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Sample records for forced convective boiling

  1. Subcooled forced convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Panian, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental heat-transfer data were obtained for the forced-convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane (R-113 or Freon-113) in a vertical annular test annular test section. The 97 data points obtained covered heat transfer by forced convection, local boiling, and fully-developed boiling. Correlating methods were obtained which accurately predicted the heat flux as a function of wall superheat (boiling curve) over the range of parameters studied.

  2. A study of forced convection boiling under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of activities conducted over the period 1/2/85-12/31/90, in which the study of forced convection boiling under reduced gravity was initiated. The study seeks to improve the understanding of the basic processes that constitute forced convection boiling by removing the buoyancy effects which may mask other phenomena. Specific objectives may also be expressed in terms of the following questions: (1) what effects, if any, will the removal of body forces to the lowest possible levels have on the forced convection boiling heat transfer processes in well-defined and meaningful circumstances? (this includes those effects and processes associated with the nucleation or onset of boiling during the transient increase in heater surface temperature, as well as the heat transfer and vapor bubble behaviors with established or steady-state conditions); and (2) if such effects are present, what are the boundaries of the relevant parameters such as heat flux, heater surface superheat, fluid velocity, bulk subcooling, and geometric/orientation relationships within which such effects will be produced?

  3. Development of a mechanistic model for forced convection subcooled boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, Dillon R.

    The focus of this work is on the formulation, implementation, and testing of a mechanistic model of subcooled boiling. Subcooled boiling is the process of vapor generation on a heated wall when the bulk liquid temperature is still below saturation. This is part of a larger effort by the US DoE's CASL project to apply advanced computational tools to the simulation of light water reactors. To support this effort, the formulation of the dispersed field model is described and a complete model of interfacial forces is formulated. The model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code with a K-epsilon model of turbulence. The interfacial force models are built on extensive work by other authors, and include novel formulations of the turbulent dispersion and lift forces. The complete model of interfacial forces is compared to experiments for adiabatic bubbly flows, including both steady-state and unsteady conditions. The same model is then applied to a transient gas/liquid flow in a complex geometry of fuel channels in a sodium fast reactor. Building on the foundation of the interfacial force model, a mechanistic model of forced-convection subcooled boiling is proposed. This model uses the heat flux partitioning concept and accounts for condensation of bubbles attached to the wall. This allows the model to capture the enhanced heat transfer associated with boiling before the point of net generation of vapor, a phenomenon consistent with existing experimental observations. The model is compared to four different experiments encompassing flows of light water, heavy water, and R12 at different pressures, in cylindrical channels, an internally heated annulus, and a rectangular channel. The experimental data includes axial and radial profiles of both liquid temperature and vapor volume fraction, and the agreement can be considered quite good. The complete model is then applied to simulations of subcooled boiling in nuclear reactor subchannels consistent with the

  4. A Study of Nucleate Boiling with Forced Convection in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The ultimate objective of basic studies of flow boiling in microgravity is to improve the understanding of the processes involved, as manifested by the ability to predict its behavior. This is not yet the case for boiling heat transfer even in earth gravity, despite the considerable research activity over the past 30 years. The elements that constitute the nucleate boiling process - nucleation, growth, motion, and collapse of the vapor bubbles (if the bulk liquid is subcooled) - are common to both pool and flow boiling. It is well known that the imposition of bulk liquid motion affects the vapor bubble behavior relative to pool boiling, but does not appear to significantly influence the heat transfer. Indeed, it has been recommended in the past that empirical correlations or experimental data of pool boiling be used for design purposes with forced convection nucleate boiling. It is anticipated that such will most certainly not be possible for boiling in microgravity, based on observations made with pool boiling in microgravity. In earth gravity buoyancy will act to remove the vapor bubbles from the vicinity of the heater surface regardless of how much the imposed bulk velocity is reduced, depending, of course, on the geometry of the system. Vapor bubbles have been observed to dramatically increase in size in pool boiling in microgravity, and the heat flux at which dryout took place was reduced considerably below what is generally termed the critical heat flux (CHF) in earth gravity, depending on the bulk liquid subcooling. However, at heat flux levels below dryout, the nucleate pool boiling process was enhanced considerably over that in earth gravity, in spite of the large vapor bubbles formed in microgravity and perhaps as a consequence. These large vapor bubbles tended to remain in the vicinity of the heater surface, and the enhanced heat transfer appeared to be associated with the presence of what variously has been referred to as a liquid microlayer between the

  5. Boiling inception in trichlorotrifluoroethane during forced convection at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Lippert, T. E.

    1972-01-01

    The inception of bubbles during forced convection was studied experimentally by using trichlorotrifluoroethane (R-113 or Freon-113). The experiments were performed in a rectangular channel, 12.7 x 9.5 mm in cross section. Heating was from a 3.2 mm wide strip embedded in the longer side of the channel. The pressures studied ranged from 3.6 to 20.7 bar, mass velocities from 700 to 600 kg/sq m/sec, and inlet subcoolings from 26 to 97 C. Photographs of the flow were used to determine when bubbles first appeared on the heated surface. These data were compared with wall temperature measurements and inception theories. A reasonable method for calculating the complete boiling curve was found to agree with these results.

  6. Film boiling heat transfer from a sphere in natural and forced convection of freon-113

    SciTech Connect

    Dix, D.; Orozco, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer fluxes were measured on a 3.84-cm hollow copper sphere, in both forced convection and pool boiling, as a function of angular position in Freon 113. This paper reports on forced-convection tests run at speeds of 0.5 to 1.9 m/s. These tests were conducted in the stable film boiling region of the boiling curve. Significant heat transfer rates were measured in the vapor wake region of the sphere for flow film boiling. Video observations of the boiling process revealed that the flow film boiling vapor removal mechanism consisted of periodic formation and detachment of a vapor wake in the rear of the sphere. For pool boiling it was found that the heated surface had a uniform rate of energy dissipation in the stable film boiling regime, whereas in forced convection the film boiling rate was dependent on angular position. Pool film boiling tests also showed multiple humps (more than one maximum heat flux) in the boiling curve when the liquid was subcooled.

  7. A Study of Nucleate Boiling with Forced Convection in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Boiling is a rather imprecise term applied to the process of evaporation in which the rate of liquid-vapor phase change is large. In seeking to determine the role and significance of body forces on the process, of which buoyancy or gravity is just one agent, it becomes necessary to define the term more precisely. It is generally characterized by the formation and growth of individual vapor bubbles arising from heat transfer to the liquid, either at a solid/liquid or liquid/liquid interface, or volumetrically. The terms 'bubble' boiling and 'nucleate' boiling are frequently used, in recognition of the interactions of surface tension and other forces in producing discrete bubbles at distinctive locations (although not always). Primary considerations are that evaporation can occur only at existing liquid-vapor interfaces, so that attention must be given to the formation of an interface (the nucleation process), and that the latent heat for this evaporation can come only from the superheated liquid, so that attention must also be given to the temperature distributions in the liquid.

  8. Forced-convection boiling tests performed in parallel simulated LMR fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, S.D.; Carbajo, J.J.; Levin, A.E.; Lloyd, D.B.; Montgomery, B.H.; Wantland, J.L.

    1985-04-21

    Forced-convection tests have been carried out using parallel simulated Liquid Metal Reactor fuel assemblies in an engineering-scale sodium loop, the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety facility. The tests, performed under single- and two-phase conditions, have shown that for low forced-convection flow there is significant flow augmentation by thermal convection, an important phenomenon under degraded shutdown heat removal conditions in an LMR. The power and flows required for boiling and dryout to occur are much higher than decay heat levels. The experimental evidence supports analytical results that heat removal from an LMR is possible with a degraded shutdown heat removal system.

  9. Fundamental Study of Local Heat Transfer in Forced Convective Boiling of Ammonia on Vertical Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hun; Arima, Hirofumi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

    In the present study, the fundamental experiments that investigate characteristics of local heat transfer in forced convective boiling on vertical flat plate with 2-mm channel height are taken to realize plate type compact evaporator for OTEC or STEC. The experiments are performed with ammonia as the working fluid. The experiments are also carried out with the following test conditions; saturated pressure = 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 MPa, mass flux = 7.5, 10, 15 kg/(m2•s), heat flux = 15, 20, 25 kW/m2 and inlet quality = 0.1 ~ 0.4 [-]. The result shows that the wall superheated temperature of forced convective boiling is lower than that of pool boiling. And the heat transfer coefficient increases with an increase in quality and the decrease in the local heat flux and saturated pressure for prescribed experimental conditions. However, local heat transfer coefficients are not affected by mass fluxes in the prescribed experimental conditions. An empirical correlation that can predict the local heat transfer coefficient on vertical flat plate within experimental conditions is also proposed.

  10. Heat and momentum transfer model studies applicable to once-through, forced convection potassium boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabin, C. M.; Poppendiek, H. F.

    1971-01-01

    A number of heat transfer and fluid flow mechanisms that control once-through, forced convection potassium boiling are studied analytically. The topics discussed are: (1) flow through tubes containing helical wire inserts, (2) motion of droplets entrained in vapor flow, (3) liquid phase distribution in boilers, (4) temperature distributions in boiler tube walls, (5) mechanisms of heat transfer regime change, and (6) heat transfer in boiler tubes. Whenever possible, comparisons of predicted and actual performances are made. The model work presented aids in the prediction of operating characteristics of actual boilers.

  11. Forced convection flow boiling and two-phase flow phenomena in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Yun Whan

    2008-07-01

    The present study was performed to numerically analyze the evaporation phenomena through the liquid-vapor interface and to investigate bubble dynamics and heat transfer behavior during forced convective flow boiling in a microchannel. Flow instabilities of two-phase flow boiling in a microchannel were studied as well. The main objective of this research is to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of two-phase flow boiling in a microchannel and provide predictive tools to design thermal management systems, for example, microchannel heat sinks. The numerical results obtained from this study were qualitatively and quantitatively compared with experimental results in the open literature. Physical and mathematical models, accounting for evaporating phenomena through the liquid-vapor interface in a microchannel at constant heat flux and constant wall temperature, have been developed, respectively. The heat transfer mechanism is affected by the dominant heat conduction through the thin liquid film and vaporization at the liquid-vapor interface. The thickness of the liquid film and the pressure of the liquid and vapor phases were simultaneously solved by the governing differential equations. The developed semi-analytical evaporation model that takes into account of the interfacial phenomena and surface tension effects was used to obtain solutions numerically using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The effects of heat flux 19 and wall temperature on the liquid film were evaluated. The obtained pressure drops in a microchannel were qualitatively consistent with the experimental results of Qu and Mudawar (2004). Forced convective flow boiling in a single microchannel with different channel heights was studied through a numerical simulation to investigate bubble dynamics, flow patterns, and heat transfer. The momentum and energy equations were solved using the finite volume method while the liquid-vapor interface of a bubble is captured using the VOF (Volume of Fluid

  12. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of + or - 15 percent.

  13. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. This design precludes nucleate boiling in the flow channels as they are too small to handle vapor flow. Consequently, it was necessary to determine boiling incipience under the operating conditions of the magnet system. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of plus or minus 15 percent

  14. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Forced Convective Boiling in Microchannels by Periodic Electrospun Nanofiber Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarin, Alexander; Freystein, Martin; Kolberg, Felix; Sinha-Ray, Sumit; Sahu, Rakesh; Spiegel, Lucas; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana; Stephan, Peter

    2015-03-01

    To enhance heat transfer in forced convective boiling the microchannel bottom was amended by a nano-texture - periodic rectangular mats of electrospun polymer nanofibers. The fibers were ~ 300-500 nm in diameter and the mat thicknesses were about 6-15 μm. The test fluid was FC-72 and the flow in microchannels contained trains of Taylor bubbles. The role of the nanofibers was to retain the warm microchannel bottom wet, to prevent dry-out and thus to enhance the heat removal rate. In the present experiments the time-average heat flux and heat transfer coefficient at the nanofiber-coated domains were found to be 1.5-2 times higher than those at the uncoated ones. Accordingly, a significant decrease (by 5-8 K) in the superheat was observed at the same Re of 387 and power supply of 36.1 kW/m2. At a higher Re of 432 and lower power supply of 28.1 kW/m2 similar trends in the heat removal rate and surface superheat were found. The significant enhancement of the heat transfer results from the fact that nanofiber mats facilitate wetting of surface under passing Taylor bubbles, thus delaying formation of vapor flow at the channel bottom. The interstices of the nanofiber mat act as the nucleation sites facilitating formation of tiny bubbles, which eventually results in a higher heat removal rate from the surface at a reduced superheat.

  15. A critical review of predictive models for the onset of significant void in forced-convection subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Dorra, H.; Lee, S.C.; Bankoff, S.G.

    1993-06-01

    This predictive models for the onset of significant void (OSV) in forced-convection subcooled boiling are reviewed and compared with extensive data. Three analytical models and seven empirical correlations are considered in this review. These models and correlations are put onto a common basis and are compared, again on a common basis, with a variety of data. The evaluation of their range of validity and applicability under various operating conditions are discussed. The results show that the correlations of Saha-Zuber seems to be the best model to predict OSV in vertical subcooled boiling flow.

  16. Review of nucleation and incipient boiling under pool and forced convection conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of liquid-vapor nucleation is given. The result of thermodynamic equilibrium across curved liquid-vapor interfaces is presented. The extension of this to include the interaction with idealizations of surface cavities is made to demonstrate how superheat requirements for nucleation will be affected by surface roughness, flow velocity and buoyancy. Experimental measurements of high liquid superheats and nucleation delay times are presented as examples of homogeneous nucleation. Examples of nucleation and boiling on smooth glass substrates and on metal surfaces with various surface roughnesses are presented.

  17. Forced Convection Boiling and Critical Heat Flux of Ethanol in Electrically Heated Tube Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Linne, Diane L.; Rousar, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Electrically heated tube tests were conducted to characterize the critical heat flux (transition from nucleate to film boiling) of subcritical ethanol flowing at conditions relevant to the design of a regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chamber. The coolant was SDA-3C alcohol (95% ethyl alcohol, 5% isopropyl alcohol by weight), and tests were conducted over the following ranges of conditions: pressure from 144 to 703 psia, flow velocities from 9.7 to 77 ft/s, coolant subcooling from 33 to 362 F, and critical heat fluxes up to 8.7 BTU/in(exp 2)/sec. For the data taken near 200 psia, critical heat flux was correlated as a function of the product of velocity and fluid subcooling to within +/- 20%. For data taken at higher pressures, an additional pressure term is needed to correlate the critical heat flux. It was also shown that at the higher test pressures and/or flow rates, exceeding the critical heat flux did not result in wall burnout. This result may significantly increase the engine heat flux design envelope for higher pressure conditions.

  18. Forced convection and flow boiling with and without enhancement devices for top-side-heated horizontal channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.; Turknett, Jerry C.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly was studied. Studies are completed of the variations in the local (axial and circumferential) and mean heat transfer coefficients in horizontal, top-heated coolant channels with smooth walls and internal heat transfer enhancement devices. The working fluid is freon-11. The objectives are to: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls; (2) examine the effect of channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel; and (3) develop and improved data reduction analysis. The case of the top-heated, horizontal flow channel with smooth wall (1.37 cm inside diameter, and 122 cm heated length) was completed. The data were reduced using a preliminary analysis based on the heated hydraulic diameter. Preliminary examination of the local heat transfer coefficient variations indicated that there are significant axial and circumferential variations. However, it appears that the circumferential variation is more significant than the axial ones. In some cases, the circumferential variations were as much as a factor of ten. The axial variations rarely exceeded a factor of three.

  19. Free convection film boiling heat transfer from a rotating surface

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco, J.; Francisco, H. )

    1992-08-01

    A boundary layer model of laminar, subcooled, free convection film boiling from a rotating sphere has been developed. The conservation equations for the vapor and liquid were simplified, transformed into ordinary differential equations using an integral approach, and solved numerically. The theoretical variation of vapor film thickness with heater temperature and the resulting boiling fluxes were investigated. An experimental facility was built for the purpose of verifying the validity of the theoretical model and good agreement was found between the model and the experimental data at low rpm. The instability of the vapor film near the minimum heat flux for a rotating surface flux was also investigated.

  20. Vegetation forcing and convective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Leach, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1995-04-01

    A large irrigated vegetation area in a semiarid or relatively dry location is a strong surface forcing of thermal circulations. Several observational studies have found that such thermally induced mesoscale circulation may contribute to the triggering and development of convective clouds. In the western United States, extensive areas of irrigated farmland are surrounded by hot, dry surfaces, such as a steppe. Substantial gradients of sensible heating in the horizontal direction lead to a {open_quotes}farm breeze{close_quotes} circulation from the cooler agricultural area to the warmer steppes found at Boardman, Oregon. These thermally forced circulations may trigger convection by the related convergence and updraft motion under favorable atmospheric conditions. The role of vegetative covering in convective motion is investigated using a mesoscale numerical model. Two- and three-dimensional simulations are described. The effects of atmospheric stability, moisture in the lower atmosphere, moisture in the upper atmosphere, and horizontal heating scale on thermally induced clouds are studied. The horizontal scale of inhomogeneity is also studied using the two-dimensional model. Finally, a realistic vegetation distribution similar to that of the Boardman Regional Flux Experiment is used in the three-dimensional simulations.

  1. Forced-convective vitrification with liquid cryogens.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Shaw-Ruey; Huang, Jen-Hung; Shih, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yung-Jiun; Hsieh, Wen-Hsin

    2013-06-01

    Cell cryopreservation by vitrification generally requires using vitrification solutions with high concentrations of cryoprotectants (CPAs), which are toxic and induce osmotic stresses associated with the addition and removal of CPAs. To increase the cooling rate and reduce the CPA concentration required for vitrification, this study proposed an innovative approach, named forced-convective vitrification with liquid cryogens, in which liquid oxygen at a temperature below its boiling point (LOX(bbp)) was used as the cryogen to reduce the generation of insulating bubbles of gaseous oxygen and the sample was subjected to a constant velocity to remove insulation bubbles from the sample. Results show that changing the cryogen from liquid nitrogen at its boiling temperature (LN(abp)) to LOX(bbp), increasing the sample velocity and reducing the test solution volume increased the cooling rate and thereby decreased the CPA concentration required for vitrification. Using the same velocity (1.2 m/s), the cooling rate achieved with LOX(bbp) was 2.3-fold greater than that achieved with LN(abp). With LOX(bbp), the increase in the sample velocity from 0.2 to 1.2 m/s enhanced the cooling rate by 1.9 times. With LOX(bbp), a velocity of 1.2m/s and a test solution volume of 1.73 μl, the CPA concentration required for vitrification decreased to 25%. These results indicate that the new approach described here can reduce the CPA concentration required for vitrification, and thus decreases the toxicity and osmotic stresses associated with adding and removing the CPA. PMID:23545291

  2. Natural Convection and Boiling for Cooling SRP Reactors During Loss of Circulation Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.R.

    2001-06-26

    This study investigated natural convection and boiling as a means of cooling SRP reactors in the event of a loss of circulation accident. These studies show that single phase natural convection cooling of SRP reactors in shutdown conditions with the present piping geometry is probably not feasible.

  3. A study on the competing effects of the dielectrophoretic force and buoyancy on nucleate boiling heat transfer rates and an analogy with variable gravity boiling results

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, T.J.; Chung, J.N.; Schneider, J.B.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to form a more general understanding of the effect an electric field has on boiling heat transfer by considering non-boiling electroconvection and boiling bubble dynamics separately. In an attempt to decouple these two heat transfer mechanisms, an electric field was utilized which produced a uniform dielectrophoretic force (DEP force) across a horizontal platinum wire. It was concluded that the effect of the DEP force on the bubbles is analogous to reducing or increasing the gravity locally or inducing vapor flow across the heater surface similar to forced-convection. In terms of the relationship between the bubble dynamics and the heat transfer, it was concluded that nucleate boiling heat transfer will be enhanced if the effective gravity acts to hold the vapor bubbles near the heater surface, while at the same time permitting access of the liquid to the surface in order to prevent dryout. However, a large electroconvective effect can dominate and possibly reverse this trend. For the critical heat flux (CHF) it was discovered that for 1boiling in the presence of an electric field can be considered as the summation of a heat transfer coefficient due to bubble dynamics and a heat transfer coefficient due to electroconvection.

  4. The Transition From Nucleate Boiling Towards the Convection: Application to the Quenching of Metallic Massive Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Bourouga, Brahim; Gilles, Jerome

    2007-04-07

    In a recent study on thermal aspects of the quenching process, we developed an original device of measurement which allowed to update the competition between the heat transfer modes according to the quenching conditions and the quenched part size. One shows that, according to the range value of Biot number, the more resistive one part is, the more the boiling phases are relatively short. In order to provide relatively precise data for simulation of the quenching process in the case of strongly resistive parts from a thermal point of view, we undertook experiments on the cooling transition from nucleate boiling towards the convection. The obtained experimental results show that the temperature of transition from the nucleate boiling to the convection increases when the bath temperature decreases. We present the differences between the values of convection coefficient according to whether the bath is agitated or not. Experimental results relating are compared to some classical correlations.

  5. Supercritical droplet gasification experiments with forced convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron; Parigger, Chris; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results of a comprehensive experimental program are presented which offer the first direct observations of suspended n-heptane droplet gasifications in pure nitrogen with forced convection without the interference to optical probing associated with a flame. Measurements show attainment of a wet-bulb temperature until reduced pressures exceed about 1.0 under supercritical gas temperatures. Thereafter, temperature measurements indicate fully transient heat-up through the critical temperature. The surface is found to regress in a continuous manner with the measured temperature approaching the critical value at the end of the droplet lifetime under supercritical conditions with very mild level of convection. At increased level of convection for the same ambient conditions, similar sized droplets will undergo significant deformation during the gasification process until partially convected away as a dense vapor cloud as the critical temperature is approached.

  6. Forced Convection Heat Transfer in Circular Pipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosun, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    One of the pitfalls of engineering education is to lose the physical insight of the problem while tackling the mathematical part. Forced convection heat transfer (the Graetz-Nusselt problem) certainly falls into this category. The equation of energy together with the equation of motion leads to a partial differential equation subject to various…

  7. Magnetospheric Convection as a Global Force Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, G.

    2007-12-01

    Since 1959 when Thomas Gold showed that motions in the magnetosphere were possible despite plasma being frozen to the magnetic field, magnetospheric convection as a subject of study has gone through several stages (to be reviewed) leading to a recent one that integrates convection into a global system of balance of forces. This area of research has opened by focusing on the region 1 current system as a carrier of force between the solar wind and the ionosphere/thermosphere fluid. An important result to emerge from it is the realization that the force that the solar wind delivers to the magnetosphere in being transferred by the region 1 current system to the ionosphere/thermosphere fluid is amplified by about an order of magnitude. (Vasyliunas refers to this as "leveraging.") The apparent violation of Newton's Third Law results from the main participants in the force balance being not the solar wind force but the JxB force on the ionosphere/thermosphere fluid and the mu-dot-grad-B force on the Earth's dipole. This talk extends the study by considering the global force-balance problem separately for the Pedersen current (a completion of the region 1 problem), the Hall current (thus introducing the region 2 current system), and the Cowling current (bringing in the substorm current wedge). The approach is through representing the ionosphere/thermosphere fluid by the shallow water equations. Novelties that result include force balance by means of tidal bulges and tidal bores.

  8. An analysis of natural convection film boiling from spheres using the spherical coordinate system

    SciTech Connect

    Tso, C.P.; Leong, K.C.; Tan, H.S.

    1995-11-01

    The problem of natural convection film boiling on a sphere was analyzed by solving the momentum and energy equations in spherical coordinates. These solutions were compared to the analytical model of Frederking and Clark based on the Cartesian coordinate system, empirical correlation of Frederking and Clark and recent experimental data of Tso et al. for boiling in various refrigerants and liquid nitrogen. For the average Nusselt number, good agreement with Frederking and Clark`s model was obtained. Results using spherical coordinates yield a limiting value of 2 for the average Nusselt number near a modified Rayleigh number of 1 which could not be extracted from Frederking and Clark`s model.

  9. Boils

    MedlinePlus

    ... the boil is very bad or comes back. Antibacterial soaps and creams cannot help much once a boil ... following may help prevent the spread of infection: Antibacterial soaps Antiseptic (germ-killing) washes Keeping clean (such as ...

  10. Technology of forced flow and once-through boiling: A survey. [pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppendieck, H. F.; Sabin, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Representative boiling heat transfer and pressure drop information obtained primarily from past NASA and AEC programs is presented which is applicable to forced flow and once-through boiler systems. The forced convection boiler has a number of advantages: little possibility of flow mal-distribution; heat transfer characteristics are usually consistent; and conductances are predictable, so that higher heat fluxes may be employed with safety (which leads to more compact, lighter weight equipment). It was found that in gas-fired systems particularly, the controlling heat transfer resistance may be on the hot side, so that increased fluxes would require extended surfaces. If in a power generation system the working fluid is very expensive, a forced flow boiler can be designed especially for small holdup volume. If the fluid is temperature sensitive, the boiling side wall temperatures can be tailored to maintain maximum heat transfer rates without overheating the fluid. The forced flow and once-through configurations may be the only type which can satisfy a specific need (such as the automotive Rankine cycle power plant design having a very short time-response boiler).

  11. Forced convection modulates gas exchange in cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Mark R.; Sebens, Kenneth P.

    1989-01-01

    Boundary layer thickness is a potentially important component of the diffusive pathway for gas exchange in aquatic organisms. The soft coral Alcyonium siderium (Octocorallia) and sea anemone Metridium senile (Actiniaria) exhibit significant increases in respiration with water flow over a range of Reynolds numbers encountered subtidally. A nondimensional mass transfer analysis of the effect of forced convection demonstrates the importance of the state of the organism's boundary layer in regulating metabolism in these invertebrates. Flow-modulated gas exchange may limit secondary productivity in subtidal environments. PMID:16594087

  12. Performance of thermal adhesives in forced convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling is critical for the life and performance of electronic equipment. In most cases cooling may be achieved by natural convection but forced convection may be necessary for high wattage applications. Use of conventional type heat sinks may not be feasible from the viewpoint of specific applications and the costs involved. In a heat sink, fins can be attached to the well by ultrasonic welding, by soldering, or with a number of industrially available thermal adhesives. In this paper, the author investigates the heat transfer characteristics of several adhesives and compares them with ultrasonic welding and theoretically calculated values. This experiment was conducted in an air flow chamber. Heat was generated by using heaters mounted on the well. Thermstrate foil, Uniset A401, and Aremco 571 adhesives were tested along with an ultrasonically welded sample. Ultrasonic welding performed far better than the adhesives and Thermstrate foil. This type of experiment can be adapted for a laboratory exercise in an upper level heat transfer course. It gives students an exposure to industrial applications that help them appreciate the importance of the course material.

  13. Natural and forced convection during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, Jerome A.

    The following work marries theoretical and experimental approaches to study the interaction of an external shear flow with a solidifying porous medium. The porous medium, a dendritic 'mushy layer', is created when a super-eutectic binary alloy is cooled leading to solid crystals bathed in an interstitial fluid which is compositionally enriched. This compositional enrichment leads to natural buoyant instabilities in the solidifying porous medium coupled with instabilities in the adjoining liquid layer. Theoretically, the effect of an external shear flow on the convective instabilities inherent to this mushy layer is investigated using a linear stability analysis. The external flow is coupled to advective perturbations in the liquid and to flow in the mush through a perturbed mush-liquid interface. A complete numerical solution of the stability of the system is performed and a critical porous medium Rayleigh number is found which is a function of both the external flow speed and the wavenumber of the interfacial perturbations. By neglecting the effects of buoyancy in the liquid and solving only for the pressure perturbations on the corrugated mush-liquid interface induced by the external flow, a reduced model is constructed and solved analytically. These theoretical results are compared with experimental observations obtained in a laboratory flume in which an ammonium-chloride solution is solidified from below at a constant rate. The experimental results reveal that at flow speeds above critical, convection is forced within the mush leading to a series of zero solid fraction tesselations aligned perpendicular to the applied shear flow. The results of the experiments compare favorably to the linear stability analysis.

  14. An experimental investigation of liquid methane convection and boiling in rocket engine cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Abraham Gerardo

    approximately 0.1 for all channels. Convective Nusselt number follows predicted trends for Reynolds number with a wall temperature correction for both the boiling and non-boiling regimes.

  15. Driving forces: Slab subduction and mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    1988-01-01

    Mantle convection is the mechanism ultimately responsible for most geological activity at Earth's surface. To zeroth order, the lithosphere is the cold outer thermal boundary layer of the convecting mantle. Subduction of cold dense lithosphere provides tha major source of negative buoyancy driving mantle convection and, hence, surface tectonics. There are, however, importnat differences between plate tectonics and the more familiar convecting systems observed in the laboratory. Most important, the temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of mantle rocks makes the thermal boundary layer mechanically strong, leading to nearly rigid plates. This strength stabilizes the cold boundary layer against small amplitude perturbations and allows it to store substantial gravitational potential energy. Paradoxically, through going faults at subduction zones make the lithosphere there locally weak, allowing rapid convergence, unlike what is observed in laboratory experiments using fluids with temperature dependent viscosities. This bimodal strength distribution of the lithosphere distinguishes plate tectonics from simple convection experiments. In addition, Earth has a buoyant, relatively weak layer (the crust) occupying the upper part of the thermal boundary layer. Phase changes lead to extra sources of heat and bouyancy. These phenomena lead to observed richness of behavior of the plate tectonic style of mantle convection.

  16. Forced-to-natural convection transition tests in parallel simulated liquid metal reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, A.E. ); Montgomery, B.H. )

    1990-01-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Out of Reactor Safety (THORS) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had as its objective the testing of simulated, electrically heated liquid metal reactor (LMR) fuel assemblies in an engineering-scale, sodium loop. Between 1971 and 1985, the THORS Program operated 11 simulated fuel bundles in conditions covering a wide range of normal and off-normal conditions. The last test series in the Program, THORS-SHRS Assembly 1, employed two parallel, 19-pin, full-length, simulated fuel assemblies of a design consistent with the large LMR (Large Scale Prototype Breeder -- LSPB) under development at that time. These bundles were installed in the THORS Facility, allowing single- and parallel-bundle testing in thermal-hydraulic conditions up to and including sodium boiling and dryout. As the name SHRS (Shutdown Heat Removal System) implies, a major objective of the program was testing under conditions expected during low-power reactor operation, including low-flow forced convection, natural convection, and forced-to-natural convection transition at various powers. The THORS-SHRS Assembly 1 experimental program was divided up into four phases. Phase 1 included preliminary and shakedown tests, including the collection of baseline steady-state thermal-hydraulic data. Phase 2 comprised natural convection testing. Forced convection testing was conducted in Phase 3. The final phase of testing included forced-to-natural convection transition tests. Phases 1, 2, and 3 have been discussed in previous papers. The fourth phase is described in this paper. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Experimental measurements and CFD simulation of convective boiling during subcooled developing flow of R-11 within vertical annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaichaoui, Y.; Kibboua, R.; Matkovič, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper a convective flow boiling of refrigerant R-11 in a vertical annular channel has been investigated. Measurements were performed under various conditions of mass flux, heat flux, and inlet subcooling, which enabled to study the influence of different boundary conditions on the development of local flow parameters. Also, some measurements have been compared to the predictions by the three-dimensional two-fluid model of subcooled boiling flow carried out with the computer code ANSYS-CFX-13. Simulation results successfully predict the main experimental tendencies associated with the heat flux and Reynolds number variation. A sensitivity analysis of several modelling parameters on the radial distribution of flow quantities has highlighted the importance of correct description of the boiling boundary layer. In general a good quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data was obtained.

  18. Enhanced Heat Rejection of Microscale Geometries in Convective Flow Boiling Evaporators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safford Smith, L. M.; Connacher, W. J.; Cheng, J. C.; Pisano, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    Four surfaces have been designed, fabricated and tested under convective flow boiling (CFB) conditions in an open loop configuration. They contain features in the 10 micron range and were tested with flow velocities under 3 mm/s. To accomplish these flow rates, this work utilizes a constant pressure potential driving flow, instead of the constant flow rate imposed with a syringe pump. This limited device flooding. The evaporation surfaces were tested to the point of dry-out at three different pressure potentials: 150, 650, and 1150 Pa, across a range of powers from 25 W/cm2 to 50 W/cm2. Temperature data was collected from an IR Camera and showed that fluctuations in the wall temperatures exceed 5 °C in more than 50% of the tests and reached differences as high as 23 °C. The wall temperature instabilities in CFB indicate that one temperature may be inaccurate and that by including time as a variable a better understanding of the behaviour at this scale may be revealed.

  19. Parabolic flight experiment "Convection in a Cylinder" - Convection patterns in varying buoyancy forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahley, N.; Futterer, B.; Egbers, C.; Crumeyrolle, O.; Mutabazi, I.

    2011-12-01

    Within the project "Convection in a Cylinder" (CiC) heat transfer enhancement is studied for the case of two concentric, vertically aligned cylinders. The cylindrical gap is filled with a dielectric liquid, which viscosity is just few times higher than that of water. The inner cylinder is heated and the outer one is cooled. This setup in a gravitational buoyancy field leads to a fluid movement in a single convective cell with hot fluid rising at the inner boundary and cold fluid sinking at the outer boundary. The top and bottom part of the system shows horizontal movement, again in boundary layers. The strengthening of temperature gradient induces instabilities of that convective motion. If we vary the buoyancy force by means of electro-hydrodynamic effects, the patterns of convection differ from those instabilities rising only from variation of the temperature gradient.

  20. Pool boiling enhancement through bubble induced convective liquid flow in feeder microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaikumar, A.; Kandlikar, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    Bubbles departing from the nucleation sites induce a liquid flow from the bulk to the heated surface during pool boiling. Alternating the nucleating regions with non-nucleating regions facilitates separate liquid-vapor pathways for departing vapor bubbles and returning liquid. We explored an additional enhancement through liquid feeder channels on the heater surface directing the returning liquid towards the nucleating region. The nucleating bubbles were confined to the nucleating region as the returning liquid flow induced strong convective currents over the non-nucleating regions. In the best performing configuration, the nucleating regions were 0.5 mm wide, separated by non-nucleating regions of width 2.125 mm, which corresponded to the bubble departure diameter. The non-nucleating regions contained 0.5 mm wide feeder channels directing liquid towards the nucleating region. High speed images indicated distinct vapor columns over the nucleating regions with liquid channeled through the feeder channels. At higher heat fluxes, the strong liquid currents established over the feeder channels suppressed any undesirable nucleation in them keeping the separated vapor-liquid pathways functional. This enhancement technique resulted in a critical heat flux of 394 W/cm2 at a wall superheat of 5.5 °C which translated to a heat transfer coefficient of 713 kW/m2 °C. The additional surface area and high heat transfer coefficient due to microchannel flow in feeder channels, and the unobstructed surface available for the bubbles to expand over the prime heat transfer surface area before departing were seen to be responsible for their superior performance.

  1. Students' Understanding of Boiling Points and Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen; Kaufmann, Birgit; Treagust, David F.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory chemistry courses students are presented with the model that matter is composed of particles, and that weak forces of attraction exist between them. This model is used to interpret phenomena such as solubility and melting points, and aids in understanding the changes in states of matter as opposed to chemical reactions. We…

  2. Heat transfer in hydrocarbon fuel boiling under conditions of natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Shigabiev, T.N.; Galimov, F.M.

    1995-12-01

    Data on the heat-transfer coefficient in boiling of five jet fuels, two automotive gasolines, and a diesel fuel are presented over a wide range of regime parameters. The obtained results are described by a unified similarity equation.

  3. Mixed convection in turbulent film boiling on a vertical ellipsoid under high and low velocity liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hai-Ping

    2011-04-01

    The theoretical study researched into heat transfer of turbulent film boiling on an isothermal ellipsoid under high and low velocity liquid. The flowing velocity of the saturated liquid at the boundary layer is determined by potential flow theory. The larger the eccentricity parameter is the smaller the mean Nusselt number will be. Besides, for the cases of turbulent film boiling under the flowing liquid, the increase in the Froude number will bring out an increase in the mean Nusselt number.

  4. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A. ); Irvine, T.F., Jr. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-04-01

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured (0 to 8.5 cm/s), the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  5. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F., Jr.

    1992-04-01

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus_minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured [0 to 8.5 cm/s], the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  6. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  7. Combined forced and free convection in a curved duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Clement G.; Dwyer, Harry A.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a combined forced and free convection flow in a curved duct. Solutions are obtained by solving the low Mach number model of the Navier-Stokes equation using a control volume method. The finite-volume method was developed with the use of a predictor-corrector numerical scheme and some new variations of the classical projection method. Solutions indicated that the existence of a buoyancy force has changed the entire flow structure inside a curved duct. Reversed flow at both inner and outer bend is observed. For moderate Reynolds number, the upstream section of the duct was significantly influenced by the free convection processes. In general, heat transfer is strong at the inner bend of the beginning of the heated section and at the outer bend on the last half of the heated section. The maximum velocity location is strongly influenced by the combined effects of buoyancy and centrifugal forces. A strong buoyancy force can reduce the strength of the secondary flow where it plays an important role in mixing.

  8. Evaluation of T-111 forced-convection loop tested with lithium at 1370 C. [free convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devan, J. H.; Long, E. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A T-111 alloy (Ta-8% W-2% Hf) forced-convection loop containing molten lithium was operated 3000 hr at a maximum temperature of 1370 C. Flow velocities up to 6.3 m/sec were used, and the results of this forced-convection loop are very similar to those observed in lower velocity thermal-convection loops of T-111 containing lithium. Weight changes were determined at 93 positions around the loop. The maximum dissolution rate occurred at the maximum wall temperature of the loop and was less than 1.3 microns/year. Mass transfer of hafnium, nitrogen, and, to a lesser extent, carbon occurred from the hotter to cooler regions. Exposed surfaces in the highest temperature region were found to be depleted in hafnium to a depth of 60 microns with no detectable change in tungsten content. There was some loss in room-temperature tensile strength for specimens exposed to lithium at 1370 C, attributable to depletion of hafnium and nitrogen and to attendant grain growth.

  9. Lox droplet vaporization in a supercritical forced convective environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, Chia-Chun; Yang, Vigor

    1994-01-01

    A systematic investigation has been conducted to study the effects of ambient flow conditions (i.e. pressure and velocity) on supercritical droplet gasification in a forced-convective environment. The model is based on the time-dependent conservation equations in axisymmetric coordinates, and accommodates thermodynamic nonidealities and transport anomalies. In addition, an efficient scheme for evaluating thermophysical properties over the entire range of fluid thermodynamic states is established. The analysis allows a thorough examination of droplet behavior during its entire lifetime, including transient gasification, dynamic deformation, and shattering. A parametric study of droplet vaporization rate in terms of ambient pressure and Reynolds number is also conducted.

  10. Membrane species mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shu-Kai; Huang, Ling-Ting; Chao, Ling

    2016-08-17

    Processing and managing cell membrane proteins for characterization while maintaining their intact structure is challenging. Hydrodynamic flow has been used to transport membrane species in supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) where the hydrophobic cores of the membrane species can be protected during processing. However, the forced convection mechanism of species embedded in lipid bilayers is still unclear. Developing a controlled SLB platform with a practical model to predict the membrane species mobility in the platform under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is imperative to ensure the practical applicability of SLBs in processing and managing membrane species with various geometrical properties. The mobility of membrane species is affected by the driving force from the aqueous environment in addition to the frictions from the lipid bilayer, in which both lipid leaflets may exhibit different speeds relative to that of the moving species. In this study, we developed a model, based on the applied driving force and the possible frictional resistances that the membrane species encounter, to predict how the mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is influenced by the sizes of the species' hydrophilic portion in the aqueous environment and the hydrophobic portion embedded in the membrane. In addition, we used a microfluidic device for controlling the flow to arrange the lipid membrane and the tested membrane species in the desirable locations in order to obtain a SLB platform which can provide clear mobility responses of the species without disturbance from the species dispersion effect. The model predictions were consistent with the experimental observations, with the sliding friction coefficient between the upper leaflet and the hydrophilic portion of the species as the only regressed parameter. The result suggests that not only the lateral drag frictions from the lipid layers but also the sliding frictions between the species and the lipid layer planes

  11. Numerical study of forced convective heat transfer around airships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qiumin; Fang, Xiande

    2016-02-01

    Forced convective heat transfer is an important factor that affects the thermal characteristics of airships. In this paper, the steady state forced convective heat transfer around an ellipsoid is numerically investigated. The numerical simulation is carried out by commercial computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software over the extended Re range from 20 to 108 and the aspect ratio from 2 to 4. Based on the regression and optimization with software, a new piecewise correlation of the Nusselt number at constant wall temperature for ellipsoid is proposed, which is suitable for applications to airships and other ellipse shaped bodies such as elliptical balloons. The thermal characteristics of a stratospheric airship in midsummer located in the north hemisphere are numerical studied. The helium temperature predicated using the new correlation is compared to those predicted by correlations applicable for spheres and flat plates. The results show that the helium temperature obtained using the new correlation at noon is about 5.4 K lower than that using the correlation of spheres and about 2.1 K higher than that of flat plates.

  12. Investigation of Body Force Effects on Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Hui; Mudawar, Issam; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2002-01-01

    The bubble coalescence and interfacial instabilities that are important to modeling critical heat flux (CHF) in reduced-gravity systems can be sensitive to even minute body forces. Understanding these complex phenomena is vital to the design and safe implementation of two-phase thermal management loops proposed for space and planetary-based thermal systems. While reduced gravity conditions cannot be accurately simulated in 1g ground-based experiments, such experiments can help isolate the effects of the various forces (body force, surface tension force and inertia) which influence flow boiling CHF. In this project, the effects of the component of body force perpendicular to a heated wall were examined by conducting 1g flow boiling experiments at different orientations. FC-72 liquid was boiled along one wall of a transparent rectangular flow channel that permitted photographic study of the vapor-liquid interface at conditions approaching CHF. High-speed video imaging was employed to capture dominant CHF mechanisms. Six different CHF regimes were identified: Wavy Vapor Layer, Pool Boiling, Stratification, Vapor Counterflow, Vapor Stagnation, and Separated Concurrent Vapor Flow. CHF showed great sensitivity to orientation for flow velocities below 0.2 m/s, where very small CHF values where measured, especially with downflow and downward-facing heated wall orientations. High flow velocities dampened the effects of orientation considerably. Figure I shows representative images for the different CHF regimes. The Wavy Vapor Layer regime was dominant for all high velocities and most orientations, while all other regimes were encountered at low velocities, in the downflow and/or downward-facing heated wall orientations. The Interfacial Lift-off model was modified to predict the effects of orientation on CHF for the dominant Wavy Vapor Layer regime. The photographic study captured a fairly continuous wavy vapor layer travelling along the heated wall while permitting liquid

  13. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    2012-10-25

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  14. Onset of convective flows in a near-wall granular layer during nonstationary liquid boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokusaev, B. G.; Karlov, S. P.; Nekrasov, D. A.; Zakharov, N. S.

    2014-08-01

    The onset and development of convective flows during nonstationary conductive heating of a cell with a layer of cylindrical pebbles placed in a liquid medium have been studied using a proposed and implemented optical method. The temperature fields have been measured using a holographic interferometry technique with immersion optical tomography elements, which is based upon the dependence of the index of refraction on the temperature and properties of a continuous medium. The mechanism of the pebble-bed influence on the time and character of microconvection formed near the cell wall heated from below has been studied for variable thermal properties of the liquid medium and pebbles in the granular layer and supplied heat flux. Data on the visualization of temperature fields and the development of convective flows in a pebble-bed reactor cell of complicated shape during nonstationary heating have been obtained for the first time.

  15. LOX droplet vaporization in a supercritical forced convective environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, Chia-Chun; Yang, Vigor

    1993-01-01

    Modern liquid rocket engines often use liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) as propellants to achieve high performance, with the engine operational conditions in the supercritical regimes of the propellants. Once the propellant exceeds its critical state, it essentially becomes a puff of dense fluid. The entire field becomes a continuous medium, and no distinct interfacial boundary between the liquid and gas exists. Although several studies have been undertaken to investigate the supercritical droplet behavior at quiescent conditions, very little effort has been made to address the fundamental mechanisms associated with LOX droplet vaporization in a supercritical, forced convective environment. The purpose is to establish a theoretical framework within which supercritical droplet dynamics and vaporization can be studied systematically by means of an efficient and robust numerical algorithm.

  16. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  17. Forced Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Properties of Liquid Hydrogen for Manganin Plate Pasted on One Side of a Rectangular Duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, K.; Shirai, Y.; Shiotsu, M.; Oura, Y.; Horie, Y.; Matsuzawa, T.; Shigeta, H.; Tatsumoto, H.; Hata, K.; Naruo, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Inatani, Y.

    In this report, we show results on the forced flow boiling heat transfer experiments for manganin plate pasted on one side of a rectangular duct. Nucleate boiling heat transfer and its Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) heat flux were measured for various pressures, subcooling and flow velocities. The DNB heat fluxes are higher for higher subcooling and higher flow velocity. The DNB heat fluxes were compared with the experimental data for round tube of nearly equal equivalent diameter. The DNB heat fluxes for the rectangular duct are lower than those for the round tube.

  18. An Analytical Approach for Relating Boiling Points of Monofunctional Organic Compounds to Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyf, Jef

    2011-01-01

    The boiling point of a monofunctional organic compound is expressed as the sum of two parts: a contribution to the boiling point due to the R group and a contribution due to the functional group. The boiling point in absolute temperature of the corresponding RH hydrocarbon is chosen for the contribution to the boiling point of the R group and is a…

  19. Forced Convection and Sedimentation Past a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelekasis, Nikolaos A.; Acrivos, Andreas

    1995-01-01

    The steady laminar flow of a well-mixed suspension of monodisperse solid spheres, convected steadily past a horizontal flat plate and sedimenting under the action of gravity, is examined. It is shown that, in the limit as Re approaches infinity and epsilon approaches 0, where Re is the bulk Reynolds number and epsilon is the ratio of the particle radius a to the characteristic length scale L, the analysis for determining the particle concentration profile has several aspects in common with that of obtaining the temperature profile in forced-convection heat transfer from a wall to a fluid stream moving at high Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. Specifically, it is found that the particle concentration remains uniform throughout the O(Re(exp -1/2)) thick Blasius boundary layer except for two O(epsilon(exp 2/3)) thin regions on either side of the plate, where the concentration profile becomes non-uniform owing to the presence of shear-induced particle diffusion which balances the particle flux due to convection and sedimentation. The system of equations within this concentration boundary layer admits a similarity solution near the leading edge of the plate, according to which the particle concentration along the top surface of the plate increases from its value in the free stream by an amount proportional to X(exp 5/6), with X measuring the distance along the plate, and decreases in a similar fashion along the underside. But, unlike the case of gravity settling on an inclined plate in the absence of a bulk flow at infinity considered earlier, here the concentration profile remains continuous everywhere. For values of X beyond the region near the leading edge, the particle concentration profile is obtained through the numerical solution of the relevant equations. It is found that, as predicted from the similarity solution, there exists a value of X at which the particle concentration along the top side of the plate attains its maximum value phi(sub m) and that, beyond this

  20. Computation of forced laminar convection in rotating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, J. W.

    1985-05-01

    Finite difference solutions are presented for forced laminar convection in a rotating cylindrical cavity with radial outflow. This forms a simple model of the cooling flow between two compressor disks in a gas turbine engine. If the fluid enters the cavity from a uniform radial source, it is shown that the local Nusselt number changes from that of a 'free disk' near the center of the cavity to that for Ekman layer flow at larger radii. With an axial inlet, the flow, and consequently, the heat transfer, is more complex. If vortex breakdown occurs, then the results are very similar to those for the radial inlet case, but otherwise a wall jet forms on the downstream disk, and the heat transfer from this disk may be several times that for the upstream disk. Variation of mean Nusselt number with rotational speed is qualitatively similar to previously published experimental measurements in turbulent flow. The effect of Prandtl number on heat transfer has also been demonstrated.

  1. Forced convective melting at an evolving ice-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramudu, Eshwan; Hirsh, Benjamin; Olson, Peter; Gnanadesikan, Anand

    2015-11-01

    The intrusion of warm Circumpolar Deep Water into the ocean cavity between the base of ice shelves and the sea bed in Antarctica causes melting at the ice shelves' basal surface, producing a turbulent melt plume. We conduct a series of laboratory experiments to investigate how the presence of forced convection (turbulent mixing) changes the delivery of heat to the ice-water interface. We also develop a theoretical model for the heat balance of the system that can be used to predict the change in ice thickness with time. In cases of turbulent mixing, the heat balance includes a term for turbulent heat transfer that depends on the friction velocity and an empirical coefficient. We obtain a new value for this coefficient by comparing the modeled ice thickness against measurements from a set of nine experiments covering one order of magnitude of Reynolds numbers. Our results are consistent with the altimetry-inferred melting rate under Antarctic ice shelves and can be used in climate models to predict their disintegration. This work was supported by NSF grant EAR-110371.

  2. Evaluation of engine coolants under flow boiling conditions

    SciTech Connect

    McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Stinson, C.; Gollin, M.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to evaluate the heat transfer performance of two engine coolant mixtures, propylene-glycol/water and ethylene-glycol/water. In each mixture, the concentration was 50-50 by volume. Performance in this situation is defined as the ability to maintain a lower surface temperature for a given flux. The heat transfer regimes considered covered the range from single phase forced convection through saturated flow boiling. Results show that both coolants perform satisfactorily. However, in single phase convection, ethylene-glycol/water is slightly more effective. Conversely, for sub-cooled nucleate boiling and saturated boiling, propylene-glycol/water results in slightly lower metal temperatures.

  3. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Five Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Fran

    1997-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many earthbound applications in steamgeneration power plants, petroleum plants, and other chemical plants. In addition, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  4. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many Earthbound applications, such as steam-generation power plants, petroleum, and other chemical plants. Also, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  5. A Closer Look at Trends in Boiling Points of Hydrides: Using an Inquiry-Based Approach to Teach Intermolecular Forces of Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazier, Samantha; Marano, Nadia; Eisen, Laura

    2010-01-01

    We describe how we use boiling-point trends of group IV-VII hydrides to introduce intermolecular forces in our first-year general chemistry classes. Starting with the idea that molecules in the liquid state are held together by some kind of force that must be overcome for boiling to take place, students use data analysis and critical reasoning to…

  6. Forced convection heat transfer of subcooled liquid hydrogen in horizontal tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, Hideki; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Hata, Koichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Kinoshita, K.

    2012-06-01

    Forced flow heat transfers of liquid hydrogen through horizontally-mounted tubes with the diameter of 3.0 mm and 6.0 mm were measured at the pressure of 0.7 MPa for various inlet temperatures and flow velocities. The measured non-boiling heat transfer coefficients agree with those by the Dittus-Boelter correlation. The heat fluxes at the onset of nucleate boiling and the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) heat fluxes, where the heat transfer continuously changes to film boiling regime, are higher for higher flow velocity, larger subcooling and larger tube diameter. The DNB heat fluxes for the horizontally-mounted tube are slightly lower than those for the vertically-mounted tube, although the effect of the tube attitude direction disappears for a small tube diameter. The measured DNB heat fluxes agree with the correlation for vertically-mounted tubes.

  7. Liquid metal boiling inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabin, C. M.; Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Meckel, P. T.; Cloakey, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of the inception of boiling in potassium in forced convection is reported. The boiler consisted of a 0.19-inch inside diameter, niobium-1% zirconium boiler tube approximately six feet long. Heating was accomplished by direct electrical tube wall conduction. Experiments were performed with both all-liquid fill and two-phase fill startup sequences and with a range of flow rates, saturation temperatures, inert gas levels, and fill liquid temperatures. Superheat of the liquid above the equilibrium saturation temperature was observed in all the experiments. Incipient boiling liquid superheat ranged from a few degrees to several hundred. Comparisons of these data with other data and with several analytical treatments are presented.

  8. Microheater Array Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    By conducting pool boiling tests in microgravity, the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and the relative magnitude of other phenomena can be assessed. Data from KC-135 and sounding rocket experiments indicate little effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble, surrounded by smaller satellite bubbles, moved over the surface, occasionally causing nucleation. Once formed, the primary bubble size remained constant for a given superheat, indicating evaporation at the bubble base is balanced with condensation on the bubble cap. The primary bubble's size increased with wall superheat. Most heaters under the primary bubble had low heat transfer rates, suggesting liquid dryout. Strong Marangoni convection developed in microgravity, forming a 'jet' into the bulk liquid that forced the bubble onto the heater. An experiment is being designed for the. Microgravity Science Glovebox. This experiment uses two 96 element microheater arrays, 2.7 and 7.0 mm in size. These heaters are individually controlled to operate at a constant temperature, measuring local heat fluxes as a function of time and space. Most boiling experiments operate at constant wall heat flux with larger heaters, allowing only time and space-averaged measurements. Each heater is about the bubble departure size in normal gravity, but significantly smaller than the bubble departure size in reduced gravity.

  9. Forced Convection Heat Transfer of Liquid Hydrogen Through a 200-mm Long Heated Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, Hideki; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Hata, Koichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Kinoshita, Katsuhiro

    The heat transfer from the inner side of a vertically- mounted heated tube with a length of 200.0 mm and a diameter of 6.0 mm to a forced flow of liquid hydrogen was measured for wide ranges of flow rate and liquid temperature. The non-boiling heat transfer coefficients agreed well with the Dittus -Boelter equation. The heat fluxes at departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) were higher for higher flow velocities and greater subcooling. The effect of the tube length on the DNB heat flux was clarified through comparison with our previous data. It was confirmed that the experimental data agreed well with the authors' DNB correlation.

  10. Induced convective enhancement of the critical heat flux from partially heated horizontal flat plates in saturated pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Bockwoldt, T.S.; Jeter, S.M.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Hartley, J.G. )

    1992-05-01

    Current developments in high-power electronics and other energy-intensive applications have accentuated the need for higher performance heat transfer. Nucleate boiling heat transfer is one of the most effective modes of heat transfer, with pool boiling being perhaps the simplest type of passive two-phase cooling. Unfortunately, the maximum heat flux attainable in nucleate pool boiling is limited by the relatively low critical heat flux at the onset of film boiling. Several methods have been suggested to enhance the critical heat flux. In particular, Costello et al. showed that the critical heat flux in saturated pool boiling could be enhanced by simply increasing the width of the pool while maintaining a fixed heater size. Elkassabgi and Lienhard examined the combined effects of immersion depth and pool size on the critical heat flux for a small-diameter horizontal cylinder in saturated pool boiling. No similar study for flat plate heaters appears in the literature. While as noted above the effect of heater appears in the literature. While as noted above the effect of heater appears in the literature. While as noted above the effect of heater size and immersion depth have been studied independently, no systematic investigation of the combined effects has been conducted previously. This paper presents the results of such a study.

  11. Mathematical Modelling of Force Convection in a Two-Phase Thermosyphon in Conjugate Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurpeiis, Atlant; Nee, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    A nonlinear non-stationary problem of the conductive-convective heat transfer is addressed (under forced convection conditions) in the thermosyphon of rectangular cross-section. The thermal energy supply is carried out through the lower horizontal border. The mathematical model is formulated in dimensionless variables of "velocity vorticity vector - current function - temperature". The current and temperature distribution lines are obtained, illustrating the effect of the Reynolds number on the thermodynamic structures formation in the analyzed object.

