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Sample records for forced driven disk-ridging

  1. Casimir-force-driven ratchets.

    PubMed

    Emig, T

    2007-04-20

    We explore the nonlinear dynamics of two parallel periodically patterned metal surfaces that are coupled by the zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field between them. The resulting Casimir force generates for asymmetric patterns with a time periodically driven surface-to-surface distance a ratchet effect, allowing for directed lateral motion of the surfaces in sizable parameter ranges. It is crucial to take into account inertia effects and hence chaotic dynamics which are described by Langevin dynamics. Multiple velocity reversals occur as a function of driving, mean surface distance, and effective damping. These transport properties are shown to be stable against weak ambient noise. PMID:17501407

  2. Impact Forces from Tsunami-Driven Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, H.; Cox, D. T.; Riggs, H.; Naito, C. J.; Kobayashi, M. H.; Piran Aghl, P.

    2012-12-01

    Debris driven by tsunami inundation flow has been known to be a significant threat to structures, yet we lack the constitutive equations necessary to predict debris impact force. The objective of this research project is to improve our understanding of, and predictive capabilities for, tsunami-driven debris impact forces on structures. Of special interest are shipping containers, which are virtually everywhere and which will float even when fully loaded. The forces from such debris hitting structures, for example evacuation shelters and critical port facilities such as fuel storage tanks, are currently not known. This research project focuses on the impact by flexible shipping containers on rigid columns and investigated using large-scale laboratory testing. Full-scale in-air collision experiments were conducted at Lehigh University with 20 ft shipping containers to experimentally quantify the nonlinear behavior of full scale shipping containers as they collide into structural elements. The results from the full scale experiments were used to calibrate computer models and used to design a series of simpler, 1:5 scale wave flume experiments at Oregon State University. Scaled in-air collision tests were conducted using 1:5 scale idealized containers to mimic the container behavior observed in the full scale tests and to provide a direct comparison to the hydraulic model tests. Two specimens were constructed using different materials (aluminum, acrylic) to vary the stiffness. The collision tests showed that at higher speeds, the collision became inelastic as the slope of maximum impact force/velocity decreased with increasing velocity. Hydraulic model tests were conducted using the 1:5 scaled shipping containers to measure the impact load by the containers on a rigid column. The column was instrumented with a load cell to measure impact forces, strain gages to measure the column deflection, and a video camera was used to provide the debris orientation and speed. The

  3. MICROFLARE ACTIVITY DRIVEN BY FORCED MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.; Crockett, P. J.; Keenan, F. P.; Browning, P. K.

    2010-03-20

    High cadence, multiwavelength, optical observations of a solar active region, obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope, are presented. Two magnetic bright points are seen to separate in opposite directions at a constant velocity of 2.8 km s{sup -1}. After a separation distance of {approx}4400 km is reached, multiple Ellerman bombs are observed in both H{alpha} and Ca-K images. As a result of the Ellerman bombs, periodic velocity perturbations in the vicinity of the magnetic neutral line, derived from simultaneous Michelson Doppler Imager data, are generated with amplitude {+-}6 km s{sup -1} and wavelength {approx}1000 km. The velocity oscillations are followed by an impulsive brightening visible in H{alpha} and Ca-K, with a peak intensity enhancement of 63%. We interpret these velocity perturbations as the magnetic field deformation necessary to trigger forced reconnection. A time delay of {approx}3 minutes between the H{alpha}-wing and Ca-K observations indicates that the observed magnetic reconnection occurs at a height of {approx}200 km above the solar surface. These observations are consistent with theoretical predictions and provide the first observational evidence of microflare activity driven by forced magnetic reconnection.

  4. Data Driven, Force Based Interaction for Quadrotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Christopher D.

    Quadrotors are small and agile, and are becoming more capable for their compact size. They are expected perform a wide variety of tasks including inspection, physical interaction, and formation flight. In all of these tasks, the quadrotors can come into close proximity with infrastructure or other quadrotors, and may experience significant external forces and torques. Reacting properly in each case is essential to completing the task safely and effectively. In this thesis, we develop an algorithm, based on the Unscented Kalman Filter, to estimate such forces and torques without making assumptions about the source of the forces and torques. We then show in experiment how the proposed estimation algorithm can be used in conjunction with controls and machine learning to choose the appropriate actions in a wide variety of tasks including detecting downwash, tracking the wind induced by a fan, and detecting proximity to the wall.

  5. A measurable force driven by an excitonic condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Hakioğlu, T.; Özgün, Ege; Günay, Mehmet

    2014-04-21

    Free energy signatures related to the measurement of an emergent force (≈10{sup −9}N) due to the exciton condensate (EC) in Double Quantum Wells are predicted and experiments are proposed to measure the effects. The EC-force is attractive and reminiscent of the Casimir force between two perfect metallic plates, but also distinctively different from it by its driving mechanism and dependence on the parameters of the condensate. The proposed experiments are based on a recent experimental work on a driven micromechanical oscillator. Conclusive observations of EC in recent experiments also provide a strong promise for the observation of the EC-force.

  6. Note: A novel piezoelectrically driven pipette using centrifugal force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhi Sen; Ma, Yu Ting; Feng, Zhi Hua

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel piezoelectrically driven pipette, which utilizes centrifugal force in swing motion of a vibrating tube as the driving force, to input and output liquid at first bending resonant frequency. Control circuit capable of frequency tracking is designed. Pulse volume changing with different driving voltage amplitude, driving frequency, tip size, and target reagents are studied in experiments. The output pulse volume of a prototype pipette driven by voltage of 560 Vpp at 175.9 Hz is 43.2 μl with a variation of ±3.5%. Minimum water spots of 3 μl can be deposited in this manner. This pipette represents an alternative to standard liquid transfer techniques in chemical or biological experiments.

  7. Note: A novel piezoelectrically driven pipette using centrifugal force.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhi Sen; Ma, Yu Ting; Feng, Zhi Hua

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel piezoelectrically driven pipette, which utilizes centrifugal force in swing motion of a vibrating tube as the driving force, to input and output liquid at first bending resonant frequency. Control circuit capable of frequency tracking is designed. Pulse volume changing with different driving voltage amplitude, driving frequency, tip size, and target reagents are studied in experiments. The output pulse volume of a prototype pipette driven by voltage of 560 V(pp) at 175.9 Hz is 43.2 μl with a variation of ±3.5%. Minimum water spots of 3 μl can be deposited in this manner. This pipette represents an alternative to standard liquid transfer techniques in chemical or biological experiments. PMID:24880431

  8. Electron Force Balance in Steady Collisionless-Driven Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bin; Horiuchi, Ritoku

    2008-11-21

    Steady collisionless-driven reconnection in an open system is investigated by means of full-particle simulations. A long thin electron current sheet extends towards the outflow direction when the system relaxes to a steady state. Although the pressure tensor term along the reconnection electric field contributes to the violation of the electron frozen-in condition, a new force balance in the inflow direction is realized between the Lorentz and electrostatic forces, which is quite different from that in Harris equilibrium. The strong electrostatic field is generated through the combined effect of the Hall term and a driving inflow. This new force balance is more evident in the three-dimensional case due to the growth of an instability along the reconnection electric field. It is also found that the normalized charge density is in proportion to the square of the electron Alfven velocity averaged over the electron dissipation region.

  9. Force-Driven Polymerization and Turgor-Induced Wall Expansion.

    PubMed

    Ali, Olivier; Traas, Jan

    2016-05-01

    While many molecular players involved in growth control have been identified in the past decades, it is often unknown how they mechanistically act to induce specific shape changes during development. Plant morphogenesis results from the turgor-induced yielding of the extracellular and load-bearing cell wall. Its mechanochemical equilibrium appears as a fundamental link between molecular growth regulation and the effective shape evolution of the tissue. We focus here on force-driven polymerization of the cell wall as a central process in growth control. We propose that mechanical forces facilitate the insertion of wall components, in particular pectins, a process that can be modulated through genetic regulation. We formalize this idea in a mathematical model, which we subsequently test with published experimental results. PMID:26895732

  10. Depletion force induced collective motion of microtubules driven by kinesin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Mahmot, Bulbul; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Farhana, Tamanna Ishrat; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Sada, Kazuki; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Collective motion is a fascinating example of coordinated behavior of self-propelled objects, which is often associated with the formation of large scale patterns. Nowadays, the in vitro gliding assay is being considered a model system to experimentally investigate various aspects of group behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects. In the in vitro gliding assay, cytoskeletal filaments F-actin or microtubules are driven by the surface immobilized associated biomolecular motors myosin or dynein respectively. Although the F-actin/myosin or microtubule/dynein system was found to be promising in understanding the collective motion and pattern formation by self-propelled objects, the most widely used biomolecular motor system microtubule/kinesin could not be successfully employed so far in this regard. Failure in exhibiting collective motion by kinesin driven microtubules is attributed to the intrinsic properties of kinesin, which was speculated to affect the behavior of individual gliding microtubules and mutual interactions among them. In this work, for the first time, we have demonstrated the collective motion of kinesin driven microtubules by regulating the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules, by employing a depletion force among them. Proper regulation of the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules through the employment of the depletion force was found to allow the exhibition of collective motion and stream pattern formation by the microtubules. This work offers a universal means for demonstrating the collective motion using the in vitro gliding assay of biomolecular motor systems and will help obtain a meticulous understanding of the fascinating coordinated behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects.Collective motion is a fascinating example of coordinated behavior of self-propelled objects, which is often associated with the formation of large scale patterns. Nowadays, the in vitro gliding assay is being

  11. Depletion force induced collective motion of microtubules driven by kinesin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Mahmot, Bulbul; Kabir, Arif Md Rashedul; Farhana, Tamanna Ishrat; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Sada, Kazuki; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2015-11-21

    Collective motion is a fascinating example of coordinated behavior of self-propelled objects, which is often associated with the formation of large scale patterns. Nowadays, the in vitro gliding assay is being considered a model system to experimentally investigate various aspects of group behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects. In the in vitro gliding assay, cytoskeletal filaments F-actin or microtubules are driven by the surface immobilized associated biomolecular motors myosin or dynein respectively. Although the F-actin/myosin or microtubule/dynein system was found to be promising in understanding the collective motion and pattern formation by self-propelled objects, the most widely used biomolecular motor system microtubule/kinesin could not be successfully employed so far in this regard. Failure in exhibiting collective motion by kinesin driven microtubules is attributed to the intrinsic properties of kinesin, which was speculated to affect the behavior of individual gliding microtubules and mutual interactions among them. In this work, for the first time, we have demonstrated the collective motion of kinesin driven microtubules by regulating the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules, by employing a depletion force among them. Proper regulation of the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules through the employment of the depletion force was found to allow the exhibition of collective motion and stream pattern formation by the microtubules. This work offers a universal means for demonstrating the collective motion using the in vitro gliding assay of biomolecular motor systems and will help obtain a meticulous understanding of the fascinating coordinated behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects. PMID:26260025

  12. Kinetic theory of a confined polymer driven by an external force and pressure-driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Jason E.; Usta, O. Berk; Kekre, Rahul; Ladd, Anthony J. C.

    2007-11-01

    Kinetic theory is used to investigate the mechanisms causing cross-stream migration of confined polymers and polyelectrolytes under the influence of external forces and flow fields. Numerical simulations and experiments have demonstrated that confined polymers migrate towards the center of the channel in response to both external forces and uniaxial flows. Yet, migration towards the walls has been observed with combinations of external force and flow. In this paper, the kinetic theory for an elastic dumbbell developed by Ma and Graham [Phys. Fluids 17, 083103 (2005)] has been extended to account for the effects of an external force. Further modifications account for counterion screening within a Debye-Hückel approximation. This enables qualitative comparison with experimental results [Zheng and Yeung, Anal. Chem. 75, 3675 (2003)] on DNA migration under combined electric and pressure-driven flow fields. The comparison supports the contention [Long et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3858 (1996)] that the hydrodynamic interactions in polyelectrolytes decay algebraically, as 1/r3, rather than exponentially. The theory qualitatively reproduces results of both simulations and experiments for the migration of neutral polymers and polyelectrolytes. Concentration profiles similar to those found in numerical simulations are observed, but the Peclet numbers differ by factors of 2-3.

  13. Proposal of interferometric display device driven by electrostatic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsuzawa, Takeshi; Hayase, Masanori; Oguchi, Toshiaki

    2001-10-01

    A new display device based on a micro-Fizeau interferometer (IDD: Interferometric Display Device) is proposed and trially manufactured. The mirror is suspended by leaf-springs so that it may move vertically when driven by a dc voltage - electrostatic force. The optical path difference between the half mirror and the bottom substrate is adjusted by the voltage, resulting in the optical interference. Contrast in the IDD can be changed by the voltage, and color can be displayed in the case of white light source. A 300micrometer-square half mirror made of SiO2 and Si substrate electrode/mirror is used for the construction of the IDD. A 4 by 4 array of the IDD is fabricated by using a bonding technique. An interferometric pattern in observed at a driving voltage of 200V dc. The frequency response of the device is confirmed more than 100Hz. The display quality is not sufficient at present because of the deformation of the half-mirror, however, it has a potential for lower driving energy and higher intensity of the pixels.

  14. An Antarctic Circumpolar Current driven by surface buoyancy forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, Andrew McC.

    2010-12-01

    Simulations of an idealised, but eddy-resolving, channel model of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) are used to investigate the sensitivity of ACC transport to wind and surface buoyancy forcing. The results are consistent with theoretical predictions of the eddy-saturated limit, where transport is independent of wind stress. In this parameter regime, buoyancy forcing provides the primary control over ACC transport.

  15. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, E; Camunas-Soler, J; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Seifert, U; Ritort, F

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force. PMID:27575077

  16. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, E.; Camunas-Soler, J.; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Seifert, U.; Ritort, F.

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force.

  17. Force-Driven Separation of Short Double-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Dominik; Zimmermann, Julia L.; Dehmelt, Florian A.; Steinbach, Uta; Erdmann, Matthias; Severin, Philip; Falter, Katja; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Short double-stranded DNA is used in a variety of nanotechnological applications, and for many of them, it is important to know for which forces and which force loading rates the DNA duplex remains stable. In this work, we develop a theoretical model that describes the force-dependent dissociation rate for DNA duplexes tens of basepairs long under tension along their axes (“shear geometry”). Explicitly, we set up a three-state equilibrium model and apply the canonical transition state theory to calculate the kinetic rates for strand unpairing and the rupture-force distribution as a function of the separation velocity of the end-to-end distance. Theory is in excellent agreement with actual single-molecule force spectroscopy results and even allows for the prediction of the rupture-force distribution for a given DNA duplex sequence and separation velocity. We further show that for describing double-stranded DNA separation kinetics, our model is a significant refinement of the conventionally used Bell-Evans model. PMID:20006953

  18. Force Model for Control of Tendon Driven Hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pena, Edward; Thompson, David E.

    1997-01-01

    Knowing the tendon forces generated for a given task such as grasping via a model, an artificial hand can be controlled. A two-dimensional force model for the index finger was developed. This system is assumed to be in static equilibrium, therefore, the equations of equilibrium were applied at each joint. Constraint equations describing the tendon branch connectivity were used. Gaussian elimination was used to solve for the unknowns of the Linear system. Results from initial work on estimating tendon forces in post-operative hands during active motion therapy were discussed. The results are important for understanding the effects of hand position on tendon tension, elastic effects on tendon tension, and overall functional anatomy of the hand.

  19. CDW-Exciton Condensate Competition and a Condensate Driven Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgün, Ege; Hakioğlu, Tuğrul

    2016-08-01

    We examine the competition between the charge-density wave (CDW) instability and the excitonic condensate (EC) in spatially separated layers of electrons and holes. The CDW and the EC order parameters (OPs), described by two different mechanisms and hence two different transition temperatures TcCDW and TcEC, are self-consistently coupled by a microscopic mean field theory. We discuss the results in our model specifically focusing on the transition-metal dichalcogenides which are considered as the most typical examples of strongly coupled CDW/EC systems with atomic layer separations where the electronic energy scales are large with the critical temperatures in the range TcEC ˜ TcCDW ˜ 100-200 K. An important consequence of this is that the excitonic energy gap, hence the condensed free energy, vary with the layer separation resulting in a new type of force FEC. We discuss the possibility of this force as the possible driver of the structural lattice deformation observed in some TMDCs with a particular attention on the 1T-TiSe2 below 200 K.

  20. Molecular Self-Assembly Driven by London Dispersion Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guo; Cooper, Valentino R; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2011-01-01

    The nature and strength of intermolecular interactions are crucial to a variety of kinetic and dynamic processes at surfaces. Whereas strong chemisorption bonds are known to facilitate molecular binding, the importance of the weaker yet ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions remains elusive in most cases. Here we use first-principles calculations combined with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to unambiguously demonstrate the vital role that vdW interactions play in molecular self-assembly, using styrene nanowire growth on silicon as a prototypical example. We find that, only when the London dispersion forces are included, accounting for the attractive parts of vdW interactions, can the effective intermolecular interaction be reversed from being repulsive to attractive. Such attractive interactions, in turn, ensure the preferred growth of long wires under physically realistic conditions as observed experimentally. We further propose a cooperative scheme, invoking the application of an electric field and the selective creation of Si dangling bonds, to drastically improve the ordered arrangement of the molecular structures. The present study represents a significant step forward in the fundamental understanding and precise control of molecular self-assembly guided by London dispersion forces.

  1. Cold ablation driven by localized forces in alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Hada, Masaki; Zhang, Dongfang; Pichugin, Kostyantyn; Hirscht, Julian; Kochman, Michał A; Hayes, Stuart A; Manz, Stephanie; Gengler, Regis Y N; Wann, Derek A; Seki, Toshio; Moriena, Gustavo; Morrison, Carole A; Matsuo, Jiro; Sciaini, Germán; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2014-01-01

    Laser ablation has been widely used for a variety of applications. Since the mechanisms for ablation are strongly dependent on the photoexcitation level, so called cold material processing has relied on the use of high-peak-power laser fluences for which nonthermal processes become dominant; often reaching the universal threshold for plasma formation of ~1 J cm(-2) in most solids. Here we show single-shot time-resolved femtosecond electron diffraction, femtosecond optical reflectivity and ion detection experiments to study the evolution of the ablation process that follows femtosecond 400 nm laser excitation in crystalline sodium chloride, caesium iodide and potassium iodide. The phenomenon in this class of materials occurs well below the threshold for plasma formation and even below the melting point. The results reveal fast electronic and localized structural changes that lead to the ejection of particulates and the formation of micron-deep craters, reflecting the very nature of the strong repulsive forces at play. PMID:24835317

  2. Parallel RF force driven by the inhomogeneity of power absorption in magnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhe; Chen, Jiale; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2013-06-01

    A nonlinear parallel force can be exerted through the inhomogeneity of rf resonant absorption in a magnetized plasma. While providing no integrated force over a plasma volume, this force can redistribute momentum parallel to the magnetic field. Because flows and currents parallel to the magnetic field encounter different resistances, this redistribution can play a large role, in addition to the role played by the direct absorption of parallel momentum. For nearly perpendicular propagating waves in a tokamak plasma, this additional force is expected to affect significantly the toroidal rf-driven current and the toroidal flow drive. PMID:25167505

  3. A silicon-nanowire memory driven by optical gradient force induced bistability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, B.; Cai, H.; Chin, L. K.; Huang, J. G.; Yang, Z. C.; Gu, Y. D.; Ng, G. I.; Ser, W.; Kwong, D. L.; Liu, A. Q.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a bistable optical-driven silicon-nanowire memory is demonstrated, which employs ring resonator to generate optical gradient force over a doubly clamped silicon-nanowire. Two stable deformation positions of a doubly clamped silicon-nanowire represent two memory states ("0" and "1") and can be set/reset by modulating the light intensity (<3 mW) based on the optical force induced bistability. The time response of the optical-driven memory is less than 250 ns. It has applications in the fields of all optical communication, quantum computing, and optomechanical circuits.

  4. A silicon-nanowire memory driven by optical gradient force induced bistability

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, B.; Cai, H. Gu, Y. D.; Kwong, D. L.; Chin, L. K.; Ng, G. I.; Ser, W.; Huang, J. G.; Yang, Z. C.; Liu, A. Q.

    2015-12-28

    In this paper, a bistable optical-driven silicon-nanowire memory is demonstrated, which employs ring resonator to generate optical gradient force over a doubly clamped silicon-nanowire. Two stable deformation positions of a doubly clamped silicon-nanowire represent two memory states (“0” and “1”) and can be set/reset by modulating the light intensity (<3 mW) based on the optical force induced bistability. The time response of the optical-driven memory is less than 250 ns. It has applications in the fields of all optical communication, quantum computing, and optomechanical circuits.

  5. Tornado-like flows driven by magnetic body forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbeth, Gunter; Grants, Ilmars; Vogt, Tobias; Eckert, Sven

    2014-11-01

    Alternating magnetic fields produce well-defined flow-independent body forces in electrically conducting media. This property is used to construct a laboratory analogue of the Fiedler chamber with a room-temperature liquid metal as working fluid. A continuously applied rotating magnetic field (RMF) provides the source of the angular momentum. A pulse of a much stronger travelling magnetic field drives a converging flow at the metal surface, which focuses this angular momentum towards the axis of the container. The resulting vortex is studied experimentally and numerically. In a certain range of the ratio of both driving actions the axial velocity changes its direction in the vortex core, resembling the subsidence in an eye of a tropical cyclone or a large tornado. During the initial deterministic spin-up stage the vortex is well described by axisymmetric direct numerical simulation. Being strong enough the flow develops a funnel-shaped surface depression that enables visual observation of the vortex structure. As the RMF strength is increased the eyewall diameter grows until it breaks down to multiple vortices. A number of further observed similarities to tornado-like vortices will be discussed. The work is supported by the German Helmholtz Association in frame of the LIMTECH alliance.

  6. Microcontroller-driven fluid-injection system for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasas, S.; Alonso, L.; Jacquet, P.; Adamcik, J.; Haeberli, C.; Dietler, G.

    2010-01-01

    We present a programmable microcontroller-driven injection system for the exchange of imaging medium during atomic force microscopy. Using this low-noise system, high-resolution imaging can be performed during this process of injection without disturbance. This latter circumstance was exemplified by the online imaging of conformational changes in DNA molecules during the injection of anticancer drug into the fluid chamber.

  7. Minimum detectable change for knee joint contact force estimates using an EMG-driven model

    PubMed Central

    Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Adequate test–retest reliability of model estimates is a necessary precursor to examining treatment effects or longitudinal changes in individuals. Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish thresholds for minimal detectable change (MDC) for joint contact forces obtained using a patient specific EMG-driven musculoskeletal model of the knee. Design A sample of young, active individuals was selected for this study, and subjects were tested on 2 separate days. Three-dimensional motion analysis with electromyography (EMG) was used to obtain data from each subject during gait for model input. An EMG-driven modeling approach was used to estimate joint contact forces at each session. Results MDC’s for contact force variables ranged from 0.30 to 0.66 BW. The lowest MDC was for peak medial compartment force (0.30 BW) and the highest was for peak tibiofemoral contact force (0.66 BW). Test–retest reliability coefficients were also reported for comparison with previous work. Conclusions Using the present model, changes in joint contact forces between baseline and subsequent measurements that are greater than these MDCs are greater than typical day-to-day variation and can be identified as real change. PMID:23601782

  8. Long-Range Force Transmission in Fibrous Matrices Enabled by Tension-Driven Alignment of Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hailong; Abhilash, A.S.; Chen, Christopher S.; Wells, Rebecca G.; Shenoy, Vivek B.

    2014-01-01

    Cells can sense and respond to mechanical signals over relatively long distances across fibrous extracellular matrices. Recently proposed models suggest that long-range force transmission can be attributed to the nonlinear elasticity or fibrous nature of collagen matrices, yet the mechanism whereby fibers align remains unknown. Moreover, cell shape and anisotropy of cellular contraction are not considered in existing models, although recent experiments have shown that they play crucial roles. Here, we explore all of the key factors that influence long-range force transmission in cell-populated collagen matrices: alignment of collagen fibers, responses to applied force, strain stiffening properties of the aligned fibers, aspect ratios of the cells, and the polarization of cellular contraction. A constitutive law accounting for mechanically driven collagen fiber reorientation is proposed. We systematically investigate the range of collagen-fiber alignment using both finite-element simulations and analytical calculations. Our results show that tension-driven collagen-fiber alignment plays a crucial role in force transmission. Small critical stretch for fiber alignment, large fiber stiffness and fiber strain-hardening behavior enable long-range interaction. Furthermore, the range of collagen-fiber alignment for elliptical cells with polarized contraction is much larger than that for spherical cells with diagonal contraction. A phase diagram showing the range of force transmission as a function of cell shape and polarization and matrix properties is presented. Our results are in good agreement with recent experiments, and highlight the factors that influence long-range force transmission, in particular tension-driven alignment of fibers. Our work has important relevance to biological processes including development, cancer metastasis, and wound healing, suggesting conditions whereby cells communicate over long distances. PMID:25468338

  9. Intense Flows Driven by Mechanical Forcing in Non-axisymmetric Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannan, A. M.; Le Bars, M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present laboratory experimental results that simulate two geophysically relevant mechanical forcings that can drive intense fluid motions in the interior fluid layer of non-axisymmetric containers; libration and tidal distortions. Longitudinal libration refers to the small periodic oscillations of a satellite's mean rotation rate as it orbits a primary body and is replicated using an oscillating hard acrylic ellipsoid. Tidal forcing refers to the rotating gravitational distortion of a body in orbit and is replicated using a deformable silicone sphere. We use a particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique to measure the 2D velocity field in the nearly equatorial plane over hundreds of librational and tidal cycles. First, while the theoretical base flow for each mechanism is nearly identical, we verify the base flow induced by the tidal distortion and a time-averaged zonal flow that scales as the square of the tidal forcing and is expected to be small in planets. Additionally, for a fixed tidal distortion, a polar vortex first identified by Suess (1970) is re-examined that may drive an intense vortex at planetary settings. Second, we investigate the characteristics of turbulence in the bulk fluid layer generated via an elliptical instability of librational and tidal forcing. An elliptic instability is the triadic resonance of two inertial modes whose non-dimensional frequencies are between [-2-2] with the mechanically induced base flow. This is called libration driven elliptical instability (LDEI) and tidal driven elliptical instability (TDEI) respectively. We characterize the evolution of the turbulent flow that displays either intermittent large cycles of growth and decay or smaller cycles of saturation while also investigating the cascade of energy inside the inertial mode frequency regime. The existence of these types of intense flows may play an important in understanding the thermal evolution and magnetic field generation in bodies subject to mechanical

  10. The response of subsurface oceans in icy satellites to tidally driven forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, E. M.; Glatzmaier, G. A.; Nimmo, F.

    2009-12-01

    Observations from the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft suggest that subsurface global water oceans are likely present on multiple icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. However, the dynamics of these oceans, under the influence of a time-varying tidal potential and buoyancy and coriolis forces, have not been investigated in detail. We have investigated the large scale ocean flow in two ways. First, we simulate the 3-D global circulation of the subsurface oceans on Europa and Titan driven primarily by a time-varying tidal potential and secondarily by heating at the base of the ocean. Second, we analyze the behavior of tidally-forced subsurface oceans in two-dimensions using quasi-nonlinear shallow water theory. These approaches allow us to predict potentially observable effects, in particular non-synchronous rotation of the ice shell driven by ocean torques and spatial variations in the heat flow supplied to the base of the ice shell, and magnetic induction effects due to the ocean circulation. Time-series analyses suggest that the ocean responds primarily at the tidal frequency; however, there are responses at lower frequencies as well. Preliminary results of full 3-D simulations will be presented, and comparisons will be made to the forced shallow water model.

