEDIS-DC examined these systems for pathological consultations in the fields of Okinawa-Kyoto, Kyoto-Mie and Mie-Okinawa. These successful examinations let us know that telepathology systems need new observation methodologies for telecytology and teleconsultation in addition to the flow for intraoperative quick diagnosis, new GUI guidelines for telepathology terminal design and, education and support for users of their smooth operation. Outcomes of MEDIS-DC activities encourageed us to challenge the next generation telepathology. We found some new trends in telepathology or pathology informatics such as virtual slide technologies and the internet applications in US and Europe. In order to keep Japanese priority, MEDIS-DC telepathology comittee has started investigations to construct a strategy for development of Japanese next generation telepathology. PMID:12832859

  2. Variable Acceleration Force Calibration System (VACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Parker, Peter A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Landman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, force balances have been calibrated manually, using a complex system of free hanging precision weights, bell cranks, and/or other mechanical components. Conventional methods may provide sufficient accuracy in some instances, but are often quite complex and labor-intensive, requiring three to four man-weeks to complete each full calibration. To ensure accuracy, gravity-based loading is typically utilized. However, this often causes difficulty when applying loads in three simultaneous, orthogonal axes. A complex system of levers, cranks, and cables must be used, introducing increased sources of systematic error, and significantly increasing the time and labor intensity required to complete the calibration. One aspect of the VACS is a method wherein the mass utilized for calibration is held constant, and the acceleration is changed to thereby generate relatively large forces with relatively small test masses. Multiple forces can be applied to a force balance without changing the test mass, and dynamic forces can be applied by rotation or oscillating acceleration. If rotational motion is utilized, a mass is rigidly attached to a force balance, and the mass is exposed to a rotational field. A large force can be applied by utilizing a large rotational velocity. A centrifuge or rotating table can be used to create the rotational field, and fixtures can be utilized to position the force balance. The acceleration may also be linear. For example, a table that moves linearly and accelerates in a sinusoidal manner may also be utilized. The test mass does not have to move in a path that is parallel to the ground, and no re-leveling is therefore required. Balance deflection corrections may be applied passively by monitoring the orientation of the force balance with a three-axis accelerometer package. Deflections are measured during each test run, and adjustments with respect to the true applied load can be made during the post-processing stage. This paper will

  3. Simplicity in command and control systems - A human factors consideration. [for man computer interfare design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafin, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of simplicity in the man computer interface (MCI) is stressed because of the effect it has on the system containing the MCI. Results are used from an MCI study at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to find an area where the system MCIs can be simplified. The circumstances under which these simplifications are appropriate are listed. The concepts of cognitive simplicity and process simplicity are presented as design alternatives for the MCI. In addition, the concepts of understandability, operation, learnability, level of learning, and usability are presented as tools for the system designer. The use of these concepts in developing a systematic MCI design is discussed.

  4. Joint Forward Operating Base Elements of Command and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, William C.

    2002-01-01

    Since the 1986 Goldwater-Nichols Act directed the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to develop doctrine for the joint employment of the armed forces, tactics, techniques, and procedures have evolved at different rates depending on the competency. Whereas the command of joint air forces is well prescribed within the structure of the air operations center and its associated leadership, command of air assets at a joint forward operating base lacks guidance. Today, the United States prosecutes an air war over Afghanistan from bases in Uzbekistan, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. Elements of the United States Army, Air Force, and Marines combine at these geographically minute locations, each bringing a certain complement of support and command and control. Evidence from operations during the 1999 air war for Kosovo at Tirana Rinas Airport in Albania suggests that when these service elements meet at the airfield for the first time, there are problems associated with local procedure. At best, time is wasted creating local joint systems to overcome the difficulties. At worst, safety and mission accomplishment are jeopardized. This thesis will address the need to develop doctrine and a jointly integrated organization to support the command and control function at a forward operating base.

  5. Turbomachinery Forced Response Prediction System (FREPS): User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, M. R.; Murthy, D. V.

    1994-01-01

    The turbomachinery forced response prediction system (FREPS), version 1.2, is capable of predicting the aeroelastic behavior of axial-flow turbomachinery blades. This document is meant to serve as a guide in the use of the FREPS code with specific emphasis on its use at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). A detailed explanation of the aeroelastic analysis and its development is beyond the scope of this document, and may be found in the references. FREPS has been developed by the NASA LeRC Structural Dynamics Branch. The manual is divided into three major parts: an introduction, the preparation of input, and the procedure to execute FREPS. Part 1 includes a brief background on the necessity of FREPS, a description of the FREPS system, the steps needed to be taken before FREPS is executed, an example input file with instructions, presentation of the geometric conventions used, and the input/output files employed and produced by FREPS. Part 2 contains a detailed description of the command names needed to create the primary input file that is required to execute the FREPS code. Also, Part 2 has an example data file to aid the user in creating their own input files. Part 3 explains the procedures required to execute the FREPS code on the Cray Y-MP, a computer system available at the NASA LeRC.

  6. Force balances in systems of cylindrical polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Brenner, S L; McQuarrie, D A

    1973-04-01

    A detailed analysis is made of the model system of two parallel cylindrical polyelectrolytes which contain ionizable groups on their surfaces and are immersed in an ionic bathing medium. The interaction between the cylinders is examined by considering the interplay between repulsive electrostatic forces and attractive forces of electrodynamic origin. The repulsive force arises from the screened coulomb interaction between the surface charge distributions on the cylinders and has been treated by developing a solution to the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The boundary condition at the cylinder surfaces is determined as a self-consistent functional of the potential, with the input consisting of the density of ionizable groups and their dissociation constants. It is suggested that a reasonably accurate representation for the form of the attractive force can be obtained by performing a pairwise summation of the individual interatomic forces. A quantitative estimate is obtained using a Hamaker constant chosen on the basis of rigorous calculations on simpler systems. It is found that a balance exists between these repulsive and attractive forces at separations in good agreement with those observed in arrays of tobacco mosaic virus and in the A band myosin lattice in striated muscle. The behavior of the balance point as a function of the pH and ionic strength of the bathing medium closely parallels that seen experimentally. PMID:4696760

  7. Design development of the Apollo command and service module thrust vector attitude control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Development of the Apollo thrust vector control digital autopilot (TVC DAP) was summarized. This is the control system that provided pitch and yaw attitude control during velocity change maneuvers using the main rocket engine on the Apollo service module. A list of ten primary functional requirements for this control system are presented, each being subordinate to a more general requirement appearing earlier on the list. Development process functions were then identified and the essential information flow paths were explored. This provided some visibility into the particular NASA/contractor interface, as well as relationships between the many individual activities.

  8. Synthese et validation d'un systeme de commandes de vol robuste et autosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhachemi, Hugo

    Flight control system development remains a very challenging issue due to architectural complexity, stringent performance requirements, and strict certification processes. Such control systems must ensure the global stability and the required performance within the whole flight envelope, even in the presence of modeling errors, parametric uncertainties, environmental fluctuations, and disturbances. As the dynamic behavior of an aircraft is highly nonlinear and varies significantly with the fight condition, controller parameters must be adequately adjusted based on the operating point. Among the viable solutions for this purpose, one can find gain-scheduling control, which is one of the most well-known techniques widely adopted in aerospace industry. In addition, it is of practical interest from an industrial point of view to leverage the legacy accumulated in the past by imposing a priori the controller structure based on classical ight control system architectures. The present research project aims at developing a procedure for the design and the validation of robust gain-scheduled ight control systems with a fixed structure. This problem is located at the junction of three topics in control, namely synthesis of fixed-structure control systems, robust control, and LPV systems control in the gain-scheduling framework. In the first phase of this research project, a nonlinear dynamic model of an aircraft that explicitly takes into account mass and center of gravity (CG) position is established. This model is linearized around a trim condition in cruise ight. A numerical model of the F-16 Fighting Falcon is then derived and the impact of mass and CG position variations on the aircraft dynamics is analyzed. In the second phase, a method for the design of a robust and self-scheduled controller with a predefined architecture is proposed. Based on the multi-model synthesis capability of structured Hinfinity methods, robustness and gain-scheduling issues are both cast into

  9. HWIL weapon system simulations in the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (USAAMCOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A.; Jolly, Alexander C.; Letson, Kenneth R.; Mobley, Scott B.; Ray, Jerry A.; Sholes, William J.

    2001-08-01

    This paper describes the Advanced Simulation Center (ASC) role, recaps the past 2000-2001 year, describes the hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) components and advancements, and outlines the path-ahead for the ASC in terms of both missile and complete system HWIL simulations and test.

  10. Sensorless Interaction Force Control Based on B-Spline Function for Human-Robot Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsantisuk, Chowarit; Katsura, Seiichiro; Ohishi, Kiyoshi

    In this paper, to provide precise force sensation of human operator, a twin direct-drive motor system with wire rope mechanism has been developed. The human-robot interaction force and the wire rope tension are independently controlled in acceleration dimension by realizing the dual disturbance observer based on modal space design. In the common mode, it is utilized for control of vibration suppression and wire rope tension. In the differential mode, the purity of human external force with compensation of friction force is obtained. This mode is useful for control of the interaction force of human. Furthermore, the human-robot system that has the ability of support of human interaction force is also proposed. The interaction force generation based on B-spline function is applied to automatically adjust the smooth force command corresponding to the adaptive parameters.
    To analyze the human movement stroke, the multi-sensor scheme is applied to fuse both two motor encoders and acceleration sensor signal by using Kalman filter. From the experimental results, the ability to design different level of assistive force makes it well suited to customized training programs due to time and human movement constraints.

  11. IT Security Support for the Spaceport Command Control Systems Development Ground Support Development Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, Drew A.

    2014-01-01

    Security is one of the most if not the most important areas today. After the several attacks on the United States, security everywhere has heightened from airports to the communication among the military branches legionnaires. With advanced persistent threats (APT's) on the rise following Stuxnet, government branches and agencies are required, more than ever, to follow several standards, policies and procedures to reduce the likelihood of a breach. Attack vectors today are very advanced and are going to continue to get more and more advanced as security controls advance. This creates a need for networks and systems to be in an updated and secured state in a launch control system environment. FISMA is a law that is mandated by the government to follow when government agencies secure networks and devices. My role on this project is to ensure network devices and systems are in compliance with NIST, as outlined in FISMA. I will achieve this by providing assistance with security plan documentation and collection, system hardware and software inventory, malicious code and malware scanning, and configuration of network devices i.e. routers and IDS's/IPS's. In addition, I will be completing security assessments on software and hardware, vulnerability assessments and reporting, and conducting patch management and risk assessments. A guideline that will help with compliance with NIST is the SANS Top 20 Critical Controls. SANS Top 20 Critical Controls as well as numerous security tools, security software and the conduction of research will be used to successfully complete the tasks given to me. This will ensure compliance with FISMA and NIST, secure systems and a secured network. By the end of this project, I hope to have carried out the tasks stated above as well as gain an immense knowledge about compliance, security tools, networks and network devices, as well as policies and procedures.

  12. IT Security Support for the Spaceport Command Control Systems Development Ground Support Development Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, Drew

    2013-01-01

    Security is one of the most if not the most important areas today. After the several attacks on the United States, security everywhere was heightened from Airports to the communication among the military branches legionnaires. With advanced persistent threats (APTs) on the rise following Stuxnet, government branches and agencies are required, more than ever, to follow several standards, policies and procedures to reduce the likelihood of a breach. Attack vectors today are very advanced and are going to continue to get more and more advanced as security controls advance. This creates a need for networks and systems to be in an updated and secured state in a launch control system environment. FISMA is a law that is mandated by the government to follow when government agencies secure networks and devices. My role on this project is to ensure network devices and systems are in compliance with NIST, as outlined in FISMA. I will achieve this by providing assistance with security plan documentation and collection, system hardware and software inventory, malicious code and malware scanning and configuration of network devices i.e. routers and IDSsIPSs. In addition I will be completing security assessments on software and hardware, vulnerability assessments and reporting, conducting patch management and risk assessments. A guideline that will help with compliance with NIST is the SANS Top 20 Critical Controls. SANS Top 20 Critical Controls as well as numerous security tools, security software and the conduction of research will be used to successfully complete the tasks given to me. This will ensure compliance with FISMA and NIST, secure systems and a secured network. By the end of this project, I hope to have carried out stated above as well as gain an immense knowledge about compliance, security tools, networks and network devices, policies and procedures.

  13. Model-based system-of-systems engineering for space-based command, control, communication, and information architecture design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindiy, Oleg V.

    This dissertation presents a model-based system-of-systems engineering (SoSE) approach as a design philosophy for architecting in system-of-systems (SoS) problems. SoS refers to a special class of systems in which numerous systems with operational and managerial independence interact to generate new capabilities that satisfy societal needs. Design decisions are more complicated in a SoS setting. A revised Process Model for SoSE is presented to support three phases in SoS architecting: defining the scope of the design problem, abstracting key descriptors and their interrelations in a conceptual model, and implementing computer-based simulations for architectural analyses. The Process Model enables improved decision support considering multiple SoS features and develops computational models capable of highlighting configurations of organizational, policy, financial, operational, and/or technical features. Further, processes for verification and validation of SoS models and simulations are also important due to potential impact on critical decision-making and, thus, are addressed. Two research questions frame the research efforts described in this dissertation. The first concerns how the four key sources of SoS complexity---heterogeneity of systems, connectivity structure, multi-layer interactions, and the evolutionary nature---influence the formulation of SoS models and simulations, trade space, and solution performance and structure evaluation metrics. The second question pertains to the implementation of SoSE architecting processes to inform decision-making for a subset of SoS problems concerning the design of information exchange services in space-based operations domain. These questions motivate and guide the dissertation's contributions. A formal methodology for drawing relationships within a multi-dimensional trade space, forming simulation case studies from applications of candidate architecture solutions to a campaign of notional mission use cases, and

  14. An expert system prototype for aiding in the development of software functional requirements for NASA Goddard's command management system: A case study and lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, Jay

    1986-01-01

    At NASA Goddard, the role of the command management system (CMS) is to transform general requests for spacecraft opeerations into detailed operational plans to be uplinked to the spacecraft. The CMS is part of the NASA Data System which entails the downlink of science and engineering data from NASA near-earth satellites to the user, and the uplink of command and control data to the spacecraft. Presently, it takes one to three years, with meetings once or twice a week, to determine functional requirements for CMS software design. As an alternative approach to the present technique of developing CMS software functional requirements, an expert system prototype was developed to aid in this function. Specifically, the knowledge base was formulated through interactions with domain experts, and was then linked to an existing expert system application generator called 'Knowledge Engineering System (Version 1.3).' Knowledge base development focused on four major steps: (1) develop the problem-oriented attribute hierachy; (2) determine the knowledge management approach; (3) encode the knowledge base; and (4) validate, test, certify, and evaluate the knowledge base and the expert system prototype as a whole. Backcasting was accomplished for validating and testing the expert system prototype. Knowledge refinement, evaluation, and implementation procedures of the expert system prototype were then transacted.

  15. Utilization of the Native American Talking Circle to teach incident command system to tribal community health representatives.

    PubMed

    Granillo, Brenda; Renger, Ralph; Wakelee, Jessica; Burgess, Jefferey L

    2010-12-01

    The public health workforce is diverse and encompasses a wide range of professions. For tribal communities, the Community Health Representative (CHR) is a public health paraprofessional whose role as a community health educator and health advocate has expanded to become an integral part of the health delivery system of most tribes. CHRs possess a unique set of skills and cultural awareness that make them an essential first responder on tribal land. As a result of their distinctive qualities they have the capability of effectively mobilizing communities during times of crisis and can have a significant impact on the communities' response to a local incident. Although public health emergency preparedness training is a priority of federal, state, local and tribal public health agencies, much of the training currently available is not tailored to meet the unique traits of CHRs. Much of the emergency preparedness training is standardized, such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Training Programs, and does not take into account the inherent cultural traditions of some of the intended target audience. This paper reports on the use of the Native American Talking Circle format as a culturally appropriate method to teach the Incident Command System (ICS). The results of the evaluation suggest the talking format circle is well received and can significantly improve the understanding of ICS roles. The limitations of the assessment instrument and the cultural adaptations at producing changes in the understanding of ICS history and concepts are discussed. Possible solutions to these limitations are provided. PMID:20300808

  16. Balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer: Acquisition, tracking and command systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    The NASA Balloon-borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrometer (BUSS) which is carried to an altitude of 40 km by a 15 million cubic foot balloon for night-time observations of ultraviolet stellar spectra is discussed. The BUSS optical system, comprising an 0.40 m aperture Cassegrain telescope and an Ebert-Fastie spectrometer, points at various selected stars and focuses a portion of their spectra on the photocathode of an image dissector tube. The spectral region between 2,775 Angstroms and 2,825 Angstroms is sampled by the detector at 0.25 Angstroms increments using photon counting techniques. The pointing system for the payload uses a pair of orthogonal magnetometers which sense the earth's magnetic field for an aximuth reference, and a platform potentiometer for an elevation reference. This pointing system places the target star within the 3x1 degree field of view of an outer optical star tracker. The outer star tracker is then used to point the entire instrument to within one arc minute of the target star.

  17. The eutrophication commandments.

    PubMed

    Fulweiler, R W; Rabalais, N N; Heiskanen, A S

    2012-10-01

    Typically, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are used to illustrate how humans have impacted the earth. However, we have also dramatically altered the amount of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling through the biosphere. Eventually these nutrients are carried to coastal receiving waters where they cause severe, often negative consequences including increased phytoplankton and macroalgae blooms, loss of submerged aquatic vegetation, low oxygen events, and decreased biodiversity. In many systems mitigation efforts are now underway to return these ecosystems to a less impacted state. While many uncertainties about the best way to manage eutrophic systems remain it is clear that we must take action to lessen our human nutrient footprint. Based on our current understanding of eutrophic systems we present ten eutrophication commandments or guidelines as a tool for scientists, policy makers, managers, and the public. PMID:22889495

  18. Integrated Laser Characterization, Data Acquisition, and Command and Control Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stysley, Paul; Coyle, Barry; Lyness, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Satellite-based laser technology has been developed for topographical measurements of the Earth and of other planets. Lasers for such missions must be highly efficient and stable over long periods in the temperature variations of orbit. In this innovation, LabVIEW is used on an Apple Macintosh to acquire and analyze images of the laser beam as it exits the laser cavity to evaluate the laser s performance over time, and to monitor and control the environmental conditions under which the laser is tested. One computer attached to multiple cameras and instruments running LabVIEW-based software replaces a conglomeration of computers and software packages, saving hours in maintenance and data analysis, and making very longterm tests possible. This all-in-one system was written primarily using LabVIEW for Mac OS X, which allows the combining of data from multiple RS-232, USB, and Ethernet instruments for comprehensive laser analysis and control. The system acquires data from CCDs (charge coupled devices), power meters, thermistors, and oscilloscopes over a controllable period of time. This data is saved to an html file that can be accessed later from a variety of data analysis programs. Also, through the LabVIEW interface, engineers can easily control laser input parameters such as current, pulse width, chiller temperature, and repetition rates. All of these parameters can be adapted and cycled over a period of time.

  19. Free-surface molecular command systems for photoalignment of liquid crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Kei; Nagano, Shusaku; Hara, Mitsuo; Seki, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    The orientation of liquid crystal molecules is very sensitive towards contacting surfaces, and this phenomenon is critical during the fabrication of liquid crystal display panels, as well as optical and memory devices. To date, research has focused on designing and modifying solid surfaces. Here we report an approach to control the orientation of liquid crystals from the free (air) surface side: a skin layer at the free surface was prepared using a non-photoresponsive liquid crystalline polymer film by surface segregation or inkjet printing an azobenzene-containing liquid crystalline block copolymer. Both planar-planar and homoeotropic-planar mode patterns were readily generated. This strategy is applicable to various substrate systems, including inorganic substrates and flexible polymer films. These versatile processes require no modification of the substrate surface and are therefore expected to provide new opportunities for the fabrication of optical and mechanical devices based on liquid crystal alignment. PMID:24534881

  20. Free-surface molecular command systems for photoalignment of liquid crystalline materials

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Kei; Nagano, Shusaku; Hara, Mitsuo; Seki, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    The orientation of liquid crystal molecules is very sensitive towards contacting surfaces, and this phenomenon is critical during the fabrication of liquid crystal display panels, as well as optical and memory devices. To date, research has focused on designing and modifying solid surfaces. Here we report an approach to control the orientation of liquid crystals from the free (air) surface side: a skin layer at the free surface was prepared using a non-photoresponsive liquid crystalline polymer film by surface segregation or inkjet printing an azobenzene-containing liquid crystalline block copolymer. Both planar-planar and homoeotropic-planar mode patterns were readily generated. This strategy is applicable to various substrate systems, including inorganic substrates and flexible polymer films. These versatile processes require no modification of the substrate surface and are therefore expected to provide new opportunities for the fabrication of optical and mechanical devices based on liquid crystal alignment. PMID:24534881

  1. Forced response analysis of hydroelectric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alligné, S.; Silva, P. C. O.; Béguin, A.; Kawkabani, B.; Allenbach, P.; Nicolet, C.; Avellan, F.

    2014-03-01

    At off-design operating points, Francis turbines develop cavitation vortex rope in the draft tube which may interact with the hydraulic system. Risk resonance assessment by means of eigenmodes computation of the system is usually performed. However, the system response to the excitation source induced by the cavitation vortex rope is not predicted in terms of amplitudes and phase. Only eigenmodes shapes with related frequencies and dampings can be predicted. Besides this modal analysis, the risk resonance assessment can be completed by a forced response analysis. This method allows identifying the contribution of each eigenmode into the system response which depends on the system boundary conditions and the excitation source location. In this paper, a forced response analysis of a Francis turbine hydroelectric power plant including hydraulic system, rotating train, electrical system and control devices is performed. First, the general methodology of the forced response analysis is presented and validated with time domain simulations. Then, analysis of electrical, hydraulic and hydroelectric systems are performed and compared to analyse the influence of control structures on pressure fluctuations induced by cavitation vortex rope.

  2. Agricultural Drainage Management Systems Task Force (ADMSTF)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Drainage Management Systems (ADMS) Task Force was initiated during a Charter meeting in the fall of 2002 by dedicated professional employees of Federal, State, and Local Government Agencies and Universities. The Agricultural Drainage Management (ADM) Coalition was established in 200...