  12. Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britz, Dieter

    Convection has long been coupled with electrochemistry, and the name hydrodynamic voltammetry has become standard. In electroanalytical chemistry we mainly seek reproducible conditions. These are almost always attained by systems in which a steady convective state is achieved, although not always. Thus, the once popular dropping mercury electrode (see texts such as [74, 257]) has convection around it, but is never in steady state; it might be called a reproducible periodic dynamic state.

  13. Estimating surface temperature in forced convection nucleate boiling: A simplified method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Papell, S. S.

    1977-01-01

    During a test program to investigate low-cycle thermal fatigue, 21 of 22 cylindrical test sections of a cylindrical rocket thrust chamber were thermally cycled to failure. Cylinder liners were fabricated from OFHC copper, Amzirc, and NARloy-Z. The cylinders were fabricated by milling cooling channels into the liner and closing out the backside with electrodeposited copper. The tests were conducted at a chamber pressure of 4.14 MN/sq m (600 psia) and an oxidant-fuel ratio of 6.0 using hydrogen-oxygen as propellants. The average throat heat flux was 54 MW/sq m (33 Btu/sq in./sec). All of the failures were characterized by a thinning of the cooling channel wall and eventual failure by tensile rupture. The 1/2-hard Amzirc material showed little improvement in cyclic life when compared with OFHC copper; while the NARloy-Z and aged Amzirc materials had the best cyclic life characteristics. One OFHC copper cylinder was thermall cycled 2044 times at a steady-state hot-gas-side wall temperature of 514 K (925 R) without failing.

  14. Multi-crystalline silicon solidification under controlled forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cablea, M.; Zaidat, K.; Gagnoud, A.; Nouri, A.; Chichignoud, G.; Delannoy, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Multi-crystalline silicon wafers have a lower production cost compared to mono-crystalline wafers. This comes at the price of reduced quality in terms of electrical properties and as a result the solar cells made from such materials have a reduced efficiency. The presence of different impurities in the bulk material plays an important role during the solidification process. The impurities are related to different defects (dislocations, grain boundaries) encountered in multi-crystalline wafers. Applying an alternative magnetic field during the solidification process has various benefits. Impurities concentration in the final ingot could be reduced, especially metallic species, due to a convective term added in the liquid that reduces the concentration of impurities in the solute boundary layer. Another aspect is the solidification interface shape that is influenced by the electromagnetic stirring. A vertical Bridgman type furnace was used in order to study the solidification process of Si under the influence of a travelling magnetic field able to induce a convective flow in the liquid. The furnace was equipped with a Bitter type three-phase electromagnet that provides the required magnetic field. A numerical model of the furnace was developed in ANSYS Fluent commercial software. This paper presents experimental and numerical results of this approach, where interface markings were performed.

  15. Studies of Forced-Convection Heat Transfer Augmentation in Large Containment Enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, S.Z.; Peterson, P.F.

    2001-06-17

    Heat transfer enhancement due to jet mixing inside a cylindrical enclosure is discussed. This work addresses conservative heat transfer assumptions regarding mixing and condensation that have typically been incorporated into passive containment design analyses. This research presents the possibility for increasing decay heat removal of passive containment systems under combined natural and forced convection. Eliminating these conservative assumptions could result in a changed containment design and reduce the construction cost. It is found that the ratio of forced- and free-convection Nusselt numbers can be predicted as a function of the Archimedes number and a correlated factor accounting for jet orientation and enclosure geometry.

  16. A numerical study of Li-SF6 wick combustion - Forced and mixed convective burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damaso, R. C.; Chen, L.-D.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to study Li-SF6 wick diffusion flames under mixed convective burning conditions at a pressure of 0.01 MPa. Both planar and cylindrical wicks are considered. The model is based on a conserved scalar approach. The objective of this study is to assess the effects of particular parameters on the burning rate and heat transfer. The flat-plate solution yields a fuel mass burning rate per unit surface area following the x exp -1/2 dependence of the classical similarity solution, where x is the streamwise distance. Cylindrical wick geometries yield enhanced burning rates over planar wicks. For the case of mixed convective burning, the burning rate results approach either the forced or natural convective burning limits as ambient streamwise velocity is changed. Critical Richardson numbers specifying these burning limits are determined for a given condition. Reducing gravity results in a lower burning rate because the influence of natural convection is diminished. Under reduced gravity of 1/1000 of the sea-level value, mixed convective burning nearly resembles forced convection.

  17. MHD forced convective laminar boundary layer flow from a convectively heated moving vertical plate with radiation and transpiration effect.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to x(m) whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to x((m-1)/2) where x is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory. PMID:23741295

  18. MHD Forced Convective Laminar Boundary Layer Flow from a Convectively Heated Moving Vertical Plate with Radiation and Transpiration Effect

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jashim; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, A. I. Md.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to where is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory. PMID:23741295

  19. The Role of Ascent-Forced Convection in Orographic Precipitation: Results from the DOMEX Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minder, J. R.; Smith, R. B.; Nugent, A. D.; Kirshbaum, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Shallow convection is a pervasive feature of orographic precipitation, but its detailed role remains poorly understood. The mountainous Caribbean island of Dominica is a natural laboratory for isolating the role of shallow convection in orographic rainfall. It lies in a region of persistent easterly trade wind flow, and receives much of its rainfall from shallow convection that is forced mechanically by ascent of easterly flow over the Dominican terrain. The Dominica Experiment (DOMEX) has focused on convective orographic precipitation over the island from 2007-2011. The first phase of the project developed a climatology of rainfall and theories to explain the observed enhancement over the terrain. The second phase of the project (Apr-May 2011) has provided a detailed view of 20 individual rainfall events with data from: surface gauges, time-lapse photography, operational radar scans, a mountaintop weather station, and both in situ and remote observations from the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft. Focusing on ascent--forced convection during DOMEX has revealed a number of the key processes that control the rainfall. Upwind of the island, clouds and water vapor anomalies exist that appear to play a crucial role in seeding the convection over the terrain and determining its vigor. Over the windward slopes the air is readily lifted with little flow deflection. Strong convective cells rapidly develop to produce large rainfall rates. Over the lee slopes of the terrain there is an abrupt transition to a deep and turbulent plunging flow that quickly eliminates convective clouds, but allows for the spillover of rainfall. The air that passes over the island is transformed such that low-levels are dried, warmed and decelerated, and the downwind wake becomes less hospitable to trade wind cumuli.

  20. Forced flow of a vapor-liquid stream in a horizontal pipe with film boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, É. K.; Panevin, V. I.; Firsov, V. P.

    1986-05-01

    The stream structure and flow regime during film boiling of liquid nitrogen in a horizontal pipe are investigated. Data on heat transfer are obtained and a model is proposed for calculating the parameters of the two-phase stream along the channel length.

  1. Effect of a forced Couette flow on coupled convective and morphological instabilities during unidirectional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Mcfadden, G. B.; Boisvert, R. F.; Sekerka, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a forced Couette flow, parallel to a horizontal crystal-melt interface during directional solidification of an alloy of lead containing tin, on the onset of convective and morphological instabilities, is calculated numerically via a linear stability analysis. Such a flow does not affect perturbations with wave vectors perpendicular to the flow. For perturbations with wave vectors parallel to the flow, the onset of morphological instability is somewhat suppressed and thermosolutal convection is greatly suppressed. When instabilities occur, they are oscillatory and correspond to travelling waves. For values of the crystal growth velocity for which mixed morphological and convective modes occur, the presence of a forced flow produces sufficient decoupling to allow otherwise degenerate branches to be identified.

  2. Weight and water loss in the neonate in natural and forced convection.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, M H; Stothers, J K; McLellan, N J

    1984-01-01

    We describe a simple method of determining weight loss and hence water loss of infants in incubators. Unlike previously reported methods, it does not interfere with the microenvironment surrounding the infant. Weight loss of 16 term and 32 preterm infants was measured in both forced and natural convection. No significant increase in water loss was observed in the term infants but in the preterm infants the mean loss in natural convection was 0.85 g/kg/hour compared with 1.26 g/kg/hour in forced convection: in the most extreme situation it was doubled. This water loss represents a substantial energy loss and suggestions to minimise it are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6497432

  3. Experimental investigation of forced-convection heat-transfer characteristics of lead-bismuth eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubarsky, Bernard

    1951-01-01

    The forced-convection heat-transfer characteristics of lead-bismuth eutectic were experimentally investigated. Experimental values of Nusselt number for lead-bismuth fell considerably below predicted values. The addition of a wetting agent did not change the heat transfer characteristics.

  4. Potential Aerosol Indirect Effects on Atmospheric Circulation and Radiative Forcing through Deep Convection

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Ding, Yanni; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Zhanqing

    2012-05-10

    Aerosol indirect effects, i.e., the interactions of aerosols with clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN), constitute the largest uncertainty in climate forcing and projection. Previous IPCC reported aerosol indirect forcing is negative, which does not account for aerosol-convective cloud interactions because the complex processes involved are poorly understood and represented in climate models. Here we report that aerosol indirect effect on deep convective cloud systems can lead to enhanced regional convergence and a strong top-of atmosphere (TOA) warming. Aerosol invigoration effect on convection can result in a strong radiative warming in the atmosphere (+5.6 W m-2) due to strong night-time warming, a lofted latent heating, and a reduced diurnal temperature difference, all of which could remarkably impact regional circulation and modify weather systems. We further elucidated how aerosols change convective intensity, diabatic heating, and regional circulation under different environmental conditions and concluded that wind shear and cloud base temperature play key roles in determining the significance of aerosol invigoration effect for convective systems.

  5. Determination of forced convective heat transfer coefficients for subsonic flows over heated asymmetric NANA 4412 airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dag, Yusuf

    Forced convection over traditional surfaces such as flat plate, cylinder and sphere have been well researched and documented. Data on forced convection over airfoil surfaces, however, remain very scanty in literature. High altitude vehicles that employ airfoils as lifting surfaces often suffer leading edge ice accretions which have tremendous negative consequences on the lifting capabilities and stability of the vehicle. One of the ways of mitigating the effect of ice accretion involves judicious leading edge convective cooling technique which in turn depends on the accuracy of convective heat transfer coefficient used in the analysis. In this study empirical investigation of convective heat transfer measurements on asymmetric airfoil is presented at different angle of attacks ranging from 0° to 20° under subsonic flow regime. The top and bottom surface temperatures are measured at given points using Senflex hot film sensors (Tao System Inc.) and used to determine heat transfer characteristics of the airfoils. The model surfaces are subjected to constant heat fluxes using KP Kapton flexible heating pads. The monitored temperature data are then utilized to determine the heat convection coefficients modelled empirically as the Nusselt Number on the surface of the airfoil. The experimental work is conducted in an open circuit-Eiffel type wind tunnel, powered by a 37 kW electrical motor that is able to generate subsonic air velocities up to around 41 m/s in the 24 square-inch test section. The heat transfer experiments have been carried out under constant heat flux supply to the asymmetric airfoil. The convective heat transfer coefficients are determined from measured surface temperature and free stream temperature and investigated in the form of Nusselt number. The variation of Nusselt number is shown with Reynolds number at various angles of attacks. It is concluded that Nusselt number increases with increasing Reynolds number and increase in angle of attack from 0

  6. Ray-tracing simulations vs. satellite observations of gravity waves forced by deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisch, Silvio; Trinh, Thai; Chun, Hye-Yeong; Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Gravity waves (GW) are a prominent coupling mechanism between their tropospheric sources and the upper stratosphere to mesosphere region. They contribute prominently to the wave driving of the Quasi-biennial-oscillation (QBO) in the tropics and other large scale circulations like the Brewer-Dobson circulation. One important dynamic source of GWs is convection. Convective GWs have considerable short horizontal wavelengths and are therefore not entirely observable by infrared limb-sounding satellite instruments. For this reason, we present the results of GW ray-tracing calculations from convective sources up to the mesosphere. We utilized the Gravity wave Regional Or Global RAy-Tracer (GROGRAT) to perform the GW trajectory calculations. The launch conditions for each GW were calculated using the convective GW source scheme from Yonsei University (South Korea) to quantify the excitation by deep convection. Heating rates, cloud data, and atmospheric background data were provided by the MERRA dataset for the estimation of convective forcing by deep convection and as the atmospheric background for the ray-tracing calculations afterwards. The resulting momentum flux distributions are in remarkable coincidence with typical geographic regions of deep convection in the tropics. Additionally, the momentum flux distributions of higher latitude regions are simulated using a standard launch distribution for GWs. In order to validate our findings we compare our simulation results with satellite measurements of temperature amplitudes and momentum flux from infrared limb-sounding satellite instruments. These validations are complemented with an in-depth analysis of the observational filter for two different satellite instruments (HIRDLS and SABER). Scanning geometry, limitations in the detection of short wavelengths, aliasing effects, and the detector sensitivity are taken into account to quantify the level of uncertainty in our results. This analysis finally shows a good agreement

  7. Forced Convective Thermal Transport and Flow Stability Characteristics in Near-Critical Supercritical Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Nusair; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2013-11-01

    Forced convective thermal transport characteristics of supercritical carbon dioxide in vertical flow are numerically investigated. A tube with a circular cross-section and heated side-wall is considered. A real-fluid model for representing the thermo-physical properties of the supercritical fluid along with the fully compressible form of the Navier-Stokes equations and an implicit time-marching scheme is used to solve the problem. Thermo-physical properties of near-critical supercritical fluids show diverging characteristics. Large variations of density of near-critical supercritical fluid in forced convective flow can induce thermo-hydraulic instability similar to density wave oscillations. The developed numerical model is used for studying the effect of geometrical parameters of the tube, wall heat flux and pressure on steady-state convective thermal transport as well as the stability behavior of the supercritical fluid near its critical point. The enhancement or deterioration of heat transfer caused by the temperature-induced variation of physical properties (especially specific heat) is also investigated, as well as the effect of buoyancy on the forced convective flow.

  8. Numerical calculation of the drag force induced by natural convection of spheres at low Grashof numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, D.; Fletcher, T.H.

    1987-02-01

    When a heated solid sphere is introduced into an ambient fluid, a natural convective flow occurs which results in a drag force on the sphere. This study involves the numerical calculation of both the steady-state and the transient natural convective drag force around spheres at low Grashof numbers. Numerical techniques are taken from Geoola and Cornish. An empirical expression is suggested for the total drag coefficient for Grashof numbers ranging from 4 x 10/sup -4/ to 0.5 and Prandtl number = 0.72: log C/sub DT/ = 1.25 + 0.31 log Gr - 0.097(log Gr)/sup 2/. The dimensionless time required to reach 90% of the steady-state drag force can be approximated by the second-order polynomial: log t/sub 90%/ = 1.32 - log Gr - 0.11(Gr)/sup 2/.

  9. Convectively Forced Gravity Waves and their Sensitivity to Heating Profile and Atmospheric Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, Oliver; Parker, Douglas; Griffiths, Stephen; Vosper, Simon; Stirling, Alison

    2016-04-01

    It has been known for some time that convective heating is communicated to its environment by gravity waves. Despite this, the radiation of gravity waves in macro-scale models, which are typically forced at the grid-scale by meso-scale parameterization schemes, is not well understood. We present here theoretical work directed toward improving our fundamental understanding of convectively forced gravity wave effects at the meso-scale, in order to begin to address this problem. Starting with the hydrostatic, non-rotating, 2D, Boussinesq equations in a slab geometry, we find a radiating, analytical solution to prescribed sensible heat forcing for both the vertical velocity and potential temperature response. Both Steady and pulsed heating with adjustable horizontal structure is considered. From these solutions we construct a simple model capable of interrogating the spatial and temporal sensitivity to chosen heating functions of the remote forced response in particular. By varying the assumed buoyancy frequency, the influence of the model stratosphere on the upward radiation of gravity waves, and in turn, on the tropospheric response can be understood. Further, we find that the macro-scale response to convection is highly dependent on the radiation characteristics of gravity waves, which are in turn dependent upon the temporal and spatial structure of the source, and upper boundary condition of the domain.

  10. Effects of vertically ribbed surface roughness on the forced convective heat losses in central receiver systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, Ralf; Frantz, Cathy; Fritsch, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    External receiver configurations are directly exposed to ambient wind. Therefore, a precise determination of the convective losses is a key factor in the prediction and evaluation of the efficiency of the solar absorbers. Based on several studies, the forced convective losses of external receivers are modeled using correlations for a roughened cylinder in a cross-flow of air. However at high wind velocities, the thermal efficiency measured during the Solar Two experiment was considerably lower than the efficiency predicted by these correlations. A detailed review of the available literature on the convective losses of external receivers has been made. Three CFD models of different level of detail have been developed to analyze the influence of the actual shape of the receiver and tower configuration, of the receiver shape and of the absorber panels on the forced convective heat transfer coefficients. The heat transfer coefficients deduced from the correlations have been compared to the results of the CFD simulations. In a final step the influence of both modeling approaches on the thermal efficiency of an external tubular receiver has been studied in a thermal FE model of the Solar Two receiver.

  11. Effects of aerosol optical properties on deep convective clouds and radiative forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Renyi; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Mohr, Karen I

    2008-04-23

    The aerosol radiative effects (ARE) on the deep convective clouds are investigated by using a spectral-bin cloud-resolving model coupled with a radiation scheme and an explicit land surface model. The sensitivity of cloud properties and the associated radiative forcing to aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) are examined. The ARE on cloud properties is pronounced for mid-visible SSA of 0.85. Relative to the case without ARE, the cloud fraction and optical depth decrease by about 18% and 20%, respectively. Ice particle number concentrations, liquid water path, ice water path, and droplet size decrease by more than 15% when the ARE is introduced. The ARE causes a surface cooling of about 0.35 K and significantly high heating rates in the lower troposphere (about 0.6 K day-1 higher at 2 km), both of which lead to a more stable atmosphere and hence weaker convection. The weaker convection explains the less cloudiness, lower cloud optical depth, less LWP and IWP, smaller droplet size, and less precipitation resulting from the ARE. The daytime-mean direct forcing induced by black carbon is about 2.2 W m-2 at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and -17.4 W m-2 at the surface for SSA of 0.85. The semi-direct forcing is positive, about 10 and 11.2 W m-2 at the TOA and surface, respectively. Both the TOA and surface total radiative forcing values are strongly negative for the deep convective clouds, attributed mostly to aerosol indirect forcing. Aerosol direct and semi-direct effects are very sensitive to SSA when aerosol optical depth is high. Because the positive semi-direct forcing compensates the negative direct forcing at the surface, the surface temperature and heat fluxes decrease less significantly with the increase of aerosol absorption (decreasing SSA). The cloud fraction, optical depth, convective strength, and precipitation decrease with the increase of absorption, resulting from a more stable atmosphere due to enhanced

  12. Aerosol Radiative Effects on Deep Convective Clouds and Associated Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, J.; Zhang, R.; Tao, W.-K.; Mohr, I.

    2007-01-01

    The aerosol radiative effects (ARE) on the deep convective clouds are investigated by using a spectral-bin cloud-resolving model (CRM) coupled with a radiation scheme and an explicit land surface model. The sensitivity of cloud properties and the associated radiative forcing to aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) are examined. The ARE on cloud properties is pronounced for mid-visible SSA of 0.85. Relative to the case excluding the ARE, cloud fraction and optical depth decrease by about 18% and 20%, respectively. Cloud droplet and ice particle number concentrations, liquid water path (LWP), ice water path (IWP), and droplet size decrease significantly when the ARE is introduced. The ARE causes a surface cooling of about 0.35 K and significantly high heating rates in the lower troposphere (about 0.6K/day higher at 2 km), both of which lead to a more stable atmosphere and hence weaker convection. The weaker convection and the more desiccation of cloud layers explain the less cloudiness, lower cloud optical depth, LWP and IWP, smaller droplet size, and less precipitation. The daytime-mean direct forcing induced by black carbon is about 2.2 W/sq m at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and -17.4 W/sq m at the surface for SSA of 0.85. The semi-direct forcing is positive, about 10 and 11.2 W/sq m at the TOA and surface, respectively. Both the TOA and surface total radiative forcing values are strongly negative for the deep convective clouds, attributed mostly to aerosol indirect forcing. Aerosol direct and semi-direct effects are very sensitive to SSA. Because the positive semi-direct forcing compensates the negative direct forcing at the surface, the surface temperature and heat fluxes decrease less significantly with the increase of aerosol absorption (decreasing SSA). The cloud fraction, optical depth, convective strength, and precipitation decrease with the increase of absorption, resulting from a more stable and dryer atmosphere due to enhanced surface cooling and

  13. Effects of aerosol optical properties on deep convective clouds and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Renyi; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Mohr, Karen I.

    2008-04-01

    The aerosol radiative effects (ARE) on the deep convective clouds are investigated by using a spectral-bin cloud-resolving model coupled with a radiation scheme and an explicit land surface model. The sensitivity of cloud properties and the associated radiative forcing to aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) are examined. The ARE on cloud properties is pronounced for mid-visible SSA of 0.85. Relative to the case without ARE, the cloud fraction and optical depth decrease by about 18% and 20%, respectively. Ice particle number concentrations, liquid water path, ice water path, and droplet size decrease by more than 15% when the ARE is introduced. The ARE causes a surface cooling of about 0.35 K and significantly high heating rates in the lower troposphere (about 0.6 K day-1 higher at 2 km), both of which lead to a more stable atmosphere and hence weaker convection. The weaker convection explains the less cloudiness, lower cloud optical depth, less LWP and IWP, smaller droplet size, and less precipitation resulting from the ARE. The daytime-mean direct forcing induced by black carbon is about 2.2 W m-2 at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and -17.4 W m-2 at the surface for SSA of 0.85. The semi-direct forcing is positive, about 10 and 11.2 W m-2 at the TOA and surface, respectively. Both the TOA and surface total radiative forcing values are strongly negative for the deep convective clouds, attributed mostly to aerosol indirect forcing. Aerosol direct and semi-direct effects are very sensitive to SSA when aerosol optical depth is high. Because the positive semi-direct forcing compensates the negative direct forcing at the surface, the surface temperature and heat fluxes decrease less significantly with the increase of aerosol absorption (decreasing SSA). The cloud fraction, optical depth, convective strength, and precipitation decrease with the increase of absorption, resulting from a more stable atmosphere due to enhanced surface cooling and atmospheric heating.

  14. Simulation of forced convection-infrared reflow soldering with nitrogen injection

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Y.S.; Bergman, T.L.; Hyun, M.T.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, forced convection reflow soldering is simulated using an existing numerical model which accounts for multimode effects and is capable of predicting large and small scale thermal and species concentration phenomena. Soldering is performed in an oven equipped with porous panel heaters through which air or nitrogen is introduced to the reflow environment. The gas is injected selectively through top or bottom infrared heaters in order to (1) dampen gas temperature fluctuations which can be established by thermal buoyancy forces and (2) minimize nitrogen use. The results reveal the utility of general process models of the reflow operation as applied to oven design. The effects of mixed convection on heat and gas species transport in the oven are also revealed, and the potential impact on the solidification process is discussed.

  15. Combined roles of buoyancy and orientation in nucleate pool boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents results obtained during pool boiling from flat surfaces over body force levels of a/g = -1 to 0 to 20 for LN2 and R-113 under steady and transient conditions. Pyrex and metal surfaces are used. Particular attention is given to the case where the effective gravity is perpendicular to the heating surface. At the lower levels of heat flux with nucleate boiling, the heater surface superheat first increases and then decreases as the body force increases above a/g = 1. This is due to the greater contribution of nonboiling convection.

  16. Extinction of a bacterial colony under forced convection in pie geometry.

    PubMed

    Shnerb, N M

    2001-01-01

    The extinction of a bacterial colony, as it is forced to migrate into a hostile environment, is analyzed in pie geometry. Under convection, separation of the radial and the azimuthal degrees of freedom is not possible, so the linearized evolution operator is diagonalized numerically. Some characteristic scales are compared with the results of recent experiments, and the "integrable" limit of the theory in the narrow growth region is studied. PMID:11304286

  17. Forced-convection Heat Transfer to Water at High Pressures and Temperatures in the Nonboiling Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, S J; Henderson, R W

    1951-01-01

    Forced-convection heat-transfer data have been obtained for water flowing in an electrically heated tube of circular cross section at water pressures of 200 and 2000 pounds per square inch, and temperatures in the nonboiling region, for water velocities ranging between 5 and 25 feet per second. The results indicate that conventional correlations can be used to predict heat-transfer coefficients for water at pressures up to 2000 pounds per square inch and temperatures in the nonboiling region.

  18. Performance characteristics of a thermal energy storage module - A transient PCM/forced convection conjugate analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Y.; Faghri, A.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of a thermal energy storage module is simulated numerically. The change of phase of the phase-change material (PCM) and the transient forced convective heat transfer for the transfer fluid with low Prandtl numbers are solved simultaneously as a conjugate problem. A parametric study and a system optimization are conducted. The numerical results show that module geometry is crucial to the design of a space-based thermal energy storage system.

  19. Estimation of boundary heat flux using experimental temperature data in turbulent forced convection flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parwani, Ajit K.; Talukdar, Prabal; Subbarao, P. M. V.

    2014-09-01

    Heat flux at the boundary of a duct is estimated using the inverse technique based on conjugate gradient method (CGM) with an adjoint equation. A two-dimensional inverse forced convection hydrodynamically fully developed turbulent flow is considered. The simulations are performed with temperature data measured in the experimental test performed on a wind tunnel. The results show that the present numerical model with CGM is robust and accurate enough to estimate the strength and position of boundary heat flux.

  20. Estimation of boundary heat flux using experimental temperature data in turbulent forced convection flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parwani, Ajit K.; Talukdar, Prabal; Subbarao, P. M. V.

    2015-03-01

    Heat flux at the boundary of a duct is estimated using the inverse technique based on conjugate gradient method (CGM) with an adjoint equation. A two-dimensional inverse forced convection hydrodynamically fully developed turbulent flow is considered. The simulations are performed with temperature data measured in the experimental test performed on a wind tunnel. The results show that the present numerical model with CGM is robust and accurate enough to estimate the strength and position of boundary heat flux.

  1. Response of High Latitude Birkeland Currents and Ionospheric Convection to Transitions in Solar Wind Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Merkin, V. G.; Barnes, R. J.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent results from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) indicate that at least some transitions from northward to southward IMF produce a specific sequence in the development of large-scale Birkeland currents. First, a set of Region 1 and Region 2 currents forms on the dayside restricted to within a few hours of noon. After about 40 minutes, currents strongly intensify on the nightside, first near midnight local time associated with substorm onset, and then progressively further toward the dayside via dawn and dusk. Only after an hour or more after the transition to stronger solar wind forcing, is the complete Region 1, Region 2 current system developed. The results imply that the initial response to a transition from weak to strong forcing is convection into the polar cap and lobes without strong return convection to the dayside from the nightside magnetosphere. Return convection from the nightside begins with substorm onset and progresses to the dayside. This analysis is extended by examining a large number of transitions from prolonged auroral quiescence, associated with northward IMF, to southward IMF and the development of large-scale Region 1/Region 2 Birkeland currents, to assess whether the above progression holds in general. In addition, transition events to particularly intense driving, for example, associated with shocks are examined to assess how this ordering of events may be changed for onsets of particularly intense solar wind forcing.

  2. Material transport in a convective surface mixed layer under weak wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensa, Jean A.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Poje, Andrew C.; Imberger, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Flows in the upper ocean mixed layer are responsible for the transport and dispersion of biogeochemical tracers, phytoplankton and buoyant pollutants, such as hydrocarbons from an oil spill. Material dispersion in mixed layer flows subject to diurnal buoyancy forcing and weak winds (| u10 | = 5m s-1) are investigated using a non-hydrostatic model. Both purely buoyancy-forced and combined wind- and buoyancy-forced flows are sampled using passive tracers, as well as 2D and 3D particles to explore characteristics of horizontal and vertical dispersion. It is found that the surface tracer patterns are determined by the convergence zones created by convection cells within a time scale of just a few hours. For pure convection, the results displayed the classic signature of Rayleigh-Benard cells. When combined with a wind stress, the convective cells become anisotropic in that the along-wind length scale gets much larger than the cross-wind scale. Horizontal relative dispersion computed by sampling the flow fields using both 2D and 3D passive particles is found to be consistent with the Richardson regime. Relative dispersion is an order of magnitude higher and 2D surface releases transition to Richardson regime faster in the wind-forced case. We also show that the buoyancy-forced case results in significantly lower amplitudes of scale-dependent horizontal relative diffusivity, kD(ℓ), than those reported by Okubo (1970), while the wind- and buoyancy-forced case shows a good agreement with Okubo's diffusivity amplitude, and the scaling is consistent with Richardson's 4/3rd law, kD ∼ ℓ4/3. These modeling results provide a framework for measuring material dispersion by mixed layer flows in future observational programs.

  3. Effect of forced convection on the collision and interaction between nanoparticles and ultramicroelectrode.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Huang, Xinjian; Wang, Lishi

    2016-04-01

    Detection of nanoparticle (NP) collision events at ultramicroelectrode (UME) has emerged as a new methodology for the investigation of single NP in recent years. Although the method was widely employed, some fundamental knowledge such as how the NP moves to and interacts with the UME remain less understood. It was generally recognized that the recorded rate of collision was determined by diffusion that should follow Fick's first law. However, significant lower collision frequency compared with that of predicted by theory were frequently reported. Experiments carried out by us suggest that the collision frequency will increase dramatically if forced convection (stir or flow injection) is applied during detection. Furthermore, the collision frequency gradually increases to a maximum and then decreases, along with the increase of the convection intensity. This phenomenon is interpreted as follows: (a) there are two steps for a freely moving NP to generate a detectable collision signal. The first step is the move of NP from bulk solution to the surface of the UME which is mass transfer limited; the second step is the landing of NP on the surface of UME which is affected by many factors and is the critical step; (b) there is a barrier that must be overcame before the contact between freely moving NP and UME. Forced convection with moderate intensity can not only increase the mass transfer rate but also help to overcome this barrier and thus enhance the collision frequency; (c) the landing of NP on the surface of UME can be suppressed by stronger convections, because NP will be swept away by hydrodynamic force. PMID:26802274

  4. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in Subcooled Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Masao; Furukawa, Masahiro; Nishizumi, Takeharu; Ozaki, Shinji; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    A theoretical prediction model of the boiling heat transfer coefficient in the subcooled region for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution flowing in a rectangular channel is proposed. In the present heat transfer model, a heat flux is assumed to consist of both the forced convective and the boiling effect components. The forced convective component is evaluated from the empirical correlation of convective heat transfer coefficient for single-phase flow considering the effect of increase of liquid velocity due to net vapor generation. Empirical correlations for determining the heat flux due to the boiling effect and the quality at the onset point of net vapor generation are obtained from the data presented in the first report1). Agreement between the present theoretical prediction and the experimental data is satisfactorily good both for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution.

  5. Details of Exact Low Prandtl Number Boundary-Layer Solutions for Forced and For Free Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, E. M.; Gregg, J. L.

    1959-01-01

    A detailed report is given of exact (numerical) solutions of the laminar-boundary-layer equations for the Prandtl number range appropriate to liquid metals (0.003 to 0.03). Consideration is given to the following situations: (1) forced convection over a flat plate for the conditions of uniform wall temperature and uniform wall heat flux, and (2) free convection over an isothermal vertical plate. Tabulations of the new solutions are given in detail. Results are presented for the heat-transfer and shear-stress characteristics; temperature and velocity distributions are also shown. The heat-transfer results are correlated in terms of dimensionless parameters that vary only slightly over the entire liquid-metal range. Previous analytical and experimental work on low Prandtl number boundary layers is surveyed and compared with the new exact solutions.

  6. Numerical and experimental study of flows in a rotating annulus with local convective forcing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolan, Hélène; Su, Sylvie; Wright, Susie; Young, Roland M. B.; Read, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We present a numerical and experimental study of flows in a rotating annulus convectively forced by local thermal forcing via a heated annular ring at the bottom near the external wall and a cooled circular disk near the centre at the top surface of the annulus. This new configuration is a variant of the classical thermally-driven annulus analogue of the atmosphere circulation, where thermal forcing was previously applied uniformly on the sidewalls. Two vertically and horizontally displaced heat sources/sinks are arranged so that, in the absence of background rotation, statically unstable Rayleigh-Bénard convection would be induced above the source and beneath the sink, thereby relaxing strong constraints placed on background temperature gradients in previous experimental configurations to better mimic in fine local vigorous convection events in tropics and polar regions whilst also facilitating baroclinic motion in midlatitude regions in the Earth's atmosphere. By using the Met Office/ Oxford Rotating Annulus Laboratory (MORALS) code, we have investigated a series of equilibrated, 2D axisymmetric flows for a large range of dimensionless parameters and characterized them in terms of velocity and temperature fields. Several distinct and different flow regimes were identified, depending upon the rotation rate and strength of differential heating. These regimes will be presented with reference to variations of horizontal Ekman layer thickness versus the thermal boundary layer thickness and corresponding scalings for various quantities such as the azimuthal velocity or the heat transport. Experimental investigation of the same setup is carried out with a 1m diameter cylindrical container on a rotating platform: local heating is produced with an electrically heated annular ring at the bottom of the tank and cooling is imposed through a circular disk near the centre of the tank at the upper surface, cooled with circulating water. Different unstable circulation regimes

  7. Some parameter boundaries governing microgravity pool boiling modes.

    PubMed

    Merte, Herman

    2006-09-01

    Pool boiling experiments were conducted in microgravity on five space shuttle flights, using a flat plate heater consisting of a semitransparent thin gold film deposited on a quartz substrate that also acted as a resistance thermometer. The test fluid was R-113, and the vapor bubble behavior at the heater surface was photographed from beneath as well as from the side. Each flight consisted of a matrix of three levels of imposed heat flux and three levels of initial bulk liquid subcooling. In many of the total of 45 experiments, steady nucleate boiling was observed from 16-mm movie films, where a large vapor bubble formed and remained slightly removed from the heater surface, with small vapor bubbles growing on the heater surface, and on contact coalescing with the large bubble. Computations of the forces associated with the momentum transfer in this process, which counters the Marangoni convection effects tending to impel the large bubble toward the heater surface, have been completed for all cases where applicable. The modes of pool boiling observed with successive increases in levels of heat flux in microgravity are categorized as: (i) minimum or incipient nucleate boiling; (ii) nucleate boiling with vigorous motion of the bubbles adjacent and parallel to the heater surface, impelled by Marangoni convection effects; (iii) nucleate boiling followed by coalescence with a neighboring large vapor bubble; (iv) partial dryout of the heater surface, in parallel with nucleate boiling; (v) complete dryout. The boundaries between these modes are delineated graphically as a function of the imposed heat flux and initial bulk liquid subcooling, together with the levels of the forces holding the large bubbles, acting as vapor reservoirs, away from the heater surface for the steady nucleate boiling mode. PMID:17124149

  8. Experimental Validation Data for Computational Fluid Dynamics of Forced Convection on a Vertical Flat Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Jeff R.; Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2015-08-10

    We present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation dataset for turbulent forced convection on a vertical plate. The design of the apparatus is based on recent validation literature and provides a means to simultaneously measure boundary conditions (BCs) and system response quantities (SRQs). Important inflow quantities for Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). CFD are also measured. Data are acquired at two heating conditions and cover the range 40,000 < Rex < 300,000, 357 < Reδ2 < 813, and 0.02 < Gr/Re2 < 0.232.

  9. Experimental Validation Data for Computational Fluid Dynamics of Forced Convection on a Vertical Flat Plate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harris, Jeff R.; Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2015-08-10

    We present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation dataset for turbulent forced convection on a vertical plate. The design of the apparatus is based on recent validation literature and provides a means to simultaneously measure boundary conditions (BCs) and system response quantities (SRQs). Important inflow quantities for Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). CFD are also measured. Data are acquired at two heating conditions and cover the range 40,000 < Rex < 300,000, 357 < Reδ2 < 813, and 0.02 < Gr/Re2 < 0.232.

  10. A theoretical study of the spheroidal droplet evaporation in forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Jian

    2014-11-01

    In many applications, the shape of a droplet may be assumed to be an oblate spheroid. A theoretical study is conducted on the evaporation of an oblate spheroidal droplet under forced convection conditions. Closed-form analytical expressions of the mass evaporation rate for an oblate spheroid are derived, in the regime of controlled mass-transfer and heat-transfer, respectively. The variation of droplet size during the evaporation process is presented in the regime of shrinking dynamic model. Comparing with the droplets having the same surface area, an increase in the aspect ratio enhances the mass evaporation rate and prolongs the burnout time.

  11. A perturbation solution for forced convection in a porous-saturated duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooman, K.

    2008-01-01

    Fully developed forced convection through a porous medium bounded by two isoflux parallel plates is investigated analytically on the basis of a Brinkman-Forchheimer model. The matched asymptotic expansion method is applied for small values of the Darcy number. For the case of large Darcy number the solution for the Brinkman-Forchheimer momentum equation is found in terms of an asymptotic expansion. With the velocity distribution determined, the energy equation is solved using the same asymptotic technique. The results for limiting cases are found to be in good agreement with those available in the literature and the numerical results obtained here.

  12. Forced convection heat transfer of saturated liquid hydrogen in vertically-mounted heated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, Hideki; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Hata, Koichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Kobayasi, Hiroaki; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer from the inner side of vertically-mounted heated pipes to forced flow of saturated liquid hydrogen was measured with a quasi-steady increase of a heat generation rate for wide ranges of flow rate and saturated pressure. The tube heaters have lengths L of 100 mm and 167 mm with the diameter D of 4 mm and lengths of 150 mm and 250 mm with the diameter of 6 mm. The heat fluxes at departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) were higher for higher flow velocity, lower pressures and shorter L/D. The effect of L/D on the DNB heat flux was clarified. It is confirmed that our DNB correlation can describe the experimental data.

  13. Single-drop reactive extraction/extractive reaction with forced convective diffusion and interphase mass transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, Leonid S.; Red, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for time-dependent forced convective diffusion-reaction having convection by a recirculating flow field within the drop that is hydrodynamically coupled at the interface with a convective external flow field that at infinity becomes a uniform free-streaming flow. The concentration field inside the droplet is likewise coupled with that outside by boundary conditions at the interface. A chemical reaction can take place either inside or outside the droplet, or reactions can take place in both phases. The algorithm has been implemented, and for comparison results are shown here for the case of no reaction in either phase and for the case of an external first order reaction, both for unsteady behavior. For pure interphase mass transfer, concentration isocontours, local and average Sherwood numbers, and average droplet concentrations have been obtained as a function of the physical properties and external flow field. For mass transfer enhanced by an external reaction, in addition to the above forms of results, we present the enhancement factor, with the results now also depending upon the (dimensionless) rate of reaction.

  14. Forces on a boiling bubble in a developing boundary layer, in microgravity with g-jitter and in terrestrial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Geld, C. W. M.; Colin, C.; Segers, Q. I. E.; Pereira da Rosa, V. H.; Yoshikawa, H. N.

    2012-08-01

    Terrestrial and microgravity flow boiling experiments were carried out with the same test rig, comprising a locally heated artificial cavity in the center of a channel near the frontal edge of an intrusive glass bubble generator. Bubble shapes were in microgravity generally not far from those of truncated spheres, which permitted the computation of inertial lift and drag from potential flow theory for truncated spheres approximating the actual shape. For these bubbles, inertial lift is counteracted by drag and both forces are of the same order of magnitude as g-jitter. A generalization of the Laplace equation is found which applies to a deforming bubble attached to a plane wall and yields the pressure difference between the hydrostatic pressures in the bubble and at the wall, Δp. A fully independent way to determine the overpressure Δp is given by a second Euler-Lagrange equation. Relative differences have been found to be about 5% for both terrestrial and microgravity bubbles. A way is found to determine the sum of the two counteracting major force contributions on a bubble in the direction normal to the wall from a single directly measurable quantity. Good agreement with expectation values for terrestrial bubbles was obtained with the difference in radii of curvature averaged over the liquid-vapor interface, ⟨(1/R2 - 1/R1)⟩, multiplied with the surface tension coefficient, σ. The new analysis methods of force components presented also permit the accounting for a surface tension gradient along the liquid-vapor interface. No such gradients were found for the present measurements.

  15. The effects of buoyancy on the critical heat flux in forced convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusstar, Matthew J.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF) in forced convection over a flat surface at relatively low flow velocities has been found, not unexpectedly, to depend upon the orientation of the buoyancy. The CHF for R-113 was measured at various heating surface orientations for test section Reynolds numbers ranging between 3000 and 6500. In this flow range, the buoyancy force acting on the vapor generally dominates over the flow inertia, yet the inertia would still be substantial were gravity to be reduced. In the experiments of this study, the CHF is determined for heating surface orientations ranging from 0 deg to 360 deg, for flow velocities between 4 cm/s and 35 cm/s, and for subcoolings between 2.8 C and 22.2 C. The results presented here demonstrate the strong influence of buoyancy at low flow velocities, which diminishes as the flow velocity and subcooling are increased.

  16. New flow boiling heat transfer model for hydrocarbons evaporating inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G. F.; Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Zou, X.; Wang, S.

    2014-01-29

    Hydrocarbons have high thermodynamic performances, belong to the group of natural refrigerants, and they are the main components in mixture Joule-Thomson low temperature refrigerators (MJTR). New evaluations of nucleate boiling contribution and nucleate boiling suppression factor in flow boiling heat transfer have been proposed for hydrocarbons. A forced convection heat transfer enhancement factor correlation incorporating liquid velocity has also been proposed. In addition, the comparisons of the new model and other classic models were made to evaluate its accuracy in heat transfer prediction.

  17. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  18. Experimental study of forced convection heat transfer during upward and downward flow of helium at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco Valentin; Narbeh Artoun; Masahiro Kawaji; Donald M. McEligot

    2015-08-01

    Fundamental high pressure/high temperature forced convection experiments have been conducted in support of the development of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. The experiments utilize a high temperature/high pressure gas flow test facility constructed for forced convection and natural circulation experiments. The test section has a single 16.8 mm ID flow channel in a 2.7 m long, 108 mm OD graphite column with four 2.3kW electric heater rods placed symmetrically around the flow channel. This experimental study presents the role of buoyancy forces in enhancing or reducing convection heat transfer for helium at high pressures up to 70 bar and high temperatures up to 873 degrees K. Wall temperatures have been compared among 10 cases covering the inlet Re numbers ranging from 500 to 3,000. Downward flows display higher and lower wall temperatures in the upstream and downstream regions, respectively, than the upward flow cases due to the influence of buoyancy forces. In the entrance region, convection heat transfer is reduced due to buoyancy leading to higher wall temperatures, while in the downstream region, buoyancyinduced mixing causes higher convection heat transfer and lower wall temperatures. However, their influences are reduced as the Reynolds number increases. This experimental study is of specific interest to VHTR design and validation of safety analysis codes.

  19. Sandwich heating film boiling heat transfer research in narrow rectangle channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. H.; Ni, M. J.

    2010-03-01

    The narrow rectangle channel heat transfer technique is a new developing heat transfer technique in recent years. In the narrow rectangle channel, film boiling is an important two-phase flow heat transfer process in many engineering application, including steam generator, nuclear reactor and engineering metallurgy. As the temperature of droplet, steam and wall are decided by forced convection heat transfer between the steam and the wall, the droplet and the wall, the steam and the droplet and radiation heat transfer process, which makes heat transfer mechanism of film boiling be difficultly interpretative. Film boiling in narrow rectangle channel is analyzed in the paper, investigating the influence of all kinds of heat transfer processes on film boiling. A rectangle channel film boiling model has been built up using thermodynamic non-equilibrium model.

  20. Single-drop reactive extraction/extractive reaction with forced convective diffusion and interphase mass transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, Leonid S.; Reed, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the forced convective diffusion-reaction problem for convection inside and outside a droplet by a recirculating flow field hydrodynamically coupled at the droplet interface with an external flow field that at infinity becomes a uniform streaming flow. The concentration field inside the droplet is likewise coupled with that outside by boundary conditions at the interface. A chemical reaction can take place either inside or outside the droplet or reactions can take place in both phases. The algorithm has been implemented and results are shown here for the case of no reaction and for the case of an external first order reaction, both for unsteady behavior. For pure interphase mass transfer, concentration isocontours, local and average Sherwood numbers, and average droplet concentrations have been obtained as a function of the physical properties and external flow field. For mass transfer enhanced by an external reaction, in addition to the above forms of results, we present the enhancement factor, with the results now also depending upon the (dimensionless) rate of reaction.

  1. Boiling heat transfer to LN2 and LH2 - Influence of surface orientation and reduced body forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, H., Jr.; Oker, E.; Littles, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The quantitative determination of the influence of heater surface orientation and gravity on nucleate pool boiling of liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen is described. A transient calorimeter technique, well suited for obtaining pool boiling data under reduced gravity and used earlier by Clark and Merte (1963), was employed after being adapted to flat a surface whose orientation could be varied. The obtained determination results are reviewed.

  2. Effect of finite length on forced convection heat transfer from cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarmby, A.; Al-Fakhri, A. A. M.

    1980-04-01

    Forced convection heat transfer from single cylinders of finite length is investigated experimentally with particular reference to the effect of aspect (length/diameter) ratio of the cylinder. It is found that for aspect ratios greater than 4 there is little further effect as aspect ratio increases to infinity. The disagreement between the correlations proposed by Zukauskas (1972) and Morgan (1975) is considered and resolved in favor of the Zukauskas correlation. A correlation is proposed for heat transfer from cylinders of low aspect ratio which in the limit agrees with the correlation for large aspect ratios and with the generally accepted correlation for turbulent heat transfer from isothermal flat plates for small aspect ratios.

  3. Application of a finite volume based method of lines to turbulent forced convection in circular tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, A.; Tebeest, K.; Lacoa, U.; Morales, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    A semianalytic analysis of in-tube turbulent forced convection is performed whose special computational feature is the combination of the method of lines, the finite volume technique, and a radial coordinate transformation. First, a numerical solution of the momentum equation was obtained by a simple Runge-Kutta integration scheme. Second, the energy equation was reformulated into a system of ordinary differential equations of first order. Each equation in the system controls the temperature along a line in a mesh consisting of concentric lines. Reliable analytic solutions for the temperature distribution of fluids in the region of thermal development can be determined for combinations of Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. Predicted results for the distributions of mean bulk temperature and local Nusselt numbers for air, water, and oils compare satisfactorily with the available experimental data.

  4. Forced convection analysis for generalized Burgers nanofluid flow over a stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Khan, Waqar Azeem

    2015-10-01

    This article reports the two-dimensional forced convective flow of a generalized Burgers fluid over a linearly stretched sheet under the impacts of nano-sized material particles. Utilizing appropriate similarity transformations the coupled nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The analytic results are carried out through the homotopy analysis method (HAM) to investigate the impact of various pertinent parameters for the velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The obtained results are presented in tabular form as well as graphically and discussed in detail. The presented results show that the rate of heat transfer at the wall and rate of nanoparticle volume fraction diminish with each increment of the thermophoresis parameter. While incremented values of the Brownian motion parameter lead to a quite opposite effect on the rates of heat transfer and nanoparticle volume fraction at the wall.

  5. Non-Darcian forced convection analysis in an annulus partially filled with a porous material

    SciTech Connect

    Chikh, S.; Boumedien, A.; Bouhadef, K.; Lauriat, G.

    1995-12-01

    Numerical solutions are presented for fully developed forced convection in concentric annuli partially filled with a porous medium. The porous medium is attached at the inner cylinder, which is maintained at uniform heat flux or at uniform wall temperature while the outer cylinder is adiabatic. The Brinkman-Forchheimer-extended Darcy model was used to model the flow inside the porous medium. The dependence of the fluid flow and heat transfer on several parameters of the problem is thoroughly documented. The inertia coefficient at which the inertial effects reduce the flow rate by 5% is determined as a function of the Darcy number for various thicknesses of the porous substrate. It is also shown that a critical thickness at which the value of the Nusselt number reaches a minimum does not exist if the effective thermal conductivity of the fluid-saturated porous medium is much higher than the fluid conductivity.

  6. Finite difference analysis for developing laminar flow in circular tubes applied to forced and combined convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, M. W.

    1980-03-01

    The complete two-dimensional partial differential equations for developing laminar flow in a circular tube have been treated by a finite difference analysis. Property variation with temperature, especially that of viscosity, is allowed for in a flexible manner. The continuity and momentum equations, and then the energy equations, are solved by direct elimination at each axial step, and a marching procedure used in the axial direction. The stepwise energy balance is rigidly satisfied throughout by using it as a constituent equation in place of the 'explicit' wall thermal boundary condition normally used. The analysis predicts the complete developing hydrodynamic and thermal fields, together with friction factors and heat transfer coefficients. It has been tested for a range of fluid velocity and thermal boundary conditions and for various fluids, including high viscosity oils, water and air. Predictions for constant wall temperature presented here are for forced and combined convection and are compared with experimental data of Test and Zeldin and Schmidt.

  7. Stability improvement of AC superconducting magnet by forced-convection cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigohka, T.; Kasuya, A.; Ninomiya, A.

    1996-07-01

    The authors propose a new improved cooling system of an AC(50/60Hz) superconducting magnet introducing a forced-convection flow of liquid helium. In this system, the flow through the cooling channel between the winding layers is generated by a screw rotating in a cylinder surrounding the magnet. A small experimental device composed of an AC superconducting magnet and a rotating screw was manufactured. The screw was rotated by an extended driving shaft. The experimental result shows that the stability of the magnet is improved by the rotation of the screw. That is, the thermal disturbance (heater input power) which generates the quench of the magnet increases as the rotational speed of the screw does. It is expected that this technique can be successfully applied to superconducting AC power apparatuses as transformers or reactors.

  8. Numerical simulation of combined natural and forced convection during thermal-hydraulic transients. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Domanus, H.M.; Sha, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    The single-phase COMMIX (COMponent MIXing) computer code performs fully three-dimensional, transient, thermal-hydraulic analyses of liquid-sodium LMFBR components. It solves the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy as a boundary-value problem in space and as an initial-value problem in time. The concepts of volume porosity, surface permeability and distributed resistance, and heat source have been employed in quasi-continuum (rod-bundle) applications. Results from three transient simulations involving forced and natural convection are presented: (1) a sodium-filled horizontal pipe initially of uniform temperature undergoing an inlet velocity rundown transient, as well as an inlet temperature transient; (2) a 19-pin LMFBR rod bundle undergoing a velocity transient; and, (3) a simulation of a water test of a 1/10-scale outlet plenum undergoing both velocity and temperature transients.

  9. Effect of Heated Perimeter on Forced Convection Heat Transfer of he i at a Supercritical Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, D.; Shiotsu, M.; Shirai, Y.; Hama, K.

    2008-03-01

    The forced convection heat transfer coefficients were measured on two pairs of test plates all 6.0 mm in width and located face to face on inner walls of a rectangular duct. Each pair having length of 20 mm and 80 mm, respectively, was connected in series electrically. The rectangular duct was 420 mm in length and 5 mm×6 mm in inner cross section. The experiments were performed for inlet temperatures from 2.2 to 6.5 K, flow velocities from 0.1 to 5.6 m/s, and at a supercritical pressure of 2.8 atm. Comparison of the obtained Nusselt numbers with the former results with a single test plate showed the clear effect of a heated perimeter. Non-dimensional heat transfer equation including the effect of heated perimeter is presented.

  10. Diabatically Forced Frontogenesis Near Surface As Trigger For The Release of Strong Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Manfred

    One prerequisite for the formation of mesoscale convective systems is the existance of moist potentially unstable air masses in the lower troposphere. For the release of the instability, however, often an ascending motion is necessary in order to destroy stable layers on top of the moist air which would prevent convection, and to bring the air to saturation. In this respect the macroscale ascent ahead of an approaching upper trough may function as trigger for the release of convection. Another favourable process is the ascending motion of the warm air within circulations across a frontal zone which undergoes a frontogenesis either in the horizontal wind field or by diabatic effects. During summer time real fronts between different air masses are often ill defined over the continent, and circulatory motions in their neighbourhood remain rather weak. There is, however, a mechanism which may lead to the formation of a very strong temperature contrast near surface within short time. That happens at the edge of larger cloud and precipitation areas during day time due to the different diabatic heat fluxes across the cloud edge: Whereas the temperature below the cloud masses remains more or less constant or is even reduced by evaporation of falling rain, it rapidly increases due to heating from the ground in the area with no or only few clouds. As consequence of this diabatically forced frontogenesis a solenoidally direct circulation across the newly established frontal zone is released with ascent of the heated air, descent of the cooler air and an ageostrophic motion from the cold towards the warm air near surface. At the same time the pressure rises - at least relatively - in the cold air and falls in the warm air so that a pressure gradient is built up between both air masses. If the warm air is potentially unstable, the ascent within the circulation may lead to the release of the instability and the formation of convective clouds ahead of the cloud edge and parallel

  11. Boils (Furunculosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... resulting from the deep infection of a hair follicle. The infection is usually caused by a type ... germ gain entry into and infect the hair follicle, resulting in a boil. Boils may resolve with ...

  12. Conjugate heat transfer analysis with subcooled boiling for an arc-heater wind tunnel nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M.A.; Gramoll, K.C.

    1996-10-01

    A method for unsteady, axisymmetric, conjugate heat transfer analysis has been developed. The conjugate heat transfer domain comprises co-flowing high-temperature air and subcooled water coolant on opposite sides of a copper-zirconium, converging nozzle. Heat transfer through the nozzle wall is characterized by solid-body conduction with convection boundary conditions along the air side and water side of the nozzle wall. The air-side heat transfer is characterized by forced convection with a turbulent boundary layer. The water-side heat transfer is characterized by forced-convection, subcooled, nucleate boiling. Convective heat transfer coefficients on each side of the nozzle wall are functions of the wall temperature and the respective flow properties, thus coupling the three regions of the domain. The solution method marches in time, solving, at each time step for the nozzle wall temperature distribution, the flow properties on each side of the nozzle wall, and for the convective heat transfer coefficients. The algorithm terminates when either the steady state is achieved or nozzle wall failure conditions are reached. Solutions are obtained for four test cases called from the run history of the Arnold Engineering Development Center HEAT-H1 Test Unit. Results show that the recorded test case failures were not caused by precritical boiling effects. Conclusive failure analysis for the HEAT-H1 test cases awaits application of an appropriate convective boiling critical heat flux model, along with creep and stress-rupture models for the nozzle wall.

  13. Free and forced convective cooling of pipe-type electric cables. Volume 1: forced cooling of cables. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chato, J.C.; Crowley, J.M.

    1981-05-01

    A multi-faceted research program has been performed to investigate in detail several aspects of free and forced convective cooling of underground electric cable systems. There were two main areas of investigation. The first one reported in this volume dealt with the fluid dynamic and thermal aspects of various components of the cable system. In particular, friction factors for laminar flow in the cable pipes with various configurations were determined using a finite element technique; the temperature distributions and heat transfer in splices were examined using a combined analytical numerical technique; the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of cable pipes in the transitional and turbulent flow regime were determined experimentally in a model study; and full-scale model experimental work was carried out to determine the fluid dynamic and thermal characteristics of entrance and exit chambers for the cooling oil. The second major area of activity, reported in volume 2, involved a feasibility study of an electrohydrodynamic pump concept utilizing a traveling electric field generated by a pumping cable. Experimental studies in two different configurations as well as theoretical calculations showed that an electrohydrodynamic pump for the moving of dielectric oil in a cable system is feasible.