  11. A fluctuation theorem for non-equilibrium relaxational systems driven by external forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamponi, Francesco; Bonetto, Federico; Cugliandolo, Leticia F.; Kurchan, Jorge

    2005-09-01

    We discuss an extension of the fluctuation theorem to stochastic models that, in the limit of zero external drive, are not able to equilibrate with their environment, extending earlier results of Sellitto. We show that if the entropy production rate is suitably defined, its probability distribution function verifies the fluctuation relation with the ambient temperature replaced by a (frequency dependent) effective temperature. We derive modified Green-Kubo relations. We illustrate these results with the simple example of an oscillator coupled to a non-equilibrium bath driven by an external force. We discuss the relevance of our results for driven glasses and the diffusion of Brownian particles in out-of-equilibrium media and propose a concrete experimental strategy for measuring the low frequency value of the effective temperature using the fluctuations of the work done by an ac conservative field. We compare our results to related ones that appeared in the literature recently.

  12. Transmission of Force Sensations by Hand of Multi-DOF Master-Slave Robot Using Tendon-Driven Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Takahiro; Suzuki, Yusuke; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    In this study, a bilateral control system for tendon-driven robots is proposed. The rotation angle and torque of the robot joints are controlled by the proposed control system. In addition, a tendon-driven robot hand for haptic applications is developed. The proposed control system is employed by the robot hand to transmit force sensations.

  13. An opto-mechanical coupled-ring reflector driven by optical force for lasing wavelength control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M.; Cai, H.; Chin, L. K.; Huang, J. G.; Gu, Y. D.; Radhakrishnan, K.; Ser, W.; Liu, A. Q.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, an opto-mechanical coupled-ring reflector driven by optical gradient force is applied in an external-cavity tunable laser. A pair of mutually coupled ring resonators with a free-standing arc serves as a movable reflector. It obtains a 13.3-nm wavelength tuning range based on an opto-mechanical lasing-wavelength tuning coefficient of 127 GHz/nm. The potential applications include optical network, on-chip optical trapping, sensing, and biology detection.

  14. The effect of power-law body forces on a thermally driven flow between concentric rotating spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to determine the effect of power-law body forces on a thermally-driven axisymmetric flow field confined between concentric co-rotating spheres. This study is motivated by Spacelab geophysical fluid-flow experiments, which use an electrostatic force on a dielectric fluid to simulate gravity; this force exhibits a (1/r)sup 5 distribution. Meridional velocity is found to increase when the electrostatic body force is imposed, relative to when the body force is uniform. Correlation among flow fields with uniform, inverse-square, and inverse-quintic force fields is obtained using a modified Grashof number.

  15. The effect of power law body forces on a thermally-driven flow between concentric rotating spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to determine the effect of power-law body forces on a thermally-driven axisymmetric flow field confined between concentric co-rotating spheres. This study is motivated by Spacelab geophysical fluid-flow experiments, which use an electrostatic force on a dielectric fluid to simulate gravity; this force exhibits a (1/r)sup 5 distribution. Meridional velocity is found to increase when the electrostatic body force is imposed, relative to when the body force is uniform. Correlation among flow fields with uniform, inverse-square, and inverse-quintic force fields is obtained using a modified Grashof number.

  16. Influence of radiation reaction force on ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration.

    PubMed

    Capdessus, R; McKenna, P

    2015-05-01

    The role of the radiation reaction force in ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated. For laser intensities ∼10(23)W/cm(2), the action of this force on electrons is demonstrated in relativistic particle-in-cell simulations to significantly enhance the energy transfer to ions in relativistically transparent targets, but strongly reduce the ion energy in dense plasma targets. An expression is derived for the revised piston velocity, and hence ion energy, taking account of energy loses to synchrotron radiation generated by electrons accelerated in the laser field. Ion mass is demonstrated to be important by comparing results obtained with proton and deuteron plasma. The results can be verified in experiments with cryogenic hydrogen and deuterium targets. PMID:26066270

  17. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  18. Characterizing local forces and rearrangements inside a gravity-driven granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackray, Emma; Nordstrom, Kerstin

    While the gravity-driven flow of a granular material in a silo geometry can be modeled by the Beverloo equation, the mesoscale-level particle rearrangements and interactions that drive this flow are not well-understood. We have constructed a quasi-two-dimensional system of bidisperse, millimeter-scale disks with photoelastic properties that make force networks within the material visible. The system is contained in an acrylic box with an adjustable bottom opening. We can approach the clogging transition by adjusting this opening and by adding external forcing to the top of the flowing pile. By placing the system between cross-polarizers, we can obtain high-speed video of this system during flow, and extract intensity signals that can be used to identify and quantify localized, otherwise indeterminate forces. We can simultaneously track individual particle motions, which can be used to identify shear transformation zones in the system. We are therefore able to correlate local forces with rearrangements within the system, and characterize the evolution of this interplay on the approach to the clogging transition.

  19. A radiation-driven stellar wind model with a line force cutoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Mark J.; Friend, David B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a model for a radiation-driven stellar wind in which the driving force is abruptly cut off at an adjustable distance from the star. The model is intended to give a first approximation of the effects of ionizing shocks in a stellar wind on the terminal velocity and mass-loss rate. As expected, the wind velocity is found to decrease after the line force is cut off. The terminal velocity depends directly on the velocity of the wind at the point where the driving force is cut off. The mass-loss rate is found to be unaffected as long as the cutoff is outside the critical point of the flow. The model is applied to the star Tau Sco, a strong X-ray source with an anomalously low terminal velocity. It is shown that this low terminal velocity can be caused by a cutoff of the line force at a distance which is consistent with the idea that the observed X-rate emission is produced by shocks in the wind.

  20. Modeling the mechanics of cells in the cell-spreading process driven by traction forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuqiang; Lai, King W. C.

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical properties of cells and their mechanical interaction with the extracellular environments are main factors influencing cellular function, thus indicating the progression of cells in different disease states. By considering the mechanical interactions between cell adhesion molecules and the extracellular environment, we developed a cell mechanical model that can characterize the mechanical changes in cells during cell spreading. A cell model was established that consisted of various main subcellular components, including cortical cytoskeleton, nuclear envelope, actin filaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. We demonstrated the structural changes in subcellular components and the changes in spreading areas during cell spreading driven by traction forces. The simulation of nanoindentation tests was conducted by integrating the indenting force to the cell model. The force-indentation curve of the cells at different spreading states was simulated, and the results showed that cell stiffness increased with increasing traction forces, which were consistent with the experimental results. The proposed cell mechanical model provides a strategy to investigate the mechanical interactions of cells with the extracellular environments through the adhesion molecules and to reveal the cell mechanical properties at the subcellular level as cells shift from the suspended state to the adherent state.

  1. Forces and moments within layers of driven tearing modes with sheared rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, A. J.; Finn, J. M.; Hegna, C. C.; Terry, P. W.

    2015-10-01

    For driven low amplitude tearing modes in a plasma with sheared rotation, forces on tearing layers due to Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are calculated. First moments about the center of the tearing layer, also due to Maxwell and Reynolds stresses, are also calculated. The forces tend to cause the tearing mode to lock to the phase of the driving perturbation, and the moments determine the evolution of the rotation shear within the layer. These forces and moments are calculated for two constant-ψ regimes of tearing modes, namely, the viscoresistive (VR) regime and the resistive-inertial (RI) regime, and an ordering in terms of the constant-ψ small parameter ɛ ˜δΔ is introduced, with the velocity shear ordered as ˜ɛ . Here, δ is the layer width and Δ the logarithmic jump in the derivative of the flux function across the layer. The forces and first moments are reported to the lowest nonvanishing order in ɛ. The Reynolds moment is analogous to the effect that can drive zonal flows in other contexts. The treatment of the tearing layers is by means of variational principles using Padé approximants (A. J. Cole and J. M. Finn, Phys. Plasmas 21, 032508 (2014)). The usual result for the Maxwell force without rotation shear is recovered for both regimes. That is, the correction due to velocity shear is small; also, the lowest order contribution to the Reynolds force is zero. In the VR regime, we find no first moments up to second order in the constant-ψ parameter. In the RI regime, we find Nm is zero to at least order ɛ3 /2 . In the RI regime, the Reynolds moment Nr is found to be of order ɛ3 /2 and is proportional to minus the rotation shear in the layer; it thus tends to damp out any velocity shear across the layer.

  2. Global mountain snow and ice loss driven by dust and black carbon radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in mountain snow and glaciers have been our strongest indicators of the effects of changing climate. Earlier melt of snow and losses of glacier mass have perturbed regional water cycling, regional climate, and ecosystem dynamics, and contributed strongly to sea level rise. Recent studies however have revealed that in some regions, the reduction of albedo by light absorbing impurities in snow and ice such as dust and black carbon can be distinctly more powerful than regional warming at melting snow and ice. In the Rocky Mountains, dust deposition has increased 5 to 7 fold in the last 150 years, leading to ~3 weeks earlier loss of snow cover from forced melt. In absolute terms, in some years dust radiative forcing there can shorten snow cover duration by nearly two months. Remote sensing retrievals are beginning to reveal powerful dust and black carbon radiative forcing in the Hindu Kush through Himalaya. In light of recent ice cores that show pronounced increases in loading of dust and BC during the Anthropocene, these forcings may have contributed far more to glacier retreat than previously thought. For example, we have shown that the paradoxical end of the Little Ice Age in the European Alps beginning around 1850 (when glaciers began to retreat but temperatures continued to decline and precipitation was unchanged) very likely was driven by the massive increases in deposition to snow and ice of black carbon from industrialization in surrounding nations. A more robust understanding of changes in mountain snow and ice during the Anthropocene requires that we move past simplistic treatments (e.g. temperature-index modeling) to energy balance approaches that assess changes in the individual forcings such as the most powerful component for melt - net solar radiation. Remote sensing retrievals from imaging spectrometers and multispectral sensors are giving us more powerful insights into the time-space variation of snow and ice albedo.

  3. Turbulent Flows Driven by the Mechanical Forcing of an Ellipsoidal Container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, Benjamin; Le Bars, Michael; Grannan, Alexander; Ribeiro, Adolfo; Aurnou, Jonathan; Irphe Team; Spinlab Team

    2015-11-01

    We present a combination of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations modelling geophysically relevant mechanical forcings. Libration and tides correspond to the periodic perturbation of a body's rotation rate and shape, and are both due to gravitational interactions with orbiting companions. Such mechanical forcings can convey a fraction of the rotational energy available and generate intense turbulence in the fluid interior of satellites and planets. We investigate the fluid motions inside a librating or tidally deformed triaxial ellipsoidal container filled with an incompressible fluid. In both cases, the turbulent flow is driven by the elliptic instability which is a triadic resonance between two inertial modes and the base flow. We characterize the transition to turbulence as triadic resonances develop while also investigating both intermittent and sustained regimes. It is shown that the flow is largely independent of the properties of the mechanical forcing, hinting at a possible universal behaviour of the saturated elliptical instability. The existence of such intense flows may play an important role in understanding the thermal and magnetic evolution of celestial bodies. This work was funded by the French Agence Nationale pour la Recherche and the National Science Foundation Geophysics Program.

  4. Robust Operation of Tendon-Driven Robot Fingers Using Force and Position-Based Control Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E (Inventor); Platt, Jr., Robert J. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A (Inventor); Strawser, Philip A (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a tendon-driven finger and a control system. The system controls the finger via a force-based control law when a tension sensor is available, and via a position-based control law when a sensor is not available. Multiple tendons may each have a corresponding sensor. The system selectively injects a compliance value into the position-based control law when only some sensors are available. A control system includes a host machine and a non-transitory computer-readable medium having a control process, which is executed by the host machine to control the finger via the force- or position-based control law. A method for controlling the finger includes determining the availability of a tension sensor(s), and selectively controlling the finger, using the control system, via the force or position-based control law. The position control law allows the control system to resist disturbances while nominally maintaining the initial state of internal tendon tensions.

  5. Atomic-scale motor driven by the current-induced forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chang; Hsu, Bailey C.; Tseng, Allen

    2012-02-01

    From first-principles approaches, we investigate the current-induced forces in an asymmetric molecular junction using Hellmann-Feynman type theorem in the framework of density functional theory in scattering approaches. We observe that it is possible to construct atomic-scale systems where the current-induced forces can be used to rotate the atoms. As an example, we consider a junction formed by the benzene molecule which directly connected to the Pt electrodes, where the benzene molecule is highly tilted. The highly tilted benzene molecule causes the streamline flow of the current to curve considerably to one side of the benzene ring. This could cause a net torque due to the unbalanced current-induced forces, which tend to rotate the benzene molecule in a manner similar to a stream of water rotates a waterwheel. Thus, the highly asymmetric single molecule junctions offer the atomic-scale systems to explore the possibility of nano-motors driven by non-equilibrium electron transport. The authors thank National Science Council (Taiwan) for support under Grant NSC 100-2112-M-012-MY3

  6. Numerical investigations of the force experienced by a wall subject to granular lid-driven flows: regimes and scaling of the mean force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneib, François; Faug, Thierry; Dufour, Frédéric; Naaim, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Discrete element simulations are used to model a two-dimensional gravity-free granular sample, which is trapped between two smooth sidewalls and one bottom rough wall while being subject to a constant shearing velocity at the top under a given confinement pressure. This system, inspired by conventional fluid mechanics, is called a granular lid-driven cavity. Attention is firstly paid to the time-averaged dynamics of the grains once a steady-state is reached. Strong spatial heterogeneities associated with a large-scale vortex formed within the whole volume of the lid-driven cavity are observed. The mean steady force on the sidewall facing the shearing velocity is then investigated in detail for different cavity lengths, shearing velocities and confinement pressures at the top. The ratio of the force on the latter wall to the top confinement pressure force is not constant but depends on both the shearing velocity and the confinement pressure. Above a critical value of the cavity length relative to the wall height and over a wide range of both shearing velocity and top confinement pressure, all data merge into a one-to-one relation between the mean force scaled by the top pressure force and the macroscopic inertial number of the lid-driven cavity. This result reveals the key role played by the inertial rheology of the granular material in the granular force transmission.

  7. Stochastic Forcing of the North Atlantic Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhak, K. C.; Moore, A. M.; Milliff, R. F.; Branstator, G.; Holland, W. R.; Fisher, M.

    2004-12-01

    At midlatitudes, the magnitude of stochastic wind stress forcing due to atmospheric weather is comparable to that associated with the seasonal cycle. Stochastic forcing is therefore likely to have a significant influence on the ocean circulation. In this work, we examine the influence of the stochastic component of the wind stress forcing on the large-scale, wind-driven circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean. To this end a quasi-geostrophic model of the North Atlantic was forced with estimates of the stochastic component of wind stress curl obtained from the NCAR Community Climate Model. Analysis reveals that much of the stochastically-induced variability in the ocean circulation occurs in the vicinity of the western boundary and some major bathymetric features. Using the ideas of generalized stability theory (GST), we find that the patterns of wind stress curl that are most effective for inducing variability in the model have their largest projection on the most nonnormal eigenmodes of the system. These eigenmodes are confined primarily to the western boundary region and are composed of long Rossby wave packets that are Doppler shifted by the Gulf Stream to have eastward group velocity. Linear interference of these eigenmodes yields transient growth of stochastically-induced perturbations, and it is this process that maintains the variance of the stochastically-induced circulations. By examining the model pseudospectra, we find that the nonnormal nature of the system enhances the transient growth of perturbation enstrophy and therefore elevates and also maintains the variance of the stochastically-induced circulations in the aforementioned regions.

  8. Direct force wall shear measurements in pressure-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, J. E.; Tennant, M. H.; Pierce, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Unique, simultaneous direct measurements of the magnitude and direction of the local wall shear stress in a pressure-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer are presented. The flow is also described with an oil streak wall flow pattern, a map of the wall shear stress-wall pressure gradient orientations, a comparison of the wall shear stress directions relative to the directions of the nearest wall velocity as measured with a typical, small boundary layer directionally sensitive claw probe, as well as limiting wall streamline directions from the oil streak patterns, and a comparison of the freestream streamlines and the wall flow streamlines. A review of corrections for direct force sensing shear meters for two-dimensional flows is presented with a brief discussion of their applicability to three-dimensional devices.

  9. An EMG-driven Model to Estimate Muscle Forces and Joint Moments in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qi; Bassett, Daniel N.; Manal, Kurt; Buchanan, Thomas S.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals following stroke exhibit altered muscle activation and movement patterns. Improving the efficiency of gait can be facilitated by knowing which muscles are affected and how they contribute to the pathological pattern. In this paper we present an electromyographically (EMG) driven musculoskeletal model to estimate muscle forces and joint moments. Subject specific EMG for the primary ankle plantar and dorsiflexor muscles, and joint kinematics during walking for four subjects following stroke were used as inputs to the model to predict ankle joint moments during stance. The model’s ability to predict the joint moment was evaluated by comparing the model output with the moment computed using inverse dynamics. The model did predict the ankle moment with acceptable accuracy, exhibiting an average R2 value ranging between 0.87 and 0.92, with RMS errors between 9.7% and 14.7%. The values are in line with previous results for healthy subjects, suggesting that EMG-driven modeling in this population of patients is feasible. It is our hope that such models can provide clinical insight into developing more effective rehabilitation therapies and to assess the effects of an intervention. PMID:19818436

  10. Capillary Force-Driven, Hierarchical Co-Assembly of Dandelion-Like Peptide Microstructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuefei; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Xie, Yanyan; Wang, Mengfan; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-06-24

    The wetting and drying of drops on flexible fibers occurs ubiquitously in nature, and the capillary force underlying this phenomenon has motivated our great interest in learning how to direct supramolecular self-assembly. Here, the hierarchical co-assembly of two aromatic peptides, diphenylalanine (FF) and ferrocene-diphenylalanine (Fc-FF), is reported via sequential, combinatorial assembly. The resulting dandelion-like microstructures have highly complex architectures, where FF microtube arrays serve as the scapes and the Fc-FF nanofibers serve as the flower heads. Homogeneous FF microtubes with diameters tailored between 1 and 9 μm and wall thickness ranging from 70 to 950 nm are initially formed by controlling the degree of supersaturation of the FF and the water content. Once the FF microtubes are formed, the growth of the dandelion-like microstructures is then driven by the capillary force, derived from the wetting and drying of the Fc-FF solution on the FF microtubes. This simple and ingenious strategy offers many opportunities to develop new and creative methods for controlling the hierarchical self-assembly of peptides and thus building highly complex nano and microstructures. PMID:25759325

  11. A systematic review of resilience and mental health outcomes of conflict-driven adult forced migrants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The rising global burden of forced migration due to armed conflict is increasingly recognised as an important issue in global health. Forced migrants are at a greater risk of developing mental disorders. However, resilience, defined as the ability of a person to successfully adapt to or recover from stressful and traumatic experiences, has been highlighted as a key potential protective factor. This study aimed to review systematically the global literature on the impact of resilience on the mental health of adult conflict-driven forced migrants. Methodology Both quantitative and qualitative studies that reported resilience and mental health outcomes among forcibly displaced persons (aged 18+) by way of exploring associations, links, pathways and causative mechanisms were included. Fourteen bibliographic databases and seven humanitarian study databases/websites were searched and a four stage screening process was followed. Results Twenty three studies were included in the final review. Ten qualitative studies identified highlighted family and community cohesion, family and community support, individual personal qualities, collective identity, supportive primary relationships and religion. Thirteen quantitative studies were identified, but only two attempted to link resilience with mental disorders, and three used a specific resilience measure. Over-reliance on cross-sectional designs was noted. Resilience was generally shown to be associated with better mental health in displaced populations, but the evidence on this and underlying mechanisms was limited. Discussion The review highlights the need for more epidemiological and qualitative evidence on resilience in forcibly displaced persons as a potential avenue for intervention development, particularly in resource-poor settings. PMID:25177360

  12. ACOUSTIC RADIATION FORCE-DRIVEN ASSESSMENT OF MYOCARDIAL ELASTICITY USING THE DISPLACEMENT RATIO RATE (DRR) METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Rouze, Ned C.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive method of characterizing myocardial stiffness could have significant implications in diagnosing cardiac disease. Acoustic radiation force (ARF)–driven techniques have demonstrated their ability to discern elastic properties of soft tissue. For the purpose of myocardial elasticity imaging, a novel ARF-based imaging technique, the displacement ratio rate (DRR) method, was developed to rank the relative stiffnesses of dynamically varying tissue. The basis and performance of this technique was demonstrated through numerical and phantom imaging results. This new method requires a relatively small temporal (<1 ms) and spatial (tenths of mm2) sampling window and appears to be independent of applied ARF magnitude. The DRR method was implemented in two in vivo canine studies, during which data were acquired through the full cardiac cycle by imaging directly on the exposed epicardium. These data were then compared with results obtained by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and shear wave velocimetry, with the latter being used as the gold standard. Through the cardiac cycle, velocimetry results portray a range of shear wave velocities from 0.76–1.97 m/s, with the highest velocities observed during systole and the lowest observed during diastole. If a basic shear wave elasticity model is assumed, such a velocity result would suggest a period of increased stiffness during systole (when compared with diastole). Despite drawbacks of the DRR method (i.e., sensitivity to noise and limited stiffness range), its results predicted a similar cyclic stiffness variation to that offered by velocimetry while being insensitive to variations in applied radiation force. PMID:21645966

  13. An accurate elasto-plastic frictional tangential force displacement model for granular-flow simulations: Displacement-driven formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Vu-Quoc, Loc

    2007-07-01

    We present in this paper the displacement-driven version of a tangential force-displacement (TFD) model that accounts for both elastic and plastic deformations together with interfacial friction occurring in collisions of spherical particles. This elasto-plastic frictional TFD model, with its force-driven version presented in [L. Vu-Quoc, L. Lesburg, X. Zhang. An accurate tangential force-displacement model for granular-flow simulations: contacting spheres with plastic deformation, force-driven formulation, Journal of Computational Physics 196(1) (2004) 298-326], is consistent with the elasto-plastic frictional normal force-displacement (NFD) model presented in [L. Vu-Quoc, X. Zhang. An elasto-plastic contact force-displacement model in the normal direction: displacement-driven version, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series A 455 (1991) 4013-4044]. Both the NFD model and the present TFD model are based on the concept of additive decomposition of the radius of contact area into an elastic part and a plastic part. The effect of permanent indentation after impact is represented by a correction to the radius of curvature. The effect of material softening due to plastic flow is represented by a correction to the elastic moduli. The proposed TFD model is accurate, and is validated against nonlinear finite element analyses involving plastic flows in both the loading and unloading conditions. The proposed consistent displacement-driven, elasto-plastic NFD and TFD models are designed for implementation in computer codes using the discrete-element method (DEM) for granular-flow simulations. The model is shown to be accurate and is validated against nonlinear elasto-plastic finite-element analysis.

  14. Elephant overflows: Multi-annual variability in Weddell Sea Deep Water driven by surface forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijers, Andrew; Meredith, Michael; Abrahamsen, Povl; Naviera-Garabato, Alberto; Ángel Morales Maqueda, Miguel; Polzin, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The volume of the deepest and densest water mass in Drake Passage, Lower Weddell Sea Deep Water (LWSDW), is shown to have been decreasing over the last 20 years of observations, with an associated reduction in density driven by freshening. Superimposed on this long term trend is a multi-annual oscillation with a period of 3-5 years. This variability only appears in Drake Passage; observations in the east of the Scotia Sea show a similar long term trend, but with no apparent multi-annual variability. Clues as to the source of this variability may be found on the continental slope at approximately 1000 m immediately north of Elephant Island on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. Here there is an intermittent westward flowing cold/fresh slope current whose volume and properties are strongly correlated with the LWSDW multi-annual variability, although leading the LWSDW by around one year. As the slope current and LWSDW are separated from each other both geographically and in water mass characteristics, their co-variability implies that they are responding to a common forcing, while the lag between deep LWSDW and shallow slope current provides information on the timescale of this response. A newly available high resolution temperature and salinity multi-year time series from the Elephant Island slope at 1000 m is compared with reanalysis and model derived surface fluxes, sea ice extent and wind stress. We find that there are strong positive relationships between the surface wind stress and heat flux over the shelf at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and the properties of the slope current at 1000 m on seasonal to annual timescales. We use tracer release experiments in the Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE) model to investigate the lag between the slope current and LWSDW timeseries and hypothesise that the observed multi-annual variability in both water masses is driven by surface forcing over the shelf and the overflow of modified water from the slope in

  15. 1D self-assembly of chemisorbed thymine on Cu(110) driven by dispersion forces.

    PubMed

    Temprano, I; Thomas, G; Haq, S; Dyer, M S; Latter, E G; Darling, G R; Uvdal, P; Raval, R

    2015-03-14

    Adsorption of thymine on a defined Cu(110) surface was studied using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were undertaken in order to further understand the energetics of adsorption and self-assembly. The combination of RAIRS, TPD, and DFT results indicates that an upright, three-point-bonded adsorption configuration is adopted by the deprotonated thymine at room temperature. DFT calculations show that the upright configuration adopted by individual molecules arises as a direct result of strong O-Cu and N-Cu bonds between the molecule and the surface. STM data reveal that this upright thymine motif self-assembles into 1D chains, which are surprisingly oriented along the open-packed [001] direction of the metal surface and orthogonal to the alignment of the functional groups that are normally implicated in H-bonding interactions. DFT modelling of this system reveals that the molecular organisation is actually driven by dispersion interactions, which cause a slight tilt of the molecule and provide the major driving force for assembly into dimers and 1D chains. The relative orientations and distances of neighbouring molecules are amenable for π-π stacking, suggesting that this is an important contributor in the self-assembly process. PMID:25770505

  16. Hydro-climatic fluctuations driven by natural and anthropogenic forcing in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Yang, D.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrological change is one of the most profound parts of global change which is associated with freshwater resources, food security and balance of ecosystem. Its driving factors in the past need to be understood and quantified for projection of future changes and management of water available. Here by applying the Budyko water-energy balance framework, we analyse the hydro-climatic fluctuations at annual scale and their natural and anthropogenic drivers during past fifty years in six major Chinese drainage basins, from south to north, and from natural basins to human-modified basins. Natural forcing here means the fluctuations in precipitation and temperature, and the shift of precipitation from snow towards rain. And we focus on the impact of change in vegetational coverage, agricultural irrigation and water division as anthropogenic effect. By cross-regional comparison and within-region comparison, we explore the spatial variability of the hydro-climatic change and the type and contribution of different driven factors, especially various human modifications, throughout China. This study shows how the complex coupled system of climate, human and eco-hydrology can be described and explored by an effective and simple model and how the water balance constraints of hydrological basins affect water available throughout China and their spatial variability in the past half century.

  17. 1D self-assembly of chemisorbed thymine on Cu(110) driven by dispersion forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temprano, I.; Thomas, G.; Haq, S.; Dyer, M. S.; Latter, E. G.; Darling, G. R.; Uvdal, P.; Raval, R.