  3. Equifinality and its violations in a redundant system: multifinger accurate force production

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Luke; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    We explored a hypothesis that transient perturbations applied to a redundant system result in equifinality in the space of task-related performance variables but not in the space of elemental variables. The subjects pressed with four fingers and produced an accurate constant total force level. The “inverse piano” device was used to lift and lower one of the fingers smoothly. The subjects were instructed “not to intervene voluntarily” with possible force changes. Analysis was performed in spaces of finger forces and finger modes (hypothetical neural commands to fingers) as elemental variables. Lifting a finger led to an increase in its force and a decrease in the forces of the other three fingers; the total force increased. Lowering the finger back led to a drop in the force of the perturbed finger. At the final state, the sum of the variances of finger forces/modes computed across repetitive trials was significantly higher than the variance of the total force/mode. Most variance of the individual finger force/mode changes between the preperturbation and postperturbation states was compatible with constant total force. We conclude that a transient perturbation applied to a redundant system leads to relatively small variance in the task-related performance variable (equifinality), whereas in the space of elemental variables much more variance occurs that does not lead to total force changes. We interpret the results within a general theoretical scheme that incorporates the ideas of hierarchically organized control, control with referent configurations, synergic control, and the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis. PMID:23904497

  4. Dielectrophoretic Force Imaging of Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Garth J.

    2004-03-01

    A new scanning probe microscopic technique is demonstrated, exploiting AC electrokinetic forces for real-time functional imaging of biological interfaces with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) describes the mobility of particles in radio-frequency AC electric fields and is related to the frequency-dependent polarizability. Similar to the forces in optical trapping, DEP interactions are greatest for large field gradients, such as those adjacent to highly curved electrodes. Moderate AC potentials (5 Vpp) are more than sufficient to induce surface forces strong enough for reliable feedback during imaging. Simply changing the AC frequency can change the nature of the DEP force from repulsive to attractive. By scanning the AC frequency, dielectrophoretic spectroscopy using light with a wavelength of ˜ 1/2 km can be performed with spatial resolution of a few nanometers (about 11 to 12 orders of magnitude below the diffraction-limit), representing a new level of achievement in near-field microscopy. Among other things, the facile applicability of DEP imaging in aqueous media is ideally suited for ultrahigh resolution microscopy of biological systems, including supported lipid bilayer membranes, immobilized organelles, and living cells.

  5. Apollo experience report. Guidance and control systems: Orbital rate drive electronics for the Apollo command module and lunar module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. B.; Sollock, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    A brief record of the development and use of the orbital-rate-drive assembly in the Apollo Program is presented. This device was procured as government-furnished equipment and was used on both the lunar module and the command module. Reviews of design, development, procurement, and flight experience are included.

  6. Development of a Testbed for Distributed Satellite Command and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetocha, Paul; Brito, Margarita

    2002-01-01

    At the Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate we are investigating and developing architectures for commanding and controlling a cluster of cooperating satellites through prototype development for the TechSat-21 program. The objective of this paper is to describe a distributed satellite testbed that is currently under development and to summarize near term prototypes being implemented for cluster command and control. To design, develop, and test our architecture we are using eight PowerPC 750 VME-based single board computers, representing eight satellites. Each of these computers is hosting the OSE(TM) real-time operating system from Enea Systems. At the core of our on-board cluster manager is ObjectAgent. ObjectAgent is an agent-based object-oriented framework for flight systems, which is particularly suitable for distributed applications. In order to handle communication with the ground as well as to assist with the cluster management we are using the Spacecraft Command Language (SCL). SCL is also at the centerpiece of our ground control station and handles cluster commanding, telemetry decommutation, state-of-health monitoring, and Fault Detection, Isolation, and Resolution (FDIR). For planning and scheduling activities we are currently using ASPEN from NASA/JPL. This paper will describe each of the above components in detail and then present the prototypes being implemented.

  7. Integrated battlefield-effects research for the National Training Center. Appendix D. Functional requirements for the National Training Center (NTC) Integrated Battlefield Command and Control Simulation (IBCCS) system. Technical report, 13 June 1983-30 December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.; Ickler, J.; McKeown, P.; Metzger, L.; Plock, R.

    1984-12-31

    This document defines the functional requirements for a command and control simulation system which will be used to support the training of brigade and battalion command staffs in an integrated battlefield environment (including conventional, nuclear and chemical warfare) at the National Training Center (NTC), California.

  8. Open-systems architecture of a standardized command interface chip-set for switching and control of a spacecraft power bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, Ian B.; Burke, Gary R.; Lung, Gerald; Whitaker, William D.; Nowicki, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has developed a command interface chip-set that primarily consists of two mixed-signal ASICs'; the Command Interface ASIC (CIA) and Analog Interface ASIC (AIA). The Open-systems architecture employed during the design of this chip-set enables its use as both an intelligent gateway between the system's flight computer and the control, actuation, and activation of the spacecraft's loads, valves, and pyrotechnics respectfully as well as the regulator of the spacecraft power bus. Furthermore, the architecture is highly adaptable and employed fault-tolerant design methods enabling a host of other mission uses including reliable remote data collection. The objective of this design is to both provide a needed flight component that meets the stringent environmental requirements of current deep space missions and to add a new element to a growing library that can be used as a standard building block for future missions to the outer planets.

  9. Air Force geographic information and analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Henney, D.A.; Jansing, D.S.; Durfee, R.C.; Margle, S.M.; Till, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    A microcomputer-based geographic information and analysis system (GIAS) was developed to assist Air Force planners with environmental analysis, natural resources management, and facility and land-use planning. The system processes raster image data, topological data structures, and geometric or vector data similar to that produced by computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) systems, integrating the data where appropriate. Data types included Landsat imagery, scanned images of base maps, digitized point and chain features, topographic elevation data, USGS stream course data, highway networks, railroad networks, and land use/land cover information from USGS interpreted aerial photography. The system is also being developed to provide an integrated display and analysis capability with base maps and facility data bases prepared on CADD systems. 3 refs.

  10. Flight evaluation of stabilization and command augmentation system concepts and cockpit displays during approach and landing of powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.; Hardy, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    A flight research program was conducted to assess the effectiveness of manual control concepts and various cockpit displays in improving altitude (pitch, roll, and yaw) and longitudinal path control during short takeoff aircraft approaches and landings. Satisfactory flying qualities were demonstrared to minimum decision heights of 30 m (100 ft) for selected stabilization and command augmentation systems and flight director combinations. Precise landings at low touchdown sink rates were achieved with a gentle flare maneuver.

  11. Station Commander Praises AMS

    NASA Video Gallery

    When asked what's the most important International Space Station experiment, Commander Chris Hadfield names the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2, a state-of-the-art particle physics detector that coul...

  12. Preliminary design concepts for command and control modeling using Time Warp/hypercube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskowski, S. J.; Nugent, R. O.; Sokol, L. M.

    1985-08-01

    The objective of this task was to develop and evaluate preliminary design concepts for modeling command and control (C2) on the hypercube parallel processing computer architecture using the associated Time Warp operating system. MITRE performed this task in support of the Army Model Improvement Program (AMIP) Management Office (AMMO) systems research and planning efforts required as part of the development of a new family of Army models. Command and control can be thought of as large complex system of facilities, equipment, communications, procedures, and personnel through which command and control of forces and resources is exercised in performing the missions and functions assigned to them. Modeling C2 provides a means of analyzing the process and the effects of alternative doctrine, tactics, and C2 systems. The size and complexity of the command and control decision process make it difficult to model; simulation is one means of making the modeling problem tractable. The objective of this effort was to develop and evaluate design concepts for modeling command and control on the hypercube parallel processing computer architecture using the associated Time Warp operating system. In particular, the evaluation was to be responsive to two basic questions: Can Time Warp on a hypercub e architecture be used in conjunction with object-oriented techniques to significantly speed up the processing time associated with command and control modeling?

  13. How cooperative systems respond to external forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenkeson, Adam

    Cooperative interactions permeate through nature, bringing about emergent behavior and complexity. Using a simple cooperative model, I illustrate the mean field dynamics that occur at the critical point of a second order phase transition in the framework of Langevin equations. Through this formalism I discuss the response, both linear and nonlinear, to external forces. Emphasis is placed on how information is transferred from one individual to another in order to facilitate the collective response of the cooperative network to a localized perturbation. The results are relevant to a wide variety of systems, ranging from nematic liquid crystals, to flocks and swarms, social groups, and neural networks.

  14. Walk-through survey report: HVLV (high velocity low volume) control technology for aircraft bonded wing and radome maintenance at Air Force Logistics Command, McClellan Air Force Base, Sacramento, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hollett, B.A.

    1983-08-01

    A walk through survey was conducted at the Sacramento Air Logistics Center, McClellan Air Force Base, California, on June 13, 1983, to evaluate the use of High Velocity Low Volume (HVLV) technology in the aircraft-maintenance industry. The HVLV system consisted of 65 ceiling drops in the bonded honeycomb shop where grinding and sanding operations created glass fiber and resin dusts. Preemployment and periodic physical examinations were required. Workers were required to wear disposable coveralls, and disposable dust masks were available. Workers walked through decontamination air jet showers before leaving the area to change clothes. Environmental monitoring revealed no significant dust exposures when the HVLV system was in use. Performance of the exhaust system on the eight-inch-diameter nose cone sanding operation was good, but the three-inch-diameter tools were too large and the shrouds too cumbersome for use on many hand-finishing tasks. The author concludes that the HVLV system is partially successful but requires additional shroud design. Further development of small tool shrouds is recommended.

  15. Borisenko Hands Over Command to Fossum

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 28 Commander Andrey Borisenko handed over station command duties to Flight Engineer Mike Fossum. Fossum will command Expedition 29. The traditional Change of Command Ceremony took place ...

  16. A force-feedback control system for micro-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhe; Chen, Peter C. Y.; Ganapathy, Anand; Zhao, Guoyong; Nam, Joohoo; Yang, Guilin; Burdet, Etienne; Teo, Cheeleong; Meng, Qingnian; Lin, Wei

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, we report the development of an explicit force-feedback control system for micro-assembly, focusing on the key issues of force transmission and control. The force-feedback system is incorporated with a compound flexure stage, which is driven by a voice-coil actuator and designed to provide frictionless translation motion along one axis. A force sensor measures the interaction force between the micromanipulator and its environment, while an explicit force controller controls the interaction force to follow a desired force trajectory. The effectiveness of this prototype force-control system has been demonstrated in an experimental application, where parts (with dimensions in microns) were picked up and assembled under explicit force-feedback control.

  17. Terrain commander UGS operational trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steadman, Robert L.

    2004-09-01

    Operational trials of Textron Systems" Terrain Commander unattended ground sensor (UGS) system are described. Terrain Commander is a powerful new concept in surveillance and remote situational awareness. It leverages a diverse suite of sophisticated unattended ground sensors, day/night electro-optics, satellite data communications, and an advanced Windows based graphic user interface. Terrain Commander OASIS (Optical Acoustic SATCOM Integrated Sensor) provides next generation target detection, classification, and tracking through smart sensor fusion of beam-forming acoustic, seismic, passive infrared, and magnetic sensors. With its fully integrated SATCOM system using internet protocols, virtually any site in the world can be monitored from almost any other location. Multiple remote sites such as airfields, landing zones, base perimeters, road junctions, flanks, and border crossings are monitored with ease from a central location. Intruding personnel or vehicles are automatically detected, classified, and imaged. Results from early operational trials in the outback of Australia and in various locations in the US are described. Probability of detection and recognition against a wide variety of targets including personnel, military and civilian vehicles, in-shore watercraft, and low altitude aircraft are discussed. Environments include snow cover, tropical savannah, rainforest, and woodlands. Experience with alternative SATCOM systems during the trials is also touched upon.

  18. Evaluation and review of the safety management system implementation in the Royal Thai Air Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaiwan, Sakkarin

    This study was designed to determine situation and effectiveness of the safety management system currently implemented in the Royal Thai Air Force. Reviewing the ICAO's SMS and the RTAF's SMS was conducted to identify similarities and differences between the two safety management systems. Later, the researcher acquired safety statistics from the RTAF Safety Center to investigate effectiveness of its safety system. The researcher also collected data to identify other factors affecting effectiveness of the safety system during conducting in-depth interviews. Findings and Conclusions: The study shows that the Royal Thai Air Force has never applied the International Civil Aviation Organization's Safety management System to its safety system. However, the RTAF's SMS and the ICAO's SMS have been developed based on the same concepts. These concepts are from Richard H. Woods's book, Aviation safety programs: A management handbook. However, the effectiveness of the Royal Thai Air Force's safety system is in good stance. An accident rate has been decreasing regularly but there are no known factors to describe the increasing rate, according to the participants' opinion. The participants have informed that there are many issues to be resolved to improve the RTAF's safety system. Those issues are cooperation among safety center's staffs, attitude toward safety of the RTAF senior commanders, and safety standards.

  19. The next generation of command post computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Ross D.; Lieb, Aaron J.; Samuel, Jason M.; Burger, Mitchell A.

    2015-05-01

    The future of command post computing demands an innovative new solution to address a variety of challenging operational needs. The Command Post of the Future is the Army's primary command and control decision support system, providing situational awareness and collaborative tools for tactical decision making, planning, and execution management from Corps to Company level. However, as the U.S. Army moves towards a lightweight, fully networked battalion, disconnected operations, thin client architecture and mobile computing become increasingly essential. The Command Post of the Future is not designed to support these challenges in the coming decade. Therefore, research into a hybrid blend of technologies is in progress to address these issues. This research focuses on a new command and control system utilizing the rich collaboration framework afforded by Command Post of the Future coupled with a new user interface consisting of a variety of innovative workspace designs. This new system is called Tactical Applications. This paper details a brief history of command post computing, presents the challenges facing the modern Army, and explores the concepts under consideration for Tactical Applications that meet these challenges in a variety of innovative ways.

  20. Conference room 211, adjacent to commander's quarters, with vault door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Conference room 211, adjacent to commander's quarters, with vault door at right. Projection area at center is equipped with automatic security drapes. Projection room uses a 45 degree mirror to reflect the image onto the frosted glass screen. Door on far left leads to display area senior battle staff viewing bridge, and the commander's quarters - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  1. Study of Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) and Velocity-vector Based Command Augmentation System (V-CAS) on Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Dahai; Goodrich, Ken; Peak, Bob

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of synthetic vision system (SVS) concepts and advanced flight controls on single pilot performance (SPP). Specifically, we evaluated the benefits and interactions of two levels of terrain portrayal, guidance symbology, and control-system response type on SPP in the context of lower-landing minima (LLM) approaches. Performance measures consisted of flight technical error (FTE) and pilot perceived workload. In this study, pilot rating, control type, and guidance symbology were not found to significantly affect FTE or workload. It is likely that transfer from prior experience, limited scope of the evaluation task, specific implementation limitations, and limited sample size were major factors in obtaining these results.

  2. Force protection demining system (FPDS) detection subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachery, Karen N.; Schultz, Gregory M.; Collins, Leslie M.

    2005-06-01

    This study describes the U.S. Army Force Protection Demining System (FPDS); a remotely-operated, multisensor platform developed for reliable detection and neutralization of both anti-tank and anti-personnel landmines. The ongoing development of the prototype multisensor detection subsystem is presented, which integrates an advanced electromagnetic pulsed-induction array and ground penetrating synthetic aperture radar array on a single standoff platform. The FPDS detection subsystem is mounted on a robotic rubber-tracked vehicle and incorporates an accurate and precise navigation/positioning module making it well suited for operation in varied and irregular terrains. Detection sensors are optimally configured to minimize interference without loss in sensitivity or performance. Mine lane test data acquired from the prototype sensors are processed to extract signal- and image-based features for automatic target recognition. Preliminary results using optimal feature and classifier selection indicate the potential of the system to achieve high probabilities of detection while minimizing false alarms. The FPDS detection software system also exploits modern multi-sensor data fusion algorithms to provide real-time detection and discrimination information to the user.

  3. Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-04-01

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS

  4. 32 CFR 700.702 - Responsibility and authority of commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... subordinate commands are fully aware of the importance of strong, dynamic leadership and its relationship to the overall efficiency and readiness of naval forces. Commanders shall exercise positive leadership and actively develop the highest qualities of leadership in persons with positions of authority...

  5. 32 CFR 700.702 - Responsibility and authority of commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subordinate commands are fully aware of the importance of strong, dynamic leadership and its relationship to the overall efficiency and readiness of naval forces. Commanders shall exercise positive leadership and actively develop the highest qualities of leadership in persons with positions of authority...

  6. 32 CFR 700.702 - Responsibility and authority of commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... subordinate commands are fully aware of the importance of strong, dynamic leadership and its relationship to the overall efficiency and readiness of naval forces. Commanders shall exercise positive leadership and actively develop the highest qualities of leadership in persons with positions of authority...

  7. 32 CFR 700.702 - Responsibility and authority of commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... subordinate commands are fully aware of the importance of strong, dynamic leadership and its relationship to the overall efficiency and readiness of naval forces. Commanders shall exercise positive leadership and actively develop the highest qualities of leadership in persons with positions of authority...

  8. Commander's conference room (room 202), closet and hallway to bathroom ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Commander's conference room (room 202), closet and hallway to bathroom and bedroom, leading to conference room 211. Viewing windows look down on the display area. View to north - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  9. Force fluctuations impact kinetics of biomolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Koslover, Elena F; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2012-07-01

    A wide array of biological processes occur at rates that vary significantly with force. Instantaneous molecular forces fluctuate due to thermal noise and active processes, leading to concomitant fluctuations in biomolecular rate constants. We demonstrate that such fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the transition kinetics of force-dependent processes. As an illustrative, biologically relevant example, we model the pausing of eukaryotic RNA polymerase as it transcribes nucleosomal DNA. Incorporating force fluctuations in the model yields qualitatively different predictions for the pausing time scales when compared to behavior under the average force alone. We use our model to illustrate the broad range of behaviors that can arise in biomolecular processes that are susceptible to force fluctuations. The fluctuation time scale, which varies significantly for in vivo biomolecular processes, yields very different results for overall rates and dramatically alters the force regime of relevance to the transition. Our results emphasize the importance of transient high-force behavior for determining kinetics in the fluctuating environment of a living cell. PMID:23005451

  10. Force fluctuations impact kinetics of biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koslover, Elena F.; Spakowitz, Andrew J.

    2012-07-01

    A wide array of biological processes occur at rates that vary significantly with force. Instantaneous molecular forces fluctuate due to thermal noise and active processes, leading to concomitant fluctuations in biomolecular rate constants. We demonstrate that such fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the transition kinetics of force-dependent processes. As an illustrative, biologically relevant example, we model the pausing of eukaryotic RNA polymerase as it transcribes nucleosomal DNA. Incorporating force fluctuations in the model yields qualitatively different predictions for the pausing time scales when compared to behavior under the average force alone. We use our model to illustrate the broad range of behaviors that can arise in biomolecular processes that are susceptible to force fluctuations. The fluctuation time scale, which varies significantly for in vivo biomolecular processes, yields very different results for overall rates and dramatically alters the force regime of relevance to the transition. Our results emphasize the importance of transient high-force behavior for determining kinetics in the fluctuating environment of a living cell.

  11. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Facilities Rule: Operational and economic impacts at U.S. Air Force Air Combat Command (ACC) installations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.C.; Durand, G.P.; Senn, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    The recently promulgated Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Facilities National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), found in 40 CFR 63 Subpart GG, is expected to significantly impact operations at US Air Force (USAF) bases. At the request of the USAF`s Air Combat Command (ACC), Armstrong Laboratory`s Air Quality Branch performed a compliance assessment for all ACC bases in the summer of 1996 to determine more clearly the rule`s impact on operations at these bases. This assessment included first determining the base`s current major source standing for hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), as defined by Title III of the Clean Air Act. In addition, this assessment ascertained the volatile organic compound (VOC) and HAP content levels for both the primers and topcoats currently being used in base aircraft maintenance operations. Finally, the survey determined the type of solvents used in cleaning aerospace parts, as well as the types of control equipment currently in place at each base. The results of the compliance assessment suggest a prohibitive impact on operations at ACC bases, including total potential direct monetary costs of up to $25M. Additional personnel requirements will be incurred as a result of increased monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting. Substitution of low VOC/HAP primers and topcoats and/or redefining maintenance operations to meet touch-up and repair definitions are discussed as possible alternatives, but the results indicate the best solution is to reassess each ACC base`s status as a major source for HAPs, with the intent of having each base defined as a minor source for HAPs. In this manner, the ACC bases can avoid the Aerospace NESHAP compliance requirements altogether, at substantial savings to the US Air Force.

  12. Schema for Spacecraft-Command Dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, Sharon; Garcia, Celina; Maxwell, Scott; Wright, Jesse

    2008-01-01

    An Extensible Markup Language (XML) schema was developed as a means of defining and describing a structure for capturing spacecraft command- definition and tracking information in a single location in a form readable by both engineers and software used to generate software for flight and ground systems. A structure defined within this schema is then used as the basis for creating an XML file that contains command definitions.

  13. Periodic solutions of a forced system with hysteresis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drew, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Hysteresis damping arising in an oscillatory system due to the phenomenon of slip damping analyzed by Goodman and Klumpp (1956) is considered. An idealized physical model is proposed, and the existence of certain periodic motions is investigated in a system with small forcing which are near the largest periodic motion in a corresponding unforced system. Periodic solutions of the forced system are obtained.-

  14. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  15. 32 CFR 724.406 - Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commander, Naval Medical Command. 724.406 Section 724.406 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Medical Command. Custodian of Navy and Marine Corps health records. (See subpart C)....

  16. 32 CFR 724.406 - Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commander, Naval Medical Command. 724.406 Section 724.406 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Medical Command. Custodian of Navy and Marine Corps health records. (See subpart C)....

  17. 32 CFR 724.406 - Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Commander, Naval Medical Command. 724.406 Section 724.406 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Medical Command. Custodian of Navy and Marine Corps health records. (See subpart C)....

  18. 32 CFR 724.406 - Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commander, Naval Medical Command. 724.406 Section 724.406 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Medical Command. Custodian of Navy and Marine Corps health records. (See subpart C)....