  14. Determination of forced convection parameters by interferometric imaging of the concentration field during growth of KDP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sunil; Muralidhar, K.

    2011-07-01

    Growth of a potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal from its aqueous solution has been considered under forced convection conditions. The KDP crystal is grown in a conventional top hanging geometry. Forced convection conditions are created by rotating the crystal about a vertical axis. The rotational RPM is varied in a cycle, creating an accelerated rotation (AR) paradigm. The effect of varying the rotational RPM on the concentration field around the crystal was investigated. Mach-Zehnder interferometry was adopted as an optical technique to image the evolving concentration fields. Six different experiments were performed to obtain the specific set of time periods and rotation rates of the acceleration cycle that result in a uniform concentration field around the growing crystal. The Reynolds number, an index of the strength of forced convection, was optimized through the experiments. The optimized parameters of the accelerated rotation cycle were found to be as follows: maximum rotation rate of 32 RPM, spin up period=40 s, spin down period=40 s, steady period=40 s, and stationary period=40 s. The parametric study further revealed that concentration was highly sensitive to the maximum rotation rate adopted during the AR cycle. It did not depend crucially on the time periods that could be varied by as much as ±25% around the respective average values. Finally, a KDP crystal was grown using the optimized forced convection parameters and the crystal quality was found to be good.

  15. Energetic dynamics of a rotating horizontal convection model with wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskova, Varvara; White, Brian; Scotti, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    We present a new test case for rotating horizontal convection, where the flow is driven by differential buoyancy forcing along a horizontal surface. This simple model is used to understand and quantify the influence of surface heating and cooling and wind stress on the Meridional Overturning Circulation. The domain is a rectangular basin with surface cooling at both ends (the poles) and surface warming in the middle (equatorial) region. To model the effect of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, reentrant channel is placed near the Southern pole. Free-slip boundary conditions are imposed in the closed box, while zonally periodic boundary conditions are enforced in the channel. The problem is solved numerically using a 3D DNS model based on a finite-volume AMR solver for the Boussinesq Navier-Stokes equations with rotation. The relative contributions of surface buoyancy and wind forcing and the energetic balance are analyzed at a Rayleigh number of 108 and a relatively high aspect ratio of [5, 10, 1] in zonal, meridional and vertical directions, respectively. The overall dynamics, including large-scale overturning, baroclinic eddying, and turbulent mixing are investigated using the local Available Potential Energy framework introduced in [Scotti and White, J. Fluid Mech., 2014]. This research is part of the Blue Waters sustained-petascale computing project, supported by the NSF (awards OCI-0725070, ACI-1238993 and ACI-14-44747) and the state of Illinois.

  16. Transient boiling heat transfer in saturated liquid nitrogen and F113 at standard and zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oker, E.; Merte, H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Transient and steady state nucleate boiling in saturated LN2 and F113 at standard and near zero gravity conditions were investigated for the horizontal up, vertical and horizontal down orientations of the heating surface. Two distinct regimes of heat transfer mechanisms were observed during the interval from the step increase of power input to the onset of nucleate boiling: the conduction and convection dominated regimes. The time duration in each regime was considerably shorter with LN2 than with F113, and decreased as heat flux increased, as gravity was reduced, and as the orientation was changed from horizontal up to horizontal down. In transient boiling, boiling initiates at a single point following the step increase in power, and then spreads over the surface. The delay time for the inception of boiling at the first site, and the velocity of spread of boiling varies depending upon the heat flux, orientation, body force, surface roughness and liquid properties, and are a consequence of changes in boundary layer temperature levels associated with changes in natural convection. Following the step increase in power input, surface temperature overshoot and undershoot occur before the steady state boiling temperature level is established.

  17. Hot stage and sample cell design for the solidification of transparent materials with and without forced convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    A temperature gradient stage design for optical microscopy is described. Exceptional thermal stability is the major feature. The stage is used to study crystal growth phenomena occurring at the solid-liquid interface. The apparatus is designed to use transparent organic solutions as models for the study of metal-like solidification. The stage provides a controlled thermal environment for unidirectional solidification of low melting temperature materials. Freezing rate is regulated by mechanically sliding in the stage a thin glass cell containing the materials being studied. Two cell assemblies are described. One type is used for convection-free and the other for controlled forced convection studies of the solidification interface.

  18. Investigation of combined free and forced convection in a 2 x 6 rod bundle during controlled flow transients

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.M.; Khan, E.U.

    1980-10-01

    An experimental study was performed to obtain local fluid velocity and temperature measurements in the mixed (combined free and forced) convection regime for specific flow coastdown transients. A brief investigation of steady-state flows for the purely free-convection regime was also completed. The study was performed using an electrically heated 2 x 6 rod bundle contained in a flow housing. In addition a transient data base was obtained for evaluating the COBRA-WC thermal-hydraulic computer program (a modified version of the COBRA-IV code).

  19. Conceptual Design of Forced Convection Molten Salt Heat Transfer Testing Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal; Piyush Sabharwall; Pattrick Calderoni; Alan K. Wertsching; S. Brandon Grover

    2010-09-01

    This report develops a proposal to design and construct a forced convection test loop. A detailed test plan will then be conducted to obtain data on heat transfer, thermodynamic, and corrosion characteristics of the molten salts and fluid-solid interaction. In particular, this report outlines an experimental research and development test plan. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project highlighted how thermophysical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report describes the options available to reach such objectives. In particular, that report outlines an experimental research and development test plan that would include following steps: •Molten Salts: The candidate molten salts for investigation will be selected. •Materials of Construction: Materials of construction for the test loop, heat exchangers, and fluid-solid corrosion tests in the test loop will also be selected. •Scaling Analysis: Scaling analysis to design the test loop will be performed. •Test Plan: A comprehensive test plan to include all the tests that are being planned in the short and long term time frame will be developed. •Design the Test Loop: The forced convection test loop will be designed including extensive mechanical design, instrument selection, data acquisition system, safety requirements, and related precautionary measures. •Fabricate the Test Loop. •Perform the Tests. •Uncertainty Analysis: As a part of the data collection, uncertainty analysis will

  20. Local Heat Transfer and CHF for Subcooled Flow Boiling - Annual Report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald D. Boyd

    2000-07-01

    The physical phenomenon of forced convective boiling is probably one of the most interesting and complex transport phenomena. It has been under study for more than two centuries. Simply stated, forced convective subcooled boiling involves a locally boiling fluid: (1) whose mean temperature is below its saturation temperature, and (2) that flows over a surface exposed uniformly or non-uniformly to a high heat flux (HHF). The objective of this work is to assess and/or improve the present ability to predict local axial heat transfer distributions in the subcooled flow boiling regime for the case of uniformly heated coolant channels. This requires an accurate and complete representation of the boiling curve up to the CHF. The present. results will be useful for both heat transfer research and industrial design applications. Future refinements may result in the application of the results to non-uniformly heated channels or other geometries, and other fluids. Several existing heat transfer models for uniformly heated channels were examined for: (1) accurate representation of the boiling curve, and (2) characterizing the local heat transfer coefficient under high heat flux (HHF) conditions. Comparisons with HHF data showed that major correlation modifications were needed in the subcooled partial nucleate boiling (SPNB) region. Since the slope of boiling curve in this region is important to assure continuity of the HHF trends into the fully developed boiling region and up to the critical heat flux, accurate characterization in the SPNB region is essential. Approximations for the asymptotic limits for the SPNB region have been obtained and have been used to develop an improved composite correlation. The developed correlation has been compared with 363 water data points. For the local heat transfer coefficient and wall temperature, the over-all percent standard deviations with respect to the data were 19% and 3%, respectively, for the high velocity water data.

  1. Aspects of subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Bankoff, S.G.

    1997-12-31

    Subcooled boiling boiling refers to boiling from a solid surface where the bulk liquid temperature is below the saturation temperature (subcooled). Two classes are considered: (1) nucleate boiling, where, for large subcoolings, individual bubbles grow and collapse while remaining attached to the solid wall, and (2) film boiling, where a continuous vapor film separates the solid from the bulk liquid. One mechanism by which subcooled nucleate boiling results in very large surface heat transfer coefficient is thought to be latent heat transport within the bubble, resulting from simultaneous evaporation from a thin residual liquid layer at the bubble base, and condensation at the polar bubble cap. Another is the increased liquid microconvection around the oscillating bubble. Two related problems have been attacked. One is the rupture of a thin liquid film subject to attractive and repulsive dispersion forces, leading to the formation of mesoscopic drops, which then coalesce and evaporate. Another is the liquid motion in the vicinity of an oscillating contact line, where the bubble wall is idealized as a wedge of constant angle sliding on the solid wall. The subcooled film boiling problem has been attacked by deriving a general long-range nonlinear evolution equation for the local thickness of the vapor layer. Linear and weakly-nonlinear stability results have been obtained. A number of other related problems have been attacked.

  2. Multirelaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for droplet heating and evaporation under forced convection.

    PubMed

    Albernaz, Daniel; Do-Quang, Minh; Amberg, Gustav

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the evaporation of a droplet surrounded by superheated vapor with relative motion between phases. The evaporating droplet is a challenging process, as one must take into account the transport of mass, momentum, and heat. Here a lattice Boltzmann method is employed where phase change is controlled by a nonideal equation of state. First, numerical simulations are compared to the D(2) law for a vaporizing static droplet and good agreement is observed. Results are then presented for a droplet in a Lagrangian frame under a superheated vapor flow. Evaporation is described in terms of the temperature difference between liquid-vapor and the inertial forces. The internal liquid circulation driven by surface-shear stresses due to convection enhances the evaporation rate. Numerical simulations demonstrate that for higher Reynolds numbers, the dynamics of vaporization flux can be significantly affected, which may cause an oscillatory behavior on the droplet evaporation. The droplet-wake interaction and local mass flux are discussed in detail. PMID:25974585

  3. Multirelaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for droplet heating and evaporation under forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albernaz, Daniel; Do-Quang, Minh; Amberg, Gustav

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the evaporation of a droplet surrounded by superheated vapor with relative motion between phases. The evaporating droplet is a challenging process, as one must take into account the transport of mass, momentum, and heat. Here a lattice Boltzmann method is employed where phase change is controlled by a nonideal equation of state. First, numerical simulations are compared to the D2 law for a vaporizing static droplet and good agreement is observed. Results are then presented for a droplet in a Lagrangian frame under a superheated vapor flow. Evaporation is described in terms of the temperature difference between liquid-vapor and the inertial forces. The internal liquid circulation driven by surface-shear stresses due to convection enhances the evaporation rate. Numerical simulations demonstrate that for higher Reynolds numbers, the dynamics of vaporization flux can be significantly affected, which may cause an oscillatory behavior on the droplet evaporation. The droplet-wake interaction and local mass flux are discussed in detail.

  4. Forced convective heat transfer in boundary layer flow of Sisko fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet.

    PubMed

    Munir, Asif; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood

    2014-01-01

    The major focus of this article is to analyze the forced convective heat transfer in a steady boundary layer flow of Sisko fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet. Two cases are studied, namely (i) the sheet with variable temperature (PST case) and (ii) the sheet with variable heat flux (PHF case). The heat transfer aspects are investigated for both integer and non-integer values of the power-law index. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using appropriate similarity variables and solved numerically. The numerical results are obtained by the shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta method with Broyden's method in the domain[Formula: see text]. The numerical results for the temperature field are found to be strongly dependent upon the power-law index, stretching parameter, wall temperature parameter, material parameter of the Sisko fluid and Prandtl number. In addition, the local Nusselt number versus wall temperature parameter is also graphed and tabulated for different values of pertaining parameters. Further, numerical results are validated by comparison with exact solutions as well as previously published results in the literature. PMID:24949738

  5. Forced convection heat transfer and hydraulic losses in porous carbon foam

    SciTech Connect

    Straatman, Anthony G; Gallego, Nidia C

    2007-01-01

    Experiments and computations are presented to quantify the convective heat transfer and the hydraulic loss that is obtained by forcing water through blocks of graphitic foam (GF) heated from one side. Experiments have been conducted in a small-scale water tunnel instrumented to measure the pressure drop and the temperature rise of water passing through the foam and the base temperature and heat flux into the foam block. The experimental data were then used to calibrate a thermal non-equilibrium finite-volume model to facilitate comparisons between GF and aluminum foam. Comparisons of the pressure drop indicate that both normal and compressed aluminum foams are significantly more permeable than GF. Results of the heat transfer indicate that the maximum possible heat dissipation from a given surface is reached using very thin layers of aluminum foam due to the inability of the foam to entrain heat into its internal structure. In contrast, graphitic foam is able to entrain heat deep into the foam structure due to its high extended surface efficiency and thus much more heat can be transferred from a given surface area. The higher extended surface efficiency is mainly due to the combination of moderate porosity and higher solid-phase conductivity.

  6. Kinetics modeling of the drying of sunflower stem (Helianthus annuus L.) in a forced convection tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, R.; Vaca, M.; Terres, H.; Lizardi, A.; Morales, J.; Flores, J.; Chávez, S.

    2015-01-01

    The sunflower is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to capture the sun. The plant has a rough, broad, hairy stem, coarsely toothed, with rough leaves, and circular flower heads. The sunflower seeds are appreciated for their oil, which has become a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fiber that may be used in paper production. Recently this flower has been used in phytoremediation of soils, contaminated with heavy metals. Sunflower has been probed as an efficient phytoextractor of chromium, lead, aluminum, zinc, cadmium from soil. In this work we present the experimental results of the drying of the sunflower stem, cut in 100 mm longitudinal sections, with diameters in the range of 11-18 mm. The aim was to obtain a dry and easy-to-handle final product, since these plants were originally cultivated in order to extract heavy metals from a polluted soil. The dried stems could then be easily confined or sent to recycle premises to concentrate the metals. The drying process was done in forced convection within a hot air tunnel. The used temperature was 60 °C, the velocity of air was 3 m/s and the required times were 8 hours. The initial average wet mass was 28 g and the final value was 5 g, resulting in the aimed product.

  7. Skin-friction drag analysis from the forced convection modeling in simplified underwater swimming.

    PubMed

    Polidori, G; Taïar, R; Fohanno, S; Mai, T H; Lodini, A

    2006-01-01

    This study deals with skin-friction drag analysis in underwater swimming. Although lower than profile drag, skin-friction drag remains significant and is the second and only other contribution to total drag in the case of underwater swimming. The question arises whether varying the thermal gradient between the underwater swimmer and the pool water may modify the surface shear stress distribution and the resulting skin-friction drag acting on a swimmer's body. As far as the authors are aware, such a question has not previously been addressed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of this thermal gradient by using the integral formalism applied to the forced convection theory. From a simplified model in a range of pool temperatures (20-30 degrees C) it was demonstrated that, whatever the swimming speeds, a 5.3% reduction in the skin-friction drag would occur with increasing average boundary-layer temperature provided that the flow remained laminar. However, as the majority of the flow is actually turbulent, a turbulent flow analysis leads to the major conclusion that friction drag is a function of underwater speed, leading to a possible 1.5% reduction for fast swimming speeds above 1m/s. Furthermore, simple correlations between the surface shear stress and resulting skin-friction drag are derived in terms of the boundary-layer temperature, which may be readily used in underwater swimming situations. PMID:16153653

  8. Nanofluid flow and forced convection heat transfer over a stretching surface considering heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, M.; Valipour, P.; Shambooli, M.; Ayani, M.; Mirparizi, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, magnetic field effects on the forced convection flow of a nanofluid over a stretching surface in the presence of heat generation/absorption are studied. The equations of continuity, momentum and energy are transformed into ordinary differential equations and solved numerically using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme featuring the shooting technique. Different types of nanoparticles as copper (Cu), silver (Ag), alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) with water as their base fluid has been considered. The influence of significant parameters, such as magnetic parameter, volume fraction of the nanoparticles, heat generation/absorption parameter, velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The results show that the values of temperature profiles increase with increasing heat generation/absorption and volume fraction of the nanoparticles but they decrease with increasing velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter. Also, it can be found that selecting silver as nanoparticle leads to the highest heat transfer enhancement.

  9. Experimental study of an upward sub-cooled forced convection in a rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouidri, A.; Madani, B.; Roubi, B.; Hamadouche, A.

    2016-07-01

    The upward sub-cooled forced convection in a rectangular channel is investigated experimentally. The aim of the present work is the studying of the local heat transfer phenomena. Concerning the experimentation: the n-pentane is used as a working fluid, the independent variables are: the velocity in the range from 0.04 to 0.086 m/s and heat flux density with values between 1.8 and 7.36 W/cm2. The results show that the local Nusselt number distribution is not uniform along the channel; however, uniformity is observed in the mean Nusselt number for Reynolds under 1600. On the other hand, a new correlation to predict the local fluid temperature is established as a function of local wall temperature. The wall's heat is dissipated under the common effect of the sub-cooled regime; therefore, the local heat transfer coefficient is increased. The study of the thermal equilibrium showed that for Reynolds less than 1500; almost all of the heat flux generated by the heater cartridges is absorbed by the fluid.

  10. Regressed relations for forced convection heat transfer in a direct injection stratified charge rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi M.; Schock, Harold J.

    1988-01-01

    Currently, the heat transfer equation used in the rotary combustion engine (RCE) simulation model is taken from piston engine studies. These relations have been empirically developed by the experimental input coming from piston engines whose geometry differs considerably from that of the RCE. The objective of this work was to derive equations to estimate heat transfer coefficients in the combustion chamber of an RCE. This was accomplished by making detailed temperature and pressure measurements in a direct injection stratified charge (DISC) RCE under a range of conditions. For each specific measurement point, the local gas velocity was assumed equal to the local rotor tip speed. Local physical properties of the fluids were then calculated. Two types of correlation equations were derived and are described in this paper. The first correlation expresses the Nusselt number as a function of the Prandtl number, Reynolds number, and characteristic temperature ratio; the second correlation expresses the forced convection heat transfer coefficient as a function of fluid temperature, pressure and velocity.

  11. Residual stress measurements in forced convective quenched steel bars by means of neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Morales, B.; Hawbolt, B.E.; Brimacombe, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    The residual stress distributions in 38.1 mm-dia., forced convective quenched bars of interstitial-free (IF), 1045 carbon, and alloyed steels were determined by neutron diffraction. The IF and 1045 carbon steel quenched bars exhibited compressive axial and circumferential (hoop) residual stresses near the surface and tensile values at the center. The radial residual stresses were tensile at all radial positions, decreasing towards zero near the surface. In contrast, the measured axial and circumferential components of the residual stress tensor in the alloyed eutectoid steel quenched bar were tensile near the surface and decreased to compressive values at the center. The radial component showed a maximum compressive value at the center and approached zero close to the surface. Metallographic analysis and hardness testing of the three steel specimens, revealed that the IF steel had transformed completely to ferrite, while the 1045 carbon steel bar transformed to martensite near the surface and a mixture of pearlite, ferrite and martensite at the center. On the other hand, the alloyed eutectoid steel specimen transformed entirely to martensite with small amounts of bainite near the center of the rod. The observed differences in the residual stress distributions in the three steels were explained based on the sequence of phase transformations that took place during quenching.

  12. Control of dynamical self-assembly of strongly Brownian nanoparticles through convective forces induced by ultrafast laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilday, Serim; Akguc, Gursoy B.; Tokel, Onur; Makey, Ghaith; Yavuz, Ozgun; Yavuz, Koray; Pavlov, Ihor; Ilday, F. Omer; Gulseren, Oguz

    We report a new dynamical self-assembly mechanism, where judicious use of convective and strong Brownian forces enables effective patterning of colloidal nanoparticles that are almost two orders of magnitude smaller than the laser beam. Optical trapping or tweezing effects are not involved, but the laser is used to create steep thermal gradients through multi-photon absorption, and thereby guide the colloids through convective forces. Convective forces can be thought as a positive feedback mechanism that helps to form and reinforce pattern, while Brownian motion act as a competing negative feedback mechanism to limit the growth of the pattern, as well as to increase the possibilities of bifurcation into different patterns, analogous to the competition observed in reaction-diffusion systems. By steering stochastic processes through these forces, we are able to gain control over the emergent pattern such as to form-deform-reform of a pattern, to change its shape and transport it spatially within seconds. This enables us to dynamically initiate and control large patterns comprised of hundreds of colloids. Further, by not relying on any specific chemical, optical or magnetic interaction, this new method is, in principle, completely independent of the material type being assembled.

  13. Low velocity nucleate flow boiling at various orientations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Kevin M.; Merte, Herman, Jr.; Keller, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Subcooled forced convection nucleate boiling experiments with R-113 were conducted at low velocities using both thin film semi-transparent gold on quartz and gold coated cooper substrate flat heaters at varying orientations. The results are intended to assist in understanding effects of buoyancy in forced convection boiling and in better defining requirements for studying flow boiling in the microgravity environment of space. Measurements of the heat flux and the surface superheat were made at three levels of subcooling from 2.2 C to 11.1 C, four bulk velocities from 4.1 cm/s to 32.4 cm/s and various orientations spanning 360 deg. The experiments demonstrate that if buoyancy is significant reative to bulk liquid momentum, then a decrease in the buoyant force normal and away from the heater surface enhances the heat transfer, with the effect being most prominent at low values of heat flux. Furthermore, the effect of velocity is shown to be dependent on the surface orientation.

  14. Numerical investigation of 22 seconds of convection under the effect of dielectrophoretic force in an annular gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Egbers, Christoph; Mutabazi, Innocent; Dahley, M. Norman; Smieszek, Marlene

    2012-07-01

    We investigate numerically the thermal convection of an annular dielectric liquid sheet under the effect of the dielectrophoretic force, as observed when a dielectric liquid is permeated by an inhomogeneous electric field. This is of particular interest for space applications as natural convection cannot appear and forced convection from moving parts such as pumps is undesirable due to the expected wearing and lower reliability. Hence heat exchanger relying on the dielectrophoretic force to create convection could provide light, compact and reliable heat exchanger for aerospace cooling systems \\cite{crumeyrolleP}. We investigate the case of a radius ratio equal to 0.5 and Prandtl number of 65. This setup is under experimental investigation at LAS, BTU Cottbus, both on ground and during parabolic flight. The 3D linear stability analysis, that takes the finite size of the system into account, shows that the critical mode is non-axisymmetric and under the form of two counteroriented helices, rather than under the form of rolls as predicted in past investigations\\cite{crumeyrolleT}. Due to the short duration of microgravity during parabolic flight (22 seconds), 3D time-dependent DNS are required with realistic initial conditions. The simulations show that the helices are difficult to observe, as the flow pattern is dominated by convection plumes. We report that transient thermal transfer at the inner cylinder is strongly enhanced by those structures, while the thermal transfer close to the outer cylinder is weaker. J.S. Paschkewitz and {D.M.} Pratt, Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci., 21,, 187 (2000). M. Takashima, Q. J. Mech. appl. Math. 33,, 93 (1980).

  15. Magnetothermal Convection of Water with the Presence or Absence of a Magnetic Force Acting on the Susceptibility Gradient.

    PubMed

    Maki, Syou

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer of magnetothermal convection with the presence or absence of the magnetic force acting on the susceptibility gradient (fsc) was examined by three-dimensional numerical computations. Thermal convection of water enclosed in a shallow cylindrical vessel (diameter over vessel height = 6.0) with the Rayleigh-Benard model was adopted as the model, under the conditions of Prandtl number 6.0 and Ra number 7000, respectively. The momentum equations of convection were nondimensionalized, which involved the term of fsc and the term of magnetic force acting on the magnetic field gradient (fb). All the computations resulted in axisymmetric steady rolls. The values of the averaged Nu, the averaged velocity components U, V, and W, and the isothermal distributions and flow patterns were almost completely the same, regardless of the presence or absence of the term of fsc. As a result, we found that the effect of fsc was extremely small, although much previous research emphasized the effect with paramagnetic solutions under an unsteady state. The magnitude of fsc depends not only on magnetic conditions (magnitudes of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic flux density), but also on the thermal properties of the solution (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and viscosity). Therefore the effect of fb becomes dominant on the magnetothermal convection. Active control over the density gradient with temperature will be required to advance heat transfer with the effect of fsc. PMID:27606823

  16. Pool and flow boiling in variable and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As is well known, boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer in that high heat flux levels are possible with relatively small temperature differences. Its optimal application requires that the process be adequately understood. A measure of the understanding of any physical event lies in the ability to predict its behavior in terms of the relevant parameters. Despite many years of research the predictability of boiling is currently possible only for quite specialized circumstances, e.g., the critical heat flux and film boiling for the pool boiling case, and then only with special geometries. Variable gravity down to microgravity provides the opportunity to test this understanding, but possibly more important, by changing the dimensional and time scales involved permits more detailed observations of elements involved in the boiling process, and perhaps discloses phenomena heretofore unknown. The focus here is on nucleate boiling although, as will be demonstrated below, under but certain circumstances in microgravity it can take place concurrently with the dryout process. In the presence of earth gravity or forced convection effects, the latter process is usually referred to as film boiling. However, no vapor film as such forms with pool boiling in microgravity, only dryout. Initial results are presented here for pool boiling in microgravity, and were made possible at such an early date by the availability of the Get-Away-Specials (GAS). Also presented here are some results of ground testing of a flow loop for the study of low velocity boiling, eventually to take place also in microgravity. In the interim, variable buoyancy normal to the heater surface is achieved by rotation of the entire loop relative to earth gravity. Of course, this is at the expense of varying the buoyancy parallel to the heater surface. Two questions which must be resolved early in the study of flow boiling in microgravity are (1) the lower limits of liquid flow velocity where buoyancy

  17. Dimensionless correlations for forced convection in liquid metals: Part I. single-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyropoulos, Stavros A.; Mikrovas, Anthony C.; Doutre, Don A.

    2001-04-01

    Two main objectives were addressed in this article. First, a dimensionless heat-transfer correlation for single-phase flow forced convection in liquid aluminum has been derived using a novel experimental method. An aluminum sphere was rotated with a specific tangential velocity in liquid aluminum. Its melting time was measured and correlated with the convective heat-transfer characteristics. The resulting correlation has the following form: % MathType!MTEF!2!1!+-% feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfeBSjuyZL2yd9gzLbvyNv2CaerbuLwBLn% hiov2DGi1BTfMBaeXatLxBI9gBaerbd9wDYLwzYbItLDharqqtubsr% 4rNCHbGeaGqiVu0Je9sqqrpepC0xbbL8F4rqqrFfpeea0xe9Lq-Jc9% vqaqpepm0xbba9pwe9Q8fs0-yqaqpepae9pg0FirpepeKkFr0xfr-x% fr-xb9adbaqaaeGaciGaaiaabeqaamaabaabaaGceaqabeaadaqdaa% qaaGqaaiaa-5eacaWF1bWaaSbaaSqaaiaadseaaeqaaaaakiabg2da% 9iaaikdacqGHRaWkcaaIXaGaaGimamaaCaaaleqabaGaaGOmaiaac6% cacaaI4aGaaGymaiaaigdaaaGccqGHxdaTciGGsbGaaiyzamaaDaaa% leaacaWGebaabaGaaGimaiaac6cacaaI1aGaaGioaiaaiwdaaaGccq% GHxdaTciGGqbGaaiOCamaaCaaaleqabaGaaGOmaiaac6cacaaIZaGa% aGioaiaaiAdaaaaakeaacaaI1aGaaGymaiaaiAdacaaIYaGaeyizIm% QaciOuaiaacwgadaWgaaWcbaGaamiraaqabaGccqGHKjYOcaaIYaGa% aGymaiaacYcacaaIYaGaaG4naiaaiodacaGGSaqefeKCPfgBaGqbai% aa+bcaciGGqbGaaiOCaiabgIKi7kaaicdacaGGUaGaaGimaiaaigda% caaI0aaaaaa!690C! begin{gathered} overline {Nu_D } = 2 + 10^{2.811} × operatorname{Re} _D^{0.585} × Pr ^{2.386} \\ 5162 ≤slant operatorname{Re} _D ≤slant 21,273, Pr ≈ 0.014 \\ The second objective of the study was to assess the accuracy of various correlations using an annular channel, which was available at an independent setting, at the Alcan Research and Development Laboratory. The correlations investigated were those derived from the current experimental work as well as those derived by other investigators, as presented in their respective published work. Results indicated that when applied to liquid metals, theoretically derived equations as

  18. Why Is NASA Boiling Fluids in Space?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Convection and buoyancy work differently in space than on Earth. Learn how NASA uses this information and applies it to everyday life. Boiling fluids in space is easier than it is on Earth. Learn m...

  19. Micro-gravity: Superconducting coils for crystal growth. Influence of the levitation force on natural convection in the fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quettier, L.; Vincent-Viry, O.; Mailfert, A.; Juster, F. P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents a novel design of superconducting coils able to generate a micro-gravity environment for protein crystal growth in aqueous solution. The structures have been calculated thanks to a method for “inverse source synthesis problem" developed at the GREEN Choice of the angular offset between the directions of magnetic force field and magnetic field in the working area as well as convection phenomena are also studied.

  20. Investigation of free-forced convection flows in cavity-type receivers. Final yearly report, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, J.A.C.

    1982-01-01

    A summary is provided of the first of three years of experimental and theoretical research on free-forced convection flows in cavity-type solar receivers. New experimental and theoretical results are presented and discussed. The implication of these findings, with respect to the future thrust of the research program, is clarified as well as is possible at the present time. Following various related conclusions a summary and tentative schedule of work projected for year two of research are presented.

  1. Gravity Wave Forcing of the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere: Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending Vertically (MaCWAVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.

    2004-01-01

    The specific objectives of this research effort included the following: 1) Quantification of gravity wave propagation throughout the lower and middle atmosphere in order to define the roles of topographic and convective sources and filtering by mean and low-frequency winds in defining the wave field and wave fluxes at greater altitudes; 2) The influences of wave instability processes in constraining wave amplitudes and fluxes and generating turbulence and transport; 3) Gravity wave forcing of the mean circulation and thermal structure in the presence of variable motion fields and wave-wave interactions, since the mean forcing may be a small residual when wave interactions, anisotropy, and momentum and heat fluxes are large; 4) The statistical forcing and variability imposed on the thermosphere at greater altitudes by the strong wave forcing and interactions occurring in the MLTI.

  2. Numerical study of forced convection in a turbulent heat sink made of several rows of blocks of square form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchenafa, Rachid; Saim, Rachid; Abboudi, Said

    2015-09-01

    Forced convection is a phenomenon associated with the heat transfer fluid flows. The presence of convection affects simultaneously the thermal and hydrodynamic fields, the problem is thus coupled. This form of heat transfer inside ducts occurs in many practical applications such as solar collectors, heat exchangers, cooling of electronic components as well as chemical and nuclear. In this work, we are interested primarily for a numerical study of thermo-hydraulic performances of an incompressible turbulent flow of air through a heat sink composed of several rows of bars of square section. Profiles and the axial velocity fields, as well as profiles and the distribution of the Nusselt number are plotted for all the geometry considered and chosen for different sections. The effects of geometrical parameters of the model and the operating parameters on the dynamic and thermal behavior of the air are analyzed.

  3. On the impact of forced roll convection on vertical turbulent transport in cold air outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryschka, Micha; Fricke, Jens; Raasch, Siegfried

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the impact of roll convection on the convective boundary layer and vertical transports in different cold air outbreak (CAO) scenarios using large eddy simulations (LES). The organization of convection into rolls was triggered by upstream heterogeneities in the surface temperature, representing ice and water. By changing the sea ice distribution in our LES, we were able to simulate a roll and a nonroll case for each scenario. Furthermore, the roll wavelength was varied by changing the scale of the heterogeneity. The characteristics of the simulated rolls and cloud streets, such as aspect ratios, orientation of the roll axes, and downstream extensions of single rolls agreed closely with observations in CAO situations. The vertical turbulent fluxes, calculated for each simulation, were decomposed into contributions from rolls and from unorganized turbulence. Even though our results confirmed that rolls triggered by upstream heterogeneities can substantially contribute to vertical turbulent fluxes, the total fluxes were not affected by the rolls.

  4. Length Scale and Gravity Effects on Microgravity Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. In earth gravity, buoyancy is an important parameter that affects boiling heat transfer through the rate at which bubbles are removed from the surface. A simple model describing the bubble departure size based on a quasistatic force balance between buoyancy and surface tension is given by the Fritz [I] relation: Bo(exp 1/2) = 0.0208 theta where Bo is the ratio between buoyancy and surface tension forces. For small, rapidly growing bubbles, inertia associated with the induced liquid motion can also cause bubble departure. In microgravity, the magnitude of effects related to natural convection and buoyancy are small and physical mechanisms normally masked by natural convection in earth gravity such as Marangoni convection can substantially influence the boiling and vapor bubble dynamics. CHF (critical heat transfer) is also substantially affected by microgravity. In 1 g environments, Bo has been used as a correlating parameter for CHF. Zuber's CHF model for an infinite horizontal surface assumes that vapor columns formed by the merger of bubbles become unstable due to a Helmholtz instability blocking the supply of liquid to the surface. The jets are spaced lambda(sub D) apart, where lambda(sub D) = 2pi square root of 3[(sigma)/(g(rho(sub l) - rho(sub v)](exp 1/2) = 2pi square root of 3 L Bo(exp -1/2) = square root of 3 lambda(sub c

  5. A Global Model of Mantle Convection that Incorporates Plate Bending Forces, Slab Pull, and Seismic Constraints on the Plate Stress.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K.; Buffett, B.; Becker, T.

    2008-12-01

    We introduce a global mantle convection model employing mantle density anomalies inferred from seismic tomography to determine present day plate motions. Our approach addresses two aspects that are not usually considered in previous work. First, we include forces associated with the bending of subducting plates. The bending forces oppose the plate motion, and may be comparable in magnitude to other important forces at subduction zones, including slab pull. Second, our model incorporates data from the Global CMT Catalog. We use the focal mechanisms of earthquakes associated with subducting slabs to estimate the relative occurrence of compressional and tensional axes in the down-dip direction of subducting slabs. This information is used to infer the state of stress in the subducting slab, which we use to calculate slab pull forces. We investigate regional variations in slab pull by comparing plate motions derived using seismic constraints with those derived using slab pull forces based solely on the age of subducting plates. Furthermore, we constrain the rheology of subducted plates by comparing plate motions predicted with and without bending forces. Although our current model uses only radial variations in mantle viscosity, we include the capability of permitting lateral variations in viscosity by calculating buoyancy and plate-driven flows using Citcom

  6. Design of Test Loops for Forced Convection Heat Transfer Studies at Supercritical State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouch, Masih N.

    Worldwide research is being conducted to improve the efficiency of nuclear power plants by using supercritical water (SCW) as the working fluid. One such SCW reactor considered for future development is the CANDU-Supercritical Water Reactor (CANDU-SCWR). For safe and accurate design of the CANDU-SCWR, a detailed knowledge of forced-convection heat transfer in SCW is required. For this purpose, two supercritical fluid loops, i.e. a SCW loop and an R-134a loop are developed at Carleton University. The SCW loop is designed to operate at pressures as high as 28 MPa, temperatures up to 600 °C and mass fluxes of up to 3000 kg/m2s. The R-134a loop is designed to operate at pressures as high as 6 MPa, temperatures up to 140 °C and mass fluxes in the range of 500-6000 kg/m2s. The test loops designs allow for up to 300 kW of heating power to be imparted to the fluid. Both test loops are of the closed-loop design, where flow circulation is achieved by a centrifugal pump in the SCW loop and three parallel-connected gear pumps in the R-134a loop, respectively. The test loops are pressurized using a high-pressure nitrogen cylinder and accumulator assembly, which allows independent control of the pressure, while simultaneously dampening pump induced pressure fluctuations. Heat exchangers located upstream of the pumps control the fluid temperature in the test loops. Strategically located measuring instrumentation provides information on the flow rate, pressure and temperature in the test loops. The test loops have been designed to accommodate a variety of test-section geometries, ranging from a straight circular tube to a seven-rod bundle, achieving heat fluxes up to 2.5 MW/m2 depending on the test-section geometry. The design of both test loops allows for easy reconfiguration of the test-section orientation relative to the gravitational direction. All the test sections are of the directly-heated design, where electric current passing through the pressure retaining walls of the

  7. Numerical investigation of laminar forced convection in Newtonian and non-Newtonian flows in eccentric annuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Pingping

    1998-12-01

    An extended numerical investigation of fully developed, forced convective laminar flows with heat transfer in eccentric annuli has been carried out. Both Newtonian and non-Newtonian (power-law or Ostwald-de Waele) fluids are studied, representing typical applications in petrochemical, bio-chemical, personal care products, polymer/plastic extrusion and food industries. For the heat transfer problem, with an insulated outer surface, two types of thermal boundary conditions have been considered: Constant wall temperature (T), and uniform axial heat flux with constant peripheral temperature (H1) on the inner surface of the annulus. The governing differential equations for momentum and energy conservation are solved by finite-difference methods. Velocity and temperature distributions in the flow cross section, the wall shear-stress distribution, and isothermal f Re, Nu i,T and Nu i,H1 values for different eccentric annuli (0/leɛ/*/le0.6,/ 0.2/le r/sp/*/le0.8) are presented. In Newtonian flows, the eccentricity is found to have a very strong influence on the flow and temperature fields. In an annulus with relatively large inner cylinder eccentricity, the flow tends to stagnate in the narrow section and has higher peak velocities in the wide section of the annulus. There is considerable flow maldistribution in the azimuthal direction, which in turn produces greater nonuniformity in the temperature field and a consequent degradation in the average heat transfer. Also, the H1 wall condition sustains higher heat transfer coefficients relative to the T boundary condition on the inner surface. For viscous, power-law type non-Newtonian flows, both shear thinning (n<1) and shear thickening (n>1) fluids are considered. Here, the non-linear shear behavior of the fluid is found to further aggravate the flow and temperature maldistribution, and once again the eccentricity is seen to exhibit a very strong influence on the friction and heat transfer behavior. Finally, the

  8. Properties of forced convection experimental with silicon carbide based nano-fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soanker, Abhinay

    -fluids. The nano-fluid properties were tested at three different volume concentrations; 0.55%, 1% and 1.6%. Thermal conductivity was measured for the three-volume concentration as function of temperature. Thermal conductivity enhancement increased with the temperature and may be attributed to increased Brownian motion of colloidal particles at higher temperatures. Measured thermal conductivity values are compared with results obtained by theoretical model derived in this work. Effect of temperature and volume concentration on viscosity was also measured and reported. Viscosity increase and related consequences are important issues for the use of nano-fluids. Extensive measurements of heat transfer and pressure drop for forced convection in circular pipes with nano-fluids was also conducted. Parameters such as heat transfer coefficient, Nusselt number, pressure drop and a thermal hydraulic performance factor that takes into account the gains made by increase in thermal conductivity as well as penalties related to increase in pressure drop are evaluated for laminar and transition flow regimes. No significant improvement in heat transfer (Nusselt number) compared to its based fluid was observed. It is also observed that the values evaluated for the thermal-hydraulic performance factor (change in heat transfer/change in pressure drop) was under unity for many flow conditions indicating poor overall applicability of SiC based nano-fluids.

  9. Free and Forced Convection in High Permeability Porous Media: Impact on Gas Flux at the Earth-atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, N.; Levintal, E.; Dragila, M. I.; Kamai, T.

    2015-12-01

    Gas movement within the earth's subsurface and its exchange with the atmosphere is one of the principal elements contributing to soil and atmospheric function. As the soil permeability increases, gas circulation by convective mechanisms becomes significantly greater than the diffusion. Two of the convective mechanisms, which can be of great importance, are being explored in this research. The first one is thermal convection venting (TCV), which develops when there are unstable density gradients. The second mechanism is wind induced convection (WIC), which develops due to surface winds that drive air movement. Here, we report the results of a study on the relationships between the porous media permeability and particle size, and the development and magnitude of TCV and WIC with the development of thermal differences and surface winds. The research included large high-permeability column experiments carried out under highly controlled laboratory conditions, using well-defined single-sized spherical particles while surface winds and thermal differences were forced and monitored. CO2 enriched air, functioned as a tracer, was used to quantify the impact of TCV and WIC on gas migration in the porous media. Results show that in homogenous porous media a permeability range of 10-7 to 10-6 m2 is the threshold value for TCV onset under standard atmospheric conditions. Adding surface wind with an average velocity of 1.5 m s-1 resulted in WIC effect to a depth of -0.3 m in most experimental settings; however, it did not caused additional air circulation at the reference depth of -0.9 m. Furthermore, given the appropriate conditions, a combined effect of TCV and WIC did significantly increase the overall media ventilation. Simulations of temperature profiles in soil under that permeability, showed that as the thermal gradient changes with depth and is a continuous function, TCV cells can be developed in local sections of the profile, not necessarily reaching the atmosphere.

  10. Forced organization of flute-type turbulence by convective cell injection

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, S.; Huld, T.; Pecseli, H.L.; Rasmussen, J.J.

    1988-03-14

    Nonlinear interactions between flute-type turbulence and an externally excited convective cell in a strongly magnetized plasma are investigated. During the interaction the azimuthal-mode-number spectrum of the turbulence is deformed and a broad spectrum evolves, indicating an inverse cascade. As a result of a modification in phase and amplitude of the fluctuations, an organized structure is created in turbulence. The macroscopic behavior is well explained by a Van der Pol--type equation.

  11. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2015-12-23

    Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and cloud base updraft velocities (Wb). Hitherto, the inability to do so has been a major cause of high uncertainty regarding anthropogenic aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative forcing. This can be addressed by the emerging capability of estimating CCN and Wb of boundary layer convective clouds from an operational polar orbiting weather satellite. Our methodology uses such clouds as an effective analog for CCN chambers. The cloud base supersaturation (S) is determined by Wb and the satellite-retrieved cloud base drop concentrations (Ndb), which is the same as CCN(S). Developing and validating this methodology was possible thanks to the ASR/ARM measurements of CCN and vertical updraft profiles. Validation against ground-based CCN instruments at the ARM sites in Oklahoma, Manaus, and onboard a ship in the northeast Pacific showed a retrieval accuracy of ±25% to ±30% for individual satellite overpasses. The methodology is presently limited to boundary layer not raining convective clouds of at least 1 km depth that are not obscured by upper layer clouds, including semitransparent cirrus. The limitation for small solar backscattering angles of <25º restricts the satellite coverage to ~25% of the world area in a single day. This methodology will likely allow overcoming the challenge of quantifying the aerosol indirect effect and facilitate a substantial reduction of the uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing.

  12. Assessment of a magnet system combining the advantages of cable-in-conduit forced-flow and pool-boiling magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, D.; Hassenzahl, W.; Felker, B.; Chaplin, M.

    1993-10-06

    This paper presents an idea for a magnet system that could be used to advantage in tokamaks and other fusion engineering devices. Higher performance designs, specifically newer tokamaks such as those for the international Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) use Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC) forced flow coils to advantage to meet field and current density requirements. Pool boiling magnets lack structural integrity to resist high magnetic forces since helium cooling areas must surround each conductor. A second problem is that any leak can threaten the voltage standoff integrity of the magnet system. This is because a leak can result in low-pressure helium gas becoming trapped by limited conductance in the magnet bundle and low-pressure helium has poor dielectric strength. The system proposed here is basically a CICC system, with it`s inherent advantages, but bathed in higher pressure supercritical helium to eliminate the leak and voltage break-down problems. Schemes to simplify helium coolant plumbing with the proposed system are discussed. A brief historical review of related magnet systems is included. The advantages and disadvantages of using higher pressure, supercritical helium in combination with solid electrical insulation in a CICC system are discussed. Related electrical data from some previous works are compiled and discussed.

  13. Boiling Heat Transfer in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller/Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Enomoto, Eiichi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    Heat transfer performance of forced convective boiling in high temperature generator was experimentally studied using an actual absorption chiller/heater. Measurements were made at six locations, three different levels on a couple of laterally separated lines, for the fluid rising along the rear wall of the high temperature generator furnace. Fluids tested were water and lithium bromide aqueous solution. System pressures were maintained at 96 and 24 kPa, and firing rates were changed from 100 to 40 % of the full load of the machine. Through the experiments, thermodynamic states of both of the fluids were in subcooled region at the lower and middle locations and in saturated region at the upper location. It can be suggested that saturated boiling occurs at comparatively narrow area, located at the upper zone of heat transfer surface of the generator, while forced convective heat transfer and subcooled boiling appear at the remaining broad area. Enhancement of heat transfer due to saturated boiling was not pronounced for lithium bromide aqueous solution than for water.

  14. Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, Robb Allan

    2000-06-01

    The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

  15. Simulation of forced convection in a channel with nanofluid by the lattice Boltzmann method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the thermal performance of fins mounted on the bottom wall of a horizontal channel and cooled with either pure water or an Al2O3-water nanofluid. The bottom wall of the channel is heated at a constant temperature and cooled by mixed convection of laminar flow at a relatively low temperature. The results of the numerical simulation indicate that the heat transfer rate of fins is significantly affected by the Reynolds number (Re) and the thermal conductivity of the fins. The influence of the solid volume fraction on the increase of heat transfer is more noticeable at higher values of the Re. PMID:23594696

  16. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    1991-01-01

    Future space exploration and commercialization will require more efficient heat rejection systems. For the required heat transfer rates, such systems must use advanced heat transfer techniques. Forced two phase flow boiling heat transfer with enhancements falls in this category. However, moderate to high quality two phase systems tend to require higher pressure losses. This report is divided into two major parts: (1) Multidimensional wall temperature measurement and heat transfer enhancement for top heated horizontal channels with flow boiling; and (2) Improved analytical heat transfer data reduction for a single side heated coolant channel. Part 1 summarizes over forty experiments which involve both single phase convection and flow boiling in a horizontal channel heated externally from the top side. Part 2 contains parametric dimensionless curves with parameters such as the coolant channel radius ratio, the Biot number, and the circumferential coordinate.

  17. Experimental study of Cu-water nanofluid forced convective flow inside a louvered channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshvaght-Aliabadi, M.; Hormozi, F.; Zamzamian, A.

    2015-03-01

    Heat transfer enhancement plays a very important role for energy saving in plate-fin heat exchangers. In the present study, the influences of simultaneous utilization of a louvered plate-fin channel and copper-base deionized water nanofluid on performance of these exchangers are experimentally explored. The effects of flow rate (2-5 l/min) and nanoparticles weight fraction (0-0.4 %) on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics are determined. Experimental results indicate that the use of louvered channel instead of the plain one can improve the heat transfer performance. Likewise, addition of small amounts of copper nanoparticles to the base fluid augments the convective heat transfer coefficient remarkably. The maximum rise of 21.7 % in the convective heat transfer coefficient is observed for the 0.4 % wt nanofluid compared to the base fluid. Also, pumping power for the base fluid and nanofluids are calculated based on the measured pressure drop in the louvered channel. The average increase in pumping power is 11.8 % for the nanofluid with 0.4 % wt compared to the base fluid. Applied performance criterion shows a maximum performance index of 1.167 for the nanofluid with 0.1 % wt Finally, two correlations are proposed for Nusselt number and friction factor which fit the experimental data with in ±10 %.

  18. Experimental study of Cu-water nanofluid forced convective flow inside a louvered channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshvaght-Aliabadi, M.; Hormozi, F.; Zamzamian, A.

    2014-09-01

    Heat transfer enhancement plays a very important role for energy saving in plate-fin heat exchangers. In the present study, the influences of simultaneous utilization of a louvered plate-fin channel and copper-base deionized water nanofluid on performance of these exchangers are experimentally explored. The effects of flow rate (2-5 l/min) and nanoparticles weight fraction (0-0.4 %) on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics are determined. Experimental results indicate that the use of louvered channel instead of the plain one can improve the heat transfer performance. Likewise, addition of small amounts of copper nanoparticles to the base fluid augments the convective heat transfer coefficient remarkably. The maximum rise of 21.7 % in the convective heat transfer coefficient is observed for the 0.4 % wt nanofluid compared to the base fluid. Also, pumping power for the base fluid and nanofluids are calculated based on the measured pressure drop in the louvered channel. The average increase in pumping power is 11.8 % for the nanofluid with 0.4 % wt compared to the base fluid. Applied performance criterion shows a maximum performance index of 1.167 for the nanofluid with 0.1 % wt Finally, two correlations are proposed for Nusselt number and friction factor which fit the experimental data with in ±10 %.

  19. BOILING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  20. Forced- and natural-convection studies on solar collectors for heating and cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, J. T.

    1983-03-01

    Convection in air heating solar collectors for heating and cooling applications was studied. It was determined that improvement in the overall conductance between the absorber and the flowing air was an area that needed much improvement. Studies were performed to obtain several absorber convector configurations which have superior heat transfer performance, modest drop penalties, and a high potential for economical manufacturing. Four surfaces which may be fabricated from aluminum or steel are recommended. Three utilize corrugated sheets bonded to the backplate and/or the back side of the absorber. These three surfaces are recommended for applications where airflow behind the absorber is appropriate. For those applications where airflow above the absorber is appropriate, a louvered surface which can be fabricated from metal or plastic is recommended.

  1. Variability of radiatively forced diurnal cycle of intense convection in the tropical west pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.M.; Sheaffer, J.D.; Thorson, W.B.

    1996-04-01

    Strong differences occur in daytime versus nighttime (DVN) net radiative cooling in clear versus cloudy areas of the tropical atmosphere. Daytime average cooling is approximately -0.7{degrees}C/day, whereas nighttime net tropospheric cooling rates are about -1.5{degrees}C/day, an approximately two-to-one difference. The comparatively strong nocturnal cooling in clear areas gives rise to a diurnally varying vertical circulation and horizontal convergence cycle. Various manifestations of this cyclic process include the observed early morning heavy rainfall maxima over the tropical oceans. The radiatively driven DVN circulation appears to strongly modulate the resulting diurnal cycle of intense convection which creates the highest, coldest cloudiness over maritime tropical areas and is likely a fundamental mechanism governing both small and large scale dynamics over much of the tropical environment.

  2. Effect of the magnetic field direction on forced convection heat transfer enhancements in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherief, Wahid; Avenas, Yvan; Ferrouillat, Sébastien; Kedous-Lebouc, Afef; Jossic, Laurent; Berard, Jean; Petit, Mickael

    2015-07-01

    Applying a magnetic field on a ferrofluid flow induces a large increase of the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this paper, the thermal-hydraulic behaviors of two commercial ferrofluids are compared. The variations of both the pressure drop and the heat transfer coefficient due to the magnetic field are measured in the following conditions: square duct, laminar flow and uniform wall heat flux. The square section with two insulated walls allows for the characterization of the effect of the magnetic field direction. The experimental results show that the heat transfer is better enhanced when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the heat flux. In the best case, the local heat transfer coefficient increase is about 75%. On the contrary, another experimental setup shows no enhancement of thermal conductivity when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the heat flux. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2014) - Elected submissions", edited by Adel Razek

  3. A methodology to determine boundary conditions from forced convection experiments using liquid crystal thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakkareddy, Pradeep S.; Balaji, C.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study to estimate the heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient using liquid crystal thermography and Bayesian inference in a heat generating sphere, enclosed in a cubical Teflon block. The geometry considered for the experiments comprises a heater inserted in a hollow hemispherical aluminium ball, resulting in a volumetric heat generation source that is placed at the center of the Teflon block. Calibrated thermochromic liquid crystal sheets are used to capture the temperature distribution at the front face of the Teflon block. The forward model is the three dimensional conduction equation which is solved within the Teflon block to obtain steady state temperatures, using COMSOL. Match up experiments are carried out for various velocities by minimizing the residual between TLC and simulated temperatures for every assumed loss coefficient, to obtain a correlation of average Nusselt number against Reynolds number. This is used for prescribing the boundary condition for the solution to the forward model. A surrogate model obtained by artificial neural network built upon the data from COMSOL simulations is used to drive a Markov Chain Monte Carlo based Metropolis Hastings algorithm to generate the samples. Bayesian inference is adopted to solve the inverse problem for determination of heat flux and heat transfer coefficient from the measured temperature field. Point estimates of the posterior like the mean, maximum a posteriori and standard deviation of the retrieved heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient are reported. Additionally the effect of number of samples on the performance of the estimation process has been investigated.

  4. Liquid crystal visualization and computer modeling of enhanced heat transfer on a flat plate in forced convection

    SciTech Connect

    Voegler, G.R.; Anderson, A.M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the results of an experimental and computational study of heat transfer enhancement found in the vicinity of a three dimensional block placed on a constant heat flux plate in turbulent forced convection. The experiments used thermochromic liquid crystals to visualize temperature on the surface. Photographs were taken to establish temperature contour lines at a range of velocities and a variety of block sizes and configurations. The results show heat transfer enhancement exists upstream and downstream of the blocks. The enhancement is caused by a horse shoe vortex which stagnates on the front surface of the block and then wraps around the sides. Thin blocks (narrow in the flow direction) show the best enhancement. The computer simulations used the {kappa}-epsilon turbulence model and had reasonable qualitative agreement with the experiments.

  5. The influence of tip clearance and Prandtl number on turbulent forced convection heat transfer of rectangular fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hae-Kyun; Chung, Bum-Jin

    2016-02-01

    The turbulent forced convection heat transfer of rectangular fins in a duct was investigated by varying the tip clearance and Pr. Mass transfer experiments using a H2SO4-CuSO4 electroplating system were performed based on the analogy between heat and mass transfers. FLUENT 6.3 was used for calculations. Turbulent models were tested and the Reynolds Stress Model was chosen, which showed a 1.15 % discrepancy with the existing correlation for a simple tube flow when Pr = 2, but 13 % when Pr = 2014. For a more complex fin channel, the discrepancy increased up to 30 %. The optimal tip clearances, corresponding to maximum heat transfer rates, did not vary with Pr, which is explained using the temperature contours. The results were also compared with the laminar case where Pr influenced the optimal tip clearance.

  6. Some aspects of high-order numerical solutions of the linear convection equation with forced boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingg, D. W.; Lomax, H.

    1993-01-01

    A six-stage low-storage Runge-Kutta time-marching method is presented and shown to be an efficient method for use with high-accuracy spatial difference operators for wave propagation problems. The accuracy of the method for inhomogeneous ordinary differential equations is demonstrated through numerical solutions of the linear convection equation with forced boundary conditions. Numerical experiments are presented simulating a sine wave and a Gaussian pulse propagating into and through the domain. For practical levels of mesh refinement corresponding to roughly ten points per wavelength, the six-stage Runge-Kutta method is more accurate than the popular fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. Further numerical experiments are presented which show that the numerical boundary scheme at an inflow boundary can be a significant source of error when high-accuracy spatial discretizations are used.

  7. Geysering in boiling channels

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomi, Masanori; Takemoto, Takatoshi; Chiang, Jing-Hsien

    1995-09-01

    A concept of natural circulation BWRs such as the SBWR has been proposed and seems to be promising in that the primary cooling system can be simplified. The authors have been investigating thermo-hydraulic instabilities which may appear during the start-up in natural circulation BWRs. In our previous works, geysering was investigated in parallel boiling channels for both natural and forced circulations, and its driving mechanism and the effect of system pressure on geysering occurrence were made clear. In this paper, geysering is investigated in a vertical column and a U-shaped vertical column heated in the lower parts. It is clarified from the results that the occurrence mechanism of geysering and the dependence of system pressure on geysering occurrence coincide between parallel boiling channels in circulation systems and vertical columns in non-circulation systems.