    2015-03-01

    Adsorption of thymine on a defined Cu(110) surface was studied using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were undertaken in order to further understand the energetics of adsorption and self-assembly. The combination of RAIRS, TPD, and DFT results indicates that an upright, three-point-bonded adsorption configuration is adopted by the deprotonated thymine at room temperature. DFT calculations show that the upright configuration adopted by individual molecules arises as a direct result of strong O-Cu and N-Cu bonds between the molecule and the surface. STM data reveal that this upright thymine motif self-assembles into 1D chains, which are surprisingly oriented along the open-packed [001] direction of the metal surface and orthogonal to the alignment of the functional groups that are normally implicated in H-bonding interactions. DFT modelling of this system reveals that the molecular organisation is actually driven by dispersion interactions, which cause a slight tilt of the molecule and provide the major driving force for assembly into dimers and 1D chains. The relative orientations and distances of neighbouring molecules are amenable for π-π stacking, suggesting that this is an important contributor in the self-assembly process.

  18. The dynamics of capillary-driven two-phase flow: the role of nanofluid structural forces.

    PubMed

    Nikolov, Alex; Zhang, Hua

    2015-07-01

    Capillary-driven flows are fundamental phenomena and are involved in many key technological processes, such as oil recovery through porous rocks, ink-jet printing, the bubble dynamics in a capillary, microfluidic devices and labs on chips. Here, we discuss and propose a model for the oil displacement dynamics from the capillary by the nanofluid (which is composed of a liquid suspension of nanoparticles); we elucidate the physics of the novelty of the phenomenon and its application. The oil displacement by the nanofluid flow is a multi-stage phenomenon, first leading to the oil film formation on the capillary wall, its break-up, and retraction over the capillary wall; this lead to the formation of the oil double concave meniscus. With time, the process repeats itself, leading to the formation of a regular "necklace" of oil droplets inside the capillary. Finally, the oil droplets are separated by the nanofluid film from the capillary wall. The light reflected differential interferometry technique is applied to investigate the nanofluid interactions with the glass wall. We find nanoparticles tend to self-structure into multiple layers close to the solid wall, which cause the structural forces to arise that lead to the oil displacement from the capillary. This research is expected to benefit the understanding of nanofluid phenomena in a capillary and promote their use in technological applications. PMID:25465201

  19. Effect of Pressing Force Applied to a Rotor on Disk-Type Ultrasonic Motor Driven by Self-Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Chiharu; Tomikawa, Yoshiro; Takahashi, Sadayuki; Takano, Takehiro

    1998-05-01

    In this paper the relationship between the pressing force applied to a rotor and the rotation characteristic of an ultrasonic motor driven by self-oscillation are discussed.The motor used here is an in-phase drive-type ultrasonic motor using two degenerate bending vibration modes of a disk.The picking-up electrical signal caused by self-oscillation is positively fed back into the piezoelectric ceramics for driving through an operational amplifier and a step-up transformer. The pressing force applied to a rotor was measured using a force gauge coupled to the shaft of the ultrasonic motor. As a result, it was confirmed that the selection of the picking-up position for the feedback signal is important for a stable starting and running of the disk-type ultrasonic motor driven by self-oscillation.

  20. Delineating the Barotropic and Baroclinic Mechanisms in the Midlatitude Eddy-Driven Jet Response to Lower-Tropospheric Thermal Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yu; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Gang; Yang, Xiuqun

    2016-04-01

    Observations and climate models have shown that the midlatitude eddy-driven jet can exhibit an evident latitudinal shift in response to lower-tropospheric thermal forcing (e.g., the tropical SST warming during El Niño or extratropical SST anomalies associated with the atmosphere-ocean-sea ice coupling). In addition to the direct thermal wind response, the eddy feedbacks - including baroclinic mechanisms, such as lower-level baroclinic eddy generation, and barotropic mechanisms, such as upper-level wave propagation and breaking - can all contribute to the atmospheric circulation response to lower-level thermal forcing, but their individual roles have not been well explained. In this study, using a nonlinear beta-plane multilevel quasigeostrophic channel model, the mechanisms through which the lower-level thermal forcing induces the jet shift are investigated. By diagnosing the finite-amplitude wave activity (FAWA) budget, the baroclinic and barotropic eddy feedbacks to the lower-level thermal forcing are delineated. Particularly, by examining the transient circulation response after thermal forcing is switched on, it is shown that the lower-level thermal forcing affects the eddy-driven jet rapidly by modifying the upper-level zonal thermal wind distribution and the associated meridional wave propagation and breaking. The anomalous baroclinic eddy generation, however, acts to enhance the latitudinal shift of the eddy-driven jet only in the later stage of transient response. Furthermore, the barotropic mechanism is explicated by overriding exper- iments in which the barotropic flow in the vorticity advection is prescribed. Unlike the conventional baroclinic view, the barotropic eddy feedback, particularly the irreversible PV mixing through barotropic vorticity advection and deformation, plays a major role in the atmospheric circulation response to the lower-level thermal forcing.

  1. Irrelevance of the power stroke for the directionality, stopping force, and optimal efficiency of chemically driven molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R Dean

    2015-01-20

    A simple model for a chemically driven molecular walker shows that the elastic energy stored by the molecule and released during the conformational change known as the power-stroke (i.e., the free-energy difference between the pre- and post-power-stroke states) is irrelevant for determining the directionality, stopping force, and efficiency of the motor. Further, the apportionment of the dependence on the externally applied force between the forward and reverse rate constants of the power-stroke (or indeed among all rate constants) is irrelevant for determining the directionality, stopping force, and efficiency of the motor. Arguments based on the principle of microscopic reversibility demonstrate that this result is general for all chemically driven molecular machines, and even more broadly that the relative energies of the states of the motor have no role in determining the directionality, stopping force, or optimal efficiency of the machine. Instead, the directionality, stopping force, and optimal efficiency are determined solely by the relative heights of the energy barriers between the states. Molecular recognition--the ability of a molecular machine to discriminate between substrate and product depending on the state of the machine--is far more important for determining the intrinsic directionality and thermodynamics of chemo-mechanical coupling than are the details of the internal mechanical conformational motions of the machine. In contrast to the conclusions for chemical driving, a power-stroke is very important for the directionality and efficiency of light-driven molecular machines and for molecular machines driven by external modulation of thermodynamic parameters. PMID:25606678

  2. Irrelevance of the Power Stroke for the Directionality, Stopping Force, and Optimal Efficiency of Chemically Driven Molecular Machines

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R. Dean

    2015-01-01

    A simple model for a chemically driven molecular walker shows that the elastic energy stored by the molecule and released during the conformational change known as the power-stroke (i.e., the free-energy difference between the pre- and post-power-stroke states) is irrelevant for determining the directionality, stopping force, and efficiency of the motor. Further, the apportionment of the dependence on the externally applied force between the forward and reverse rate constants of the power-stroke (or indeed among all rate constants) is irrelevant for determining the directionality, stopping force, and efficiency of the motor. Arguments based on the principle of microscopic reversibility demonstrate that this result is general for all chemically driven molecular machines, and even more broadly that the relative energies of the states of the motor have no role in determining the directionality, stopping force, or optimal efficiency of the machine. Instead, the directionality, stopping force, and optimal efficiency are determined solely by the relative heights of the energy barriers between the states. Molecular recognition—the ability of a molecular machine to discriminate between substrate and product depending on the state of the machine—is far more important for determining the intrinsic directionality and thermodynamics of chemo-mechanical coupling than are the details of the internal mechanical conformational motions of the machine. In contrast to the conclusions for chemical driving, a power-stroke is very important for the directionality and efficiency of light-driven molecular machines and for molecular machines driven by external modulation of thermodynamic parameters. PMID:25606678

  3. A computational model of cerebrospinal fluid production and reabsorption driven by Starling forces.

    PubMed

    Buishas, Joel; Gould, Ian G; Linninger, Andreas A

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence has cast doubt on the classical model of river-like cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow from the choroid plexus to the arachnoid granulations. We propose a novel model of water transport through the parenchyma from the microcirculation as driven by Starling forces. This model investigates the effect of osmotic pressure on water transport between the cerebral vasculature, the extracellular space (ECS), the perivascular space (PVS), and the CSF. A rigorous literature search was conducted focusing on experiments which alter the osmolarity of blood or ventricles and measure the rate of CSF production. Investigations into the effect of osmotic pressure on the volume of ventricles and the flux of ions in the blood, choroid plexus epithelium, and CSF are reviewed. Increasing the osmolarity of the serum via a bolus injection completely inhibits nascent fluid flow production in the ventricles. A continuous injection of a hyperosmolar solution into the ventricles can increase the volume of the ventricle by up to 125%. CSF production is altered by 0.231 μL per mOsm in the ventricle and by 0.835 μL per mOsm in the serum. Water flux from the ECS to the CSF is identified as a key feature of intracranial dynamics. A complete mathematical model with all equations and scenarios is fully described, as well as a guide to constructing a computational model of intracranial water balance dynamics. The model proposed in this article predicts the effects the osmolarity of ECS, blood, and CSF on water flux in the brain, establishing a link between osmotic imbalances and pathological conditions such as hydrocephalus and edema. PMID:25358881

  4. A Three-Dimensional Shape-Based Force and Stiffness-Sensing Platform for Tendon-Driven Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Kouh Soltani, Minou; Khanmohammadi, Sohrab; Ghalichi, Farzan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient shape-based three-axial force and stiffness estimator for active catheters commonly implemented in cardiac ablation. The force-sensing capability provides important feedback for catheterization procedures including real-time control and catheter steering in autonomous navigation systems. The proposed platform is based on the introduced accurate and computationally efficient Cosserat rod model for tendon-driven catheters. The proposed nonlinear Kalman filter formulation for contact force estimation along with the developed catheter model provides a real-time force observer robust to nonlinearities and noise covariance uncertainties. Furthermore, the proposed platform enables stiffness estimation in addition to tip contact force sensing in different operational circumstances. The approach incorporates pose measurements which can be achieved using currently developed pose-sensing systems or imaging techniques. The method makes the approach compatible with the range of forces applied in clinical applications. The simulation and experimental results verify the viability of the introduced force and stiffness-sensing technique. PMID:27367685

  5. A Three-Dimensional Shape-Based Force and Stiffness-Sensing Platform for Tendon-Driven Catheters.

    PubMed

    Kouh Soltani, Minou; Khanmohammadi, Sohrab; Ghalichi, Farzan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient shape-based three-axial force and stiffness estimator for active catheters commonly implemented in cardiac ablation. The force-sensing capability provides important feedback for catheterization procedures including real-time control and catheter steering in autonomous navigation systems. The proposed platform is based on the introduced accurate and computationally efficient Cosserat rod model for tendon-driven catheters. The proposed nonlinear Kalman filter formulation for contact force estimation along with the developed catheter model provides a real-time force observer robust to nonlinearities and noise covariance uncertainties. Furthermore, the proposed platform enables stiffness estimation in addition to tip contact force sensing in different operational circumstances. The approach incorporates pose measurements which can be achieved using currently developed pose-sensing systems or imaging techniques. The method makes the approach compatible with the range of forces applied in clinical applications. The simulation and experimental results verify the viability of the introduced force and stiffness-sensing technique. PMID:27367685

  6. Viscoelastic properties of single polysaccharide molecules determined by analysis of thermally driven oscillations of an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Masaru; Byrne, Katherine; Khatri, Bhavin; McLeish, Tom C B; Radford, Sheena E; Smith, D Alastair

    2004-10-12

    We report on single molecule measurements of the viscoelastic properties of the polysaccharide dextran using a new approach which involves acquiring the power spectral density of the thermal noise of an atomic force microscope cantilever while holding the single molecule of interest under force-clamp conditions. The attractiveness of this approach when compared with techniques which use forced oscillations under constant loading rate conditions is that it is a near-equilibrium measure of mechanical response which provides a more relevant probe of thermally driven biomolecular dynamics. Using a simple harmonic oscillator model of the cantilever-molecule system and by subtracting the response of the free cantilever taking into account hydrodynamic effects, the effective damping zetamol and elastic constant kmol of a single molecule are obtained. The molecular elasticity measured by this new technique shows a dependence on applied force that reflects the chair-boat conformational transition of the pyranose rings of the dextran molecule which is in good agreement with values obtained directly from the gradient of a conventional constant loading rate force-extension curve. The molecular damping is also seen to follow a nontrivial dependence on loading which we suggest indicates that it is internal friction and not work done on the solvent that is the dominant dissipative process. PMID:15461521

  7. Flow in complex domains simulated by Dissipative Particle Dynamics driven by geometry-specific body-forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Deng, Mingge; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how the quality of simulations by Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) of flows in complex geometries is greatly enhanced when driven by body forces suitably tailored to the geometry. In practice, the body force fields are most conveniently chosen to be the pressure gradient of the corresponding Navier-Stokes (N-S) flow. In the first of three examples, the driving-force required to yield a stagnation-point flow is derived from the pressure field of the potential flow for a lattice of counter-rotating line vortices. Such a lattice contains periodic squares bounded by streamlines with four vortices within them. Hence, the DPD simulation can be performed with periodic boundary conditions to demonstrate the value of a non-uniform driving-force without the need to model real boundaries. The second example is an irregular geometry consisting of a 2D rectangular cavity on one side of an otherwise uniform channel. The Navier-Stokes pressure field for the same geometry is obtained numerically, and its interpolated gradient is then employed as the driving-force for the DPD simulation. Finally, we present a third example, where the proposed method is applied to a complex 3D geometry of an asymmetric constriction. It is shown that in each case the DPD simulations closely reproduce the Navier-Stokes solutions. Convergence rates are found to be much superior to alternative methods; in addition, the range of convergence with respect to Reynolds number and Mach number is greatly extended.

  8. Tooth Eruption Results from Bone Remodelling Driven by Bite Forces Sensed by Soft Tissue Dental Follicles: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sarrafpour, Babak; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing; Zoellner, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent tongue, lip and cheek forces influence precise tooth position, so we here examine the possibility that tissue remodelling driven by functional bite-force-induced jaw-strain accounts for tooth eruption. Notably, although a separate true ‘eruptive force’ is widely assumed, there is little direct evidence for such a force. We constructed a three dimensional finite element model from axial computerized tomography of an 8 year old child mandible containing 12 erupted and 8 unerupted teeth. Tissues modelled included: cortical bone, cancellous bone, soft tissue dental follicle, periodontal ligament, enamel, dentine, pulp and articular cartilage. Strain and hydrostatic stress during incisive and unilateral molar bite force were modelled, with force applied via medial and lateral pterygoid, temporalis, masseter and digastric muscles. Strain was maximal in the soft tissue follicle as opposed to surrounding bone, consistent with follicle as an effective mechanosensor. Initial numerical analysis of dental follicle soft tissue overlying crowns and beneath the roots of unerupted teeth was of volume and hydrostatic stress. To numerically evaluate biological significance of differing hydrostatic stress levels normalized for variable finite element volume, ‘biological response units’ in Nmm were defined and calculated by multiplication of hydrostatic stress and volume for each finite element. Graphical representations revealed similar overall responses for individual teeth regardless if incisive or right molar bite force was studied. There was general compression in the soft tissues over crowns of most unerupted teeth, and general tension in the soft tissues beneath roots. Not conforming to this pattern were the unerupted second molars, which do not erupt at this developmental stage. Data support a new hypothesis for tooth eruption, in which the follicular soft tissues detect bite-force-induced bone-strain, and direct bone remodelling at the inner surface of

  9. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  10. Motion of an atom in a weakly driven fiber-Bragg-grating cavity: Force, friction, and diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Le Kien, Fam; Hakuta, K.

    2010-06-15

    We study the translational motion of an atom in the vicinity of a weakly driven nanofiber with two fiber-Bragg-grating mirrors. We calculate numerically and analytically the force, the friction coefficients, and the momentum diffusion. We find that the spatial dependences of the force, the friction coefficients, and the momentum diffusion are very complicated due to the evanescent-wave nature of the atom-field coupling as well as the effect of the van der Waals potential. We show that the time development of the mean number of photons in the cavity closely follows the translational motion of the atom through the nodes and antinodes of the fiber-guided cavity standing-wave field even though the cavity finesse is moderate, the cavity is long, and the probe field is weak.

  11. Vegetation and climate variability in East Asia driven by low-latitude oceanic forcing during the middle to late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jaesoo; Fujiki, Toshiyuki

    2011-09-01

    At centennial to millennial timescales, little is known of C 3 and C 4 plant productivity's responses to past regional climate changes and the dominant forcing factors during the Holocene, although large-scale changes in glacial-interglacial periods have been attributed to changes in aridity, temperature, and CO 2 concentration. We investigated the δ 13C of TOC, C/N ratios, and pollen in samples from a wetland on Jeju Island, Korea. The bulk isotopic signal ranging from -17‰ to -29‰ was partitioned into C 3 and C 4 plant signals by using a binary mixing model and calculating separate organic carbon-accumulation rates for C 3 and C 4 plants (OCAR 3 and OCAR 4) during the last 6500 years. Pollen data indicated that the temperate deciduous broadleaved trees replaced grassland dominated by Artemisia, dry-tolerant grass, and further expanded in the maar. The long-term decreasing trend of Artemisia-dominated grassland was similar to those of δ 13C values and OCAR 4. The multi-centennial to millennial variability superimposed on the gradual increasing trend of OCAR 3 was inversely correlated with those of the sea surface temperature (SST) in the western tropical Pacific (WTP) and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) activity, suggesting that C 3 plants have stronger sensitivity to regional climate change driven by oceanic forcing. Our data suggest that vegetation changes in a coastal area in East Asia were affected by monsoonal changes coupled with SST in WTP and ENSO activity. The vegetation change on Jeju Island varied quite differently from change in the westerly pathway, suggesting only a weak influence from high-latitude-driven atmospheric circulation changes. We conclude that centennial- to millennial-scale climate changes in coastal regions of East Asia during the mid- to late-Holocene may have been mainly controlled by low-latitudinal oceanic forcing, including forcing by SST and ENSO activity.

  12. Spinmotive force due to motion of magnetic bubble arrays driven by magnetic field gradient

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Yuta; Hemmatiyan, Shayan; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between local magnetization and conduction electrons is responsible for a variety of phenomena in magnetic materials. It has been recently shown that spin current and associated electric voltage can be induced by magnetization that depends on both time and space. This effect, called spinmotive force, provides for a powerful tool for exploring the dynamics and the nature of magnetic textures, as well as a new source for electromotive force. Here we theoretically demonstrate the generation of electric voltages in magnetic bubble array systems subjected to a magnetic field gradient. It is shown by deriving expressions for the electric voltages that the present system offers a direct measure of phenomenological parameter β that describes non-adiabaticity in the current induced magnetization dynamics. This spinmotive force opens a door for new types of spintronic devices that exploit the field-gradient. PMID:25365971

  13. Mapping of force fields in a capacitively driven radiofrequency plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Chen, M.; Sabo, H.; Laufer, R.; Herdrich, G.; Matthews, L. S.; Hyde, T. W.

    2016-08-01

    > In this paper a method is described that allows mapping of the forces acting on dust particles in a GEC reference cell. Monodisperse particles are dropped into the plasma environment and their trajectories are tracked using a high-speed camera system to determine local accelerations and respective forces. Collecting data from a large number of particle drops allows the identification of three-dimensional vector fields for the acting forces. The procedure is described and multiple examples in which the method has been applied are given. These examples include a simple plasma sheath, plasmas perturbed by a horizontal and vertical dipole magnet, an array of multiple magnets mimicking the fields found at a lunar swirl, and the fields inside a glass box used for particle confinement. Further applicability in other plasma environments will be discussed shortly.

  14. Phase-locking of driven vortex lattices with transverse ac force and periodic pinning

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Kolton, Alejandro B.; Dominguez, Daniel; Gronbech-Jensen, Niels

    2001-10-01

    For a vortex lattice moving in a periodic array we show analytically and numerically that a new type of phase locking occurs in the presence of a longitudinal dc driving force and a transverse ac driving force. This phase locking is distinct from the Shapiro step phase locking found with longitudinal ac drives. We show that an increase in critical current and a fundamental phase-locked step width scale with the square of the driving ac amplitude. Our results should carry over to other systems such as vortex motion in Josephson-junction arrays.

  15. Macrophage motility is driven by frontal-towing with a force magnitude dependent on substrate stiffness.

    PubMed

    Hind, Laurel E; Dembo, Micah; Hammer, Daniel A

    2015-04-01

    The ability of macrophages to properly migrate is crucial to their success as early responders during the innate immune response. Furthermore, improper regulation of macrophage migration is known to contribute to several pathologies. The signaling mechanisms underlying macrophage migration have been previously studied but to date the mechanical mechanism of macrophage migration has not been determined. In this study, we have created the first traction maps of motile primary human macrophages by observing their migration on compliant polyacrylamide gels. We find that the force generated by migrating macrophages is concentrated in the leading edge of the cell - so-called frontal towing - and that the magnitude of this force is dependent on the stiffness of the underlying matrix. With the aid of chemical inhibitors, we show that signaling through the RhoA kinase ROCK, myosin II, and PI3K is essential for proper macrophage force generation. Finally, we show that Rac activation by its GEF Vav1 is crucial for macrophage force generation while activation through its GEF Tiam1 is unnecessary. PMID:25768202

  16. Forced desorption of semiflexible polymers, adsorbed and driven by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Chaudhuri, Debasish

    2016-02-21

    We formulate and characterize a model to describe the dynamics of semiflexible polymers in the presence of activity due to motor proteins attached irreversibly to a substrate, and a transverse pulling force acting on one end of the filament. The stochastic binding-unbinding of the motor proteins and their ability to move along the polymer generate active forces. As the pulling force reaches a threshold value, the polymer eventually desorbs from the substrate. Performing underdamped Langevin dynamics simulation of the polymer, and with stochastic motor activity, we obtain desorption phase diagrams. The correlation time for fluctuations in the desorbed fraction increases as one approaches complete desorption, captured quantitatively by a power law spectral density. We present theoretical analysis of the phase diagram using mean field approximations in the weakly bending limit of the polymer and performing linear stability analysis. This predicts an increase in the desorption force with the polymer bending rigidity, active velocity and processivity of the motor proteins to capture the main features of the simulation results. PMID:26750537

  17. Rotordynamic effects driven by fluid forces from a geometrically imperfect labyrinth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williston, William C., Jr.

    1993-12-01

    The forces on a rotor due to asymmetric pressure distributions resulting from a single gland non-circular labyrinth seal in a circular outer casing are analyzed for the purpose of understanding the possible causes of synchronous vibration due to seal intolerance. A lumped parameter model is developed for flow in the azimuthal direction inside the seal gland. The sealing knife imperfections causing the non-circularity may be due to manufacturing defects or in service ware. The resulting continuity and momentum equations are solved using a regular linear perturbation technique. Results from this model indicate under what conditions seal imperfections can generate forces of the same order of magnitude as rotor mass unbalance.

  18. Observation of the saturation of Langmuir waves driven by ponderomotive force in a large scale plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R. K.; Moody, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kruer, W. L.; Estabrook, K. G.; Wharton, K. B.; Williams, E. A.; Berger, R. L.

    1997-06-22

    We report the observation of amplification of a probe laser beam (I {le} 1 {times} 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) in a large scale ({approximately} 1 mm) plasma by interaction with a pumping laser beam (I = 2 {times} 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) and a stimulated Langmuir wave. When the plasma density is adjusted to allow the Langmuir wave dispersion to match the difference frequency and wave number of the two beams, amplification factors as high as {times} 2.5 result. Interpretation of this amplification as scattering of pump beam energy by the Langmuir wave that is produced by the ponderomotive force of the two beams, allows the dependence of Langmuir wave amplitude on ponderomotive force to be measured. It is found that the Langmuir wave amplitude saturates at a level that depends on ion wave damping, and is generally consistent with secondary ion wave instabilities limiting its growth. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Approach and Coalescence of Gold Nanoparticles Driven by Surface Thermodynamic Fluctuations and Atomic Interaction Forces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Shuai; Cui, Kai; Li, Dangguo; Chen, Darong

    2016-02-23

    The approach and coalescence behavior of gold nanoparticles on a silicon surface were investigated by experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. By analyzing the behavior of the atoms in the nanoparticles in the simulations, it was found that the atoms in a single isolated nanoparticle randomly fluctuated and that the surface atoms showed greater fluctuation. The fluctuation increased as the temperature increased. When there were two or more neighboring nanoparticles, the fluctuating surface atoms of the nanoparticles "flowed" toward the neighboring nanoparticle because of atomic interaction forces between the nanoparticles. With the surface atoms "flowing", the gold nanoparticles approached and finally coalesced. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results. It can be concluded that surface thermodynamic fluctuations and atomic interaction forces are the causes of the approach and coalescence behavior of the gold nanoparticles. PMID:26756675

  20. Heinrich events driven by feedback between ocean forcing and glacial isostatic adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassis, J. N.; Petersen, S. V.; Cathles, L. M. M., IV

    2015-12-01

    One of the most puzzling glaciological features of the past ice age is the episodic discharge of large volumes of icebergs from the Laurentide Ice Sheet, known as Heinrich events. It has been suggested that Heinrich events are caused by internal instabilities in the ice sheet (e.g. the binge-purge oscillation). A purely ice dynamic cycle, however, is at odds with the fact that every Heinrich event occurs during the cold phase of a DO cycle, implying some regional climate connection. Recent work has pointed to subsurface water warming as a trigger for Heinrich events through increased basal melting of an ice shelf extending across the Hudson Strait and connecting with the Greenland Ice Sheet. Such a large ice shelf, spanning the deepest part of the Labrador Sea, has no modern analog and limited proxy evidence. Here we use a width averaged "flowline" model of the Hudson Strait ice stream to show that Heinrich events can be triggered by ocean forcing of a grounded terminus without the need for an ice shelf. At maximum ice extent, bed topography is depressed and the terminus is more sensitive to a subsurface thermal forcing. Once triggered, the retreat is rapid, and continues until isostatic rebound of the bed causes local sea level to drop sufficiently to arrest retreat. Topography slowly rebounds, decreasing the sensitivity to ocean forcing and the ice stream re-advances at a rate that is an order of magnitude slower than collapse. This simple feedback cycle between a short-lived ocean trigger and slower isostatic adjustment can reproduce the periodicity and timing of observed Heinrich events under a range of glaciological and solid earth parameters. Our results suggest that not only does the solid Earth play an important role in regulating ice sheet stability, but that grounded marine terminating portions of ice sheets may be more sensitive to ocean forcing than previously thought.

  1. Numerics of surface acoustic wave (SAW) driven acoustic streaming and radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nama, Nitesh; Barnkob, Rune; Kahler, Christian; Costanzo, Francesco; Jun Huang, Tony

    2015-11-01

    Recently, surface acoustic wave (SAW) based systems have shown great potential for various lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the physical understanding of the precise acoustic fields and associated acoustophoresis is rather limited. In this work, we present a numerical study of the acoustophoretic particle motion inside a SAW-actuated, liquid-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel. We utilize a perturbation approach to divide the flow variables into first- and second-order components. The first-order fields result in a time-averaged acoustic radiation force on suspended particles, as well as the time-averaged body force terms that drive the second-order fields. We model the SAW actuation by a displacement function while we utilize impedance boundary conditions to model the PDMS walls. We identify the precise acoustic fields generated inside the microchannel and investigate a range of particle sizes to characterize the transition from streaming-dominated acoustophoresis to radiation-force-dominated acoustophoresis. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of SAW devices to tune the position of vertical pressure node inside the microchannel by tuning the phase difference between the two incoming surface acoustic waves.