  19. 32 CFR 724.406 - Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Commander, Naval Medical Command. 724.406 Section 724.406 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL..., Naval Medical Command. Custodian of Navy and Marine Corps health records. (See subpart C)....

  20. Gravitational Force and the Cardiovascular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, D. R.; Olszowka, A. J.; Rokitka, M. A.; Farhi, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses to changes in gravitational force are considered. Man is ideally suited to his 1-g environment. Although cardiovascular adjustments are required to accommodate to postural changes and exercise, these are fully accomplished for short periods (min). More challenging stresses are those of short-term microgravity (h) and long-term microgravity (days) and of gravitational forces greater than that of Earth. The latter can be simulated in the laboratory and quantitative studies can be conducted.

  1. 70. Commander's launch control console, plexiglass shield down, looking southeast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. Commander's launch control console, plexiglass shield down, looking southeast, filing cabinet in corner - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  2. Dynamics and stability of mechanical systems with follower forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, G.

    1971-01-01

    A monograph on problems of stability of equilibrium of mechanical systems with follower forces is presented. Concepts of stability and criteria of stability are reviewed briefly, together with means of analytical specification of follower forces. Nondissipative systems with two degrees of freedom are discussed, and destabilizing effects due to various types of dissipative forces both in discrete and continuous systems, are treated. The analyses are accompanied by some quantative experiments and observations on demonstrational laboratory models.

  3. Station Change of Command Ceremony

    NASA Video Gallery

    The reins of the International Space Station were passed from Expedition 29 Commander Mike Fossum of NASA to his NASA colleague, newly arrived Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank in a ceremony on t...

  4. Setting-Up Of A Cutting Forces Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turc, Cristian-Gheorghe; Belgiu, George; Banciu, Felicia Veronica

    2015-07-01

    The paper is focused in the field of cutting forces measurement by modern sensors and data acquisition systems. It is presented the measurement chain with its components. Thus, there are presented the piezoelectric sensors that are commonly used in modern cutting forces dynamometers construction, as well as some typical topologies. The measurement system includes a data acquisition system that allows the real time data acquisition during the cutting process. The proposed cutting force measurement system can be used in the measurement of three orthogonal forces in milling processes, as well as the measurement of the torque in drilling processes.

  5. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Sam; Mihalusova, Mariana; Valles, Jim

    2003-01-01

    At Brown University, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means to simulate variable gravity body forces on biological systems. This tool promises new means to probe gravi-sensing and the gravi-response of biological systems. It also has the potential as a technique for screening future systems for space flight experiments.

  6. Spatiotemporal Stochastic Forcing In Ensemble Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, M. N.; Montero, P.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.

    In 1998, the ECMWF introduced in the operational Ensemble Prediction System (EPS) a new scheme to simulate random model errors due to parameterized phys- ical processes (Buizza et al., 1999). This scheme is based on the notion that this randomness is coherent between the different parameterization modules and has a certain coherence on the space and time scales represented by the model. Following this idea, we have perturbed with a spatiotemporal correlated noise of the Ornstein- Uhlenbeck type both, a diffusively coupled one-dimensional array of Lorenz chaotic cells (Lorenzo and Pérez-Muñuzuri, 1999, 2001), and a simplified atmospheric global circulation model, PUMA (Portable University Model of the Atmosphere) (Frisius et al., 1998). In both cases, forcing increases the spread of the ensemble for a certain value of the correlation time where the predictability also attains a critical value. On the other hand, for increasing correlation length ( fixed) the numerical results suggest a nonmonotonous behavior of the ensemble spread. The influence of noise amplitude, as well as the effect of a multiplicative or additive contribution of the noise is also shown. Finally, the impact of model resolution and ensemble size on the performance of the ensemble forecast has been analyzed numerically. newline [1] Buizza, R., Miller, M. and Palmer, T.N. (1999) Stochastic representation of model uncertainties in the ECMWF Ensemble Prediction System. Q.J.R. Meteorol. Soc. 125, 2887-2908. [2] Frisius, T., Lunkeit, F., Fraedrich, K. and James, I.N. (1998) Storm-track orga- nization and variability in a simplified atmospheric global circulation model. Q.J.R. Meteorol. Soc. 124, 1019-1043. [3] Lorenzo, M.N. and Pérez-Muñuzuri, V. (1999) Colored noise-induced chaotic ar- ray synchronization. Phys. Rev. E 60 2779-2787. [4] Lorenzo, M.N. and Pérez-Muñuzuri, V. (2001) Influence of low intensity noise on assemblies of diffusively coupled chaotic cells. Chaos 11, 371-376.

  7. Stable dynamics in forced systems with sufficiently high/low forcing frequency.

    PubMed

    Bartuccelli, M; Gentile, G; Wright, J A

    2016-08-01

    We consider parametrically forced Hamiltonian systems with one-and-a-half degrees of freedom and study the stability of the dynamics when the frequency of the forcing is relatively high or low. We show that, provided the frequency is sufficiently high, Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theorem may be applied even when the forcing amplitude is far away from the perturbation regime. A similar result is obtained for sufficiently low frequency, but in that case we need the amplitude of the forcing to be not too large; however, we are still able to consider amplitudes which are outside of the perturbation regime. In addition, we find numerically that the dynamics may be stable even when the forcing amplitude is very large, well beyond the range of validity of the analytical results, provided the frequency of the forcing is taken correspondingly low. PMID:27586604

  8. Open-systems Architecture of a Standardized Command Interface Chip-set for Switching and Control of a Spacecraft Power Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, B. Ian; Burke, Gary R.; Lung, Gerald; Whitaker, William D.; Nowicki, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the architecture of the The CIA-AlA chip-set is a set of mixed-signal ASICs that provide a flexible high level interface between the spacecraft's command and data handling (C&DH) electronics and lower level functions in other spacecraft subsystems. Due to the open-systems architecture of the chip-set including an embedded micro-controller a variety of applications are possible. The chip-set was developed for the missions to the outer planets. The chips were developed to provide a single solution for both the switching and regulation of a spacecraft power bus. The Open-Systems Architecture allows for other powerful applications.

  9. Smart command recognizer (SCR) - For development, test, and implementation of speech commands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Carol A.; Bunnell, John W.; Krones, Robert R.

    1988-01-01

    The SCR, a rapid prototyping system for the development, testing, and implementation of speech commands in a flight simulator or test aircraft, is described. A single unit performs all functions needed during these three phases of system development, while the use of common software and speech command data structure files greatly reduces the preparation time for successive development phases. As a smart peripheral to a simulation or flight host computer, the SCR interprets the pilot's spoken input and passes command codes to the simulation or flight computer.

  10. Development of cylindrical-type finger force measuring system using force sensors and its characteristics evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeon-Min; Yoon, Joungwon; Shin, Hee-Suk; Kim, Gab-Soon

    2012-02-01

    Some patients cannot use their hands because of the paralysis of their fingers. Their fingers can recover with rehabilitative training, and the extent of rehabilitation can be judged by grasping a cylindrical-object with their fingers. At present, the cylindrical-object used in hospitals is only a plastic cylinder, which cannot measure grasping force of the fingers. Therefore, doctors must judge the extent of rehabilitation by watching patients' fingers as they grasp the plastic cylinder. In this paper, the development of two cylindrical-type finger force measuring systems with four force sensors for left hand and right hand were developed. The developed finger force measuring system can measure the grasping force of patients' each finger (forefinger, middle finger, ring finger and little finger), and the measured results could be used to judge the rehabilitation extent of a finger patient. The grasping force tests of men and women were performed using the developed cylindrical-type finger force measuring systems. The tests confirm that the average finger forces of right hand and left hand for men were about 194 N and 179 N, and for women, 108 N and 95 N.

  11. Force-chain identification in quasi-2D granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Wu, Jun-Qi; Zhang, Jie

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the properties of force-chains is essential in understanding the physical and mechanical properties of granular materials. The key is to identify force-chains. In this study, we describe a systematic method to identify individual force-chains in 2D granular systems under different external load-pure shear or isotropic compression, where bi-disperse photo-elastic particles were used in order to measure vector contact forces between particles. Using this method, we studied the statistics of force-chain size distribution in these two systems: in pure shear, the distribution shows a fat tail that deviates from an exponential distribution function, whereas in isotropic compression, the distribution decays exponentially. In addition, we also investigated the dependence of various force-chain statistics on two main parameters defined in the force-chain identification algorithm.

  12. Data acquisition command interface using VAX/VMS DCL

    SciTech Connect

    Poore, R.V.; Barrus, D.M.; Cort, G.; Goldstone, J.A.; Miller, L.B.; Nelson, R.O.

    1985-01-01

    The user interface to a data acquisition system is being developed at the Los Alamos Weapons Neutron Research Facility using the VAX/VMS command language interface DCL. Commands are being implemented which provide for system initialization and control functions and FASTBUS diagnostics. The data acquisition system incorporates the concept of a data acquisition ''state'' (running, halted, etc.) where a certain subset of input commands is allowed.

  13. Advanced interactive displays for deployable command and control centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrysik, Peter A.; Parada, Francisco E.; Stedman, Terrance A.; Zhang, Jingyuan

    2003-09-01

    Command and control in today's battlefield environment requires efficient and effective control of massive amounts of constantly changing information from a variety of databases and real-time sensors. Using advanced information technology for presentation and interactive control enables more extensive data fusion and correlation to present an accurate picture of the battlespace to commanders and their staffs. The Interactive DataWall being developed by the Advanced Displays and Intelligent Interfaces (ADII) technology team of the Air Force Research Laboratory's Information Directorate (AFRL/IF) is a strong contender for solving the information management problems facing the 21st century military commander. It provides an ultra high-resolution large screen display with multi-modal, wireless interaction. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology has been combined with specialized hardware and software developed in-house to provide a unique capability for multimedia data display and control. The technology once isolated to a laboratory environment has been packaged into deployable systems that have been successfully transitioned to support the warfighter in the field.

  14. Modeling complex force systems, Part 1: The cutting and pad forces in deep drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, B.J. )

    1993-05-01

    An understanding of the forces generated in machining processes is necessary because they are related to such things as wear, vibrations, accuracy, power, process planning, and computer integrated manufacture. Force magnitudes can be determined by a variety of techniques from empirical laws to theoretical analyses of the mechanics of idealized cutting situations. The force situation becomes significantly more difficult to assess when a complex force system exists in which several different force groupings exist simultaneously which cannot be separated and are therefore indeterminate. One such process is deep drilling in which not only cutting forces occur at a cutting edge, but also friction and burnishing forces exist at two separate locations (i.e., the pads). This work describes an approach to (1) model the forces at each location and (2) to determine the constituent and separate forces at each of the locations. This will be done in a two paper series with the first paper describing the former and the second paper describing the latter.

  15. The absolute path command

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  16. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  17. Force reflection with compliance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Two types of systems for force-reflecting control, which enables high force-reflection gain, are presented: position-error-based force reflection and low-pass-filtered force reflection. Both of the systems are combined with shared compliance control. In the position-error-based class, the position error between the commanded and the actual position of a compliantly controlled robot is used to provide force reflection. In the low-pass-filtered force reflection class, the low-pass-filtered output of the compliance control is used to provide force reflection. The increase in force reflection gain can be more than 10-fold as compared to a conventional high-bandwidth pure force reflection system, when high compliance values are used for the compliance control.

  18. A Model-Based System For Force Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Tod S.; Kirby, Robert L.; Muller, Hans E.

    1985-04-01

    Given a set of image-derived vehicle detections and/or recognized military vehicles, SIGINT cues and a priori analysis of terrain, the force structure analysis (FSA) problem is to utilize knowledge of tactical doctrine and spatial deployment information to infer the existence of military forces such as batteries, companies, battalions, regiments, divisions, etc. A model-based system for FSA has been developed. It performs symbolic reasoning about force structures represented as geometric models. The FSA system is a stand-alone module which has also been developed as part of a larger system, the Advanced Digital Radar Image Exploitation System (ADRIES) for automated SAR image exploitation. The models recursively encode the component military units of a force structure, their expected spatial deployment, search priorities for model components, prior match probabilities, and type hierarchies for uncertain recognition. Partial and uncertain matching of models against data is the basic tool for building up hypotheses of the existence of force structures. Hypothesis management includes the functions of matching models against data, predicting the existence and location of unobserved force components, localization of search areas and resolution of conflicts between competing hypotheses. A subjective Bayesian inference calculus is used to accrue certainty of force structure hypotheses and resolve conflicts. Reasoning from uncertain vehicle level data, the system has successfully inferred the correct locations and components of force structures up to the battalion level. Key words: Force structure analysis, SAR, model-based reasoning, hypothesis management, search, matching, conflict resolution, Bayesian inference, uncertainty.

  19. Command and Service Module Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Command and Service Module (CSM) Communications. The communication system's capabilities are defined, including CSM-Earth, CSM-Lunar Module and CSM-Extravehicular crewman communications. An overview is provided for S-band communications, including data transmission and receiving rates, operating frequencies and major system components (pre-modulation processors, unified S-band electronics, S-band power amplifier and S-band antennas). Additionally, data transmission rates, operating frequencies and the capabilities of VHF communications are described. Major VHF components, including transmitters and receivers, and the VHF multiplexer and antennas are also highlighted. Finally, communications during pre-launch, ascent, in-flight and entry are discussed. Overall, the CSM communication system was rated highly by flight controllers and crew. The system was mostly autonomous for both crew and flight controllers and no major issues were encountered during flight.

  20. Time-Localization of Forced Oscillations in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Follum, James D.; Pierre, John W.

    2015-07-26

    In power systems forced oscillations occur, and identification of these oscillations is important for the proper operation of the system. Two of the parameters of interest in analyzing and addressing forced oscillations are the starting and ending points. To obtain estimates of these parameters, this paper proposes a time-localization algorithm based on the geometric analysis of the sample cross-correlation between the measured data and a complex sinusoid at the frequency of the forced oscillation. Results from simulated and measured synchrophasor data demonstrate the algorithm's ability to accurately estimate the starting and ending points of forced oscillations.

  1. Increased productivity in flight with voice commanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Automatic Speech Recognition technology has matured to the point where it can provide a viable means of increasing productivity by naturalizing the man-machine interface. With ever increasing workloads being placed on astronauts, speech recognition may provide an alternative means of system controlling that would reduce the task burden. Voice commanding, allowing hands-free operation, can be especially effective during operations requiring simultaneous system control. A flight experiment is under development to demonstrate the operational effectiveness of voice control by commanding the Space Shuttle's Closed Circuit Television (CCIV) system. This experiment will help direct future applications of voice entry to space operations.

  2. Competing resonances in spatially forced pattern-forming systems.

    PubMed

    Mau, Yair; Haim, Lev; Hagberg, Aric; Meron, Ehud

    2013-09-01

    Spatial periodic forcing can entrain a pattern-forming system in the same way as temporal periodic forcing can entrain an oscillator. The forcing can lock the pattern's wave number to a fraction of the forcing wave number within tonguelike domains in the forcing parameter plane, it can increase the pattern's amplitude, and it can also create patterns below their onset. We derive these results using a multiple-scale analysis of a spatially forced Swift-Hohenberg equation in one spatial dimension. In two spatial dimensions the one-dimensional forcing can induce a symmetry-breaking instability that leads to two-dimensional (2D) patterns, rectangular or oblique. These patterns resonate with the forcing by locking their wave-vector component in the forcing direction to half the forcing wave number. The range of this type of 2:1 resonance overlaps with the 1:1 resonance tongue of stripe patterns. Using a multiple-scale analysis in the overlap region we show that the 2D patterns can destabilize the 1:1 resonant stripes even at exact resonance. This result sheds new light on the use of spatial periodic forcing for controlling patterns. PMID:24125335

  3. Force Measurements in Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzin, Alexander; Shapovalov, George; Prohorov, Nikolay

    1996-01-01

    The description of an infrared telemetry system for measurement of drag forces in Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS) is presented. This system includes a drag force sensor, electronic pack and transmitter placed in the model which is of special construction, and receiver with a microprocessor-based measuring device, placed outside of the test section. Piezosensitive resonators as sensitive elements and non-magnetic steel as the material for the force sensor are used. The main features of the proposed system for load measurements are discussed and the main characteristics are presented.

  4. Gravitational force and the cardiovascular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, D. R.; Olszowka, A. J.; Rokitka, M. A.; Farhi, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Ground-based simulation studies have been conducted to clarify the problems of the cardiovascular adaptation to alterations in gravitational force. Simulated microgravity experiments resulted in increases in cardiac stretch, urine flow, and sodium excretion, which were accompanied by lower plasma renin, aldosterone, and ADH. There appears to be a decrease in plasma volume as well as in sympathetic tone after 2-3 days of 0 Gz. Complete adjustment to 0 Gz is found within 8 h without a decrease in plasma volume, when subjects are allowed to dehydrate mildly.

  5. The Influence of Future Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (C4) on Doctrine and the Operational Commander's Decision-Making Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Michael G.

    1996-01-01

    Future C4 systems will alter the traditional balance between force and information, having a profound influence on doctrine and the operational commander's decision making process. The Joint Staff's future vision of C4 is conceptualized in 'C4I for the Warrior' which envisions a joint C4I architecture providing timely sensor to shoot information direct to the warfighter. C4 system must manage and filter an overwhelming amount of information; deal with interoperability issues; overcome technological limitations; meet emerging security requirements; and protect against 'Information Warfare.' Severe budget constraints necessitate unified control of C4 systems under singular leadership for the common good of all the services. In addition, acquisition policy and procedures must be revamped to allow new technologies to be fielded quickly; and the commercial marketplace will become the preferred starting point for modernization. Flatter command structures are recommended in this environment where information is available instantaneously. New responsibilities for decision making at lower levels are created. Commanders will have to strike a balance between exerting greater control and allowing subordinates enough flexibility to maintain initiative. Clearly, the commander's intent remains the most important tool in striking this balance.

  6. Managing the Risk of Command File Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshkat, Leila; Bryant, Larry W.

    2013-01-01

    Command File Error (CFE), as defined by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Mission Operations Assurance (MOA) is, regardless of the consequence on the spacecraft, either: an error in a command file sent to the spacecraft, an error in the process for developing and delivering a command file to the spacecraft, or the omission of a command file that should have been sent to the spacecraft. The risk consequence of a CFE can be mission ending and thus a concern to space exploration projects during their mission operations. A CFE during space mission operations is often the symptom of some kind of imbalance or inadequacy within the system that comprises the hardware & software used for command generation and the human experts involved in this endeavour. As we move into an era of enhanced collaboration with other NASA centers and commercial partners, these systems become more and more complex and hence it is all the more important to formally model and analyze CFEs in order to manage the risk of CFEs. Here we will provide a summary of the ongoing efforts at JPL in this area and also explain some more recent developments in the area of developing quantitative models for the purpose of managing CFE's.

  7. Converting a commercial electric direct-drive robot to operate from joint torque commands

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, P.F.

    1991-07-01

    Many robot control algorithms for high performance in-contact operations including hybrid force/position, stiffness control and impedance control approaches require the command the joint torques. However, most commercially available robots do not provide joint torque command capabilities. The joint command at the user level is typically position or velocity and at the control developer level is voltage, current, or pulse-width, and the torque generated is a nonlinear function of the command and joint position. To enable the application of high performance in-contact control algorithms to commercially available robots, and thereby facilitate technology transfer from the robot control research community to commercial applications, an methodology has been developed to linearize the torque characteristics of electric motor-amplifier combinations. A four degree of freedom Adept 2 robot, having pulse-width modulation amplifiers and both variable reluctance and brushless DC motors, is converted to operate from joint torque commands to demonstrate the methodology. The commercial robot controller is replaced by a VME-based system incorporating special purpose hardware and firmware programmed from experimental data. The performance improvement is experimentally measured and graphically displayed using three-dimensional plots of torque vs command vs position. The average percentage torque deviation over the command and position ranges is reduced from as much as 76% to below 5% for the direct-drive joints 1, 2 and 4 and is cut by one half in the remaining ball-screw driven joint 3. Further, the torque deviation of the direct-drive joints drops below 2.5% if only the upper 90% of the torque range is considered. 23 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Lessons learned in simulating a command center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Gregory A.; Cantor, Robert M.; Wenzel, Gregory

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents some lessons learned from simulating the operation of a command center in distributed interactive simulations (DIS). We present the design of the Booz Allen Command Center Systems Interface (C2SI) in terms of its functional architecture as well as the technologies used in its implementation. We discuss the design of the distributed component interfaces based on cooperating software agent pairs. We discuss aspects of several issues in simulating command and control systems in the ADS/DIS environment, namely, interoperation of constructive and virtual simulation, situation awareness, communication with adjacent C2 entities, control of subordinate entities and external sensors, terrain/environmental data management, and data collection for after-action reporting.

  9. Wavenumber Locking And Pattern Formation In Spatially Forced Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hagberg, Aric; Meron, Ehud; Manor, Rotem

    2008-01-01

    We study wavenumber locking and pattern formation resulting from weak spatially periodic one-dimensional forcing of two-dimensional systems. We consider systems that support stationary or traveling stripe patterns in the absence of the forcing, and assume that the one-dimensional forcing is aligned with the direction of the stripe patterns. When the forcing wavenumber is about twice as large as the wavenumber of the unforced system we find that the forcing can either select or stabilize a resonant stripe solution at half the forcing wavenumber, or create a new resonant solution. When the wavenumber mismatch is high we find that the wave-vector component of the pattern in the direction of the forcing can stilI lock at half the forcing wavenumber, but a wave-vector component in the orthogonal direction develops to compensate for the total wavenumber. As a result stationary two-dimensional rectangular and oblique patterns form. When the unforced system supports traveling waves resonant rectangular patterns remain stationary but the oblique patterns travel in a direction orthogonal to the traveling-waves.

  10. An implantable micropower command receiver for telemetry battery power switching.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, J D; Leung, A; Ko, W H

    1981-01-01

    Command receivers that control the functioning of additional implanted circuitry can be useful in many medical telemetry applications. The authors have designed and constructed a thick-film hybrid command receiver system that directly interfaces with the second-generation ICP telemetry system. This command receiver controls telemetry on/off state through enabling/disabling the telemetry pulse generator stage. Lithium battery powering of the implant is made practical through use of this command receiver. An automatic power shutdown feature is incorporated to guard against accidental battery drain. The unit uses two commercial CMOS integrated circuits, a transistor, a resistor and an RF coil. PMID:7295932

  11. Critical Casimir forces in a magnetic system: An experimental protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Cardozo, David; Jacquin, Hugo; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.