  8. The influence of molten pool geometry on forced convective heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Cheng-hua; Fang, Bo-lang; Liu, Wei-ping; Wang, Li-jun; Ma, Zhi-liang

    2015-05-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the relationship between heat transfer coefficient and molten pool's geometry. It was accomplished by performing an experimental and numerical investigation using a cylinder dimple with two different serials of geometry: (1) cylinder dimples with fixed print diameter D=50mm and different depth, and (2) cylinder dimples with fixed depth d=10mm and different print diameter. The airflow speed varies from 50m/s to 250m/s in the turbulent regime. The results consist of flow characteristics, mainly velocity profile and heat transfer characteristics, including heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number along flow direction, were obtained. The comparison was held against the smooth surface. Results showed that a centrally-located vortex was formed due to the flow separation. For heat transfer coefficient, such augmentations are present near the downstream edges and diminutions are present near the upstream edges of dimple rims, both slightly within each depression. It was found that the convection heat transfer coefficients with different geometry parameters have similar distribution along flow direction. A uniform piecewise linear function was built to describe the heat transfer characterizes for different molten pool print diameter.

  9. Local jet impingement boiling heat transfer with R113

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, D. W.; Ma, C. F.

    An experimental study was performed to characterize the boiling heat transfer of impinging circular submerged jets on simulated microelectronic chips with a nominal area of 5 mm × 5 mm. The heat transfer modes included natural convection, partially developed nucleate boiling, fully developed nucleate boiling and critical heat flux. The study included the effects of jet parameters and fluid subcooling on the nucleate boiling. The results showed that the nucleate boiling data varied only with fluid subcooling regardless of jet parameters and that both the pool and impingement nucleate boiling curves at the same subcooling condition were well correlated. The high heat flux portions of the boiling curves with jet exit velocities greater than 10 m/s were corrected for the elevated saturation temperature. A new expression was developed with an interpolation method to construct the partially developed nucleate boiling curve.

  10. Heat Transfer in Boiling Dilute Emulsion with Strong Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburg, Eric Thomas

    Little attention has been given to the boiling of emulsions compared to that of boiling in pure liquids. The advantages of using emulsions as a heat transfer agent were first discovered in the 1970s and several interesting features have since been studied by few researchers. Early research focuses primarily on pool and flow boiling and looks to determine a mechanism by which the boiling process occurs. This thesis looks at the boiling of dilute emulsions in fluids with strong buoyant forces. The boiling of dilute emulsions presents many favorable characteristics that make it an ideal agent for heat transfer. High heat flux electronics, such as those seen in avionics equipment, produce high heat fluxes of 100 W/cm2 or more, but must be maintained at low temperatures. So far, research on single phase convection and flow boiling in small diameter channels have yet to provide an adequate solution. Emulsions allow the engineer to tailor the solution to the specific problem. The fluid can be customized to retain the high thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of the continuous phase while enhancing the heat transfer coefficient through boiling of the dispersed phase component. Heat transfer experiments were carried out with FC-72 in water emulsions. FC-72 has a saturation temperature of 56 °C, far below that of water. The parameters were varied as follows: 0% ≤ epsilon ≤ 1% and 1.82 x 1012 ≤ RaH ≤ 4.42 x 1012. Surface temperatures along the heated surface reached temperature that were 20 °C in excess of the dispersed phase saturation temperature. An increase of ˜20% was seen in the average Nusselt numbers at the highest Rayleigh numbers. Holography was used to obtain images of individual and multiple FC-72 droplets in the boundary layer next to the heated surface. The droplet diameters ranged from 0.5 mm to 1.3 mm. The Magnus effect was observed when larger individual droplets were injected into the boundary layer, causing the droplets to be pushed

  11. Effect of the coriolis force on the onset of convection in a layer with a fixed heat flux on the boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Muginov, R.R.; Smorodin, B.L.

    1994-11-01

    The effect of the Coriolis force on the onset of convection in a plane horizontal layer of viscous fluid with a fixed heat flux on the rigid lower and free upper boundaries is investigated. Expressions for the critical Rayleigh numbers and wave number are obtained analytically in the rapid rotation limit.

  12. On the concept of leaf boundary layer resistance for forced convection

    PubMed

    Vesala

    1998-09-01

    The definition of leaf boundary layer resistance is reconsidered in respect of the three-dimensional diffusion-controlled mass transport region just above the leaf surface. Due to the existence of this superstomatal air layer, the conventional convective boundary layer is not in direct contact with the surface. Thus, in terms of plant physiology, the diffusive "end correction" to the stomatal resistance should be included in the boundary layer resistance. This is true for laminar as well as turbulent flows. When the surface mole fraction of an exchanged gas is estimated using the boundary layer resistance ignoring the diffusive term may lead to a noticeable error. The self-consistent approach is used to clarify the problems of the boundary layer formation and stomatal interference. If the correction is taken into account, the boundary layer resistance becomes dependent also on stomatal shape and distribution on the leaf. The traditional semiempirical formula corrected by the superstomatal diffusion is applied in numerical calculations. In estimates of the water vapour mole fraction on the surface of a transpiring leaf the relative error ranges from insignificant (quiescent air, large leaf and large stomatal pores) to 20 % (low humidity, strong wind, small leaf and small elliptic pores). The boundary layer resistance can decrease by a factor of 3 when the semiaxis lengths of the stomata increase from 1 and 0.5 &mgr;m to 10 and 5 &mgr;m. The effective thickness of the superstomatal air layer is maximally several millimetres (small stomatal surface concentration and small pores). Copyright 1998 Academic Press Limited PMID:9778427

  13. Conjugate conduction-convection heat transfer with a high-speed boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shope, Frederick L.

    1994-04-01

    A space-marching boundary-layer program has been extensively modified to model conjugate conduction-convection heat transfer for the case of co-flowing high-speed gas and liquid coolant. Solid body conduction is modeled as one-dimensional, constant property heat transfer. The coolant is modeled empirically as a bulk fluid with combined forced convection and subcooled nucleate boiling. The flow solver was modified to solve the group of conjugate boundary equations simultaneously and implicitly with the existing momentum and energy equations for the gas. The resulting conjugate conduction-convection program has been applied to analysis of failure of a backside water-cooled nozzle for a high enthalpy, supersonic wind tunnel. The computational results have been used to establish that the primary failure mode is nucleate-boiling burnout and to propose a numerical burnout limit applicable to the specific nozzle configuration.

  14. Convective forcing of mercury and ozone in the Arctic boundary layer induced by leads in sea ice.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christopher W; Obrist, Daniel; Steffen, Alexandra; Staebler, Ralf M; Douglas, Thomas A; Richter, Andreas; Nghiem, Son V

    2014-02-01

    The ongoing regime shift of Arctic sea ice from perennial to seasonal ice is associated with more dynamic patterns of opening and closing sea-ice leads (large transient channels of open water in the ice), which may affect atmospheric and biogeochemical cycles in the Arctic. Mercury and ozone are rapidly removed from the atmospheric boundary layer during depletion events in the Arctic, caused by destruction of ozone along with oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) to oxidized mercury (Hg(II)) in the atmosphere and its subsequent deposition to snow and ice. Ozone depletion events can change the oxidative capacity of the air by affecting atmospheric hydroxyl radical chemistry, whereas atmospheric mercury depletion events can increase the deposition of mercury to the Arctic, some of which can enter ecosystems during snowmelt. Here we present near-surface measurements of atmospheric mercury and ozone from two Arctic field campaigns near Barrow, Alaska. We find that coastal depletion events are directly linked to sea-ice dynamics. A consolidated ice cover facilitates the depletion of Hg(0) and ozone, but these immediately recover to near-background concentrations in the upwind presence of open sea-ice leads. We attribute the rapid recoveries of Hg(0) and ozone to lead-initiated shallow convection in the stable Arctic boundary layer, which mixes Hg(0) and ozone from undepleted air masses aloft. This convective forcing provides additional Hg(0) to the surface layer at a time of active depletion chemistry, where it is subject to renewed oxidation. Future work will need to establish the degree to which large-scale changes in sea-ice dynamics across the Arctic alter ozone chemistry and mercury deposition in fragile Arctic ecosystems. PMID:24429521

  15. Convective forcing of mercury and ozone in the Arctic boundary layer induced by leads in sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher W.; Obrist, Daniel; Steffen, Alexandra; Staebler, Ralf M.; Douglas, Thomas A.; Richter, Andreas; Nghiem, Son V.

    2014-02-01

    The ongoing regime shift of Arctic sea ice from perennial to seasonal ice is associated with more dynamic patterns of opening and closing sea-ice leads (large transient channels of open water in the ice), which may affect atmospheric and biogeochemical cycles in the Arctic. Mercury and ozone are rapidly removed from the atmospheric boundary layer during depletion events in the Arctic, caused by destruction of ozone along with oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) to oxidized mercury (Hg(II)) in the atmosphere and its subsequent deposition to snow and ice. Ozone depletion events can change the oxidative capacity of the air by affecting atmospheric hydroxyl radical chemistry, whereas atmospheric mercury depletion events can increase the deposition of mercury to the Arctic, some of which can enter ecosystems during snowmelt. Here we present near-surface measurements of atmospheric mercury and ozone from two Arctic field campaigns near Barrow, Alaska. We find that coastal depletion events are directly linked to sea-ice dynamics. A consolidated ice cover facilitates the depletion of Hg(0) and ozone, but these immediately recover to near-background concentrations in the upwind presence of open sea-ice leads. We attribute the rapid recoveries of Hg(0) and ozone to lead-initiated shallow convection in the stable Arctic boundary layer, which mixes Hg(0) and ozone from undepleted air masses aloft. This convective forcing provides additional Hg(0) to the surface layer at a time of active depletion chemistry, where it is subject to renewed oxidation. Future work will need to establish the degree to which large-scale changes in sea-ice dynamics across the Arctic alter ozone chemistry and mercury deposition in fragile Arctic ecosystems.

  16. Liquid Salts as Media for Process Heat Transfer from VHTR's: Forced Convective Channel Flow Thermal Hydraulics, Materials, and Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd; Corradini, Michael

    2012-01-30

    on Cr-carbide on the graphite surface. Ni-electroplating dramatically reduced corrosion of alloys, although some diffusion of Fe and Cr were observed occur through the Ni plating. A pyrolytic carbon and SiC (PyC/SiC) CVD coating was also investigated and found to be effective in mitigating corrosion. The KCl-MgCl2 molten salt was less corrosive than FLiNaK fluoride salts for corrosion tests performed at 850oC. Cr dissolution in the molten chloride salt was still observed and consequently Ni-201 and Hastelloy N exhibited the least depth of attack. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (as measured by weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. Because Cr dissolution is an important mechanism of corrosion, molten salt electrochemistry experiments were initiated. These experiments were performed using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Using this technique, the reduction potential of Cr was determined against a Pt quasi-reference electrode as well as against a Ni(II)-Ni reference electrode in molten FLiNaK at 650 oC. The integrated current increased linearly with Cr-content in the salt, providing for a direct assessment of the Cr concentration in a given salt of unknown Cr concentration. To study heat transfer mechanisms in these molten salts over the forced and mixed convection regimes, a forced convective loop was constructed to measure heat transfer coefficients, friction factors and corrosion rates in different diameter tubes in a vertical up flow configuration in the laminar flow regime. Equipment and instrumentation for the forced convective loop was designed, constructed, and tested. These include a high temperature centrifugal pump, mass flow meter, and differential pressure sensing capabilities to an uncertainty of < 2 Pa. The heat transfer coefficient for the KCl-MgCl2 salt was measured in two different diameter channels (0.083 and 0.370Ã). In the 0

  17. Chemical activity induces dynamical force with global structure in a reaction-diffusion-convection system.

    PubMed

    Mahara, Hitoshi; Okada, Koichi; Nomura, Atsushi; Miike, Hidetoshi; Sakurai, Tatsunari

    2009-07-01

    We found a rotating global structure induced by the dynamical force of local chemical activity in a thin solution layer of excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction coupled with diffusion. The surface flow and deformation associated with chemical spiral waves (wavelength about 1 mm) represents a global unidirectional structure and a global tilt in the entire Petri dish (100 mm in diameter), respectively. For these observations, we scanned the condition of hierarchal pattern selection. From this result, the bromomalonic acid has an important role to induce the rotating global structure. An interaction between a reaction-diffusion process and a surface-tension-driven effect leads to such hierarchal pattern with different scales. PMID:19658764

  18. Forced convection and transport effects during hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, James L; Chavez, Craig A; Espinoza, Miguel; Black, Marcie; Maskaly, Karlene; Boman, Mats

    2009-01-01

    This work explores mass transport processes during HP-LCYD, including the transverse forced-flow of precursor gases through a nozzle to enhance fiber growth rates. The use of laser trapping and suspension of nano-scale particles in the precursor flow is also described, providing insights into the nature of the gas flow, including jetting from the fiber tip and thermodiffusion processes near the reaction zone. The effects of differing molecular-weight buffer gases is also explored in conjunction with the Soret effect, and it is found that nucleation at the deposit surface (and homogeneous nucleation in the gas phase) can be enhanced/ retarded, depending on the buffer gas molecular weight. To demonstrate that extensive microstructures can be grown simultaneously, three-dimensional fiber arrays are also grown in-parallel using diffractive optics--without delatory effects from neighboring reaction sites.

  19. Combined effects of a magnetic field and a helical force on the onset of a rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection with free-free boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabi Orou, Jean Bio; Pomalégni, Gisèle

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the combined effects of rotation , magnetic field and helical force on the onset of stationary and oscillatory convection in a horizontal electrically conducting fluid layer heated from below with free-free boundary conditions. For this investigation the linear stability analysis studied by Chandrasekhar (1961) is used. We obtain the condition for the formation of a single large scale structure. In (Pomalégni et al., 2014) it was shown the existence of a critical value Scr of the intensity of the helical force for which the apparition of two cells at marginal stability for the oscillatory convection is obtained. Then, we have shown here how the increasing of parameter Ta influences this critical value of the helical force intensity.

  20. Cryogenic Boiling and Two-Phase Flow during Pipe Chilldown in Earth and Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kun; Ji, Yan; Chung, J. N.; Shyy, Wei

    2008-01-01

    For many industrial, medical and space technologies, cryogenic fluids play indispensable roles. An integral part of the cryogenic transport processes is the chilldown of the system components during initial applications. In this paper, we report experimental results for a chilldown process that is involved with the unsteady two-phase vapor-liquid flow and boiling heat transfer of the cryogen coupled with the transient heat conduction inside pipe walls. We have provided fundamental understanding on the physics of the two-phase flow and boiling heat transfer during cryogenic quenching through experimental observation, measurement and analysis. Based on the temperature measurement of the tube wall, the terrestrial cryogenic chilldown process is divided into three stages of film boiling, nucleate boiling and single-phase convection that bears a close similarity to the conventional pool boiling process. In earth gravity, cooling rate is non-uniform circumferentially due to a stratified flow pattern that gives rise to more cooling on the bottom wall by liquid filaments. In microgravity, there is no stratified flow and the absence of the gravitational force sends liquid filaments to the central core and replaces them by low thermal conductivity vapor that significantly reduces the heat transfer from the wall. Thus, the chilldown process is axisymmetric, but longer in microgravity.

  1. An investigation into the influence of different parameters on the onset of boiling in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecka, Magdalena

    2013-02-01

    The paper presents experimental studies on boiling heat transfer in rectangular minichannels. The investigations focus on the transition from single phase forced convection to nucleate boiling, i.e., in the zone of boiling incipience. The experiment has been carried out with FC-72, R-123 and R-11 at the Reynolds number below 4700, corresponding to mass flow rate range 95-710 kg/(m s). The main part of the test section is a minichannel of pre-set depth from 0.7 to 2 mm and width (20, 40 and 60 mm), with different spatial orientations from vertical to horizontal and 30% inclination angle adjustment. The objective of the paper includes the impact of selected parameters (liquid flow velocity, pressure and inlet liquid subcooling, channel dimensions and spatial orientation) on the boiling incipience in minichannels. The investigations are intended to develop a correlation for the calculations of the Nusselt number under the conditions of boiling incipience in the minichannel as a function of changeable parameters.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of boiling heat transfer: The boiling curve and the effects of wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; He, Y. L.; Luo, K. H.

    2015-03-03

    A hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented to simulate thermal multiphase flows with phase change based on an improved pseudopotential LB approach (Li et al., 2013). The present model does not suffer from the spurious term caused by the forcing-term effect, which was encountered in some previous thermal LB models for liquid–vapor phase change. Using the model, the liquid–vapor boiling process is simulated. The boiling curve together with the three boiling stages (nucleate boiling, transition boiling, and film boiling) is numerically reproduced in the LB community for the first time. The numerical results show that the basic features and the fundamental characteristics of boiling heat transfer are well captured, such as the severe fluctuation of transient heat flux in the transition boiling and the feature that the maximum heat transfer coefficient lies at a lower wall superheat than that of the maximum heat flux. Moreover, the effects of the heating surface wettability on boiling heat transfer are investigated. It is found that an increase in contact angle promotes the onset of boiling but reduces the critical heat flux, and makes the boiling process enter into the film boiling regime at a lower wall superheat, which is consistent with the findings from experimental studies.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of boiling heat transfer: The boiling curve and the effects of wettability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Q.; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; He, Y. L.; Luo, K. H.

    2015-03-03

    A hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented to simulate thermal multiphase flows with phase change based on an improved pseudopotential LB approach (Li et al., 2013). The present model does not suffer from the spurious term caused by the forcing-term effect, which was encountered in some previous thermal LB models for liquid–vapor phase change. Using the model, the liquid–vapor boiling process is simulated. The boiling curve together with the three boiling stages (nucleate boiling, transition boiling, and film boiling) is numerically reproduced in the LB community for the first time. The numerical results show that the basic featuresmore » and the fundamental characteristics of boiling heat transfer are well captured, such as the severe fluctuation of transient heat flux in the transition boiling and the feature that the maximum heat transfer coefficient lies at a lower wall superheat than that of the maximum heat flux. Moreover, the effects of the heating surface wettability on boiling heat transfer are investigated. It is found that an increase in contact angle promotes the onset of boiling but reduces the critical heat flux, and makes the boiling process enter into the film boiling regime at a lower wall superheat, which is consistent with the findings from experimental studies.« less

  4. Computations of Boiling in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Jacqmin, David

    1999-01-01

    The absence (or reduction) of gravity, can lead to major changes in boiling heat transfer. On Earth, convection has a major effect on the heat distribution ahead of an evaporation front, and buoyancy determines the motion of the growing bubbles. In microgravity, convection and buoyancy are absent or greatly reduced and the dynamics of the growing vapor bubbles can change in a fundamental way. In particular, the lack of redistribution of heat can lead to a large superheat and explosive growth of bubbles once they form. While considerable efforts have been devoted to examining boiling experimentally, including the effect of microgravity, theoretical and computational work is limited to very simple models. In this project, the growth of boiling bubbles is studied by direct numerical simulations where the flow field is fully resolved and the effects of inertia, viscosity, surface deformation, heat conduction and convection, as well as the phase change, are fully accounted for. The proposed work is based on previously funded NASA work that allowed us to develop a two-dimensional numerical method for boiling flows and to demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate film boiling. While numerical simulations of multi-fluid flows have been advanced in a major way during the last five years, or so, similar capability for flows with phase change are still in their infancy. Although the feasibility of the proposed approach has been demonstrated, it has yet to be extended and applied to fully three-dimensional simulations. Here, a fully three-dimensional, parallel, grid adaptive code will be developed. The numerical method will be used to study nucleate boiling in microgravity, with particular emphasis on two aspects of the problem: 1) Examination of the growth of bubbles at a wall nucleation site and the instabilities of rapidly growing bubbles. Particular emphasis will be put on accurately capturing the thin wall layer left behind as a bubble expands along a wall, on

  5. Flow and forced-convection heat transfer over forward-facing double steps (effects of step ratio)

    SciTech Connect

    Shakouchi, Toshihiko; Kajino, Itsuki

    1994-07-01

    The flow and heat transfer over a step (a forward- or backward-facing step) result in complicated flow conditions, such as a shear flow field, flow separation, and generation of vortices, and provide some interesting information that improves understanding of the heat transfer on the surface. This is a very frequent flow, and basic to various kinds of chemical equipment, fluid machinery, combustion furnaces, and IC-packages. Recently, there have been many studies on this flow situation by numerical analysis, measurement of mean and fluctuating velocities within the separation bubble using laser Doppler anemometer, and heat transfer analysis. A flow passage having two steps in tiers (forward- or backward-facing double steps) is also frequent, and it is very important to clarify the effects of each step on the flow and the heat-transfer characteristics. This however, has not yet been investigated. This study presents the results of an experimental investigation on the flow and forced convective heat transfer over forward-facing single and double steps. Measurements of velocity and turbulence intensity, flow visualization, pressure distribution, and heat transfer over forward-facing double steps were carried out for various step ratios, L/a (L: step length, a: step height). From these results, the effects of the step ratio on the flow and heat-transfer characteristics were clarified and the following results were confirmed. Heat-transfer enhancement of a double step is considerable compared with that of a single step or a flat plate.

  6. An invariant descriptor for conjugate forced convection-conduction cooling of 3D protruding heaters in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini Alves, Thiago; Santos, Paulo H. D.; Barbur, Murilo A.

    2015-09-01

    In this research, the temperatures of threedimensional (3D) protruding heaters mounted on a conductive substrate in a horizontal rectangular channel with laminar airflow are related to the independent power dissipation in each heater by using a matrix G + with invariant coefficients, which are dimensionless. These coefficients are defined in this study as the conjugate influence coefficients ( g +) caused by the forced convection- conduction nature of the heaters' cooling process. The temperature increase of each heater in the channel is quantified to clearly identify the contributions attributed to the self-heating and power dissipation in the other heaters (both upstream and downstream). The conjugate coefficients are invariant with the heat generation rate in the array of heaters when assuming a defined geometry, invariable fluid and flow rate, and constant substrate and heater conductivities. The results are numerically obtained by considering three 3D protruding heaters on a twodimensional (2D) array by ANSYS/Fluent™ 15.0 software. The conservation equations are solved by a coupled procedure within a single calculation domain comprising of solid and fluid regions and by considering a steady state laminar airflow with constant properties. Some examples are shown, indicating the effects of substrate thermal conductivity and Reynolds number on conjugate influence coefficients.

  7. Free and forced convective cooling of pipe-type electric cables. Volume 2: electrohycrodynamic pumping. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chato, J.C.; Crowley, J.M.

    1981-05-01

    A multi-faceted research program has been performed to investigate in detail several aspects of free and forced convective cooling of underground electric cable systems. There were two main areas of investigation. The first one, reported in Volume 1, dealt with the fluid dynamic and thermal aspects of various components of the cable system. In particular, friction factors for laminar flow in the cable pipes with various configurations were determined using a finite element technique; the temperature distributions and heat transfer in splices were examined using a combined analytical numerical technique; the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of cable pipes in the transitional and turbulent flow regime were determined experimentally in a model study; and full-scale model experimental work was carried out to determine the fluid dynamic and thermal characteristics of entrance and exit chambers for the cooling oil. The second major area of activity, reported in this volume, involved a feasibility study of an electrohydrodynamic pump concept utilizing a traveling electric field generated by a pumping cable. Experimental studies in two different configurations as well as theoretical calculations showed that an electrohydrodynamic pump for the moving of dielectric oil in a cable system is feasible.

  8. Numerical simulation of fluid flow and forced convection heat transfer from tandem circular cylinders using overset grid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harimi, Iman; Saghafian, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Forced convection heat transfer from two and three isothermal circular cylinders in tandem arrangement is studied numerically. In addition, the flow field and the vortex shedding behavior in the wake of the cylinders are investigated. The governing equations consist of continuity, momentum and energy equations are solved for laminar unsteady flow regime. The numerical simulations are performed with a developed finite volume code using the overset grid method. A general orthogonal boundary fitted coordinate system is used for the grid generation. This simulation is performed for the Prandtl numbers of 0.7 and 7 at the Reynolds numbers of 100 and 200. The spacing ratio L/D is set at 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 10. In order to analyze the heat transfer from isothermal cylinders, the mean and local Nusselt numbers and isotherm plots are presented and discussed for different values of the problem parameters. In addition, the mean and instantaneous drag and lift coefficients and Strouhal numbers are computed to elucidate the role of the Reynolds number and spacing ratio. Furthermore, two new correlations for the calculation of the mean Nusselt number, in terms of the spacing ratio and the Reynolds and Prandtl numbers, is proposed. In order to validate the solution, the obtained results are compared with available results in the published literature.

  9. An analysis of laminar free-convection flow and heat transfer about a flat plate paralled to the direction of the generating body force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon

    1953-01-01

    The free-convection flow and heat transfer (generated by a body force) about a flat plate parallel to the direction of the body force are formally analyzed and the type of flow is found to be dependent on the Grashof number alone. For large Grashof numbers (which are of interest in aeronautics), the flow is of the boundary-layer type and the problem is reduced in a formal manner, which is analogous to Prandtl's forced-flow boundary-layer theory, to the simultaneous solution of two ordinary differential equations subject to the proper boundary conditions. Velocity and temperature distributions for Prandtl numbers of 0.01, 0.72, 0.733, 1, 1, 10, 100, and 1000 are computed, and it is shown that velocities and Nusselt numbers of the order of magnitude of those encountered in forced-convection flows may be obtained in free-convection flows. The theoretical and experimental velocity and temperature distributions are in good agreement. A flow and a heat-transfer parameter, from which the important physical quantities such as shear stress and heat-transfer rate can be computed, are derived as functions of Prandtl number alone.

  10. Theoretical and Computational Study of Forced-Convection Heat Transfer at Supercritical Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianguo

    In the simulation of turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer at supercritical pressures, substantial difficulties have been encountered in the modeling of turbulence and bounda-ry layer. This is due to significant fluid property variations with respect to the local temperature and pressure, especially in the near-wall region of a heated wall, where large temperature differences occur. The classical turbulence models available in literature were typically developed for constant-property fluids, where an empirical wall function in the high-Re k-epsilon model, and a damping function in the low-Re k-epsilon model were derived based on the constant-property data to solve the boundary layer. As it can be found in the existing literature, large differences have been observed between the experimental and numerical simulation results of the heat transfer coefficient predictions in the en-hanced and deteriorated heat transfer situations for supercritical fluids. In this thesis, a novel near-wall treatment method is proposed to treat large property variations in the thermal and velocity sub-layers. In the near-wall region, the supercritical fluids can be considered thermal-conductive and viscous forces dominated. The thick-ness of the viscous sub-layer (VSL) and the conduction sub-layer (CSL) can be related to the wall shear stress and local Prandtl number information by using computational CFD models, such as that implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD code. The fluids' bulk and wall temperature information has been obtained from the literature review of experi-mental measurements. The wall temperature and heat transfer coefficient calculated from the k-epsilon model with the proposed wall treatment method have been found to be in good agreement with experimental data for both heat transfer enhancement and deterioration cases for two most widely used fluids: CO2 and water. The proposed model has been applied in the reactor-scale thermal-hydraulic analysis of different flow path

  11. A New Theory of Nucleate Pool Boiling in Arbitrary Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Y. A.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    gravity levels, with a good agreement with experimental evidence. The other problem bears upon equilibrium shapes of a detached bubble near a heated surface in exceedingly low gravity. In low gravity or in weightlessness, the bubble can remain in the close vicinity of the surface for a long time, and its shape is greatly affected by the Marangoni effect due to both temperature and possible surfactant concentration being nonuniform along the interface. The bubble performs at these conditions like a heat pipe, with evaporation at the bubble lower boundary and condensation at its upper boundary, and ultimately ensures a substantial increase in heat removal as compared with that in normal gravity. Some other problems relevant to nucleate pool and forced convection boiling heat transfer are also discussed.

  12. Engineering correlations of variable-property effects on laminar forced convection mass transfer for dilute vapor species and small particles in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A simple engineering correlation scheme is developed to predict the variable property effects on dilute species laminar forced convection mass transfer applicable to all vapor molecules or Brownian diffusing small particle, covering the surface to mainstream temperature ratio of 0.25 T sub W/T sub e 4. The accuracy of the correlation is checked against rigorous numerical forced convection laminar boundary layer calculations of flat plate and stagnation point flows of air containing trace species of Na, NaCl, NaOH, Na2SO4, K, KCl, KOH, or K2SO4 vapor species or their clusters. For the cases reported here the correlation had an average absolute error of only 1 percent (maximum 13 percent) as compared to an average absolute error of 18 percent (maximum 54 percent) one would have made by using the constant-property results.

  13. Benchmarking of thermal hydraulic loop models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES), phase-I: Isothermal steady state forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Hyun; Batta, A.; Casamassima, V.; Cheng, X.; Choi, Yong Joon; Hwang, Il Soon; Lim, Jun; Meloni, P.; Nitti, F. S.; Dedul, V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Komlev, O.; Jaeger, W.; Sedov, A.; Kim, Ji Hak; Puspitarini, D.

    2011-08-01

    As highly promising coolant for new generation nuclear reactors, liquid Lead-Bismuth Eutectic has been extensively worldwide investigated. With high expectation about this advanced coolant, a multi-national systematic study on LBE was proposed in 2007, which covers benchmarking of thermal hydraulic prediction models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES). This international collaboration has been organized by OECD/NEA, and nine organizations - ENEA, ERSE, GIDROPRESS, IAEA, IPPE, KIT/IKET, KIT/INR, NUTRECK, and RRC KI - contribute their efforts to LACANES benchmarking. To produce experimental data for LACANES benchmarking, thermal-hydraulic tests were conducted by using a 12-m tall LBE integral test facility, named as Heavy Eutectic liquid metal loop for integral test of Operability and Safety of PEACER (HELIOS) which has been constructed in 2005 at the Seoul National University in the Republic of Korea. LACANES benchmark campaigns consist of a forced convection (phase-I) and a natural circulation (phase-II). In the forced convection case, the predictions of pressure losses based on handbook correlations and that obtained by Computational Fluid Dynamics code simulation were compared with the measured data for various components of the HELIOS test facility. Based on comparative analyses of the predictions and the measured data, recommendations for the prediction methods of a pressure loss in LACANES were obtained. In this paper, results for the forced convection case (phase-I) of LACANES benchmarking are described.

  14. The Impact of Model Configuration and Large-Scale, Upper-Level Forcing on CRM- Simulated Convective Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Zeng, X.; Shie, C.-L.; Starr, D.; Simpson, J.

    2004-01-01

    Real clouds and cloud systems are inherently three-dimensional (3D). Because of the limitations in computer resources, however, most cloud-resolving models (CRMs) today are still two-dimensional (2D, see a brief review by Tao 2003). Only recently have 3D experiments been performed for multi-day periods for tropical cloud systems with large horizontal domains at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, at NOAA GFDL, at the U. K. Met. Office, at Colorado State University and at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (Tao 2003). At Goddard, a 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was used to simulate periods during TOGA COARE (December 19-27, 1992), GATE (September 1-7, 1974), SCSMEX (June 2-11, 1998), ARM (June 26-30, 1997) and KWAJEX (August 7-13, August 18-21, and August 29-September 12, 1999) using a 512 by 512 km domain (with 2-km resolution). The results indicate that surface precipitation and latent heating profiles are similar between the 2D and 3D GCE model simulations. However, there are difference in radiation, surface fluxes and precipitation characteristics. The 2D GCE model was used to perform a long-term integration on ARM/GCSS case 4 (22 days at the ARM Southern Great Plains site in March 2000). Preliminary results showed a large temperature bias in the upper troposphere that had not been seen in previous tropical cases. The major objectives of this paper are: (1) to determine the sensitivities to model configuration (i.e., 2D in west-east, south-north or 3D), (2) to identify the differences and similarities in the organization and entrainment rates of convection between 2D- and 3D-simulated ARM cloud systems, and (3) assess the impact of upper tropospheric forcing on tropical and ARM case 4 cases.

  15. The Impact of Model Configuration and Large-Scale, Upper-Level Forcing on CRM-Simulated Convective Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Zeng, X.; Shie, C.-L.; Starr, D.; Simpson, J.

    2004-01-01

    Real clouds and cloud systems are inherently three-dimensional (3D). Because of the limitations in computer resources, however, most cloud-resolving models (CRMs) today are still two-dimensional (2D, see a brief review by Tao 2003). Only recently have 3D experiments been performed for multi-day periods for tropical cloud systems with large horizontal domains at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, at NOAA GFDL, at the U. K. Met. Office, at Colorado State University and at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (Tao 2003). At Goddard, a 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was used to simulate periods during TOGA COARE (December 19-27, 1992), GATE (September 1-7, 1974), SCSMEX (June 2-11, 1998), ARM (June 26-30, 1997) and KWAJEX (August 7-13, August 18-21, and August 29-September 12, 1999) using a 512 km domain (with 2-kilometer resolution). The results indicate that surface precipitation and latent heating profiles are similar between the 2D and 3D GCE model simulations. However, there are difference in radiation, surface fluxes and precipitation characteristics. The 2D GCE model was used to perform a long-term integration on ARM/GCSS case 4 (22 days at the ARM southern Great Plains site in March 2000). Preliminary results showed a large temperature bias in the upper troposphere that had not been seen in previous tropical cases. The major objectives of this paper are: (1) to determine the sensitivities to model configuration (ie., 2D in west-east, south-north or 3D), (2) to identify the differences and similarities in the organization and entrainment rates of convection between 2D- and 3D-simulated ARM cloud systems, and (3) assess the impact of upper tropospheric forcing on tropical and ARM case 4 cases.

  16. Phenomenological and statistical analyses of turbulence in forced convection with temperature-dependent viscosity under non-Boussinesq condition.

    PubMed

    Yahya, S M; Anwer, S F; Sanghi, S

    2013-10-01

    In this work, Thermal Large Eddy Simulation (TLES) is performed to study the behavior of weakly compressible Newtonian fluids with anisotropic temperature-dependent viscosity in forced convection turbulent flow. A systematic analysis of variable-viscosity effects, isolated from gravity, with relevance to industrial cooling/heating applications is being carried out. A LES of a planar channel flow with significant heat transfer at a low Mach number was performed to study effects of fluid property variation on the near-wall turbulence structure. In this flow configuration the top wall is maintained at a higher temperature (T hot ) than the bottom wall (T cold ). The temperature ratio (R θ = T hot /T cold ) is fixed at 1.01, 2 and 3 to study the effects of property variations at low Mach number. Results indicate that average and turbulent fields undergo significant changes. Compared with isothermal flow with constant viscosity, we observe that turbulence is enhanced in the cold side of the channel, characterized by locally lower viscosity whereas a decrease of turbulent kinetic energy is found at the hot wall. The turbulent structures near the cold wall are very short and densely populated vortices but near the hot wall there seems to be a long streaky structure or large elongated vortices. Spectral study reveals that turbulence is completely suppressed at the hot side of the channel at a large temperature ratio because no inertial zone is obtained (i.e. index of Kolmogorov scaling law is zero) from the spectra in these region. PMID:24158263

  17. Numerical investigation of forced convection of nano fluid flow in horizontal U-longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, S. M.; Sahar, A. F. A.; Firas, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    A numerical study has been carried out to investigate the heat transfer by laminar forced convection of nanofluid taking Titania (TiO2) and Alumina (Al2O3) as nanoparticles and the water as based fluid in a three dimensional plain and U-longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger. A Solid WORKS PREMIUM 2012 is used to draw the geometries of plain tube heat exchanger or U-longitudinal copper finned tube heat exchanger. Four U-longitudinal copper fins have 100 cm long, 3.8cm height and 1mm thickness are attached to a straight copper tube of 100 cm length, 2.2 cm inner diameter and 2.39 cm outer diameter. The governing equations which used as continuity, momentum and energy equations under assumptions are utilized to predict the flow field, temperature distribution, and heat transfer of the heat exchanger. The finite volume approach is used to obtain all the computational results using commercial ANSYS Fluent copy package 14.0 with assist of solid works and Gambit software program. The effect of various parameters on the performance of heat exchanger are investigated numerically such as Reynolds' number (ranging from 270 to 1900), volume consternation of nanoparticles (0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%), type of nanoparticles, and mass flow rate of nanofluid in the hot region of heat exchanger. For 0.8% consternation of nanoparticles, heat transfer has significant enhancement in both nanofluids. It can be found about 7.3% for TiO2 and about 7.5% for Al2O3 compared with the water only as a working fluid.

  18. Two-dimensional model simulation of Martian atmospheric convection with condensation of the major component under fixed thermal forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, T.; Odaka, M.; Sugiyama, K.; Nakajima, K.; Ishiwatari, M.; Takahashi, Y. O.; Nishizawa, S.; Hayashi, Y.-Y.

    2011-10-01

    We perform a numerical simulation of cloud convection by using two-dimensional nonhydrostatic model for the purpose of investigating the structure of cloud convection with condensation of the major component when significant high supersaturation is not allowed. In quasi-equilibrium state, horizontally uniform cloud layer is formed above the condensation level, and the dry adiabatic layer is formed below the level. The updraft and downdraft associated with convection extends from near the surface to the top of the model atmosphere. The updraft and downdraft in the cloud layer seem to be maintained by buoyancy in the dry adiabatic layer.

  19. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Boiling Nitrogen in Square Pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Nakayama, Tadashi; Takahashi, Koichi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Aoki, Itsuo

    Pressure drop and forced convection heat transfer were studied in the boiling nitrogen flow in a horizontal square pipe with a side of 12 mm at inlet pressure between 0.1 and0.15 MPa with a mass flux between 70 and 2000 kg/m2-s and with a heat flux of 5, 10 and 20 kW/m2. Accordingly, the flow and heat transfer mechanisms specific to square pipe were elucidated, and the applicability to cryogenic fluids of pressure drop and heat transfer models originally proposed for room temperature fluids was clarified.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Natural Convection of a Nanofluid in an Inclined Heated Enclosure Using Two-Phase Lattice Boltzmann Method: Accurate Effects of Thermophoresis and Brownian Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mahmoud; Eslamian, Morteza

    2015-07-01

    Laminar natural convection in differentially heated ( β = 0°, where β is the inclination angle), inclined ( β = 30° and 60°), and bottom-heated ( β = 90°) square enclosures filled with a nanofluid is investigated, using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann simulation approach. The effects of the inclination angle on Nu number and convection heat transfer coefficient are studied. The effects of thermophoresis and Brownian forces which create a relative drift or slip velocity between the particles and the base fluid are included in the simulation. The effect of thermophoresis is considered using an accurate and quantitative formula proposed by the authors. Some of the existing results on natural convection are erroneous due to using wrong thermophoresis models or simply ignoring the effect. Here we show that thermophoresis has a considerable effect on heat transfer augmentation in laminar natural convection. Our non-homogenous modeling approach shows that heat transfer in nanofluids is a function of the inclination angle and Ra number. It also reveals some details of flow behavior which cannot be captured by single-phase models. The minimum heat transfer rate is associated with β = 90° (bottom-heated) and the maximum heat transfer rate occurs in an inclination angle which varies with the Ra number.

  1. Experimental validation benchmark data for CFD of transient convection from forced to natural with flow reversal on a vertical flat plate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2016-06-23

    Transient convection has been investigated experimentally for the purpose of providing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation benchmark data. A specialized facility for validation benchmark experiments called the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel was used to acquire thermal and velocity measurements of flow over a smooth, vertical heated plate. The initial condition was forced convection downward with subsequent transition to mixed convection, ending with natural convection upward after a flow reversal. Data acquisition through the transient was repeated for ensemble-averaged results. With simple flow geometry, validation data were acquired at the benchmark level. All boundary conditions (BCs) were measured and their uncertainties quantified.more » Temperature profiles on all four walls and the inlet were measured, as well as as-built test section geometry. Inlet velocity profiles and turbulence levels were quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry. System Response Quantities (SRQs) were measured for comparison with CFD outputs and include velocity profiles, wall heat flux, and wall shear stress. Extra effort was invested in documenting and preserving the validation data. Details about the experimental facility, instrumentation, experimental procedure, materials, BCs, and SRQs are made available through this paper. As a result, the latter two are available for download and the other details are included in this work.« less

  2. Numerical Simulation of Natural Convection of a Nanofluid in an Inclined Heated Enclosure Using Two-Phase Lattice Boltzmann Method: Accurate Effects of Thermophoresis and Brownian Forces.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahmoud; Eslamian, Morteza

    2015-12-01

    Laminar natural convection in differentially heated (β = 0°, where β is the inclination angle), inclined (β = 30° and 60°), and bottom-heated (β = 90°) square enclosures filled with a nanofluid is investigated, using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann simulation approach. The effects of the inclination angle on Nu number and convection heat transfer coefficient are studied. The effects of thermophoresis and Brownian forces which create a relative drift or slip velocity between the particles and the base fluid are included in the simulation. The effect of thermophoresis is considered using an accurate and quantitative formula proposed by the authors. Some of the existing results on natural convection are erroneous due to using wrong thermophoresis models or simply ignoring the effect. Here we show that thermophoresis has a considerable effect on heat transfer augmentation in laminar natural convection. Our non-homogenous modeling approach shows that heat transfer in nanofluids is a function of the inclination angle and Ra number. It also reveals some details of flow behavior which cannot be captured by single-phase models. The minimum heat transfer rate is associated with β = 90° (bottom-heated) and the maximum heat transfer rate occurs in an inclination angle which varies with the Ra number. PMID:26183389

  3. Boiling Heat Transfer in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller/Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Enomoto, Eiichi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    The heat transfer performance of forced convective boiling was tested using a high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater, the rear furnace wall of which was composed of two different surfaces; i. e., plain and sprayed heated surfaces. These two surfaces were bisymmetrically set. Wall surface temperatures of both the fire and fluid sides were measured at three locations along the upward flow direction in each heated surface for determining the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. Nickel-chromium and alumina were employed as the spray materials. The test results show that the sprayed surface can yield a marked elevation in the heat transfer performance due to boiling on the plain surface. Therefore the level of heated surface temperature is largely reduced by means of the spraying surface treatment. This implies that the spraying would much improve a corrosive condition of the heated surface.

  4. RUBI -a Reference mUltiscale Boiling Investigation for the Fluid Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Nils; Stelzer, Marco; Schoele-Schulz, Olaf; Picker, Gerold; Ranebo, Hans; Dettmann, Jan; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Winter, Josef; Tadrist, Lounes; Stephan, Peter; Grassi, Walter; di Marco, Paolo; Colin, Catherine; Piero Celata, Gian; Thome, John; Kabov, Oleg

    Boiling is a two-phase heat transfer process where large heat fluxes can be transferred with small driving temperature differences. The high performance of boiling makes the process very interesting for heat transfer applications and it is widely used in industry for example in power plants, refrigeration systems, and electronics cooling. Nevertheless, due to the large number of involved phenomena and their often highly dynamic nature a fundamental understanding and closed theoretical description is not yet accomplished. The design of systems incorporating the process is generally based on empirical correlations, which are commonly accompanied by large uncertainties and, thus, has to be verified by expensive test campaigns. Hence, strong efforts are currently made to develop applicable numerical tools for a reliable prediction of the boiling heat transfer performance and limits. In order to support and validate this development and, in particular as a precondition, to enhance the basic knowledge about boiling the comprehensive multi-scale experiment RUBI (Reference mUlti-scale Boiling Investigation) for the Fluid Science Laboratory on board the ISS is currently in preparation. The scientific objectives and requirements of RUBI have been defined by the members of the ESA topical team "Boiling and Multiphase Flow" and addresses fundamental aspects of boiling phenomena. The main objectives are the measurement of wall temperature and heat flux distribution underneath vapour bubbles with high spatial and tem-poral resolution by means of IR thermography accompanied by the synchronized high-speed observation of the bubble shapes. Furthermore, the fluid temperature in the vicinity and inside of the bubbles will be measured by a micro sensor array. Additional stimuli are the generation of an electric field above the heating surface and a shear flow created by a forced convection loop. The objective of these stimuli is to impose forces on the bubbles and investigate the

  5. The Influence of the Heating Condition on the Void Fraction in a Boiling Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umekawa, H.; Nakamura, S.; Fujiyoshi, S.; Ami, T.; Ozawa, M.; Saito, Y.; Ito, D.

    The void fraction profile in a boiling channel is essential in analyzing convective flow boiling, where several investigations have been conducted. But due to the difficulty in the treatment of the non-thermodynamic equilibrium phenomena under subcooled conditions, the issues in comprehensive void fraction profile has not been solved, yet. To improve the understanding of these phenomena, detailed measurement results are required. In this investigation, by using five kinds of test sections, i.e. I.D.=3 mm L=400 mm, I.D.=5 mm L=200, 400, 1000 mm, and I.D.=10 mm L=400 mm, the void fraction was measured quantitatively over the whole length. For the measurements, thermal neutron radiography at the B-4 port of the Kyoto University Research Reactor was used. This facility is designed for the visualization of forced convective flow boiling in vertical tubes. To introduce the performance of this facility, this paper presents the measurement results of void fraction and the estimation results briefly.

  6. Effect of Melt Convection at Various Gravity Levels and Orientations on the Forces Acting on a Large Spherical Particle in the Vicinity of a Solidification Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Sen, Subhayu; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Catalina, Adrian; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2000-01-01

    Numerical modeling was Undertaken to analyze the influence of both radial and axial thermal gradients on convection patterns and velocities claiming solidification of pure Al and an Al-4 wt% Cu alloy. The objective of the numerical task was to predict the influence of convective velocity on an insoluble particle near a solid/liquid (s/l) interface. These predictions were then be used to define the minimum gravity level (q) required to investigate the fundamental physics of interactions between a particle and a s/l interface. This is an ongoing NASA founded flight experiment entitled "particle engulfment and pushing by solidifying interfaces (PEP)". Steady-state calculations were performed for different gravity levels and orientations with respect to the gravity vector The furnace configuration used in this analysis is the quench module insert (QMI-1) proposed for the Material Science Research Facility (MSRF) on board the International Space Station (ISS). The general model of binary alloy solidification was based on the finite element code FIDAP. At a low g level of 10(exp -4) g(sub o) (g(sub o) = 9.8 m/square s) maximum melt convection was obtained for an orientation of 90 deg. Calculations showed that even for this worst case orientation the dominant forces acting on the particle are the fundamental drag and interfacial forces.

  7. A review on boiling heat transfer enhancement with nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing interest of late in nanofluid boiling and its use in heat transfer enhancement. This article covers recent advances in the last decade by researchers in both pool boiling and convective boiling applications, with nanofluids as the working fluid. The available data in the literature is reviewed in terms of enhancements, and degradations in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux. Conflicting data have been presented in the literature on the effect that nanofluids have on the boiling heat-transfer coefficient; however, almost all researchers have noted an enhancement in the critical heat flux during nanofluid boiling. Several researchers have observed nanoparticle deposition at the heater surface, which they have related back to the critical heat flux enhancement. PMID:21711794

  8. A review on boiling heat transfer enhancement with nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jacqueline; Brutin, David; Tadrist, Lounes

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing interest of late in nanofluid boiling and its use in heat transfer enhancement. This article covers recent advances in the last decade by researchers in both pool boiling and convective boiling applications, with nanofluids as the working fluid. The available data in the literature is reviewed in terms of enhancements, and degradations in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux. Conflicting data have been presented in the literature on the effect that nanofluids have on the boiling heat-transfer coefficient; however, almost all researchers have noted an enhancement in the critical heat flux during nanofluid boiling. Several researchers have observed nanoparticle deposition at the heater surface, which they have related back to the critical heat flux enhancement. PMID:21711794

  9. Validation and development of existing and new RAOB-based warm-season convective wind forecasting tools for Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCue, Mitchell Hollis

    Using a 15-year (1995 to 2009) climatology of 1500 UTC warm-season (May through September) rawinsonde observation (RAOB) data from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Skid Strip (KXMR) and 5 minute wind data from 36 wind towers on CCAFS and Kennedy Space Center (KSC), several convective wind forecasting techniques currently employed by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) were evaluated. Present forecasting methods under evaluation include examining the vertical equivalent potential temperature (theta e) profile, vertical profiles of wind spend and direction, and several wet downburst forecasting indices. Although previous research found that currently used wet downburst forecasting methods showed little promise for forecasting convective winds, it was carried out with a very small sample, limiting the reliability of the results. Evaluation versus a larger 15-year dataset was performed to truly assess the forecasting utility of these methods in the central Florida warm-season convective environment. In addition, several new predictive analytic based forecast methods for predicting the occurrence of warm-season convection and its associated wind gusts were developed and validated. This research was performed in order to help the 45 WS better forecast not only which days are more likely to produce convective wind gusts, but also to better predict which days are more likely to yield warning criteria wind events of 35 knots or greater, should convection be forecasted. Convective wind forecasting is a very challenging problem that requires new statistically based modeling techniques since conventional meteorologically based methods do not perform well. New predictive analytic based forecasting methods were constructed using R statistical software and incorporate several techniques including multiple linear regression, logistic regression, multinomial logistic regression, classification and regression trees (CART), and ensemble CART using bootstrapping. All of

  10. Investigation into flow boiling heat transfer in a minichannel with enhanced heating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecka, Magdalena

    2012-04-01

    The paper presents results of flow boiling in a minichannel of 1.0 mm depth. The heating element for the working fluid (FC-72) that flows along the minichannel is a single-sided enhanced alloy foil made from Haynes-230. Microrecesses were formed on the selected area of the heating foil by laser technology. The observations of the flow structure were carried out through a piece of glass. Simultaneously, owing to the liquid crystal layer placed on the opposite side of the enhanced foil surface, it was possible to measure temperature distribution on the heating wall through another piece of glass. The experimental research has been focused on the transition from single phase forced convection to nucleate boiling, i.e. the zone of boiling incipience and further development of boiling. The objective of the paper is determining of the void fraction for some cross-sections of selected images for increasing heat fluxes supplied to the heating surface. The flow structure photos were processed in Corel graphics software and binarized. The analysis of phase volumes was developed in Techystem Globe software.

  11. Visualization study on pool boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamei, Shuya; Hirata, Masaru

    1991-04-01

    The visualized boiling phenomena were observed by means of high speed photographic shadowgraphy using a rotating prism camera (nac HIGH SPEED CAMERA model-16HD) with the speed of about 3500 frames per second. The photographs show that pool boiling heat transfer phenomena are varied for the boiling curve based on the experiments. Experiments have been carried out to investigate pool boiling heat transfer phenomena on a horizontal thin filament in subcooled and saturated distilled water. The experiments were performed for atmospheric pressure,for filament diameters of about 0.3 mm, for region of natural convection to film boiling. The color-film made by high speed movie camera are converted to high speed color video-tape. It is convenient to edit and show the tape for visualization with teaching the students. The high speed color video showed that the successive motion and shape of bubbles during their process of detachment varied with increasing heat flux on the heated surface of a filament. From these results, it was confirmed that the high speed phenomena of boiling by the slow motion video pictures could be estimated clearly.

  12. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  13. Investigation of Satellite Measurements in the Presence of Clouds, Forcing Influences on Clouds and Feedback to the Large Scale Following Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, C.

    1984-01-01

    Satellite measurements during cloudy conditions, forces influencing clouds and large scale feedback following convection were investigated. The following conditions were studied: (1) passing marked thermal features aloft near the northern Bay of Bengal at the time of formation of the July 1979 monsoon depression; (2) recognition of regions of dense high overcast clouds in satellite radiances; (3) evolution of monsoon cloud systems and controlling factors on the clouds, and the effects of the clouds on thermodynamic and wind structures for improvements for numerical models are suggested.

  14. Thermodynamics of Flow Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, F. J.

    2003-05-01

    Convective boiling in sub-cooled water flowing through a heated channel is essential in many engineering applications where high heat flux needs to be accommodated. It has been customary to represent the heat transfer by the boiling curve, which shows the heat flux versus the wall-minus-saturation temperature difference. However it is a rather complicated problem, and recent revisions of two-phase flow and heat transfer note that calculated values of boiling heat transfer coefficients present many uncertainties. Quite recently, the author has shown that the average thermal gap in the heated channel (the wall temperature minus the average temperature of the coolant) was tightly connected with the thermodynamic efficiency of a theoretical reversible engine placed in this thermal gap. In this work, whereas this correlation is checked again with data taken by General Electric (task III) for water at high pressure, a possible connection between this wall efficiency and the reversible-work theorem is explored.

  15. The mesoscale forcing of a midlatitude upper-tropospheric jet streak by a simulated convective system. 1: Mass circulation and ageostrophic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Bart J.; Johnson, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    The mutual forcing of a midlatitude upper-tropospheric jet streak by organized mesoscale adiabatic and diabatic processes within a simulated convective system (SCS) is investigated. Using isentropic diagnostics, results from a three-dimensional numerical simulation of an SCS are examined to study the isallobaric flow field, modes of dominant ageostrophic motion, and stability changes in relation to the mutual interdependence of adiabatic processes and latent heat release. Isentropic analysis affords an explicit isolation of a component of isallobaric flow associated with diabatic processes within the SCS. Prior to convective development within the simulations, atmospheric destabilization occurs through adiabatic ageostrophic mass adjustment and low-level convergence in association with the preexisting synoptic-scale upper-tropospheric jet streak. The SCS develops in a baroclinic zone and quickly initiates a vigorous mass circulation. By the mature stage, a pronounced vertical couplet of low-level convergence and upper-level mass divergence is established, linked by intense midtropospoheric diabatic heating. Significant divergence persists aloft for several hours subsequent to SCS decay. The dominant role of ageostrophic motion within which the low-level mass convergence develops is the adiabatic isallobaric component, while the mass divergence aloft develops principally through the diabatic isallobaric component. Both compnents are intrinsically linked to the convectively forced vertical mass transport. The inertial diabatic ageostrophic component is largest near the level of maximum heating and is responsible for the development of inertial instability to the north of SCS, resulting in this quadrant being preferred for outflow. The inertial advective component, the dominant term that produces the new downstream wind maximum, rapidly develops north of the SCS and through mutual adjustment creates the baroclinic support for the new jet streak.