  2. Finite element-based force/moment-driven simulation of orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Geiger, M

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a numerically controlled experimental set-up to predict the movement caused by the force systems of orthodontic devices and to experimentally verify this system. The presented experimental set-up incorporated an artificial tooth fixed via a 3D force/moment sensor to a parallel kinematics robot. An algorithm determining the initial movement of the tooth in its elastic embedding controlled the set-up. The initial tooth movement was described by constant compliances. The constants were obtained prior to the experiment in a parameterised finite element (FE) study on the basis of a validated FE model of a human molar. The long-term tooth movement was assembled by adding up a multiple of incremental steps of initial tooth movements. A pure translational movement of the tooth of about 8 mm resulted for a moment to force ratio of - 8.85 mm, corresponding to the distance between the bracket and the centre of resistance. The correct behaviour of this linear elastic model in its symmetry plane allows for simulating single tooth movement induced by orthodontic devices. PMID:22292517

  3. Field-driven crossover from attractive-to-repulsive Casimir-like force in smectic films.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, I N; Lyra, M L

    2004-11-01

    External fields have a profound effect on the fluctuations of strongly correlated fluids, such as a liquid crystal. Within a harmonic functional integral approach, we compute the fluctuation-induced force between the surfaces of a smectic liquid-crystal film under the presence of an ordering field. In particular, we show that for asymmetrically anchored films, the thermal Casimir interaction energy can be collapsed into a universal form crossing over from a repulsive to an attractive interaction as the film thickness is increased. We discuss the possible relevance of this field effect in nematic-smectic wetting transitions. PMID:15600581

  4. Numerical Study of Electrolytic Flow Instabilities Driven by an Azimuthal Lorentz Force in a Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Barrera, James; Pérez-Espinoza, José Enrique; Ortíz, Alejandro; Cuevas, Sergio; Ramos, Eduardo

    2014-11-01

    We present numerical simulations of the flow produced by an azimuthal Lorentz force in an electromagnetic stirrer. The stirrer consists of a cylindrical cavity with two copper concentric cylindrical electrodes, filled with an electrolytic solution. Underneath the cavity, a permanent magnet creates an almost uniform magnetic field, perpendicular to the circular section of the stirrer. An electric potential difference between the electrodes produces a radial D.C. current that passes through the fluid and interacts with the axial magnetic field, generating an azimuthal Lorentz force that drives the fluid. Experiments have shown the appearance of a flow instability that gives rise to a varying number of anticyclonic vortices for given values of the current intensity and fluid layer thickness. The MHD governing equations are expressed in terms of the velocity, pressure and electric potential. Numerical simulations are carried out using a hybrid Finite volume-Fourier method to ensure periodicity in the azimuthal direction. Numerical results show the formation of different modes of perturbation in the velocity field, which give rise to a varying number of traveling vortical structures. Work supported by CONACYT, Mexico under Project 131399. JPB acknowledges a Grant from CONACYT.

  5. Onset of deglacial warming in West Antarctica driven by local orbital forcing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    WAIS Divide Project Members; Steig, Eric J.; Markle, Bradley R.; Schoenemann, Spruce W.; Ding, Qinghua; Taylor, Kendrick C.; McConnell, Joseph R.; Brook, Edward J.; Sowers, Todd; White, James W. C.; Alley, Richard B.; Chen, Hai; Clow, Gary D.; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Conway, Howard; Fitzpatrick, Joan J.; Hargreaves, Geoffrey; and others

    2013-01-01

    The cause of warming in the Southern Hemisphere during the most recent deglaciation remains a matter of debate. Hypotheses for a Northern Hemisphere trigger, through oceanic redistributions of heat, are based in part on the abrupt onset of warming seen in East Antarctic ice cores and dated to 18,000 years ago, which is several thousand years after high-latitude Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity began increasing from its minimum, approximately 24,000 years ago. An alternative explanation is that local solar insolation changes cause the Southern Hemisphere to warm independently. Here we present results from a new, annually resolved ice-core record from West Antarctica that reconciles these two views. The records show that 18,000 years ago snow accumulation in West Antarctica began increasing, coincident with increasing carbon dioxide concentrations, warming in East Antarctica and cooling in the Northern Hemisphere associated with an abrupt decrease in Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. However, significant warming in West Antarctica began at least 2,000 years earlier. Circum-Antarctic sea-ice decline, driven by increasing local insolation, is the likely cause of this warming. The marine-influenced West Antarctic records suggest a more active role for the Southern Ocean in the onset of deglaciation than is inferred from ice cores in the East Antarctic interior, which are largely isolated from sea-ice changes.

  6. Dehydration-Driven Solvent Exposure of Hydrophobic Surfaces as a Driving Force in Peptide Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Daidone, Isabella; Ulmschneider, Martin; DiNola, Alfredo; Amadei, Andrea; Smith, Jeremy C

    2007-09-01

    Recent work has shown that the nature of hydration of pure hydrophobic surfaces changes with the length scale considered: water hydrogen-bonding networks adapt to small exposed hydrophobic species, hydrating or 'wetting' them at relatively high densities, whereas larger hydrophobic areas are 'dewetted' [Chandler D (2005), Nature 29:640-647]. Here we determine whether this effect is also present in peptides by examining the folding of a {beta}-hairpin (the 14-residue amyloidogenic prion protein H1 peptide), using microsecond time-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Two simulation models are compared, one explicitly including the water molecules, which may thus adapt locally to peptide configurations, and the other using a popular continuum approximation, the generalized Born/surface area implicit solvent model. The results obtained show that, in explicit solvent, peptide conformers with high solvent-accessible hydrophobic surface area indeed also have low hydration density around hydrophobic residues, whereas a concomitant higher hydration density around hydrophilic residues is observed. This dewetting effect stabilizes the fully folded {beta}-hairpin state found experimentally. In contrast, the implicit solvent model destabilizes the fully folded hairpin, tending to cluster hydrophobic residues regardless of the size of the exposed hydrophobic surface. Furthermore, the rate of the conformational transitions in the implicit solvent simulation is almost doubled with respect to that of the explicit solvent. The results suggest that dehydration-driven solvent exposure of hydrophobic surfaces may be a significant factor determining peptide conformational equilibria.

  7. Onset of deglacial warming in West Antarctica driven by local orbital forcing.

    PubMed

    2013-08-22

    The cause of warming in the Southern Hemisphere during the most recent deglaciation remains a matter of debate. Hypotheses for a Northern Hemisphere trigger, through oceanic redistributions of heat, are based in part on the abrupt onset of warming seen in East Antarctic ice cores and dated to 18,000 years ago, which is several thousand years after high-latitude Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity began increasing from its minimum, approximately 24,000 years ago. An alternative explanation is that local solar insolation changes cause the Southern Hemisphere to warm independently. Here we present results from a new, annually resolved ice-core record from West Antarctica that reconciles these two views. The records show that 18,000 years ago snow accumulation in West Antarctica began increasing, coincident with increasing carbon dioxide concentrations, warming in East Antarctica and cooling in the Northern Hemisphere associated with an abrupt decrease in Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. However, significant warming in West Antarctica began at least 2,000 years earlier. Circum-Antarctic sea-ice decline, driven by increasing local insolation, is the likely cause of this warming. The marine-influenced West Antarctic records suggest a more active role for the Southern Ocean in the onset of deglaciation than is inferred from ice cores in the East Antarctic interior, which are largely isolated from sea-ice changes. PMID:23945585

  8. Electrothermally driven high-frequency piezoresistive SiC cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekri, R.; Cambril, E.; Couraud, L.; Bernardi, L.; Madouri, A.; Portail, M.; Chassagne, T.; Moisson, C.; Zielinski, M.; Jiao, S.; Michaud, J.-F.; Alquier, D.; Bouloc, J.; Nony, L.; Bocquet, F.; Loppacher, C.

    2014-08-07

    Cantilevers with resonance frequency ranging from 1 MHz to 100 MHz have been developed for dynamic atomic force microscopy. These sensors are fabricated from 3C-SiC epilayers grown on Si(100) substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. They use an on-chip method both for driving and sensing the displacement of the cantilever. A first gold metallic loop deposited on top of the cantilever is used to drive its oscillation by electrothermal actuation. The sensing of this oscillation is performed by monitoring the resistance of a second Au loop. This metallic piezoresistive detection method has distinct advantages relative to more common semiconductor-based schemes. The optimization, design, fabrication, and characteristics of these cantilevers are discussed.

  9. Interfacial force-driven pattern formation during drying of Aβ (25-35) fibrils.

    PubMed

    Sett, Ayantika; Bag, Sudipta; Dasgupta, Swagata; DasGupta, Sunando

    2015-08-01

    Pattern formation during evaporation of biofluids finds significant applications in the biomedical field for disease identification. Aβ (25-35) is the smallest peptide in the amyloid peptide family that retains the toxicity of a full length peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease and is chosen here as the model solute. Drying experiments on substrates of varying wettability exhibit unique drying patterns of Aβ (25-35) fibrils visualized through fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The unique pattern formations can be interpreted as manifestations of the changes in the self-pinning mechanism with changes in wettability, which in some cases resembles the well-known coffee ring effect. Additionally, the delicate balance between the drag and capillary forces has been perturbed by initiating controlled rates of evaporation and probing their effects on the fibril patterning. PMID:25964177

  10. Variability in a mixed layer ocean model driven by stochastic atmospheric forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, M.A.; Penland, C.

    1996-10-01

    A stochastic model of atmospheric surface conditions, developed from 30 years of data at Ocean Weather Station P in the northeast Pacific, is used to drive a mixed layer model of the upper ocean. The spectral characteristics of anomalies in the four atmospheric variables: air and dewpoint temperature, wind speed and solar radiation, and many ocean features, including the seasonal cycle are reasonably well reproduced in a 500-year model simulation. However, the ocean model slightly underestimates the range of the mean and standard deviation of both temperature and mixed layer depth over the course of the year. The spectrum of the monthly SST anomalies from the model simulation are in close agreement with observations, especially when atmospheric forcing associated with El Nino is included. The spectral characteristics of the midlatitude SST anomalies is consistent with stochastic climate theory proposed by Frankignoul and Hasselmann (1977) for periods up to {approximately}6 months. 72 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Indian and African plate motions driven by the push force of the Réunion plume head.

    PubMed

    Cande, Steven C; Stegman, Dave R

    2011-07-01

    Mantle plumes are thought to play an important part in the Earth's tectonics, yet it has been difficult to isolate the effect that plumes have on plate motions. Here we analyse the plate motions involved in two apparently disparate events--the unusually rapid motion of India between 67 and 52 million years ago and a contemporaneous, transitory slowing of Africa's motion--and show that the events are coupled, with the common element being the position of the Indian and African plates relative to the location of the Réunion plume head. The synchroneity of these events suggests that they were both driven by the force of the Réunion plume head. The recognition of this plume force has substantial tectonic implications: the speed-up and slowdown of India, the possible cessation of convergence between Africa and Eurasia in the Palaeocene epoch and the enigmatic bends of the fracture zones on the Southwest Indian Ridge can all be attributed to the Réunion plume. PMID:21734702

  12. Viscoelastic measurements of single molecules on a millisecond time scale by magnetically driven oscillation of an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Masaru; Byrne, Katherine; Khatri, Bhavin S; Mcleish, Tom C B; Radford, Sheena E; Smith, D Alastair

    2005-05-10

    The dynamical nature of biomolecular systems means that knowledge of their viscoelastic behavior is important in fully understanding function. The linear viscoelastic response can be derived from an analysis of Brownian motion. However, this is a slow measurement and technically demanding for many molecular systems of interest. To address this issue, we have developed a simple method for measuring the full linear viscoelastic response of single molecules based on magnetically driven oscillations of an atomic force microscope cantilever. The cantilever oscillation frequency is periodically swept through the system resonance in less than 200 ms allowing the power spectrum to be obtained rapidly and analyzed with a suitable model. The technique has been evaluated using dextran, a polysaccharide commonly used as a test system for single molecule mechanical manipulation experiments. The monomer stiffness and friction constants were compared with those derived from other methods. Excellent agreement is obtained indicating that the new method accurately and, most importantly, rapidly provides the viscoelastic response of a single molecule between the tip and substrate. The method will be a useful tool for studying systems that change their structure and dynamic response on a time scale of 100-200 ms, such as protein folding and unfolding under applied force. PMID:16032901

  13. LES simulation of synoptic, mechanic-forcing, and thermally-driven flow interaction of Granite Mountain, UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Knievel, J. C.; Pace, J.; Zajic, D.; De Wekker, S.

    2013-12-01

    The NCAR-ATEC (National Center for Atmospheric Research and Army test and Evaluation Command) RTFDDA-LES (real-time four-dimensional data assimilation and LES simulation) model was employed to study multi-scale flow interactions at Granite Mountain and its surrounding areas. Granite Mountain is a locally erected mountain peak with an area of ~6x10 km2 located in the US Army Dugway Providing Ground, UT. The mountain sits in the midwest inter-mountains, but is surrounded by relatively flat terrain nearby. The Granite Peak is about 700m above the surrounding flat terrain. It significantly affects the flows in the DPG test area and often greatly impacts on the DPG test activities. The area has been selected by mountain terrain atmospheric modeling and observations (MATERHORN) program as a test bed for improving Meteorological Modeling in Mountain Terrain. In this paper, RTFDDA-LES was employed to study the multiple-scale flow interaction of synoptic, mechanic forcing, and thermally driven flows of Granite Mountain. Six nested-grid domains with grid sizes of 8100, 2700, 900, 300, 100, and 33m, respectively, were configured and a 48h simulation was carried out simultaneously on the six nested grids for a two-day period during Spring 2012. The data assimilation of RTFDDA was turned on for the mesoscale domains (1, 2 and 3), while the LES domains (4, 5 and 6) were run with 'free forecasting'. The mesoscale data assimilation on the coarse meshes provide realistic mesoscale forcing for the LES simulation, so that the model outputs of the LES domains can be reasonably verified using high-resolution (every 1 - 5 minutes) measurements of DPG surface stations and multi-level met-tower in the vicinity of Granite Mountain. The model successfully simulates the overall flow evolutions during the two-day period and also many features of microscale flows for different time periods of the day (with different thermally-forcing and boundary layer stability) and under varying larger

  14. Dielectrophoresis-magnetophoresis force driven magnetic nanoparticle movement in transformer oil based magnetic fluids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Chul; Lee, Sangyoup

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic fluid is a stable colloidal mixture contained magnetic nanoparticles coated with a surfactant. Recently, it was found that the fluid has properties to increase heat transfer and dielectric characteristics due to the added magnetic nanoparticles in transformer oils. The magnetic nanoparticles in the fluid experience an electrical force directed toward the place of maximum electric field strength when the electric field is applied. And when the external magnetic field is applied, the magnetic nanoparticles form long chains oriented along the direction of the field. The behaviors of magnetic nanoparticles in both the fields must play an important role in changing the heat transfer and dielectric characteristics of the fluids. In this study, we visualized the movement of magnetic nanoparticles influenced by both the fields applied in-situ. It was found that the magnetic nanoparticles travel in the region near the electrode by the electric field and form long chains along the field direction by the magnetic field. It can be inferred that the movement of magnetic nanoparticles appears by both the fields, and the breakdown voltage of transformer oil based magnetic fluids might be influenced according to the dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:24205624

  15. Lamb Wave-Based Acoustic Radiation Force-Driven Particle Ring Formation Inside a Sessile Droplet.

    PubMed

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Ha, Byunghang; Park, Jinsoo; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate an acoustofluidic device using Lamb waves (LWs) to manipulate polystyrene (PS) microparticles suspended in a sessile droplet of water. The LW-based acoustofluidic platform used in this study is advantageous in that the device is actuated over a range of frequencies without changing the device structure or electrode pattern. In addition, the device is simple to operate and cheap to fabricate. The LWs, produced on a piezoelectric substrate, attenuate inside the fluid and create acoustic streaming flow (ASF) in the form of a poloidal flow with toroidal vortices. The PS particles experience direct acoustic radiation force (ARF) in addition to being influenced by the ASF, which drive the concentration of particles to form a ring. This phenomenon was previously attributed to the ASF alone, but the present experimental results confirm that the ARF plays an important role in forming the particle ring, which would not be possible in the presence of only the ASF. We used a range of actuation frequencies (45-280 MHz), PS particle diameters (1-10 μm), and droplet volumes (5, 7.5, and 10 μL) to experimentally demonstrate this phenomenon. PMID:26937678

  16. A new model for biological effects of radiation and the driven force of molecular evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Takahiro; Manabe, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Hiroo; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Bando, Masako

    We proposed a new mathematical model to estimate biological effects of radiation, which we call Whack-A-Mole (WAM) model. A special feature of WAM model is that it involves the dose rate of radiation as a key ingredient. We succeeded to reproduce the experimental data of various species concerning the radiation induced mutation frequencies. From the analysis of the mega-mouse experiments, we obtained the mutation rate per base-pair per year for mice which is consistent with the so-called molecular clock in evolution genetics, 10-9 mutation/base-pair/year. Another important quantity is the equivalent dose rate for the whole spontaneous mutation, deff. The value of deff for mice is 1.1*10-3 Gy/hour which is much larger than the dose rate of natural radiation (10- (6 - 7) Gy/hour) by several orders of magnitude. We also analyzed Drosophila data and obtained essentially the same numbers. This clearly indicates that the natural radiation is not the dominant driving force of the molecular evolution, but we should look for other factors, such as miscopy of DNA in duplication process. We believe this is the first quantitative proof of the small contribution of the natural radiation in the molecular evolution.

  17. A self-stabilized coherent phonon source driven by optical forces

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Urrios, D.; Capuj, N. E.; Gomis-Bresco, J.; Alzina, F.; Pitanti, A.; Griol, A.; Martínez, A.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel injection scheme that allows for “phonon lasing” in a one-dimensional opto-mechanical photonic crystal, in a sideband unresolved regime and with cooperativity values as low as 10−2. It extracts energy from a cw infrared laser source and is based on the triggering of a thermo-optical/free-carrier-dispersion self-pulsing limit-cycle, which anharmonically modulates the radiation pressure force. The large amplitude of the coherent mechanical motion acts as a feedback that stabilizes and entrains the self-pulsing oscillations to simple fractions of the mechanical frequency. A manifold of frequency-entrained regions with two different mechanical modes (at 54 and 122 MHz) are observed as a result of the wide tuneability of the natural frequency of the self-pulsing. The system operates at ambient conditions of pressure and temperature in a silicon platform, which enables its exploitation in sensing, intra-chip metrology or time-keeping applications. PMID:26503448

  18. In Vivo Cardiac, Acoustic-Radiation-Force-Driven, Shear Wave Velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Stephen J.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2009-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) was employed to track acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) -induced shear waves in the mid-myocardium of the left ventricular free wall (LVFW) of a beating canine heart. Shear waves were generated and tracked with a linear ultrasound transducer that was placed directly on the exposed epicardium. Acquinsition was ECG-gated arid coincided with the mid-diastolic portion of the cardiac cycle. Axial displacement profiles consistent with shear wave propagation were clearly evident in all SWEI acquisitions (i.e., those including an ARFI excitation); displacement data from control cases (i.e., sequences lacking an ARFI excitation) offered no evidence of shear wave propagation and yielded a peak absolute mean displacement below 0.31 μm after motion filtering. Shear wave velocity estimates ranged from 0.82 to 2.65 m/s and were stable across multiple heartbeats for the same interrogation region, with coefficients of variation less than 19% for all matched acquisitions. Variations in velocity estimates suggest a spatial dependence of shear wave velocity through the mid-myocardium of the LVFW, with velocity estimates changing, in limited cases, through depth and lateral position. PMID:19771962

  19. Influence of pressure driven secondary flows on the behavior of turbofan forced mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B.; Povinelli, L.; Gerstenmaier, W.

    1980-01-01

    A finite difference procedure was developed to analyze the three dimensional subsonic turbulent flows in turbofan forced mixer nozzles. The method is based on a decomposition of the velocity field into primary and secondary flow components which are determined by solution of the equations governing primary momentum, secondary vorticity, thermal energy, and continuity. Experimentally, a strong secondary flow pattern was identified which is associated with the radial inflow and outflow characteristics of the core and fan streams and forms a very strong vortex system aligned with the radial interface between the core and fan regions. A procedure was developed to generate a similar generic secondary flow pattern in terms of two constants representing the average radial outflow or inflow in the core and fan streams as a percentage of the local streamwise velocity. This description of the initial secondary flow gave excellent agreement with experimental data. By identifying the nature of large scale secondary flow structure and associating it with characteristic mixer nozzle behavior, it is felt that the cause and effect relationship between lobe design and nozzle performance can be understood.

  20. EMG-Driven Forward-Dynamic Estimation of Muscle Force and Joint Moment about Multiple Degrees of Freedom in the Human Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Massimo; Reggiani, Monica; Farina, Dario; Lloyd, David G.

    2012-01-01

    This work examined if currently available electromyography (EMG) driven models, that are calibrated to satisfy joint moments about one single degree of freedom (DOF), could provide the same musculotendon unit (MTU) force solution, when driven by the same input data, but calibrated about a different DOF. We then developed a novel and comprehensive EMG-driven model of the human lower extremity that used EMG signals from 16 muscle groups to drive 34 MTUs and satisfy the resulting joint moments simultaneously produced about four DOFs during different motor tasks. This also led to the development of a calibration procedure that allowed identifying a set of subject-specific parameters that ensured physiological behavior for the 34 MTUs. Results showed that currently available single-DOF models did not provide the same unique MTU force solution for the same input data. On the other hand, the MTU force solution predicted by our proposed multi-DOF model satisfied joint moments about multiple DOFs without loss of accuracy compared to single-DOF models corresponding to each of the four DOFs. The predicted MTU force solution was (1) a function of experimentally measured EMGs, (2) the result of physiological MTU excitation, (3) reflected different MTU contraction strategies associated to different motor tasks, (4) coordinated a greater number of MTUs with respect to currently available single-DOF models, and (5) was not specific to an individual DOF dynamics. Therefore, our proposed methodology has the potential of producing a more dynamically consistent and generalizable MTU force solution than was possible using single-DOF EMG-driven models. This will help better address the important scientific questions previously approached using single-DOF EMG-driven modeling. Furthermore, it might have applications in the development of human-machine interfaces for assistive devices. PMID:23300725

  1. General circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating: Significance of planetary rotation and polar eddy heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-04-01

    A high significance of planetary rotation and poleward eddy heat fluxes is determined for general circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating. In a high-resolution simplified Venus general circulation model, a planetary-scale mixed Rossby-gravity wave with meridional winds across the poles produces strong poleward heat flux and indirect circulation. This strong poleward heat transport induces downward momentum transport of indirect cells in the regions of weak high-latitude jets. It also reduces the meridional temperature gradient and vertical shear of the high-latitude jets in accordance with the thermal wind relation below the cloud layer. In contrast, strong equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets form in the cloud layer in the absence of polar indirect cells in an experiment involving Titan's rotation. Both the strong midlatitude jet and meridional temperature gradient are maintained in the situation that eddy horizontal heat fluxes are weak. The presence or absence of strong poleward eddy heat flux is one of the important factors determining the slow or fast superrotation state in the cloud layer through the downward angular momentum transport and the thermal wind relation. For fast Earth rotation, a weak global-scale Hadley circulation of the low-density upper atmosphere maintains equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets above the cloud layer, whereas multiple meridional circulations suppress the zonal wind speed below the cloud layer.

  2. Generation of Nonlinear Force Driven Blocks from Skin Layer Interaction of Petawatt-Picosecond Laser Pulses for ICF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Hora; Cang, Yu; He, Xiantu; Zhang, Jie; F, Osman; J, Badziak; F, P. Boody; S, Gammino; R, Höpfl; K, Jungwirth; B, Kralikova; J, Kraska; L, Laska; Liu, Hong; G, H. Miley; P, Parys; Peng, Hansheng; M, Pfeifer; K, Rohlena; J, Skala; Z, Skladanowski; L, Torrisi; J, Ullschmied; J, Wolowski; Zhang, Weiyan

    2004-02-01

    The discovery of the essential difference of maximum ion energy for TW - ps laser plasma interaction compared with the 100 ns laser pulses [1] led to the theory of a skin layer model [2] where the control of prepulses suppressed the usual relativistic self-focusing. The subsequent generation of two nonlinear force driven blocks has been demonstrated experimentally and in extensive numerical studies where one block moves against the laser light and the other block into the irradiated target. These blocks of nearly solid state density DT plasma correspond to ion beam current densities [3] exceeding 1010 A/cm2 where the ion velocity can be chosen up to highly relativistic values. Using the results of the expected ignition of DT fuel by light ion beams, a self-sustained fusion reaction front may be generated even into uncompressed solid DT fuel similar to the Nuckolls-Wood [4] scheme where 10 kJ laser pulses produce 100 MJ fusion energy. This new and simplified scheme of laser-ICF needs and optimisation of the involved parameters.

  3. Towards all-optical quantification of force- and power-based performance metrics in cilia-driven fluid flow physiology (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Loewenberg, Michael; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    In pulmonary ciliary physiology, most tissue-level measures of performance focus on flow velocity. However, as with the heart, fluid transport performance requires an understanding of force and power generation under various loading conditions. Here, we present our initial work in quantifying shearing force and net power dissipation from OCT-based cilia-driven fluid flow velocimetry. Typical measurements of force require invasive contact with the ciliated surface, while measurements of power rely on metabolic consumption that reflect energy consumption not just from cilia, but from the entirety of cellular processes. We will present two different approaches to non-contact, all-optical shear force and power dissipation physiology. First, we developed a lumped-parameter model of flow driven by a ciliated surface. The lumped-parameter model yields semi-quantitative, Ohm's law-type relationships (F=U*R and P=U*F) between flow velocity (U), shear force (F), viscous resistance (R), and power dissipation (P). This model allows a lumped (spatially averaged) approach to evaluate force and power performance under viscous loading, an approach we demonstrated using ciliated Xenopus embryos. Second, we numerically estimate shear force and power dissipation using flow velocity fields acquired using OCT. Specifically, the velocity gradient tensor estimated from the flow velocity field contains the required information to estimate both shear force and net power dissipation. We have preliminary data using this numerical approach in Xenopus. Our results support the feasibility of an all-optical approach to estimating mesoscopic measures of force and power in ciliary physiology.

  4. Direction detectable static magnetic field imaging by frequency-modulated magnetic force microscopy with an AC magnetic field driven soft magnetic tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hitoshi; Ito, Ryoichi; Egawa, Genta; Li, Zhenghua; Yoshimura, Satoru

    2011-04-01

    Direction detectable static magnetic field imaging, which directly distinguishes the up and down direction of static perpendicular magnetic field from a sample surface and the polarity of magnetic charges on the surface, was demonstrated for CoCrPt-SiO2 perpendicular magnetic recording media based on a frequency-modulated magnetic force microscopy (FM-MFM), which uses a frequency modulation of the cantilever oscillation induced by an alternating force from the tip-sample magnetic interaction. In this study, to generate the alternating force, we used a NiFe soft magnetic tip driven by the ac magnetic field of a soft ferrite core and imaged the direction and the amplitude of the static magnetic field from the recorded bits. This method enables measurement of the static magnetic field near a sample surface, which is masked by short range forces of the surface. The present method will be effective in analyzing the microscopic magnetic domain structure of hard magnetic samples.

  5. Eddy permitting simulation of the global ocean model COCO4.3 driven by the CORE inter- annual forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Hasumi, H.; Komuro, Y.; Sakamoto, T. T.