    2014-11-01

    We numerically test an experimentally realizable method for the extraction of the critical Casimir force based on its thermodynamic definition as the derivative of the excess free energy with respect to system size. Free energy differences are estimated for different system sizes by integrating the order parameter along an isotherm. The method could be developed for experiments on magnetic systems and could give access to the critical Casimir force for any universality class. By choosing an applied field that opposes magnetic ordering at the boundaries, the Casimir force is found to increase by an order of magnitude over zero-field results.

  12. The Air Force Air Program and Information Management System (APIMS): A flexible tool for managing your Title V Operating Permits

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, A.A.; Gordon, S.R.

    1999-07-01

    The Air Force Command Core System (CCS) is an integrated, activity-based risk management system designed to support the information needs of Environment, Safety, and Occupational Health (ESOH) professionals. These professionals are responsible for managing a complex and often dynamic set of requirements, and therefore, have a need for an information system that can readily be customized to meet their specific needs. This dynamic environment also drives the need for flexibility in the system. The Air Program Information Management System (APIMS) is a module within CCS designed to not only manage permit compliance and emission inventories, but also support the monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements related to air quality issues. This paper will describe the underlying foundation of CCS, the information linkages within the database, and then summarize the functionality available within the APIMS module to support the Air Quality Managers' information needs, placing emphasis on the flexibility the system provides to manage Title V Operating Permits.

  13. Early warning signals of tipping points in periodically forced systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Mark S.; Bathiany, Sebastian; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2016-04-01

    The prospect of finding generic early warning signals of an approaching tipping point in a complex system has generated much interest recently. Existing methods are predicated on a separation of timescales between the system studied and its forcing. However, many systems, including several candidate tipping elements in the climate system, are forced periodically at a timescale comparable to their internal dynamics. Here we use alternative early warning signals of tipping points due to local bifurcations in systems subjected to periodic forcing whose timescale is similar to the period of the forcing. These systems are not in, or close to, a fixed point. Instead their steady state is described by a periodic attractor. For these systems, phase lag and amplification of the system response can provide early warning signals, based on a linear dynamics approximation. Furthermore, the Fourier spectrum of the system's time series reveals harmonics of the forcing period in the system response whose amplitude is related to how nonlinear the system's response is becoming with nonlinear effects becoming more prominent closer to a bifurcation. We apply these indicators as well as a return map analysis to a simple conceptual system and satellite observations of Arctic sea ice area, the latter conjectured to have a bifurcation type tipping point. We find no detectable signal of the Arctic sea ice approaching a local bifurcation.

  14. Linear versus nonlinear response of a forced wave turbulence system.

    PubMed

    Cadot, Olivier; Touzé, Cyril; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2010-10-01

    A vibrating plate is set into a chaotic state of wave turbulence by a forcing having periodic and random components. Both components are weighted in order to explore continuously intermediate forcing from the periodic to the random one, but keeping constant its rms value. The transverse velocity of the plate is measured at the application point of the force. It is found that whatever the detail of the forcing is, the velocity spectra exhibit a universal cascade for frequencies larger than the forcing frequency range. In contrast, the velocity spectra strongly depend on the nature of the forcing within the range of forcing frequencies. The coherence function is used to extract the contribution of the velocity fluctuations that display a linear relationship with the forcing. The nonlinear contribution to the velocity fluctuations is found to be almost constant, about 55% of the total velocity fluctuations whatever the nature of the forcing from random to periodic. On the other hand, the nonlinear contribution to the fluctuations of the injected power depends on the nature of the forcing; it is significantly larger for the periodic forcing (60%) and decreases continuously as the randomness is increased, reaching a value of 40% for the pure random forcing. For all the cases of intermediate forcing from random to periodic, a simple model of the velocity response recovers in a fairly good agreement the probability density function of the injected power. The consequence of the existence of a linear-response component is discussed in the context of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem validation in experiments of out-of-equilibrium systems. PMID:21230369

  15. Force Transmission Control in Multilateral System for Teletraining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Seiichiro; Suzuyama, Toshiyuki; Ohishi, Kiyoshi

    Recently, skill preservation of an expert has been a serious problem of the medical or production fields. It is difficult to acquire a human motion including touching motion by the conventional visual-based system. A touching motion is inherently bilateral, since an action is always accompanied by a reaction. A bilateral force feedback control is necessary to acquire the human's skill. This paper proposes a haptic teletraining system by multilateral force feedback control. Since the multilateral control transmits haptic information among three or more remote systems, it is possible to train remote trainee by one skilled trainer simultaneously. In the proposed haptic teletraining system, each local system consists of a master-slave system. Since a touching motion is subject to the “law of action and reaction”, it is possible to decompose the force information into action force and reaction force by using the bilateral control. Thus the skilled motion by a trainer is acquired and saved as a digital database integrated with his haptic information. The proposed system is applied to one-trainer/two-trainee system. As a result, a motion including contact with the environment is transmitted and trained with vivid force feedback. The experimental results show viability of the proposed method.

  16. Urban search and rescue medical teams: FEMA Task Force System.

    PubMed

    Barbera, J A; Lozano, M

    1993-01-01

    Recent national and international disasters involving collapsed structures and trapped casualties (Mexico City; Armenia; Iran; Philippines; Charleston, South Carolina; Loma Prieta, California; and others) have provoked a heightened national concern for the development of an adequate capability to respond quickly and effectively to this type of calamity. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has responded to this need by developing an Urban Search and Rescue (US&R) Response System, a national system of multi-disciplinary task forces for rapid deployment to the site of a collapsed structure incident. Each 56-person task force includes a medical team capable of providing advanced emergency medical care both for task force members and for victims located and reached by the sophisticated search, rescue, and technical components of the task force. This paper reviews the background and development of urban search and rescue, and describes the make-up and function of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Task Force medical teams. PMID:10155479

  17. Anisotropy of force distributions in sheared soft-particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boberski, Jens; Shaebani, M. Reza; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2014-11-01

    In this numerical study, measurements of the contact forces inside a periodic two-dimensional sheared system of soft frictional particles are reported. The distribution \\text{P}(fn) of normalized normal forces fn=Fn/< Fn > exhibits a gradual broadening with the increase of the pure shear deformation γ, leading to a slower decay for large forces. The process, however, slows down and \\text{P}(fn) approaches an invariant shape at high γ. By introducing the joint probability distribution \\text{P}(fn,α) in sheared configurations, it is shown that for a fixed direction α, the force distribution decays faster than exponentially even in a sheared system. The overall broadening can be attributed to the averaging over different directions in the presence of shear-induced stress anisotropy. The distribution of normalized tangential forces almost preserves its shape for arbitrary applied strain.

  18. View of building 11070 showing vents and forced air system ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of building 11070 showing vents and forced air system on east side, looking southwest. - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, China Lake Pilot Plant, Maintenance Shop, C Street, China Lake, Kern County, CA

  19. Pressure transducer system is force-balanced, has digital output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Forced-balanced pressure transducer and associated circuitry controls pressure testing of space equipment systems under actual operating conditions. The transducer and circuitry automatically converts the sensed pressure to digital form.

  20. Maximizing TDRS Command Load Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Aaron J.

    2002-01-01

    The GNC software onboard ISS utilizes TORS command loads, and a simplistic model of TORS orbital motion to generate onboard TORS state vectors. Each TORS command load contains five "invariant" orbital elements which serve as inputs to the onboard propagation algorithm. These elements include semi-major axis, inclination, time of last ascending node crossing, right ascension of ascending node, and mean motion. Running parallel to the onboard software is the TORS Command Builder Tool application, located in the JSC Mission Control Center. The TORS Command Builder Tool is responsible for building the TORS command loads using a ground TORS state vector, mirroring the onboard propagation algorithm, and assessing the fidelity of current TORS command loads onboard ISS. The tool works by extracting a ground state vector at a given time from a current TORS ephemeris, and then calculating the corresponding "onboard" TORS state vector at the same time using the current onboard TORS command load. The tool then performs a comparison between these two vectors and displays the relative differences in the command builder tool GUI. If the RSS position difference between these two vectors exceeds the tolerable lim its, a new command load is built using the ground state vector and uplinked to ISS. A command load's lifetime is therefore defined as the time from when a command load is built to the time the RSS position difference exceeds the tolerable limit. From the outset of TORS command load operations (STS-98), command load lifetime was limited to approximately one week due to the simplicity of both the onboard propagation algorithm, and the algorithm used by the command builder tool to generate the invariant orbital elements. It was soon desired to extend command load lifetime in order to minimize potential risk due to frequent ISS commanding. Initial studies indicated that command load lifetime was most sensitive to changes in mean motion. Finding a suitable value for mean motion

  1. Robot Task Commander with Extensible Programming Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Stephen W (Inventor); Yamokoski, John D. (Inventor); Wightman, Brian J (Inventor); Dinh, Duy Paul (Inventor); Gooding, Dustin R (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system for developing distributed robot application-level software includes a robot having an associated control module which controls motion of the robot in response to a commanded task, and a robot task commander (RTC) in networked communication with the control module over a network transport layer (NTL). The RTC includes a script engine(s) and a GUI, with a processor and a centralized library of library blocks constructed from an interpretive computer programming code and having input and output connections. The GUI provides access to a Visual Programming Language (VPL) environment and a text editor. In executing a method, the VPL is opened, a task for the robot is built from the code library blocks, and data is assigned to input and output connections identifying input and output data for each block. A task sequence(s) is sent to the control module(s) over the NTL to command execution of the task.

  2. Seasonal forcing in a host-macroparasite system.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rachel A; White, Andrew; Sherratt, Jonathan A

    2015-01-21

    Seasonal forcing represents a pervasive source of environmental variability in natural systems. Whilst it is reasonably well understood in interacting populations and host-microparasite systems, it has not been studied in detail for host-macroparasite systems. In this paper we analyse the effect of seasonal forcing in a general host-macroparasite system with explicit inclusion of the parasite larval stage and seasonal forcing applied to the birth rate of the host. We emphasise the importance of the period of the limit cycles in the unforced system on the resulting dynamics in the forced system. In particular, when subject to seasonal forcing host-macroparasite systems are capable of multi-year cycles, multiple solution behaviour, quasi-periodicity and chaos. The host-macroparasite systems show a larger potential for multiple solution behaviour and a wider range of periodic solutions compared to similar interacting population and microparasite systems. By examining the system for parameters that represent red grouse and the macroparasite nematode Trichostrongylus tenuis we highlight how seasonality could be an important factor in explaining the wide range of seemingly uncorrelated cycle periods observed in grouse abundance in England and Scotland. PMID:25445186

  3. Early warning signals of tipping points in periodically forced systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, M. S.; Bathiany, S.; Lenton, T. M.

    2015-11-01

    The prospect of finding generic early warning signals of an approaching tipping point in a complex system has generated much recent interest. Existing methods are predicated on a separation of timescales between the system studied and its forcing. However, many systems, including several candidate tipping elements in the climate system, are forced periodically at a timescale comparable to their internal dynamics. Here we find alternative early warning signals of tipping points due to local bifurcations in systems subjected to periodic forcing whose time scale is similar to the period of the forcing. These systems are not in, or close to, a fixed point. Instead their steady state is described by a periodic attractor. We show that the phase lag and amplification of the system response provide early warning signals, based on a linear dynamics approximation. Furthermore, the power spectrum of the system's time series reveals the generation of harmonics of the forcing period, the size of which are proportional to how nonlinear the system's response is becoming with nonlinear effects becoming more prominent closer to a bifurcation. We apply these indicators to a simple conceptual system and satellite observations of Arctic sea ice area, the latter conjectured to have a bifurcation type tipping point. We find no detectable signal of the Arctic sea ice approaching a local bifurcation.

  4. Natural language interface for command and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A working prototype of a flexible 'natural language' interface for command and control situations is presented. This prototype is analyzed from two standpoints. First is the role of natural language for command and control, its realistic requirements, and how well the role can be filled with current practical technology. Second, technical concepts for implementation are discussed and illustrated by their application in the prototype system. It is also shown how adaptive or 'learning' features can greatly ease the task of encoding language knowledge in the language processor.

  5. In Vivo Wireless Monitoring System of Cardiovascular Force Data.

    PubMed

    Bechsgaard, Tommy; Honge, Jesper Langhoff; Nygaard, Hans; Jensen, Morten Olgaard

    2015-03-01

    Biotelemetry provides the possibility to measure physiological data in awake, free-ranging animals without the effects of anesthesia and repeated surgery. In this project a fully implantable, telemetric system to measure biomechanical force data of the moving structures of the heart along with the ECG of experimental animals was developed. The system is based on a microcontroller with a built in bidirectional radio frequency transceiver, which allows for the implant to both receive and send data wirelessly. ECG was acquired using electrodes placed directly onto the heart, and the forces were collected using a miniature force transducer. The system was tested in a porcine model (60 kg body weight), where the system transmitted ECG and force data at a range of 5 m between the implant and the receiver. The data was displayed and saved to the hard drive of a laptop computer using a custom built software user interface. It was shown feasible to wirelessly measure forces simultaneously with physiological data from the cardiovascular system of living animals. The current system was optimized to measure forces and ECG, and more channels can be added to increase the number of parameters recorded. PMID:26577097

  6. Repulsive force support system feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, R. W.; Abdelsalam, M. K.; Eyssa, Y. M.; Mcintosh, G. E.

    1987-01-01

    A new concept in magnetic levitation and control is introduced for levitation above a plane. A set of five vertical solenoid magnets mounted flush below the plane supports and controls the model in five degrees of freedom. The compact system of levitation coils is contained in a space 2.4 m (96 in) diameter by 1 m (40 in) deep with the top of the levitation system 0.9 m (36 in) below the center line of the suspended model. The levitated model has a permanent magnet core held in position by the five parallel superconductive solenoids symmetrically located in a circle. The control and positioning system continuously corrects for model position in five dimensions using computer current pulses superimposed on the levitation coil base currents. The conceptual designs include: superconductive and Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet model cores and levitation solenoids of either superconductive, cryoresistive, or room temperature windings.

  7. Designing A Robust Command, Communications and Data Acquisition System For Autonomous Sensor Platforms Using The Data Transport Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentic, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Data Transport Network is designed for the delivery of data from scientific instruments located at remote field sites with limited or unreliable communications. Originally deployed at the Sondrestrom Research Facility in Greenland over a decade ago, the system supports the real-time collection and processing of data from large instruments such as incoherent scatter radars and lidars. In recent years, the Data Transport Network has been adapted to small, low-power embedded systems controlling remote instrumentation platforms deployed throughout the Arctic. These projects include multiple buoys from the O-Buoy, IceLander and IceGoat programs, renewable energy monitoring at the Imnavait Creek and Ivotuk field sites in Alaska and remote weather observation stations in Alaska and Greenland. This presentation will discuss the common communications controller developed for these projects. Although varied in their application, each of these systems share a number of common features. Multiple instruments are attached, each of which needs to be power controlled, data sampled and files transmitted offsite. In addition, the power usage of the overall system must be minimized to handle the limited energy available from sources such as solar, wind and fuel cells. The communications links are satellite based. The buoys and weather stations utilize Iridium, necessitating the need to handle the common drop outs and high-latency, low-bandwidth nature of the link. The communications controller is an off-the-shelf, low-power, single board computer running a customized version of the Linux operating system. The Data Transport Network provides a Python-based software framework for writing individual data collection programs and supplies a number of common services for configuration, scheduling, logging, data transmission and resource management. Adding a new instrument involves writing only the necessary code for interfacing to the hardware. Individual programs communicate with the

  8. Applicability of existing C3 (command, control and communications) vulnerability and hardness analyses to sentry system issues. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.C.

    1983-01-13

    This report is a compilation of abstracts resulting from a literature search of reports relevant to Sentry Ballistic missile system C3 vulnerability and hardness. Primary sources consulted were the DOD Nuclear Information Analysis Center (DASIAC) and the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC). Approximately 175 reports were reviewed and abstracted, including several related to computer programs for estimating nuclear effects on electromagnetic propagation. The reports surveyed were ranked in terms of their importance for Sentry C3 VandH issues.

  9. Resonances in periodically forced excitable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dolnik, M. |; Marek, M.; Epstein, I.R.

    1992-04-16

    Using a phase excitation curve, this paper studies single and periodic pulse perturbations in two model excitable systems, a four-variable extended Oregonator and a six-variable model of the chlorite-iodide reaction. 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Positive commandable oiler for satellite bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    On-orbit commandable lubrication of ball bearings accomplished by direct oil application to the moving ball surfaces was studied. Test results for the lubricant applicator portion of the system are presented in conjunction with a design approach for the reservoir and metering components.

  11. Positive commandable oiler for satellite bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study showed that on-orbit commandable lubrication of ball bearings can be accomplished by direct oil application to the moving ball surfaces. Test results for the lubricant applicator portion of the system are presented, in conjunction with a design approach for the reservoir and metering components.

  12. Cost-Effective Telemetry and Command Ground Systems Automation Strategy for the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Joshua S.; Sanders, Antonio L.

    2012-01-01

    Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is an Earth-orbiting, remote-sensing NASA mission slated for launch in 2014.[double dagger] The ground data system (GDS) being developed for SMAP is composed of many heterogeneous subsystems, ranging from those that support planning and sequencing to those used for real-time operations, and even further to those that enable science data exchange. A full end-to-end automation of the GDS may result in cost savings during mission operations, but it would require a significant upfront investment to develop such comprehensive automation. As demonstrated by the Jason-1 and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) missions, a measure of "lights-out" automation for routine, orbital pass ground operations can still reduce mission cost through smaller staffing of operators and limited work hours. The challenge, then, for the SMAP GDS engineering team is to formulate an automated operations strategy--and corresponding system architecture--to minimize operator intervention during operations, while balancing the development cost associated with the scope and complexity of automation. This paper discusses the automated operations approach being developed for the SMAP GDS. The focus is on automating the activities involved in routine passes, which limits the scope to real-time operations. A key subsystem of the SMAP GDS--NASA's AMMOS Mission Data Processing and Control System (AMPCS)--provides a set of capabilities that enable such automation. Also discussed are the lights-out pass automations of the Jason-1 and WISE missions and how they informed the automation strategy for SMAP. The paper aims to provide insights into what is necessary in automating the GDS operations for Earth satellite missions.

  13. Cost-Effective Telemetry and Command Ground Systems Automation Strategy for the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Josh; Sanders, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is an Earth-orbiting, remote-sensing NASA mission slated for launch in 2014. The ground data system (GDS) being developed for SMAP is composed of many heterogeneous subsystems, ranging from those that support planning and sequencing to those used for real-time operations, and even further to those that enable science data exchange. A full end-to-end automation of the GDS may result in cost savings during mission operations, but it would require a significant upfront investment to develop such a comprehensive automation. As demonstrated by the Jason-1 and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) missions, a measure of "lights-out" automation for routine, orbital pass, ground operations can still reduce mission costs through smaller staffing of operators and limiting their working hours. The challenge, then, for the SMAP GDS engineering team, is to formulate an automated operations strategy--and corresponding system architecture -- to minimize operator intervention during routine operations, while balancing the development costs associated with the scope and complexity of automation. This paper discusses the automated operations approach being developed for the SMAP GDS. The focus is on automating the activities involved in routine passes, which limits the scope to real-time operations. A key subsystem of the SMAP GDS -- NASA's AMMOS Mission Data Processing and Control System (AMPCS) -- provides a set of capabilities that enable such automation. Also discussed are the lights-out pass automations of the Jason-1 and WISE missions and how they informed the automation strategy for SMAP. The paper aims to provide insights into what is necessary in automating the GDS operations for Earth satellite missions.

  14. 33 CFR 334.1300 - Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1300 Section 334.1300... gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. A rhomboidal area... Air Command, U.S. Air Force, Anchorage, Alaska, or such agencies as he may designate. (Sec. 7, 40...

  15. 33 CFR 334.1300 - Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1300 Section 334.1300... gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. A rhomboidal area... Air Command, U.S. Air Force, Anchorage, Alaska, or such agencies as he may designate. (Sec. 7, 40...

  16. 33 CFR 334.1300 - Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1300 Section 334.1300... gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. A rhomboidal area... Air Command, U.S. Air Force, Anchorage, Alaska, or such agencies as he may designate. (Sec. 7, 40...

  17. 33 CFR 334.1300 - Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1300 Section 334.1300... gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. A rhomboidal area... Air Command, U.S. Air Force, Anchorage, Alaska, or such agencies as he may designate. (Sec. 7, 40...

  18. 33 CFR 334.1300 - Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1300 Section 334.1300... gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. A rhomboidal area... Air Command, U.S. Air Force, Anchorage, Alaska, or such agencies as he may designate. (Sec. 7, 40...

  19. An investigation into the placement of force delivery systems and the initial forces applied by clinicians during space closure.

    PubMed

    Nattrass, C; Ireland, A J; Sherriff, M

    1997-05-01

    This in vitro investigation was designed to establish not only how clinicians apply forces for space closure when using the straight wire appliance and sliding mechanics, but also to quantify the initial force levels produced. A single typodont, with residual extraction space in each quadrant, was set up to simulate space closure using sliding mechanics. On two occasions, at least 2 months apart, 18 clinicians were asked to apply three force delivery systems to the typodont, in the manner in which they would apply it in a clinical situation. The three types of force delivery system investigated were elastomeric chain, an elastomeric module on a steel ligature, and a nickel-titanium closed coil spring. A choice of spaced or unspaced elastomeric chain produced by a single manufacturer was provided. The amount of stretch which was placed on each type of system was measured and, using an Instron Universal Testing Machine, the initial force which would be generated by each force delivery system was established. Clinicians were assessed to examine their consistency in the amount of stretch which each placed on the force delivery systems, their initial force application and their ability to apply equivalent forces with the different types of force delivery system. The clinicians were found to be consistent in their method of application of the force delivery systems and, therefore, their force application, as individuals, but there was a wide range of forces applied as a group. However, most clinicians applied very different forces when using different force delivery systems. When using the module on a ligature the greatest force was applied, whilst the nickel titanium coil springs provided the least force. PMID:9218110

  20. Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) Force Measurement System (FMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    An Electronics Engineer at the Glenn Research Center (GRC), requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) provide technical support for an evaluation of the existing force measurement system (FMS) at the GRC's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) with the intent of developing conceptual designs to improve the tunnel's force measurement capability in order to better meet test customer needs. This report contains the outcome of the NESC technical review.