  16. Momentum effects in steady nucleate pool boiling during microgravity.

    PubMed

    Merte, Herman

    2004-11-01

    Pool boiling experiments were conducted in microgravity on five space shuttle flights, using a flat plate heater consisting of a semitransparent thin gold film deposited on a quartz substrate that also acted as a resistance thermometer. The test fluid was R-113, and the vapor bubble behavior at the heater surface was photographed from beneath as well as from the side. Each flight consisted of a matrix of three levels of heat flux and three levels of subcooling. In 26 of the total of 45 experiments conditions of steady-state pool boiling were achieved under certain combinations of heat flux and liquid subcooling. In many of the 26 cases, it was observed from the 16-mm movie films that a large vapor bubble formed, remaining slightly removed from the heater surface, and that subsequent vapor bubbles nucleate and grow on the heater surface. Coalescence occurs upon making contact with the large bubble, which thus acts as a vapor reservoir. Recently, measurements of the frequencies and sizes of the small vapor bubbles as they coalesced with the large bubble permitted computation of the associated momentum transfer. The transient forces obtained are presented here. Where these arise from the conversion of the surface energy in the small vapor bubble to kinetic energy acting away from the solid heater surface, they counter the Marangoni convection due to the temperature gradients normal to the heater surface. This Marangoni convection would otherwise impel the large vapor bubble toward the heater surface and result in dryout and unsteady heat transfer. PMID:15644357

  17. Raman Shifting a Tunable ArF Excimer Laser to Wavelengths of 190 to 240 nm With a Forced Convection Raman Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    Tunable radiation, at ultraviolet wavelengths, is produced by Raman shifting a modified 285-mJ ArF excimer laser. Multiple Stokes outputs are observed in H2, CH4, D2, N2, SF6, and CF4 (20, 22, 53, 21, 2.1, and 0.35 percent, respectively). Numbers in parentheses are the first Stokes energy conversion efficiencies. We can access 70 percent of the frequency range 42000-52000 cm (exp -1) (190-240 nm) with Stokes energies that vary from 0.2 microJoule to 58 mJ inside the Raman cell. By using 110 mJ of pump energy and D 2 , the tunable first Stokes energy varies over the 29-58 mJ range as the wavelength is tuned over the 204-206 nm range. Dependence on input energy, gas pressure, He mixture fraction, and circulation of the gas in the forced convection Raman cell is discussed; Stokes conversion is also discussed for laser repetition rates from 1 to 100 Hz. An empirical equation is given to determine whether forced convection can improve outputs for a given repetition rate.

  18. A critical review of forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of Al2O3, TiO2 and CuO nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Deepak; Choudhary, Rajesh; Subudhi, Sudhakar

    2016-04-01

    Nanofluid is the colloidal suspension of nanosized solid particles like metals or metal oxides in some conventional fluids like water and ethylene glycol. Due to its unique characteristics of enhanced heat transfer compared to conventional fluid, it has attracted the attention of research community. The forced convection heat transfer of nanofluid is investigated by numerous researchers. This paper critically reviews the papers published on experimental studies of forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of Al2O3, TiO2 and CuO based nanofluids dispersed in water, ethylene glycol and water-ethylene glycol mixture. Most of the researchers have shown a little rise in pressure drop with the use of nanofluids in plain tube. Literature has reported that the pumping power is appreciably high, only at very high particle concentration i.e. more than 5 %. As nanofluids are able to enhance the heat transfer at low particle concentrations so most of the researchers have used less than 3 % volume concentration in their studies. Almost no disagreement is observed on pressure drop results of different researchers. But there is not a common agreement in magnitude and mechanism of heat transfer enhancement. Few studies have shown an anomalous enhancement in heat transfer even at low particle concentration. On the contrary, some researchers have shown little heat transfer enhancement at the same particle concentration. A large variation (2-3 times) in Nusselt number was observed for few studies under similar conditions.

  19. Optimizing the Combination of Smoking and Boiling on Quality of Korean Traditional Boiled Loin (M. longissimus dorsi)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    The combined effects of smoking and boiling on the proximate composition, technological quality traits, shear force, and sensory characteristics of the Korean traditional boiled loin were studied. Cooking loss, processing loss, and shear force were lower in the smoked/boiled samples than those in the control (without smoking treatment) (p<0.05). The results showed that the boiled loin samples between the control and treatment did not differ significantly in protein, fat, or ash contents, or pH values (p>0.05). The treated samples had higher score for overall acceptability than the control (p<0.05). Thus, these results show that the Korean traditional boiled loin treated with smoking for 60 min before boiling had improved physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics. PMID:26761822

  20. THORAX pretest prediction of a sodium-boiling transient in a 19-pin simulated LMFBR driver bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments will be conducted in the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety-Shutdown Heat Removal System (THORS-SHRS) Assembly 1 loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to model the behavior of a reactor during degraded decay heat removal conditions. The test section is to consist of two parallel 19-pin electrically-heated driver bundles, typical of U.S. Large Developmental Plant (LDP) Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) design. Analysis of these experiments will include using THORAX, a two-dimensional boiling model which assumes an equilibrium mixture two-phase flow (with slip). A THORAX prediction is presented for a single-bundle forced convection boiling-to-dryout transient at 15.8 kW/pin.

  1. Boiling Experiment Facility for Heat Transfer Studies in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; McQuillen, John; Chao, David

    2008-01-01

    Pool boiling in microgravity is an area of both scientific and practical interest. By conducting tests in microgravity, it is possible to assess the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and assess the relative magnitude of effects with regards to other "forces" and phenomena such as Marangoni forces, liquid momentum forces, and microlayer evaporation. The Boiling eXperiment Facility is now being built for the Microgravity Science Glovebox that will use normal perfluorohexane as a test fluid to extend the range of test conditions to include longer test durations and less liquid subcooling. Two experiments, the Microheater Array Boiling Experiment and the Nucleate Pool Boiling eXperiment will use the Boiling eXperiment Facility. The objectives of these studies are to determine the differences in local boiling heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity and normal gravity from nucleate boiling, through critical heat flux and into the transition boiling regime and to examine the bubble nucleation, growth, departure and coalescence processes. Custom-designed heaters will be utilized to achieve these objectives.

  2. Experimental investigation of forced convective heat transfer performance in nanofluids of Al2O3/water and CuO/water in a serpentine shaped micro channel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, A.; Alagumurthi, N.; Senthilvelan, T.

    2016-07-01

    The microchannels are device used to remove high heat fluxes from smaller area. In this experimental research work the heat transfer performance of nanofluids of Al2O3/water and CuO/water were compared. The important character of such fluids is the enhanced thermal conductivity, in comparison with base fluid without considerable alteration in physical and chemical properties. The effect of forced convective heat transfer coefficient was calculated using serpentine shaped microchannel heat exchanger. Furthermore we calculated the forced convective heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluids using theoretical correlations in order to compare the results with the experimental data. The heat transfer coefficient for different particle concentration and temperature were analysed using forced convection heat transfer using nanofluids. The findings indicate considerable enhancement in convective heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluids as compared to the basefluid. The results also shows that CuO/water nanofluid has increased heat transfer coefficient compared with Al2O3/water and base fluids. Moreover the experimental results indicate there is increased forced convective heat transfer coefficient with the increase in nano particle concentration.

  3. Intraseasonal Forcing of Lightning and Convective Activity in the Southern Amazon as a Function of Cross Equatorial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, W. A.; Fu, R.; Blakeslee, R.; Chen, M.

    2003-12-01

    Recently, Wang and Fu (2002) developed a monsoon-index (V-index; VI), based on changes in cross-equatorial 925 hPa meridional wind flow in the northwest Amazon. This index appears to be a robust metric of seasonal and intraseasonal changes in precipitation regime (e.g., wet vs. dry) across the Amazon and other parts of South America. While the VI identifies continental-scale variability of the monsoon, it yields no information on structural changes in the convective regime. For example, how does the overall three-dimensional structure of convection change as a function of VI-regime? Similarly, how are transitions in VI-regime manifested in lightning trends? In an effort to answer these questions we have examined four wet seasons (Dec.-Mar., 1998-2001) of TRMM satellite Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data in addition to two wet seasons (2000-2001) of ground-based Brazilian Lightning Detection Network (BLDN) data over South America. Composited LIS data indicate that the most statistically significant wide-spread response to VI-regime changes occurs over the south-central Amazon (SCAMZ), with other noticeable variations observed over portions of the subtropical Altiplano and Parana River basin. Most notably, over the SCAMZ both LIS and BLDN lightning data suggest for the southerly (northerly) VI-regime: 1) a pronounced widespread increase (decrease) in lightning activity; 2) a marked increase (decrease) in the amplitude of the diurnal cycle of lightning; (3) in association with (1) and (2), a factor of two relative increase (decrease) in the probability of any radar reflectivity pixel exceeding 30 dBZ above the freezing level; (4) an associated 20% increase (decrease) in pixel-mean ice water contents between the 7 and 11 km levels; and (5) an increase (decrease) in the relative frequency of occurrence of large rain rates. Interestingly, while our results suggest the presence of more vertically developed convection, lightning, attendant ice

  4. A New Program To Study Gravity Wave Forcing of The Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere: Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending Vertically (macwave)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, R. A.

    Gravity waves provide the dominant forcing of the mesosphere and lower thermo- sphere under solstice conditions via energy and momentum transports from lower al- titudes and their dissipation in the MLT. Despite this, the quantitative aspects of this important forcing are poorly understood at present. Furthermore, dynamical forcing must be considered when evaluating the chemical processes affecting this region. The correlative rocket and ground-based program described here will address the above issues with launch sequences during summer and winter conditions in 2002-2003. In summer, launch sequences coupled with ground-based measurements at the Andøya Rocket Range (ARR) in Norway will address the forcing of the summer mesopause environment by anticipated convective and shear generated gravity waves. Two 12-hr rocket sequences will be employed to provide sensitivity to strong and weak forc- ing conditions, each involving one Terrier-Orion payload accompanied by a mix of MET rockets and balloons, at Andøya Rocket Range (ARR) in Norway. Additional European payloads (MIDAS, Dusty) will enhance the measurements of turbulence and related parameters in the atmosphere. Correlative instrumentation will include the ALOMAR radars and lidars (including the new CSU/CoRA sodium lidar), ESRANGE MST and meteor radars (ESRAD), radiosondes, and TIMED satellite measurements of thermal and constituent structures. The winter program (February 2003) will study the upward propagation and penetration of mountain waves from northern Norway into the MLT at a site favored for such penetration. As the major response will be down- stream (east) of the Norwegian coast and will vary with MLT winds, these motions will be measured with similar 12-hr rocket sequences, but at ESRANGE in Sweden. Ground based measurements will once again include the ALOMAR facilities coupled with radar and lidar observatories as ESRANGE. The data in both cases will be used to define the wave field structure, fluxes

  5. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  6. Effect of magnetic field on the forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of a magnetic nanofluid in a miniature heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashjaee, Mehdi; Goharkhah, Mohammad; Khadem, Leila Azizi; Ahmadi, Reza

    2014-12-01

    The effect of an external magnetic field on the forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of water based Fe3O4 nanofluid (ferrofluid) in a miniature heat sink is studied experimentally. The heat sink with the dimensions of 40 mm (L) × 40 mm (W) × 10 mm (H) consists of an array of five circular channels with diameter and length of 4 and 40 mm, respectively. It is heated from the bottom surface with a constant heat flux while the other surfaces are insulated. The heat sink is also influenced by an external magnetic field generated by an electromagnet. The local convective coefficients are measured at various flow rates (200 < Re < 900), magnetic field intensities (B < 1,400 G), and particle volume fractions (φ = 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 %). Results show that using ferrofluid results in a maximum of 14 % improvement in heat transfer compared to the pure water, in the absence of magnetic field. This value grows up to 38 % when a magnetic field with the strength of 1,200 G is applied to the ferrofluid. On the other hand, it is observed that the significant heat transfer enhancement due to the magnetic field is always accompanied by a pressure drop penalty. The optimum operating condition is obtained based on the maximum heat transfer enhancement per pressure loss.

  7. Fast drying of biocompatible polymer films loaded with poorly water-soluble drug nano-particles via low temperature forced convection.

    PubMed

    Susarla, Ramana; Sievens-Figueroa, Lucas; Bhakay, Anagha; Shen, Yueyang; Jerez-Rozo, Jackeline I; Engen, William; Khusid, Boris; Bilgili, Ecevit; Romañach, Rodolfo J; Morris, Kenneth R; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena; Davé, Rajesh N

    2013-10-15

    Fast drying of nano-drug particle laden strip-films formed using water-soluble biocompatible polymers via forced convection is investigated in order to form films having uniform drug distribution and fast dissolution. Films were produced by casting and drying a mixture of poorly water soluble griseofulvin (GF) nanosuspensions produced via media milling with aqueous hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC E15LV) solutions containing glycerin as a plasticizer. The effects of convective drying parameters, temperature and air velocity, and film-precursor viscosity on film properties were investigated. Two major drying regimes, a constant rate period as a function of the drying conditions, followed by a single slower falling rate period, were observed. Films dried in an hour or less without any irreversible aggregation of GF nanoparticles with low residual water content. Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) and the content uniformity analysis indicated a better drug particle distribution when higher viscosity film-precursors were used. Powder X-ray diffraction showed that the GF in the films retained crystallinity and the polymorphic form. USP IV dissolution tests showed immediate release (~20 min) of GF. Overall, the films fabricated from polymer-based suspensions at higher viscosity dried at different conditions exhibited similar mechanical properties, improved drug content uniformity, and achieved fast drug dissolution. PMID:23911341

  8. Numerical analysis of interaction between non-gray radiation and forced convection flow over a recess using the full-spectrum k-distribution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atashafrooz, M.; Gandjalikhan Nassab, S. A.; Lari, K.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, the interaction between non-gray radiation and forced convection in a laminar radiating gas flow over a recess including two backward and forward facing steps in a duct is investigated numerically. Distributions of absorption coefficients across the spectrum (50 cm-1 < η < 20,000 cm-1) are obtained from the HITRAN2008 database. The full-spectrum k-distribution method is used to account for non-gray radiation properties, while the gray radiation calculations are carried out using the Planck mean absorption coefficient. To find the divergence of radiative heat flux distribution, the radiative transfer equation is solved by the discrete ordinates method. The effects of radiation-conduction parameter, wall emissivity, scattering coefficient and recess length on heat transfer behaviors of the convection-radiation system are investigated for both gray and non-gray mediums. In addition, the results of gray medium are compared with non-gray results in order to judge if the differences between these two approaches are significant enough to justify the usage of non-gray models. Results show that for air mixture with 10 % CO2 and 20 % H2O, use of gray model for the radiative properties may cause significant errors and should be avoided.

  9. The mesoscale forcing of a midlatitude upper-tropospheric jet streak by a simulated convective system. 2: Kinetic energy and resolution analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Bart J.; Johnson, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    A kinetic energy (KE) analysis of the forcing of a mesoscale upper-tropospheric jet streak by organized diabatic processes within the simulated convective system (SCS) that was discussed in Part 1 is presented in this study. The relative contributions of the ageostrophic components of motion to the generation of KE of the convectively generated jet streak are compared, along with the KE generation by the rotational (nondivergent) and irrotational (divergent) mass transport. The sensitivity of the numerical simulations of SCS development to resolution is also briefly examined. Analysis within isentropic coordinates provides for an explicit determination of the influence of the diabatic processes on the generation of KE. The upper-level production of specific KE is due predominatly to the inertial advective ageostrophic component (IAD), and as such represents the primary process through which the KE of the convectively generated jet streak is realized. A secondary contribution by the inertial diabatic (IDI) term is observed. Partitioning the KE generation into its rotational and irrotational components reveals that the latter, which is directly linked to the diabatic heating within the SCS through isentropic continuity requirements, is the ultimate source of KE generation as the global area integral of generation by the rotational component vanishes. Comparison with an identical dry simulation reveals that the net generation of KE must be attributed to latent heating. Both the IAD and IDI ageostrophic components play important roles in this regard. Examination of results from simulations conducted at several resolutions supports the previous findings in that the effects of diabatic processes and ageostrophic motion on KE generation remain consistent. Resolution does impact the location and timing of SCS development, a result that has important implications in forecasting the onset of convection that develops from evolution of the large-scale flow and moisture

  10. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  11. Noninvasive estimation of transmitral pressure drop across the normal mitral valve in humans: importance of convective and inertial forces during left ventricular filling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; McCarthy, P. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that color M-mode (CMM) images could be used to solve the Euler equation, yielding regional pressure gradients along the scanline, which could then be integrated to yield the unsteady Bernoulli equation and estimate noninvasively both the convective and inertial components of the transmitral pressure difference. BACKGROUND: Pulsed and continuous wave Doppler velocity measurements are routinely used clinically to assess severity of stenotic and regurgitant valves. However, only the convective component of the pressure gradient is measured, thereby neglecting the contribution of inertial forces, which may be significant, particularly for nonstenotic valves. Color M-mode provides a spatiotemporal representation of flow across the mitral valve. METHODS: In eight patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, high-fidelity left atrial and ventricular pressure measurements were obtained synchronously with transmitral CMM digital recordings. The instantaneous diastolic transmitral pressure difference was computed from the M-mode spatiotemporal velocity distribution using the unsteady flow form of the Bernoulli equation and was compared to the catheter measurements. RESULTS: From 56 beats in 16 hemodynamic stages, inclusion of the inertial term ([deltapI]max = 1.78+/-1.30 mm Hg) in the noninvasive pressure difference calculation significantly increased the temporal correlation with catheter-based measurement (r = 0.35+/-0.24 vs. 0.81+/-0.15, p< 0.0001). It also allowed an accurate approximation of the peak pressure difference ([deltapc+I]max = 0.95 [delta(p)cathh]max + 0.24, r = 0.96, p<0.001, error = 0.08+/-0.54 mm Hg). CONCLUSIONS: Inertial forces are significant components of the maximal pressure drop across the normal mitral valve. These can be accurately estimated noninvasively using CMM recordings of transmitral flow, which should improve the understanding of diastolic filling and function of the heart.

  12. CHIMNEY FOR BOILING WATER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Petrick, M.

    1961-08-01

    A boiling-water reactor is described which has vertical fuel-containing channels for forming steam from water. Risers above the channels increase the head of water radially outward, whereby water is moved upward through the channels with greater force. The risers are concentric and the radial width of the space between them is somewhat small. There is a relatively low rate of flow of water up through the radially outer fuel-containing channels, with which the space between the risers is in communication. (AE C)

  13. Pressure drop and heat transfer in inverted film boiling hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasch, James

    Two-phase boiling hydrogen pressure drop and heat transfer is studied in the context of high velocity upflow in a constant, high heat flux, steady state, internal pipe flow environment. These data were generated by NASA in the early and mid 1960s in support of the manned space flight programs. Measurements taken were local pressure, temperature, and voltage drop. System measurements included mass flow rate, and test section inlet and discharge pressure and temperature. This effort establishes the nature of the flow as inverted film boiling, which has been studied to some degree. In this structure, the wall temperatures are too hot to allow liquid to remain at the surface. Therefore, a vapor film is established at the wall throughout the flow. The approach of this analysis is to reverse-engineer the data to determine mass quality, void fraction, and velocity slip. This is accomplished by applying a one-dimensional, five-equation model, with pressure gradient being the one combined equation for the liquid and vapor phases. Other major assumptions are that all of the vapor is at the mean film temperature, and the liquid core experiences no sensible heating. The resulting velocity slips are correlated for high and low pressure conditions, with the cutoff established at 600 kPa. Good agreement is achieved between the pressures predicted using the slip correlations and the measured pressures. Results are in general significantly better than those from the homogeneous equilibrium model. Various established heat transfer coefficient models are also applied to these data. It is shown that pre-critical heat flux models fail absolutely to predict the heat transfer coefficient. It is further shown that film boiling models that focus on buoyancy fail as well. While all forced convection film boiling models are within a reasonable range of the data, recommendations for appropriate models are made. The range of pipe inlet conditions are 188 kPa to 1265 kPa, mass fluxes from 327

  14. The influence of nanoparticle migration on forced convective heat transfer of nanofluid under heating and cooling regimes.

    PubMed

    Kozlova, Sofya V; Ryzhkov, Ilya I

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, laminar convective heat transfer of water-alumina nanofluid in a circular tube with uniform heat flux at the tube wall is investigated. The investigation is performed numerically on the basis of two-component model, which takes into account nanoparticle transport by diffusion and thermophoresis. Two thermal regimes at the tube wall, heating and cooling, are considered and the influence of nanoparticle migration on the heat transfer is analyzed comparatively. The intensity of thermophoresis is characterized by a new empirical model for thermophoretic mobility. It is shown that the nanoparticle volume fraction decreases (increases) in the boundary layer near the wall under heating (cooling) due to thermophoresis. The corresponding variations of nanofluid properties and flow characteristics are presented and discussed. The intensity of heat transfer for the model with thermophoresis in comparison to the model without thermophoresis is studied by plotting the dependence of the heat transfer coefficient on the Peclet number. The effectiveness of water-alumina nanofluid is analyzed by plotting the average heat transfer coefficient against the required pumping power. The analysis of the results reveals that the water-alumina nanofluid shows better performance in the heating regime than in the cooling regime due to thermophoretic effect. PMID:25260328

  15. Effect of microscale protrusions on local fluid flow and mass transport in the presence of forced convection

    SciTech Connect

    Matzen, G.W.

    1997-01-01

    Three-dimensional creeping flow around single, axisymmetric protrusions is studied numerically using the boundary-integral technique. Emphasis is placed upon cylindrical protrusions on plane walls for various height-to-radius (h-to-a) aspect ratios, but cones and sections of spheres protruding from plane walls are also briefly examined. The presented items include shear-stress distributions, shear-stress contours, extents of the fluid-flow disturbance, total forces and torques on the cylinders, streamlines, and skin-friction lines. Also included is a discussion of flow topology around axisymmetric geometries. No flow reversal is observed for cylindrical protrusions with aspect ratios greater than 2.4 to 2.6. At higher aspect ratios, the fluid tends to be swept around cylindrical protrusions with little vertical motion. At lower aspect ratios, the strength of the recirculation increases, and the recirculation region becomes wider in the transverse direction and narrower in the flow direction. Also, the recirculation pattern begins to resemble the closed streamline patterns in two-dimensional flow over square ridges. However, unlike two-dimensional flow, closed streamline patterns are not observed. For arbitrary axisymmetric geometries, the extent of the fluid-flow disturbance can be estimated with the total force that is exerted on the protrusion. When the same force is exerted on protrusions with different aspect ratios, the protrusion with the higher aspect ratio tends to have a greater disturbance in the flow direction and a smaller disturbance in the transverse direction. The total force exerted on cylindrical protrusions with rounded corners is only slightly lower than the total force exerted on cylindrical protrusions with sharp corners.

  16. Odd-Boiled Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, Kenneth; Scheman, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    At a Shabbat lunch in Madrid not long ago, the conversation turned to the question of boiling eggs. One of the guests mentioned that a Dutch rabbi he knew had heard that in order to make it more likely that boiled eggs be kosher, you should add an egg to the pot if the number you began with was even. According to the laws of Kashruth, Jews may not…

  17. Boiling of Various Liquids on Microstructurized Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, I. A.; Shchelchkov, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies of the heat transfer of microstructurized surfaces of various configurations and sizes obtained by the method of deforming cutting. It has been shown that the intensity of heat transfer on such surfaces with three-dimensional columnar and channel structures increases by 20 times, and on microfinned surfaces by 2.5 times, compared to the smooth boiling surface. The critical heat flow density increases 4.1-6 times thereby. The obtained results on the heat transfer on the above surfaces and the critical flow densities on them can be used for calculating the heat transfer coefficients and the heat loads in boiling of various saturated liquids on such surfaces with sizes of fin elements from 50 to 420 μm at a pressure of 0.1 MPa under free convection conditions.

  18. Boiling local heat transfer enhancement in minichannels using nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on nanofluid convective boiling heat transfer in parallel rectangular minichannels of 800 μm hydraulic diameter. Experiments are conducted with pure water and silver nanoparticles suspended in water base fluid. Two small volume fractions of silver nanoparticles suspended in water are tested: 0.000237% and 0.000475%. The experimental results show that the local heat transfer coefficient, local heat flux, and local wall temperature are affected by silver nanoparticle concentration in water base fluid. In addition, different correlations established for boiling flow heat transfer in minichannels or macrochannels are evaluated. It is found that the correlation of Kandlikar and Balasubramanian is the closest to the water boiling heat transfer results. The boiling local heat transfer enhancement by adding silver nanoparticles in base fluid is not uniform along the channel flow. Better performances and highest effect of nanoparticle concentration on the heat transfer are obtained at the minichannels entrance. PMID:23506445

  19. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72

    SciTech Connect

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M.; Hong, Y.S.

    1995-12-31

    A recently developed photographic method is used to quantify vapor volumetric flow rate above a boiling wire. The volumetric flow rate is combined with additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from four nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms (latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection). This technique is used to quantify the boiling heat transfer mechanisms versus heat flux for a 510-{micro}m wire immersed in saturated water and in water with a small amount of liquid soap added. These data are compared with similar data taken for a 75-{micro}m wire boiling in saturated FC-72. For all cases, latent heat is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the fully developed nucleate boiling regime. In addition, the latent heat component is significantly increased by the addition of small amounts of soap (surfactant).

  20. Near-wall measurements of the bubble- and Lorentz-force-driven convection at gas-evolving electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczyzmalski, Dominik; Weier, Tom; Kähler, Christian J.; Cierpka, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Chemical energy storage systems, e.g., in the form of hydrogen or methanol, have a great potential for the establishment of volatile renewable energy sources due to the large energy density. The efficiency of hydrogen production through water electrolysis is, however, limited by gas bubbles evolving at the electrode's surface and can be enhanced by an accelerated bubble detachment. In order to characterize the complex multi-phase flow near the electrode, simultaneous measurements of the fluid velocities and the size and trajectories of hydrogen bubbles were performed in a water electrolyzer. The liquid phase velocity was measured by PIV/PTV, while shadowgraphy was used to determine the bubble trajectories. Special measurement and evaluation techniques had to be applied as the measurement uncertainty is strongly affected by the high void fraction close to the wall. In particular, the application of an advanced PTV scheme allowed for more precise fluid velocity measurements closer to electrode. Based on these data, stability characteristics of the near-wall flow were evaluated and compared to that of a wall jet. PTV was used as well to investigate the effect of Lorentz forces on the near-wall fluid velocities. The results show a significantly increased wall parallel liquid phase velocity with increasing Lorentz forces. It is presumed that this enhances the detachment of hydrogen bubbles from the electrode surface and, consequently, decreases the fractional bubble coverage and improves the efficiency. In addition, the effect of large rising bubbles with path oscillations on the near-wall flow was investigated. These bubbles can have a strong impact on the mass transfer near the electrode and thus affect the performance of the process.

  1. Enhancements of Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents two means for enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux under microgravity conditions: using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface and dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols as the working fluid. In the former, thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix plays an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling-heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. In the latter cases, the surface tension-temperature gradient of the long-chain alcohol solutions turns positive as the temperature exceeds a certain value. Consequently, the Marangoni effect does not impede, but rather aids in bubble departure from the heating surface. This feature is most favorable in microgravity. As a result, the bubble size of departure is substantially reduced at higher frequencies. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. In addition, performance equations for nucleate boiling and critical heat flux in dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols are obtained.

  2. Radiolysis of boiling water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Katsumura, Yosuke; Yamashita, Shinichi; Matsuura, Chihiro; Hiroishi, Daisuke; Lertnaisat, Phantira; Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2016-06-01

    γ-radiolysis of boiling water has been investigated. The G-value of H2 evolution was found to be very sensitive to the purity of water. In high-purity water, both H2 and O2 gases were formed in the stoichiometric ratio of 2:1; a negligible amount of H2O2 remained in the liquid phase. The G-values of H2 and O2 gas evolution depend on the dose rate: lower dose rates produce larger yields. To clarify the importance of the interface between liquid and gas phase for gas evolution, the gas evolution under Ar gas bubbling was measured. A large amount of H2 was detected, similar to the radiolysis of boiling water. The evolution of gas was enhanced in a 0.5 M NaCl aqueous solution. Deterministic chemical kinetics simulation elucidated the mechanism of radiolysis in boiling water.

  3. Measurement and modelling of forced convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of Al2O3- and SiO2-water nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julia, J. E.; Hernández, L.; Martínez-Cuenca, R.; Hibiki, T.; Mondragón, R.; Segarra, C.; Jarque, J. C.

    2012-11-01

    Forced convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of SiO2- and Al2O3-water nanofluids were characterized. The experimental facility was composed of thermal-hydraulic loop with a tank with an immersed heater, a centrifugal pump, a bypass with a globe valve, an electromagnetic flow-meter, a 18 kW in-line pre-heater, a test section with band heaters, a differential pressure transducer and a heat exchanger. The test section consists of a 1000 mm long aluminium pipe with an inner diameter of 31.2 mm. Eighteen band heaters were placed all along the test section in order to provide a uniform heat flux. Heat transfer coefficient was calculated measuring fluid temperature using immersed thermocouples (Pt100) placed at both ends of the test section and surface thermocouples in 10 axial locations along the test section (Pt1000). The measurements have been performed for different nanoparticles (Al2O3 and SiO2 with primary size of 11 nm and 12 nm, respectively), volume concentrations (1% v., 5% v.), and flow rates (3 103Re<105). Maximum heat transfer coefficient enhancement (300%) and pressure drop penalty (1000%) is obtained with 5% v. SiO2 nanofluid. Existing correlations can predict, at least in a first approximation, the heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of nanofluids if thermal conductivity, viscosity and specific heat were properly modelled.

  4. Numerical study of forced convection flow and heat transfer of a nanofluid flowing inside a straight circular pipe filled with a saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqaie Saryazdi, A.; Talebi, F.; Armaghani, T.; Pop, I.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the problem of developing forced convection flow of a nanofluid in a constant-wall-temperature circular tube filled with a porous medium is considered. The flow is steady and Brinkman-Forchheimer-extended Darcy equation model is employed. The thermal-equilibrium model is assumed between nanofluid and solid phase. It is also assumed that nanoparticles are distributed non-uniformly inside the pipe, hence the particles volume fraction equation is also coupled with the governing equations. A numerical study has been performed using the Finite-Volume method to analyze heat transfer coefficient of Al2O3 -water nanofluid. The effects of nanoparticles volume fraction and porosity on fluid flow and heat transfer of nanofluids are studied. The results show that the Nusselt number is increased with increasing particles volume fraction. Moreover, the wall shear stresses are increased. Finally, the effect of porosity on particle volume fraction distribution is studied and discussed in detail. We are confident that the reported results are new and original.

  5. Magneto-convection.

    PubMed

    Stein, Robert F

    2012-07-13

    Convection is the transport of energy by bulk mass motions. Magnetic fields alter convection via the Lorentz force, while convection moves the fields via the curl(v×B) term in the induction equation. Recent ground-based and satellite telescopes have increased our knowledge of the solar magnetic fields on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Magneto-convection modelling has also greatly improved recently as computers become more powerful. Three-dimensional simulations with radiative transfer and non-ideal equations of state are being performed. Flux emergence from the convection zone through the visible surface (and into the chromosphere and corona) has been modelled. Local, convectively driven dynamo action has been studied. The alteration in the appearance of granules and the formation of pores and sunspots has been investigated. Magneto-convection calculations have improved our ability to interpret solar observations, especially the inversion of Stokes spectra to obtain the magnetic field and the use of helioseismology to determine the subsurface structure of the Sun. PMID:22665893

  6. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Rajaram; Stevens, Richard J A M; Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to give rise to a much-enhanced natural convection. In this article, we focus specifically on this enhancement and present a numerical study of the resulting two-phase Rayleigh-Bénard convection process in a cylindrical cell with a diameter equal to its height. We make no attempt to model other aspects of the boiling process such as bubble nucleation and detachment. The cell base and top are held at temperatures above and below the boiling point of the liquid, respectively. By keeping this difference constant, we study the effect of the liquid superheat in a Rayleigh number range that, in the absence of boiling, would be between 2 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(9). We find a considerable enhancement of the heat transfer and study its dependence on the number of bubbles, the degree of superheat of the hot cell bottom, and the Rayleigh number. The increased buoyancy provided by the bubbles leads to more energetic hot plumes detaching from the cell bottom, and the strength of the circulation in the cell is significantly increased. Our results are in general agreement with recent experiments on boiling Rayleigh-Bénard convection. PMID:23696657

  7. Nucleate pool boiling heat transfer in aqueous surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasekar, Vivek Mahadeorao

    Saturated, nucleate pool boiling in aqueous surfactant solutions is investigated experimentally. Also, the role of Marangoni convection, driven both by temperature and surfactant concentration gradients at the vapor-liquid interface of a nucleating bubble is computationally explored. Experimental measurements of dynamic and equilibrium sigma using the maximum bubble pressure method indicate dynamic sigma to be higher than the corresponding equilibrium value, both at room and elevated temperatures. Also, nonionic surfactants (Triton X-100, Triton X-305) show larger sigma depression than anionic surfactants (SDS, SLES), and a normalized representation of their dynamic adsorption isotherms is shown to be helpful in generalizing the surfactant effectiveness to reduce surface tension. The dynamic sigma has a primary role in the modification of bubble dynamics and associated heat transfer, and is dictated by the adsorption kinetics of the surfactant molecules at boiling temperatures. In general, an enhancement in heat transfer is observed, which is characterized by an early incipience and an optimum boiling performance at or around the critical micelle concentration of the surfactant. The optimum performances, typically in the fully developed boiling regime ( q''w > 100 kW/m2), show a reverse trend with respect to surfactant molecular weights M, i.e., higher molecular weight additives promote lower enhancement. Normalized boiling performance using the respective solution's dynamic sigma correlates heat transfer coefficient by M-0.5 for anionics and M 0 for nonionics. This has been shown to be brought about by the surfactant concentration and its interfacial activity in a concentration sublayer around the growing vapor bubble, which governs the bubble growth behavior through the mechanism of dynamic sigma. The ionic nature of the surfactant influences the thickness and molecular makeup of the enveloping sublayer, thereby affecting the bubble dynamics and boiling heat

  8. Simulated convective systems using a cloud resolving model: Impact of large-scale temperature and moisture forcing using observations and GEOS-3 reanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, C.-L.; Tao, W.-K.; Hou, A.; Lin, X.

    2006-01-01

    The GCE (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble) model, which has been developed and improved at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center over the past two decades, is considered as one of the finer and state-of-the-art CRMs (Cloud Resolving Models) in the research community. As the chosen CRM for a NASA Interdisciplinary Science (IDS) Project, GCE has recently been successfully upgraded into an MPI (Message Passing Interface) version with which great improvement has been achieved in computational efficiency, scalability, and portability. By basically using the large-scale temperature and moisture advective forcing, as well as the temperature, water vapor and wind fields obtained from TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) field experiments such as SCSMEX (South China Sea Monsoon Experiment) and KWAJEX (Kwajalein Experiment), our recent 2-D and 3-D GCE simulations were able to capture detailed convective systems typical of the targeted (simulated) regions. The GEOS-3 [Goddard EOS (Earth Observing System) Version-3] reanalysis data have also been proposed and successfully implemented for usage in the proposed/performed GCE long-term simulations (i.e., aiming at producing massive simulated cloud data -- Cloud Library) in compensating the scarcity of real field experimental data in both time and space (location). Preliminary 2-D or 3-D pilot results using GEOS-3 data have generally showed good qualitative agreement (yet some quantitative difference) with the respective numerical results using the SCSMEX observations. The first objective of this paper is to ensure the GEOS-3 data quality by comparing the model results obtained from several pairs of simulations using the real observations and GEOS-3 reanalysis data. The different large-scale advective forcing obtained from these two kinds of resources (i.e., sounding observations and GEOS-3 reanalysis) has been considered as a major critical factor in producing various model results. The second objective of this paper is therefore to

  9. Boiling on Microconfigured Composite Surfaces Enhanced

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer is one of the key technologies for the two-phase active thermal-control system used on space platforms, as well as for the dynamic power systems aboard the International Space Station. Because it is an effective heat transfer mode, boiling is integral to many space applications, such as heat exchangers and other cooling devices. Nucleate boiling near the critical heat flux (CHF) can transport very large thermal loads with a much smaller device and much lower pumping power than for single-phase heat exchangers. However, boiling performance sharply deteriorates in a reduced-gravity environment, and operation in the CHF regime is somewhat perilous because of the risk of burnout to the device surface. New materials called microconfigured metal-graphite composites can enhance boiling. The photomicrograph shows the microconfiguration (x3000) of the copper-graphite (Cu-Gr) surface as viewed by scanning electronic microscope. The graphite fiber tips appear as plateaus with rugged surfaces embedded in the copper matrix. It has been experimentally demonstrated that this type of material manifests excellent boiling heat transfer performance characteristics and an increased CHF. Nonisothermal surfaces were less sensitive to variations of wall superheat in the CHF regime. Because of the great difference in conductivity between the copper base and the graphite fiber, the composite surfaces have a nonisothermal surface characteristic and, therefore, will have a much larger "safe" operating region in the CHF regime. In addition, the thermocapillary forces induced by the temperature differences between the fiber tips and the metal matrix play an important role in bubble detachment, and may not be adversely affected in a reduced-gravity environment. All these factors indicate that microconfigured composites may improve the reliability and economy (dominant factors in all space applications) of various thermal components found on spacecraft during future

  10. Sub-Cooled Pool Boiling Enhancement with Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Elliott Charles

    Phase-change heat transfer is an important process used in many engineering thermal designs. Boiling is an important phase change phenomena as it is a common heat transfer process in many thermal systems. Phase change processes are critical to thermodynamic cycles as most closed loop systems have an evaporator, in which the phase change process occurs. There are many applications/processes in which engineers employ the advantages of boiling heat transfer, as they seek to improve heat transfer performance. Recent research efforts have experimentally shown that nanofluids can have significantly better heat transfer properties than those of the pure base fluids, such as water. The objective of this study is to improve the boiling curve of de-ionized water by adding aluminum oxide nanoparticles in 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3% and 0.4% wt concentrations in a sub-cooled pool boiling apparatus. Enhancement to the boiling curve can be quantified in two ways: (i) the similar heat fluxes of de-ionized water at smaller excess temperature, indicating similar quantity of heat removal at lower temperatures and (ii) greater heat fluxes than de-ionized water at similar excess temperatures indicating better heat transfer at similar excess temperatures. In the same fashion, the secondary objective is to increase the convective heat transfer coefficient due to boiling by adding different concentrations of aluminum oxide nanoparticles.

  11. Effect of surface oxidation on the onset of nucleate boiling in a materials test reactor coolant channel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Forrest, Eric C.; Don, Sarah M.; Hu, Lin -Wen; Buongiorno, Jacopo; McKrell, Thomas J.

    2016-02-29

    The onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) serves as the thermal-hydraulic operating limit for many research and test reactors. However, boiling incipience under forced convection has not been well-characterized in narrow channel geometries or for oxidized surface conditions. This study presents experimental data for the ONB in vertical upflow of deionized (DI) water in a simulated materials test reactor (MTR) coolant channel. The channel gap thickness and aspect ratio were 1.96 mm and 29:1, respectively. Boiling surface conditions were carefully controlled and characterized, with both heavily oxidized and native oxide surfaces tested. Measurements were performed for mass fluxes ranging from 750more » to 3000 kg/m2s and for subcoolings ranging from 10 to 45°C. ONB was identified using a combination of high-speed visual observation, surface temperature measurements, and channel pressure drop measurements. Surface temperature measurements were found to be most reliable in identifying the ONB. For the nominal (native oxide) surface, results indicate that the correlation of Bergles and Rohsenow, when paired with the appropriate single-phase heat transfer correlation, adequately predicts the ONB heat flux. Furthermore, incipience on the oxidized surface occurred at a higher heat flux and superheat than on the plain surface.« less

  12. Subcooled Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Microgravity: Terrier-improved Orion Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Benton, John; Kucner, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A microscale heater array was used to study boiling in earth gravity and microgravity. The heater array consisted of 96 serpentine heaters on a quartz substrate. Each heater was 0.27 square millimeters. Electronic feedback loops kept each heater's temperature at a specified value. The University of Maryland constructed an experiment for the Terrier-Improved Orion sounding rocket that was delivered to NASA Wallops and flown. About 200 s of high quality microgravity and heat transfer data were obtained. The VCR malfunctioned, and no video was acquired. Subsequently, the test package was redesigned to fly on the KC-135 to obtain both data and video. The pressure was held at atmospheric pressure and the bulk temperature was about 20 C. The wall temperature was varied from 85 to 65 C. Results show that gravity has little effect on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble was surrounded by smaller bubbles, which eventually merged with the primary bubble. This bubble was formed by smaller bubbles coalescing, but had a constant size for a given superheat, indicating a balance between evaporation at the base and condensation on the cap. Most of the heaters under the bubble indicated low heat transfer, suggesting dryout at those heaters. High heat transfer occurred at the contact line surrounding the primary bubble. Marangoni convection formed a "jet" of fluid into the bulk fluid that forced the bubble onto the heater.

  13. Dynamics of Vapour Bubbles in Nucleate Boiling. 1; Basic Equations of Bubble Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Callaway, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We consider the behaviour of a vapour bubble formed at a nucleation site on a heated horizontal wall. There is no forced convection of an ambient liquid, and the bubble is presumably separated from the wall by a thin liquid microlayer. The energy conservation law results in a variational equation for the mechanical energy of the whole system consisting of the bubble and liquid. It leads to a set of two strongly nonlinear equations which govern bubble expansion and motion of its centre of mass. A supplementary equation to find out the vapour temperature follows from consideration of heat transfer to the bubble, both from the bulk of surrounding liquid and through the microlayer. The average thickness of the microlayer is shown to increase monotonously with time as the bubble meniscus spreads along the wall. Bubble expansion is driven by the pressure head between vapour inside and liquid far away from the bubble, with due allowance for surface tension and gravity effects. It is resisted by inertia of liquid being placed into motion as the bubble grows. The inertia originates also a force that presses the bubble to the wall. This force is counteracted by the buoyancy and an effective surface tension force that tends to transform the bubble into a sphere. The analysis brings about quite a new formulation of the familiar problem of bubble growth and detachment under conditions of nucleate pool boiling.

  14. Numerical modeling of the large-scale neutral and plasma responses to the body forces created by the dissipation of gravity waves from 6 h of deep convection in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, S. L.; Liu, H.-L.

    2013-05-01

    We study the response of the thermosphere and ionosphere to gravity waves (GWs) excited by 6 h of deep convection in Brazil on the evening of 01 October 2005 via the use of convective plume, ray trace, and global models. We find that primary GWs excited by convection having horizontal wavelengths of λH˜70-300 km, periods of 10-60 min, and phase speeds of cH˜50-225 m/s propagate well into the thermosphere. Their density perturbations are ρ'/ρ300 km. The dissipation of these GWs creates spatially and temporally localized body forces with amplitudes of 0.2- 1.0 m/s2at z˜120-230 km. These forces generate two counter-rotating circulation cells with horizontal velocities of 50-350 m/s. They also excite secondary GWs; those resolved by our global model have λH˜4000-5000 km and cH˜500-600 m/s. These secondary GWs propagate globally and have ρ'/ρforces also create plasma perturbations of foF2'˜0.2-1.0 MHz, TEC'˜0.4- 1.5 TECU (total electron content unit, 1TECU =1016 elm-2), and hmF2'˜5-50 km. The large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs) induced by the secondary GWs have amplitudes of foF2'˜0.2-0.5 MHz, TEC'˜0.2- 0.6 TECU, and hmF2'˜5-10 km. In a companion paper, we discuss changes to the prereversal enhancement and plasma drift from these forces.

  15. Effects of forced wall vibration on the onset of flow instability and critical heat flux in uniformly-heated microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberger, Jorg Hermann

    Numerous experimental and theoretical investigations on two-phase flow instability and burnout in heated microchannels have been reported in the literature. However none of these investigations deals with the possible effects of wall vibrations on such flow boiling processes within microchannels. Fluid-structure interaction in ultra high power density systems cooled by high velocity single phase forced convection in microchannels may result in vibration amplitudes that are a significant fraction of the diameter of the channel. Such vibrations may significantly impact vapor bubble dynamics at the wall and, hence, the limiting heat fluxes corresponding to the onset of flow instability and/or burnout. The primary purpose of this research was to experimentally quantify the effect of forced wall vibration on the onset of flow instability (OFI) and the critical heat flux (CHF) in uniformly-heated annular microchannels. The secondary interest of this investigation was to compare the experimental data collected in the single-phase regime to commonly used single-phase forced convection correlations. Experimental data acquired in the flow boiling regime were to be utilized to confirm the validity of common flow boiling correlations for microchannel flow. The influence of forced wall vibration on subcooled single-phase forced convection and flow boiling was examined. The Georgia Tech Microchannel Test Facility (GTMTF) was modified to allow such experiments to be conducted at controlled values of transverse wall vibration amplitudes and accelerations for a range of frequencies. The channel demand curves were obtained for various inner and outer surface heat fluxes. Experiments were conducted for broad ranges of transverse wall vibration amplitudes over a range of frequencies. The experiments conducted in this investigation provide designers of high power density systems cooled by forced convection in microchannels with the appropriate data and correlations to confidently

  16. Transient pool boiling in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, J. S.; Merte, H., Jr.; Keller, R. B.; Kirk, K.

    1992-01-01

    Transient nucleate pool boiling experiments using R113 are conducted for short times in microgravity and in earth gravity with different heater surface orientations and subcoolings. The heating surface is a transparent gold film sputtered on a quartz substrate, which simultaneously provides surface temperature measurements and permits viewing of the boiling process from beneath. For the microgravity experiments, which have uniform initial temperatures and no fluid motion, the temperature distribution in the R 113 at the moment of boiling inception is known. High speed cameras with views both across and through the heating surface record the boiling spread across the heater surface, which is classified into six distinct categories.

  17. How Does Water Boil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-11-01

    Insight into the boiling of water is obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. The process is initiated by the spontaneous formation of small vacuum cavities in liquid water. By themselves, these defects are very short lived. If, however, several cavities occur at close distances, they are likely to merge into larger vacuum holes. At the liquid-vapor interfaces, single or small groups of water molecules tend to leave the liquid surface. Once the system is propagated beyond the transition state, these evaporation events outnumber the competing reintegration into the hydrogen-bonded network.

  18. Effect of boiling surface vibration on heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alangar, Sathyabhama

    2016-03-01

    Experimental investigation of effect of forced vertical surface vibration on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer of saturated water at atmospheric pressure is presented in this paper. Vertical vibration was induced externally to the circular copper test surface on which boiling took place, using a vibration exciter. Frequency was varied in the range 0-25 Hz and amplitude of vibration was varied in the range 0-5 mm. Boiling takes place at much lower superheats for the same heat flux, slope of boiling curve decreases remarkably, when the surface is given external excitation. High frequency and high amplitude oscillations lead to more intensive heat transfer. There are some combinations of frequency and vibration amplitude, which cause up to two times increase in heat transfer coefficients.

  19. Anomalously Weak Solar Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical- harmonic degree l..Within the wavenumber band l < 60, convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers l < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10(exp -2) at r/R-solar = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  20. Enhanced boiling heat transfer using radial fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razelos, P.; Das, S.; Krikkis, R. N.

    2008-04-01

    A numerical bifurcation analysis is carried out in order to determine the solution structure of radial fins subjected to multi-boiling heat transfer mode. One-dimensional conduction is employed throughout the thermal analysis. The fluid heat transfer coefficient is temperature dependent on the three regimes of phase-change of the fluid. Six fin profiles, defined in the text, are considered. Multiplicity structure is obtained to determine different types of bifurcation diagrams, which describe the dependence of a state variable of the system like the temperature or the heat dissipation on the fin design parameters, conduction convection parameter (CCP) or base temperature difference (Δ T). Specifically, the effects of Δ T, CCP and Biot number are analyzed. The results are presented graphically, showing the significant behavioral features of the heat rejection mechanism.

  1. Supergranular Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-12-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Here the opacity is so large that heat flux transport is mainly by convection rather than by photon diffusion. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection , Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni

  2. Variation of superheat with subcooling in nucleate pool boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, R. L.; Merte, H., Jr.; Ulucakli, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is presented that explains the variation of superheat with subcooling that has been observed by a number of researchers investigating nucleate boiling heat transfer at constant heat flux. It is shown that superheat initially increases with increasing subcooling near saturated conditions because of the way in which changes in active site density and average bubble frequency with increasing subcooling affect the rate of heat removal from the heater surface by enthalpy transport and microlayer evaporation. As subcooling increases further, natural convection begins to play an increasingly important role in the heat transfer process. Ultimately, natural convection is able to accommodate the entire imposed heat flux, after which superheat decreases as subcooling increases. The success of the analysis in explaining the variation of superheat with subcooling suggests that the rate of the heat removal from the heater surface is completely determined by the mechanisms of enthalpy transport, natural convection, and microlayer evaporation.

  3. Bubble Dynamics, Two-Phase Flow, and Boiling Heat Transfer in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jacob N.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the research is to study the feasibility of employing an external force to replace the buoyancy force in order to maintain nucleate boiling in microgravity. We have found that a bulk velocity field, an electric field and an acoustic field could each play the role of the gravity field in microgravity. Nucleate boiling could be maintained by any one of the three external force fields in space.

  4. Boiling Fluids Behave Quite Differently in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    The boiling process is really different in space, since the vapor phase of a boiling liquid does not rise via buoyancy. Spacecraft and Earth-based systems use boiling to efficiently remove large am...

  5. Numerical simulation of subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Won Cheol

    Sub-cooled flow boiling in a U-bend has been examined using numerical methods. An Eulerian/Eulerian mathematical description was used with a multiphase computational algorithm to predict several types of flows and to examine sub-cooled flow boiling. As a prelude to the study of sub-cooled boiling and two-phase flows, single-phase laminar and turbulent flows in a U-bend were investigated. Air-water bubbly up flow in a vertical straight duct followed by a U-bend with heat transfer was analyzed. In such a flow, as the flow develops through the U-bend the bubbles move from center and outer wall toward inner wall. After half way through the U-bend, the fluids do not have sufficient time for complete reorganization in the presence of centrifugal forces and the pressure gradients. After the U-bend, the bubbles finally reach the original distribution in about forty diameters. The heat transfer in the U-bend was also calculated and as expected heat transfer rate on the outer wall is higher than on the inner wall. For air-water bubbly two-phase flow, Nusselt numbers in the U-bend can be as high as 400 percent of the value in the straight duct on one of the walls. The method of partitioned wall heat flux was used to study sub-cooled flow boiling. For sub-cooled flow boiling in a U-bend, axial and lateral velocity distributions as well as quality and void fraction variations were analyzed. Computed axial and lateral variations of void fraction compare favorably with existing experimental data. As expected, the pressure drop for bubbly flow through the U-bend is larger than for single-phase flow by as much as fifty percent. Computed pressure drop for flow with phase change falls between the predictions of two different correlations in the literature, and thus seems reasonable. Predictions of heat transfer and void fraction under sub-cooled flow boiling using two-fluid models need better quantitative knowledge related to the mechanisms associated with bubble growth and

  6. CFD simulation of DEBORA boiling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzehak, Roland; Krepper, Eckhard

    2012-08-01

    In this work we investigate the present capabilities of computational fluid dynamics for wall boiling. The computational model used combines the Euler/Euler two-phase flow description with heat flux partitioning. This kind of modeling was previously applied to boiling water under high pressure conditions relevant to nuclear power systems. Similar conditions in terms of the relevant non-dimensional numbers have been realized in the DEBORA tests using dichlorodifluoromethane (R12) as the working fluid. This facilitated measurements of radial profiles for gas volume fraction, gas velocity, bubble size and liquid temperature as well as axial profiles of wall temperature. After reviewing the theoretical and experimental basis of correlations used in the ANSYS CFX model used for the calculations, we give a careful assessment of the necessary recalibrations to describe the DEBORA tests. The basic CFX model is validated by a detailed comparison to the experimental data for two selected test cases. Simulations with a single set of calibrated parameters are found to give reasonable quantitative agreement with the data for several tests within a certain range of conditions and reproduce the observed tendencies correctly. Several model refinements are then presented each of which is designed to improve one of the remaining deviations between simulation and measurements. Specifically we consider a homogeneous MUSIG model for the bubble size, modified bubble forces, a wall function for turbulent boiling flow and a partial slip boundary condition for the liquid phase. Finally, needs for further model developments are identified and promising directions discussed.

  7. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  8. The Gibbs Energy Basis and Construction of Boiling Point Diagrams in Binary Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Norman O.

    2004-01-01

    An illustration of how excess Gibbs energies of the components in binary systems can be used to construct boiling point diagrams is given. The underlying causes of the various types of behavior of the systems in terms of intermolecular forces and the method of calculating the coexisting liquid and vapor compositions in boiling point diagrams with…

  9. 77 FR 38338 - Dairyland Power Cooperative; La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor Exemption From Certain Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ..., which utilized a forced-circulation, direct-cycle boiling water reactor as its heat source. The plant is... March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13926). The revised regulation stated that it was applicable to all Part 50... COMMISSION Dairyland Power Cooperative; La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor Exemption From Certain...

  10. Flow boiling heat transfer of R134a, R236fa and R245fa in a horizontal 1.030 mm circular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Chin L.; Thome, John R.

    2009-04-15

    This research focuses on acquiring accurate flow boiling heat transfer data and flow pattern visualization for three refrigerants, R134a, R236fa and R245fa in a 1.030 mm channel. We investigate trends in the data, and their possible mechanisms, for mass fluxes from 200 to 1600 kg/m{sup 2}s, heat fluxes from 2.3 kW/m{sup 2} to 250 kW/m{sup 2} at T{sub sat} = 31 C and {delta}T{sub sub} from 2 to 9 K. The local saturated flow boiling heat transfer coefficients display a heat flux and a mass flux dependency but no residual subcooling influence. The changes in heat transfer trends correspond well with flow regime transitions. These were segregated into the isolated bubble (IB) regime, the coalescing bubble (CB) regime, and the annular (A) regime for the three fluids. The importance of nucleate boiling and forced convection in these small channels is still relatively unclear and requires further research. (author)

  11. The potential for free and mixed convection in sedimentary basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raffensperger, J.P.; Vlassopoulos, D.

    1999-01-01

    Free thermal convection and mixed convection are considered as potential mechanisms for mass and heat transport in sedimentary basins. Mixed convection occurs when horizontal flows (forced convection) are superimposed on thermally driven flows. In cross section, mixed convection is characterized by convection cells that migrate laterally in the direction of forced convective flow. Two-dimensional finite-element simulations of variable-density groundwater flow and heat transport in a horizontal porous layer were performed to determine critical mean Rayleigh numbers for the onset of free convection, using both isothermal and semi-conductive boundaries. Additional simulations imposed a varying lateral fluid flux on the free-convection pattern. Results from these experiments indicate that forced convection becomes dominant, completely eliminating buoyancy-driven circulation, when the total forced-convection fluid flux exceeds the total flux possible due to free convection. Calculations of the thermal rock alteration index (RAI=q????T) delineate the patterns of potential diagenesis produced by fluid movement through temperature gradients. Free convection produces a distinct pattern of alternating positive and negative RAIs, whereas mixed convection produces a simpler layering of positive and negative values and in general less diagenetic alteration. ?? Springer-Verlag.

  12. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  13. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1996-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  14. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1995-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  15. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1996-01-16

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

  16. Modeling Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, James R.; Elliott, Nancy A.; Hurteau, Laura; Schulz, Amanda

    2004-01-01

    Students must understand the fundamental process of convection before they can grasp a wide variety of Earth processes, many of which may seem abstract because of the scales on which they operate. Presentation of a very visual, concrete model prior to instruction on these topics may facilitate students' understanding of processes that are largely…

  17. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. For these data, diffusion from the upper surface of the drop is a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  18. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. Diffusion from the upper surface of the drop appears as a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  19. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment is another investigation that examines the flow of a mixture of liquids and the vapors they produce when in contact with hot space system equipment. Coo...