    2008-12-01

    We are developing ocean component of the CCSR/NIES/FRCGC climate model to conduct high-resolution global warming simulations under IPCC scenarios. This presentation focuses on the performance and the behavior and role of eddies in the global ocean. The Ocean model is CCSR Ocean Component Model (COCO) version 4.3, which is a z-coordinate, free-surface primitive equation ocean model with multi-category sea ice model. The geographical North Pole is moved to 40W, 77N on Greenland and the geographical South Pole is moved to 40E, 77S. The computational domain covers global ocean, with zonal grid spacing of 0.28125 degree and meridional grid spacing of 0.1875 degree. There are 50 vertical levels excluding the bottom boundary layer, and 7 of which are within the sigma-coordinate (~42m). The model employs the momentum advection algorithm of Ishizaki and Motoi (1991), which is a pseudo-enstrophy preserving scheme with a consideration for up-/down-sloping advection. The model's tracer advection is based on the second-order moment (SOM) advection scheme of Prather, M. J. (1986). The vertical mixing of momentum and tracers is represented by a harmonic form. The coefficients are calculated by the parameterization of Noh and Kim (1999), but the formulation is slightly modified (see K1-developers, 2004). As background diffusivity, a minimum value is set for each level, suggested by Tsujino et al. (2000). The Smagorinsky's (1963) biharmonic viscosity is applied for the lateral momentum mixing, and its coefficient is dependent on the grid width and the strain rate, and its controlled by a single non- dimensional parameter whose values is taken to be 2.5. The constant coefficient biharmonic diffusion is applied with the coefficient value of 1.0E9 m4/s. The model is driven by the inter-annual forcing data set adopted by common ocean-ice reference experiments (CORE). The results are reported by focusing on heat transport in strong eddy activity regions, such as the Kuroshio

  6. EMGD-FE: an open source graphical user interface for estimating isometric muscle forces in the lower limb using an EMG-driven model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the “EMG Driven Force Estimator (EMGD-FE)”, a Matlab® graphical user interface (GUI) application that estimates skeletal muscle forces from electromyography (EMG) signals. Muscle forces are obtained by numerically integrating a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that simulates Hill-type muscle dynamics and that utilises EMG signals as input. In the current version, the GUI can estimate the forces of lower limb muscles executing isometric contractions. Muscles from other parts of the body can be tested as well, although no default values for model parameters are provided. To achieve accurate evaluations, EMG collection is performed simultaneously with torque measurement from a dynamometer. The computer application guides the user, step-by-step, to pre-process the raw EMG signals, create inputs for the muscle model, numerically integrate the ODEs and analyse the results. Results An example of the application’s functions is presented using the quadriceps femoris muscle. Individual muscle force estimations for the four components as well the knee isometric torque are shown. Conclusions The proposed GUI can estimate individual muscle forces from EMG signals of skeletal muscles. The estimation accuracy depends on several factors, including signal collection and modelling hypothesis issues. PMID:24708668

  7. Convective flow patterns in an eight-box cube driven by combined wind stress, thermal and saline forcing. (Reannouncement with new availability information). Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.X.; Stommel, H.M.

    1992-02-15

    An eight-box cube model ocean, simulating the subpolar gyre in the North Atlantic, is formulated in order to understand how the wind-induced horizontal gyre affects the thermohaline circulation and its catastrophe. The model is forced from above by thermal conduction and freshwater flux. The structure of the thermohaline circulation and its catastrophe during the process of gradually increasing or reducing the evaporation/precipitation are examined. The results indicate that, although adding the third dimension and a wind-driven horizontal gyre of medium strength splits the catastrophe into several separate ones, only some of these catastrophes remain of significant amplitude. With choice of parameters appropriate for the North Atlantic, the model predicts a single stable state, circulating in the thermal sense (sinking at the pole). This can be driven smoothly to a reversed saline sense (sinking at the equator), without catastrophe, by increasing the precipitation/evaporation rate beyond 3 times the present-day value.

  8. Fo-driven Rotation in the ATP Synthase Direction against the Force of F1 ATPase in the FoF1 ATP Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Martin, James; Hudson, Jennifer; Hornung, Tassilo; Frasch, Wayne D.

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms rely on the FoF1 ATP synthase to maintain the non-equilibrium chemical gradient of ATP to ADP and phosphate that provides the primary energy source for cellular processes. How the Fo motor uses a transmembrane electrochemical ion gradient to create clockwise torque that overcomes F1 ATPase-driven counterclockwise torque at high ATP is a major unresolved question. Using single FoF1 molecules embedded in lipid bilayer nanodiscs, we now report the observation of Fo-dependent rotation of the c10 ring in the ATP synthase (clockwise) direction against the counterclockwise force of ATPase-driven rotation that occurs upon formation of a leash with Fo stator subunit a. Mutational studies indicate that the leash is important for ATP synthase activity and support a mechanism in which residues aGlu-196 and cArg-50 participate in the cytoplasmic proton half-channel to promote leash formation. PMID:25713065

  9. Effects of eddy viscosity and thermal conduction and Coriolis force in the dynamics of gravity wave driven fluctuations in the OH nightglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, M. P.

    1988-01-01

    The chemical-dynamical model of Walterscheid et al. (1987), which describes wave-driven fluctuations in OH nightglow, was modified to include the effects of both eddy thermal conduction and viscosity, as well as the Coriolis force (with the shallow atmosphere approximation). Using the new model, calculations were performed for the same nominal case as used by Walterscheid et al. but with only wave periods considered. For this case, the Coriolis force was found to be unimportant at any wave period. For wave periods greater than 2 or 3 hours, the inclusion of thermal conduction alone greatly modified the results (in terms of a complex ratio 'eta' which expresses the relationship between the intensity oscillation about the time-averaged intensity and the temperature oscillation about the time-averaged temperature); this effect was reduced with the further inclusion of the eddy viscosity.

  10. Wavelength dependence of eddy dissipation and Coriolis force in the dynamics of gravity wave driven fluctuations in the OH nightglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, M. P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of inclusion of Coriolis force and eddy dissipation in the gravity wave dynamics theory of Walterscheid et al. (1987). It was found that the values of the ratio 'eta' (where eta is a complex quantity describing the ralationship between the intensity oscillation about the time-averaged intensity, and the temperature oscillation about the time-averaged temperature) strongly depend on the wave period and the horizontal wavelength; thus, if comparisons are to be made between observations and theory, horizontal wavelengths will need to be measured in conjunction with the OH nightglow measurements. For the waves with horizontal wavelengths up to 1000 km, the eddy dissipation was found to dominate over the Coriolis force in the gravity wave dynamics and also in the associated values of eta. However, for waves with horizontal wavelengths of 10,000 km or more, the Coriolis force cannot be neglected; it has to be taken into account along with the eddy dissipation.

  11. Anomalous pinch of turbulent plasmas driven by the magnetic-drift-induced Lorentz force through the Stokes-Einstein relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaojie

    2016-07-01

    It is found that the Lorentz force generated by the magnetic drift drives a generic plasma pinch flux of particle, energy and momentum through the Stokes-Einstein relation. The proposed theoretical model applies for both electrons and ions, trapped particles, and passing particles. An anomalous parallel current pinch due to the electrostatic turbulence with long parallel wave-length is predicted.

  12. Laser-optical path to nuclear energy without radioactivity: Fusion of hydrogen-boron by nonlinear force driven plasma blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Malekynia, B.; Azizi, N.

    2009-10-01

    Anomalous interaction of terawatt-picosecond laser pulses allows side-on ignition of solid state density fusion fuel with the unexpected possibility of igniting uncompressed hydrogen-boron p- 11B. Suppression of relativistic self-focusing by using very clean laser pulses with an extremely high contrast ratio is essential to achieve ignition thresholds only ten times more difficult than fusion of deuterium-tritium (DT). This opens the possibility for laser driven fusion energy without neutrons and less radioactivity than from burning coal. The complex nonlinear optical properties involved are elaborated.

  13. Floating Chip Mounting System Driven by Repulsive Force of Permanent Magnets for Multiple On-Site SPR Immunoassay Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Tsutomu; Tobita, Tatsuya; Miura, Toru; Iwasaki, Yuzuru; Seyama, Michiko; Inoue, Suzuyo; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Haga, Tsuneyuki; Tamechika, Emi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a measurement chip installation/removal mechanism for a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunoassay analysis instrument designed for frequent testing, which requires a rapid and easy technique for changing chips. The key components of the mechanism are refractive index matching gel coated on the rear of the SPR chip and a float that presses the chip down. The refractive index matching gel made it possible to optically couple the chip and the prism of the SPR instrument easily via elastic deformation with no air bubbles. The float has an autonomous attitude control function that keeps the chip parallel in relation to the SPR instrument by employing the repulsive force of permanent magnets between the float and a float guide located in the SPR instrument. This function is realized by balancing the upward elastic force of the gel and the downward force of the float, which experiences a leveling force from the float guide. This system makes it possible to start an SPR measurement immediately after chip installation and to remove the chip immediately after the measurement with a simple and easy method that does not require any fine adjustment. Our sensor chip, which we installed using this mounting system, successfully performed an immunoassay measurement on a model antigen (spiked human-IgG) in a model real sample (non-homogenized milk) that included many kinds of interfering foreign substances without any sample pre-treatment. The ease of the chip installation/removal operation and simple measurement procedure are suitable for frequent on-site agricultural, environmental and medical testing. PMID:23202030

  14. Forces driven by morphogenesis modulate Twist Expression to determine Anterior Mid-gut Differentiation in Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farge, Emmanuel

    2008-03-01

    By combining magnetic tweezers to in vivo laser ablation, we locally manipulate Drosophila embryonic tissues with physiologically relevant forces. We demonstrate that high level of Twist expression in the stomodeal primordium is mechanically induced in response to compression by the 60±20 nN force developed during germ-band extension (GBE). We find that this force triggers the junctional release and nuclear translocation of Armadillo involved in Twist mechanical induction in the stomodeum in a Src42A dependent way. Finally, stomodeal-specific RNAi-mediated silencing of Twist during compression impairs the differentiation of midgut cells, as revealed by strong defects in Dve expression and abnormal larval lethality. Thus, mechanical induction of Twist overexpression in stomodeal cells is necessary for subsequent midgut differentiation. In collaboration with Nicolas Desprat, Willy Supatto, and Philippe-Alexandre Pouille, MGDET, UMR168 CNRS, Institut Curie11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005, Paris, France; and Emmanuel Beaurepaire, LOB, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS and INSERM U 696, 91128 Palaiseau, France.

  15. Magnetic force driven six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system using a phase compensated velocity sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongdae; Park, Kyihwan; Kim, Sangyoo

    2009-04-15

    A six-axis active vibration isolation system (AVIS) is developed using voice coil actuators. Point contact configuration is employed to have an easy assembly of eight voice coil actuators to an upper and a base plates. The velocity sensor, using an electromagnetic principle that is commonly used in the vibration control, is investigated since its phase lead characteristic causes an instability problem for a low frequency vibration. The performances of the AVIS are investigated in the frequency domain and finally validated by comparing with the passive isolation system using the atomic force microscope images.

  16. Cell Origami: Self-Folding of Three-Dimensional Cell-Laden Microstructures Driven by Cell Traction Force

    PubMed Central

    Kuribayashi-Shigetomi, Kaori; Onoe, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method of generating three-dimensional (3D) cell-laden microstructures by applying the principle of origami folding technique and cell traction force (CTF). We harness the CTF as a biological driving force to fold the microstructures. Cells stretch and adhere across multiple microplates. Upon detaching the microplates from a substrate, CTF causes the plates to lift and fold according to a prescribed pattern. This self-folding technique using cells is highly biocompatible and does not involve special material requirements for the microplates and hinges to induce folding. We successfully produced various 3D cell-laden microstructures by just changing the geometry of the patterned 2D plates. We also achieved mass-production of the 3D cell-laden microstructures without causing damage to the cells. We believe that our methods will be useful for biotechnology applications that require analysis of cells in 3D configurations and for self-assembly of cell-based micro-medical devices. PMID:23251426

  17. Near-wall measurements of the bubble- and Lorentz-force-driven convection at gas-evolving electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczyzmalski, Dominik; Weier, Tom; Kähler, Christian J.; Cierpka, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Chemical energy storage systems, e.g., in the form of hydrogen or methanol, have a great potential for the establishment of volatile renewable energy sources due to the large energy density. The efficiency of hydrogen production through water electrolysis is, however, limited by gas bubbles evolving at the electrode's surface and can be enhanced by an accelerated bubble detachment. In order to characterize the complex multi-phase flow near the electrode, simultaneous measurements of the fluid velocities and the size and trajectories of hydrogen bubbles were performed in a water electrolyzer. The liquid phase velocity was measured by PIV/PTV, while shadowgraphy was used to determine the bubble trajectories. Special measurement and evaluation techniques had to be applied as the measurement uncertainty is strongly affected by the high void fraction close to the wall. In particular, the application of an advanced PTV scheme allowed for more precise fluid velocity measurements closer to electrode. Based on these data, stability characteristics of the near-wall flow were evaluated and compared to that of a wall jet. PTV was used as well to investigate the effect of Lorentz forces on the near-wall fluid velocities. The results show a significantly increased wall parallel liquid phase velocity with increasing Lorentz forces. It is presumed that this enhances the detachment of hydrogen bubbles from the electrode surface and, consequently, decreases the fractional bubble coverage and improves the efficiency. In addition, the effect of large rising bubbles with path oscillations on the near-wall flow was investigated. These bubbles can have a strong impact on the mass transfer near the electrode and thus affect the performance of the process.

  18. Effect of including land-use driven radiative forcing of the surface albedo of land on climate response in the 16th-21st centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, A. V.; Mokhov, I. I.

    2011-02-01

    A change in ecosystem types, such as through natural-vegetation-agriculture conversion, alters the surface albedo and triggers attendant shortwave radiative forcing (RF). This paper describes numerical experiments performed using the climate model (CM) of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP), Russian Academy of Sciences, for the 16th-21st centuries; this model simulated the response to a change in the contents of greenhouse gases (tropospheric and stratospheric), sulfate aerosols, solar constant, as well as the response to change in surface albedo of land due to natural-vegetation-agriculture conversion. These forcing estimates relied on actual data until the late 20th century. In the 21st century, the agricultural area was specified according to scenarios of the Land Use Harmonization project and other anthropogenic impacts were specified using SRES scenarios. The change in the surface vegetation during conversion from natural vegetation to agriculture triggers a cooling RF in most regions except for those of natural semiarid vegetation. The global and annual average RF derived from the IAP RAS CM in late 20th century is -0.11 W m-2. Including the land-use driven RF in IAP RAS CM appreciably reconciled the model calculations to observations in this historical period. For instance, in addition to the net climate warming, IAP RAS CM predicted an annually average cooling and reduction in precipitation in the subtropics of Eurasia and North America and in Amazonia and central Africa, as well as a local maximum in annually average and summertime warming in East China. The land-use driven RF alters the sign in the dependence that the amplitude of the annual cycle of the near-surface atmospheric temperature has on the annually averaged temperature. One reason for the decrease in precipitation as a result of a change in albedo due to land use may be the suppression of the convective activity in the atmosphere in the warm period (throughout the year in the tropics

  19. A comparison of mesial molar root canal preparations using two engine-driven instruments and the balanced-force technique.

    PubMed

    Imura, N; Kato, A S; Novo, N F; Hata, G; Uemura, M; Toda, T

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two engine-driven, nickel-titanium instrument systems with hand files in the final shape of slight and moderately curved canals. A total of 72 mesial roots of extracted human mandibular molars were divided into three groups: ProFile .04 taper, Pow-R rotary systems, and Flex-R hand-filing technique. The roots were mounted and cross-sectioned at two different horizontal levels using a modified Bramante technique. Pre- and postinstrumented cross-sectional roots were imaged, recorded, and computer analyzed. Results showed that, at the middle third, in almost all groups, there was a tendency of cutting more toward the mesial side with only one exception: Pow-R cut more to the distal side (danger zone) (p < 0.02). At the apical third, Flex-R (p < 0.03) and ProFile (0.001) transported to the mesial side (danger zone) when the curvature increased. When the three techniques were compared analyzing each side and considering the two groups of curvature, at the middle third in the moderately curved-canal group, Flex-R cut statistically more than Pow-R toward the lingual side. The other comparisons showed no statistically significant difference. When the techniques were compared in relation with the degree of curvature, in the apical third, ProFile .04 cut statistically more toward the mesial side in the moderately curved canal group than in the slightly curved canal group. The other comparisons showed no statistically significant difference. Canal preparation time was shorter with hand instrumentation (p < .05) in a few instances. PMID:11592493

  20. Superfluid helium sloshing dynamics induced oscillations and fluctuations of angular momentum, force and moment actuated on spacecraft driven by gravity gradient or jitter acceleration associated with slew motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The generalized mathematical formulation of sloshing dynamics for partially filled liquid of cryogenic superfluid helium II in dewar containers driven by the gravity gradient and jitter accelerations associated with slew motion for the purpose to perform scientific observation during the normal spacecraft operation are investigated. An example is given with the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility-Spectroscopy (AXAF-S) for slew motion which is responsible for the sloshing dynamics. The jitter accelerations include slew motion, spinning motion, atmospheric drag on the spacecraft, spacecraft attitude motions arising from machinery vibrations, thruster firing, pointing control of spacecraft, crew motion, etc. Explicit mathematical expressions to cover these forces acting on the spacecraft fluid systems are derived. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertia frame spacecraft bound coordinate, and solve time-dependent, three-dimensional formulations of partial differential equations subject to initial and boundary conditions. The explicit mathematical expressions of boundary conditions to cover capillary force effect on the liquid-vapor interface in microgravity environments are also derived. The formulations of fluid moment and angular moment fluctuations in fluid profiles induced by the sloshing dynamics, together with fluid stress and moment fluctuations exerted on the spacecraft dewar containers have also been derived. Examples are also given for cases applicable to the AXAF-S spacecraft sloshing dynamics associated with slew motion.

  1. Dynamics driven by lipophilic force in Langmuir monolayers: In-plane and out-of-plane growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Uttam Kumar; Datta, Alokmay

    2015-04-01

    While monolayer area fraction versus time (An-t ) curves obtained from surface pressure-area (π -A ) isotherms for desorption-dominated (DD) processes in Langmuir monolayers of fatty acids represent continuous loss, those from Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) also show a two-dimensional (2D) coalescence. For nucleation-dominated (ND) processes both techniques suggest competing processes, with BAM showing 2D coalescence alongside multilayer formation. π enhances both DD and ND processes with a lower cutoff for ND processes, while temperature has a lower cutoff for DD but negligible effect on ND processes. Hydrocarbon chain length has the strongest effect, causing a crossover from DD to ND dynamics. Imaging ellipsometry of horizontally transferred films onto Si(100) shows Stranski-Krastanov-like growth for ND process in an arachidic acid monolayer resulting in successive stages of monolayer, trilayer, and multilayer islands, ridges from lateral island coalescence, and shallow wavelike structures from ridge coalescence on the film surface. These studies show that lipophilic attraction between hydrocarbon chains is the driving force at all stages of long-term monolayer dynamics.

  2. High sensitive space electric field sensing based on micro fiber interferometer with field force driven gold nanofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Zhou, Liming; Liu, Min; Zhang, Jingdong; Shi, Leilei

    2015-01-01

    The traditional electrical field sensing can be realized by utilizing electro-optic materials or liquid crystals, and has limitations of easy breakdown, free assembly and difficult measurement of low-frequency. Here, we propose a new method to realize safe measurement of spatial dynamic electric field by using a micro fiber interferometer integrated with gold nanofilm. The energy of the electric charge received through antenna forms the intrinsic electric field with two micro electrodes, one of which is the 120 nm gold film vibration beam micromachined by femtosecond lasers and integrated with the micro fiber. The change of the intrinsic electric field force due to the spatial electric field will cause the vibration of the film beam. By demodulating the output signal of the micro fiber interferometer, the electric field can be measured. We demonstrate the detectable frequency ranges from tens of Hz to tens of KHz, and the minimum electric field intensity is ~200 V/m at 1 KHz. Our electric field measurement technology combining optical fiber interference with gold nanostructures shows the advantages of security, high sensitivity, compact size, and multiplexed multi-point and remote detection. PMID:26507680

  3. High sensitive space electric field sensing based on micro fiber interferometer with field force driven gold nanofilm

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tao; Zhou, Liming; Liu, Min; Zhang, Jingdong; Shi, Leilei

    2015-01-01

    The traditional electrical field sensing can be realized by utilizing electro-optic materials or liquid crystals, and has limitations of easy breakdown, free assembly and difficult measurement of low-frequency. Here, we propose a new method to realize safe measurement of spatial dynamic electric field by using a micro fiber interferometer integrated with gold nanofilm. The energy of the electric charge received through antenna forms the intrinsic electric field with two micro electrodes, one of which is the 120 nm gold film vibration beam micromachined by femtosecond lasers and integrated with the micro fiber. The change of the intrinsic electric field force due to the spatial electric field will cause the vibration of the film beam. By demodulating the output signal of the micro fiber interferometer, the electric field can be measured. We demonstrate the detectable frequency ranges from tens of Hz to tens of KHz, and the minimum electric field intensity is ~200 V/m at 1 KHz. Our electric field measurement technology combining optical fiber interference with gold nanostructures shows the advantages of security, high sensitivity, compact size, and multiplexed multi-point and remote detection. PMID:26507680

  4. High sensitive space electric field sensing based on micro fiber interferometer with field force driven gold nanofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tao; Zhou, Liming; Liu, Min; Zhang, Jingdong; Shi, Leilei

    2015-10-01

    The traditional electrical field sensing can be realized by utilizing electro-optic materials or liquid crystals, and has limitations of easy breakdown, free assembly and difficult measurement of low-frequency. Here, we propose a new method to realize safe measurement of spatial dynamic electric field by using a micro fiber interferometer integrated with gold nanofilm. The energy of the electric charge received through antenna forms the intrinsic electric field with two micro electrodes, one of which is the 120 nm gold film vibration beam micromachined by femtosecond lasers and integrated with the micro fiber. The change of the intrinsic electric field force due to the spatial electric field will cause the vibration of the film beam. By demodulating the output signal of the micro fiber interferometer, the electric field can be measured. We demonstrate the detectable frequency ranges from tens of Hz to tens of KHz, and the minimum electric field intensity is ~200 V/m at 1 KHz. Our electric field measurement technology combining optical fiber interference with gold nanostructures shows the advantages of security, high sensitivity, compact size, and multiplexed multi-point and remote detection.

  5. Aerosol size distribution and radiative forcing response to anthropogenically driven historical changes in biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, S. D.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Farina, S. C.; Scott, C. E.; Rap, A.; Farmer, D. K.; Spracklen, D. V.; Riipinen, I.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-03-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have changed in the past millennium due to changes in land use, temperature, and CO2 concentrations. Recent reconstructions of BVOC emissions have predicted that global isoprene emissions have decreased, while monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions have increased; however, all three show regional variability due to competition between the various influencing factors. In this work, we use two modeled estimates of BVOC emissions from the years 1000 to 2000 to test the effect of anthropogenic changes to BVOC emissions on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, global aerosol size distributions, and radiative effects using the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS (Goddard Earth Observing System; TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional) global aerosol microphysics model. With anthropogenic emissions (e.g., SO2, NOx, primary aerosols) turned off and BVOC emissions changed from year 1000 to year 2000 values, decreases in the number concentration of particles of size Dp > 80 nm (N80) of > 25% in year 2000 relative to year 1000 were predicted in regions with extensive land-use changes since year 1000 which led to regional increases in the combined aerosol radiative effect (direct and indirect) of > 0.5 W m-2 in these regions. We test the sensitivity of our results to BVOC emissions inventory, SOA yields, and the presence of anthropogenic emissions; however, the qualitative response of the model to historic BVOC changes remains the same in all cases. Accounting for these uncertainties, we estimate millennial changes in BVOC emissions cause a global mean direct effect of between +0.022 and +0.163 W m-2 and the global mean cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect of between -0.008 and -0.056 W m-2. This change in aerosols, and the associated radiative forcing, could be a largely overlooked and important anthropogenic aerosol effect on regional climates.

  6. Aerosol size distribution and radiative forcing response to anthropogenically driven historical changes in biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, S. D.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Farina, S. C.; Scott, C. E.; Rap, A.; Farmer, D. K.; Spracklen, D. V.; Riipinen, I.; Pierce, J. R.

    2014-10-01

    and the global mean cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect of between -0.008 and -0.056 W m-2. This change in aerosols, and the associated radiative forcing, could be a~largely overlooked and important anthropogenic aerosol effect on regional climates.

  7. Testing the validity of the Ehrenfest theorem beyond simple static systems: Caldirola–Kanai oscillator driven by a time-dependent force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medjber, Salim; Bekkar, Hacene; Menouar, Salah; Ryeol Choi, Jeong

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between quantum mechanics and classical mechanics is investigated by taking a Gaussian-type wave packet as a solution of the Schrödinger equation for the Caldirola–Kanai oscillator driven by a sinusoidal force. For this time-dependent system, quantum properties are studied by using the invariant theory of Lewis and Riesenfeld. In particular, we analyze time behaviors of quantum expectation values of position and momentum variables and compare them to those of the counterpart classical ones. Based on this, we check whether the Ehrenfest theorem which was originally developed in static quantum systems can be extended to such time-varying systems without problems. Project supported by Fund from the Algerian Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research (Grant No. CNEPRU/ D01220120010) and the Basic Science Research Program of the year 2015 through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (Grant No. NRF-2013R1A1A2062907).

  8. Tectonically driven late Paleocene (57.9-54.7 Ma) transgression and climatically forced latest middle Eocene (41.3-38.0 Ma) regression on the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Singh, Y. Raghumani; Andotra, D. S.; Patra, A.; Srivastava, V. K.; Guruaribam, Venus; Sijagurumayum, Umarani; Singh, G. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cenozoic era was the turning point in the geological history of the Indian subcontinent when India experienced maximum isolation before it collided with Asia and there occurred a great mountain building activity shaping the Himalaya. In the Cenozoic era, the sedimentation commenced in the late Paleocene (∼57.9 Ma) in the pericratonic basins of the western India as well as the foreland basins of the Himalaya that marks the beginning of a major transgression on the Indian subcontinent. Till now, it is not sure whether this transgression was forced by tectonics or climate. We have interpreted that the primary driver for this transgression was the tectonics that marks the beginning of the India-Asia convergence. A major regression of similar magnitude occurred during latest middle Eocene (41.3-38.0 Ma) that corresponds to global sea-level fall. This regression is global and can be identified even in the Cenozoic basins developed within the African plate. It is interpreted that this regression was driven by the global cooling during latest middle Eocene/late Eocene possibly associated with the nucleation of the Antarctica ice-sheets coupled with the uplift of the Himalaya.

  9. Simulation of sloshing dynamics induced forces and torques actuated on dewar container driven by gravity gradient and jitter accelerations in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Pan, H. L.

    1993-01-01

    three levels of gravity jitter (10(exp -6), 10(exp -7), and 10(exp -8) g(sub 0)) each at three predominant frequencies (0.1, 1.0, and 10 Hz), combined with a gravity gradient appropriate for the GP-B orbit. Dynamical evolution of sloshing dynamics excited fluid forces and torque fluctuations exerted on the dewar container driven by the combined gravity gradient and jitter accelerations are also investigated and simulated.