  1. 14 CFR 1215.106 - User command and tracking data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false User command and tracking data. 1215.106 Section 1215.106 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA... one of three locations: (1) For Shuttle payloads which utilize the Shuttle commanding system,...

  2. 14 CFR 1215.106 - User command and tracking data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true User command and tracking data. 1215.106 Section 1215.106 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA... one of three locations: (1) For Shuttle payloads which utilize the Shuttle commanding system,...

  3. Optimum control forces for multibody systems with intermittent motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ider, Sitki Kemal; Amirouche, F. M. L.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to address the continuity of motion when a dynamical system is suddenly subjected to constraint conditions. Motion discontinuity due to the initial constraint violation is avoided by prior control forces that adjust the motion and yield velocity and acceleration consistent at the point of application of the constraint. The optimum control forces are determined for a specified control interval. The method proposed provides an optimum adjustment of the system's motion and assures that the stresses developed at the system components are kept within acceptable limits. The procedures developed will be illustrated making use of inequality constraints applied to obstacle avoidance problems in robotics.

  4. Influence of force systems on archwire-bracket combinations.

    PubMed

    Kusy, Robert P

    2005-03-01

    Orthodontic forces and couples are presented for the 3 principal directions and planes by using simplified free-body diagrams, equilibrium principles, and equivalent force systems. These simplified free-body diagrams show only the forces and couples applied by the practitioner to a single tooth or a group of teeth-minus any frictional effects associated with appliances. By using equilibrium principles, these forces and couples are resisted by each root in an equal but opposite manner. When an equivalent force system is produced at the center of resistance, the simplified free-body diagram requires only 1 force and 1 couple at the center of resistance of a tooth or a group of teeth because the reactions are the same but opposite in magnitude. This approach not only is much easier to comprehend but also facilitates the conceptualization of tooth mechanics with regard to centers of rotation. Specific examples of this approach include cases in which a tooth is labially or lingually displaced, intruded or extruded, bodily translated, or bodily rotated, as well as the combined effects of translation and rotation with and without auxiliary appliances or friction. PMID:15775948

  5. Force identification of dynamic systems using virtual work principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xun; Ou, Jinping

    2015-02-01

    One of the key inverse problems for estimating dynamic forces acting on a structure is to determine the force expansion and the corresponding solving method. This paper presents a moving least square (MLS) method for fitting dynamic forces, which improves the existing traditional methods. The simulation results show that the force expansion order has a tiny effect on the types of forces, which indicates the MLS method's excellent ability for local approximation and noise immunity as well as good fitting function. Then, the differential equation of motion for the system is transformed into an integral equation by using the virtual work principle, which can eliminate the structural acceleration response without introducing the calculation error. Besides, the transformation derives an expression of velocity by integrating by parts, which diminishes the error propagation of the velocity. Hence, the integral equation of motion for the system has a strong constraint to noise with zero mean value. Finally, this paper puts forward an optimization method to solve the equation. The numerical stability can be enhanced as the matrix inversion calculation is avoided. Illustrative examples involving different types of forces demonstrate that the transformation of the differential equation proposed through virtual work principle can eliminate interference efficiently and is robust for dynamic calculation.

  6. Mapping the Surface Adsorption Forces of Nanomaterials in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xin R.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Mathur, Sanjay; Song, Xuefeng; Xiao, Lisong; Oldenberg, Steven J.; Fadeel, Bengt; Riviere, Jim E.

    2011-01-01

    The biological surface adsorption index (BSAI) is a novel approach to characterize surface adsorption energy of nanomaterials that is the primary force behind nanoparticle aggregation, protein corona formation, and other complex interactions of nanomaterials within biological systems. Five quantitative nanodescriptors were obtained to represent the surface adsorption forces (hydrophobicity, hydrogen bond, polarity/polarizability, and lone-pair electrons) of the nanomaterial interaction with biological components. We have mapped the surface adsorption forces over 16 different nanomaterials. When the five-dimensional information of the nanodescriptors was reduced to two dimensions, the 16 nanomaterials were classified into distinct clusters according their surface adsorption properties. BSAI nanodescriptors are intrinsic properties of nanomaterials useful for quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) model development. This is the first success in quantitative characterization of the surface adsorption forces of nanomaterials in biological conditions, which could open a quantitative avenue in predictive nanomedicine development, risk assessment, and safety evaluation of nanomaterials. PMID:21999618

  7. Detection of forced oscillations in power systems with multichannel methods

    SciTech Connect

    Follum, James D.

    2015-09-30

    The increasing availability of high fidelity, geographically dispersed measurements in power systems improves the ability of researchers and engineers to study dynamic behaviors in the grid. One such behavior that is garnering increased attention is the presence of forced oscillations. Power system engineers are interested in forced oscillations because they are often symptomatic of the malfunction or misoperation of equipment. Though the resulting oscillation is not always large in amplitude, the root cause may be serious. In this report, multi-channel forced oscillation detection methods are developed. These methods leverage previously developed detection approaches based on the periodogram and spectral-coherence. Making use of geographically distributed channels of data is shown to improved detection performance and shorten the delay before an oscillation can be detected in the online environment. Results from simulated and measured power system data are presented.

  8. Station Commander Sends Holiday Greetings

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 30 Commander Dan Burbank of NASA sends season's greetings to the world and shares his thoughts about being in orbit aboard the space-based laborat...

  9. Quantum mechanical actuation of microelectromechanical systems by the Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Chan, H B; Aksyuk, V A; Kleiman, R N; Bishop, D J; Capasso, F

    2001-03-01

    The Casimir force is the attraction between uncharged metallic surfaces as a result of quantum mechanical vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. We demonstrate the Casimir effect in microelectromechanical systems using a micromachined torsional device. Attraction between a polysilicon plate and a spherical metallic surface results in a torque that rotates the plate about two thin torsional rods. The dependence of the rotation angle on the separation between the surfaces is in agreement with calculations of the Casimir force. Our results show that quantum electrodynamical effects play a significant role in such microelectromechanical systems when the separation between components is in the nanometer range. PMID:11239149

  10. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A FORCE-REFLECTING TELEOPERATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    For certain applications, such as space servicing, undersea operations, and hazardous material handling tasks in nuclear reactors, the environments can be uncertain, complex, and hazardous. Lives may be in danger if humans were to work under these conditions. As a result, a man-machine system--a teleoperator system--has been developed to work in these types of environments. In a typical teleoperator system, the actual system operates at a remote site; the operator located away from this system usually receives visual information from a video image and/or graphical animation on the computer screen. Additional feedback, such as aural and force information, can significantly enhance performance of the system. Force reflection is a type of feedback in which forces experienced by the remote manipulator are fed back to the manual controller. Various control methods have been proposed for implementation on a teleoperator system. In order to examine different control schemes, a one Degree-Of-Freedom (DOF) Force-Reflecting Manual Controller (FRMC) is constructed and integrated into a PC. The system parameters are identified and constructed as a mathematical model. The Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) and fuzzy logic controllers are developed and tested experimentally. Numerical simulation results obtained from the mathematical model are compared with those of experimental data for both types of controllers. In addition, the concept of a telesensation system is introduced. A telesensation system is an advanced teleoperator system that attempts to provide the operator with sensory feedback. In this context, a telesensation system integrates the use of a Virtual Reality (VR) unit, FRMC, and Graphical User Interface (GUI). The VR unit is used to provide the operator with a 3-D visual effect. Various commercial VR units are reviewed and features compared for use in a telesensation system. As for the FRMC, the conceptual design of a 3-DOF FRMC is developed in an effort to

  11. 32 CFR 536.12 - Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.... Army Medical Command. (a) After consulting with the Commander USARCS on the selection of medical claims attorneys, the Commander of the U.S. Army MEDCOM, the European Medical Command, or other regional...

  12. 32 CFR 536.12 - Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.... Army Medical Command. (a) After consulting with the Commander USARCS on the selection of medical claims attorneys, the Commander of the U.S. Army MEDCOM, the European Medical Command, or other regional...

  13. Command Process Modeling & Risk Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshkat, Leila

    2011-01-01

    Commanding Errors may be caused by a variety of root causes. It's important to understand the relative significance of each of these causes for making institutional investment decisions. One of these causes is the lack of standardized processes and procedures for command and control. We mitigate this problem by building periodic tables and models corresponding to key functions within it. These models include simulation analysis and probabilistic risk assessment models.

  14. ARAC: A unique command and control resource

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.M.; Baskett, R.L.; Ellis, J.S.

    1996-04-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a centralized federal facility designed to provide real-time, world-wide support to military and civilian command and control centers by predicting the impacts of inadvertent or intentional releases of nuclear, biological, or chemical materials into the atmosphere. ARAC is a complete response system consisting of highly trained and experienced personnel, continually updated computer models, redundant data collection systems, and centralized and remote computer systems. With over 20 years of experience responding to domestic and international incidents, strong linkages with the Department of Defense, and the ability to conduct classified operations, ARAC is a unique command and control resource.

  15. Potential Role of Atomic Force Microscopy in Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Arce, Fernando Teran; Lal, Ratnesh

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology is a quantitative approach for understanding a biological system at its global level through systematic perturbation and integrated analysis of all its components. Simultaneous acquisition of information datasets pertaining to the system components (e.g., genome, proteome) is essential to implement this approach. There are limitations to such an approach in measuring gene expression levels and accounting for all proteins in the system. The success of genomic studies is critically dependent on PCR for its amplification, but PCR is very uneven in amplifying the samples, ineffective in scarce samples and unreliable in low copy number transcripts. On the other hand, lack of amplifying techniques for proteins critically limits their identification to only a small fraction of high concentration proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), AFM cantilever sensors and AFM force spectroscopy in particular, could address these issues directly. In this article, we reviewed and assessed their potential role in systems biology. PMID:21766465

  16. Scaling properties of force networks for compressed particulate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalcinova, L.; Goullet, A.; Kondic, L.

    2016-04-01

    We consider, computationally and experimentally, the scaling properties of force networks in the systems of circular particles exposed to compression in two spatial dimensions. The simulations consider polydisperse and monodisperse particles, both frictional and frictionless, and in experiments we use monodisperse and bidisperse frictional particles. While for some of the considered systems we observe consistent scaling exponents describing the behavior of the force networks, we find that this behavior is not universal. In particular, we find that frictionless systems, independently of whether they partially crystallize under compression or not, show scaling properties that are significantly different compared to the frictional disordered ones. The findings of nonuniversality are confirmed by explicitly computing fractal dimension for the considered systems. The results of the physical experiments are consistent with the results obtained in simulations of frictional disordered systems.

  17. Potential role of atomic force microscopy in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Teran Arce, Fernando; Lal, Ratnesh

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology is a quantitative approach for understanding a biological system at its global level through systematic perturbation and integrated analysis of all its components. Simultaneous acquisition of information data sets pertaining to the system components (e.g., genome, proteome) is essential to implement this approach. There are limitations to such an approach in measuring gene expression levels and accounting for all proteins in the system. The success of genomic studies is critically dependent on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for its amplification, but PCR is very uneven in amplifying the samples, ineffective in scarce samples and unreliable in low copy number transcripts. On the other hand, lack of amplifying techniques for proteins critically limits their identification to only a small fraction of high concentration proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), AFM cantilever sensors, and AFM force spectroscopy in particular, could address these issues directly. In this article, we reviewed and assessed their potential role in systems biology. PMID:21766465

  18. COMMAND PROCEDURES FOR MANIPULATING TAPE DATA FILES: A SET OF PROCEDURES DEVELOPED FOR USE WITH THE COMNET ALPHA TIME-SHARING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The problem addressed by this report is the lack of simple terminal commands to manipulate tape data files at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Washington Computer Center. This work was performed to enable relatively inexperienced programmers or scientists to maintain la...

  19. Implementation of a medical command and control team in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Reigner, Philippe; Vallotton, Laurent; Clouet, Jean-Gabriel; Danzeisen, Claude; Zürcher, Mathias; Yersin, Bertrand

    2014-04-01

    In case of a major incident or disaster, the advance medical rescue command needs to manage several essential tasks simultaneously. These include the rapid deployment of ambulance, police, fire and evacuation services, and their coordinated activity, as well as triage and emergency medical care on site. The structure of such a medical rescue command is crucial for the successful outcome of medical evacuation at major incidents. However, little data has been published on the nature and structure of the command itself. This study presents a flexible approach to command structure, with two command heads: one emergency physician and one experienced paramedic. This approach is especially suitable for Switzerland, whose federal system allows for different structures in each canton. This article examines the development of these structures and their efficiency, adaptability and limitations with respect to major incident response in the French-speaking part of the country. PMID:24601925

  20. Dynamics of forced system with vibro-impact energy sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendelman, O. V.; Alloni, A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper treats forced response of primary linear oscillator with vibro-impact energy sink. This system exhibits some features of dynamics, which resemble forced systems with other types of nonlinear energy sinks, such as steady-state and strongly modulated responses. However, the differences are crucial: in the system with vibro-impact sink the strongly modulated response consists of randomly distributed periods of resonant and non-resonant motion. This salient feature allows us to identify this type of dynamic behavior as chaotic strongly modulated response (CSMR). It is demonstrated, that the CSMR exists due to special structure of a slow invariant manifold (SIM); the latter is derived in a course of a multiple-scale analysis of the system. In the considered system, this manifold has only one stable and one unstable branch. This feature defines new class of universality for the nonlinear energy sinks. Very different physical system with topologically similar SIM - the oscillator with rotational energy sink - also exhibits CSMRs. In the system with the vibro-impact sink, such responses are observed even for very low level of the external forcing. This feature makes such system viable for possible energy harvesting applications.

  1. Dynamic Force Sensing Using an Optically Trapped Probing System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanan; Cheng, Peng; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the design of an adaptive observer that is implemented to enable real-time dynamic force sensing and parameter estimation in an optically trapped probing system. According to the principle of separation of estimation and control, the design of this observer is independent of that of the feedback controller when operating within the linear range of the optical trap. Dynamic force sensing, probe steering/clamping, and Brownian motion control can, therefore, be developed separately and activated simultaneously. The adaptive observer utilizes the measured motion of the trapped probe and input control effort to recursively estimate the probe-sample interaction force in real time, along with the estimation of the probing system's trapping bandwidth. This capability is very important to achieving accurate dynamic force sensing in a time-varying process, wherein the trapping dynamics is nonstationary due to local variations of the surrounding medium. The adaptive estimator utilizes the Kalman filter algorithm to compute the time-varying gain in real time and minimize the estimation error for force probing. A series of experiments are conducted to validate the design of and assess the performance of the adaptive observer. PMID:24382944

  2. Domain specific software architectures: Command and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Christine; Hatch, William; Ruegsegger, Theodore; Balzer, Bob; Feather, Martin; Goldman, Neil; Wile, Dave

    1992-01-01

    GTE is the Command and Control contractor for the Domain Specific Software Architectures program. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate an architecture-driven, component-based capability for the automated generation of command and control (C2) applications. Such a capability will significantly reduce the cost of C2 applications development and will lead to improved system quality and reliability through the use of proven architectures and components. A major focus of GTE's approach is the automated generation of application components in particular subdomains. Our initial work in this area has concentrated in the message handling subdomain; we have defined and prototyped an approach that can automate one of the most software-intensive parts of C2 systems development. This paper provides an overview of the GTE team's DSSA approach and then presents our work on automated support for message processing.

  3. Comparative Study Between The Alternative Used By The IMP Type Pecussion Drills And The Version Using Fluid Elements Regarding The Supplying, Command And Automatic Adjustment Systems Of The Injection Water Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotetiu, Adriana; Cotetiu, Radu; Ungureanu, Nicolae

    2015-12-01

    Starting from analyzing of an existing solution regarding the injection water feeding system for the pneumatic rotating and percussion drilling installations, which is included in the structure of the perforator installation (IMP-1or IMP-2), the paper presents part of a research regarding an original solution of the automatic command and regulate with monostable fluidic elements, with different physical nature jets. This solution is applicable to this drilling installations type, made in Romania.

  4. A Solar System Survey of Forced Librations in Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornstock, Robert L.; Bills, Bruce G.

    2003-01-01

    Forced librations are periodic rotational rate variations due to gravitational interactions with an orbital partner. We have developed an analytic theory capable of calculating expected amplitudes of forced librations for nonresonant rotators as well as for bodies existing in a spin-orbit resonance. The theory has been applied to 34 solar system bodies, including terrestrial planets, planetary satellites, and the asteroid Eros. Parameters governing libration amplitude are the body s orbital eccentricity, moment difference, and the ratio of its spin rate to its orbital rate. In each case the largest libration amplitude is associated with the forcing frequency 2 (p - 1) n, where n is the orbital mean motion and p is the spin/orbit rate ratio. This dominant frequency is simply semidiurnal as seen from the position of the torquing body. The maximum libration angular amplitude is 1.3 x 10(exp -2) radians for Thebe, and the maximum mean equatorial displacement is 1.4 km for Mimas.

  5. Networked sensors for the future force (NSFF) advanced technology demonstration (ATD) communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemeroff, Jay; DiPierro, Stefano

    2005-05-01

    The U.S. Army"s Future Combat Systems (FCS) and Future Force Warrior (FFW) will rely on the use of unattended, tactical sensors to detect and identify enemy targets in order to avoid enemy fires and enable precise networked fire to survive on the future battlefield with less armor protection. Successful implementation of these critical sensor fields requires the development of a specialized communications network infrastructure needed to disseminate sensor data to provide relevant, timely and accurate situational awareness information to the tactical common operating picture. The sensor network communications must support both static deployed and mobile ground and air robotic sensor arrays with robust, secure, stealthy, and jam resistant links. It is envisioned that tactical sensor networks can be deployed in a two tiered communications architecture that includes a lower sensor sub-layer consisting of acoustic, magnetic, Chemical/Biological and seismic detectors and an upper sub-layer consisting of infrared or visual imaging cameras. The upper sub-layer can be cued by the lower sub-layer and provides a seamless gateway link to higher echelon backbone tactical networks. The NSFF Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) communications effort focuses on providing Future Force systems such as the FCS and the Future Force Warrior with critical situational awareness data needed for survivability. The communications systems supporting this functionality must be designed such that unattended ground sensor data can flow seamlessly from the lowest unattended tactical sensor echelons into the Army"s tactical backbone networks while also allowing the "fusing" of the data with other intelligence information for correlation within a tactical command and control node. NSFF is realizing this capability by using advanced communications technologies developed under the Soldier Level Integrated Communications Environment (SLICE) Soldier Radio Waveform (SRW) project. These technologies

  6. Simulations of the bichromatic force in multilevel systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, L.; Galica, S. E.; Eyler, E. E.

    2016-01-01

    Coherent optical bichromatic forces have been shown to be effective tools for rapidly slowing and cooling simple atomic systems. While previous estimates suggest that these forces may also be effective for rapidly decelerating molecules or complex atoms, a quantitative treatment for multilevel systems has been lacking. We describe detailed numerical modeling of bichromatic forces by direct numerical solution for the time-dependent density matrix in the rotating-wave approximation. We describe both the general phenomenology of an arbitrary few-level system and the specific requirements for slowing and cooling on a many-level transition in calcium monofluoride (CaF), one of the molecules of greatest current experimental interest. We show that it should be possible to decelerate a cryogenic buffer-gas-cooled beam of CaF nearly to rest without a repumping laser and within a longitudinal distance of about 1 cm. We also compare a full 16-level simulation for the CaF B ↔X system with a simplified numerical model and with a semiquantitative estimate based on two-level systems. The simplified model performs nearly as well as the complete version, whereas the two-level model is useful for making order-of-magnitude estimates, but nothing more.

  7. Developing accurate molecular mechanics force fields for conjugated molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Do, Hainam; Troisi, Alessandro

    2015-10-14

    A rapid method to parameterize the intramolecular component of classical force fields for complex conjugated molecules is proposed. The method is based on a procedure of force matching with a reference electronic structure calculation. It is particularly suitable for those applications where molecular dynamics simulations are used to generate structures that are therefore analysed by electronic structure methods, because it is possible to build force fields that are consistent with electronic structure calculations that follow classical simulations. Such applications are commonly encountered in organic electronics, spectroscopy of complex systems and photobiology (e.g. photosynthetic systems). We illustrate the method by parameterizing the force fields of a molecule used in molecular semiconductors (2,2-dicyanovinyl-capped S,N-heteropentacene or DCV-SN5), a polymeric semiconductor (thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-diketopyrrolopyrrole TT-DPP) and a chromophore embedded in a protein environment (15,16-dihydrobiliverdin or DBV) where several hundreds of parameters need to be optimized in parallel. PMID:26349916

  8. 34. Launch Control Center, bottom of drawer of commander's console, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Launch Control Center, bottom of drawer of commander's console, signed by alert crew members on their last alerts. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  9. 40. Upper level, electronic racks, left to rightstatus command message ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Upper level, electronic racks, left to right--status command message processing group, UHF radio, impss rack security, power supply group rack - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  10. 32 CFR 761.9 - Entry Control Commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NAVAL DEFENSIVE SEA AREAS; NAVAL AIRSPACE RESERVATIONS, AREAS UNDER NAVY ADMINISTRATION, AND THE TRUST...) Commander U.S. Naval Forces Caribbean. Authorization for all persons, ships, and aircraft to enter the Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area and the Guantanamo Naval Airspace Reservation. (This...

  11. 32 CFR 761.9 - Entry Control Commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NAVAL DEFENSIVE SEA AREAS; NAVAL AIRSPACE RESERVATIONS, AREAS UNDER NAVY ADMINISTRATION, AND THE TRUST...) Commander U.S. Naval Forces Caribbean. Authorization for all persons, ships, and aircraft to enter the Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area and the Guantanamo Naval Airspace Reservation. (This...