  20. Bandages of boiled potato peels.

    PubMed

    Patil, A R; Keswani, M H

    1985-08-01

    The use of potato peels as a dressing for burn wounds has been reported previously. A technique of preparing bandage rolls with boiled potato peels is now presented, which makes dressing of a burn wound more convenient. PMID:4041947

  1. Effect of the buoyancy force on natural convection in a cubical cavity with a heat source of triangular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibanov, N. S.; Sheremet, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical analysis of laminar natural convection inside a cubical cavity with a local heat source of triangular cross-section has been conducted. The mathematical model formulated in dimensionless variables such as "vector potential functions - vorticity vector" has been solved by the finite difference method of the second order accuracy. The three-dimensional temperature fields, 2D streamlines and isotherms in a wide range of the Rayleigh number from 104 to 106 have been presented illustrating variations of the fluid flow and heat transfer.

  2. Granular convection in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, N; Rozitis, B; Nordstrom, K; Green, S F; Michel, P; de Lophem, T-L; Losert, W

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the role of gravity on convection in a dense granular shear flow. Using a microgravity-modified Taylor-Couette shear cell under the conditions of parabolic flight microgravity, we demonstrate experimentally that secondary, convective-like flows in a sheared granular material are close to zero in microgravity and enhanced under high-gravity conditions, though the primary flow fields are unaffected by gravity. We suggest that gravity tunes the frictional particle-particle and particle-wall interactions, which have been proposed to drive the secondary flow. In addition, the degree of plastic deformation increases with increasing gravitational forces, supporting the notion that friction is the ultimate cause. PMID:23383851

  3. Anomalously weak solar convection

    PubMed Central

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical-harmonic degree ℓ. Within the wavenumber band ℓ < 60, convective velocities are 20–100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers ℓ < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10-2 at r/R⊙ = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient. PMID:22665774

  4. Channel orientation and geometry influence on heat transfer with two-phase forced flow of nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, V. V.; Fyodorov, M. V.; Fomichyov, Yu. A.

    The results of an investigation of tube diameter and orientation influence on two-phase forced flow heat transfer of nitrogen are presented. In vertical channels a diameter effect is revealed in a transition from convective to less intensive nucleate boiling when the Froude number of a mixture, Fr m = w m(gd) - 1/2 decreases from 40 to 10. On the contrary, in horizontal non-stratified flow, the reduction of the Frm number is accompanied by heat transfer enhancement in the upper part of the channel because of the formation of a thin liquid film there. This leads to a notable increase (20-30%), averaged over the cross-section, of heat transfer coefficient in the nucleate boiling region. If Frm ≳ 40 then geometry and orientation do not affect the heat transfer coefficient which can be calculated using the Klimenko correlation.

  5. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-02-08

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

  6. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; Konichi, Chris; Hyounsoon, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and

  7. Microscale Heaters Detailed Boiling Behavior in Normal Gravity and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Pool boiling in microgravity is an area of both scientific and practical interest. Conducting tests in microgravity, as well as lunar and Martian gravity, makes it possible to assess the effect of the density difference between the vapor and liquid phases on the overall boiling process and to assess the relative magnitude of these effects in comparison to other "forces" and phenomena, such as surface tension forces, liquid momentum forces, and microlayer evaporation. The microscale heater developed under a NASA Glenn Research Center grant serves as a unique tool to probe the fundamental mechanisms associated with pool boiling. An experimental package was designed and built by the University of Maryland and tested on the NASA Johnson Space Center KC-135 experimental aircraft and a NASA WFF Terrier Orion Sounding Rocket under NASA Grants NAG3-2228 and NCC3-783. A square array of 96 microscale heaters was constructed and installed into a special boiling chamber. A fluorinert, FC-72, was used as the test fluid. A variety of tests were conducted at different pressures, heater wall temperatures, bulk fluid temperatures, and gravity levels.

  8. Combined Effect of Buoyancy Force and Navier Slip on MHD Flow of a Nanofluid over a Convectively Heated Vertical Porous Plate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effect of magnetic field on boundary layer flow of an incompressible electrically conducting water-based nanofluids past a convectively heated vertical porous plate with Navier slip boundary condition. A suitable similarity transformation is employed to reduce the governing partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically by employing fourth-order Runge-Kutta with a shooting technique. Three different water-based nanofluids containing copper (Cu), aluminium oxide (Al2O3), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are taken into consideration. Graphical results are presented and discussed quantitatively with respect to the influence of pertinent parameters, such as solid volume fraction of nanoparticles (φ), magnetic field parameter (Ha), buoyancy effect (Gr), Eckert number (Ec), suction/injection parameter (fw), Biot number (Bi), and slip parameter (β), on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient, and heat transfer rate. PMID:24222749

  9. Combined effect of buoyancy force and Navier slip on MHD flow of a nanofluid over a convectively heated vertical porous plate.

    PubMed

    Mutuku-Njane, Winifred Nduku; Makinde, Oluwole Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effect of magnetic field on boundary layer flow of an incompressible electrically conducting water-based nanofluids past a convectively heated vertical porous plate with Navier slip boundary condition. A suitable similarity transformation is employed to reduce the governing partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically by employing fourth-order Runge-Kutta with a shooting technique. Three different water-based nanofluids containing copper (Cu), aluminium oxide (Al2O3), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are taken into consideration. Graphical results are presented and discussed quantitatively with respect to the influence of pertinent parameters, such as solid volume fraction of nanoparticles (φ), magnetic field parameter (Ha), buoyancy effect (Gr), Eckert number (Ec), suction/injection parameter (f w ), Biot number (Bi), and slip parameter ( β ), on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient, and heat transfer rate. PMID:24222749

  10. A heat exchanger between forced flow helium gas at 14 to 18 K andliquid hydrogen at 20 K circulated by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.

    2003-09-15

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) has three 350-mm long liquid hydrogen absorbers to reduce the momentum of 200 MeV muons in all directions. The muons are then re-accelerated in the longitudinal direction by 200 MHz RF cavities. The result is cooled muons with a reduced emittance. The energy from the muons is taken up by the liquid hydrogen in the absorber. The hydrogen in the MICE absorbers is cooled by natural convection to the walls of the absorber that are in turn cooled by helium gas that enters at 14 K. This report describes the MICE liquid hydrogen absorber and the heat exchanger between the liquid hydrogen and the helium gas that flows through passages in the absorber wall.

  11. Numerical Investigation of Microgravity Tank Pressure Rise Due to Boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, Sonya; Ibrahim, Mounir; Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control self-pressurization in cryogenic storage tanks is essential for NASAs long-term space exploration missions. Predictions of the tank pressure rise in Space are needed in order to inform the microgravity design and optimization process. Due to the fact that natural convection is very weak in microgravity, heat leaks into the tank can create superheated regions in the liquid. The superheated regions can instigate microgravity boiling, giving rise to pressure spikes during self-pressurization. In this work, a CFD model is developed to predict the magnitude and duration of the microgravity pressure spikes. The model uses the Schrage equation to calculate the mass transfer, with a different accommodation coefficient for evaporation at the interface, condensation at the interface, and boiling in the bulk liquid. The implicit VOF model was used to account for the moving interface, with bounded second order time discretization. Validation of the models predictions was carried out using microgravity data from the Tank Pressure Control Experiment, which flew aboard the Space Shuttle Mission STS-52. Although this experiment was meant to study pressurization and pressure control, it underwent boiling during several tests. The pressure rise predicted by the CFD model compared well with the experimental data. The ZBOT microgravity experiment is scheduled to fly on February 2016 aboard the ISS. The CFD model was also used to perform simulations for setting parametric limits for the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiments Test Matrix in an attempt to avoid boiling in the majority of the test runs that are aimed to study pressure increase rates during self-pressurization. *Supported in part by NASA ISS Physical Sciences Research Program, NASA HQ, USA

  12. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  13. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  14. Pool boiling of dielectric liquids on porous graphite and extended copper surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jack L.

    This work investigated pool boiling of the dielectric liquids HFE-7100 and FC-72 on plane copper and porous graphite and on copper surfaces with corner pins. The work investigated the effects of surface orientation and liquid subcooling and, for the copper surfaces with corner pins, the effect of surface roughness. In addition, investigations were made studying the heat transfer by natural convection and nucleate boiling, as well as the effects of liquid subcooling (up to 30 K) and surface inclination (0°--upward facing, to 180°--downward facing) on nucleate boiling heat transfer and Critical Heat Flux (CHF). The results are applicable to direct immersion cooling by nucleate boiling of high power computer chips dissipating 50 - 100 W/cm2 while maintaining the junction temperature for the chips below the recommended values (˜85 °C). Pool boiling experiments are performed with degassed HFE-7100 and FC-72 liquids using uniformly heated 10 x 10 mm porous graphite and copper surfaces with corner pins. The measured footprint temperatures and thermal power removed from the surfaces are used to construct the pool boiling curves and determine the critical heat flux and corresponding surface superheat. Results are compared with those obtained on plane copper of same heated footprint area. The obtained CHF values are also compared with those reported in the open literature for plane, micro-porous, and macro-structured surfaces. Digital photographs and video are obtained to help explain and interpret the results. For the first time, natural convection correlations for dielectric liquids on plane, porous, and copper with corner pins developed. These correlations are important to electronic cooling in the stand-by mode when the heat dissipation by the chips is only a few watts. Results show that the power removed by natural convection from surfaces with corner pins is 67% more than from plane Si and Cu surfaces at the same surface superheat. Using porous graphite and copper

  15. Transient Mixed Convection Validation for NGNP

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Barton; Schultz, Richard

    2015-10-19

    The results of this project are best described by the papers and dissertations that resulted from the work. They are included in their entirety in this document. They are: (1) Jeff Harris PhD dissertation (focused mainly on forced convection); (2) Blake Lance PhD dissertation (focused mainly on mixed and transient convection). This dissertation is in multi-paper format and includes the article currently submitted and one to be submitted shortly; and, (3) JFE paper on CFD Validation Benchmark for Forced Convection.

  16. Bubble dynamics, two-phase flow, and boiling heat transfer in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jacob N.

    1994-01-01

    The two-phase bubbly flow and boiling heat transfer in microgravity represents a substantial challenge to scientists and engineers and yet there is an urgent need to seek fundamental understanding in this area for future spacecraft design and space missions. At Washington State University, we have successfully designed, built and tested a 2.1 second drop tower with an innovation airbag deceleration system. Microgravity boiling experiments performed in our 0.6 second Drop Tower produced data flow visualizations that agree with published results and also provide some new understanding concerning flow boiling and microgravity bubble behavior. On the analytical and numerical work, the edge effects of finite divergent electrode plates on the forces experienced by bubbles were investigated. Boiling in a concentric cylinder microgravity and an electric field was numerically predicted. We also completed a feasibility study for microgravity boiling in an acoustic field.

  17. Effect of ice contamination on liquid-nitrogen drops in film boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Previously reported vaporization time data of liquid nitrogen drops in film boiling on a flat plate are about 30 percent shorter than predicted from standard laminar film boiling theory. This theory, however, had been found to successfully correlate the data for conventional fluids such as water, ethanol, benzene, or carbon tetrachloride. This paper presents experimental evidence that some of the discrepancy for cryogenic fluids results from ice contamination due to condensation. The data indicate a fairly linear decrease in droplet evaporation time with the diameter of the ice crystal residue. After correcting the raw data for ice contamination along with convection, a comparison of theory with experiment shows good agreement.

  18. Effect of ice contamination of liquid-nitrogen drops in film boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Previously reported vaporization time data of liquid nitrogen drops in film boiling on a flat plate are about 30 percent shorter than predicted from standard laminar film boiling theory. This theory, however, had been found to successfully correlate the data for conventional fluids such as water, ethanol, benzene, or carbon tetrachloride. Experimental evidence that some of the discrepancy for cryogenic fluids results from ice contamination due to condensation is presented. The data indicate a fairly linear decrease in droplet evaporation time with the diameter of the ice crystal residue. After correcting the raw data for ice contamination along with convection, a comparison of theory with experiment shows good agreement.

  19. Marangoni Convection and Deviations from Maxwells' Evaporation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segre, P. N.; Snell, E. H.; Adamek, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the convective dynamics of evaporating pools of volatile liquids using an ultra-sensitive thermal imaging camera. During evaporation, there are significant convective flows inside the liquid due to Marangoni forces. We find that Marangoni convection during evaporation can dramatically affect the evaporation rates of volatile liquids. A simple heat balance model connects the convective velocities and temperature gradients to the evaporation rates.

  20. Characteristics of Transient Boiling Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Monde, Masanori; Mitsutake, Y.

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, one dimensional inverse heat conduction solution is used for a measurement of pool boiling curve. The experiments are performed under atmospheric pressure for copper, brass, carbon steel and gold. Boiling curves, including unsteady transition boiling region, are found can be traced fairly well from a simple experiment system by solving inverse heat conduction solution. Boiling curves for steady heating and transient heating, for heating process and cooling process are compared. Surface behavior around CHF point, transition boiling and film-boiling regions are observed by using a high-speed camera. The results show the practicability of the inverse heat conduction solution in tracing boiling curve and thereby supply us a new way in boiling heat transfer research. (authors)

  1. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, R.M.

    1983-12-27

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation. 14 figs.

  2. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  3. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  4. Electrical control and enhancement of boiling heat transfer during quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari, Arjang; Hermes, Mark; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2016-02-01

    Heat transfer associated with boiling degrades at elevated temperatures due to the formation of an insulating vapor layer at the solid-liquid interface (Leidenfrost effect). Interfacial electrowetting (EW) fields can disrupt this vapor layer to promote liquid-surface wetting. We experimentally analyze EW-induced disruption of the vapor layer and measure the resulting enhanced cooling during the process of quenching. Imaging is employed to visualize the fluid-surface interactions and understand boiling patterns in the presence of an electrical voltage. It is seen that EW fields fundamentally change the boiling pattern, wherein a stable vapor layer is replaced by intermittent wetting of the surface. Heat conduction across the vapor gap is thus replaced with transient convection. This fundamental switch in the heat transfer mode significantly accelerates cooling during quenching. An order of magnitude increase in the cooling rate is observed, with the heat transfer seen approaching saturation at higher voltages. An analytical model is developed to extract voltage dependent heat transfer rates from the measured cooling curve. The results show that electric fields can alter and tune the traditional cooling curve. Overall, this study presents an ultralow power consumption concept to control the mechanical properties and metallurgy, by electrically tuning the cooling rate during quenching.

  5. Transient boiling in two-phase helium natural circulation loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2014-01-01

    Two-phase helium natural circulation loops are used for cooling large superconducting magnets, as CMS for LHC. During normal operation or in the case of incidents, transients are exerted on the cooling system. Here a cooling system of this type is studied experimentally. Sudden power changes are operated on a vertical-heated-section natural convection loop, simulating a fast increase of heat deposition on magnet cooling pipes. Mass flow rate, heated section wall temperature and pressure drop variations are measured as a function of time, to assess the time behavior concerning the boiling regime according to the values of power injected on the heated section. The boiling curves and critical heat flux (CHF) values have been obtained in steady state. Temperature evolution has been observed in order to explore the operating ranges where heat transfer is deteriorated. Premature film boiling has been observed during transients on the heated section in some power ranges, even at appreciably lower values than the CHF. A way of attenuating these undesired temperature excursions has been identified through the application of high enough initial heating power.

  6. Self-propelled film-boiling liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, Heiner; Taormina, Michael; Aleman, Benjamin; Melling, Laura; Dow-Hygelund, Corey; Taylor, Richard; Francis, Matthew

    2006-03-01

    We report that liquids perform self-propelled motion when they are placed in contact with hot surfaces with asymmetric (ratchet-like) topology. Millimeter-sized droplets or slugs accelerate at rates up to 0.1 g and reach terminal velocities of several cm/s, sustained over distances up to a meter. The pumping effect is observed when the liquid is in the film-boiling regime, for many liquids and over a wide temperature range. We propose that liquid motion is driven by a viscous force exerted by vapor flow between the solid and the liquid. This heat-driven pumping mechanism may be of interest in cooling applications, eliminating the need for an additional power source.

  7. Marangoni Effects in the Boiling of Binary Fluid Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Sayeed; Carey, Van P.; Motil, Brian

    1996-01-01

    Results of very recent experimental studies indicate that during nucleate boiling in some binary mixture, Marangoni effects augment the gravity driven flow of liquid towards the heated surface. With gravity present, it is impossible to separate the two effects. The reduced gravity environment gives an unique opportunity to explore th role of Marangoni effects on the boiling mechanisms free of gravitational body forces that obscure the role of such effects. However, recent experimental results suggest that under reduced gravity conditions, Marangoni effects is the dominant mechanism of vapor-liquid exchange at the surface for some binary mixture. To further explore such effects, experiments have been conducted with water/2-propanol mixtures at three different concentrations under normal gravity with different orientations of the heater surface and under reduce gravity aboard the DC-9 aircraft at NASA Lewis Research Center. The system pressure was sub atmospheric (approx. 8 kP at 1g(n)) and the bulk liquid temperature varied from low subcooling to near saturation. The molar concentrations of 2-propanol tested were 0.015, 0.025, and 0.1. Boiling curves were obtained both for high gravity (approx. 2g(n)) and reduce gravity (approx. 0.01g(n)). For each concentration of 2-propanol, the critical heat flux has been determined in the flight experiments only for reduced gravity conditions. Comparison of boiling curves and CHF obtained under l-g(n) an reduced gravity indicates that boiling mechanism in this mixtures is nearly independent of gravity. The results also indicate that the Marangoni mechanism is strong enough in these mixtures to sustain the boiling under reduced gravity conditions.

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  9. Generalized convective quasi-equilibrium principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Plant, Robert S.

    2016-03-01

    A generalization of Arakawa and Schubert's convective quasi-equilibrium principle is presented for a closure formulation of mass-flux convection parameterization. The original principle is based on the budget of the cloud work function. This principle is generalized by considering the budget for a vertical integral of an arbitrary convection-related quantity. The closure formulation includes Arakawa and Schubert's quasi-equilibrium, as well as both CAPE and moisture closures as special cases. The formulation also includes new possibilities for considering vertical integrals that are dependent on convective-scale variables, such as the moisture within convection. The generalized convective quasi-equilibrium is defined by a balance between large-scale forcing and convective response for a given vertically-integrated quantity. The latter takes the form of a convolution of a kernel matrix and a mass-flux spectrum, as in the original convective quasi-equilibrium. The kernel reduces to a scalar when either a bulk formulation is adopted, or only large-scale variables are considered within the vertical integral. Various physical implications of the generalized closure are discussed. These include the possibility that precipitation might be considered as a potentially-significant contribution to the large-scale forcing. Two dicta are proposed as guiding physical principles for the specifying a suitable vertically-integrated quantity.

  10. A study of bubble behavior and boiling heat transfer enhancement under electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S.D.; Kwak, H.Y.

    1996-12-31

    For utilizing low temperature waste heat sources, one of the major tasks is to develop a high performance heat exchanger. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) augmentation has been proved to be one of the most appropriate techniques to enhance nucleate boiling heat transfer in dielectric liquids which are suitable working fluids for the evaporator employed in waste heat recovery plants. Here, the effect of d.c. electric field on nucleate boiling heat transfer for refrigerants, R11, R113 and FC72 was investigated experimentally in a single-tube shell/tube heat exchanger by using the temperature control method of wall superheat. Also the behavior of bubble under nonuniform electric field produced by wire electrodes was studied by numerical calculation. For R11, the EHD enhancement for boiling heat transfer was observed for all ranges of the wall superheat tested. However, the enhancement in boiling heat transfer disappeared if the wall superheat exceeds 13 C for R113 and no electric field effect on the boiling heat transfer was observed for FC72. An application of approximately 5kV was enough to eliminate the boiling hysteresis for R11 and R113. Numerical study has revealed that the bubbles are forced away from the heating surface and toward the electrostatic stagnation point by the dielectrophoretic force. Such modified bubble motion turns out to promote the boiling heat transfer if one uses proper electrode configuration.

  11. Forced and natural convection in laminar-jet diffusion flames. [normal-gravity, inverted-gravity and zero-gravity flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggard, J. B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on methane, laminar-jet, diffusion flames with coaxial, forced-air flow to examine flame shapes in zero-gravity and in situations where buoyancy aids (normal-gravity flames) or hinders (inverted-gravity flames) the flow velocities. Fuel nozzles ranged in size from 0.051 to 0.305 cm inside radius, while the coaxial, convergent, air nozzle had a 1.4 cm inside radius at the fuel exit plane. Fuel flows ranged from 1.55 to 10.3 cu cm/sec and air flows from 0 to 597 cu cm/sec. A computer program developed under a previous government contract was used to calculate the characteristic dimensions of normal and zero-gravity flames only. The results include a comparison between the experimental data and the computed axial flame lengths for normal gravity and zero gravity which showed good agreement. Inverted-gravity flame width was correlated with the ratio of fuel nozzle radius to average fuel velocity. Flame extinguishment upon entry into weightlessness was studied, and it was found that relatively low forced-air velocities (approximately 10 cm/sec) are sufficient to sustain methane flame combustion in zero gravity. Flame color is also discussed.

  12. Convective flow patterns in an eight-box cube driven by combined wind stress, thermal and saline forcing. (Reannouncement with new availability information). Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.X.; Stommel, H.M.

    1992-02-15

    An eight-box cube model ocean, simulating the subpolar gyre in the North Atlantic, is formulated in order to understand how the wind-induced horizontal gyre affects the thermohaline circulation and its catastrophe. The model is forced from above by thermal conduction and freshwater flux. The structure of the thermohaline circulation and its catastrophe during the process of gradually increasing or reducing the evaporation/precipitation are examined. The results indicate that, although adding the third dimension and a wind-driven horizontal gyre of medium strength splits the catastrophe into several separate ones, only some of these catastrophes remain of significant amplitude. With choice of parameters appropriate for the North Atlantic, the model predicts a single stable state, circulating in the thermal sense (sinking at the pole). This can be driven smoothly to a reversed saline sense (sinking at the equator), without catastrophe, by increasing the precipitation/evaporation rate beyond 3 times the present-day value.

  13. Thermosyphon boiling in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, A.; Schweitzer, H.

    The thermal characteristics of ebullient cooling systems for VHSIC and VLSI microelectronic component thermal control are studied by experimentally and analytically investigating boiling heat transfer from a pair of flat, closely spaced, isoflux plates immersed in saturated water. A theoretical model for liquid flow rate through the channel is developed and used as a basis for correlating the rate of heat transfer from the channel walls. Experimental results for wall temperature as a function of axial location, heat flux, and plate spacing are presented. The finding that the wall superheat at constant imposed heat flux decreases as the channel is narrowed is explained with the aid of a boiling thermosiphon analysis which yields the mass flux through the channel.

  14. Pool boiling heat transfer of water/ γ-alumina micro-fluids around the horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhah, V.; Hormozi, F.

    2016-04-01

    A set of experiments was performed to quantify the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient of water/ γ-alumina micro-fluids at mass concentration ranged from 0.1 to 0.4 % of micro-particles with mean size of 1-2 μm. To stabilize the prepared micro-fluid, pH control, stirring and adding the SDS as a surfactant were carried out. Also, thermal conductivity of micro-fluids are measured using KD2 decagon pro. Results showed that micro-fluids have relatively higher thermal conductivity rather than the base fluids. According to the results, there are two distinguishable heat transfer regions namely natural convection and nucleate boiling regions. Influence of some operating parameters such as heat flux, mass concentration of micro-particles and surface fouling resistance on the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient were experimentally studied and briefly discussed. Results demonstrated a significant deterioration of heat transfer coefficient of micro-fluids in comparison with the base fluid over the extended time (1000 min of operation) in nucleate boiling region, while in natural convection region, enhancement of heat transfer coefficient is registered. According to the results, heat transfer coefficient is strongly controlled by/ γ-alumina concentration due to the deposition of micro-particles on the heating section. Rectilinear changes of scale formation with time in term of fouling resistance were clearly seen at regions, where natural convection is a dominant heat transfer mechanism and also for higher heat fluxes at nucleate boiling heat transfer region.

  15. Studies on sodium boiling phenomena in out of pile rod bundles for various accidental situations in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR) experiments and interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, J. M.; Rameau, B.

    Bundle sodium boiling in nominal geometry for different accident conditions is reviewed. Voiding of a subassembly is controlled by not only hydrodynamic effects but mainly by thermal effects. There is a strong influence of the thermal inertia of the bundle material compared to the sodium thermal inertia. Flow instability, during a slow transient, can be analyzed with numerical tools and estimated using simplified approximations. Stable boiling operational conditions under bundle mixed convection (natural convection in the reactor) can be predicted. Voiding during a fast transient can be approximated from single channel calculations. The phenomenology of boiling behavior for a subassembly with inlet completely blocked, submitted to decay heat and lateral cooling; two-phase sodium flow pressure drop in a tube of large hydraulic diameter under adiabatic conditions; critical flow phenomena and voiding rate under high power, slow transient conditions; and onset of dry out under local boiling remains problematical.

  16. Heat Transfer Performances of Pool Boiling on Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    2000-01-01

    Nucleate boiling, especially near the critical heat flux (CHF), can provide excellent economy along with high efficiency of heat transfer. However, the performance of nucleate boiling may deteriorate in a reduced gravity environment and the nucleate boiling usually has a potentially dangerous characteristic in CHF regime. That is, any slight overload can result in burnout of the boiling surface because the heat transfer will suddenly move into the film-boiling regime. Therefore, enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer becomes more important in reduced gravity environments. Enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux can be reached using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface. Thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix, which is independent of gravity, will play an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. Experimental studies were performed on nucleate pool boiling of pentane on cooper-graphite (Cu-Gr) and aluminum-graphite (Al-Gr) composite surfaces with various fiber volume concentrations for heat fluxes up to 35 W per square centimeter. It is revealed that a significant enhancement in boiling heat transfer performance on the composite surfaces is achieved, due to the presence of micro-graphite fibers embedded in the matrix. The onset of nucleate boiling (the isolated bubble regime) occurs at wall superheat of about 10 C for the Cu-Gr surface and 15 C for the Al-Gr surface, much lower than their respective pure metal surfaces. Transition from an isolated bubble regime to a coalesced bubble regime in boiling occurs at a superheat of

  17. Bubble transport in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owoeye, Eyitayo James

    Understanding the behavior of bubbles in subcooled flow boiling is important for optimum design and safety in several industrial applications. Bubble dynamics involve a complex combination of multiphase flow, heat transfer, and turbulence. When a vapor bubble is nucleated on a vertical heated wall, it typically slides and grows along the wall until it detaches into the bulk liquid. The bubble transfers heat from the wall into the subcooled liquid during this process. Effective control of this transport phenomenon is important for nuclear reactor cooling and requires the study of interfacial heat and mass transfer in a turbulent flow. Three approaches are commonly used in computational analysis of two-phase flow: Eulerian-Lagrangian, Eulerian-Eulerian, and interface tracking methods. The Eulerian- Lagrangian model assumes a spherical non-deformable bubble in a homogeneous domain. The Eulerian-Eulerian model solves separate conservation equations for each phase using averaging and closure laws. The interface tracking method solves a single set of conservation equations with the interfacial properties computed from the properties of both phases. It is less computationally expensive and does not require empirical relations at the fluid interface. Among the most established interface tracking techniques is the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method. VOF is accurate, conserves mass, captures topology changes, and permits sharp interfaces. This work involves the behavior of vapor bubbles in upward subcooled flow boiling. Both laminar and turbulent flow conditions are considered with corresponding pipe Reynolds number of 0 -- 410,000 using a large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence model and VOF interface tracking method. The study was performed at operating conditions that cover those of boiling water reactors (BWR) and pressurized water reactors (PWR). The analysis focused on the life cycle of vapor bubble after departing from its nucleation site, i.e. growth, slide, lift-off, rise

  18. Boiling fluids in a region of rapid uplift, Nanga Parbat Massif, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craw, D.; Koons, P. O.; Winslow, D.; Chamberlain, C. P.; Zeitler, P.

    1994-12-01

    The Nanga Parbat massif of northern Pakistan is currently undergoing rapid uplift (approx. 5-10 mm/a), resulting in near-surface elevated temperatures. Numerous quartz veins cut geologically young structures (less than 2 Ma), attesting to widespread young fluid flow. Fluid inclusions in quartz veins are predominantly low density water vapor (down to 0.05 mg/cu m), with some low density carbon dioxide vapor, and the fluid is predominantly meteoric in origin. Fluid inclusions provide evidence for boiling near to the critical points for water and for 5 wt% NaCl solution (up to 410 C). Head-driven meteoric water was convecting in fracture permeability under hydrostatic pressures which followed the boiling point-depth curve and near-boiling springs emanate from the surface. Hydrostatic pressures persisted to depths of about 6 km below the topographic surface, or near to sea level, where the brittle-ductile transition is inferred to lie. Numerical modeling of conductive heat flow in an area of high relief during rapid uplift indicates that the shape of the near-surface conductive geotherm is significantly influenced by topographic relief. Reasonable approximations for topgraphy at Nanga Parbat produce a conductive geotherm which implies high, near-surface geothermal gradients (greater than 100 C/km, and the isotherms describe a giant pillar of heat. Above about 4 km, fluid temperature is greater than conductive rock temperature in permeable zones which carry convecting boiling meteoric fluid.

  19. Turbulent generation and mechanism analysis of forced-convective heat transfer enhancement by applying electric fields in the restricted region near the wall

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Masato; Yabe, Akira; Nariai, Hideki

    1999-07-01

    The heat transfer enhancement method of applying electric fields only near a heat transfer wall was numerically investigated. Generation of additional turbulence in the near-wall region occurs by the interaction between migrating electric charges and the turbulent flow of weakly electrically conductive fluids such as refrigerants, oils, and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) alternatives. Based on electrostatic probe experiments, the authors assumed that the current was mainly transferred by the negative charges. They solved the Navier-Stokes equation with a Coulomb force term, the conservation equation of electric current, the Poisson equation of electric potential, and the energy equation. They used the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method to represent the turbulence. The numerical analysis showed a heat transfer enhancement of 2.8 times for turbulent flow (Re = 1.8 x 10{sup 4}) when applying 5 kV to the near-wall region, 5 mm from the wall. The simulations for different distances between the coupled electrodes showed that an optimum location of the electrodes exists for achieving the lowest electric power input for a given electric field strength. They also evaluated the heat efficiency in a simple heat exchanger system using this heat transfer enhancement method. For the 5 kV/5 mm condition, where 19% of the total input power was consumed by the electric field, they achieved a heat transfer enhancement of 27 times compared to the case when an equivalent, additional amount of input power would be consumed by the pump to increase the flow rate of the heat-transfer fluid.

  20. Pattern formation in solutal convection: vermiculated rolls and isolated cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Piro, Oreste; Villacampa, Ana I.

    2002-11-01

    Observations of the peculiar behaviour of a drink of liqueur topped with cream led us to perform experiments showing that the instability is a convection phenomenon that arises through destabilizing surface-tension forces. The convection is solutal: driven by gradients of concentration of a solute, rather than by heat gradients as in the more commonly studied thermal convection. The convective patterns, vermiculated rolls and isolated cells, are quite unlike the usual planforms. They are associated with an elastic surface film, and the Marangoni number is high, characteristic of solutal convection. We have conducted further experiments that reproduce these patterns in simpler working fluids.

  1. ASTRID: A 3D Eulerian software for subcooled boiling modelling - comparison with experimental results in tubes and annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Briere, E.; Larrauri, D.; Olive, J.

    1995-09-01

    For about four years, Electricite de France has been developing a 3-D computer code for the Eulerian simulation of two-phase flows. This code, named ASTRID, is based on the six-equation two-fluid model. Boiling water flows, such as those encountered in nuclear reactors, are among the main applications of ASTRID. In order to provide ASTRID with closure laws and boundary conditions suitable for boiling flows, a boiling model has been developed by EDF and the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse. In the fluid, the heat and mass transfer between a bubble and the liquid is being modelled. At the heating wall, the incipient boiling point is determined according to Hsu`s criterion and the boiling heat flux is split into three additive terms: a convective term, a quenching term and a vaporisation term. This model uses several correlations. EDF`s program in boiling two-phase flows also includes experimental studies, some of which are performed in collaboration with other laboratories. Refrigerant subcooled boiling both in tubular (DEBORA experiment, CEN Grenoble) and in annular geometry (Arizona State University Experiment) have been computed with ASTRID. The simulations show the satisfactory results already obtained on void fraction and liquid temperature. Ways of improvement of the model are drawn especially on the dynamical part.

  2. Experimental investigation on the phenomena around the onset nucleate boiling during the impacting of a droplet on the hot surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrakusuma, Windy H.; Deendarlianto, Kamal, Samsul; Indarto, Nuriyadi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Onset of nucleate boiling of a droplet when impacted onto hot surface was investigated. Three kinds of surfaces, normal stainless steel (NSS), stainless steel with TiO2 coating (UVN), and stainless steel with TiO2 coating and radiated by ultraviolet ray were employed to examine the effect of wettability. The droplet size was 2.4 mm diameter, and dropped under different We number. The image is generated by high speed camera with the frame speed of 1000 fps. The boiling conditions are identified as natural convection, nucleate boiling, critical heat flux, transition, and film boiling. In the present report, the discussion will be focused on the beginning of nucleate boiling on the droplet. Nucleate boiling occurs when bubbles are generated. These bubbles are probably caused by nucleation on the impurities within the liquid rather than at nucleation sites on the heated surface because the bubbles appear to be in the bulk of the liquid instead of at the liquid-solid interface. In addition, the smaller the contact angle, the fastest the boiling.

  3. Criticality in the slowed-down boiling crisis at zero gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charignon, T.; Lloveras, P.; Chatain, D.; Truskinovsky, L.; Vives, E.; Beysens, D.; Nikolayev, V. S.

    2015-05-01

    Boiling crisis is a transition between nucleate and film boiling. It occurs at a threshold value of the heat flux from the heater called CHF (critical heat flux). Usually, boiling crisis studies are hindered by the high CHF and short transition duration (below 1 ms). Here we report on experiments in hydrogen near its liquid-vapor critical point, in which the CHF is low and the dynamics slow enough to be resolved. As under such conditions the surface tension is very small, the experiments are carried out in the reduced gravity to preserve the conventional bubble geometry. Weightlessness is created artificially in two-phase hydrogen by compensating gravity with magnetic forces. We were able to reveal the fractal structure of the contour of the percolating cluster of the dry areas at the heater that precedes the boiling crisis. We provide a direct statistical analysis of dry spot areas that confirms the boiling crisis at zero gravity as a scale-free phenomenon. It was observed that, in agreement with theoretical predictions, saturated boiling CHF tends to zero (within the precision of our thermal control system) in zero gravity, which suggests that the boiling crisis may be observed at any heat flux provided the experiment lasts long enough.

  4. Criticality in the slowed-down boiling crisis at zero gravity.

    PubMed

    Charignon, T; Lloveras, P; Chatain, D; Truskinovsky, L; Vives, E; Beysens, D; Nikolayev, V S

    2015-05-01

    Boiling crisis is a transition between nucleate and film boiling. It occurs at a threshold value of the heat flux from the heater called CHF (critical heat flux). Usually, boiling crisis studies are hindered by the high CHF and short transition duration (below 1 ms). Here we report on experiments in hydrogen near its liquid-vapor critical point, in which the CHF is low and the dynamics slow enough to be resolved. As under such conditions the surface tension is very small, the experiments are carried out in the reduced gravity to preserve the conventional bubble geometry. Weightlessness is created artificially in two-phase hydrogen by compensating gravity with magnetic forces. We were able to reveal the fractal structure of the contour of the percolating cluster of the dry areas at the heater that precedes the boiling crisis. We provide a direct statistical analysis of dry spot areas that confirms the boiling crisis at zero gravity as a scale-free phenomenon. It was observed that, in agreement with theoretical predictions, saturated boiling CHF tends to zero (within the precision of our thermal control system) in zero gravity, which suggests that the boiling crisis may be observed at any heat flux provided the experiment lasts long enough. PMID:26066249

  5. Electrodynamic convection in silicon floating zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlbauer, A.; Erdmann, W.; Keller, W.

    1983-12-01

    Using a simplified Navier-Stokes equation it has been possible to compute the electrodynamic convection generated by a radio frequency coil field for the modern needle-eye float-zone growth of silicon. The calculated electrodynamic force in such a zone shows maximum values up to 11.7 N/cm 3 and generates flow velocities between 25 and 100 cm/s. As only superficial convection can be brought about by electrodynamic forces, the axial and radial dopant incorporation will not be influenced strongly. A comparison of electrodynamic forces with the other forces possibly causing flow in silicon floating zones shows that the electrodynamic forces exceed all other forces by several orders of magnitude.

  6. Theoretical modeling of CHF for near-saturated pool boiling and flow boiling from short heaters using the interfacial lift-off criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Mudawar, I.; Galloway, J.E.; Gersey, C.O.

    1995-12-31

    Pool boiling and flow boiling were examined for near-saturated bulk conditions in order to determine the critical heat flux (CHF) trigger mechanism for each. Photographic studies of the wall region revealed features common to both situations. At fluxes below CHF, the vapor coalesces into a wavy layer which permits wetting only in wetting fronts, the portions of the liquid-vapor interface which contact the wall as a result of the interfacial waviness. Close examination of the interfacial features revealed the waves are generated from the lower edge of the heater in pool boiling and the heater`s upstream region in flow boiling. Wavelengths follow predictions based upon the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability criterion. Critical heat flux in both cases occurs when the pressure force exerted upon the interface due to interfacial curvature, which tends to preserve interfacial contact with the wall prior to CHF, is overcome by the momentum of vapor at the site of the first wetting front, causing the interface to lift away from the wall. It is shown this interfacial lift-off criterion facilitates accurate theoretical modeling of CHF in pool boiling and in flow boiling in both straight and curved channels.

  7. Pool boiling heat transfer of deionized and degassed water in packed-perforated copper beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Mao-Yu; Jang, Kuang-Jang; Ho, Ching-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Nucleate pool boiling with porous media made of perforated copper beads as the enhanced structure is conducted in saturated, deionized and degassed water. Data are taken at an atmospheric pressure (saturation temperature of 100 °C) and at heat fluxes from 4500 to 72,300 W/m2 while increasing the heat flux. The bead-packed structure is heated on the bottom. The layer of loose particles on the heated surface is free to move under the action of bulk liquid convection and vapor nucleation. The effects of the weight (number), size and layers of the free particles are experimentally explored using copper particles for different copper bead diameters which were 2, 3, 4 and 5 mm. The boiling enhancement is closely related to the particle weight, size and layers, and the heat flux applied. The results show that free particles are presented to have a distinct advantage in boiling heat transfer, resulting in an average increase in the heat transfer coefficient of 126 % relative to the flat plate without particles. In order to obtain insight into the fluid boiling phenomena, flow visualization is also made to observe the detailed fluid boiling characteristics of the copper particles present. The visualizations show that bubble nucleation preferentially occurs at the narrow corner cavities formed between the free particles and the heated surface.

  8. Boiling significantly promotes photodegradation of perfluorooctane sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Xian-Jin; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Paul K S; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    The application of photochemical processes for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) degradation has been limited by a low treatment efficiency. This study reports a significant acceleration of PFOS photodegradation under boiling condition compared with the non-boiling control. The PFOS decomposition rate increased with the increasing boiling intensity, but declined at a higher hydronium level or under oxygenation. These results suggest that the boiling state of solution resulted in higher effective concentrations of reactants at the gas-liquid interface and enhanced the interfacial mass transfer, thereby accelerating the PFOS decomposition. This study broadens our knowledge of PFOS photodegradation process and may have implications for development of efficient photodegradation technologies. PMID:26117498

  9. ATWS Analysis with an Advanced Boiling Curve Approach within COBRA 3-CP

    SciTech Connect

    Gensler, A.; Knoll, A.; Kuehnel, K.

    2007-07-01

    In 2005 the German Reactor Safety Commission issued specific requirements on core coolability demonstration for PWR ATWS (anticipated transients without scram). Thereupon AREVA NP performed detailed analyses for all German PWRs. For a German KONVOI plant the results of an ATWS licensing analysis are presented. The plant dynamic behavior is calculated with NLOOP, while the hot channel analysis is performed with the thermal hydraulic computer code COBRA 3-CP. The application of the fuel rod model included in COBRA 3-CP is essential for this type of analysis. Since DNB (departure from nucleate boiling) occurs, the advanced post DNB model (advanced boiling curve approach) of COBRA 3-CP is used. The results are compared with those gained with the standard BEEST model. The analyzed ATWS case is the emergency power case 'loss of main heat sink with station service power supply unavailable'. Due to the decreasing coolant flow rate during the transient the core attains film boiling conditions. The results of the hot channel analysis strongly depend on the performance of the boiling curve model. The BEEST model is based on pool boiling conditions whereas typical PWR conditions - even in most transients - are characterized by forced flow for which the advanced boiling curve approach is particularly suitable. Compared with the BEEST model the advanced boiling curve approach in COBRA 3-CP yields earlier rewetting, i.e. a shorter period in film boiling. Consequently, the fuel rod cladding temperatures, that increase significantly due to film boiling, drop back earlier and the high temperature oxidation is significantly diminished. The Baker-Just-Correlation was used to calculate the value of equivalent cladding reacted (ECR), i.e. the reduction of cladding thickness due to corrosion throughout the transient. Based on the BEEST model the ECR value amounts to 0.4% whereas the advanced boiling curve only leads to an ECR value of 0.2%. Both values provide large margins to the 17

  10. Boils

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News ... Surveys About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  11. Shallow Convection along the Sea Breeze Front and its Interaction with Horizontal Convective Rolls and Convective Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, B. A.; Stenchikov, G. L.; Abualnaja, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Shallow convection has been studied in the sea breeze frontal zone along the Arabian Red Sea coast. This convection is forced by thermal and dynamic instabilities and generally is capped below 500 hPa. The thermally induced sea breeze modifies the desert Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) and propagates inland as a density current. The leading edge of the denser marine air rapidly moves inland undercutting the hot and dry desert air mass. The warm air lifts up along the sea breeze front (SBF). Despite large moisture flux from the sea, the shallow convection in SBF does not cause precipitation on the most part of the Arabian coastal plane. The main focus of this research is to study the vertical structure and extent of convective activity in SBF and to differentiate flow regimes that lead to dry and wet convection. The Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) has been employed at a high spatial resolution of 500 m to investigate the thermodynamic structure of the atmospheric column along the SBF. We found that convection occurs during offshore and cross-shore mean wind conditions; precipitation in SBF frequently develops in the southern region of the Red Sea along the high terrain of Al-Sarawat Mountains range, while on most of the days convection is dry in the middle region and further north of the Red Sea. The coherent structures in the PBL, horizontal convective rolls (HCRs) and open convective cells (OCCs), play an important role shaping interaction of SBF with the desert boundary layer. The HCRs develop in the midmorning along the mean wind vector and interact with the SBF. Later in the afternoon HCRs evolve into OCCs. The convection is strongest, where the HCR and OCC updrafts overlap with SBF and is weakest in their downdraft regions.

  12. Magnetic Control of Solutal Buoyancy Driven Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Volumetric forces resulting from local density variations and gravitational acceleration cause buoyancy induced convective motion in melts and solutions. Solutal buoyancy is a result of concentration differences in an otherwise isothermal fluid. If the fluid also exhibits variations in magnetic susceptibility with concentration then convection control by external magnetic fields can be hypothesized. Magnetic control of thermal buoyancy induced convection in ferrofluids (dispersions of ferromagnetic particles in a carrier fluid) and paramagnetic fluids have been demonstrated. Here we show the nature of magnetic control of solutal buoyancy driven convection of a paramagnetic fluid, an aqueous solution of Manganese Chloride hydrate. We predict the critical magnetic field required for balancing gravitational solutal buoyancy driven convection and validate it through a simple experiment. We demonstrate that gravity driven flow can be completely reversed by a magnetic field but the exact cancellation of the flow is not possible. This is because the phenomenon is unstable. The technique can be applied to crystal growth processes in order to reduce convection and to heat exchanger devices for enhancing convection. The method can also be applied to impose a desired g-level in reduced gravity applications.

  13. Microchannel flow boiling mechanisms leading to burnout

    SciTech Connect

    Landram, C.S.

    1994-03-01

    The boiling mechanisms for microchannel flow are investigated when the channel cross-section in height to width is large (of order 10/1), near its single-phase optimum. A separated flow model was developed which allowed for saturated boiling near the heated base and single-phase flow elsewhere within the channel cross-section. In these high aspect ratio heat sinks, the role of subcooled boiling was found to be insignificant relative to that of saturated boiling, the latter allowing for a doubling of the applied heat load from single-phase operation before burnout was experienced. As the exit mass quality of the saturated region approached one for increasing heat flux, both the model and the experimental case indicated a burnout condition had also been approached. The model underpredicted the measured base temperature, which has been generally noted for saturated boiling in annular two-phase flow.

  14. A groundwater convection model for Rio Grande rift geothermal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Harder, V.; Daggett, P. H.; Swanberg, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    It has been proposed that forced convection, driven by normal groundwater flow through the interconnected basins of the Rio Grande rift is the primary source mechanism for the numerous geothermal anomalies along the rift. A test of this concept using an analytical model indicates that significant forced convection must occur in the basins even if permeabilities are as low as 50-200 millidarcies at a depth of 2 km. Where groundwater flow is constricted at the discharge areas of the basins forced convection can locally increase the gradient to a level where free convection also occurs, generating surface heat flow anomalies 5-15 times background. A compilation of groundwater data for the rift basins shows a strong correlation between constrictions in groundwater flow and hot springs and geothermal anomalies, giving strong circumstantial support to the convection model.

  15. Simulating Convection in Stellar Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Joel

    sensitive to changes in opacity which are in response to adjustments to the metallicity and helium abundance. We find that increasing the metallicity forces the location of the transition region to lower densities and pressures, and results in larger mean and turbulent velocities throughout the superadiabatic region. We also quantify the degree of convective overshoot in the atmosphere, and show that it increases with metallicity as well. The signature of helium differs from that of metallicity in the manner in which the photospheric velocity distribution is affected. We also find that helium abundance and surface gravity behave largely in similar ways, but differ in the way they affect the mean molecular weight. A simple model for spectral line formation suggests that the bisectors and absolute Doppler shifts of spectral lines depend on the helium abundance. We look at the effect of alpha-element enhancement and find that it has a considerably smaller effect on the convective dynamics in the superadiabatic layer compared to that of helium abundance. Improving the treatment of convection in stellar models remains one of the primary applications of RHD simulations. A simple and direct way to introduce the effect of 3D convection into 1D stellar models is through the surface boundary condition. Usually the atmospheric structure of a stellar model is defined beforehand in the form of a T-tau relation, and is kept fixed at chemical compositions and stages of evolution. Extracting mean atmospheric stratifications from simulations provides a means of introducing surface boundary conditions to stellar models that self-consistently include the effects of realistic convection and overshoot. We apply data from simulations to stellar models in this manner to measure how realistic atmospheric stratifications relate to the value of the mixing length parameter in calibrated stellar models. Moving beyond improving the surface boundary condition, we also explore a method for calibrating

  16. A continuous and prognostic convection scheme based on buoyancy, PCMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérémy, Jean-François; Piriou, Jean-Marcel

    2016-04-01

    A new and consistent convection scheme (PCMT: Prognostic Condensates Microphysics and Transport), providing a continuous and prognostic treatment of this atmospheric process, is described. The main concept ensuring the consistency of the whole system is the buoyancy, key element of any vertical motion. The buoyancy constitutes the forcing term of the convective vertical velocity, which is then used to define the triggering condition, the mass flux, and the rates of entrainment-detrainment. The buoyancy is also used in its vertically integrated form (CAPE) to determine the closure condition. The continuous treatment of convection, from dry thermals to deep precipitating convection, is achieved with the help of a continuous formulation of the entrainment-detrainment rates (depending on the convective vertical velocity) and of the CAPE relaxation time (depending on the convective over-turning time). The convective tendencies are directly expressed in terms of condensation and transport. Finally, the convective vertical velocity and condensates are fully prognostic, the latter being treated using the same microphysics scheme as for the resolved condensates but considering the convective environment. A Single Column Model (SCM) validation of this scheme is shown, allowing detailed comparisons with observed and explicitly simulated data. Four cases covering the convective spectrum are considered: over ocean, sensitivity to environmental moisture (S. Derbyshire) non precipitating shallow convection to deep precipitating convection, trade wind shallow convection (BOMEX) and strato-cumulus (FIRE), together with an entire continental diurnal cycle of convection (ARM). The emphasis is put on the characteristics of the scheme which enable a continuous treatment of convection. Then, a 3D LAM validation is presented considering an AMMA case with both observations and a CRM simulation using the same initial and lateral conditions as for the parameterized one. Finally, global

  17. On the Influence of Surface Heterogeneities onto Roll Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryschka, M.; Drüe, C.; Raasch, S.; Etling, D.

    2009-04-01

    Roll convection is a common phenomenon in atmospheric convective boundary layers (CBL) with background wind. Roll convection is observed both over land and over sea for different synoptic situations. There is still some debate about the different types of roll convection and their causes or rather the necessary conditions for their appearance. The stability parameter ζ = -zi•L (zi: boundary layer height, L: Monin-Obukhov stability length) is widely used as a predictor for roll convection, since numerous studies suggest that convective rolls only appear when 0 < ζ < 20. In other words, roll development becomes unlikely for strong surface heating and weak vertical wind shear. In contrast to those studies the presence of roll convection in almost any polar cold air outbreak (as can be seen in numerous satellite images as cloud streets) reveals that even for large ζ roll convection can develop. Some studies report roll convection in cold air outbreaks for ζ = 250. Our large eddy simulations (LES) on roll convection suggests that the contrasting results concerning the dependency of roll convection on ζ are due to two different types of roll convection: One type which develops purely by self organization if ζ < 20 ("free rolls") and another type which is triggered by heterogeneities in surface temperature and develops also for large ζ ("forced rolls"). We think that most of the cloud streets observed in polar cold air outbreaks over open water are due to rolls of forced type which are tied to upstream located heterogeneities in the sea-ice distribution. The results of this study suggests that the omission of surface inhomogeneities in previous LES is the reason for the absence of rolls in all LES with strong surface heating and weak vertical wind shear so far. In this contribution we will present a large eddy simulation which successfully represents forced rolls under such conditions.

  18. Electromagnetically driven dwarf tornados in turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenjereš, Saša

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the concept of interdependency of turbulent flow and electromagnetic fields inside the spiraling galaxies, we explored the possibilities of generating a localized Lorentz force that will produce a three-dimensional swirling flow in weakly conductive fluids. Multiple vortical flow patterns were generated by combining arrays of permanent magnets and electrodes with supplied dc current. This concept was numerically simulated and applied to affect natural convection flow, turbulence, and heat transfer inside a rectangular enclosure heated from below and cooled from above over a range of Rayleigh numbers (104<=Ra<=5×109). The large-eddy simulations revealed that for low- and intermediate-values of Ra, the heat transfer was increased more than five times when an electromagnetic forcing was activated. In contrast to the generally accepted view that electromagnetic forcing will suppress velocity fluctuations and will increase anisotropy of turbulence, we demonstrated that localized forcing can enhance turbulence isotropy of thermal convection compared to its neutral state.

  19. Outbreak of boils in an Alaskan village

    PubMed Central

    Landen, Michael G; McCumber, Barbara J; Asay, Elvin D; Egeland, Grace M

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine whether taking steam baths was associated with furunculosis and to evaluate possible risk factors for the occurrence of boils during a large outbreak in Alaska. Design A cohort study of village residents, a case-control study, and assessment of environmental cultures taken from steam baths. Setting Village in southwestern Alaska. Participants 1 adult member from 77 of the 92 house-holds in the village was interviewed; 115 residents with at least one boil occurring between January 1 and December 12, 1996 were considered to be cases; 209 residents without a boil acted as the control group. All 459 village residents were included in the cohort study. Main outcome measure Rate of infection among all residents and residents who regularly took steam baths, risk factors for infection, and relative risk of infection. Results 115 people (25%) had had at least one boil. Men were more likely to have had a boil than women (relative risk 1.5; 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.2). The highest rate of infection was among people ages 25-34 years (32/76; 42%). No children younger than 2 years had had boils. Boils were associated with using a steam bath (odds ratio 8.1; 3.3 to 20.1). Among those who used a steam bath, the likelihood of developing boils was reduced by routinely sitting on a towel while bathing, which women were more likely to do, and bathing with fewer than 8 people. Of the 93 samples taken from steam baths, one Staphylococcus aureus isolate was obtained from a bench in an outer dressing room. Conclusion Using a steam bath was associated with developing boils in this outbreak in a village in Alaska. People should be advised to sit on towels while using steam baths. PMID:10778372

  20. Free convection in the Matian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clow, G. D.; Haberle, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The 'free convective' regime for the Martian atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) was investigated. This state occurs when the mean windspeed at the top of the ABL drops below some critical value U(sub c) and positive buoyant forces are present. Such forces can arise either from vertical temperature or water vapor gradients across the atmospheric surface layer. During free convection, buoyant forces drive narrow plumes that ascend to the inversion height with a return circulation consisting of broad slower-moving downdraughts. Horizontal pressure, temperature, windspeed, and water vapor fluctuations resulting form this circulation pattern can be quite large adjacent to the ground (within the surface layer). The local turbulent fluctuations cause non-zero mean surface stresses, sensible heat fluxes, and latent heat fluxes, even when the mean regional windspeed is zero. Although motions above the surface layer are insensitive to the nature of the surface, the sensible and latent heat fluxes are primarily controlled by processes within the interfacial sublayer immediately adjacent to the ground during free convection. Thus the distinction between aerodynamically smooth and rough airflow within the interfacial sublayer is more important than for the more typical situation where the mean regional windspeed is greater than U(sub c). Buoyant forces associated with water vapor gradients are particularly large on Mars at low pressures and high temperatures when the surface relative humidity is 100 percent, enhancing the likelihood of free convection under these conditions. On this basis, Ingersol postulated the evaporative heat losses from an icy surface on Mars at 237 K and current pressures would exceed the available net radiative flux at the surface, thus prohibiting ice from melting at low atmospheric pressures. Schumann has developed equations describing the horizontal fluctuations and mean vertical gradients occurring during free convection. Schumann's model was

  1. Convective heat transfer to low-temperature fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Research into forced and natural convection processes in low-temperature (cryogenic) fluids is reviewed with primary emphasis on forced convection. Boundaries of the near-critical region are defined, fluid properties near the critical state are discussed, and heat-transfer processes around the critical point are described. The thermodynamics of the critical point is analyzed together with transport properties of a near-critical fluid, and the quantum states of low-temperature molecular hydrogen (para and ortho) are discussed. Experimental work on heat transfer in free, natural, and forced convection systems is briefly summarized. Graham's (1969) penetration model for near-critical fluids is outlined, near-critical heat transfer is discussed in relation to conventional geometric effects, and the effects of curvature on the properties of near-critical hydrogen are noted. Theoretical considerations in free and forced convection are examined.