  10. Time-Dependent Measure of a Nano-Scale Force-Pulse Driven by the Axonemal Dynein Motors in Individual Live Sperm Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M J; Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M W; Balhorn, R

    2009-04-23

    Nano-scale mechanical forces generated by motor proteins are crucial to normal cellular and organismal functioning. The ability to measure and exploit such forces would be important to developing motile biomimetic nanodevices powered by biological motors for Nanomedicine. Axonemal dynein motors positioned inside the sperm flagellum drive microtubule sliding giving rise to rhythmic beating of the flagellum. This force-generating action makes it possible for the sperm cell to move through viscous media. Here we report new nano-scale information on how the propulsive force is generated by the sperm flagellum and how this force varies over time. Single cell recordings reveal discrete {approx}50 ms pulses oscillating with amplitude 9.8 {+-} 2.6 nN independent of pulse frequency (3.5-19.5 Hz). The average work carried out by each cell is 4.6 x 10{sup -16} J per pulse, equivalent to the hydrolysis of {approx}5,500 ATP molecules. The mechanochemical coupling at each active dynein head is {approx}2.2 pN/ATP, and {approx}3.9 pN per dynein arm, in agreement with previously published values obtained using different methods.

  11. Fluctuations of a Greenlandic tidewater glacier driven by changes in atmospheric forcing: observations and modelling of Kangiata Nunaata Sermia, 1859-present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, J. M.; Mair, D. W. F.; Nick, F. M.; Rea, B. R.; van As, D.; Morlighem, M.; Nienow, P. W.; Weidick, A.

    2014-11-01

    Many tidewater glaciers in Greenland are known to have undergone significant retreat during the last century following their Little Ice Age maxima. Where it is possible to reconstruct glacier change over this period, they provide excellent records for comparison to climate records, as well as calibration/validation for numerical models. These glacier change records therefore allow for tests of numerical models that seek to simulate tidewater glacier behaviour over multi-decadal to centennial timescales. Here we present a detailed record of behaviour from Kangiata Nunaata Sermia (KNS), SW Greenland, between 1859 and 2012, and compare it against available oceanographic and atmospheric temperature data between 1871 and 2012. We also use these records to evaluate the ability of a well-established one-dimensional flow-band model to replicate behaviour for the observation period. The record of terminus change demonstrates that KNS has advanced/retreated in phase with atmosphere and ocean climate anomalies averaged over multi-annual to decadal timescales. Results from an ensemble of model runs demonstrate that observed dynamics can be replicated. Model runs that provide a reasonable match to observations always require a significant atmospheric forcing component, but do not necessarily require an oceanic forcing component. Although the importance of oceanic forcing cannot be discounted, these results demonstrate that changes in atmospheric forcing are likely to be a primary driver of the terminus fluctuations of KNS from 1859 to 2012. We propose that the detail and length of the record presented makes KNS an ideal site for model validation exercises investigating links between climate, calving rates, and tidewater glacier dynamics.

  12. Capillary Force Driven Self-Assembly of Anisotropic Hierarchical Structures Prepared by Femtosecond Laser 3D Printing and Their Applications in Crystallizing Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Lao, Zhaoxin; Hu, Yanlei; Zhang, Chenchu; Yang, Liang; Li, Jiawen; Chu, Jiaru; Wu, Dong

    2015-12-22

    The hierarchical structures are the derivation of various functionalities in the natural world and have inspired broad practical applications in chemical systhesis and biological manipulation. However, traditional top-down fabrication approaches suffered from low complexity. We propose a laser printing capillary-assisted self-assembly (LPCS) strategy for fabricating regular periodic structures. Microscale pillars are first produced by the localized femtosecond laser polymerization and are subsequently self-assembled into periodic hierarchical architectures with the assistance of controlled capillary force. Moreover, based on anisotropic assemblies of micropillars, the LPCS method is further developed for the preparation of more complicated and advanced functional microstructures. Pillars cross section, height, and spatial arrangement can be tuned to guide capillary force, and diverse assemblies with different configurations are thus achieved. Finally, we developed a strategy for growing micro/nanoparticles in designed spatial locations through solution-evaporation self-assembly induced by morphology. Due to the high flexibility of LPCS method, the special arrangements, sizes, and distribution density of the micro/nanoparticles can be controlled readily. Our method will be employed not only to fabricate anisotropic hierarchical structures but also to design and manufacture organic/inorganic microparticles. PMID:26506428

  13. Experimental approach for selecting the excitation frequency for maximum compositional contrast in viscous environments for piezo-driven bimodal atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Babak; Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a method for guiding the selection of the microcantilever excitation frequencies in low-quality-factor (liquid) bimodal amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy (AFM). Within the proposed method, the compositional contrast frequency is selected based on maximizing the derivative of the phase shift with respect to the drive frequency, observed during a tuning curve. This leads to different frequency choices and significant differences in the observables with respect to the customary practice of selecting the drive frequencies based on the amplitude peaks in the tuning curve. We illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of our approach by imaging an atomically flat calcite surface with single-eigenmode tapping-mode AFM in water, but driving a higher eigenmode instead of the fundamental eigenmode, and by imaging a polytetrafluoroethylene thin film with bimodal AFM, also in water.

  14. Short to long-term evolution of the shoreline and the subaerial sand beach driven by extreme forcings : Wan-Tzu-Liao, Taïwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campmas, Lucie; Bouchette, Frederic; Meulé, Samuel; Sous, Damien; Liou, Jiing-Yih; Leroux-Mallouf, Romain; Sabatier, François; Hwung, Hwung-Hweng

    2015-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the interactions between wave conditions, water level and morphology of a sand barrier driven by paroxysmal conditions over instantaneous swash event, storm event, monsoon/typhoons seasons and decadal time scales. In the framework of the KUN-SHEN project, 7 months of monitoring (2011-2012) provided 20 topobathymetric surveys (from the subtidal zone to the back-barrier) and acquisitions of offshore, nearshore and shallow water hydrodynamics including velocity profiling, free surface measurement and absolute pressure. Offshore waves were extracted at Cigu buoy (18 m of water depth). Nearshore waves were acquired from the current profiler deployed 400 m off the coast in 4 m of water depth and water level on the subaerial beach were acquired from pressure sensors deployed from the subtidal zone to the dune crest. Morphologic changes of the emerged beach were monitored using D-GPS each week during the winter monsoon season and just before and after each event during the summer typhoons season. The long-term shoreline changes (1993-2009) of the sand barrier is based on aerial photographs and satellites images. The short-term study focus on the sand bed elevation changes associated with individual swash events during the most energetic storm recorded. During this Talim tropical storm (offshore significant wave height up to 10.3 m with period about 14.6 s), pressure sensors deployed in the subaerial beach display a sand bed nourishment about +3.02 cm/h during the storm rising. The numerous swash-swash interactions during the falling period of the storm appear more erosive. Morphological changes of Talim storm in the whole emerged beach included 6.7 m of dunefoot retreat and a sand transfer from a dune breach to wash-over deposits in the lagoon. Additionally, the foreshore was nourished +2261 m3 +/-268 m3 as well as the whole sand barrier (+1920 m3 +/-1071 m3). The summer season of typhoons appears to be an accretive period (3556 m3 +/-1071

  15. Climate-driven increase in the variability and multi-year mean level of severe thunderstorm-related losses and thunderstorm forcing environments in the U.S. since 1970

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Julia; Eichner, Jan; Faust, Eberhard; Steuer, Markus

    2013-04-01

    In the year 2011, direct losses from thunderstorms reached US 26 billion (insured) and US 47 billion (economic), thus equalling the dimension of losses caused by Hurricane Sandy in the New York area 2012. Beyond doubt the 2011 damages had outlier characteristics due to two cities hit by tornadoes. Nonetheless a substantial increase in the variability of normalised direct economic and insured severe thunderstorm-related losses in the U.S. east of the Rocky Mountains over the period 1970-2009 (March - September) has been detected. Besides the annual variability, also the multi-year mean level of losses has strongly increased. Our study focused on sizeable severe thunderstorm events causing at least US 250 million in normalized economic losses. The high threshold guarantees homogeneity over time, because those events regularly covered several states and thus are very unlikely to have been missed at any time due to reporting variability. To shed light on the question whether the strong increase was driven by an external climate driver, the time series of normalized losses (annual counts and annual loss aggregate) was correlated with the time series of thunderstorm forcing environments. The latter were inferred from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and comprise 6-hourly CAPE and vertical wind shear data combined to form a variable called Thunderstorm Severity Potential (TSP). From the notable correlation found between the time series of normalized thunderstorm-related losses and meteorologically registered thunderstorm forcing environments (TSP) it could be inferred that climate was the dominant driver for the increase in variability and average level of thunderstorm-related losses over the period 1970-2009. An important component in the rise of TSP over time could be identified in CAPE, as we found a substantial rise in the annual number of exceedances of a high CAPE threshold in the reanalysis data. Recent studies imply that the changes observed in our study, particularly

  16. Current-driven atomic waterwheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dundas, Daniel; McEniry, Eunan J.; Todorov, Tchavdar N.

    2009-02-01

    A current induces forces on atoms inside the conductor that carries it. It is now possible to compute these forces from scratch, and to perform dynamical simulations of the atomic motion under current. One reason for this interest is that current can be a destructive force-it can cause atoms to migrate, resulting in damage and in the eventual failure of the conductor. But one can also ask, can current be made to do useful work on atoms? In particular, can an atomic-scale motor be driven by electrical current, as it can be by other mechanisms? For this to be possible, the current-induced forces on a suitable rotor must be non-conservative, so that net work can be done per revolution. Here we show that current-induced forces in atomic wires are not conservative and that they can be used, in principle, to drive an atomic-scale waterwheel.

  17. Current-driven atomic waterwheels.

    PubMed

    Dundas, Daniel; McEniry, Eunan J; Todorov, Tchavdar N

    2009-02-01

    A current induces forces on atoms inside the conductor that carries it. It is now possible to compute these forces from scratch, and to perform dynamical simulations of the atomic motion under current. One reason for this interest is that current can be a destructive force--it can cause atoms to migrate, resulting in damage and in the eventual failure of the conductor. But one can also ask, can current be made to do useful work on atoms? In particular, can an atomic-scale motor be driven by electrical current, as it can be by other mechanisms? For this to be possible, the current-induced forces on a suitable rotor must be non-conservative, so that net work can be done per revolution. Here we show that current-induced forces in atomic wires are not conservative and that they can be used, in principle, to drive an atomic-scale waterwheel. PMID:19197311

  18. Water-driven micromotors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Pei, Allen; Wang, Joseph

    2012-09-25

    We demonstrate the first example of a water-driven bubble-propelled micromotor that eliminates the requirement for the common hydrogen peroxide fuel. The new water-driven Janus micromotor is composed of a partially coated Al-Ga binary alloy microsphere prepared via microcontact mixing of aluminum microparticles and liquid gallium. The ejection of hydrogen bubbles from the exposed Al-Ga alloy hemisphere side, upon its contact with water, provides a powerful directional propulsion thrust. Such spontaneous generation of hydrogen bubbles reflects the rapid reaction between the aluminum alloy and water. The resulting water-driven spherical motors can move at remarkable speeds of 3 mm s(-1) (i.e., 150 body length s(-1)), while exerting large forces exceeding 500 pN. Factors influencing the efficiency of the aluminum-water reaction and the resulting propulsion behavior and motor lifetime, including the ionic strength and environmental pH, are investigated. The resulting water-propelled Al-Ga/Ti motors move efficiently in different biological media (e.g., human serum) and hold considerable promise for diverse biomedical or industrial applications. PMID:22891973

  19. Quantized Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Tse, Wang-Kong; MacDonald, A H

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the Casimir effect between two-dimensional electron systems driven to the quantum Hall regime by a strong perpendicular magnetic field. In the large-separation (d) limit where retardation effects are essential, we find (i) that the Casimir force is quantized in units of 3ħcα(2)/8π(2)d(4) and (ii) that the force is repulsive for mirrors with the same type of carrier and attractive for mirrors with opposite types of carrier. The sign of the Casimir force is therefore electrically tunable in ambipolar materials such as graphene. The Casimir force is suppressed when one mirror is a charge-neutral graphene system in a filling factor ν=0 quantum Hall state. PMID:23368242

  20. Active microrheology of driven granular particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Grob, Matthias; Zippelius, Annette; Sperl, Matthias

    2014-04-01

    When pulling a particle in a driven granular fluid with constant force Fex, the probe particle approaches a steady-state average velocity v. This velocity and the corresponding friction coefficient of the probe ζ=Fex/v are obtained within a schematic model of mode-coupling theory and compared to results from event-driven simulations. For small and moderate drag forces, the model describes the simulation results successfully for both the linear as well as the nonlinear region: The linear response regime (constant friction) for small drag forces is followed by shear thinning (decreasing friction) for moderate forces. For large forces, the model demonstrates a subsequent increasing friction in qualitative agreement with the data. The square-root increase of the friction with force found in [Fiege et al., Granul. Matter 14, 247 (2012)] is explained by a simple kinetic theory. PMID:24827243

  1. MRI driven magnetic microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Kósa, Gábor; Jakab, Péter; Székely, Gábor; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a promising technique for diagnosing diseases in the digestive system. Here we design and characterize a miniature swimming mechanism that uses the magnetic fields of the MRI for both propulsion and wireless powering of the capsule. Our method uses both the static and the radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields inherently available in MRI to generate a propulsive force. Our study focuses on the evaluation of the propulsive force for different swimming tails and experimental estimation of the parameters that influence its magnitude. We have found that an approximately 20 mm long, 5 mm wide swimming tail is capable of producing 0.21 mN propulsive force in water when driven by a 20 Hz signal providing 0.85 mW power and the tail located within the homogeneous field of a 3 T MRI scanner. We also analyze the parallel operation of the swimming mechanism and the scanner imaging. We characterize the size of artifacts caused by the propulsion system. We show that while the magnetic micro swimmer is propelling the capsule endoscope, the operator can locate the capsule on the image of an interventional scene without being obscured by significant artifacts. Although this swimming method does not scale down favorably, the high magnetic field of the MRI allows self propulsion speed on the order of several millimeter per second and can propel an endoscopic capsule in the stomach. PMID:22037673

  2. A Micropump Driven by Marangoni Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Kenji; Iwamoto, Kaoru; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    A micropump driven by the thermocapillary convection is proposed. The purpose of this study is to examine the flow structure in liquid region and the effect of the geometry on the performance of the present micropump. There are two significant advantages in the thermocapillary-driven system. First, the surface forces become more dominant than the volume forces with decreasing scale. The present micropump driven by the surface forces shows an advantage in the micro scale over a diaphragm pump driven by the volume forces. Secondary, the thermocapillary driven system contains no movable parts; thus, it allows a very simple structure compared to the diaphragm one. In the present micropump system, a number of ribs are distributed along the flow circuit between a heater and a cooler. Since heat transfer from these ribs to the working liquid imposes temperature gradients along the gas-liquid interfaces, the flow from the hot to the cold side is induced by the Marangoni effect. Fundamental characteristics of the present micropump are studied on the basis of three-dimensional simulation conducted taking the gas, liquid and ribs into account. In this study, the flow structure corresponding to the temperature field was observed. The present calculation has revealed that the flow field exhibits a transition from steady flow to oscillatory flow when the Marangoni number exceeds a critical value of about 2,000-2,500. An experiment was also performed. The liquid flow driven by the present micropump system was confirmed through the experiment.

  3. Nuclear forces

    SciTech Connect

    Machleidt, R.

    2013-06-10

    These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach, in which the forces between nucleons emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory.

  4. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. PMID:21721701

  5. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  6. Heat driven pulse pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Steve M (Inventor); Martins, Mario S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A heat driven pulse pump includes a chamber having an inlet port, an outlet port, two check valves, a wick, and a heater. The chamber may include a plurality of grooves inside wall of the chamber. When heated within the chamber, a liquid to be pumped vaporizes and creates pressure head that expels the liquid through the outlet port. As liquid separating means, the wick, disposed within the chamber, is to allow, when saturated with the liquid, the passage of only liquid being forced by the pressure head in the chamber, preventing the vapor from exiting from the chamber through the outlet port. A plurality of grooves along the inside surface wall of the chamber can sustain the liquid, which is amount enough to produce vapor for the pressure head in the chamber. With only two simple moving parts, two check valves, the heat driven pulse pump can effectively function over the long lifetimes without maintenance or replacement. For continuous flow of the liquid to be pumped a plurality of pumps may be connected in parallel.

  7. Glassy dynamics of driven elastic manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Vinokur, V.M.

    1996-12-31

    We study the low-temperature dynamics of an elastic manifold driven through a random medium. For driving forces well below the zero- temperature depinning force, the manifold advances via thermally activated hops over the energy barriers separating favorable metastable states. We develop a scaling theory of the thermally activated dynamics (creep) and find a nonlinear glassy response for the driven manifold, {upsilon}{approximately}exp(-const{times}F{sup - {mu}}). We consider an exactly solvable 1-D model for random driven dynamics which exhibits a creep-like velocity-force characteristic. We discuss a microscopic mechanism for the creep motion and show that the distribution of waiting times for the hopping processes scales as a power law. This power-law distribution naturally yields an exponential response for the creep of the manifold.

  8. Smart friction driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Rainer; Gaul, Lothar

    2005-02-01

    Vibration properties of most assembled mechanical systems depend on frictional damping in joints. The nonlinear transfer behavior of the frictional interfaces often provides the dominant damping mechanism in a built-up structure and plays an important role in the vibratory response of the structure (Gaul and Nitsche 2001 Appl. Mech. Rev. 54 93-105). For improving the performance of systems, many studies have been carried out to predict, measure and/or enhance the energy dissipation of friction. To enhance the friction damping in joint connections a semi-active joint is investigated. A rotational joint connection is designed and manufactured such that the normal force in the friction interface can be influenced with a piezoelectric stack disc. With the piezoelectric device the normal force and thus the friction damping in the joint connection can be controlled. A control design method, namely semi-active control, is investigated. The recently developed LuGre friction model is used to describe the nonlinear transfer behavior of joints. This model is based on a bristle model and turns out to be highly suitable for systems assembled by such smart joints. Those systems can also be regarded as friction driven systems, since the energy flow is controlled by smart joints. The semi-active method is well suited for large space structures since the friction damping in joints turned out to be a major source of damping. To show the applicability of the proposed concept to large space structures a two-beam system representing a part of a large space structure is considered. Two flexible beams are connected with a semi-active joint connection. It can be shown that the damping of the system can be improved significantly by controlling the normal force in the semi-active joint connection. Experimental results validate the damping improvement due to the semi-active friction damping.

  9. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  10. One Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald R.

    2002-04-01

    There is only one entity that can extend force and couple through space; and it should be apparent that Electromagnetism is that entity. In the cases of the nuclear strong force and the nuclear weak force, this is the same fundamental Electromagnetism manifesting itself in two different ways in the nucleus. It remains the same basic Electromagnetism. On the other hand, General Relativity fails to produce force at a distance, fails the Cavendish experiment, and does not allow an apple to fall to the ground. The result shows there is only Electromagnetism that functions through physical nature providing gravity, actions in the nucleus, as well as all other physical actions universally, including Gravity and Gravitation. There are many direct proofs of this, the same proofs as in NUCLEAR QUANTUM GRAVITATION. In contrast, General Relativity plainly relies on fallacy abstract and incoherent proofs; proofs which have now been mostly disproved. In the past it was deemed necessary by some to have an "ether" to propagate Electromagnetic waves. The fallacy concept of time space needs "space distortions" in order to cause gravity. However, Electromagnetic gravity does not have this problem. Clearly there is only ONE FORCE that causes Gravity, Electromagnetism, the Nuclear Strong Force, and the Nuclear Weak Force, and that ONE FORCE is Electromagnetism.

  11. Active and driven hydrodynamic crystals.

    PubMed

    Desreumaux, N; Florent, N; Lauga, E; Bartolo, D

    2012-08-01

    Motivated by the experimental ability to produce monodisperse particles in microfluidic devices, we study theoretically the hydrodynamic stability of driven and active crystals. We first recall the theoretical tools allowing to quantify the dynamics of elongated particles in a confined fluid. In this regime hydrodynamic interactions between particles arise from a superposition of potential dipolar singularities. We exploit this feature to derive the equations of motion for the particle positions and orientations. After showing that all five planar Bravais lattices are stationary solutions of the equations of motion, we consider separately the case where the particles are passively driven by an external force, and the situation where they are self-propelling. We first demonstrate that phonon modes propagate in driven crystals, which are always marginally stable. The spatial structures of the eigenmodes depend solely on the symmetries of the lattices, and on the orientation of the driving force. For active crystals, the stability of the particle positions and orientations depends not only on the symmetry of the crystals but also on the perturbation wavelengths and on the crystal density. Unlike unconfined fluids, the stability of active crystals is independent of the nature of the propulsion mechanism at the single-particle level. The square and rectangular lattices are found to be linearly unstable at short wavelengths provided the volume fraction of the crystals is high enough. Differently, hexagonal, oblique, and face-centered crystals are always unstable. Our work provides a theoretical basis for future experimental work on flowing microfluidic crystals. PMID:22864543

  12. Entropic forces in Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Nico

    2014-12-01

    Interest in the concept of entropic forces has risen considerably since Verlinde proposed in 2011 to interpret the force in Newton's second law and gravity as entropic forces. Brownian motion—the motion of a small particle (pollen) driven by random impulses from the surrounding molecules—may be the first example of a stochastic process in which such forces are expected to emerge. In this article, it is shown that at least two types of entropic force can be identified in three-dimensional Brownian motion. This analysis yields simple derivations of known results of Brownian motion, Hooke's law, and—applying an external (non-radial) force—Curie's law and the Langevin-Debye equation.

  13. Dynamic signatures of driven vortex motion.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Lopez, D.; Olsson, R. J.; Paulius, L. M.; Petrean, A. M.; Safar, H.

    1999-09-16

    We probe the dynamic nature of driven vortex motion in superconductors with a new type of transport experiment. An inhomogeneous Lorentz driving force is applied to the sample, inducing vortex velocity gradients that distinguish the hydrodynamic motion of the vortex liquid from the elastic and-plastic motion of the vortex solid. We observe elastic depinning of the vortex lattice at the critical current, and shear induced plastic slip of the lattice at high Lorentz force gradients.

  14. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  15. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  16. Micromechanism linear actuator with capillary force sealing

    DOEpatents

    Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    A class of micromachine linear actuators whose function is based on gas driven pistons in which capillary forces are used to seal the gas behind the piston. The capillary forces also increase the amount of force transmitted from the gas pressure to the piston. In a major subclass of such devices, the gas bubble is produced by thermal vaporization of a working fluid. Because of their dependence on capillary forces for sealing, such devices are only practical on the sub-mm size scale, but in that regime they produce very large force times distance (total work) values.

  17. Inter-daily variability of a strong thermally-driven wind system over the Atacama Desert of South America: synoptic forcing and short-term predictability using the GFS global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques-Coper, Martín; Falvey, Mark; Muñoz, Ricardo C.

    2015-07-01

    Crucial aspects of a strong thermally-driven wind system in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile during the extended austral winter season (May-September) are studied using 2 years of measurement data from the Sierra Gorda 80-m meteorological mast (SGO, 22° 56' 24″ S; 69° 7' 58″ W, 2,069 m above sea level (a.s.l.)). Daily cycles of atmospheric variables reveal a diurnal (nocturnal) regime, with northwesterly (easterly) flow and maximum mean wind speed of 8 m/s (13 m/s) on average. These distinct regimes are caused by pronounced topographic conditions and the diurnal cycle of the local radiative balance. Wind speed extreme events of each regime are negatively correlated at the inter-daily time scale: High diurnal wind speed values are usually observed together with low nocturnal wind speed values and vice versa. The associated synoptic conditions indicate that upper-level troughs at the coastline of southwestern South America reinforce the diurnal northwesterly wind, whereas mean undisturbed upper-level conditions favor the development of the nocturnal easterly flow. We analyze the skill of the numerical weather model Global Forecast System (GFS) in predicting wind speed at SGO. Although forecasted wind speeds at 800 hPa do show the diurnal and nocturnal phases, observations at 80 m are strongly underestimated by the model. This causes a pronounced daily cycle of root-mean-squared error (RMSE) and bias in the forecasts. After applying a simple Model Output Statistics (MOS) post-processing, we achieve a good representation of the wind speed intra-daily and inter-daily variability, a first step toward reducing the uncertainties related to potential wind energy projects in the region.

  18. Vacuum force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    To study on vacuum force, we must clear what is vacuum, vacuum is a space do not have any air and also ray. There is not exist an absolute the vacuum of space. The vacuum of space is relative, so that the vacuum force is relative. There is a certain that vacuum vacuum space exists. In fact, the vacuum space is relative, if the two spaces compared to the existence of relative vacuum, there must exist a vacuum force, and the direction of the vacuum force point to the vacuum region. Any object rotates and radiates. Rotate bend radiate- centripetal, gravity produced, relative gravity; non gravity is the vacuum force. Gravity is centripetal, is a trend that the objects who attracted wants to Centripetal, or have been do Centripetal movement. Any object moves, so gravity makes the object curve movement, that is to say, the radiation range curve movement must be in the gravitational objects, gravity must be existed in non vacuum region, and make the object who is in the region of do curve movement (for example: The earth moves around the sun), or final attracted in the form gravitational objects, and keep relatively static with attract object. (for example: objects on the earth moves but can't reach the first cosmic speed).

  19. Impulse-driven Micromechanism Capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takahiro; Ishimori, Shohei; Hayashi, Teru

    We have developed a traveling small capsule, which has a smooth outer surface and is driven by inertia force and friction force. Measuring only 7 mm in diameter and 12 mm in length, it is sufficiently small to be placed in the human gullet or intestines. The capsule contains a small magnet and a coil, and an electric pulse drives the magnet to move the capsule. We performed an experimental investigation on making our capsule travel on a plastic material, which has similar elasticity characteristics to the living body. We also showed that it can travel on the surface of a pig's intestine. Our capsule may be useful for medical treatments such as inspection, drug delivery and operation.

  20. Measurements in a pressure-driven and a shear-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, F. J.; Mcallister, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Results of mean velocity field, wall static pressure field and simultaneous, direct force measurements of the local wall shear stress magnitude and direction are reported for a pressure-driven and a shear-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer. These data, particularly the direct force local wall shear data, were obtained to test the validity of several of the near-wall similarity models proposed in the literature for such flows.

  1. Quantitative measurement of tip sample forces by dynamic force spectroscopy in ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, H.; Anczykowski, B.

    2005-03-01

    We introduce a dynamic force spectroscopy technique enabling the quantitative measurement of conservative and dissipative tip-sample forces in ambient conditions. In difference to the commonly detected force-vs-distance curves dynamic force microscopy allows to measure the full range of tip-sample forces without hysteresis effects caused by a jump-to-contact. The approach is based on the specific behavior of a self-driven cantilever (frequency-modulation technique). Experimental applications on different samples (Fischer-sample, silicon wafer) are presented.

  2. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  3. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  4. Light-driven robotics for nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    2013-03-01

    The science fiction inspired shrinking of macro-scale robotic manipulation and handling down to the micro- and nanoscale regime opens new doors for exploiting the forces and torques of light for micro- and nanoscopic probing, actuation and control. Advancing light-driven micro-robotics requires the optimization of optical forces and torques that, in turn, requires optimization of the underlying light-matter interaction. This report is two-fold desribing the new use of proprietary strongholds we currently are harnessing in the Programmable Phase Optics in Denmark on new means of sculpting of both light and matter for robotically probing at the smallest biological length scales.

  5. Nanomechanical sensing of gravitational wave-induced Casimir force perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2014-06-01

    It is shown by means of the optical medium analogy that the static Casimir force between two conducting plates is modulated by gravitational waves. The magnitude of the resulting force changes within the range of already existing small force metrology. It is suggested to enhance the effects on a Casimir force oscillator by mechanical parametric amplification driven by periodic illumination of interacting semiconducting boundaries. This represents a novel opportunity for the ground-based laboratory detection of gravitational waves on the nanoscale.