  12. 32 CFR 761.9 - Entry Control Commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NAVAL DEFENSIVE SEA AREAS; NAVAL AIRSPACE RESERVATIONS, AREAS UNDER NAVY ADMINISTRATION, AND THE TRUST...) Commander U.S. Naval Forces Caribbean. Authorization for all persons, ships, and aircraft to enter the Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area and the Guantanamo Naval Airspace Reservation. (This...

  13. 32 CFR 761.9 - Entry Control Commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NAVAL DEFENSIVE SEA AREAS; NAVAL AIRSPACE RESERVATIONS, AREAS UNDER NAVY ADMINISTRATION, AND THE TRUST...) Commander U.S. Naval Forces Caribbean. Authorization for all persons, ships, and aircraft to enter the Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area and the Guantanamo Naval Airspace Reservation. (This...

  14. 32 CFR 761.9 - Entry Control Commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... NAVAL DEFENSIVE SEA AREAS; NAVAL AIRSPACE RESERVATIONS, AREAS UNDER NAVY ADMINISTRATION, AND THE TRUST...) Commander U.S. Naval Forces Caribbean. Authorization for all persons, ships, and aircraft to enter the Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area and the Guantanamo Naval Airspace Reservation. (This...

  15. Ground-Commanded Television Assembly (GCTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A ground-commanded color television assembly (GCTA) was designed for use on lunar explorations associated with NASA manned Apollo missions. The camera system as seen on Apollo 15 provided television coverage in the vicinity of the lunar module (LM) landing site, and was mounted on the lunar roving vehicle (LRV) to provide color coverage of astronaut activity and lunar topography during traverses on the surface. Remote control of the camera from earth was accomplished through the existing real-time Apollo command links. The assembly is illustrated. The configuration satisfied all anticipated requirements of the Apollo 15 mission and was fully responsive to specifications. The technical approach was based on proven designs and offered maximum mission flexibility, potential growth, and capability to withstand environmental extremes encountered on the lunar surface.

  16. Electrostatic forces in the Poisson-Boltzmann systems

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Li; Cai, Qin; Ye, Xiang; Wang, Jun; Luo, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Continuum modeling of electrostatic interactions based upon numerical solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation has been widely used in structural and functional analyses of biomolecules. A limitation of the numerical strategies is that it is conceptually difficult to incorporate these types of models into molecular mechanics simulations, mainly because of the issue in assigning atomic forces. In this theoretical study, we first derived the Maxwell stress tensor for molecular systems obeying the full nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation. We further derived formulations of analytical electrostatic forces given the Maxwell stress tensor and discussed the relations of the formulations with those published in the literature. We showed that the formulations derived from the Maxwell stress tensor require a weaker condition for its validity, applicable to nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann systems with a finite number of singularities such as atomic point charges and the existence of discontinuous dielectric as in the widely used classical piece-wise constant dielectric models. PMID:24028101

  17. Ultrasensitive Force Detection and Applications to Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Thomas

    2001-03-01

    For many years, researchers have developed a variety of micromechanical devices for a range of applications. The majority of these devices are based on micromechanical force transducers to convert external physical signals into electrical signals. The force sensing capabilities of these devices are remarkable - it is possible to design devices with force resolution ranging from milli-N to atto-N within this technology. In addition to the conventional applications for MEMS devices, it is possible to tailor these designs to allow interesting scientific measurements on biological systems. For example, there are active research communities investigating cellular adhesion, protein folding, and animal locomotion. In all of these cases, the basic questions are mechanical in nature, and direct force measurements can provide new insight. This talk will review some ongoing biological research that makes use of MEMS devices, and discuss opportunities for new directions. Collaborators on this research include : Yiching Liang, Robert Rudnitsky, Michael Bartsch, Robert Full, Kellar Autumn, James Nelson, Jim Spudich, and Mark Cutkosky This work is funded by NSF (XYZ on a Chip) and ONR MURI (Biomimetic Robots).

  18. Forced vibration of flexible body systems. A dynamic stiffness method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. S.; Lin, J. C.

    1993-10-01

    Due to the development of high speed machinery, robots, and aerospace structures, the research of flexible body systems undergoing both gross motion and elastic deformation has seen increasing importance. The finite element method and modal analysis are often used in formulating equations of motion for dynamic analysis of the systems which entail time domain, forced vibration analysis. This study develops a new method based on dynamic stiffness to investigate forced vibration of flexible body systems. In contrast to the conventional finite element method, shape functions and stiffness matrices used in this study are derived from equations of motion for continuum beams. Hence, the resulting shape functions are named as dynamic shape functions. By applying the dynamic shape functions, the mass and stiffness matrices of a beam element are derived. The virtual work principle is employed to formulate equations of motion. Not only the coupling of gross motion and elastic deformation, but also the stiffening effect of axial forces is taken into account. Simulation results of a cantilever beam, a rotating beam, and a slider crank mechanism are compared with the literature to verify the proposed method.

  19. 10 commandments of smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Andre Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The search for esthetic treatment has persisted in the routine of dental professionals. Following this trend, dental patients have sought treatment with the primary aim of improving smile esthetics. The aim of this article is to present a protocol to assess patient's smile: The 10 Commandments of smile esthetics. PMID:25279532

  20. Technology For Command, Control, Communications And Intelligence (C3I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, John S.

    1980-02-01

    I am happy to be here this morning with this distinguished technical audience of the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. You have recognized a very important problem area and I think that through this conference or seminar, you will address many technical aspects of the problems associated with Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence (C³I). C³I is a term that is gaining more and more visibility and acceptance in all areas of military operations. In the past, the transfer of technology into military operations has been concentrated on force effectiveness. Our leaders now recognize more fully that force effectiveness depends to a very high degree on the command and control functions which in turn need to know the status of enemy as well as friendly forces. Perhaps the best way to start this discussion of C³I is to arrive at a definition. Unfortunately, I'm sure that if I ask each of you to give me a definition of C³I, I would have just as many definitions as there are people in the audience. The situation is similar to the old story about the three blind men trying to describe an elephant. I would like to paraphrase a few remarks of Julian Lake in a recent editorial in Military Electronics/Countermeasures Magazine. As he points out, C3 is many things to many people. To the intelligence specialist who is so wrapped up in his intelligence community activity, C³I is simply an extension of the modern applications of intelligence. In fact, the intelligence officer feels that he is the actual center of the C³I structure. On the other hand, the communications specialist thinks that communications is the actual heartbeat of C³I activity, and this is right to a point because communications is a fundamental building block of the C3 function. The computer specialist will point out that C³I is merely a product of the computer age. One reason there was very little done about C³I in the past was the nonavailability of computer techniques and

  1. Mortality following Traumatic Brain Injury among Individuals Unable to Follow Commands at the Time of Rehabilitation Admission: A National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Brian D; Hammond, Flora M; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia; Nakase-Richardson, Risa; Howe, Laura L S; Kreider, Scott

    2015-12-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been associated with increased mortality. This study characterizes long-term mortality, life expectancy, causes of death, and risk factors for death among patients admitted within the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) TBI Model Systems Programs (TBIMS) who lack command following at the time of admission for inpatient TBI rehabilitation. Of the 8084 persons enrolled from 1988 and 2009, 387 from 20 centers met study criteria. Individuals with moderate to severe TBI who received inpatient rehabilitation were 2.2 times more likely to die than individuals in the U.S. general population of similar age, gender, and race, with an average life expectancy (LE) reduction of 6.6 years. The subset of individuals who were unable to follow commands on admission to rehabilitation was 6.9 times more likely to die, with an average LE reduction of 12.2 years. Relative to the U.S. general population matched for age, gender, and race/ethnicity, these non-command following individuals were more than four times more likely to die of circulatory conditions, 44 times more likely to die of pneumonia, and 38 times more likely to die of aspiration pneumonia. The subset of individuals with TBI who are unable to follow commands upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation are at a significantly increased risk of death when compared with the U.S. general population and compared with all individuals with moderate to severe TBI receiving inpatient rehabilitation. Respiratory causes of death predominate, compared with the general population. PMID:25518731

  2. Dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Wang, Z.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the research performed on maglev vehicle dynamic stability at Argonne National Laboratory during the past few years. It also documents both measured and calculated magnetic-force data. Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all maglev systems. This report presents dynamic stability experiments on maglev systems and compares the results with predictions calculated by a nonlinear-dynamics computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic-suspension system type vehicle model were obtained by experimental observation and computer simulation of a five-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle moving on a guideway that consists of a pair of L-shaped aluminum conductors attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  3. Power system restoration - The second task force report

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M.; Borkoski, J.N.; Kafka, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    In its second report, the Power System Restoration Task Force (PSR-TF) (1) reviews the 1979-83 North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) Reports on Major Bulk Power System Disturbances (2), identifying restoration problems which have been encountered during that 5-year period. Generally, these problems fall into three phases of restoration activities: planning for restart, reintegration and restoration of the bulk power supply; control actions during system degradation for saving and retaining critical sources of power; and restoration after a major disturbance when the power system has stabilized. The report also briefly discusses the applicability of several existing programs to the system restoration process. The opinions and conclusions expressed in this paper are those of the authors; they are bases on the referenced reports and have not been reviewed with NERC or the reporting utilities.

  4. Power system restoration - The second task force report

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M.; Borkoski, J.N.; Kafka, R.J.

    1987-11-01

    In its second report, the Power System Restoration Task Force (PSR-TF) (1) reviews the 1979-83 North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) Reports on Major Bulk Power System Disturbances (2), identifying restoration problems which have been encountered during that 5-year period. Generally, these problems fall into three phases of restoration activities: planning for restart, reintegration and restoration of the bulk power supply; control actions during system degradation for saving and retaining critical sources of power; and restoration after a major disturbance when the power system has stabilized. The report also briefly discusses the applicability of several existing programs to the system restoration process. The opinions and conclusions expressed in this paper are those of the authors; they are based on the referenced reports and have not been reviewed with NERC or the reporting utilities.

  5. The Canadian Forces ILDS: a militarily fielded multisensor vehicle-mounted teleoperated landmine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Russell, Kevin L.; Chesney, Robert H.; Faust, Anthony A.; Das, Yogadhish

    2006-05-01

    The Improved Landmine Detection System (ILDS) is intended to meet Canadian military mine clearance requirements in rear area combat situations and peacekeeping on roads and tracks. The system consists of two teleoperated vehicles and a command vehicle. The teleoperated protection vehicle precedes, clearing antipersonnel mines and magnetic and tilt rod-fuzed antitank mines. It consists of an armoured personnel carrier with a forward looking infrared imager, a finger plow or roller and a magnetic signature duplicator. The teleoperated detection vehicle follows to detect antitank mines. The purpose-built vehicle carries forward looking infrared and visible imagers, a 3 m wide, down-looking sensitive electromagnetic induction detector array and a 3 m wide down-looking ground probing radar, which scan the ground in front of the vehicle. Sensor information is combined using navigation sensors and custom navigation, registration, spatial correspondence and data fusion algorithms. Suspicious targets are then confirmed by a thermal neutron activation detector. The prototype, designed and built by Defence R&D Canada, was completed in October 1997. General Dynamics Canada delivered four production units, based on the prototype concept and technologies, to the Canadian Forces (CF) in 2002. ILDS was deployed in Afghanistan in 2003, making the system the first militarily fielded, teleoperated, multi-sensor vehicle-mounted mine detector and the first with a fielded confirmation sensor. Performance of the prototype in Canadian and independent US trials is summarized and recent results from the production version of the confirmation sensor are discussed. CF operations with ILDS in Afghanistan are described.

  6. Radiation forces on small particles in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Lamy, P. L.; Soter, S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar radiation forces on small particles in the solar system are examined, and the resulting orbital evolution of interplanetary and circumplanetary dust is considered. An expression is derived for the effects of radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag on small, spherical particles using the energy and momentum transformation laws of special relativity, and numerical examples are presented to illustrate that radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag are only important for particles within a narrow size range. The orbital consequences of these radiation forces are considered both for heliocentric and planetocentric orbiting particles, and the coupling between particle sizes and dynamics is discussed. A qualitative derivation is presented for the differential Doppler effect, which is due to the differential Doppler shifting of radiation from approaching and receding solar hemispheres, and the Yarkovsky effect, which is important for rotating meter-to kilometer-sized particles, is briefly described.

  7. United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Steven D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2000-01-01

    The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), as part of the Air Force Material Command, requested that NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) conduct testing and analyses in support of the United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Development Project. The purpose of the wipe solvent project is to develop an alternative to be used by Air Force flight line and maintenance personnel for the wipe cleaning of oxygen equipment. This report provides material compatibility, liquid oxygen (LOX) mechanical impact, autogenous ignition temperature (AIT), and gauge cleaning test data for some of the currently available solvents that may be used to replace CFC-113 and methyl chloroform. It provides data from previous WSTF test programs sponsored by the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Kennedy Space Center, and other NASA programs for the purpose of assisting WP AFB in identifying the best alternative solvents for validation testing.

  8. Combined alternating gradient force magnetometer and susceptometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, M.; Mendizábal Vázquez, I. de; Aroca, C.

    2015-01-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new system that combines the performances of two different types of magnetic characterization systems, Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometers (AGFM) and susceptometers. The flexibility of our system is demonstrated by its capability to be used as any of them, AGFM or susceptometer, without any modification in the experimental set-up because of the electronics we have developed. Our system has a limit of sensitivity lower than 5 × 10{sup −7} emu. Moreover, its main advantage is demonstrated by the possibility of measuring small quantities of materials under DC or AC magnetic fields that cannot properly be measured with a commercial vibrating sample magnetometers or AGFM.

  9. Combined alternating gradient force magnetometer and susceptometer system.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M; Ranchal, R; de Mendizábal Vázquez, I; Cobos, P; Aroca, C

    2015-01-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new system that combines the performances of two different types of magnetic characterization systems, Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometers (AGFM) and susceptometers. The flexibility of our system is demonstrated by its capability to be used as any of them, AGFM or susceptometer, without any modification in the experimental set-up because of the electronics we have developed. Our system has a limit of sensitivity lower than 5 × 10(-7) emu. Moreover, its main advantage is demonstrated by the possibility of measuring small quantities of materials under DC or AC magnetic fields that cannot properly be measured with a commercial vibrating sample magnetometers or AGFM. PMID:25638125

  10. Force control compensation method with variable load stiffness and damping of the hydraulic drive unit force control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Ba, Kaixian; Yu, Bin; Cao, Yuan; Zhu, Qixin; Zhao, Hualong

    2016-05-01

    Each joint of hydraulic drive quadruped robot is driven by the hydraulic drive unit (HDU), and the contacting between the robot foot end and the ground is complex and variable, which increases the difficulty of force control inevitably. In the recent years, although many scholars researched some control methods such as disturbance rejection control, parameter self-adaptive control, impedance control and so on, to improve the force control performance of HDU, the robustness of the force control still needs improving. Therefore, how to simulate the complex and variable load characteristics of the environment structure and how to ensure HDU having excellent force control performance with the complex and variable load characteristics are key issues to be solved in this paper. The force control system mathematic model of HDU is established by the mechanism modeling method, and the theoretical models of a novel force control compensation method and a load characteristics simulation method under different environment structures are derived, considering the dynamic characteristics of the load stiffness and the load damping under different environment structures. Then, simulation effects of the variable load stiffness and load damping under the step and sinusoidal load force are analyzed experimentally on the HDU force control performance test platform, which provides the foundation for the force control compensation experiment research. In addition, the optimized PID control parameters are designed to make the HDU have better force control performance with suitable load stiffness and load damping, under which the force control compensation method is introduced, and the robustness of the force control system with several constant load characteristics and the variable load characteristics respectively are comparatively analyzed by experiment. The research results indicate that if the load characteristics are known, the force control compensation method presented in this

  11. Force control compensation method with variable load stiffness and damping of the hydraulic drive unit force control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Ba, Kaixian; Yu, Bin; Cao, Yuan; Zhu, Qixin; Zhao, Hualong

    2016-04-01

    Each joint of hydraulic drive quadruped robot is driven by the hydraulic drive unit (HDU), and the contacting between the robot foot end and the ground is complex and variable, which increases the difficulty of force control inevitably. In the recent years, although many scholars researched some control methods such as disturbance rejection control, parameter self-adaptive control, impedance control and so on, to improve the force control performance of HDU, the robustness of the force control still needs improving. Therefore, how to simulate the complex and variable load characteristics of the environment structure and how to ensure HDU having excellent force control performance with the complex and variable load characteristics are key issues to be solved in this paper. The force control system mathematic model of HDU is established by the mechanism modeling method, and the theoretical models of a novel force control compensation method and a load characteristics simulation method under different environment structures are derived, considering the dynamic characteristics of the load stiffness and the load damping under different environment structures. Then, simulation effects of the variable load stiffness and load damping under the step and sinusoidal load force are analyzed experimentally on the HDU force control performance test platform, which provides the foundation for the force control compensation experiment research. In addition, the optimized PID control parameters are designed to make the HDU have better force control performance with suitable load stiffness and load damping, under which the force control compensation method is introduced, and the robustness of the force control system with several constant load characteristics and the variable load characteristics respectively are comparatively analyzed by experiment. The research results indicate that if the load characteristics are known, the force control compensation method presented in this

  12. Collins named First Woman Shuttle Commander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Just a few hours after NASA revealed that there is water ice on the Moon, U.S. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton introduced Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Eileen Collins to a packed auditorium at Dunbar Senior High School in Washington, D.C., as the first woman who will command a NASA space shuttle mission. With students at this school, which is noted for its pre-engineering program, cheering, Clinton said that Collins' selection “is one big step forward for women and one giant step for humanity.” Clinton added, “It doesn't matter if you are a boy or a girl, you can be an astronaut or a pilot, if you get a first-rate education in math and science.”

  13. Force wave transmission through the human locomotor system.

    PubMed

    Voloshin, A; Wosk, J; Brull, M

    1981-02-01

    A method to measure the capability of the human shock absorber system to attenuate input dynamic loading during the gait is presented. The experiments were carried out with two groups: healthy subjects and subjects with various pathological conditions. The results of the experiments show a considerable difference in the capability of each group's shock absorbers to attenuate force transmitted through the locomotor system. Comparison shows that healthy subjects definitely possess a more efficient shock-absorbing capacity than do those subjects with joint disorders. Presented results show that degenerative changes in joints reduce their shock absorbing capacity, which leads to overloading of the next shock absorber in the locomotor system. So, the development of osteoarthritis may be expected to result from overloading of a shock absorber's functional capacity. PMID:7253613

  14. An Electromotive Force Measurement System for Alloy Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Changhu Xing; Colby Jensen; Heng Ban; Robert Mariani; J. Rory Kennedy

    2010-11-01

    The development of advanced nuclear fuels requires a better understanding of the transmutation and micro-structural evolution of the materials. Alloy fuels have the advantage of high thermal conductivity and improved characteristics in fuel-cladding chemical reaction. However, information on thermodynamic and thermophysical properties is limited. The objective of this project is to design and build an experimental system to measure the thermodynamic properties of solid materials from which the understanding of their phase change can be determined. The apparatus was used to measure the electromotive force (EMF) of several materials in order to calibrate and test the system. The EMF of chromel was measured from 100°C to 800°C and compared with theoretical values. Additionally, the EMF measurement of Ni-Fe alloy was performed and compared with the Ni-Fe phase diagram. The prototype system is to be modified eventually and used in a radioactive hot-cell in the future.

  15. Energy transfer in systems with random forcing and nonlinear dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignol, Ricardo Jorge

    The purpose of this thesis is to study energy transfer in nonlinear systems. In the first part, I focus on a model of two nonlinearly coupled (complex) oscillators subject to stochastic forcing and nonlinear dissipation. This model arises from isolating an individual resonant quartet in a general dispersive system, and reducing it further by exploiting some of the system's symmetries. It turns out that the reduced model exhibits a rich and complex behavior encountered in far larger systems, with two qualitatively distinct regimes arising as one varies the system's single non-dimensional parameter: one that can be characterized as a perturbation of thermal equilibrium, and another highly constrained state, with phase and amplitude locking , and singular invariant measures. The relative simplicity of the reduced model allows a thorough numerical and theoretical treatment (including a closed expression for the system's invariant measures) that furnishes valuable insight on the energy transfer process in systems with much higher dimensionality. In the second part, the damped oscillator is replaced by an individual mode of the inviscid Burgers equation. Here, the dissipation occurs through shocks. Despite the complexity resulting from the inclusion of a nonlinear partial differential equation, I show that much of this system's behavior can be inferred precisely from a reduction to one of the cases studied in the first part.

  16. British Airways' pre-command training program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdstock, L. F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Classroom, flight simulator, and in-flight sessions of an airline pilot training program are briefly described. Factors discussed include initial command potential assessment, precommand airline management studies course, precommand course, and command course.

  17. Expedition 33/34 Change of Command

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams ceremonially handed over command of the International Space Station on Saturday to fellow NASA astronaut Kevin Ford on the eve of her departure from the comple...

  18. A Solar System Survey of Forced Librations in Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, R. L.; Bills, B. G.