  2. Boiling Heat Transfer to Halogenated Hydrocarbon Refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Suguru; Fujita, Yasunobu

    The current state of knowledge on heat transfer to boiling refrigerants (halogenated hydrocarbons) in a pool and flowing inside a horizontal tube is reviewed with an emphasis on information relevant to the design of refrigerant evaporators, and some recommendations are made for future research. The review covers two-phase flow pattern, heat transfer characteristics, correlation of heat transfer coefficient, influence of oil, heat transfer augmentation, boiling from tube-bundle, influence of return bend, burnout heat flux, film boiling, dryout and post-dryout heat transfer.

  3. 77 FR 38339 - Dairyland Power Cooperative, La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor Exemption From Certain Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ..., which utilized a forced-circulation, direct-cycle boiling water reactor as its heat source. The plant is... March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13926). The revised regulation stated that it was applicable to all Part 50... published in the Federal Register on May 8, 2012 (77 FR 27097). Based upon the environmental assessment,...

  4. Pool boiling of water on nano-structured micro wires at sub-atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Mahendra; Khandekar, Sameer; Pratap, Dheeraj; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-10-01

    Past decades have seen active research in enhancement of boiling heat transfer by surface modifications. Favorable surface modifications are expected to enhance boiling efficiency. Several interrelated mechanisms such as capillarity, surface energy alteration, wettability, cavity geometry, wetting transitions, geometrical features of surface morphology, etc., are responsible for change in the boiling behavior of modified surfaces. Not much work is available on pool boiling at low pressures on microscale/nanoscale geometries; low pressure boiling is attractive in many applications wherein low operating temperatures are desired for a particular working fluid. In this background, an experimental setup was designed and developed to investigate the pool boiling performance of water on (a) plain aluminum micro wire (99.999 % pure) and, (b) nano-porous alumina structured aluminum micro wire, both having diameter of 250 µm, under sub-atmospheric pressure. Nano-structuring on the plain wire surface was achieved via anodization. Two samples, A and B of anodized wires, differing by the degree of anodization were tested. The heater length scale (wire diameter) was much smaller than the capillary length scale. Pool boiling characteristics of water were investigated at three different sub-atmospheric pressures of 73, 123 and 199 mbar (corresponding to T sat = 40, 50 and 60 °C). First, the boiling characteristics of plain wire were measured. It was noticed that at sub-atmospheric pressures, boiling heat transfer performance for plain wire was quite low due to the increased bubble sizes and low nucleation site density. Subsequently, boiling performance of nano-structured wires (both Sample A and Sample B) was compared with plain wire and it was noted that boiling heat transfer for the former was considerably enhanced as compared to the plain wire. This enhancement is attributed to increased nucleation site density, change in wettability and possibly due to enhanced pore scale

  5. Flash boiling from carbon foams for high-heat-flux transient cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engerer, J. D.; Fisher, T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Flash boiling of a liquid pool results in an event characterized by rapid phase change and, as a result, high rates of expansion and cooling. Because of the potential advantages of such characteristics for convective heat transfer, flash boiling is considered here for the purpose of cooling transient heat loads. The event has the positive characteristics mentioned as well as rapid response (˜10 ms) and high initial rates of phase change, and then quickly decays to a steady-state regime analogous to pool boiling. The performance of the cooling mechanism is evaluated using an objective function derived from the effect of temperature on the efficiency of optical transmission in a diode-pumped solid-state laser. Statistical surrogate models based on the experimental results are used to predict optimal run conditions. Experiments using these predicted parameters show that flash boiling can maintain device temperature to within ±6.1 °C through a pulsed 5 s heat flux of 68 W cm-2 and to within ±1.4 °C for a heat flux of 39 W cm-2.

  6. Boiling heat transfer enhancement of nanofluids on a smooth surface with agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xin; Qi, Baojin; Wei, Jinjia; Li, Wei; Ding, Jie; Zhang, Yonghai

    2016-02-01

    The pool boiling heat transfer performance on a smooth silicon chip surface with agitation was experimentally investigated in this study. The nanofluids (Ag/alcohol) of 0.02 % volume concentration and ethyl alcohol with purification over 99.9 % were the two contrast working fluids. For each group, subcoolings of 40, 50 and 60 K were conducted under atmospheric pressure. To enhance the heat transfer performance, an agitating device was fixed above the top of the chip. The experimental results indicated that nanofluids could enhance the heat transfer performance especially in the nucleate boiling region. The heat transfer coefficient was significantly increased with nanofluids, while the critical heat flux (CHF) was nearly not changed. In the agitation Reynolds number of 20,300, the heat transfer performance of nanofluids was significantly enhanced in the convection region, and the CHF was increased by more than 25 % for all groups. This boiling phenomenon was observed for both nanofluids and alcohol groups. Meanwhile, the boiling curves of different liquid subcoolings in the nucleate region were quite similar to each other under agitation.

  7. Magnetic control of convection in nonconducting paramagnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Edwards, Boyd F.; Gray, Donald D.

    1998-01-01

    An inhomogeneous magnetic field exerts a magnetic body force on magnetically permeable fluids. A recent experiment [D. Braithwaite, E. Beaugnon, and R. Tournier, Nature (London) 354, 134 (1991)] demonstrates that this force can be used to compensate for gravity and to control convection in a paramagnetic solution of gadolinium nitrate. We provide the theory of magnetically controlled convection in a horizontal paramagnetic fluid layer heated from either above or below. Our theoretical predictions agree with the experiments.

  8. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  10. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  11. Effects of heater and heating methods on pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.M.; Lee, D.J. )

    1989-10-01

    In a pool boiling from an electrically-heated wire, there are three modes of boiling: nucleate, film, and coexisting nucleate and film boiling. These are shown. In this work, the effects of the physical properties of heating wires on steady-state pool boiling have been investigated analytically. The cases of constant voltage heating and constant current heating have been solved.

  12. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  13. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  14. EFFECTS OF PENETRATIVE CONVECTION ON SOLAR DYNAMO

    SciTech Connect

    Masada, Youhei; Yamada, Kohei; Kageyama, Akira

    2013-11-20

    Spherical solar dynamo simulations are performed. A self-consistent, fully compressible magnetohydrodynamic system with a stably stratified layer below the convective envelope is numerically solved with a newly developed simulation code based on the Yin-Yang grid. The effects of penetrative convection are studied by comparing two models with and without the stable layer. The differential rotation profile in both models is reasonably solar-like with equatorial acceleration. When considering the penetrative convection, a tachocline-like shear layer is developed and maintained beneath the convection zone without assuming any forcing. While the turbulent magnetic field becomes predominant in the region where the convective motion is vigorous, mean-field components are preferentially organized in the region where the convective motion is less vigorous. Particularly in the stable layer, the strong, large-scale field with a dipole symmetry is spontaneously built up. The polarity reversal of the mean-field component takes place globally and synchronously throughout the system regardless of the presence of the stable layer. Our results suggest that the stably stratified layer is a key component for organizing the large-scale strong magnetic field, but is not essential for the polarity reversal.

  15. Convection in Condensible-rich Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, F.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.

    2016-05-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case—water vapor in Earth’s present climate—the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO2 is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-convective simulations. As a further illustration of the behavior of the scheme, results for a runaway greenhouse atmosphere for both steady instellation and seasonally varying instellation corresponding to a highly eccentric orbit are presented. The latter case illustrates that the high thermal inertia associated with latent heat in nondilute atmospheres can damp out the effects of even extreme seasonal forcing.

  16. Conceptual design for spacelab pool boiling experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, J. H.; Peck, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A pool boiling heat transfer experiment to be incorporated with a larger two-phase flow experiment on Spacelab was designed to confirm (or alter) the results of earth-normal gravity experiments which indicate that the hydrodynamic peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes vanish at very low gravity. Twelve small sealed test cells containing water, methanol or Freon 113 and cylindrical heaters of various sizes are to be built. Each cell will be subjected to one or more 45 sec tests in which the surface heat flux on the heaters is increased linearly until the surface temperature reaches a limiting value of 500 C. The entire boiling process will be photographed in slow-motion. Boiling curves will be constructed from thermocouple and electric input data, for comparison with the motion picture records. The conduct of the experiment will require no more than a few hours of operator time.

  17. Heterogeneous nanofluids: natural convection heat transfer enhancement

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Convective heat transfer using different nanofluid types is investigated. The domain is differentially heated and nanofluids are treated as heterogeneous mixtures with weak solutal diffusivity and possible Soret separation. Owing to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, the resulting solutal buoyancy forces could be significant and interact with the initial thermal convection. A modified formulation taking into account the thermal conductivity, viscosity versus nanofluids type and concentration and the spatial heterogeneous concentration induced by the Soret effect is presented. The obtained results, by solving numerically the full governing equations, are found to be in good agreement with the developed solution based on the scale analysis approach. The resulting convective flows are found to be dependent on the local particle concentration φ and the corresponding solutal to thermal buoyancy ratio N. The induced nanofluid heterogeneity showed a significant heat transfer modification. The heat transfer in natural convection increases with nanoparticle concentration but remains less than the enhancement previously underlined in forced convection case. PMID:21711755

  18. Heterogeneous nanofluids: natural convection heat transfer enhancement.

    PubMed

    Oueslati, Fakhreddine Segni; Bennacer, Rachid

    2011-01-01

    Convective heat transfer using different nanofluid types is investigated. The domain is differentially heated and nanofluids are treated as heterogeneous mixtures with weak solutal diffusivity and possible Soret separation. Owing to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, the resulting solutal buoyancy forces could be significant and interact with the initial thermal convection. A modified formulation taking into account the thermal conductivity, viscosity versus nanofluids type and concentration and the spatial heterogeneous concentration induced by the Soret effect is presented. The obtained results, by solving numerically the full governing equations, are found to be in good agreement with the developed solution based on the scale analysis approach. The resulting convective flows are found to be dependent on the local particle concentration φ and the corresponding solutal to thermal buoyancy ratio N. The induced nanofluid heterogeneity showed a significant heat transfer modification. The heat transfer in natural convection increases with nanoparticle concentration but remains less than the enhancement previously underlined in forced convection case. PMID:21711755

  19. Heterogeneous nanofluids: natural convection heat transfer enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oueslati, Fakhreddine Segni; Bennacer, Rachid

    2011-12-01

    Convective heat transfer using different nanofluid types is investigated. The domain is differentially heated and nanofluids are treated as heterogeneous mixtures with weak solutal diffusivity and possible Soret separation. Owing to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, the resulting solutal buoyancy forces could be significant and interact with the initial thermal convection. A modified formulation taking into account the thermal conductivity, viscosity versus nanofluids type and concentration and the spatial heterogeneous concentration induced by the Soret effect is presented. The obtained results, by solving numerically the full governing equations, are found to be in good agreement with the developed solution based on the scale analysis approach. The resulting convective flows are found to be dependent on the local particle concentration φ and the corresponding solutal to thermal buoyancy ratio N. The induced nanofluid heterogeneity showed a significant heat transfer modification. The heat transfer in natural convection increases with nanoparticle concentration but remains less than the enhancement previously underlined in forced convection case.

  20. Effects of rotation and mid-troposphere moisture on organized convection and convectively coupled gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Khouider, Boualem; Frenkel, Yevgeniy

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric convection has the striking capability to organize itself into a hierarchy of cloud clusters and super-clusters on scales ranging from the convective cell of a few kilometres to planetary scale disturbances such as the Madden-Julian oscillation. It is widely accepted that this phenomenon is due in large part to the two-way coupling between convective processes and equatorially trapped waves and planetary scale flows in general. However, the physical mechanisms responsible for this multiscale organization and the associated across-scale interactions are poorly understood. The two main peculiarities of the tropics are the vanishing of the Coriolis force at the equator and the abundance of mid-level moisture. Here we test the effect of these two physical properties on the organization of convection and its interaction with gravity waves in a simplified primitive equation model for flows parallel to the equator. Convection is represented by deterministic as well as stochastic multicloud models that are known to represent organized convection and convectively coupled waves quite well. It is found here that both planetary rotation and mid-troposphere moisture are important players in the diminishing of organized convection and convectively coupled gravity wave activity in the subtropics and mid-latitudes. The meridional mean circulation increases with latitude while the mean zonal circulation is much shallower and is dominated by mid-level jets, reminiscent of a second baroclinic mode circulation associated with a congestus mode instability in the model. This is consistent with the observed shallow Hadley and Walker circulations accompanied by congestus cloud decks in the higher latitude tropics and sub-tropics. Moreover, deep convection activity in the stochastic model simulations becomes very patchy and unorganized as the computational domain is pushed towards the subtropics and mid-latitudes. This is consistent with previous work based on cloud resolving

  1. Contribution of a mesoscale analysis to convection nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calas, C.; Ducrocq, V.; Sénési, S.

    We study the contribution of surface data to convection nowcasting outside mountainous areas and under weak synoptic forcing. The CANARI optimal interpolation mesoscale analysis scheme is used, which combines guess-fields from the fine-mesh (10 km) ALADIN model with hourly routine observations arising from a mesonet of automated ground stations. A tuning of this scheme is realized in order to fit convective systems scales (meso-β scale) as well as the mesonet scale. Then, these grid point analyses allow the computation of diagnostic fields such as Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and MOisture CONvergence (MOCON), which are relevant in convection nowcasting. These diagnostic fields are compared with radar reflectivities observed from 1 to 5 hours later, so as to estimate their skill in predicting convection triggering. First results on six case studies show that convection generally occurs over areas where high CAPE values and persisting convergence were analyzed 4 to 1 hour before.

  2. SUPERHEATING IN A BOILING WATER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1960-05-31

    A boiling-water reactor is described in which the steam developed in the reactor is superheated in the reactor. This is accomplished by providing means for separating the steam from the water and passing the steam over a surface of the fissionable material which is not in contact with the water. Specifically water is boiled on the outside of tubular fuel elements and the steam is superheated on the inside of the fuel elements.

  3. Heat transfer performance of engine coolants under sub-cooled boiling conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowmick, S.; Branchi, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Gollin, M.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to evaluate the heat transfer performance of two engine cooling fluid mixtures, propylene-glycol/water and ethylene-glycol/water. These tests were performed under conditions closely simulating normal engine operation. For both mixtures, results were obtained over a range of heat transfer regimes from single phase convection to saturated flow boiling. Tests showed that propylene-glycol/water and ethylene-glycol/water have very similar heat transfer performances. Performance is defined as the steady state wall temperature maintained for a given surface heat flux and test section inlet velocity. For the lowest velocity tested, the test section experienced saturated boiling over approximately one-half of its heated length. The experimental results were also compared to analytical predictions based upon the Chen correlation. At higher fluxes, the analytical methods under-predicted the test section wall temperature.

  4. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian

    2002-01-01

    The prestart thermal conditioning of the hardware in LOX (liquid oxygen) systems involve heat transfer between LOX and metal where boiling plays a large role. Information is easily found on nucleate boiling, maximum heat flux, minimum heat flux and film boiling for common fluids like water. After looking at these standard correlations it was felt more data was needed for the cool down side transition boiling for the LN2 and LOX. In particular interest is the film boiling values, the temperature at which transition begins and the slope as peak heat flux is approached. The ultimate goal is an array of boiling heat transfer coefficient as a function of surface temperature which can be used in the chilldown model of the feed system, engine and bleed system for X-34. The first experiment consisted of an actual MC-1 LOX Impeller which had been machined backwards, that was instrumented with 17 surface thermocouples and submerged in liquid nitrogen. The thermocouples were installed on metal thicknesses varying from the thin inducer to the thick hub.

  5. Stochastic Convection Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teixeira, Joao; Reynolds, Carolyn; Suselj, Kay; Matheou, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics, radiation, clouds, turbulence, convection, gravity waves, surface interaction, radiation interaction, cloud and aerosol microphysics, complexity (vegetation, biogeochemistry, radiation versus turbulence/convection stochastic approach, non-linearities, Monte Carlo, high resolutions, large-Eddy Simulations, cloud structure, plumes, saturation in tropics, forecasting, parameterizations, stochastic, radiation-clod interaction, hurricane forecasts

  6. Sunspots and the physics of magnetic flux tubes. VI - Convective propulsion. VII - Heat flow in a convective downdraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of negative aerodynamic drag in an ideal fluid subject to convective instability is considered. It is shown that a cylinder moving in such a fluid is propelled forward in its motion by the convective forces and that the characteristic acceleration time is comparable to the onset time of convective motions in the fluid. It is suggested that convective propulsion plays an important role in the dynamics of flux tubes extending through the surface of the sun. The suppression of the upward heat flow in a Boussinesq convective cell with free upper and lower boundaries by a downdraft is then analyzed. Application to the solar convection zone indicates that downdrafts of 1 to 2 km/s at depths of 1000 to 4000 km beneath the visible surface of the sun are sufficient to reduce the upward heat flux to a small fraction of the ambient value.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.

    2000-01-01

    The research carried out in the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University was motivated by previous studies indicating that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 when compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. Imposing an external electric field holds the promise to improve pool boiling heat transfer in low gravity, since a phase separation force other than gravity is introduced. The influence of electric fields on bubble formation has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically.

  8. Magnetic control of convection in nonconducting diamagnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Gray, Donald D.; Edwards, Boyd F.

    1998-10-01

    Inhomogeneous magnetic fields exert a body force on electrically nonconducting, diamagnetic fluids. This force can be used to compensate for gravity and to control convection. The field effect on convection is represented by a dimensionless vector parameter Rm=(μ0αχ0d3ΔT/ρ0νDT)(H.∇H)extr=0, which measures the relative strength of the induced magnetic buoyancy force due to the applied field gradient. The vertical component of this parameter competes with the gravitational buoyancy effect and a critical relationship between this component and the Rayleigh number is identified for the onset of convection. Magnetically driven convection should be observable even in pure water using current technology.

  9. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, David W.; Guzik, Monica C.

    2014-03-01

    A computational model of the cryogenic boil-off reduction system being developed by NASA as part of the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer technology maturation project has been applied to a range of propellant storage tanks sizes for high-performing in-space cryogenic propulsion applications. This effort focuses on the scaling of multi-layer insulation (MLI), cryocoolers, broad area cooling shields, radiators, solar arrays, and tanks for liquid hydrogen propellant storage tanks ranging from 2 to 10 m in diameter. Component scaling equations were incorporated into the Cryogenic Analysis Tool, a spreadsheet-based tool used to perform system-level parametric studies. The primary addition to the evolution of this updated tool is the integration of a scaling method for reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocoolers, as well as the development and inclusion of Self-Supporting Multi-Layer Insulation. Mass, power, and sizing relationships are traded parametrically to establish the appropriate loiter period beyond which this boil-off reduction system application reduces mass. The projected benefit compares passive thermal control to active thermal control, where active thermal control is evaluated for reduced boil-off with a 90 K shield, zero boil-off with a single heat interception stage at the tank wall, and zero boil-off with a second interception stage at a 90 K shield. Parametric studies show a benefit over passive storage at loiter durations under one month, in addition to showing a benefit for two-stage zero boil-off in terms of reducing power and mass as compared to single stage zero boil-off. Furthermore, active cooling reduces the effect of varied multi-layer insulation performance, which, historically, has been shown to be significant.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1996-01-01

    Boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer since high heat flux levels are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences. The high heat transfer coefficients associated with boiling have made the use of these processes increasingly attractive to aerospace engineering. Applications of this type include compact evaporators in the thermal control of aircraft avionics and spacecraft environments, heat pipes, and use of boiling to cool electronic equipment. In spite of its efficiency, cooling based on liquid-vapor phase change processes has not yet found wide application in aerospace engineering due to specific problems associated with the low gravity environment. After a heated surface has reached the superheat required for the initiation of nucleate boiling, bubbles will start forming at nucleation sites along the solid interface by evaporation of the liquid. Bubbles in contact with the wall will continue growing by this mechanism until they detach. In terrestrial conditions, bubble detachment is determined by the competition between body forces (e.g. buoyancy) and surface tension forces that act to anchor the bubble along the three phase contact line. For a given body force potential and a balance of tensions along the three phase contact line, bubbles must reach a critical size before the body force can cause them to detach from the wall. In a low gravity environment the critical bubble size for detachment is much larger than under terrestrial conditions, since buoyancy is a less effective means of bubble removal. Active techniques of heat transfer enhancement in single phase and phase change processes by utilizing electric fields have been the subject of intensive research during recent years. The field of electrohydrodynamics (EHD) deals with the interactions between electric fields, flow fields and temperature fields. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 as

  11. Experimental verification of heat transfer coefficient for nucleate boiling at sub-atmospheric pressure and small heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajaczkowski, Bartosz; Halon, Tomasz; Krolicki, Zbigniew

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we study the influence of sub-atmospheric pressure on nucleate boiling. Sixteen correlations for pool boiling available in literature are gathered and evaluated. Analysis is performed in the pressure range 1-10 kPa and for heat flux densities 10-45 kW/m2. Superheats are set between 6.2 and 28.7 K. The results of calculations were compared with experimental values for the same parameters. The experiments were conducted using isolated glass cylinder and water boiling above the copper plate. Results show that low pressure adjust the character of boiling curve—the curve flattened and the natural convection region of boiling is shifted towards higher wall temperature superheats due to the influence of low pressure on the bubble creation and process of its departure. In result, 8 of 16 analyzed correlations were determined as completely invalid in subatmospheric conditions and the remaining set of equations was compared to experimental results. Experimentally obtained values of heat transfer coefficients are between 1 and 2 kW/m2K. With mean absolute deviation (MAD) we have found that the most accurate approximation of heat transfer coefficient is obtained using Mostinski reduced pressure correlation (0.13-0.35 MAD) and Labuntsov correlation (0.12-0.89 MAD).

  12. Experimental investigation on thermo-magnetic convection inside cavities.

    PubMed

    Gontijo, R G; Cunha, F R

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents experimental results on thermo-magnetic convection inside cavities. We examine the flow induced by convective currents inside a cavity with aspect ratio near the unity and the heat transfer rates measurements inside a thin cavity with aspect ratio equal to twelve. The convective unstable currents are formed when a magnetic suspension is subjected to a temperature gradient combined with a gradient of an externally imposed magnetic field. Under these conditions, stratifications in the suspension density and susceptibility are both important effects to the convective motion. We show a comparison between flow patterns of magnetic and gravitational convections. The impact of the presence of a magnetic field on the amount of heat extracted from the system when magnetic and gravitational effects are combined inside the test cell is evaluated. The convection state is largely affected by new instability modes produced by stratification in susceptibility. The experiments reveal that magnetic field enhances the instability in the convective flow leading to a more effective mixing and consequently to a more statistically homogenous temperature distribution inside the test cell. The experimental results allow the validation of the scaling law proposed in a previous theoretical work that has predicted that the Nusselt number scales with the magnetic Rayleigh number to the power of 1/3, in the limit in which magnetic force balances viscous force in the convective flow. PMID:23447978

  13. Mechanisms initiating deep convection over complex terrain during COPS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kottmeier, C.; Kalthoff, N.; Barthlott, C.; Corsmeier, U.; Van Baelen, J.; Coulter, R.; Environmental Science Division; Inst. for Meteorology and Climate Research; Lab. de Meteorologie Physique; Inst. of Physics and Meteorology

    2008-12-01

    Precipitating convection in a mountain region of moderate topography is investigated, with particular emphasis on its initiation in response to boundary-layer and mid- and upper-tropospheric forcing mechanisms. The data used in the study are from COPS (Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study) that took place in southwestern Germany and eastern France in the summer of 2007. It is found that the initiation of precipitating convection can be roughly classified as being due to either: (i) surface heating and low-level flow convergence; (ii) surface heating and moisture supply overcoming convective inhibition during latent and/or potential instability; or (iii) mid-tropospheric dynamical processes due to mesoscale convergence lines and forced mean vertical motion. These phenomena have to be adequately represented in models in order to improve quantitative precipitation forecast. Selected COPS cases are analyzed and classified into these initiation categories. Although only a subset of COPS data (mainly radiosondes, surface weather stations, radar and satellite data) are used here, it is shown that convective systems are captured in considerable detail by sensor synergy. Convergence lines were observed by Doppler radar in the location where deep convection is triggered several hours later. The results suggest that in many situations, observations of the location and timing of convergence lines will facilitate the nowcasting of convection. Further on, forecasting of the initiation of convection is significantly complicated if advection of potentially convective air masses over changing terrain features plays a major role. The passage of a frontal structure over the Vosges - Rhine valley - Black Forest orography was accompanied by an intermediate suppression of convection over the wide Rhine valley. Further downstream, an intensification of convection was observed over the Black Forest due to differential surface heating, a convergence line, and the flow

  14. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  15. A heat engine based moist convection parametrization for Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuchowski, L. C.; Read, P. L.; Yamazaki, Y. H.; Renno, N. O.

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a parametrization of Jovian moist convection based on a heat engine model of moist convection. In comparison to other moist convection schemes, this framework allows the computation of the total available convective energy TCAPE and the corresponding mass flux M as dynamic variables from the mean atmospheric state. The effects of this parametrization have been investigated both analytically and numerically. In agreement with previous numerical experiments and observations, the inclusion of moist convection leads to heat and water vapor transport from the water condensation level into higher altitudes. The time development of the modeled convective events was found to be strongly influenced by a rapid reduction of kinetic energy and a subsequent lowering of the cumulus tower's top in response to convective heating. We have tested the sensitivity of the scheme to different variations in the fractional cloud coverage and under the inclusion of external radiative forcing towards a stable/unstable temperature profile. While the time development of convective events differs in response to these variations, the general moist convective heating and moistening of the upper troposphere was a robust feature observed in all experiments.

  16. Convective dynamics - Panel report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbone, Richard; Foote, G. Brant; Moncrieff, Mitch; Gal-Chen, Tzvi; Cotton, William; Heymsfield, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of highly organized forms of deep convection at midlatitudes are reviewed. Past emphasis in field work and cloud modeling has been directed toward severe weather as evidenced by research on tornadoes, hail, and strong surface winds. A number of specific issues concerning future thrusts, tactics, and techniques in convective dynamics are presented. These subjects include; convective modes and parameterization, global structure and scale interaction, convective energetics, transport studies, anvils and scale interaction, and scale selection. Also discussed are analysis workshops, four-dimensional data assimilation, matching models with observations, network Doppler analyses, mesoscale variability, and high-resolution/high-performance Doppler. It is also noted, that, classical surface measurements and soundings, flight-level research aircraft data, passive satellite data, and traditional photogrammetric studies are examples of datasets that require assimilation and integration.

  17. Convection in Oblate Late-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng

    2015-08-01

    In this talk, we present recent investigations of the convection, oblateness and differential rota-tion in rapidly rotating late-type stars with a novel and powerful Compressible High-ORder Un-structured Spectral-difference (CHORUS) code (J. Comput. Physics Vol. 290, 190-211, 2015). Recent observations have revealed the drastic effects of rapid rotation on stellar structure, including centrifugal deformation and gravity darkening. The centrifugal force counteracts gravity, causing the equatorial region to expand. Consequently, rapidly rotating stars are oblate and cannot be described by an one-dimensional spherically symmetric model. If convection establishes a substantial differential rotation, as in the envelopes of late-type stars, this can considerably increase the oblateness. We have successfully extended the CHORUS code to model rapidly rotating stars on fixed unstructured grids. In the CHORUS code, the hydrodynamic equations are discretized by a robust and efficient high-order Spectral Difference Method (SDM). The discretization stencil of the spectral difference method is compact and advantageous for parallel processing. CHORUS has been verified by comparing to spherical anelastic convection simulations on benchmark problems. This talk will be centred on the first global simulations by CHORUS for convection in oblate stars with different rotating rates. We quantify the influence of the oblateness on the mean flows and the thermal structure of the convection zone through these new simulations and implications of these results for stellar observations will be discussed.

  18. How does surface wettability influence nucleate boiling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Hai Trieu; Caney, Nadia; Marty, Philippe; Colasson, Stéphane; Gavillet, Jérôme

    2009-05-01

    Although the boiling process has been a major subject of research for several decades, its physics still remain unclear and require further investigation. This study aims at highlighting the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nanocoating techniques were used to vary the water contact angle from 20° to 110° by modifying nanoscale surface topography and chemistry. The experimental results obtained disagree with the predictions of the classical models. A new approach of nucleation mechanism is established to clarify the nexus between the surface wettability and the nucleate boiling heat transfer. In this approach, we introduce the concept of macro- and micro-contact angles to explain the observed phenomenon. To cite this article: H.T. Phan et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  19. Deep convection in mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the evolution of radar echoes and lightning attending the convective storms in mesoscale convective systems (MCS) and the relationships between the spatial and temporal evolution of deep convection and the storm environment, precipitation, severe weather, and lightning. The total number of ground discharges ranges from 10,000 to 30,000 over the life cycle of the MCS with peak sustained rates (for up to 10 consecutive hours) in excess of 2000 per hour. The peak lightning activity occurs from 5 to 20 hours after the first storms and anywhere from 7 hours prior to 7 hours after the time of the maximum areal extent of the MCS for very similar synoptic environments. Thus, it appears that mesoscale and sub-synoptic scale mechanisms are responsible for these large temporal variation in lightning activity. In addition, we have found that the lightning rates in MCS's are not related to either the size or the duration of the MCS. Preliminary results suggest that the MCA's with embedded squall lines produce the greatest flash rates.

  20. Global tectonics from mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltice, N.

    2015-12-01

    The motions of the surface of the Earth are described using the theory of Plate Tectonics. Despite the fact that this theory has shaped modern geosciences it has some limitations, and among them the impossibility to evaluate the forces at the origin of the surface displacements and deformations. Hence important questions remain difficult to solve like the origin of the sizes of plates, forces driving mountain building or supercontinent dispersal... Tremendous progresses have been made in the past 15 years in mantle convection modelling. Especially, modern convection codes can solve for motion equations with complex material properties. Since the early 2000's, the development of pseudo-plastic rheologies contributed to produce convection models with plate-like behaviour: plates naturally emerge and interact with the flow in a self-organized manner. Using such models in 3D spherical geometry (computed with StagYY - Tackley, 2008), I will show that important questions on the global tectonics of the planet can be addressed now: the distribution of seafloor ages, the distribution of plate area, the lifetime of small and large plates or modes of plate reorganizations. Tackley, P.J., Modellng compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three-dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter, 171, 7-18 (2008).

  1. BOILING SLURRY REACTOR AND METHOD FO CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Petrick, M.; Marchaterre, J.F.

    1963-05-01

    The control of a boiling slurry nuclear reactor is described. The reactor consists of a vertical tube having an enlarged portion, a steam drum at the top of the vertical tube, and at least one downcomer connecting the steam drum and the bottom of the vertical tube, the reactor being filled with a slurry of fissionabie material in water of such concentration that the enlarged portion of the vertical tube contains a critical mass. The slurry boils in the vertical tube and circulates upwardly therein and downwardly in the downcomer. To control the reactor by controlling the circulation of the slurry, a gas is introduced into the downcomer. (AEC)

  2. CONTINUOUS ANALYZER UTILIZING BOILING POINT DETERMINATION

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, W.S.

    1963-03-19

    A device is designed for continuously determining the boiling point of a mixture of liquids. The device comprises a distillation chamber for boiling a liquid; outlet conduit means for maintaining the liquid contents of said chamber at a constant level; a reflux condenser mounted above said distillation chamber; means for continuously introducing an incoming liquid sample into said reflux condenser and into intimate contact with vapors refluxing within said condenser; and means for measuring the temperature of the liquid flowing through said distillation chamber. (AEC)

  3. The boiling point of stratospheric aerosols.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A photoelectric particle counter was used for the measurement of aerosol boiling points. The operational principle involves raising the temperature of the aerosol by vigorously heating a portion of the intake tube. At or above the boiling point, the particles disintegrate rather quickly, and a noticeable effect on the size distribution and concentration is observed. Stratospheric aerosols appear to have the same volatility as a solution of 75% sulfuric acid. Chemical analysis of the aerosols indicates that there are other substances present, but that the sulfate radical is apparently the major constituent.

  4. Effect of superheat and electric field on saturated film boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Vinod; Biswas, Gautam; Dalal, Amaresh

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this investigation is to study the influence of superheat temperature and applied uniform electric field across the liquid-vapor interface during film boiling using a coupled level set and volume of fluid algorithm. The hydrodynamics of bubble growth, detachment, and its morphological variation with electrohydrodynamic forces are studied considering the medium to be incompressible, viscous, and perfectly dielectric at near critical pressure. The transition in interfacial instability behavior occurs with increase in superheat, the bubble release being periodic both in space and time. Discrete bubble growth occurs at a smaller superheat whereas vapor columns form at the higher superheat values. Destabilization of interfacial motion due to applied electric field results in decrease in bubble separation distance and increase in bubble release rate culminating in enhanced heat transfer rate. A comparison of maximum bubble height owing to application of different intensities of electric field is performed at a smaller superheat. The change in dynamics of bubble growth due to increasing superheat at a high intensity of electric field is studied. The effect of increasing intensity of electric field on the heat transfer rate at different superheats is determined. The boiling characteristic is found to be influenced significantly only above a minimum critical intensity of the electric field.

  5. Convective scale interaction: Arc cloud lines and the development and evolution of deep convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James Francis Whitehurst

    1986-01-01

    Information is used from satellite data and research aircraft data to provide new insights concerning the mesoscale development and evolution of deep convection in an atmosphere typified by weak synoptic-scale forcing. The importance of convective scale interaction in the development and evolution of deep convection is examined. This interaction is shown to manifest itself as the merger and intersection of thunderstorm outflow boundaries (arc cloud lines) with other convective lines, areas or boundaries. Using geostationary satellite visible and infrared data convective scale interaction is shown to be responsible for over 85 percent of the intense convection over the southeast U.S. by late afternoon, and a majority of that area's afternoon rainfall. The aircraft observations provided valuable information concerning critically important regions of the arc cloud line: (1) the cool outflow region, (2) the density surge line interface region; and (3) the sub-cloud region above the surge line. The observations when analyzed with rapid scan satellite data, helped in defining the arc cloud line's life cycle as 3 evolving stages.

  6. The nature of the sunspot phenomenon. II - Internal overstable modes. [convectively driven Alfven wave role

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    It had been pointed out by Parker (1974) that the basic cause of the sunspot phenomenon is the enhanced heat transport in the magnetic field of the sunspot. The enhanced transport occurs through convective overstability which operates as a heat engine generating Alfven waves. The characteristics of the convective forces present are investigated along with questions concerning overstability and convectively driven Alfven waves. Relations regarding instability and convectively driven surface waves are discussed and attention is given to individual overstable Alfven modes. It is found that the form of an Alfven wave in the absence of convective forces is entirely arbitrary, so that waves with any arbitrary profile can be fitted into a vertical column of the field without disturbing the fluid outside. With the introduction of convective forces the situation changes so that the presence of lateral boundaries alters the form of the basic wave modes.

  7. Environmental qualification testing of the prototype pool boiling experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, J. Andrew

    1992-01-01

    The prototype Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) flew on the STS-47 mission in September 1992. This report describes the purpose of the experiment and the environmental qualification testing program that was used to prove the integrity of the prototype hardware. Component and box level vibration and thermal cycling tests were performed to give an early level of confidence in the hardware designs. At the system level, vibration, thermal extreme soaks, and thermal vacuum cycling tests were performed to qualify the complete design for the expected shuttle environment. The system level vibration testing included three axis sine sweeps and random inputs. The system level hot and cold soak tests demonstrated the hardware's capability to operate over a wide range of temperatures and gave the project team a wider latitude in determining which shuttle thermal altitudes were compatible with the experiment. The system level thermal vacuum cycling tests demonstrated the hardware's capability to operate in a convection free environment. A unique environmental chamber was designed and fabricated by the PBE team and allowed most of the environmental testing to be performed within the project's laboratory. The completion of the test program gave the project team high confidence in the hardware's ability to function as designed during flight.

  8. An Investigation of Graduate Scientists' Understandings of Evaporation and Boiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan; Orlik, Yuri

    2000-01-01

    Uses a video presentation of six situations relating to the evaporation and boiling of liquids and the escape of dissolved gases from solution and investigates graduate scientists' understanding of the concepts of boiling and evaporation. (Author/YDS)

  9. Driving factors of electro-convective instability in concentration polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Rjal, Ramadan; Rubinstein, Isaak; Zaltzman, Boris

    2016-06-01

    Until recently, based on the analysis pertaining to a perfectly charge selective interface, electro-convective instability in concentration polarization was attributed to the nonequilibrium mechanism related to the extended space charge which forms next to that of the electric double layer near the limiting current. More recently it was shown that imperfect charge selectivity of the interface makes equilibrium instability possible, driven by either equilibrium electro-osmosis or bulk electro-convection, or both. In this paper we identify and analyze the major surface and bulk factors affecting the electro-convective instability. These factors, some known previously under the names of diffusio-osmosis, electro-osmosis, or bulk electro-convection, and some newly identified in this paper are manifestations of the electric force and pressure gradient, balanced by the viscous force acting in various locations in solution. The contribution of these factors to hydrodynamic stability in concentration polarization is analyzed for a varying charge selectivity of the interface.

  10. Convection in Multiphase Fluid Flows Using Lattice Boltzmann Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biferale, L.; Perlekar, P.; Sbragaglia, M.; Toschi, F.

    2012-03-01

    We present high-resolution numerical simulations of convection in multiphase flows (boiling) using a novel algorithm based on a lattice Boltzmann method. We first study the thermodynamical and kinematic properties of the algorithm. Then, we perform a series of 3D numerical simulations changing the mean properties in the phase diagram and compare convection with and without phase coexistence at Rayleigh number Ra˜107. We show that in the presence of nucleating bubbles non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq effects develop, the mean temperature profile becomes asymmetric, and heat-transfer and heat-transfer fluctuations are enhanced, at all Ra studied. We also show that small-scale properties of velocity and temperature fields are strongly affected by the presence of the buoyant bubble leading to high non-Gaussian profiles in the bulk.

  11. Enhanced Boiling on Micro-Configured Composite Surfaces Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chai, An-Ti

    1999-01-01

    In order to accommodate the growing thermal management needs of future space platforms, several two-phase active thermal control systems (ATCSs) have evolved and were included in the designs of space stations. Compared to the pumped single-phase liquid loops used in the conventional Space Transportation System and Spacelab, ATCSs offer significant benefits that may be realized by adopting a two-phase fluid-loop system. Alternately, dynamic power systems (DPSs), based on the Rankine cycle, seem inevitably to be required to supply the electrical power requirements of expanding space activities. Boiling heat transfer is one of the key technologies for both ATCSs and DPSs. Nucleate boiling near critical heat flux (CHF) can transport very large thermal loads with much smaller device size and much lower pumping power. However, boiling performance deteriorates in a reduced gravity environment and operation in the CHF regime is precarious because any slight overload will cause the heat transfer to suddenly move to the film boiling regime, which in turn, will result in burnout of the heat transfer surfaces. New materials, such as micro-configured metal-graphite composites, can provide a solution for boiling enhancement. It has been shown experimentally that this type of material manifests outstanding boiling heat transfer performance and their CHF is also extended to higher values. Due to the high thermal conductivity of graphite fiber (up to 1,200 W/m-K in the fiber direction), the composite surfaces are non-isothermal during the boiling process. The composite surfaces are believed to have a much wider safe operating region (a more uniform boiling curve in the CHF regime) because non-isothermal surfaces have been found to be less sensitive to variations of wall superheat in the CHF regime. The thermocapillary forces formed by the temperature difference between the fiber tips and the metal matrix play a more important role than the buoyancy in the bubble detachment, for the

  12. Electrohydrodynamic Pool Boiling in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.; Stahl, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research is concerned with studying the effects of applied electric fields on pool boiling in a reduced-gravity environment. Experiments are conducted at the NASA Lewis 2.2 sec Drop tower using a drop rig constructed at UC Davis. In the experiments, a platinum wire is heated while immersed in saturated liquid refrigerants (FC-72 and FC-87), or water, causing vapor formation at the wire surface. Electric fields are applied between the wire surface and an outer screen electrode that surrounds the wire. Preliminary normal-gravity experiments with water have demonstrated that applied electric fields generated by the rig electronics can influence boiling characteristics. Reduced-gravity experiments will be performed in the summer of 1996. The experiments will provide fundamental data on electric field strengths required to disrupt film boiling (for various wire heat generation input rates) in reduced gravity for a cylindrical geometry. The experiments should also shed light on the roles of characteristic bubble generation times and charge relaxation times in determining the effects of electric fields on pool boiling. Normal-gravity comparison experiments will also be performed.

  13. The Plausibility of Boiling Geysers on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Brown, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    A mechanism is suggested and modeled whereby there may be boiling geysers on Triton. The geysers would be of nitrogen considering that Voyager detected cryovolcanic activity, that solid nitrogen conducts heat much less than water ice, and that there is internal heat on Triton.

  14. Big Bubbles in Boiling Liquids: Students' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costu, Bayram

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elicit students' conceptions about big bubbles in boiling liquids (water, ethanol and aqueous CuSO[subscript 4] solution). The study is based on twenty-four students at different ages and grades. The clinical interviews technique was conducted to solicit students' conceptions and the interviews were analyzed to…

  15. Classic and Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, John M.

    Through an analysis of several stories, this paper defines the similarities and differences between classic and hard-boiled detective fiction. The characters and plots of three stories are discussed: "The Red House" by A. A. Milne; "I, The Jury" by Mickey Spillane; and "League of Frightened Men" by Rex Stout. The classic detective story is defined…

  16. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    The Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System was tested with LH2 and LOX in a vacuum chamber to simulate space vacuum and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. Testing was successful and results validated the scaling study model that predicts active cooling reduces upper stage cryogenic propulsion mass for loiter periods greater than 2 weeks.

  17. Convective Regimes in Crystallizing Basaltic Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Holness, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Cooling through the chamber walls drives crystallisation in crustal magma chambers, resulting in a cumulate pile on the floor and mushy regions at the walls and roof. The liquid in many magma chambers, either the bulk magma or the interstitial liquid in the mushy regions, may convect, driven either thermally, due to cooling, or compositionally, due to fractional crystallization. We have constructed a regime diagram of the possible convective modes in a system containing a basal mushy layer. These modes depend on the large-scale buoyancy forcing characterised by a global Rayleigh number and the proportion of the chamber height constituting the basal mushy region. We have tested this regime diagram using an analogue experimental system composed of a fluid layer overlying a pile of almost neutrally buoyant inert particles. Convection in this system is driven thermally, simulating magma convection above and within a porous cumulate pile. We observe a range of possible convective regimes, enabling us to produce a regime diagram. In addition to modes characterised by convection of the bulk and interstitial fluid, we also observe a series of regimes where the crystal pile is mobilised by fluid motions. These regimes feature saltation and scouring of the crystal pile by convection in the bulk fluid at moderate Rayleigh numbers, and large crystal-rich fountains at high Rayleigh numbers. For even larger Rayleigh numbers the entire crystal pile is mobilised in what we call the snowglobe regime. The observed mobilisation regimes may be applicable to basaltic magma chambers. Plagioclase in basal cumulates crystallised from a dense magma may be a result of crystal mobilisation from a plagioclase-rich roof mush. Compositional convection within such a mush could result in disaggregation, enabling the buoyant plagioclase to be entrained in relatively dense descending liquid plumes and brought to the floor. The phenocryst load in porphyritic lavas is often interpreted as a

  18. Supergranulation, a convective phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-08-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection ,Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J., Srikanth, R., 2004, MNRAS, 347, 1279-12814) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J

  19. A new regime of nucleate boiling in microsphere mesostructures: Jumping pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. S.; Makarov, P. G.; El Bouz, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied a new regime of nucleate boiling in distilled water on substrates representing mesostructures of monodisperse and/or polydisperse microspheres made of various materials. It is experimentally established that, under some conditions of nucleate boiling, there appear "jumping pool boiling" regimes in which bubbles do not reach the surface of underheated liquid. In addition, bubbles may capture a certain number of microspheres, lift them up to some height, and then sink together down to the vessel bottom. Alternatively, microspheres may trap a certain number of bubbles, float up toward the evaporating surface, and then (without reaching the surface) sink back to the bottom layer where the nucleate bubbling takes place. Subregimes of this boiling mechanism involving microspheres of various densities and dimensions have also been observed.

  20. Thermodynamics of convective circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D. K.; Renno, N. O.

    2003-04-01

    The heat engine framework has proven successful for studies of atmospheric phenomena ranging from small to large scales. At large scales, the heat engine framework provides estimates of convective available potential energy, convective velocities, and fractional area covered by convection. At the smaller end of the spectrum, the framework provides estimates of the intensity of convective vortices such as dust devils and waterspouts. The heat engine framework sheds light on the basic physics of planetary atmospheres. In particular, it allows the calculation of their thermodynamic efficiency. Indeed, this is a fundamental number for atmospheric circulations because it quantifies the amount of heat that is converted into kinetic energy. As such, it is a valuable number not only for comparison of models with nature, but also for the intercomparison of models. In the present study, we generalize the heat engine framework to large-scale circulations, both open (e.g., the Hadley circulation) and closed (e.g., the general circulation) and apply it to an idealized global climate model to ascertain the thermodynamic efficiency of model circulations, both global and regional. Our results show that the thermodynamic efficiency is sensitive to model resolution and provides a baseline for minimum model resolution in climate studies. The value of the thermodynamic efficiency of convective circulations in nature is controversial. It has been suggested that both nature and numerical models are extremely irreversible. We show that both the global and the Hadley circulation of the idealized model are, to a first approximation, reversible.

  1. Budget study of a mesoscale convective system - Model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Mccumber, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A tropical squall-type cloud cluster is examined as an example of a mesoscale convective complex. The precipitation growth processes and air circulations that develop in the convective and stratiform regions are studied using a data set generated from a time-dependent numerical cloud model. The relationship of the stratiform region of the mesoscale convective complex is discussed. The vertical profiles of heating and drying are calculated. Comparisons are made between simulations with and without ice-phase microphysical processes and a simulation with forcing by weaker lifting at middle and upper levels.

  2. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration due to the high specific impulse that can be achieved using engines suitable for moving 10's to 100's of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several days. The losses can be greatly reduced by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and by the integration of self-supporting multi-layer insulation. The active thermal control technology under development is the integration of the reverse turbo- Brayton cycle cryocooler to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling network of tubes coupled to a shield in the tank insulation and to the tank wall itself. Also, the self-supporting insulation technology was utilized under the shield to obtain needed tank applied LH2 performance. These elements were recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a series of three tests, two that reduced LH2 boil-off and one to eliminate LO2 boil-off. This test series was conducted in a vacuum chamber that replicated the vacuum of space and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. The test results show that LH2 boil-off was reduced 60% by the cryocooler system operating at 90K and that robust LO2 zero boil-off storage, including full tank pressure control was achieved.

  3. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, C.; Bretherton, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES) as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-Column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM). Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle. Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  4. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, C.; Bretherton, C. S.

    2011-10-01

    Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES) as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM). Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle. Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  5. The influence of convection parameterisations under alternate climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybka, Harald; Tost, Holger

    2013-04-01

    the cloud radiative forcing a huge spread of the cloud-induced radiative flux change is found in the warm pool region due to a change of the convection parameterisation.

  6. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer and Control of Bubble Motion in Microgravity Using Electric Fields (BCOEL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila; Iacona, Estelle; Acquaviva, Tom; Coho, Bill; Grant, Nechelle; Nahra, Henry; Taylor, Al; Julian, Ed; Robinson, Dale; VanZandt, Dave

    2001-01-01

    The BCOEL project focuses on improving pool boiling heat transfer and bubble control in microgravity by exposing the fluid to electric fields. The electric fields induce a body force that can replace gravity in the low gravity environment, and enhance bubble removal from the heated surface. A better understanding of microgravity effects on boiling with and without electric fields is critical to the proper design of the phase-change-heat-removal equipment for use in spacebased applications. The microgravity experiments will focus on the visualization of bubble formation and shape during boiling. Heat fluxes on the boiling surface will be measured, and, together with the measured driving temperature differences, used to plot boiling curves for different electric field magnitudes. Bubble formation and boiling processes were found to be extremely sensitive to g-jitter. The duration of the experimental run is critical in order to achieve steady state in microgravity experiments. The International Space Station provides conditions suitable for such experiments. The experimental apparatus to be used in the study is described in the paper. The apparatus will be tested in the KC-135 first, and microgravity experiments will be conducted on board of the International Space Station using the Microgravity Science Glovebox as the experimental platform.

  7. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer and Control of Bubble Motion in Microgravity Using Electric Fields - BCOEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila; Iacona, Estelle; Acquaviva, Tom; Coho, Bill; Grant, Nechelle; Nahra, Henry; Sankaran, Subramanian; Taylor, Al; Julian, Ed; Robinson, Dale; VanZandt, Dave

    2001-01-01

    The BCOEL project focuses on improving pool boiling heat transfer and bubble control in microgravity by exposing the fluid to electric fields. The electric fields induce a body force that can replace gravity in the low gravity environment, and enhance bubble removal from thc heated surface. A better understanding of microgravity effects on boiling with and without electric fields is critical to the proper design of the phase-change-heat-removal equipment for use in space-based applications. The microgravity experiments will focus on the visualization of bubble formation and shape during boiling. Heat fluxes on the boiling surface will be measured, and, together with the measured driving temperature differences, used to plot boiling curvcs for different electric field magnitudes. Bubble formation and boiling processes were found to be extremely sensitive to g-jitter. The duration of the experimental run is critical in order to achieve steady state in microgravity experiments. The International Space Station provides conditions suitable for such experiments. The experimental appararus to be used in the study is described in the paper. The apparatus will be tested in the KC-135 first, and microgravity experiments will be conducted on board of the International Space Station using the Microgravity Science Glovebox as the experimental platform.

  8. High-intensity focused ultrasound monitoring using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) under boiling or slow denaturation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Apostolakis, Iason-Zacharias; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-07-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method that utilizes an amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam to induce an oscillatory radiation force at the HIFU focus and estimates the focal tissue displacement to monitor the HIFU thermal treatment. In this study, the performance of HMIFU under acoustic, thermal, and mechanical effects was investigated. The performance of HMIFU was assessed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 13) under slow denaturation or boiling regimes. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to assess the acoustic cavitation activity, and a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. During lesioning with slow denaturation, high quality displacements (correlation coefficient above 0.97) were observed under minimum cavitation noise, indicating the tissue initial-softening-then- stiffening property change. During HIFU with boiling, HMIFU monitored a consistent change in lesion-to-background displacement contrast (0.46 ± 0.37) despite the presence of strong cavitation noise due to boiling during lesion formation. Therefore, HMIFU effectively monitored softening-then-stiffening during lesioning under slow denaturation, and detected lesioning under boiling with a distinct change in displacement contrast under boiling in the presence of cavitation. In conclusion, HMIFU was shown under both boiling and slow denaturation regimes to be effective in HIFU monitoring and lesioning identification without being significantly affected by cavitation noise. PMID:26168177

  9. Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D; Parsons, D; Geerts, B

    2015-03-01

    The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment is a large field campaign that is being supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with contributions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Atmospheric and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The overarching goal of the PECAN experiment is to improve the understanding and simulation of the processes that initiate and maintain convection and convective precipitation at night over the central portion of the Great Plains region of the United States (Parsons et al. 2013). These goals are important because (1) a large fraction of the yearly precipitation in the Great Plains comes from nocturnal convection, (2) nocturnal convection in the Great Plains is most often decoupled from the ground and, thus, is forced by other phenomena aloft (e.g., propagating bores, frontal boundaries, low-level jets [LLJ], etc.), (3) there is a relative lack of understanding how these disturbances initiate and maintain nocturnal convection, and (4) this lack of understanding greatly hampers the ability of numerical weather and climate models to simulate nocturnal convection well. This leads to significant uncertainties in predicting the onset, location, frequency, and intensity of convective cloud systems and associated weather hazards over the Great Plains.

  10. Dielectrophoretic Rayleigh-Bénard convection under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, H. N.; Tadie Fogaing, M.; Crumeyrolle, O.; Mutabazi, I.

    2013-04-01

    Thermal convection in a dielectric fluid layer between two parallel plates subjected to an alternating electric field and a temperature gradient is investigated under microgravity conditions. A thermoelectric coupling resulting from the thermal variation of the electric permittivity of the fluid produces the dielectrophoretic (DEP) body force, which can be regarded as thermal buoyancy due to an effective gravity. This electric gravity can destabilize a stationary conductive state of the fluid to develop convection. The similarity of the DEP thermal convection with the Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection is examined by considering its behavior in detail by a linear stability theory and a two-dimensional direct numerical simulation. The results are analyzed from an energetic viewpoint and in the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation. The stabilizing effects of a thermoelectric feedback make the critical parameters different from those in the RB instability. The nonuniformity of the electric gravity arising from the finite variation of permittivity also affects the critical parameters. The characteristic constants of the GL equation are comparable with those for the RB convection. The heat transfer in the DEP convection is weaker than in the RB convection as a consequence of the feedback that impedes the convection.

  11. Dielectrophoretic Rayleigh-Bénard convection under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, H N; Tadie Fogaing, M; Crumeyrolle, O; Mutabazi, I

    2013-04-01

    Thermal convection in a dielectric fluid layer between two parallel plates subjected to an alternating electric field and a temperature gradient is investigated under microgravity conditions. A thermoelectric coupling resulting from the thermal variation of the electric permittivity of the fluid produces the dielectrophoretic (DEP) body force, which can be regarded as thermal buoyancy due to an effective gravity. This electric gravity can destabilize a stationary conductive state of the fluid to develop convection. The similarity of the DEP thermal convection with the Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection is examined by considering its behavior in detail by a linear stability theory and a two-dimensional direct numerical simulation. The results are analyzed from an energetic viewpoint and in the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation. The stabilizing effects of a thermoelectric feedback make the critical parameters different from those in the RB instability. The nonuniformity of the electric gravity arising from the finite variation of permittivity also affects the critical parameters. The characteristic constants of the GL equation are comparable with those for the RB convection. The heat transfer in the DEP convection is weaker than in the RB convection as a consequence of the feedback that impedes the convection. PMID:23679509

  12. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  13. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  14. Physics of Stellar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnett, W. David

    2009-05-01

    We review recent progress using numerical simulations as a testbed for development of a theory of stellar convection, much as envisaged by John von Newmann. Necessary features of the theory, non-locality and fluctuations, are illustrated by computer movies. It is found that the common approximation of convection as a diffusive process presents the wrong physical picture, and improvements are suggested. New observational results discussed at the conference are gratifying in their validation of some of our theoretical ideas, especially the idea that SNIb and SNIc events are related to the explosion of massive star cores which have been stripped by mass loss and binary interactions [1

  15. Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Cycle Optimization for Prevention of Channel-Blade Interference

    SciTech Connect

    Kropaczek, David J.; Karve, Atul A.; Oyarzun, Christian C.; Asgari, Mehdi

    2006-07-01

    A formal optimization method for eliminating the potential of Boiling Water Reactor channel-blade interference is presented within the context of fuel cycle design. The method is based on the use of threshold constraints on blade force as penalty terms within an objective function that are employed as part of a search algorithm. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the constraint formulation in eliminating channel-blade interference as part of the design of the core loading and operational strategy. (authors)

  16. Marangoni effect induced convection in material processing under microgravity (M-18)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enya, S.