  6. Self-driven jamming in growing microbial populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delarue, Morgan; Hartung, Jörn; Schreck, Carl; Gniewek, Pawel; Hu, Lucy; Herminghaus, Stephan; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2016-08-01

    In natural settings, microbes tend to grow in dense populations where they need to push against their surroundings to accommodate space for new cells. The associated contact forces play a critical role in a variety of population-level processes, including biofilm formation, the colonization of porous media, and the invasion of biological tissues. Although mechanical forces have been characterized at the single-cell level, it remains elusive how collective pushing forces result from the combination of single-cell forces. Here, we reveal a collective mechanism of confinement, which we call self-driven jamming, that promotes the build-up of large mechanical pressures in microbial populations. Microfluidic experiments on budding yeast populations in space-limited environments show that self-driven jamming arises from the gradual formation and sudden collapse of force chains driven by microbial proliferation, extending the framework of driven granular matter. The resulting contact pressures can become large enough to slow down cell growth, to delay the cell cycle in the G1 phase, and to strain or even destroy the micro-environment through crack propagation. Our results suggest that self-driven jamming and build-up of large mechanical pressures is a natural tendency of microbes growing in confined spaces, contributing to microbial pathogenesis and biofouling.

  7. Planar latch-up microactuator driven by thermoelastic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Myung-Lae; Jang, Won-Ick; Choi, Chang-Auck; Kim, Youn Tae

    2000-08-01

    We designed and fabricated a planar-type thermoelastic microactuator with a latch-up operation for optical switching. Latch-up actuation is prerequisite to implement an optical switch with low power consumption and high reliability. The proposed microactuator consists of four cantilever-shaped thermal actuators, four displacement linkages, two shallow arch-shaped leaf springs, a mobile shuttle mass with a micromirror, and four elastic boundaries. The planar microactuator consists of phosphorous-doped 12 micrometers -thick polysilicon as a structural layer and LTO (Low Temperature Oxide) of 3 micrometers thickness as a sacrificial layer on polysilicon substrate. The experimental displacement of the microactuator was more than 21 micrometers at 10V input voltage for the prototype of a thermoelastic microactuator. The frequency response for square wave input was measured up to 50Hz, which was the highest frequency we can detect using optical microscope for now. The proposed microactuators have advantages of easy assembly with other optical component by way of fiber alignment in the substrate plane, and its fabrication process features simplicity while retaining batch-fabrication economy.

  8. Model Driven Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaševic, Dragan; Djuric, Dragan; Devedžic, Vladan

    A relevant initiative from the software engineering community called Model Driven Engineering (MDE) is being developed in parallel with the Semantic Web (Mellor et al. 2003a). The MDE approach to software development suggests that one should first develop a model of the system under study, which is then transformed into the real thing (i.e., an executable software entity). The most important research initiative in this area is the Model Driven Architecture (MDA), which is Model Driven Architecture being developed under the umbrella of the Object Management Group (OMG). This chapter describes the basic concepts of this software engineering effort.

  9. Forced motion near black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gair, Jonathan R.; Flanagan, Eanna E.; Drasco, Steve; Hinderer, Tanja; Babak, Stanislav

    2011-02-15

    We present two methods for integrating forced geodesic equations in the Kerr spacetime. The methods can accommodate arbitrary forces. As a test case, we compute inspirals caused by a simple drag force, mimicking motion in the presence of gas. We verify that both methods give the same results for this simple force. We find that drag generally causes eccentricity to increase throughout the inspiral. This is a relativistic effect qualitatively opposite to what is seen in gravitational-radiation-driven inspirals, and similar to what others have observed in hydrodynamic simulations of gaseous binaries. We provide an analytic explanation by deriving the leading order relativistic correction to the Newtonian dynamics. If observed, an increasing eccentricity would thus provide clear evidence that the inspiral was occurring in a nonvacuum environment. Our two methods are especially useful for evolving orbits in the adiabatic regime. Both use the method of osculating orbits, in which each point on the orbit is characterized by the parameters of the geodesic with the same instantaneous position and velocity. Both methods describe the orbit in terms of the geodesic energy, axial angular momentum, Carter constant, azimuthal phase, and two angular variables that increase monotonically and are relativistic generalizations of the eccentric anomaly. The two methods differ in their treatment of the orbital phases and the representation of the force. In the first method, the geodesic phase and phase constant are evolved together as a single orbital phase parameter, and the force is expressed in terms of its components on the Kinnersley orthonormal tetrad. In the second method, the phase constants of the geodesic motion are evolved separately and the force is expressed in terms of its Boyer-Lindquist components. This second approach is a direct generalization of earlier work by Pound and Poisson [A. Pound and E. Poisson, Phys. Rev. D 77, 044013 (2008).] for planar forces in a

  10. Stochastically forced zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Kaushik

    This thesis investigates the dynamics of multiple zonal jets, that spontaneously emerge on the barotropic beta-plane, driven by a homogenous and rapidly decorrelating forcing and damped by bottom drag. Decomposing the barotropic vorticity equation into the zonal-mean and eddy equations, and neglecting the eddy-eddy interactions, defines the quasi-linear (QL) system. Numerical solution of the QL system shows zonal jets with length scales comparable to jets obtained by solving the nonlinear (NL) system. Starting with the QL system, one can construct a deterministic equation for the evolution of the two-point single-time correlation function of the vorticity, from which one can obtain the Reynolds stress that drives the zonal mean flow. This deterministic system has an exact nonlinear solution, which is a homogenous eddy field with no jets. When the forcing is also isotropic in space, we characterize the linear stability of this jetless solution by calculating the critical stability curve in the parameter space and successfully comparing this analytic result with numerical solutions of the QL system. But the critical drag required for the onset of NL zonostrophic instability is up to a factor of six smaller than that for QL zonostrophic instability. The constraint of isotropic forcing is then relaxed and spatially anisotropic forcing is used to drive the jets. Meridionally drifting jets are observed whenever the forcing breaks an additional symmetry that we refer to as mirror, or reflexional symmetry. The magnitude of drift speed in our results shows a strong variation with both mu and beta: while the drift speed decreases almost linearly with decreasing mu, it actually increases as beta decreases. Similar drifting jets are also observed in QL, with the same direction (i.e. northward or southward) and similar magnitude as NL jet-drift. Starting from the laminar solution, and assuming a mean-flow that varies slowly with reference to the scale of the eddies, we obtain

  11. ISOTROPICALLY DRIVEN VERSUS OUTFLOW DRIVEN TURBULENCE: OBSERVATIONAL CONSEQUENCES FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Jonathan J.; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.

    2010-10-10

    Feedback from protostellar outflows can influence the nature of turbulence in star-forming regions even if they are not the primary source of velocity dispersion for all scales of molecular clouds. For the rate and power expected in star-forming regions, we previously (Carroll et al.) demonstrated that outflows could drive supersonic turbulence at levels consistent with the scaling relations from Matzner although with a steeper velocity power spectrum than expected for an isotropically driven supersonic turbulent cascade. Here, we perform higher resolution simulations and combine simulations of outflow driven turbulence with those of isotropically forced turbulence. We find that the presence of outflows within an ambient isotropically driven turbulent environment produces a knee in the velocity power spectrum at the outflow scale and a steeper slope at sub-outflow scales than for a purely isotropically forced case. We also find that the presence of outflows flattens the density spectrum at large scales effectively reducing the formation of large-scale turbulent density structures. These effects are qualitatively independent of resolution. We have also carried out Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for synthetic data from our simulations. We find that PCA as a tool for identifying the driving scale of turbulence has a misleading bias toward low amplitude large-scale velocity structures even when they are not necessarily the dominant energy containing scales. This bias is absent for isotropically forced turbulence but manifests strongly for collimated outflow driven turbulence.

  12. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  13. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugués, Agustí; Anon, Ester; Conte, Vito; Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and `purse-string’ contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate.

  14. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and “purse-string” contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate. PMID:27340423

  15. A force-feedback control system for micro-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhe; Chen, Peter C. Y.; Ganapathy, Anand; Zhao, Guoyong; Nam, Joohoo; Yang, Guilin; Burdet, Etienne; Teo, Cheeleong; Meng, Qingnian; Lin, Wei

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, we report the development of an explicit force-feedback control system for micro-assembly, focusing on the key issues of force transmission and control. The force-feedback system is incorporated with a compound flexure stage, which is driven by a voice-coil actuator and designed to provide frictionless translation motion along one axis. A force sensor measures the interaction force between the micromanipulator and its environment, while an explicit force controller controls the interaction force to follow a desired force trajectory. The effectiveness of this prototype force-control system has been demonstrated in an experimental application, where parts (with dimensions in microns) were picked up and assembled under explicit force-feedback control.

  16. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recchia, S.; Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.

    2016-08-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfvén waves, that in turn determine the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the implications for the spectrum of cosmic rays by solving together the hydrodynamical equations for the wind and the transport equation for cosmic rays under the action of self-generated diffusion and advection with the wind and the self-excited Alfvén waves.

  17. Torque Control of Underactuated Tendon-driven Robotic Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Wampler, Charles W. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having a total number of degrees of freedom (DOF) equal to at least n, an underactuated tendon-driven finger driven by n tendons and n DOF, the finger having at least two joints, being characterized by an asymmetrical joint radius in one embodiment. A controller is in communication with the robot, and controls actuation of the tendon-driven finger using force control. Operating the finger with force control on the tendons, rather than position control, eliminates the unconstrained slack-space that would have otherwise existed. The controller may utilize the asymmetrical joint radii to independently command joint torques. A method of controlling the finger includes commanding either independent or parameterized joint torques to the controller to actuate the fingers via force control on the tendons.

  18. Glacial cycles and astronomical forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, R.A.; MacDonald, G.J.

    1997-07-11

    Narrow spectral features in ocean sediment records offer strong evidence that the cycles of glaciation were driven by astronomical forces. Two million years ago, the cycles match the 41,000-year period of Earth`s obliquity. This supports the Croll/Milankovitch theory, which attributes the cycles to variations in insolation. But for the past million years, the spectrum is dominated by a single 100,000-year feature and is a poor match to the predictions of insolation models. The spectrum can be accounted for by a theory that derives the cycles of glaciation from variations in the inclination of Earth`s orbital plane.

  19. Outflow Driven Turbulence in Star Forming Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Adam

    Setting young stellar object jets and outflows in their broadest context requires an understanding of outflows as “feedback” in the development of molecular cloud turbulence and the determination of star formation efficiencies. In this contribution I review our group’s recent studies exploring relationships between protostellar outflows and turbulence in molecular clouds. We first present studies of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by YSO outflows using numerical simulations which track the evolution of single transient jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. These studies demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Next we present simulations of multiple interacting jets. We show that turbulence can readily be sustained by these interactions and show that it is possible to broadly characterize an effective driving scale of the outflows. Comparing the velocity spectrum obtained in our studies to that of an isotropically forced control we show that in outflow driven turbulence a power law of the form E(k) ∝ k - β is indeed achieved. However we find a steeper spectrum β ˜ 3 is obtained in outflow driven turbulence models than in isotropically forced simulations β ˜ 2. 0. Taken together both studies provide broad support for the conclusion that fossil cavities driven by decaying jets can provide a source of turbulence and feedback which mediate star formation processes in molecular clouds. Whether this does obtain in real clouds remains a point which must be demonstrated

  20. Quantum thermodynamics of the driven resonant level model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, Anton; Thomas, Mark; Viola Kusminskiy, Silvia; von Oppen, Felix; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    We present a consistent thermodynamic theory for the resonant level model in the wide-band limit, whose level energy is driven slowly by an external force. The problem of defining "system" and "bath" in the strong-coupling regime is circumvented by considering as the system everything that is influenced by the externally driven level. The thermodynamic functions that are obtained to first order beyond the quasistatic limit fulfill the first and second law with a positive entropy production, successfully connect to the forces experienced by the external driving, and reproduce the correct weak-coupling limit of stochastic thermodynamics.

  1. Manipulating bubbles with secondary Bjerknes forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lanoy, Maxime; Derec, Caroline; Leroy, Valentin; Tourin, Arnaud

    2015-11-23

    Gas bubbles in a sound field are submitted to a radiative force, known as the secondary Bjerknes force. We propose an original experimental setup that allows us to investigate in detail this force between two bubbles, as a function of the sonication frequency, as well as the bubbles radii and distance. We report the observation of both attractive and, more interestingly, repulsive Bjerknes force, when the two bubbles are driven in antiphase. Our experiments show the importance of taking multiple scatterings into account, which leads to a strong acoustic coupling of the bubbles when their radii are similar. Our setup demonstrates the accuracy of secondary Bjerknes forces for attracting or repealing a bubble, and could lead to new acoustic tools for noncontact manipulation in microfluidic devices.

  2. Driven Markovian Quantum Criticality.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jamir; Diehl, Sebastian

    2016-02-19

    We identify a new universality class in one-dimensional driven open quantum systems with a dark state. Salient features are the persistence of both the microscopic nonequilibrium conditions as well as the quantum coherence of dynamics close to criticality. This provides a nonequilibrium analogue of quantum criticality, and is sharply distinct from more generic driven systems, where both effective thermalization as well as asymptotic decoherence ensue, paralleling classical dynamical criticality. We quantify universality by computing the full set of independent critical exponents within a functional renormalization group approach. PMID:26943517

  3. The driven spinning top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-05-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader’s available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few pounds in the one that has been designed, tested and manufactured to a high standard. Either way the unique design of the driven top can provide several hours of interesting experimentation. Our aim here is simply to inform and inspire readers to further investigation and experimentation.

  4. Transport in driven plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.

    1985-03-01

    A plasma in contact with an external source of power, especially a source that interacts specifically with high-velocity electrons, exhibits transport properties, such as conductivity, different from those of an isolated plasma near thermal equilibrium. This is true even when the bulk of the particles in the driven plasma are near thermal equilibrium. To describe the driven plasma we derive an adjoint equation to the inhomogeneous, linearized, dynamic Boltzmann equation. The Green's functions for a variety of plasma responses can then be generated. It is possible to modify the Chapman-Enskog expansion in order to incorporate the response functions derived here.

  5. Hands-on force spectroscopy: weird springs and protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, Manfred

    2008-05-01

    A force spectroscopy model experiment is presented using a low-cost tensile apparatus described earlier. Force-extension measurements of twisted rubber bands are obtained. They exhibit a complex nonlinear elastic behaviour that resembles atomic force spectroscopy investigations of molecules of titin, a muscle protein. The model experiments open up intriguing possibilities to stimulate insight into entropy-driven self-organization of soft biological matter at the nanometre scale and into protein folding by hands-on experience and analogical transfer.

  6. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  7. Plasma sheath driven targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, J. H.; Freeman, B. L.

    1980-02-01

    Plasma focus driven target implosions are simulated using hydrodynamic-burn codes. Support is given to the idea that the use of a target in a plasma focus should allow 'impedance matching' between the fuel and gun, permitting larger fusion yields from a focus-target geometry than the scaling laws for a conventional plasma focus would predict.

  8. Data Driven Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech & Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Data-driven decision-making (DDDM) is a system of teaching and management practices that gets better information about students into the hands of classroom teachers. This article discusses the five major elements: (1) good baseline data; (2) measurable instructional goals; (3) frequent formative assessment; (4) professional learning communities;…

  9. The Driven Spinning Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-01-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader's available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few…

  10. Argument-Driven Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Victor; Grooms, Jonathon; Walker, Joi

    2009-01-01

    Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) is an instructional model that enables science teachers to transform a traditional laboratory activity into a short integrated instructional unit. To illustrate how the ADI instructional model works, this article describes an ADI lesson developed for a 10th-grade chemistry class. This example lesson was designed to…

  11. Position Control of Tendon-Driven Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E.; Platt, Robert, Jr.; Hargrave, B.; Pementer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, tendon-driven manipulators implement some force control scheme based on tension feedback. This feedback allows the system to ensure that the tendons are maintained taut with proper levels of tensioning at all times. Occasionally, whether it is due to the lack of tension feedback or the inability to implement sufficiently high stiffnesses, a position control scheme is needed. This work compares three position controllers for tendon-driven manipulators. A new controller is introduced that achieves the best overall performance with regards to speed, accuracy, and transient behavior. To compensate for the lack of tension feedback, the controller nominally maintains the internal tension on the tendons by implementing a two-tier architecture with a range-space constraint. These control laws are validated experimentally on the Robonaut-2 humanoid hand. I

  12. Hydrodynamic synchronisation of optically driven rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debono, Luke J.; Box, Stuart; Phillips, David B.; Simpson, Stephen H.; Hanna, Simon

    2015-08-01

    Hydrodynamic coupling is thought to play a role in the coordinated beating of cilia and flagella, and may inform the future design of artificial swimmers and pumps. In this study, optical tweezers are used to investigate the hydrodynamic coupling between a pair of driven oscillators. The theoretical model of Lenz and Ryskin [P. Lenz and A. Ryskin, Phys. Biol. 3, 285{294 (2006)] is experimentally recreated, in which each oscillator consists of a sphere driven in a circular trajectory. The optical trap position is maintained ahead of the sphere to provide a tangential driving force. The trap is also moved radially to harmonically constrain the sphere to the circular trajectory. Analytically, it has been shown that two oscillators of this type are able to synchronise or phase-lock under certain conditions. We explore the interplay between synchronisation mechanisms and find good agreement between experiment, theory and Brownian dynamics simulations.

  13. Measurements of gravity driven granular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facto, Kevin

    This dissertation presents experiments that studied two gravity driven granular channel flows. The first experiment used magnetic resonance imaging to measure the density and displacement distributions of poppy seeds flowing in a rough walled channel. Time-averaged measurements of normalized velocity and density showed little flow speed dependence. Instantaneous measurements, however, showed marked velocity dependence in the displacement distributions. There was evidence of aperiodic starting and stopping at lower flow speeds and the onset of density waves on a continuous flow at higher speeds. The second experiment measured forces in all three spatial directions at the boundary of a flow of steel balls. The relationship between the normal and the tangential forces were examined statistically and compared to the Coulomb friction model. For both large and small forces, the tangential and normal forces are unrelated, as there appears to be a strong tendency for the tangential force to maintain a value that will bear the weight the weight of the particles in flow.

  14. The swim force as a body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  15. Response to reflected-force feedback to fingers in teleoperations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, P. H.; Iatridis, J. C.; Thakor, N. V.

    1989-01-01

    Reflected-force feedback is an important aspect of teleoperations. The objective is to determine the ability of the human operator to respond to that force. Telerobotics operation is simulated by computer control of a motor-driven device with capabilities for programmable force feedback and force measurement. A computer-controlled motor drive is developed that provides forces against the fingers as well as (angular) position control. A load cell moves in a circular arc as it is pushed by a finger and measures reaction forces on the finger. The force exerted by the finger on the load cell and the angular position are digitized and recorded as a function of time by the computer. Flexure forces of the index, long and ring fingers of the human hand in opposition to the motor driven load cell are investigated. Results of the following experiments are presented: (1) Exertion of maximum finger force as a function of angle; (2) Exertion of target finger force against a computer controlled force; and (3) Test of the ability to move to a target force against a force that is a function of position. Averaged over ten individuals, the maximum force that could be exerted by the index or long finger is about 50 Newtons, while that of the ring finger is about 40 Newtons. From the tests of the ability of a subject to exert a target force, it was concluded that reflected-force feedback can be achieved with the direct kinesthetic perception of force without the use of tactile or visual clues.

  16. Exponential Mixing of the 3D Stochastic Navier-Stokes Equations Driven by Mildly Degenerate Noises

    SciTech Connect

    Albeverio, Sergio; Debussche, Arnaud; Xu Lihu

    2012-10-15

    We prove the strong Feller property and exponential mixing for 3D stochastic Navier-Stokes equation driven by mildly degenerate noises (i.e. all but finitely many Fourier modes being forced) via a Kolmogorov equation approach.

  17. Parametric resonance induced chaos in magnetic damped driven pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomeriki, Giorgi

    2016-07-01

    A damped driven pendulum with a magnetic driving force, appearing from a solenoid, where ac current flows is considered. The solenoid acts on the magnet, which is located at a free end of the pendulum. In this system the existence and interrelation of chaos and parametric resonance is theoretically examined. Derived analytical results are supported by numerical simulations and conducted experiments.

  18. Energy-beam-driven rapid fabrication system

    DOEpatents

    Keicher, David M.; Atwood, Clinton L.; Greene, Donald L.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Harwell, Lane D.; Jeantette, Francisco P.; Romero, Joseph A.; Schanwald, Lee P.; Schmale, David T.

    2002-01-01

    An energy beam driven rapid fabrication system, in which an energy beam strikes a growth surface to form a molten puddle thereon. Feed powder is then injected into the molten puddle from a converging flow of feed powder. A portion of the feed powder becomes incorporated into the molten puddle, forcing some of the puddle contents to freeze on the growth surface, thereby adding an additional layer of material. By scanning the energy beam and the converging flow of feed powder across the growth surface, complex three-dimensional shapes can be formed, ready or nearly ready for use. Nearly any class of material can be fabricated using this system.

  19. Stacking trilayers to increase force generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajollahi, Meisam; Ebrahimi Takallo, Saeede; Woehling, Vincent; Fannir, Adelyne; Plesse, Cédric; Vidal, Frédéric; Sassani, Farrokh; Madden, John D. W.

    2015-04-01

    Trilayer actuators enable large mechanical amplification, but at the expense of force. Thicker trilayers can generate more force, but displacement drops. Ideally of course a combination of high force and large displacement is desirable. In this work we explore the stacking of trilayers driven by conducting polymers in order to combine large force and reasonable deflection. Trilayer actuators operating in air are simulated using the finite element method. Force generated and the maximum beam deflection of individual and multiple stacked trilayers are studied in terms of the interface condition of the neighboring layers and the length of the auxiliary trilayer. The best performance is obtained when trilayers are able to slide with respect to each other so forces can add without impeding displacement. This case will require low friction and uniformity among the trilayers. Bonding of stacked trilayers along their entire length increases force, but dramatically reduces displacement. An alternative which leads to moderate displacements with increased force is the use of a long and a short trilayer that are bonded.

  20. Electrically driven optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Johannes; Kullock, René; Prangsma, Jord; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Hecht, Bert

    2015-09-01

    Unlike radiowave antennas, so far optical nanoantennas cannot be fed by electrical generators. Instead, they are driven by light or indirectly via excited discrete states in active materials in their vicinity. Here we demonstrate the direct electrical driving of an in-plane optical antenna by the broadband quantum-shot noise of electrons tunnelling across its feed gap. The spectrum of the emitted photons is determined by the antenna geometry and can be tuned via the applied voltage. Moreover, the direction and polarization of the light emission are controlled by the antenna resonance, which also improves the external quantum efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. The one-material planar design offers facile integration of electrical and optical circuits and thus represents a new paradigm for interfacing electrons and photons at the nanometre scale, for example for on-chip wireless communication and highly configurable electrically driven subwavelength photon sources.

  1. Laser driven radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.; Sefcik, J.; Cowan, T.

    1997-12-20

    Intense laser (> 1021 W/cm{sup 3}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator Bremsstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design and potential cost advantage for multiple axis views. High spatial and temporal resolution is achievable as a result of the very small source size (<100 um) and short-duration of the laser pulse. We have begun a series of experiments with the Petawatt laser at LLNL to determine the photon flux achievable with these sources and assess their potential for Stewardship applications. Additionally, we are developing a conceptual design and cost estimate of a multi-pulse, multi-axis (up to five) radiographic facility utilizing the Contained Firing Facility at site 300 and existing laser hardware.

  2. Test-driven programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Bozhidar; Georgieva, Adriana

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, are presented some possibilities concerning the implementation of a test-driven development as a programming method. Here is offered a different point of view for creation of advanced programming techniques (build tests before programming source with all necessary software tools and modules respectively). Therefore, this nontraditional approach for easier programmer's work through building tests at first is preferable way of software development. This approach allows comparatively simple programming (applied with different object-oriented programming languages as for example JAVA, XML, PYTHON etc.). It is predictable way to develop software tools and to provide help about creating better software that is also easier to maintain. Test-driven programming is able to replace more complicated casual paradigms, used by many programmers.

  3. Adiabatically driven Brownian pumps.

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, Viktor M; Makhnovskii, Yurii A; Shapochkina, Irina V; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2013-07-01

    We investigate a Brownian pump which, being powered by a flashing ratchet mechanism, produces net particle transport through a membrane. The extension of the Parrondo's approach developed for reversible Brownian motors [Parrondo, Phys. Rev. E 57, 7297 (1998)] to adiabatically driven pumps is given. We demonstrate that the pumping mechanism becomes especially efficient when the time variation of the potential occurs adiabatically fast or adiabatically slow, in perfect analogy with adiabatically driven Brownian motors which exhibit high efficiency [Rozenbaum et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 041116 (2012)]. At the same time, the efficiency of the pumping mechanism is shown to be less than that of Brownian motors due to fluctuations of the number of particles in the membrane. PMID:23944411

  4. Gas-driven microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.; McWhorter, P.J.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Miller, W.M.

    1996-06-27

    This paper describes an invention which relates to microtechnology and the fabrication process for developing microelectrical systems. It describes a means for fabricating a gas-driven microturbine capable of providing autonomous propulsion in which the rapidly moving gases are directed through a micromachined turbine to power devices by direct linkage or turbo-electric generators components in a domain ranging from tenths of micrometers to thousands of micrometers.

  5. Data-Driven Objectness.

    PubMed

    Hongwen Kang; Hebert, Martial; Efros, Alexei A; Kanade, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    We propose a data-driven approach to estimate the likelihood that an image segment corresponds to a scene object (its "objectness") by comparing it to a large collection of example object regions. We demonstrate that when the application domain is known, for example, in our case activity of daily living (ADL), we can capture the regularity of the domain specific objects using millions of exemplar object regions. Our approach to estimating the objectness of an image region proceeds in two steps: 1) finding the exemplar regions that are the most similar to the input image segment; 2) calculating the objectness of the image segment by combining segment properties, mutual consistency across the nearest exemplar regions, and the prior probability of each exemplar region. In previous work, parametric objectness models were built from a small number of manually annotated objects regions, instead, our data-driven approach uses 5 million object regions along with their metadata information. Results on multiple data sets demonstrates our data-driven approach compared to the existing model based techniques. We also show the application of our approach in improving the performance of object discovery algorithms. PMID:26353218

  6. Trace anomaly driven inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.; Hertog, T.; Reall, H. S.

    2001-04-01

    This paper investigates Starobinsky's model of inflation driven by the trace anomaly of conformally coupled matter fields. This model does not suffer from the problem of contrived initial conditions that occurs in most models of inflation driven by a scalar field. The universe can be nucleated semiclassically by a cosmological instanton that is much larger than the Planck scale provided there are sufficiently many matter fields. There are two cosmological instantons: the four sphere and a new ``double bubble'' solution. This paper considers a universe nucleated by the four sphere. The AdS/CFT correspondence is used to calculate the correlation function for scalar and tensor metric perturbations during the ensuing de Sitter phase. The analytic structure of the scalar and tensor propagators is discussed in detail. Observational constraints on the model are discussed. Quantum loops of matter fields are shown to strongly suppress short scale metric perturbations, which implies that short distance modifications of gravity would probably not be observable in the cosmic microwave background. This is probably true for any model of inflation provided there are sufficiently many matter fields. This point is illustrated by a comparison of anomaly driven inflation in four dimensions and in a Randall-Sundrum brane-world model.