    2003-01-01

    Physical librations in longitude are forced periodic variations of a body's rotation rate. If the torque producing the librations can be calculated, then observations of the phase and amplitude of librations can provide information on mass distribution, and effective strength of the body. In the near future prospects for observing physical librations look quite promising. Radio interferometric observations of Venus and Mercury may yield sufficiently accurate rotational observations that librations there may be visible. Range measurements from Earth to networks of landed instrument packages on Mars are likely to yield librational data there as well. We compute expected libration amplitudes from physical and orbital parameters of a set of planets and satellites partially motivated by a desire to identify candidates for future observations. Solar system bodies occupy one of three general rotation states: non-resonant states, resonant states, and the synchronous resonant state. Analytical treatments of forced librations were initially motivated by the Moon. Lunar librations were predicted by Newton, first detected telescopically by Bessel, and definitively resolved through lunar laser ranging which has led to quite thorough analysis of of librations for the synchronous case. The synchronous resonant state is commonly observed among satellites. The only known body to exist in a non-synchronous resonance is Mercury which exists in a 3:2 resonance, completing three rotations for every two revolutions about the sun. The analysis of Goldreich and Peale has lead to improved understanding of the general case of half integer resonance states. The dynamics of forced librations in non-resonant rotators has received less attention. While there are few cases in which non-resonant forced librations have been observed, Earth is an important exception, and current observing techniques may have the capacity to detect them on Venus. A comprehensive observing program spanning a range of

  19. Unmanned ground vehicles for integrated force protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Daniel M.; Mikell, Kenneth; Denewiler, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    The combination of Command and Control (C2) systems with Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) provides Integrated Force Protection from the Robotic Operation Command Center. Autonomous UGVs are directed as Force Projection units. UGV payloads and fixed sensors provide situational awareness while unattended munitions provide a less-than-lethal response capability. Remote resources serve as automated interfaces to legacy physical devices such as manned response vehicles, barrier gates, fence openings, garage doors, and remote power on/off capability for unmanned systems. The Robotic Operations Command Center executes the Multiple Resource Host Architecture (MRHA) to simultaneously control heterogeneous unmanned systems. The MRHA graphically displays video, map, and status for each resource using wireless digital communications for integrated data, video, and audio. Events are prioritized and the user is prompted with audio alerts and text instructions for alarms and warnings. A control hierarchy of missions and duty rosters support autonomous operations. This paper provides an overview of the key technology enablers for Integrated Force Protection with details on a force-on-force scenario to test and demonstrate concept of operations using Unmanned Ground Vehicles. Special attention is given to development and applications for the Remote Detection Challenge and Response (REDCAR) initiative for Integrated Base Defense.

  20. Force reflecting hand controller for manipulator teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryfogle, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    A force reflecting hand controller based upon a six degree of freedom fully parallel mechanism, often termed a Stewart Platform, has been designed, constructed, and tested as an integrated system with a slave robot manipulator test bed. A force reflecting hand controller comprises a kinesthetic device capable of transmitting position and orientation commands to a slave robot manipulator while simultaneously representing the environmental interaction forces of the slave manipulator back to the operator through actuators driving the hand controller mechanism. The Stewart Platform was chosen as a novel approach to improve force reflecting teleoperation because of its inherently high ratio of load generation capability to system mass content and the correspondingly high dynamic bandwidth. An additional novelty of the program was to implement closed loop force and torque control about the hand controller mechanism by equipping the handgrip with a six degree of freedom force and torque measuring cell. The mechanical, electrical, computer, and control systems are discussed and system tests are presented.

  1. Force reflecting hand controller for manipulator teleoperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryfogle, Mark D.

    1991-12-01

    A force reflecting hand controller based upon a six degree of freedom fully parallel mechanism, often termed a Stewart Platform, has been designed, constructed, and tested as an integrated system with a slave robot manipulator test bed. A force reflecting hand controller comprises a kinesthetic device capable of transmitting position and orientation commands to a slave robot manipulator while simultaneously representing the environmental interaction forces of the slave manipulator back to the operator through actuators driving the hand controller mechanism. The Stewart Platform was chosen as a novel approach to improve force reflecting teleoperation because of its inherently high ratio of load generation capability to system mass content and the correspondingly high dynamic bandwidth. An additional novelty of the program was to implement closed loop force and torque control about the hand controller mechanism by equipping the handgrip with a six degree of freedom force and torque measuring cell. The mechanical, electrical, computer, and control systems are discussed and system tests are presented.

  2. Refining the Instructional Systems Concept: Some Experiences from Military Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renckly, Thomas

    1980-01-01

    The systems approach to instruction is studied through an analysis of the use of this approach by the U.S. Air Force's Air Training Command. An explanation of the USAF Instructional Systems Development (ISD) model is given. (RAO)

  3. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. The term...

  4. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. The term...

  5. Effects of a Velocity-Vector Based Command Augmentation System and Synthetic Vision System Terrain Portrayal and Guidance Symbology Concepts on Single-Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Dahai; Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Peak, Bob

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of synthetic vision system (SVS) concepts and advanced flight controls on the performance of pilots flying a light, single-engine general aviation airplane. We evaluated the effects and interactions of two levels of terrain portrayal, guidance symbology, and flight control response type on pilot performance during the conduct of a relatively complex instrument approach procedure. The terrain and guidance presentations were evaluated as elements of an integrated primary flight display system. The approach procedure used in the study included a steeply descending, curved segment as might be encountered in emerging, required navigation performance (RNP) based procedures. Pilot performance measures consisted of flight technical performance, perceived workload, perceived situational awareness and subjective preference. The results revealed that an elevation based generic terrain portrayal significantly improved perceived situation awareness without adversely affecting flight technical performance or workload. Other factors (pilot instrument rating, control response type, and guidance symbology) were not found to significantly affect the performance measures.

  6. Register Closing Effects on Forced Air Heating System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.

    2003-11-01

    Closing registers in forced air heating systems and leaving some rooms in a house unconditioned has been suggested as a method of quickly saving energy for California consumers. This study combined laboratory measurements of the changes in duct leakage as registers are closed together with modeling techniques to estimate the changes in energy use attributed to closing registers. The results of this study showed that register closing led to increased energy use for a typical California house over a wide combination of climate, duct leakage and number of closed registers. The reduction in building thermal loads due to conditioning only a part of the house was offset by increased duct system losses; mostly due to increased duct leakage. Therefore, the register closing technique is not recommended as a viable energy saving strategy for California houses with ducts located outside conditioned space. The energy penalty associated with the register closing technique was found to be minimized if registers furthest from the air handler are closed first because this tends to only affect the pressures and air leakage for the closed off branch. Closing registers nearer the air handler tends to increase the pressures and air leakage for the whole system. Closing too many registers (more than 60%) is not recommended because the added flow resistance severely restricts the air flow though the system leading to safety concerns. For example, furnaces may operate on the high-limit switch and cooling systems may suffer from frozen coils.

  7. Electrostatic forces in muscle and cylindrical gel systems.

    PubMed Central

    Millman, B M; Nickel, B G

    1980-01-01

    Repulsive pressure has been measured as a function of lattice spacing in gels of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and in the filament lattice of vertebrate striated muscle. External pressures up to ten atm have been applied to these lattices by an osmotic stress method. Numerical solutions to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation in hexagonal lattices have been obtained and compared to the TMV and muscle data. The theoretical curves using values for k calculated from the ionic strength give a good fit to experimental data from TMV gels, and an approximate fit to that from the muscle lattice, provided that a charge radius for the muscle thick filaments of approximately 16 nm is assumed. Variations in ionic strength, sarcomere length and state of the muscle give results which agree qualitatively with the theory, though a good fit between experiment and theory in the muscle case will clearly require consideration of other types of forces. We conclude that Poisson-Boltzmann theory can provide a good first approximation to the long-range electrostatic forces operating in such biological gel systems. PMID:7248458

  8. Tethered satellite system control using electromagnetic forces and reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alandi Hallaj, Mohammad Amin; Assadian, Nima

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel non-rotating space tethered configuration is introduced which its relative positions controlled using electromagnetic forces. The attitude dynamics is controlled by three reaction wheels in the body axes. The nonlinear coupled orbital dynamics of a dumbbell tethered satellite formation flight are derived through a constrained Lagrangian approach. These equations are presented in the leader satellite orbital frame. The tether is assumed to be mass-less and straight, and the J2 perturbation is included to the analysis. The forces and the moments of the electromagnetic coils are modeled based on the far-filed model of the magnetic dipoles. A guidance scheme for generating the desired positions as a function of time in Cartesian form is presented. The satellite tethered formation with variable length is controlled utilizing a linear controller. This approach is applied to a specified scenario and it is shown that the nonlinear guidance method and the linear controller can control the nonlinear system of the tethered formation and the results are compared with optimal control approach.

  9. A force balance system for the measurement of skin friction drag force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. W.; Mcvey, E. S.

    1971-01-01

    Research on force balance instrumentation to measure the skin friction of hypersonic vehicles at extreme temperatures, high altitudes and in a vibration field is discussed. A rough overall summary and operating instructions for the equipment are presented.

  10. Training augmentation device for the Air Force satellite Control Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoates, Keith B.

    1993-01-01

    From the 1960's and into the early 1980's satellite operations and control were conducted by Air Force Systems Command (AFSC), now Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC), out of the Satellite Control Facility at Onizuka AFB, CA. AFSC was responsible for acquiring satellite command and control systems and conducting routine satellite operations. The daily operations, consisting of satellite health and status contacts and station keeping activities, were performed for AFSC by a Mission Control Team (MCT) staffed by civilian contractors who were responsible for providing their own technically 'qualified' personnel as satellite operators. An MCT consists of five positions: mission planner, ground controller, planner analyst, orbit analyst, and ranger controller. Most of the training consisted of On-the-Job-Training (OJT) with junior personnel apprenticed to senior personnel until they could demonstrate job proficiency. With most of the satellite operators having 15 to 25 years of experience, there was minimal risk to the mission. In the mid 1980's Air Force Space Command (AFSPACOM) assumed operational responsibility for a newly established control node at Falcon AFB (FAFB) in CO. The satellites and ground system program offices (SPO's) are organized under AFSC's Space and Missiles Systems Center (SMC) to function as a systems engineering and acquisition agency for AFSPACECOM. The collection of the satellite control nodes, ground tracking stations, computer processing equipment, and connecting communications links is referred to as the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN).

  11. Rome Air Development Center Air Force technical objective document fiscal year 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-12-01

    This TOD describes the RADC technical programs in support of the Air Force Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) mission. The technical objectives have been aligned with the VANGUARD mission areas of Command, Control, and Communications (C3), Reconnaissance and Intelligence, Strategic Systems (Defense) and Technology as a means of focusing the RADC support of VANGUARD. This document is prepared to provide industry and universities with the midterm technical objectives in these areas.

  12. A spacecraft computer repairable via command.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fimmel, R. O.; Baker, T. E.

    1971-01-01

    The MULTIPAC is a central data system developed for deep-space probes with the distinctive feature that it may be repaired during flight via command and telemetry links by reprogramming around the failed unit. The computer organization uses pools of identical modules which the program organizes into one or more computers called processors. The interaction of these modules is dynamically controlled by the program rather than hardware. In the event of a failure, new programs are entered which reorganize the central data system with a somewhat reduced total processing capability aboard the spacecraft. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of the system architecture and the final overall system design rather than the specific logic design.

  13. The Modulation of Crustal Magmatic Systems by Tectonic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, O.; Dufek, J.

    2010-12-01

    The amount, location and residence time of melt in the crust significantly impacts crustal structure and influences the composition, frequency, and volume of eruptive products. In this study, we develop a two dimensional model that simulates the response of the crust to prolonged mantle-derived intrusions in arc environments. The domain includes the entire crustal section and upper mantle and focuses on the evolving thermal structure due to intrusions and external tectonic forcing. Magmatic intrusion into the crust can be accommodated by extension or thickening of the crust or some combination of both mechanisms. Additionally, external tectonic forcing can generate thicker crustal sections, while tectonic extension can significantly thin the crust. We monitor the thermal response, melt fraction and surface heat flux for different tectonic conditions and melt flux from the mantle. The amount of crustal melt versus fractionated primary mantle melts present in the crustal column helps determine crustal structure and growth through time. We express the amount of crustal melting in terms of an efficiency; we define the melting efficiency as the ratio of the melted volume of crustal material to the volume of melt expected from a strict enthalpy balance as explained by Dufek and Bergantz (2005). Melting efficiencies are less than 1 in real systems because heat diffuses to sections of the crust that never melt. In general, thick crust and crust experiencing extended compressional regimes results in an increased melting efficiency; and thin crust and crust with high extension rates have lower efficiency. In most settings, maximum efficiencies are less than 0.05-0.10. We also observe that with a geophysically estimated flux, the mantle-derived magma bodies build up isolated magma pods that are distributed in the crust. One of the aspects of this work is to monitor the location and size of these magma chambers in the crustal column. We further investigate the rheological

  14. A new transducer system for direct motor unit force measurement.

    PubMed

    Turkawski, S J; van Ruijven, L J; van Kuyen, M; Schreurs, A W; Weijs, W A

    1996-11-01

    A new transducer was developed for in situ measurement of the force vector in a complex muscle. The transducer measures the magnitude, and the line of action of a force in a single plane. The dynamic range of the transducer is 0-5 N. This range includes the small forces developed by an active motor unit and the relatively large passive force of a whole muscle. In this study we present the details of the transducer design and specifications, and describe its application in the measurement of motor unit forces of the rabbit masseter muscle. PMID:8894930

  15. Magnetospheres of black hole systems in force-free plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Garrett, Travis; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.

    2010-08-15

    The interaction of black holes with ambient magnetic fields is important for a variety of highly energetic astrophysical phenomena. We study this interaction within the force-free approximation in which a tenuous plasma is assumed to have zero inertia. Blandford and Znajek used this approach to demonstrate the conversion of some of the black hole's energy into electromagnetic Poynting flux in stationary and axisymmetric single black hole systems. We adopt this approach and extend it to examine asymmetric and, most importantly, dynamical systems by implementing the fully nonlinear field equations of general relativity coupled to Maxwell's equations. For single black holes, we study, in particular, the dependence of the Poynting flux and show that, even for misalignments between the black hole spin and the direction of the asymptotic magnetic field, a Poynting flux is generated with a luminosity dependent on such misalignment. For binary black hole systems, we show both in the head-on and orbiting cases that the moving black holes generate a Poynting flux.

  16. Thermodynamic Vent System Applied as Propellant Delivery System for Air Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Responding to a request from the Air Force, NASA Lewis Research Center engineers designed a combination pressure control and propellant delivery system based on thermodynamic vent system (TVS) technology. The Air Force is designing a new type of orbit transfer vehicle that uses energy from sunlight to both propel and power the vehicle. Because this vehicle uses propellant at a substantially slower rate than higher-energy rockets, it needed the Lewis-developed TVS technology for long-duration storage of cryogen propellants. Lewis engineers, in conjunction with industry partners, showed how this TVS technology could also be used to deliver propellant to the thruster. The Air Force has now begun the ground test demonstration phase. After successful completion of ground testing, the Air Force plans to use this technology in a space flight as early as 1999.

  17. A voice coil motor based measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shengdong; Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Liangzhou; Zhou, Liping; Lu, Wenlong

    2015-02-01

    In tactile scanning profiler, the measuring force would change in a wide range when it was used for profile measurement in a large range, which could possibly destroy the measured surface. To solve the problem, measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler was needed. In the paper, a voice coil motor-based measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler was designed. In the design, a low stiffness coefficient spring was used to provide contact force, while a voice coil motor (VCM) to balance the spring force so that the contact force could be kept for constant measuring force. A VCM was designed specially, and for active measuring force control, a precision current source circuit under the control of a DSP unit was designed to drive the VCM. The performance of voice coil motor based measuring force control system had been tested, and its good characteristics were verified.

  18. Gravity of Living Systems: May the Force Be With You

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Gravity, the force which shapes the architecture of organisms from single cells to dinosaurs, has been the most constant environmental factor during the evolution of species on Earth. With long-duration space flight, an understanding of how gravity affects living systems gains greater urgency in order to maintain the health and performance of crews who will explore the solar system. For example, the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems are normally exposed to gravitational gradients of blood pressure and weight on Earth. Such gradients increase blood pressure and tissue weight in dependent tissues of the body. Thus, from a physiologic standpoint, these systems are greatly affected by altered gravity. Exposure to actual and simulated microgravity causes blood and tissue fluid to shift from the legs to the head. Studies of humans in space have documented facial edema, space adaptation syndrome, decreased plasma volume, muscle atrophy, and loss of bone strength. Return of astronauts to Earth is accompanied by orthostatic intolerance, decreased neuromuscular coordination, and reduced exercise capacity. These factors decrease performance during descent from orbit and increase risk during emergency egress from the space craft. Models of simulated microgravity include 60 head-down tilt, immersion, and prolonged horizontal bedrest. Head-down tilt and dry immersion are the most accepted models and studies using these models of up to one year have been performed in Russia. Sensitive animal models which offer clear insights into the role of gravity on structure and function include the developing giraffe and snakes from various habitats. Finally, possible countermeasures to speed readaptation of astronauts to gravity after prolonged space flight include exercise, lower body negative pressure, and centrifugation.

  19. Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. The poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

  20. Mission operations and command assurance - Automating an operations TQM task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welz, Linda; Kazz, Sheri; Potts, Sherrill; Witkowski, Mona; Bruno, Kristin

    1993-01-01

    A long-term program is in progress at JPL to reduce cost and risk of mission operations through defect prevention and error management. A major element of this program, Mission Operations and Command Assurance (MO&CA), provides a system level function on flight projects to instill quality in mission operations. MO&CA embodies the total quality management TQM principle of continuous process improvement (CPI) and uses CPI in applying automation to mission operations to reduce risk and costs. MO&CA has led efforts to apply and has implemented automation in areas that impact the daily flight project work environment including Incident Surprise Anomaly tracking and reporting; command data verification, tracking and reporting; and command support data usage. MO&CA's future work in automation will take into account that future mission operations systems must be designed to avoid increasing error through the introduction of automation, while adapting to the demands of smaller flight teams.

  1. (abstract) Automated Constraint Checking of Spacecraft Command Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Joan; Alkalaj, Leon; Schneider, Karl; Spitale, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    Making certain that spacecraft command sequences do not violate any constraints is often tedious and expensive in terms of both personnel and software development. To reduce this cost, we have pursued the development of a flexible system for specifying models of spacecraft behavior in response to commands as well as constraints on that behavior. The potential need for modeling complex spacecraft behavior required that the system be designed to be usable both on a conventional workstation and a parallel supercomputer. Finally, it needed to be intuitive enough for the the intended mission operations users to easily design sets of rules and models to automate tedious, resource-consuming constraint checking of commands. We have defined a Specification And Verification Environment (SAVE) for spacecraft flight rules.

  2. Apollo 8 Commander Frank Borman Receives Presidential Call

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Apollo 8 Astronaut Frank Borman, commander of the first manned Saturn V space flight into Lunar orbit, accepted a phone call from the U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson prior to launch. Borman, along with astronauts William Anders, Lunar Module (LM) pilot, and James Lovell, Command Module (CM) pilot, launched aboard the Apollo 8 mission on December 21, 1968 and returned safely to Earth on December 27, 1968. The mission achieved operational experience and tested the Apollo command module systems, including communications, tracking, and life-support, in cis-lunar space and lunar orbit, and allowed evaluation of crew performance on a lunar orbiting mission. The crew photographed the lunar surface, both far side and near side, obtaining information on topography and landmarks as well as other scientific information necessary for future Apollo landings. All systems operated within allowable parameters and all objectives of the mission were achieved.

  3. On unsteady-motion theory of magnetic force for maglev systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Energy Technology

    1995-12-14

    Motion-dependent magnetic forces are the key elements in the study of magnetically levitated vehicle (maglev) system dynamics. This paper presents an experimental and analytical study that will enhance our understanding of the role of unsteady-motion-dependent magnetic forces and demonstrate an experimental technique that can be used to measure those unsteady magnetic forces directly. The experimental technique is a useful tool for measuring motion-dependent magnetic forces for the prediction and control of maglev systems.

  4. Modular fuzzy-neuro controller driven by spoken language commands.

    PubMed

    Pulasinghe, Koliya; Watanabe, Keigo; Izumi, Kiyotaka; Kiguchi, Kazuo

    2004-02-01

    We present a methodology of controlling machines using spoken language commands. The two major problems relating to the speech interfaces for machines, namely, the interpretation of words with fuzzy implications and the out-of-vocabulary (OOV) words in natural conversation, are investigated. The system proposed in this paper is designed to overcome the above two problems in controlling machines using spoken language commands. The present system consists of a hidden Markov model (HMM) based automatic speech recognizer (ASR), with a keyword spotting system to capture the machine sensitive words from the running utterances and a fuzzy-neural network (FNN) based controller to represent the words with fuzzy implications in spoken language commands. Significance of the words, i.e., the contextual meaning of the words according to the machine's current state, is introduced to the system to obtain more realistic output equivalent to users' desire. Modularity of the system is also considered to provide a generalization of the methodology for systems having heterogeneous functions without diminishing the performance of the system. The proposed system is experimentally tested by navigating a mobile robot in real time using spoken language commands. PMID:15369072

  5. Influence of G-forces on venous and nervous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyskin, Y. A.; Prives-Bardina, R. A.; Tikhonova, L. P.

    1975-01-01

    Cats and rabbits were subjected to rotation in the centrifuge. Controls were maintained to determine the individual tolerance to g-forces. Thickening of the vascular wall was found to occur due to the g-forces' effect, as well as other vascular changes. Nervous changes included edema and chromatolysis of the nerve cells.

  6. Design and implementation of a nuclear weapons management system submodule: Shipboard security force system. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Settlemyer, S.R.

    1991-09-01

    The Nuclear Weapons Management System combines the strengths of an expert system with the flexibility of a database management system to assist the Weapons Officer, Security Officer, and the Personnel Reliability Program Officer in the performance of administrative duties associated with the nuclear weapons programs in the United States Navy. This thesis examines the need for, and ultimately the design of, a system that will assist the Security Officer in administrative duties associated with the Shipboard Self Defense Force. This system, designed and coded utilizing dBASE IV, can be implemented as a stand alone system. Furthermore, it interfaces with the expert system submodule that handles the PRP screening process.

  7. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, E; Camunas-Soler, J; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Seifert, U; Ritort, F

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force. PMID:27575077

  8. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, E.; Camunas-Soler, J.; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Seifert, U.; Ritort, F.

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force.

  9. Station Commander Congratulates New Flight Directors

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 29 Commander Mike Fossum congratulates Judd Frieling, Tomas Gonzalez-Torres and Greg Whitney on being selected as NASA's newest flight directors. ...

  10. A life cycle cost economics model for automation projects with uniformly varying operating costs. [applied to Deep Space Network and Air Force Systems Command

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    The described mathematical model calculates life-cycle costs for projects with operating costs increasing or decreasing linearly with time. The cost factors involved in the life-cycle cost are considered, and the errors resulting from the assumption of constant rather than uniformly varying operating costs are examined. Parameters in the study range from 2 to 30 years, for project life; 0 to 15% per year, for interest rate; and 5 to 90% of the initial operating cost, for the operating cost gradient. A numerical example is presented.