    1993-01-01

    On the ground the upper layer of the liquid in a vessel heated from below becomes hotter than the lower layer. This well-known phenomenon results from buoyancy-induced convection. Though this means that the buoyancy-induced convection is not dominant under microgravity conditions in space, another convection called Marangoni convection may possibly occur. This convection results from an intermolecular force which acts on a free surface, that is surface tension. Since it is stronger at lower temperatures, the liquid surface near the heated wall is pulled to the cooled side as shown. This surface movement causes the inner convection. Marangoni convection, however, may be negligible on the Earth, for the molecular force is generally smaller than buoyancy. Various tests on material processing were recently conducted in space and some high quality crystals free from buoyancy convection were obtained. But, at the same time, others proved to be less uniform than expected in the components' distribution. This nonuniformity seems to be mainly caused by Marangoni convection. It is, therefore, very important to know how to control the convection by studying its characteristics, but the problem is that on the ground it is impossible to carry out the experiment without gravity. That is what a space experiment aboard the space shuttle is planned as the First Material Processing Tests (FMPT) of Japan. The experiment on Marangoni flow visualization is being performed in order to investigate the characteristics of convection in uni-dimensional melt growth under microgravity conditions.

  17. Seafloor dynamics in mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltice, N.; Rolf, T.; Tackley, P. J.; Labrosse, S.

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of seafloor ages determines fundamental characteristics of our planet: sea-level, ocean chemistry,tectonic forces and heat loss. The present-day distribution suggests that subduction affects lithosphere of all ageswith the same probability (B. Parsons, J. Geophys. Res 87, 289-302, 1982). This is at odds with the theory of thermal convection which predicts that subduction should happen once a critical age has been reached. So far, the area-age distribution remains a primary constraint, which convection models have failed to satisfy (S. Labrosse and C. Jaupart, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 260, 465-481, 2007). We will show that combined action of plate-like behavior and continents causes the seafloor area-age distribution in spherical models of mantle convection to be Earth-like (Coltice et al., Science 336, 335-338, 2012). Our simulations suggest that the seafloor age distribution on Earth evolves over a time-scale of several 100Myrs. Depending on the parameters of the convective flow, strong variations of the production rate of new ocean floor and of the length of ridges are obtained.

  18. Meniscus height controlled convective self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Satyan; Crosby, Alfred

    Convective self-assembly techniques based on the 'coffee-ring effect' allow for the fabrication of materials with structural hierarchy and multi-functionality across a wide range of length scales. The coffee-ring effect describes deposition of non-volatiles at the edge of droplet due to capillary flow and pattern formations due to pinning and de-pinning of meniscus with the solvent evaporation. We demonstrate a novel convective self-assembly method which uses a piezo-actuated bending motion for driving the de-pinning step. In this method, a dilute solution of nanoparticles or polymers is trapped by capillary forces between a blade and substrate. As the blade oscillates with a fixed frequency and amplitude and the substrate translates at a fixed velocity, the height of the capillary meniscus oscillates. The meniscus height controls the contact angle of three phase contact line and at a critical angle de-pinning occurs. The combination of convective flux and continuously changing contact angle drives the assembly of the solute and subsequent de-pinning step, providing a direct means for producing linear assemblies. We demonstrate a new method for convective self-assembly at an accelerated rate when compared to other techniques, with control over deposit dimensions. Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0185).

  19. Computation of three-dimensional mixed convective boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadepalli, Prashandt; Rahman, Muhammad M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the numerical solution of heat and mass transfer during cross-flow (orthogonal) mixed convection. In this class of flow, a buoyancy-driven transport in the vertical direction and a forced convective flow in the horizontal direction results in a three-dimensional boundary layer structure adjacent to the plate. The rates of heat and mass transfer are determined by a combined influence of the two transport processes. The equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentration were solved along with appropriate boundary conditions to determine the distributions of velocity components, temperature, and concentration across the thickness of the boundary layer at different locations on the plate. Results were expressed in dimensionless form using Reynolds number, Richardson number for heat transfer, Richardson number for mass transfer, Prandtl number, and Schmidt number as parameters. It was found that the transport is dominated by buoyancy at smaller vertical locations and at larger distances away from the forced convection leading edge. Effects of forced convection appeared to be very strong at smaller horizontal distances from the leading edge. The cross stream forced convection enhanced the rate of heat and mass transfer by a very significant amount.

  20. Convection Compensated Electrophoretic NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiuhong; Wei, Zhaohui

    2001-06-01

    A novel method of convection compensated ENMR (CC-ENMR) has been developed to detect electrophoretic motion of ionic species in the presence of bulk solution convection. This was accomplished using a gradient moment nulling technique to remove spectral artifacts from heat-induced convection and using the polarity switch of the applied electric field to retain spin phase modulations due to electrophoretic flow. Experiments were carried out with a mixture of 100 mM L-aspartic acid and 100 mM 4,9-dioxa-1,12-dodecanediamine to demonstrate this new method of ENMR. CC-ENMR enhances our previously developed capillary array ENMR (CA-ENMR) in solving the convection problem. The combined CA- and CC-ENMR approach strengthens the potential of multidimensional ENMR in simultaneous structural determination of coexisting proteins and protein conformations in biological buffer solutions of high ionic strength. Structural mapping of interacting proteins during biochemical reactions becomes possible in the future using ENMR techniques, which may have a profound impact on the understanding of biological events, including protein folding, genetic control, and signal transduction in general.

  1. Natural convection in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V.; Hussain, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on free convection in porous materials. Topics considered at the conference included heat transfer, nonlinear temperature profiles and magnetic fields, boundary conditions, concentrated heat sources in stratified porous media, free convective flow in a cavity, heat flux, laminar mixed convection flow, and the onset of convection in a porous medium with internal heat generation and downward flow.

  2. Combined buoyancy-thermocapillary convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homsy, G. M.

    1990-01-01

    Combined buoyancy-thermocapillary convection was studied in 2D and 3D. Fluid motion caused by thermally induced tension gradients on the free surface of a fluid is termed thermocapillary convection. It is well-known that in containerless processing of materials in space, thermocapillary convection is a dominant mechanism of fluid flow. Welding and crystal growth processes are terrestrial applications where thermocapillary convection has direct relevance.

  3. Acoustic field interaction with a boiling system under terrestrial gravity and microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sitter, J S; Snyder, T J; Chung, J N; Marston, P L

    1998-11-01

    Pool boiling experiments from a platinum wire heater in FC-72 liquid were conducted under terrestrial and microgravity conditions, both with and without the presence of a high-intensity acoustic standing wave within the fluid. The purpose of this research was to study the interaction between an acoustic field and a pool boiling system in normal gravity and microgravity. The absence of buoyancy in microgravity complicates the process of boiling. The acoustic force on a vapor bubble generated from a heated wire in a standing wave was shown to be able to play the role of buoyancy in microgravity. The microgravity environment was achieved with 0.6 and 2.1-s drop towers. The sound was transmitted through the fluid medium by means of a half wavelength sonic transducer driven at 10.18 kHz. At high enough acoustic pressure amplitudes cavitation and streaming began playing an important role in vapor bubble dynamics and heat transfer. Several different fixed heat fluxes were chosen for the microgravity experiment and the effects of acoustics on the surface temperature of the heater were recorded and the vapor bubble movement was filmed. Video images of the pool boiling processes and heat transfer data are presented. PMID:9821335

  4. A simple hydrodynamic model for transition boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Sang W.; Davis, Stephen H.; Bankoff, S. George

    2000-01-01

    A vertical column of an inviscid fluid, heated uniformly from below through a horizontal rigid bottom, is studied, with focus on the dynamics of the vapour/liquid interface near the three-phase (contact) line. The interfacial motion is induced by the competing effects of liquid feeding from above and evaporative mass loss through the interface. A linearized solution is obtained that describes the location of the contact line. The solution is used to study the transition processes to and from film boiling, where part of the liquid, lying on top of a vapour layer, can spontaneously be drawn downward and touch the heated bottom. Recession or advancement of the contact line then determines whether the film boiling is sustained or broken. It is seen that the correct contact-line dynamics cannot be predicted solely from a global mass balance in the liquid column.

  5. Enhanced Droplet Control by Transition Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grounds, Alex; Still, Richard; Takashina, Kei

    2012-10-01

    A droplet of water on a heated surface can levitate over a film of gas produced by its own evaporation in the Leidenfrost effect. When the surface is prepared with ratchet-like saw-teeth topography, these droplets can self-propel and can even climb uphill. However, the extent to which the droplets can be controlled is limited by the physics of the Leidenfrost effect. Here, we show that transition boiling can be induced even at very high surface temperatures and provide additional control over the droplets. Ratchets with acute protrusions enable droplets to climb steeper inclines while ratchets with sub-structures enable their direction of motion to be controlled by varying the temperature of the surface. The droplets' departure from the Leidenfrost regime is assessed by analysing the sound produced by their boiling. We anticipate these techniques will enable the development of more sophisticated methods for controlling small droplets and heat transfer.

  6. Enhanced Droplet Control by Transition Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, Alex; Still, Richard; Takashina, Kei

    2012-01-01

    A droplet of water on a heated surface can levitate over a film of gas produced by its own evaporation in the Leidenfrost effect. When the surface is prepared with ratchet-like saw-teeth topography, these droplets can self-propel and can even climb uphill. However, the extent to which the droplets can be controlled is limited by the physics of the Leidenfrost effect. Here, we show that transition boiling can be induced even at very high surface temperatures and provide additional control over the droplets. Ratchets with acute protrusions enable droplets to climb steeper inclines while ratchets with sub-structures enable their direction of motion to be controlled by varying the temperature of the surface. The droplets' departure from the Leidenfrost regime is assessed by analysing the sound produced by their boiling. We anticipate these techniques will enable the development of more sophisticated methods for controlling small droplets and heat transfer. PMID:23056912

  7. Microwave-Assisted Superheating and/or Microwave-Specific Superboiling (Nucleation-Limited Boiling) of Liquids Occurs under Certain Conditions but is Mitigated by Stirring.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Anthony; Hunt, Jacob; Stiegman, Albert; Dudley, Gregory B

    2015-01-01

    Temporary superheating and sustained nucleation-limited "superboiling" of unstirred liquids above the normal atmospheric boiling point have been documented during microwave heating. These phenomena are reliably observed under prescribed conditions, although the duration (of superheating) and magnitude (of superheating and superboiling) vary according to system parameters such as volume of the liquid and the size and shape of the vessel. Both phenomena are mitigated by rapid stirring with an appropriate stir bar and/or with the addition of boiling chips, which provide nucleation sites to support the phase-change from liquid to gas. With proper experimental design and especially proper stirring, the measured temperature of typical organic reaction mixtures heated at reflux will be close to the normal boiling point temperature of the solvent, whether heated using microwave radiation or conventional convective heat transfer. These observations are important to take into consideration when comparing reaction rates under conventional and microwave heating. PMID:26690096

  8. Flow boiling in vertical down-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Reddy, G.; Yang, B.; Jafri, T. ); McAssey, E. ); Qureshi, Z. )

    1989-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate the onset of Ledinegg instability in vertical down-flow. For three size uniformly heated test sections with L/D ratios from 100 to 150, the pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions has been obtained for a wide range of operating parameters. The results are presented in non-dimensional forms which correlate the important variables and provide techniques for predicting the onset of flow instability. 3 refs.

  9. Flow boiling in vertical down-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Reddy, G.; Yang, B.; Jafri, T.; McAssey, E.; Qureshi, Z.

    1989-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate the onset of Ledinegg instability in vertical down-flow. For three size uniformly heated test sections with L/D ratios from 100 to 150, the pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions has been obtained for a wide range of operating parameters. The results are presented in non-dimensional forms which correlate the important variables and provide techniques for predicting the onset of flow instability. 3 refs.

  10. Reduced Boil-Off System Sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, Monica C.; Plachta, David W.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is currently developing cryogenic propellant storage and transfer systems for future space exploration and scientific discovery missions by addressing the need to raise the technology readiness level of cryogenic fluid management technologies. Cryogenic propellants are baselined in many propulsion systems due to their inherently high specific impulse; however, their low boiling points can cause substantial boil-off losses over time. Recent efforts such as the Reduced Boil-off Testing and the Active Thermal Control Scaling Study provide important information on the benefit of an active cooling system applied to LH2 propellant storage. Findings show that zero-boil off technologies can reduce overall mass in LH2 storage systems when low Earth orbit loiter periods extend beyond two months. A significant part of this mass reduction is realized by integrating two stages of cooling: a 20 K stage to intercept heat at the tank surface, and a 90 K stage to reduce the heat entering the less efficient 20 K stage. A missing element in previous studies, which is addressed in this paper, is the development of a direct method for sizing the 90 K cooling stage. Such a method requires calculation of the heat entering both the 90 K and 20 K stages as compared to the overall system masses, and is reliant upon the temperature distribution, performance, and unique design characteristics of the system in question. By utilizing the known conductance of a system without active thermal control, the heat being intercepted by a 90 K stage can be calculated to find the resultant lift and mass of each active thermal control stage. Integral to this is the thermal conductance of the cooling straps and the broad area cooling shield, key parts of the 90 K stage. Additionally, a trade study is performed to show the ability of the 90 K cooling stage to reduce the lift on the 20 K cryocooler stage, which is considerably less developed and efficient than 90 K cryocoolers.

  11. Boiling incipience in a reboiler tube

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, H.; Alam, S.S. )

    1991-03-01

    This heating surface and liquid temperature distributions were experimentally obtained to identify the boiling incipience conditions in a single vertical tube thermosiphon reboiler with water, acetone, ethanol, and ethylene glycol as test liquids. The test section was an electrically heated stainless steel tube of 25.56-mm i.d. and 1900 mm long. The uniform heat flux values were used in the range of 3800--40 000 W/m{sup 2}, while inlet liquid subcooling were varied from 0.2 to 45.5{degrees} C. The liquid submergence was maintained around 100, 75, 50 and 30%. All the data were generated at 1-atm pressure. The maximum superheats attained around boiling incipience were taken from the wall temperature distributions and correlated with heat flux and physical properties of liquids using the expression of Yin and Abdelmessih. The heated sections required for onset of fully developed boiling with net vapor generation were determined assuming a thermal equilibrium model. In this paper a dimensionless correlation relating these values with heat flux, liquid subcooling, and submergence is proposed.

  12. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-02-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  13. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  14. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    PubMed

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-01-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics. PMID:26837464

  15. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes results from experiments performed to help understand certain aspects of the MC-1 engine prestart thermal conditioning procedure. The procedure was constrained by the fact that the engine must chill long enough to get quality LOX at the LOX pump inlet but must be short enough to prevent freezing of RP-1 in the fuel pump. A chill test of an MC-1 LOX impeller was performed in LN2 to obtain data on film boiling, transition boiling and impeller temperature histories. The transition boiling data was important to the chill time so a subsequent experiment was performed chilling simple steel plates in LOX to obtain similar data for LOX. To address the fuel freezing concern, two experiments were performed. First, fuel was frozen in a tray and its physical characteristics were observed and temperatures of the fuel were measured. The result was physical characteristics as a function of temperature. Second was an attempt to measure the frozen thickness of RP-1 on a cold wall submerged in warm RP-1 and to develop a method for calculating that thickness for other conditions.

  16. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-01-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics. PMID:26837464

  17. Magnetic Control of Convection in Electrically Nonconducting Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jie; Gray, Donald D.; Edwards, Boyd F.

    1999-01-01

    Inhomogeneous magnetic fields exert a body force on electrically nonconducting, magnetically permeable fluids. This force can be used to compensate for gravity and to control convection. The effects of uniform and nonuniform magnetic fields on a laterally unbounded fluid layer heated from below or above are studied using a linear stability analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations supplemented by Maxwell's equations and the appropriate magnetic body force. For a uniform oblique field, the analysis shows that longitudinal rolls with axes parallel to the horizontal component of the field are the rolls most unstable to convection. The corresponding critical Rayleigh number and critical wavelength for the onset of such rolls are less than the well-known Rayleigh-Benard values in the absence of magnetic fields. Vertical fields maximize these deviations, which vanish for horizontal fields. Horizontal fields increase the critical Rayleigh number and the critical wavelength for all rolls except longitudinal rolls. For a nonuniform field, our analysis shows that the magnetic effect on convection is represented by a dimensionless vector parameter which measures the relative strength of the induced magnetic buoyancy force due to the applied field gradient. The vertical component of this parameter competes with the gravitational buoyancy effect, and a critical relationship between this component and the Rayleigh number is identified for the onset of convection. Therefore, Rayleigh-Benard convection in such fluids can be enhanced or suppressed by the field. It also shows that magnetothermal convection is possible in both paramagnetic and diamagnetic fluids. Our theoretical predictions for paramagnetic fluids agree with experiments. Magnetically driven convection in diamagnetic fluids should be observable even in pure water using current technology.

  18. Intermittent Convective Overturn As a Geyser Eruption Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanism of geyser eruption has long intrigued scientists and the public, yet it has remained a matter of debate. Three major categories of model have been proposed: One category focuses on the processes in the geyser conduit. The second focuses on the processes in an underground 'bubble trap' that connects to the surface through a conduit. The third considers the geyser system to consist of a vertical fracture zone of high permeability and compressibility, surrounded by rock matrix of low permeability and compressibility. Since the interior of geysers is largely inaccessible to direct observation, numerical simulation constrained by available observation may be an important tool for deciphering the mechanism of geyser eruption. Here we use numerical simulation to explore the mechanism of geyser eruption from a system that consists of a heated underground cavern, delineated by seismic tremor location near the Old Faithful Geyser, WY (Vandemeulebrouck, et al., 2013) and connects to the surface through a conduit. Differential equations representing conservations of mass, momentum and energy, constrained by appropriate initial and boundary conditions, are solved to simulate the coupled geyser processes. Hydrothermal fluids seeping into the cavern heat up the bottom water to form an unstable thermal boundary layer near the base. Convection becomes intermittent at large Rayleigh number. Top-down boiling in the conduit releases pressure not only in the conduit but also in the cavern, triggering bubble nucleation and uprise from the base. Convective overturn of the thermal boundary layer leads to vigorous boiling in the cavern and geyser eruption through the conduit. Boiling in the cavern sustains geyser eruption until the thermal boundary layer is destroyed. Results suggest that the complex interaction between processes in the conduit and in the cavern, rather than either one in isolation, may control geyser eruption.

  19. Self-propulsion via natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardekani, Arezoo; Mercier, Matthieu; Allshouse, Michael; Peacock, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Natural convection of a fluid due to a heated or cooled boundary has been studied within a myriad of different contexts due to the prevalence of the phenomenon in environmental systems such as glaciers, katabatic winds, or magmatic chambers; and in engineered problems like natural ventilation of buildings, or cooling of electronic components. It has, however, hitherto gone unrecognized that boundary-induced natural convection can propel immersed objects. We experimentally investigate the motion of a wedge-shaped object, immersed within a two-layer fluid system, due to a heated surface. The wedge resides at the interface between the two fluid layers of different density, and its concomitant motion provides the first demonstration of the phenomenon of propulsion via boundary-induced natural convection. Established theoretical and numerical models are used to rationalize the propulsion speed by virtue of balancing the propulsion force against the appropriate drag force. We successfully verified the influence of various fluid and heat parameters on the predicted speed. now at IMFT (Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse).

  20. A mesoscale gravity wave event observed during CCOPE. II - Interactions between mesoscale convective systems and the antecedent waves. [Cooperative Convection Precipitation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E.; Golus, Robert E.; Dorian, Paul B.

    1988-01-01

    The interactions between preexisting gravity waves and convective systems were investigated using data obtained by the Cooperative Convection Precipitation Experiment observational network in Montana on July 11-12, 1981. The results indicate that strong convection substantially affects gravity waves locally by augmenting the wave amplitude, reducing its wavelength, distorting the wave shape, altering the wave phase velocity, and greatly weakening the in-phase covariance between the perturbation wind and pressure fields. These convective effects upon gravity waves are explained in terms of hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic pressure forces and gust front processes associated with thunderstorms.

  1. Interaction Between Convection and Pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdek, Günter; Dupret, Marc-Antoine

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews our current understanding of modelling convection dynamics in stars. Several semi-analytical time-dependent convection models have been proposed for pulsating one-dimensional stellar structures with different formulations for how the convective turbulent velocity field couples with the global stellar oscillations. In this review we put emphasis on two, widely used, time-dependent convection formulations for estimating pulsation properties in one-dimensional stellar models. Applications to pulsating stars are presented with results for oscillation properties, such as the effects of convection dynamics on the oscillation frequencies, or the stability of pulsation modes, in classical pulsators and in stars supporting solar-type oscillations.

  2. Thermocapillary Convection in Liquid Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this video is to understand the effects of surface tension on fluid convection. The fluid system chosen is the liquid sessile droplet to show the importance in single crystal growth, the spray drying and cooling of metal, and the advance droplet radiators of the space stations radiators. A cross sectional representation of a hemispherical liquid droplet under ideal conditions is used to show internal fluid motion. A direct simulation of buoyancy-dominant convection and surface tension-dominant convection is graphically displayed. The clear differences between two mechanisms of fluid transport, thermocapillary convection, and bouncy dominant convection is illustrated.

  3. Simulations of Convective Excitation of Internal Waves in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, D.; Quataert, E.; Vasil, G. M.; Brown, B. P.; Oishi, J.

    2014-12-01

    Convection adjacent to stable stratification can excite internal waves. These convectively excited internal waves can transport energy, momentum, and other quantities in a variety of geophysical and atmospherical contexts, including in the Earth's stratosphere, and the radiative zones of stars. To better understand the excitation mechanism, we perform simplified 2D simulations of a recent experiment by Perrard et al. (2013). The simulations are run using the new, very flexible, pseudo-spectral code Dedalus. The experiment and simulations exploit water's density maximum at 4C: a linear temperature profile includes both convectively unstable and stably stratified regions. The simulations and experiment show qualitatively similar excitation spectra. We then test two heuristic models of internal wave excitation by convection, the interface forcing mechanism and the deep excitation mechanism. To test these, we run linear simulations of the simulation. In one case, we solve the linear wave equation, with a boundary condition mimicking the motions of the interface from the simulations. This successfully reproduces the low frequency waves, but overestimates the excitation of high frequency waves. This is because high frequency convective motions are nonlinear, but the interface forcing simulation treats them as linear. Next, we test the deep excitation mechanism by solving the linear wave equation with a source term related to the Reynolds stress in the convective region. This successfully reproduces all waves, and the correlation between the linear model and the full simulation is about 0.95. This suggests that the deep excitation mechanism most accurately explains the wave generation in this system.

  4. Convective intitiation over a heated mountain: mechanisms and predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshbaum, D.

    2010-09-01

    In conditionally unstable flows over orography, the strong horizontal convergence generated by elevated heating locally weakens convective inhibition and increases the likelihood of convective initiation. This generally serves to enhance the predictability of deep convection, except when the associated uplift lies just at the margin of the forcing needed for convective initiation. In such marginal cases, airflows with very small initial differences may experience substantially different evolutions. To investigate the processes that govern cloud development in such cases, this study analyzes ensembles of idealized, high-resolution 2d simulations of the diurnal cycle in conditionally unstable flow over a mountain ridge. The case considered is based on a well-observed event from the Convective and Orographic Precipitation Study (COPS) that has proven highly difficult to predict in NWP models. This event was characterized by strong conditional instability but also large convective inhibition and a very dry mid-troposphere that presented a hostile environment for ascending clouds. Within each ensemble, the members differ only in their random seeds of low-amplitude, white-noise thermal perturbations added to the initial flow (0600 local time). The members of each ensemble experience similar mesoscale evolution, with convective inhibition (CIN) eroding completely and large CAPE developing over the high terrain by noon. Shallow orographic cumuli form predictably in response, but only in some cases do these transition to deep cumulonimbi. The dynamical and microphysical mechanisms that determine the cloud evolution in these simulations are examined through parcel trajectory analysis and an entraining thermal model.

  5. SST dependence of convective aggregation in three General Circulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bony, Sandrine; Becker, Tobias; Coppin, David; Medeiros, Brian; Reed, Kevin; Stevens, Bjorn; Voigt, Aiko

    2015-04-01

    Studies using cloud-resolving models or simple models have shown that under certain conditions, the radiative-convective equilibrium state becomes unstable to large-scale overturning circulations, and leads to the phenomenon of self-aggregation of moist convection. Modeling and observational studies suggest that the degree of aggregation of moist convection can influence the large-scale atmospheric state (e.g. humidity, clouds) and its energy budget. The question thus arises as to what extent the aggregation of convection may rectify the Earth's climate, including the large-scale atmospheric circulation, hydrological sensitivity and climate feedbacks. We explore these issues by running three General Circulation Models (IPSL-CM5A-LR, ECHAM6, CAM5) in radiative-convective equilibrium, i.e. a non-rotating aqua-planet configuration forced by a globally-uniform insolation and sea surface temperature (SST). We show that in these conditions, all three models can predict the spontaneous emergence of a large-scale convective organization and overturning circulation, and that the equilibrium aggregation state depends on SST and cloud-radiative effects. We will explore the reasons why the equilibrium aggregation state depends on temperature, and the impact of convective aggregation on the global mean state. Robust behaviors will be highlighted, as well as inter-model differences. The implications of these results will be discussed.

  6. Edge convection driven by externally applied potentials

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2000-08-01

    A theoretical model of convection in collisional tokamak edge and scrape-off-layer plasmas is described. In the linear theory, any mechanism for poloidal and toroidal symmetry breaking of the equilibrium will drive ExB flows; this result stems from the parallel thermal and pressure forces in Ohm's law. In the nonlinear theory, the quadratic coupling of the perturbations leads to quasilinear-type fluxes in the vorticity, density, and temperature equations. If the convection is strong enough, these fluxes lead to an ambipolarity constraint on the equilibrium electric field and to increased transport of particles and energy. The theory shows qualitative agreement with some tokamak experiments in which potential perturbations are externally driven by radio frequency antennas. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Experimental study on natural-convection boiling burnout in an annulus. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, K.; Ishii, M.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study was performed on burnout heat flux at low flow rates for low-pressure steam-water upward flow in an annulus. The data indicated that a premature burnout occurred due to flow-regime transition from churn-turbulent to annular flow. It is shown that the burnout observed in the experiment is essentially a flooding-limited burnout and the burnout heat flux can be well reproduced by a nondimensional correlation derived from the previously obtained criterion for flow-regime transition. It is also shown that the conventional correlations for burnout heat flux at low mass velocities agree well with the data on circulation and entrainment-limited burnout.

  8. VARIATION OF STELLAR ENVELOPE CONVECTION AND OVERSHOOT WITH METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre

    2013-04-10

    We examine how metallicity affects convection and overshoot in the superadiabatic layer of main sequence stars. We present results from a grid of three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations with four metallicities (Z = 0.040, 0.020, 0.010, 0.001), and spanning a range in effective temperature (4950 < T{sub eff} < 6230). We show that changing the metallicity alters properties of the convective gas dynamics, and the structure of the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere. Our grid of simulations shows that the amount of superadiabaticity, which tracks the transition from efficient to inefficient convection, is sensitive to changes in metallicity. We find that increasing the metallicity forces the location of the transition region to lower densities and pressures, and results in larger mean and turbulent velocities throughout the superadiabatic region. We also quantify the degree of convective overshoot in the atmosphere, and show that it increases with metallicity as well.

  9. Convection in Rotating Spherical Fluid Shells and its Dynamo Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, Friedrich

    2015-04-01

    Convection in rotating spherical fluid shells is characterized by the relative orientation of gravity and rotation vector. Outside the virtual cylinder touching the inner boundary at its equator convection assumes the form of thermal Rossby waves which are particularly suitable for the generation of magnetic fields. Without magnetic field the shear generated by the thermal Rossby waves tends to destroy them. Only localized convection or intermittent convection may survive the shearing action. Dipolar, quadrupolar and hemispherical dynamos can be realized. Lorentz forces counteract the shearing action of the differential rotation and thus permit an efficient heat transport. Of particular interest are regimes of bistability where depending on initial conditions either dynamos with strong mean magnetic fields or dynamos with highly fluctuating magnetic fields are realized. In systems like the Earth's core aperiodic reversals of the poloidal field may occur in connection with periodic toroidal dynamo waves.

  10. Spatial symmetry breaking in rapidly rotating convective spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Many problems in geophysical and astrophysical convection systems are characterized by fast rotation and spherical shell geometry. The combined effects of Coriolis forces and spherical shell geometry produce a unique spatial symmetry for the convection pattern in a rapidly rotating spherical shell. In this paper, we first discuss the general spatial symmetries for rotating spherical shell convection. A special model, a spherical shell heated from below, is then used to illustrate how and when the spatial symmetries are broken. Symmetry breaking occurs via a sequence of spatial transitions from the primary conducting state to the complex multiple-layered columnar structure. It is argued that, because of the dominant effects of rotation, the sequence of spatial transitions identified from this particular model is likely to be generally valid. Applications of the spatial symmetry breaking to planetary convection problems are also discussed.

  11. Magnetothermal Convection in Nonconducting Diamagnetic and Paramagnetic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Gray, Donald D.; Huang, Jie

    1996-01-01

    Nonuniform magnetic fields exert a magnetic body force on electrically nonconducting classical fluids. These include paramagnetic fluids such as gaseous and liquid oxygen and diamagnetic fluids such as helium. Recent experiments show that this force can overwhelm the force of gravity even at the surface of the earth; it can levitate liquids and gases, quench candle flames, block gas flows, and suppress heat transport. Thermal gradients render the magnetic force nonuniform through the temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility. These thermal gradients can therefore drive magnetic convection analogous to buoyancy-driven convection. This magnetothermal convection can overwhelm convection driven by gravitational buoyancy in terrestrial experiments. The objectives of the proposed ground-based theoretical study are (a) to supply the magnetothermohydrodynamic theory necessary to understand these recent experiments and (b) to explore the consequences of nonuniform magnetic fields in microgravity. Even the linear theory for the onset of magnetothermal convection is lacking in the literature. We intend to supply the linear and nonlinear theory based on the thermohydrodynamic equations supplemented by the magnetic body force. We intend to investigate the effect of magnetic fields on gas blockage and heat transport in microgravity. Since magnetic fields provide a means of creating arbitrary, controllable body force distributions, we intend to investigate the possibility of using magnetic fields to position and control fluids in microgravity. We also intend to investigate the possibility of creating stationary terrestrial microgravity environments by using the magnetic force to effectively cancel gravity. These investigations may aid in the design of space-based heat-transfer, combustion, and human-life-support equipment.

  12. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  13. Forces required by complete dentures for penetrating food in simulated function.

    PubMed

    Eerikäinen, E; Könönen, M

    1987-11-01

    Forces required by complete dentures for penetrating some commonly used food items were measured experimentally. These forces were compared with the maximal bite forces of twenty-seven complete denture wearers. Food items that required the greatest forces in direct closure were rye bread (167 N), raw carrot (118 N), boiled meat (80 N), and raw cabbage (74 N). Raw carrot and raw cabbage required the greatest force in straight incision (39 N and 33 N, respectively). Simulated laterotrusion aided most in the penetration of rye bread and boiled meat. The penetration forces in simulated conditions were high compared with the maximal bite forces of the complete denture wearers. PMID:3481400

  14. Magnetic Control of Convection during Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2004-01-01

    force counteract terrestrial gravity. The genera1 objective is to test the hypothesis of convective control using a strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient and to understand the nature of the various forces that come into play. Specifically we aim to delineate causative factors and to quantify them through experiments, analysis and numerical modeling. The paper will report on the experimental results using paramagentic salts and solutions in magnetic fields and compare them to analyticalprctions.

  15. Bubble departure in the direct-contact boiling field with a continuous liquid-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoguchi, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-15

    Behavior of vapor bubbles was experimentally investigated in the boiling field where a volatile liquid layer of per-fluorocarbon PF5050 (boiling point 306K) was directly in contact with an immiscible hot liquid layer of water above it. Heat was supplied to the continuous liquid-liquid interface by the impingement of the downward hot water jet. Vapor bubbles were generated not only from this continuous interface but from a large number of PF5050 droplets floating on it. According to precise observation, incipience of boiling did not occur at the liquid-liquid interface but in the PF5050 liquid close to the interface in both cases of continuous and dispersed interfaces. As a result, the bubbles broke up the thin PF5050 liquid film above them and rose up into the water layer. This bubble departure phenomenon, which does not occur in the ordinary pool boiling field on the solid heating wall, is very important to evaluate the heat transfer performance in the present direct-contact boiling system. For modeling this behavior, sizes of the bubbles were measured at the moment just after they were released into the water pool. Volumes of the bubbles were larger in the case of departing from the continuous liquid-liquid interface than from the droplets. This tendency could be explained by taking into account the buoyancy force acting on unit area of the thin PF5050 liquid film above the bubble before departure, which was one of the most important parameters for the liquid film breakdown. (author)

  16. The Solar Convection Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Kurt T.

    2000-01-01

    I helped to complete a research project with NASA scientists Dr. David Hathaway (my mentor), Rick Bogart, and John Beck from the SOHO/SOI collaboration. Our published paper in 'Solar Physics' was titled 'The Solar Convection Spectrum' (April 2000). Two of my undergraduate students were named on the paper--Gavrav Khutri and Josh Petitto. Gavrav also wrote a short paper for the National Conference of Undergraduate Research Proceedings in 1998 using a preliminary result. Our main result was that we show no evidence of a scale of convection named 'mesogranulation'. Instead, we see only direct evidence for the well-known scales of convection known as graduation and supergranulation. We are also completing work on vertical versus horizontal flow fluxes at the solar surface. I continue to work on phase relationships of solar activity indicators, but I have not yet written a paper with my students on this topic. Along with my research results, I have developed and augmented undergraduate courses at Birmingham-Southern College by myself and with other faculty. We have included new labs and observations, speakers from NASA and elsewhere, new subject material related to NASA and space science. I have done a great deal of work in outreach, mostly as President and other offices in the Birmingham Astronomical Society. My work includes speaking, attracting speakers, giving workshops, and governing.

  17. Entropy generation analysis for film boiling: A simple model of quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Ali; Lakzian, Esmail

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, quenching in high-temperature materials processing is modeled as a superheated isothermal flat plate. In these phenomena, a liquid flows over the highly superheated surfaces for cooling. So the surface and the liquid are separated by the vapor layer that is formed because of the liquid which is in contact with the superheated surface. This is named forced film boiling. As an objective, the distribution of the entropy generation in the laminar forced film boiling is obtained by similarity solution for the first time in the quenching processes. The PDE governing differential equations of the laminar film boiling including continuity, momentum, and energy are reduced to ODE ones, and a dimensionless equation for entropy generation inside the liquid boundary and vapor layer is obtained. Then the ODEs are solved by applying the 4th-order Runge-Kutta method with a shooting procedure. Moreover, the Bejan number is used as a design criterion parameter for a qualitative study about the rate of cooling and the effects of plate speed are studied in the quenching processes. It is observed that for high speed of the plate the rate of cooling (heat transfer) is more.

  18. Hexaroll Convection and Heteroclinic Chaos in Convection Driven by Centrifugal Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, Friedrich

    1998-11-01

    An experimental study is reported in which convection in a rotating vertical cylindrical annulus cooled from within and heated from the outside is observed. Both, thermochromatic liquid crystals and suspended flat particles, are used for visualisation. While the centrifugal force by far exceeds laboratory gravity the limit of vanishing Coriolis force is approached through the use of rather viscous liquids. In particular, glycerol-water mixtures and 10cSt silicone oil have been used. Hexaroll convection patterns and knot convection are observed as predicted by the theory of Auer et al. (J. Fluid Mech. 301, 371, 1995). At Rayleigh numbers R of the order 3000 oblique rolls appear to be preferred. Their angle \\chi with respect to the axis of rotation increases with R and axisymmetric rolls are found for R in the range of 10^4 as long as the Coriolis force can be regarded as a perturbation. Spatio-temporal chaos is found in a transition regime where hexarolls and oblique rolls tend to replace each other in a heteroclinic fashion. These findings will be related to computational simulations presently performed by O. Brausch and W. Pesch.

  19. Water boiling inside carbon nanotubes: toward efficient drug release.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2011-07-26

    We show using molecular dynamics simulation that spatial confinement of water inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially increases its boiling temperature and that a small temperature growth above the boiling point dramatically raises the inside pressure. Capillary theory successfully predicts the boiling point elevation down to 2 nm, below which large deviations between the theory and atomistic simulation take place. Water behaves qualitatively different inside narrow CNTs, exhibiting transition into an unusual phase, where pressure is gas-like and grows linearly with temperature, while the diffusion constant is temperature-independent. Precise control over boiling by CNT diameter, together with the rapid growth of inside pressure above the boiling point, suggests a novel drug delivery protocol. Polar drug molecules are packaged inside CNTs; the latter are delivered into living tissues and heated by laser. Solvent boiling facilitates drug release. PMID:21648482

  20. Characteristics of Extreme Summer Convection over equatorial America and Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuluaga, M. D.; Houze, R.

    2013-12-01

    Fourteen years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) version 7 data for June-August show the temporal and spatial characteristics of extreme convection over equatorial regions of the American and African continents. We identify three types of extreme systems: storms with deep convective cores (contiguous convective 40 dBZ echoes extending ≥10 km in height), storms with wide convective cores (contiguous convective 40 dBZ echoes with areas >1,000 km2) and storms with broad stratiform regions (stratiform echo >50,000 km2). European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis is used to describe the environmental conditions around these forms of extreme convection. Storms with deep convective cores occur mainly over land: in the equatorial Americas, maximum occurrence is in western Mexico, Northern Colombia and Venezuela; in Africa, the region of maximum occurrence is a broad zone enclosing the central and west Sudanian Savanna, south of the Sahel region. Storms with wide convective radar echoes occur in these same general locations. In the American sector, storms with broad stratiform precipitation regions (typifying robust mesoscale convective systems) occur mainly over the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean and the Colombia-Panama bight. In the African sector, storms with broad stratiform precipitation areas occur primarily over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean near the coast of West Africa. ECMWF reanalyses show how the regions of extreme deep convection associated with both continents are located mainly in regions affected by diurnal heating and influenced by atmospheric jets in regions with strong humidity gradients. Composite analysis of the synoptic conditions leading to the three forms of extreme convection provides insights into the forcing mechanisms in which these systems occur. These analyses show how the monsoonal flow directed towards the Andes slopes is mainly what concentrates the occurrence of extreme

  1. A Mechanistic Study of Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.; Warrier, G. R.; Hasan, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of this work is to study nucleate boiling heat transfer under microgravity conditions in such a way that while providing basic knowledge of the phenomena, it also leads to development of simulation models and correlations that can be used as design tools for a wide range of gravity levels. In the study a building block type of approach is used and both pool and low velocity flow boiling are investigated. Starting with experiments using a single bubble, the complexity of the experiments is increased to two or three inline bubbles, to five bubbles placed on a two-dimensional grid. Finally, experiments are conducted where a large number of prescribed cavities nucleate on the heater and when a commercial surface is used. So far experiments have been conducted at earth normal gravity and in the reduced gravity environment of the KC-135 aircraft whereas experiments on the space station are planned. Modeling/complete numerical simulation of the boiling process is an integral part of the total effort. Experiments conducted with single bubbles formed on a nucleation site microfabricated on a polished silicon wafer show that for gravity levels (g) varying from 1.5g(sub e) to 0.01g(sub e), the bubble diameter at departure varies approximately as (g(sub e)/g)(exp 1/2) and the growth period as (g(sub e)/g). When bubbles merge either inline or in a plane, the bubble diameter at departure is found to be smaller than that obtained for a single bubble and shows a weaker dependence on the level of gravity. The possible reason is that as the bubbles merge they create fluid circulation around the bubbles, which in turn induces a lift force that is responsible for the earlier departure of the bubbles. The verification of this proposition is being sought through numerical simulations. There is a merger of two inline, three inline, and several bubbles in a plane in the low gravity environment of the KC-135 aircraft. After merger and before departure, a mushroom type

  2. Zero Boil-Off System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages suitable for transporting 10s to 100s of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit and for their return. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several months. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler to control tank pressure. The active thermal control technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center, in a vacuum chamber and cryoshroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. Testing consisted of three passive tests with the active cryocooler system off, and 7 active tests, with the cryocooler powered up. The test matrix included zero boil-off tests performed at 90 full and 25 full, and several demonstrations at excess cooling capacity and reduced cooling capacity. From this, the tank pressure response with varied cryocooler power inputs was determined. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  3. Mixed Convection Heat Transfer Experiments in Smooth and Rough Verticla Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    P Symolon; W Neuhaus; R Odell

    2004-12-22

    The mixed convection regime is a transitional heat transfer regime between forced convection and natural convection, where both the forced component of flow, and the buoyancy induced component are important. Aiding flow is when buoyancy forces act in the same direction as the forced flow (heated upflow or cooled downflow), while opposing flow is when the buoyancy force is in the opposite direction of the forced flow (cooled upflow or heated downflow). For opposing flow the buoyancy always increases the rate of heat transfer over the forced convection value. For aiding flow, as the heat flux increased, a reduction in heat transfer is encountered until a condition known as laminarization occurs, where the heat transfer is at a minimum value. Further increases in the wall heat flux causes re-transition to turbulence, and increased heat transfer. In this paper, for the first time, experiments were performed to characterize the effect of surface roughness on heat transfer in mixed convection, for the case of aiding flow. A correlation was developed to allow calculation of mixed convection heat transfer coefficients for rough or smooth tubes.

  4. Investigating Convective Heat Transfer with an Iron and a Hairdryer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Manuel I.; Lucio, Jesus H.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experimental set-up to study free and forced convection in undergraduate physics laboratories is presented. The flat plate of a domestic iron has been chosen as the hot surface, and a hairdryer is used to generate an air stream around the plate. Several experiments are proposed and typical numerical results are reported. An analysis and…

  5. Pool boiling heat transfer from vertical heater array in liquid nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, C.J.; Sehmbey, M.S.; Chow, L.C.; Hahn, O.J.

    1995-04-01

    The heat transfer from an array of discrete sources is expected to differ from the behavior of a single heat source due to the interaction between the flow induced by individual heat sources. This study details the results from experiments conducted to study the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics from a vertical heater array with flush-mounted heat sources. The lower heaters were found to enhance the heat transfer from upper heaters. The bubble pumped convection due to the lower heaters enhanced the preboiling heat transfer coefficient at the upper heater by as much as 700%. The critical heat flux from the upper heaters was also enhanced up to 15%. Correlations are presented for both these effects. 21 refs.

  6. Dislocation dynamics in Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    PubMed

    Walter, Th; Pesch, W; Bodenschatz, E

    2004-09-01

    Theoretical results on the dynamics of dislocations in Rayleigh-Bénard convection are reported both for a Swift-Hohenberg model and the Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations. For intermediate Prandtl numbers the motion of dislocations is found to be driven by the superposition of two independent contributions: (i) the Peach-Koehler force and (ii) an advection force on the dislocation core by its self-generated mean flow. Their competition allows to explain the experimentally observed bound dislocation pairs. PMID:15447003

  7. Development boiling to sprinkled tube bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracík, Petr; Pospíšil, Jiří

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results of a studied heat transfer coefficient at the surface of a sprinkled tube bundle where boiling occurs. Research in the area of sprinkled exchangers can be divided into two major parts. The first part is research on heat transfer and determination of the heat transfer coefficient at sprinkled tube bundles for various liquids, whether boiling or not. The second part is testing of sprinkle modes for various tube diameters, tube pitches and tube materials and determination of individual modes' interface. All results published so far for water as the falling film liquid apply to one to three tubes for which the mentioned relations studied are determined in rigid laboratory conditions defined strictly in advance. The sprinkled tubes were not viewed from the operational perspective where there are more tubes and various modes may occur in different parts with various heat transfer values. The article focuses on these processes. The tube is located in a low-pressure chamber where vacuum is generated using an exhauster via ejector. The tube consists of smooth copper tubes of 12 mm diameter placed horizontally one above another.

  8. Zero Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcquillen, John

    2016-01-01

    The Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) experiment has been developed as a small scale ISS experiment aimed at delineating important fluid flow, heat and mass transport, and phase change phenomena that affect cryogenic storage tank pressurization and pressure control in microgravity. The experiments use a simulant transparent low boiling point fluid (PnP) in a sealed transparent Dewar to study and quantify: (a) fluid flow and thermal stratification during pressurization; (b) mixing, thermal destratification, depressurization, and jet-ullage penetration during pressure control by jet mixing. The experiment will provide valuable microgravity empirical two-phase data associated with the above-mentioned physical phenomena through highly accurate local wall and fluid temperature and pressure measurements, full-field phase-distribution and flow visualization. Moreover, the experiments are performed under tightly controlled and definable heat transfer boundary conditions to provide reliable high-fidelity data and precise input as required for validation verification of state-of-the-art two-phase CFD models developed as part of this research and by other groups in the international scientific and cryogenic fluid management communities.

  9. (Boiling water reactor (BWR) CORA experiments)

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1990-10-16

    To participate in the 1990 CORA Workshop at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) GmbH, Karlsruhe, FRG, on October 1--4, and to participate in detailed discussions on October 5 with the KfK CORA Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) experiments. The traveler attended the 1990 CORA Workshop at KfK, FRG. Participation included the presentation of a paper on work performed by the Boiling Water Reactor Core Melt Progression Phenomena Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on posttest analyses of CORA BWR experiments. The Statement of Work (November 1989) for the BWR Core Melt Progression Phenomena Program provides for pretest and posttest analyses of the BWR CORA experiments performed at KfK. Additionally, it is intended that ORNL personnel participate in the planning process for future CORA BWR experiments. For these purposes, meetings were held with KfK staff to discuss such topics as (1) experimental test schedule, (2) BWR test conduct, (3) perceived BWR experimental needs, and (4) KfK operational staff needs with respect to ORNL support. 19 refs.

  10. Lead chloride crystal growth from boiling solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Rodríguez-Clemente, R.; Torrent-Burgues, J.

    1993-03-01

    Lead chloride single crystals can be grown from boiling solutions using KNO3-H20 solutions as a solvent. Crystals of 1 mm size produced by gel-growth technique were used as seeds. The solubility of PbC12 increases almost linearly with the KNO3 molality being 0.63m in a 7m KNO3 aqueous solutions at 105°C and pH = 2.6; this increase is related to the decrease of the activity coefficient of lead chloride in these solutions. In the first experiments, the supersaturation was attained by solvent extraction, but due to the simultaneous changes in the concentration of the KNO3 mineralizer during the extraction, the growth rate was irregular and defective crystals were obtained. The experimental set-up was therefore modified and a transport technique was added to the system in order to feed the boiling reactor continuously with fresh lead chloride solution. The growth of the crystals takes place at constant concentration of KNO3 in these new conditions. With this experimental modification, isometric PbCI2 crystals of up to lcm size were obtained in three weeks. The observed morphology is close to that calculated by Woensdregt and Hartmann [J. Crystal Growth 87(1988)561].

  11. Zero boil-off system testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Johnson, W. L.; Feller, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration plans due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for long duration missions. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler temperature to control tank pressure. The technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a vacuum chamber and cryoshroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  12. Unsteady heat transfer during subcooled film boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagov, V. V.; Zabirov, A. R.; Lexin, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cooling of high-temperature bodies in subcooled liquid is of importance for quenching technologies and also for understanding the processes initiating vapor explosion. An analysis of the available experimental information shows that the mechanisms governing heat transfer in these processes are interpreted ambiguously; a more clear-cut definition of the Leidenfrost temperature notion is required. The results of experimental observations (Hewitt, Kenning, and previous investigations performed by the authors of this article) allow us to draw a conclusion that there exists a special mode of intense heat transfer during film boil- ing of highly subcooled liquid. For revealing regularities and mechanisms governing intense transfer of energy in this process, specialists of Moscow Power Engineering Institute's (MPEI) Department of Engineering Thermal Physics conduct systematic works aimed at investigating the cooling of high-temperature balls made of different metals in water with a temperature ranging from 20 to 100°C. It has been determined that the field of temperatures that takes place in balls with a diameter of more than 30 mm in intense cooling modes loses its spherical symmetry. An approximate procedure for solving the inverse thermal conductivity problem for calculating the heat flux density on the ball surface is developed. During film boiling, in which the ball surface temperature is well above the critical level for water, and in which liquid cannot come in direct contact with the wall, the calculated heat fluxes reach 3-7 MW/m2.

  13. Thermohydrodynamics of boiling in binary compressible fluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiewei; Do-Quang, Minh; Amberg, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    We numerically study the thermohydrodynamics of boiling for a CO(2) + ethanol mixture on lyophilic and lyophobic surfaces in both closed and open systems, based on a diffuse interface model for a two-component system. The corresponding wetting boundary conditions for an isothermal system are proposed and verified in this paper. New phenomena due to the addition of another component, mainly the preferential evaporation of the more volatile component, are observed. In the open system and the closed system, the physical process shows very different characteristics. In the open system, except for the movement of the contact line, the qualitative features are rather similar for lyophobic and lyophilic surfaces. In the closed system, the vortices that are observed on a lyophobic surface are not seen on a lyophilic surface. More sophisticated wetting boundary conditions for nonisothermal, two-component systems might need to be further developed, taking into account the variations of density, temperature, and surface tension near the wall, while numerical results show that the boundary conditions proposed here also work well even in boiling, where the temperature is nonuniform. PMID:26565342

  14. Zero Boil-Off System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Johnson, W. L.; Feller, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration plans due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for long duration missions. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler temperature to control tank pressure. The technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a vacuum chamber and cryoshroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  15. A Convective Vorticity Vector Associated With Tropical Convection: A 2D Cloud-Resolving Modeling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Shou-Ting; Ping, Fan; Li, Xiao-Fan; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    Although dry/moist potential vorticity is a useful physical quantity for meteorological analysis, it cannot be applied to the analysis of 2D simulations. A convective vorticity vector (CVV) is introduced in this study to analyze 2D cloud-resolving simulation data associated with 2D tropical convection. The cloud model is forced by the vertical velocity, zonal wind, horizontal advection, and sea surface temperature obtained from the TOGA COARE, and is integrated for a selected 10-day period. The CVV has zonal and vertical components in the 2D x-z frame. Analysis of zonally-averaged and mass-integrated quantities shows that the correlation coefficient between the vertical component of the CVV and the sum of the cloud hydrometeor mixing ratios is 0.81, whereas the correlation coefficient between the zonal component and the sum of the mixing ratios is only 0.18. This indicates that the vertical component of the CVV is closely associated with tropical convection. The tendency equation for the vertical component of the CVV is derived and the zonally-averaged and mass-integrated tendency budgets are analyzed. The tendency of the vertical component of the CVV is determined by the interaction between the vorticity and the zonal gradient of cloud heating. The results demonstrate that the vertical component of the CVV is a cloud-linked parameter and can be used to study tropical convection.

  16. Zoned mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Albarède, Francis; Van Der Hilst, Rob D

    2002-11-15

    We review the present state of our understanding of mantle convection with respect to geochemical and geophysical evidence and we suggest a model for mantle convection and its evolution over the Earth's history that can reconcile this evidence. Whole-mantle convection, even with material segregated within the D" region just above the core-mantle boundary, is incompatible with the budget of argon and helium and with the inventory of heat sources required by the thermal evolution of the Earth. We show that the deep-mantle composition in lithophilic incompatible elements is inconsistent with the storage of old plates of ordinary oceanic lithosphere, i.e. with the concept of a plate graveyard. Isotopic inventories indicate that the deep-mantle composition is not correctly accounted for by continental debris, primitive material or subducted slabs containing normal oceanic crust. Seismological observations have begun to hint at compositional heterogeneity in the bottom 1000 km or so of the mantle, but there is no compelling evidence in support of an interface between deep and shallow mantle at mid-depth. We suggest that in a system of thermochemical convection, lithospheric plates subduct to a depth that depends - in a complicated fashion - on their composition and thermal structure. The thermal structure of the sinking plates is primarily determined by the direction and rate of convergence, the age of the lithosphere at the trench, the sinking rate and the variation of these parameters over time (i.e. plate-tectonic history) and is not the same for all subduction systems. The sinking rate in the mantle is determined by a combination of thermal (negative) and compositional buoyancy and as regards the latter we consider in particular the effect of the loading of plates with basaltic plateaux produced by plume heads. Barren oceanic plates are relatively buoyant and may be recycled preferentially in the shallow mantle. Oceanic plateau-laden plates have a more pronounced

  17. Rotating convection in elliptical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evonuk, M.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal interactions between hot jupiter planets and their host stars are likely to result in non-spherical geometries. These elliptical instabilities may have interesting effects on interior fluid convective patterns, which in turn influence the nature of the magnetic dynamo within these planets. Simulations of thermal convection in the 2D rotating equatorial plane are conducted to determine to first order the effect of ellipticity on convection for varying density contrasts with differing convective vigor and rotation rate. This survey is conducted in two dimensions in order to simulate a broad range of ellipticities and to maximize the parameter space explored.

  18. An introduction to thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    In this lecture I propose a little tour of thermal convection and its applications in astrophysics. The first part of the lecture is devoted to a qualitative introduction to the convective instability using the Schwarzschild criterion; then, concentrating on the equations governing the fluid motions, I introduce the Boussinesq and anelastic approximations which are so often used in these problems. The following part focuses on the Rayleigh-Bénard model which is worked out in detail up to the Landau equation and the Lorenz strange attractor. Finally, I briefly sketch out some results on turbulent convection and end the lecture with the case of stellar convection.

  19. Convective Dynamo Simulation with a Grand Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustson, Kyle C.; Brun, A. S.; Miesch, Mark; Toomre, Juri

    2015-01-01

    The global-scale dynamo action achieved in a simulation of a Sun-like star rotating at thrice the solar rate is assessed. The 3-D MHD Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, augmented with a viscosity minimization scheme, is employed to capture convection and dynamo processes in this G-type star. The simulation is carried out in a spherical shell that encompasses 3.8 density scale heights of the solar convection zone. It is found that dynamo action with a high degree of time variation occurs, with many periodic polarity reversals occurring roughly every 6.2 years. The magnetic energy also rises and falls with a regular period. The magnetic energy cycles arise from a Lorentz-force feedback on the differential rotation, whereas the processes leading to polarity reversals are more complex, appearing to arise from the interaction of convection with the mean toroidal fields. Moreover, an equatorial migration of toroidal field is found, which is linked to the changing differential rotation, and potentially to a nonlinear dynamo wave. This simulation also enters a grand minimum lasting roughly 20 years, after which the dynamo recovers its regular polarity cycles.

  20. Magneto-convective instabilities in horizontal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistrangelo, Chiara; Bühler, Leo

    2016-02-01

    A linear stability analysis is performed to investigate the onset of convective motions in a flat cavity filled with liquid metal. A volumetric heat source is uniformly distributed in the fluid and a horizontal magnetic field is imposed. Walls perpendicular to the magnetic field are thermally insulating, and the top wall is isothermal and the bottom adiabatic. When a magnetic field is applied, electromagnetic forces tend to transform 3D convective flow structures into quasi-2D rolls aligned to the magnetic field. By integrating 3D equations along magnetic field lines, a quasi-2D mathematical model has been derived. A dissipation term in the 2D equations accounts for 3D viscous effects in boundary layers at Hartmann walls perpendicular to the magnetic field. The influence of various parameters on flow stability is investigated. The flow is stabilized by increasing the magnetic field intensity or the electric conductance of Hartmann walls and by reducing the aspect ratio of the cavity. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the analytical results and to describe the main convective flow patterns in the non-linear regime.