  11. 75 FR 14580 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ..., Department of Defense. F036 AFSPC A System name: Space Command Operations Training (June 11, 1997; 62 FR... Information Officer, SAF/XCPPF, 1800 Air Force Pentagon, Washington, DC 20330-1800. The specific changes...

  12. Interior, building 1205, view to west showing roof truss system, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, building 1205, view to west showing roof truss system, 90 mm lens plus electronic flash fill lighting. - Travis Air Force Base, Readiness Maintenance Hangar, W Street, Air Defense Command Readiness Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  13. Interior detail, view to northnortheast showing support system for roof ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail, view to north-northeast showing support system for roof truss (typical), 90 mm lens plus electronic flash lighting. - Travis Air Force Base, Readiness Maintenance Hangar, W Street, Air Defense Command Readiness Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  14. Cell Separation by Non-Inertial Force Fields in Microfluidic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Hideaki; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Cell and microparticle separation in microfluidic systems has recently gained significant attention in sample preparations for biological and chemical studies. Microfluidic separation is typically achieved by applying differential forces on the target particles to guide them into different paths. This paper reviews basic concepts and novel designs of such microfluidic separators with emphasis on the use of non-inertial force fields, including dielectrophoretic force, optical gradient force, magnetic force, and acoustic primary radiation force. Comparisons of separation performances with discussions on physiological effects and instrumentation issues toward point-of-care devices are provided as references for choosing appropriate separation methods for various applications. PMID:20046897

  15. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James; Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Samuel; Mihalusova, Mariana

    2003-03-01

    We have commissioned a superconducting solenoid based apparatus designed to exert strong magnetic body forces on biological specimens and other organic materials in ambient environmental conditions for extended periods. In its room temperature bore, it can produce a maximum magnetic field-field gradient product of 16 T^2-cm-1 which is sufficient to levitate frog embryos Xenopus Laevis[1]. We will discuss how we are applying these magnetic body forces to probe the known influences of gravitational forces on frog embryos and the swimming behavior of Paramecium Caudatum. In the process, we will describe a novel method for measuring the diamagnetic susceptibilities of specimens such as paramecia.

  16. 14 CFR 91.1031 - Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...: Designation required. (a) Each program manager must designate a— (1) Pilot in command for each program flight... designated by the program manager, must remain the pilot in command at all times during that flight....

  17. Swing-Free Cranes via Input Shaping of Operator Commands

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, Kenneth N.; Parker, Gordon G.; Robinett, Rush D.; Leban, Frank

    1999-08-25

    This paper presents an open-loop control method for suppressing payload oscillation or swing caused by operator commanded maneuvers in rotary boom cranes and the method is experimentally verified on a one-sixteenth scale model of a Hagglunds shipboard crane. The crane configuration consists of a payload mass that swings like a spherical pendulum on the end of a lift-line which is attached to a boom capable of hub rotation (slewing) and elevation (luffing). Positioning of the payload is accomplished through the hub and boom angles and the load-line length. Since the configuration of the crane affects the excitation and response of the payload, the swing control scheme must account for the varying geometry of the system. Adaptive forward path command filters are employed to remove components of the command signal which induce payload swing.

  18. System implementation for US Air Force Global Theater Weather Analysis and Prediction System (GTWAPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Simunich, K.L.; Pinkerton, S.C.; Michalakes, J.G.; Christiansen, J.H.

    1997-03-01

    The Global Theater Weather Analysis and Prediction System (GTWAPS) is intended to provide war fighters and decision makers with timely, accurate, and tailored meteorological and oceanographic (METOC) information to enhance effective employment of battlefield forces. Of critical importance to providing METOC theater information is the generation of meteorological parameters produced by numerical prediction models and application software at the Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC), Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Ultimately, application-derived data will be produced by the regional Joint METOC Forecast Units and by the deployed teams within a theater. The USAF Air Staff contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for assistance in defining a hardware and software solution using off-the-shelf technology that would give the USAF the flexibility of testing various meteorological models and the ability to use the system within their daily operational constraints.

  19. Three dimensional visualization to support command and control

    SciTech Connect

    Van Slambrook, G.A.

    1997-04-01

    Virtual reality concepts are changing the way one thinks about and with computers. The concepts have already proven their potential usefulness in a broad range of applications. This research was concerned with exploring and demonstrating the utility of virtual reality in robotics and satellite command and control applications. The robotics work addressed the need to quickly build accurate graphical models of physical environments by allowing a user to interactively build a model of a remote environment by superimposing stereo graphics onto live stereo video. The satellite work addressed the fusion of multiple data sets or models into one synergistic display for more effective training, design, and command and control of satellite systems.

  20. Close up view of the Commander's Seat on the Flight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close up view of the Commander's Seat on the Flight Deck of the Orbiter Discovery. It appears the Orbiter is in the roll out / launch pad configuration. A protective cover is over the Rotational Hand Controller to protect it during the commander's ingress. Most notable in this view are the Speed Brake/Thrust Controller in the center right in this view and the Translational Hand Controller in the center top of the view. This image was taken at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  1. Somatosensory Gating Is Dependent on the Rate of Force Recruitment in the Human Orofacial System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreatta, Richard D.; Barlow, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Functional orofacial behaviors vary in their force endpoint and rate of recruitment. This study assessed the gating of orofacial cutaneous somatosensation during different cyclic lip force recruitment rates. Understanding how differences in the rate of force recruitment influences trigeminal system function is an important step toward…

  2. Influence of G-forces and hypodynamia on the portal system of the liver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozdova, A. V.

    1975-01-01

    Longitudinally and transversely applied g-forces as intolerable levels cause damage to the interlobular veins of the liver, with maximum damage caused by dorso-ventral g-force application. The portal vein system is more resilient with respect to g-forces at the limit of tolerance.

  3. Collective behaviors of the Casimir force in microelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H. B.; Yelton, J.

    2013-01-23

    Our goal was to explore the strong dependence of the Casimir force on the shape of the interacting bodies. We made significant progress and measured the Casimir force on silicon surface with rectangular corrugation and showed that the results agree with theoretical calculations, provided that the optical properties of silicon are taken into account. Furthermore, we performed measurement of the Casimir force within a single chip for the first time, between a doubly clamped beam and a movable, on-chip electrode at liquid helium temperature. This experiment represents a new way of studying the Casimir effect, a significant advance from the conventional approach of placing an external surface close to a force transducer.

  4. Foresight for commanders: a methodology to assist planning for effects-based operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul K.; Kahan, James P.

    2006-05-01

    Looking at the battlespace as a system of systems is a cornerstone of Effects-Based Operations and a key element in the planning of such operations, and in developing the Commander's Predictive Environment. Instead of a physical battleground to be approached with weapons of force, the battlespace is an interrelated super-system of political, military, economic, social, information and infrastructure systems to be approached with diplomatic, informational, military and economic actions. A concept that has proved useful in policy arenas other than defense, such as research and development for information technology, addressing cybercrime, and providing appropriate and cost-effective health care, is foresight. In this paper, we provide an overview of how the foresight approach addresses the inherent uncertainties in planning courses of action, present a set of steps in the conduct of foresight, and then illustrate the application of foresight to a commander's decision problem. We conclude that foresight approach that we describe is consistent with current doctrinal intelligence preparation of the battlespace and operational planning, but represents an advance in that it explicitly addresses the uncertainties in the environment and planning in a way that identifies strategies that are robust over different possible ground truths. It should supplement other planning methods.

  5. A wearable force plate system for the continuous measurement of triaxial ground reaction force in biomechanical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Inoue, Yoshio; Shibata, Kyoko

    2010-08-01

    The ambulatory measurement of ground reaction force (GRF) and human motion under free-living conditions is convenient, inexpensive and never restricted to gait analysis in a laboratory environment and is therefore much desired by researchers and clinical doctors in biomedical applications. A wearable force plate system was developed by integrating small triaxial force sensors and three-dimensional (3D) inertial sensors for estimating dynamic triaxial GRF in biomechanical applications. The system, in comparison to existent systems, is characterized by being lightweight, thin and easy-to-wear. A six-axial force sensor (Nitta Co., Japan) was used as a verification measurement device to validate the static accuracy of the developed force plate. To evaluate the precision during dynamic gait measurements, we compared the measurements of the triaxial GRF and the center of pressure (CoP) by using the developed system with the reference measurements made using a stationary force plate and an optical motion analysis system. The root mean square (RMS) differences of the two transverse components (x- and y-axes) and the vertical component (z-axis) of the GRF were 4.3 ± 0.9 N, 6.0 ± 1.3 N and 12.1 ± 1.1 N, respectively, corresponding to 5.1 ± 1.1% and 6.5 ± 1% of the maximum of each transverse component and 1.3 ± 0.2% of the maximum vertical component of GRF. The RMS distance between the two systems' CoP traces was 3.2 ± 0.8 mm, corresponding to 1.2 ± 0.3% of the length of the shoe. Moreover, based on the results of the assessment of the influence of the system on natural gait, we found that gait was almost never affected. Therefore, the wearable system as an alternative device can be a potential solution for measuring CoP and triaxial GRF in non-laboratory environments.

  6. Optical pulling force and conveyor belt effect in resonator-waveguide system.

    PubMed

    Intaraprasonk, Varat; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-09-01

    We present the theoretical condition and actual numerical design that achieves an optical pulling force in resonator-waveguide systems, where the direction of the force on the resonator is in the opposite direction to the input light in the waveguide. We also show that this pulling force can occur in conjunction with the lateral optical equilibrium effect, such that the resonator is maintained at the fixed distance from the waveguide while experiencing the pulling force. PMID:23988930

  7. 46 CFR 42.05-25 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 42.05-25 Section 42.05-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-25 Coast Guard District Commander or District...

  8. 46 CFR 42.05-25 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 42.05-25 Section 42.05-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-25 Coast Guard District Commander or District...

  9. 32 CFR 552.65 - Command supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Command supervision. 552.65 Section 552.65 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND....65 Command supervision. (a) All insurance business conducted on Army installation will be...

  10. 76 FR 19893 - Unified Command Plan 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... HOUSE, Washington, April 6, 2011 [FR Doc. 2011-8644 Filed 4-7-11; 11:15 am] Billing code 5000-04-P ...#0;#0; ] Memorandum of April 6, 2011 Unified Command Plan 2011 Memorandum for the Secretary of... the revised Unified Command Plan. Consistent with title 10, United States Code, section 161(b)(2)...

  11. 32 CFR 215.7 - Command relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Command relationships. 215.7 Section 215.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EMPLOYMENT OF MILITARY RESOURCES IN THE EVENT OF CIVIL DISTURBANCES § 215.7 Command...

  12. 32 CFR 215.7 - Command relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Command relationships. 215.7 Section 215.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EMPLOYMENT OF MILITARY RESOURCES IN THE EVENT OF CIVIL DISTURBANCES § 215.7 Command...

  13. 32 CFR 637.3 - Installation Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Installation Commander. 637.3 Section 637.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.3 Installation Commander....

  14. 32 CFR 637.3 - Installation Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Installation Commander. 637.3 Section 637.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.3 Installation Commander....

  15. 32 CFR 637.3 - Installation Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Installation Commander. 637.3 Section 637.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.3 Installation Commander....

  16. 32 CFR 637.3 - Installation Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Installation Commander. 637.3 Section 637.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.3 Installation Commander....

  17. 32 CFR 637.3 - Installation Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Installation Commander. 637.3 Section 637.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.3 Installation Commander....

  18. XTCE. XML Telemetry and Command Exchange Tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Kevin; Kizzort, Brad; Simon, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    An XML Telemetry Command Exchange (XTCE) tutoral oriented towards packets or minor frames is shown. The contents include: 1) The Basics; 2) Describing Telemetry; 3) Describing the Telemetry Format; 4) Commanding; 5) Forgotten Elements; 6) Implementing XTCE; and 7) GovSat.

  19. 32 CFR 536.3 - Command and organizational relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Command and organizational relationships. 536.3 Section 536.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND... relationships. (a) The Secretary of the Army. The Secretary of the Army (SA) heads the Army Claims System...

  20. 32 CFR 536.3 - Command and organizational relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Command and organizational relationships. 536.3 Section 536.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND... relationships. (a) The Secretary of the Army. The Secretary of the Army (SA) heads the Army Claims System...

  1. Command module/service module reaction control subsystem assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weary, D. P.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed review of component failure histories, qualification adequacy, manufacturing flow, checkout requirements and flow, ground support equipment interfaces, subsystem interface verification, protective devices, and component design did not reveal major weaknesses in the command service module (CSM) reaction control system (RCS). No changes to the CSM RCS were recommended. The assessment reaffirmed the adequacy of the CSM RCS for future Apollo missions.

  2. 14 CFR 1215.106 - User command and tracking data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false User command and tracking data. 1215.106 Section 1215.106 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION TRACKING AND DATA RELAY SATELLITE SYSTEM (TDRSS) Use and Reimbursement Policy for Non-U.S. Government Users §...

  3. 9. Photocopy of command flow chart of NIKE Battalion, Headquarters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of command flow chart of NIKE Battalion, Headquarters Battery and Missile Battery from Procedures and Drills for NIKE Ajax System, Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-80 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA 1956 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  4. RMS end effector waiting for command and SPAS-01 nearby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The end effector of the remote manipulator system (RMS) appears to be waiting for its next command at the top of this frame and the Shuttle pallet satellite (SPAS-01), in its free flying mode, appears nearby. The three letters legible on the SPAS stand for Messerschmitt-Boelkow-Blohm Gmbit, a West German firm.

  5. The influence of central command on baroreflex resetting during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, Peter B.; Fadel, Paul J.; Smith, Scott A.

    2002-01-01

    The arterial baroreflex functions as a negative feedback system regulating blood pressure around an established operating point. Paradoxically, a parallel increase in heart rate and blood pressure manifests during exercise. Experimental evidence suggests these events are caused, in part, by a rapid resetting of the baroreflex by central command.

  6. Telemetry, tracking, and command consolidation in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, Jeff B.; Odea, J. Andrew; Bryant, Scott H.; Guerreo, Ana Maria P.; Louie, John J.

    2001-01-01

    Currently, in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN), telemetry, tracking, and command (TT&C) functions are distributed between multiple subsystem computers. Control design of these subsystems did not consider the interaction necessary between the functions, which create opportunities for loss of data. Also, the current controller design can force the use of equipment that is not needed for the task at hand, to the detriment of others. As part of the Network Simplification Project (NSP), the TTC implementation has been re-examined, New telemetry and commanding equipment is being built, and the control of the TT&C functions is being consolidated into two controllers, Uplink and Downlink. The new equipment uses commercial components, as opposed to the custom built equipment it is replacing, which improves reliability and simplifies maintenance.

  7. 28 CFR 16.105 - Exemption of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exemption of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System. 16.105 Section 16.105 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR... of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System. (a) The following system of records is exempt from...

  8. 28 CFR 16.105 - Exemption of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exemption of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System. 16.105 Section 16.105 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR... of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System. (a) The following system of records is exempt from...

  9. 28 CFR 16.105 - Exemption of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemption of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System. 16.105 Section 16.105 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR... of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System. (a) The following system of records is exempt from...

  10. 28 CFR 16.105 - Exemption of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exemption of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System. 16.105 Section 16.105 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR... of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System. (a) The following system of records is exempt from...

  11. 28 CFR 16.105 - Exemption of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemption of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System. 16.105 Section 16.105 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR... of Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force System. (a) The following system of records is exempt from...

  12. OOTW Force Design Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  13. Autonomous Command Operation of the WIRE Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prior, Mike; Walyus, Keith; Saylor, Rick

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the end-to-end design architecture for an autonomous commanding capability to be used on the Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) mission for the uplink of command loads during unattended station contacts. The WIRE mission is the fifth and final mission of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Small Explorer (SMEX) series to be launched in March of 1999. Its primary mission is the targeting of deep space fields using an ultra-cooled infrared telescope. Due to its mission design WIRE command loads are large (approximately 40 Kbytes per 24 hours) and must be performed daily. To reduce the cost of mission operations support that would be required in order to uplink command loads, the WIRE Flight Operations Team has implemented an autonomous command loading capability. This capability allows completely unattended operations over a typical two-day weekend period.

  14. Deformation of Polymer Composites in Force Protection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarian, Oshin

    Systems used for protecting personnel, vehicles and infrastructure from ballistic and blast threats derive their performance from a combination of the intrinsic properties of the constituent materials and the way in which the materials are arranged and attached to one another. The present work addresses outstanding issues in both the intrinsic properties of high-performance fiber composites and the consequences of how such composites are integrated into force protection systems. One aim is to develop a constitutive model for the large-strain intralaminar shear deformation of an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber-reinforced composite. To this end, an analytical model based on a binary representation of the constituent phases is developed and validated using finite element analyses. The model is assessed through comparisons with experimental measurements on cross-ply composite specimens in the +/-45° orientation. The hardening behavior and the limiting tensile strain are attributable to rotations of fibers in the plastic domain and the effects of these rotations on the internal stress state. The model is further assessed through quasi-static punch experiments and dynamic impact tests using metal foam projectiles. The finite element model based on this model accurately captures both the back-face deflection-time history and the final plate profile (especially the changes caused by fiber pull-in). A separate analytical framework for describing the accelerations caused by head impact during, for example, the secondary collision of a vehicle occupant with the cabin interior during an external event is also presented. The severity of impact, characterized by the Head Injury Criterion (HIC), is used to assess the efficacy of crushable foams in mitigating head injury. The framework is used to identify the optimal foam strength that minimizes the HIC for prescribed mass and velocity, subject to constraints on foam thickness. The predictive capability of

  15. Enclosed Electronic System for Force Measurements in Knee Implants

    PubMed Central

    Forchelet, David; Simoncini, Matteo; Arami, Arash; Bertsch, Arnaud; Meurville, Eric; Aminian, Kamiar; Ryser, Peter; Renaud, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a widely performed surgical technique. Soft tissue force balancing during the operation relies strongly on the experience of the surgeon in equilibrating tension in the collateral ligaments. Little information on the forces in the implanted prosthesis is available during surgery and post-operative treatment. This paper presents the design, fabrication and testing of an instrumented insert performing force measurements in a knee prosthesis. The insert contains a closed structure composed of printed circuit boards and incorporates a microfabricated polyimide thin-film piezoresistive strain sensor for each condylar compartment. The sensor is tested in a mechanical knee simulator that mimics in-vivo conditions. For characterization purposes, static and dynamic load patterns are applied to the instrumented insert. Results show that the sensors are able to measure forces up to 1.5 times body weight with a sensitivity fitting the requirements for the proposed use. Dynamic testing of the insert shows a good tracking of slow and fast changing forces in the knee prosthesis by the sensors. PMID:25196007

  16. Enclosed electronic system for force measurements in knee implants.

    PubMed

    Forchelet, David; Simoncini, Matteo; Arami, Arash; Bertsch, Arnaud; Meurville, Eric; Aminian, Kamiar; Ryser, Peter; Renaud, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a widely performed surgical technique. Soft tissue force balancing during the operation relies strongly on the experience of the surgeon in equilibrating tension in the collateral ligaments. Little information on the forces in the implanted prosthesis is available during surgery and post-operative treatment. This paper presents the design, fabrication and testing of an instrumented insert performing force measurements in a knee prosthesis. The insert contains a closed structure composed of printed circuit boards and incorporates a microfabricated polyimide thin-film piezoresistive strain sensor for each condylar compartment. The sensor is tested in a mechanical knee simulator that mimics in-vivo conditions. For characterization purposes, static and dynamic load patterns are applied to the instrumented insert. Results show that the sensors are able to measure forces up to 1.5 times body weight with a sensitivity fitting the requirements for the proposed use. Dynamic testing of the insert shows a good tracking of slow and fast changing forces in the knee prosthesis by the sensors. PMID:25196007

  17. Organization of a hospital-based victim decontamination plan using the incident command structure.

    PubMed

    Powers, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Hospitals are required to have the capability of performing patient decontamination. Incorporating the incident command structure provided by the National Incident Management System and the Hospital Incident Command System into their decontamination plans will enable hospitals to be better organized and efficient in managing events producing contaminated patients. HAZMAT Branch incident command includes the leadership positions of a HAZMAT Branch director and a Victim Decontamination Unit leader, as well as managers for each zone, logistics, triage, medical monitoring, and support roles. Coupling a well-developed decontamination command structure with staff practice in their roles will help to ensure an organized response. This article describes the specific roles and responsibilities included in an incident command system-based hospital decontamination plan than has been used successfully in a multi-hospital system. PMID:17996656

  18. History of Command and Control at KSC: Kennedy Engineering Academy Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurt, George Richard

    2007-01-01

    Agenda for this presentation is: Evolution of Command and Control (C&C), C&C history, Launch Processing System overview, Core System Overview, Checkout & Launch Control System, Overview and Commercial-Off-The-Shelf guidelines

  19. Yellowstone Wolves and the Forces That Structure Natural Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Andy P.

    2014-01-01

    Since their introduction in 1995 and 1996, wolves have had effects on Yellowstone that ripple across the entire structure of the food web that defines biodiversity in the Northern Rockies ecosystem. Ecological interpretations of the wolves have generated a significant amount of debate about the relative strength of top-down versus bottom-up forces in determining herbivore and vegetation abundance in Yellowstone. Debates such as this are central to the resolution of broader debates about the role of natural enemies and climate as forces that structure food webs and modify ecosystem function. Ecologists need to significantly raise the profile of these discussions; understanding the forces that structure food webs and determine species abundance and the supply of ecosystem services is one of the central scientific questions for this century; its complexity will require new minds, new mathematics, and significant, consistent funding. PMID:25535737

  20. Efficient force feedback transmission system for tele surgery.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Sriram; Ganz, Aura

    2008-01-01

    Remote surgery information requires quick and reliable transmission between the surgeon and the patient side. However, the interconnecting network is usually time varying and lossy which can cause packet loss and delay jitter. In this paper we introduce an adaptive packet prediction and buffer time adjustment algorithm which reduces the negative effects caused by the time varying networks on the transmission of force feedback data. To evaluate our scheme we run a virtual reality applet built in Matlab. Our results show, for severe packet loss and variable delay jitter, the integrated synchronization technique significantly improves the performance of the force feedback device. PMID:19163399