  7. Driven superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2014-03-01

    Driven nonlinear quantum systems show rich phenomena in various fields of physics. Among them, superconducting quantum circuits have very attractive features such as well-controlled quantum states with design flexibility, strong nonlinearity of Josephson junctions, strong coupling to electromagnetic driving fields, little internal dissipation, and tailored coupling to the electromagnetic environment. We have investigated properties and functionalities of driven superconducting quantum circuits. A transmon qubit coupled to a transmission line shows nearly perfect spatial mode matching between the incident and scattered microwave field in the 1D mode. Dressed states under a driving field are studied there and also in a semi-infinite 1D mode terminated by a resonator containing a flux qubit. An effective Λ-type three-level system is realized under an appropriate driving condition. It allows ``impedance-matched'' perfect absorption of incident probe photons and down conversion into another frequency mode. Finally, the weak signal from the qubit is read out using a Josephson parametric amplifier/oscillator which is another nonlinear circuit driven by a strong pump field. This work was partly supported by the Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST), Project for Developing Innovation Systems of MEXT, MEXT KAKENHI ``Quantum Cybernetics,'' and the NICT Commissioned Research.

  8. Dissipation and oscillatory solvation forces in confined liquids studied by small-amplitude atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2010-08-13

    We determine conservative and dissipative tip-sample interaction forces from the amplitude and phase response of acoustically driven atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers using a non-polar model fluid (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, which displays strong molecular layering) and atomically flat surfaces of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. Taking into account the base motion and the frequency-dependent added mass and hydrodynamic damping on the AFM cantilever, we develop a reliable force inversion procedure that allows for extracting tip-sample interaction forces for a wide range of drive frequencies. We systematically eliminate the effect of finite drive amplitudes. Dissipative tip-sample forces are consistent with the bulk viscosity down to a thickness of 2-3 nm. Dissipation measurements far below resonance, which we argue to be the most reliable, indicate the presence of peaks in the damping, corresponding to an enhanced 'effective' viscosity, upon expelling the last and second-last molecular layer. PMID:20639584

  9. Coalescence cascade of dissipative solitons in parametrically driven systems.

    PubMed

    Clerc, M G; Coulibaly, S; Gordillo, L; Mujica, N; Navarro, R

    2011-09-01

    Parametrically driven spatially extended systems exhibit uniform oscillations which are modulationally unstable. The resulting periodic state evolves to the creation of a gas of dissipative solitons. Driven by the interaction of dissipative solitons, the multisoliton state undergoes a cascade of coalescence processes, where the average soliton separation distance obeys a temporal self-similar law. Starting from the soliton pair interaction law, we have derived analytically and characterized the law of this multisoliton coarsening process. A comparison of numerical results obtained with different models such as the parametrically driven damped nonlinear Schrödinger equation, a vertically driven chain of pendula, and a parametrically forced magnetic wire, shows remarkable agreement. Both phenomena, the pair interaction law and the coarsening process, are also observed experimentally in a quasi-one-dimensional layer of Newtonian fluid which is oscillated vertically. PMID:22060473

  10. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. PMID:27410747

  11. Forcing it on: Cytoskeletal dynamics during lymphocyte activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2012-02-01

    Formation of the immune synapse during lymphocyte activation involves cell spreading driven by large scale physical rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton and the cell membrane. Several recent observations suggest that mechanical forces are important for efficient T cell activation. How forces arise from the dynamics of the cytoskeleton and the membrane during contact formation, and their effect on signaling activation is not well understood. We have imaged membrane topography, actin dynamics and the spatiotemporal localization of signaling clusters during the very early stages of spreading. Formation of signaling clusters was closely correlated with the movement and topography of the membrane in contact with the activating surface. Further, we observed membrane waves driven by actin polymerization originating at these signaling clusters. Actin-driven membrane protrusions likely play an important role in force generation at the immune synapse. In order to study cytoskeletal forces during T-cell activation, we studied cell spreading on elastic gels. We found that gel stiffness influences cell morphology, actin dynamics and receptor activation. Efforts to determine the quantitative relationships between cellular forces and signaling are underway. Our results suggest a role for cytoskeleton driven forces during signaling activation in lymphocytes.

  12. Driven motion of vortices in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G.W.; Leaf, G.K.; Kaper, H.G.; Vinokur, V.M.; Koshelev, A.E.; Braun, D.W.; Levine, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    The driven motion of vortices in the solid vortex state is analyzed with the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations. In large-scale numerical simulations, carried out on the IBM Scalable POWERparallel (SP) system at Argonne National Laboratory, many hundreds of vortices are followed as they move under the influence of a Lorentz force induced by a transport current in the presence of a planar defect (similar to a twin boundary in YBa{sub 2}CU{sub 3}O{sub 7}). Correlations in the positions and velocities of the vortices in plastic and elastic motion are identified and compared. Two types of plastic motion are observed. Organized plastic motion displaying long-range orientational correlation and shorter-range velocity correlation occurs when the driving forces are small compared to the pinning forces in the twin boundary. Disorganized plastic motion displaying no significant correlation in either the velocities or orientation of the vortex system occurs when the driving and pinning forces axe of the same order.

  13. Micro-force sensing mobile microrobots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Wuming; Cappelleri, David J.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the first microscale micro force sensing mobile microrobot. The design consists of a planar, vision-based micro force sensor end-effector, while the microrobot body is made from photoresist mixed with nickel particles that is driven by an exterior magnetic field. With a known stiffness, the manipulation forces can be determined from observing the deformation of the end-effector through a camera attached to an optical microscope. After analyzing and calibrating the stiffness of a micromachined prototype, proof of concept tests are conducted to verify this microrobot prototype possessing the mobility and in-situ force sensing capabilities. This microscale micro-Force Sensing Mobile Microrobot (μFSMM) is able to translate with the speed up to 10 mm=s in a fluid environment. The calibrated stiffness of the micro force sensor end-effector of the μFSMM is on the order of 10-2 N=m. The force sensing resolution with the current vision system is approximately 100 nN.

  14. Dissipative adaptation in driven self-assembly.

    PubMed

    England, Jeremy L

    2015-11-01

    In a collection of assembling particles that is allowed to reach thermal equilibrium, the energy of a given microscopic arrangement and the probability of observing the system in that arrangement obey a simple exponential relationship known as the Boltzmann distribution. Once the same thermally fluctuating particles are driven away from equilibrium by forces that do work on the system over time, however, it becomes significantly more challenging to relate the likelihood of a given outcome to familiar thermodynamic quantities. Nonetheless, it has long been appreciated that developing a sound and general understanding of the thermodynamics of such non-equilibrium scenarios could ultimately enable us to control and imitate the marvellous successes that living things achieve in driven self-assembly. Here, I suggest that such a theoretical understanding may at last be emerging, and trace its development from historic first steps to more recent discoveries. Focusing on these newer results, I propose that they imply a general thermodynamic mechanism for self-organization via dissipation of absorbed work that may be applicable in a broad class of driven many-body systems. PMID:26530021

  15. Magnetic Control of Solutal Buoyancy Driven Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Volumetric forces resulting from local density variations and gravitational acceleration cause buoyancy induced convective motion in melts and solutions. Solutal buoyancy is a result of concentration differences in an otherwise isothermal fluid. If the fluid also exhibits variations in magnetic susceptibility with concentration then convection control by external magnetic fields can be hypothesized. Magnetic control of thermal buoyancy induced convection in ferrofluids (dispersions of ferromagnetic particles in a carrier fluid) and paramagnetic fluids have been demonstrated. Here we show the nature of magnetic control of solutal buoyancy driven convection of a paramagnetic fluid, an aqueous solution of Manganese Chloride hydrate. We predict the critical magnetic field required for balancing gravitational solutal buoyancy driven convection and validate it through a simple experiment. We demonstrate that gravity driven flow can be completely reversed by a magnetic field but the exact cancellation of the flow is not possible. This is because the phenomenon is unstable. The technique can be applied to crystal growth processes in order to reduce convection and to heat exchanger devices for enhancing convection. The method can also be applied to impose a desired g-level in reduced gravity applications.

  16. Dissipative adaptation in driven self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Jeremy L.

    2015-11-01

    In a collection of assembling particles that is allowed to reach thermal equilibrium, the energy of a given microscopic arrangement and the probability of observing the system in that arrangement obey a simple exponential relationship known as the Boltzmann distribution. Once the same thermally fluctuating particles are driven away from equilibrium by forces that do work on the system over time, however, it becomes significantly more challenging to relate the likelihood of a given outcome to familiar thermodynamic quantities. Nonetheless, it has long been appreciated that developing a sound and general understanding of the thermodynamics of such non-equilibrium scenarios could ultimately enable us to control and imitate the marvellous successes that living things achieve in driven self-assembly. Here, I suggest that such a theoretical understanding may at last be emerging, and trace its development from historic first steps to more recent discoveries. Focusing on these newer results, I propose that they imply a general thermodynamic mechanism for self-organization via dissipation of absorbed work that may be applicable in a broad class of driven many-body systems.

  17. System Driven Workarounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda; Wichner, David; Jakey, Abegael Marie

    2013-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) in a partnership between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), participating carriers, and labor organizations. It is designed to improve the National Airspace System by collecting and studying reports detailing unsafe conditions and events in the aviation industry. Employees are able to report safety issues or concerns with confidentiality and without fear of discipline. Safety reports highlighting system driven workarounds for the aviation community highlight the human workaround for the complex aviation system.

  18. Phase contrast and operation regimes in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Sergio

    2014-04-07

    In amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy the attractive and the repulsive force regimes induce phase shifts above and below 90°, respectively. In the more recent multifrequency approach, however, multiple operation regimes have been reported and the theory should be revisited. Here, a theory of phase contrast in multifrequency atomic force microscopy is developed and discussed in terms of energy transfer between modes, energy dissipation and the kinetic energy and energy transfer associated with externally driven harmonics. The single frequency virial that controls the phase shift might undergo transitions in sign while the average force (modal virial) remains positive (negative)

  19. Lorentz Body Force Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz force induced by a traveling magnetic field (TMF) in a cylindrical container has been calculated. The force can be used to control flow in dectrically conducting melts and the direction of the magnetic field and resulting flow can be reversed. A TMF can be used to partially cancel flow driven by buoyancy. The penetration of the field into the cylinder decreases as the frequency increases, and there exists an optimal value of frequency for which the resulting force is a maximum. Expressions for the Lorentz force in the limiting cases of low frequency and infinite cylinder are also given and compared to the numerical calculations.

  20. Forced wetting and hydrodynamic assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Terence D.; Fernandez-Toledano, Juan-Carlos; Doyen, Guillaume; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Wetting is a prerequisite for coating a uniform layer of liquid onto a solid. Wetting failure and air entrainment set the ultimate limit to coating speed. It is well known in the coating art that this limit can be postponed by manipulating the coating flow to generate what has been termed "hydrodynamic assist," but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Experiments have shown that the conditions that postpone air entrainment also reduce the apparent dynamic contact angle, suggesting a direct link, but how the flow might affect the contact angle remains to be established. Here, we use molecular dynamics to compare the outcome of steady forced wetting with previous results for the spontaneous spreading of liquid drops and apply the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting to rationalize our findings and place them on a quantitative footing. The forced wetting simulations reveal significant slip at the solid-liquid interface and details of the flow immediately adjacent to the moving contact line. Our results confirm that the local, microscopic contact angle is dependent not simply only on the velocity of wetting but also on the nature of the flow that drives it. In particular, they support an earlier suggestion that during forced wetting, an intense shear stress in the vicinity of the contact line can assist surface tension forces in promoting dynamic wetting, thus reducing the velocity-dependence of the contact angle. Hydrodynamic assist then appears as a natural consequence of wetting that emerges when the contact line is driven by a strong and highly confined flow. Our theoretical approach also provides a self-consistent model of molecular slip at the solid-liquid interface that enables its magnitude to be estimated from dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the model predicts how hydrodynamic assist and slip may be influenced by liquid viscosity and solid-liquid interactions.

  1. Ultrasensitive hysteretic force sensing with parametric nonlinear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papariello, Luca; Zilberberg, Oded; Eichler, Alexander; Chitra, R.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a method for linear detection of weak forces using parametrically driven nonlinear resonators. The method is based on a peculiar feature in the response of the resonator to a near resonant periodic external force. This feature stems from a complex interplay among the parametric drive, external force, and nonlinearities. For weak parametric drive, the response exhibits the standard Duffing-like single jump hysteresis. For stronger drive amplitudes, we find a qualitatively new double jump hysteresis which arises from stable solutions generated by the cubic Duffing nonlinearity. The additional jump exists only if the external force is present and the frequency at which it occurs depends linearly on the amplitude of the external force, permitting a straightforward ultrasensitive detection of weak forces. With state-of-the-art nanomechanical resonators, our scheme should permit force detection in the attonewton range.

  2. Collisional effects on nonlinear ion drag force for small grains

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Haakonsen, C. B.

    2013-08-15

    The ion drag force arising from plasma flow past an embedded spherical grain is calculated self-consistently and non-linearly using particle in cell codes, accounting for ion-neutral collisions. Using ion velocity distribution appropriate for ion drift driven by a force field gives wake potential and force greatly different from a shifted Maxwellian distribution, regardless of collisionality. The low-collisionality forces are shown to be consistent with estimates based upon cross-sections for scattering in a Yukawa (shielded) grain field, but only if non-linear shielding length is used. Finite collisionality initially enhances the drag force, but only by up to a factor of 2. Larger collisionality eventually reduces the drag force. In the collisional regime, the drift distribution gives larger drag than the shift distribution even at velocities where their collisionless drags are equal. Comprehensive practical analytic formulas for force that fit the calculations are provided.

  3. THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert E.

    2010-06-20

    Accurately determining the escape rate from a planet's atmosphere is critical for determining its evolution. A large amount of Cassini data is now available for Titan's upper atmosphere and a wealth of data is expected within the next decade on escape from Pluto, Mars, and extra-solar planets. Escape can be driven by upward thermal conduction of energy deposited well below the exobase, as well as by nonthermal processes produced by energy deposited in the exobase region. Recent applications of a model for escape driven by upward thermal conduction, called the slow hydrodynamic escape model, have resulted in surprisingly large loss rates for the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Based on a molecular kinetic simulation of the exobase region, these rates appear to be orders of magnitude too large. Therefore, the slow hydrodynamic model is evaluated here. It is shown that such a model cannot give a reliable description of the atmospheric temperature profile unless it is coupled to a molecular kinetic description of the exobase region. Therefore, the present escape rates for Titan and Pluto must be re-evaluated using the atmospheric model described here.

  4. Force propagation and force generation in cells.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Oliver; Duschl, Claus

    2010-09-01

    Determining how forces are produced by and propagated through the cytoskeleton (CSK) of the cell is of great interest as dynamic processes of the CSK are intimately correlated with many molecular signaling pathways. We are presenting a novel approach for integrating measurements on cell elasticity, transcellular force propagation, and cellular force generation to obtain a comprehensive description of dynamic and mechanical properties of the CSK under force loading. This approach uses a combination of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We apply well-defined loading schemes onto the apical cell membrane of fibroblasts using the SFM and simultaneously use TIRF microscopy to image the topography of the basal cell membrane. The locally distinct changes of shape and depth of the cytoskeletal imprints onto the basal membrane are interpreted as results of force propagation through the cytoplasm. This observation provides evidence for the tensegrity model and demonstrates the usefulness of our approach that does not depend on potentially disturbing marker compounds. We confirm that the actin network greatly determines cell stiffness and represents the substrate that mediates force transduction through the cytoplasm of the cell. The latter is an essential feature of tensegrity. Most importantly, our new finding that, both intact actin and microtubule networks are required for enabling the cell to produce work, can only be understood within the framework of the tensegrity model. We also provide, for the first time, a direct measurement of the cell's mechanical power output under compression at two femtowatts. PMID:20607861

  5. Current-driven plasma acceleration versus current-driven energy dissipation. I - Wave stability theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant unstable electrostatic wave modes of an electromagnetically accelerated plasma are investigated. The study is the first part of a three-phase program aimed at characterizing the current-driven turbulent dissipation degrading the efficiency of Lorentz force plasma accelerators such as the MPD thruster. The analysis uses a kinetic theory that includes magnetic and thermal effects as well as those of an electron current transverse to the magnetic field and collisions, thus combining all the features of previous models. Analytical and numerical solutions allow a detailed description of threshold criteria, finite growth behavior, destabilization mechanisms and maximized-growth characteristics of the dominant unstable modes. The lower hybrid current-driven instability is implicated as dominant and was found to preserve its character in the collisional plasma regime.

  6. Energizing porters by proton-motive force.

    PubMed

    Nelson, N

    1994-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the chemistry of water was the most crucial determinant in shaping life on earth. Among the more important chemical features of water is its dissociation into protons and hydroxyl ions. The presence of relatively high proton concentrations in the ambient solution resulted in the evolution of proton pumps during the dawn of life on earth. These proton pumps maintained neutral pH inside the cells and generated electrochemical gradients of protons (proton-motive force) across their membranes. The existence of proton-motive force enabled the evolution of porters driven by it that are most probably among the more primitive porters in the world. The directionality of the substrate transport by the porters could be to both sides of the membranes because they can serve as proton symporters or antiporters. One of the most important subjects of this meeting is the mechanism by which proton-motive and other ion-motive forces drive the transport processes through porters. Is there a common mechanism of action for all proton-driven porters? Is there some common partial reaction by which we can identify the way that porters are energized by proton-motive force? Is there a common coupling between proton movement and uptake or secretion of certain molecules? Even a partial answer to one of these questions would advance our knowledge... or confusion. As my mentor Efraim Racker used to say: 'If you are not totally confused you do not understand the issue'. PMID:7823046

  7. Forces on particles in microstreaming flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Thameem, Raqeeb

    2015-11-01

    In various microfluidic applications, vortical steady streaming from ultrasonically driven microbubbles is used in concert with a pressure-driven channel flow to manipulate objects. While a quantitative theory of this boundary-induced streaming is available, little work has been devoted to a fundamental understanding of the forces exerted on microparticles in boundary streaming flows, even though the differential action of such forces is central to applications like size-sensitive sorting. Contrary to other microfluidic sorting devices, the forces in bubble microstreaming act over millisecond times and micron length scales, without the need for accumulated deflections over long distances. Accordingly, we develop a theory of hydrodynamic forces on the fast time scale of bubble oscillation using the lubrication approximation, showing for the first time how particle displacements are rectified near moving boundaries over multiple oscillations in parallel with the generation of the steady streaming flow. The dependence of particle migration on particle size and the flow parameters is compared with experimental data. The theory is applicable to boundary streaming phenomena in general and demonstrates how particles can be sorted very quickly and without compromising device throughput. We acknowledge support by the National Science Foundation under grant number CBET-1236141.

  8. Six axis force feedback input device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohm, Timothy (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a low friction, low inertia, six-axis force feedback input device comprising an arm with double-jointed, tendon-driven revolute joints, a decoupled tendon-driven wrist, and a base with encoders and motors. The input device functions as a master robot manipulator of a microsurgical teleoperated robot system including a slave robot manipulator coupled to an amplifier chassis, which is coupled to a control chassis, which is coupled to a workstation with a graphical user interface. The amplifier chassis is coupled to the motors of the master robot manipulator and the control chassis is coupled to the encoders of the master robot manipulator. A force feedback can be applied to the input device and can be generated from the slave robot to enable a user to operate the slave robot via the input device without physically viewing the slave robot. Also, the force feedback can be generated from the workstation to represent fictitious forces to constrain the input device's control of the slave robot to be within imaginary predetermined boundaries.

  9. Stochastic regimes in the driven oscillator with a step-like nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Koga, J. K.; Kondo, K.; Kando, M.; Yogo, A.; Bulanov, S. S.

    2015-06-15

    A nonlinear oscillator with an abruptly inhomogeneous restoring force driven by an uniform oscillating force exhibits stochastic properties under specific resonance conditions. This behaviour elucidates the elementary mechanism of the electron energization in the strong electromagnetic wave interaction with thin targets.

  10. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  11. Climate-driven regime shift of a temperate marine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wernberg, Thomas; Bennett, Scott; Babcock, Russell C; de Bettignies, Thibaut; Cure, Katherine; Depczynski, Martial; Dufois, Francois; Fromont, Jane; Fulton, Christopher J; Hovey, Renae K; Harvey, Euan S; Holmes, Thomas H; Kendrick, Gary A; Radford, Ben; Santana-Garcon, Julia; Saunders, Benjamin J; Smale, Dan A; Thomsen, Mads S; Tuckett, Chenae A; Tuya, Fernando; Vanderklift, Mathew A; Wilson, Shaun

    2016-07-01

    Ecosystem reconfigurations arising from climate-driven changes in species distributions are expected to have profound ecological, social, and economic implications. Here we reveal a rapid climate-driven regime shift of Australian temperate reef communities, which lost their defining kelp forests and became dominated by persistent seaweed turfs. After decades of ocean warming, extreme marine heat waves forced a 100-kilometer range contraction of extensive kelp forests and saw temperate species replaced by seaweeds, invertebrates, corals, and fishes characteristic of subtropical and tropical waters. This community-wide tropicalization fundamentally altered key ecological processes, suppressing the recovery of kelp forests. PMID:27387951

  12. Liquid mixing driven motions of floating macroscopic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming

    2007-04-01

    Dropping miscible and low-density organic solvents into water generates translational and rotational motions of floating objects including oil droplets, polymer half spheres, and model boats. The moving speed of the boat at different loads and the force produced by solvent drops are measured. In contrast to motions driven by surface tension of monolayer, the liquid mixing driven motion can be dynamically steered without restriction and continued provided the supply is maintained and the amount of water is large enough. Such motions are the result of Marangoni instability in binary liquid-liquid systems with intentionally produced concentration gradients behind the floating objects.

  13. Surface tension driven flow in glass melts and model fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneil, T. J.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Surface tension driven flow has been investigated analytically and experimentally using an apparatus where a free column of molten glass or model fluids was supported at its top and bottom faces by solid surfaces. The glass used in the experiments was sodium diborate, and the model fluids were silicone oils. In both the model fluid and glass melt experiments, conclusive evidence was obtained to prove that the observed flow was driven primarily by surface tension forces. The experimental observations are in qualitative agreement with predictions from the theoretical model.

  14. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  15. Dynamo Driven By Inertial Instabilities, Application to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebron, D.; Hollerbach, R.; Vantieghem, S.; Noir, J.; Schaeffer, N.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, large-scale, turbulent flows may also be driven by the combined action of boundary topography (i.e. departure from spherical geometry), and mechanical forcings (e.g. libration, tides). This has been previously proposed to explain the magnetic data we have on the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. In this work, we use theoretical analysis and global magneto-hydrodynamic simulations to show, for the first time, that: (i) the tidal forcing can generate a (dipole-dominated) large-scale magnetic field in global simulations, an hypothesis previously assumed by Le Bars et al. (2011) in their model of lunar magnetic history. (ii) latitudinal libration (i.e. an oscillation of the figure axis with respect to the mean rotation axis) can excite inertial instabilities, which may have driven dynamos in telluric bodies such as the Early Moon. We discuss our results in the light of magnetic observations. In particular, we propose here a new possible mechanism for the early Moon dynamo, based on latitudinal libration driven instabilities. This new scenario is evaluated by comparing the associated estimates of the surface magnetic field strength with the recent paleo-magnetic lunar measurements.

  16. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  17. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force. Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without…

  18. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  19. Muscle-driven nanogenerators

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong L.; Yang, Rusen

    2011-03-01

    In a method of generating electricity, a plurality of living cells are grown on an array of piezoelectric nanowires so that the cells engage the piezoelectric nanowires. Induced static potentials are extracted from at least one of the piezoelectric nanowires when at least one of the cells deforms the at least one of the piezoelectric nanowires. A cell-driven electrical generator that includes a substrate and a plurality of spaced-apart piezoelectric nanowires disposed on the substrate. A plurality of spaced-apart conductive electrodes interact with the plurality of piezoelectric nanowires. A biological buffer layer that is configured to promote growth of cells is disposed on the substrate so that cells placed on the substrate will grow and engage the piezoelectric nanowires.

  20. Soliton driven angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carretero, M.; Terragni, F.; Birnir, B.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a multiscale process by which blood vessels grow from existing ones and carry oxygen to distant organs. Angiogenesis is essential for normal organ growth and wounded tissue repair but it may also be induced by tumours to amplify their own growth. Mathematical and computational models contribute to understanding angiogenesis and developing anti-angiogenic drugs, but most work only involves numerical simulations and analysis has lagged. A recent stochastic model of tumour-induced angiogenesis including blood vessel branching, elongation, and anastomosis captures some of its intrinsic multiscale structures, yet allows one to extract a deterministic integropartial differential description of the vessel tip density. Here we find that the latter advances chemotactically towards the tumour driven by a soliton (similar to the famous Korteweg-de Vries soliton) whose shape and velocity change slowly. Analysing these collective coordinates paves the way for controlling angiogenesis through the soliton, the engine that drives this process. PMID:27503562

  1. Steady Capillary Driven Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1996-01-01

    A steady capillary driven flow is developed for a liquid index in a circular tube which is partially coated with a surface modifier to produce a discontinuous wetting condition from one side of the tube to the other. The bulk flow is novel in that it is truly steady, and controlled solely by the physics associated with dynamic wetting. The influence of gravity on the flow is minimized through the use of small diameter tubes approximately O(1 mm) tested horizontally in a laboratory and larger tubes approximately O(10 mm) tested in the low gravity environment of a drop tower. Average steady velocities are predicted and compared against a large experimental data set which includes the effects of tube dimensions and fluid properties. The sensitivity of the velocity to surface cleanliness is dramatic and the advantages of experimentation in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  2. Consistent model driven architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  3. Multilane driven diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curatolo, A. I.; Evans, M. R.; Kafri, Y.; Tailleur, J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider networks made of parallel lanes along which particles hop according to driven diffusive dynamics. The particles also hop transversely from lane to lane, hence indirectly coupling their longitudinal dynamics. We present a general method for constructing the phase diagram of these systems which reveals that in many cases their physics reduce to that of single-lane systems. The reduction to an effective single-lane description legitimizes, for instance, the use of a single TASEP to model the hopping of molecular motors along the many tracks of a single microtubule. Then, we show how, in quasi-2D settings, new phenomena emerge due to the presence of non-zero transverse currents, leading, for instance, to strong ‘shear localization’ along the network.

  4. Soliton driven angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carretero, M.; Terragni, F.; Birnir, B.

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenesis is a multiscale process by which blood vessels grow from existing ones and carry oxygen to distant organs. Angiogenesis is essential for normal organ growth and wounded tissue repair but it may also be induced by tumours to amplify their own growth. Mathematical and computational models contribute to understanding angiogenesis and developing anti-angiogenic drugs, but most work only involves numerical simulations and analysis has lagged. A recent stochastic model of tumour-induced angiogenesis including blood vessel branching, elongation, and anastomosis captures some of its intrinsic multiscale structures, yet allows one to extract a deterministic integropartial differential description of the vessel tip density. Here we find that the latter advances chemotactically towards the tumour driven by a soliton (similar to the famous Korteweg-de Vries soliton) whose shape and velocity change slowly. Analysing these collective coordinates paves the way for controlling angiogenesis through the soliton, the engine that drives this process.

  5. Soliton driven angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, L L; Carretero, M; Terragni, F; Birnir, B

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a multiscale process by which blood vessels grow from existing ones and carry oxygen to distant organs. Angiogenesis is essential for normal organ growth and wounded tissue repair but it may also be induced by tumours to amplify their own growth. Mathematical and computational models contribute to understanding angiogenesis and developing anti-angiogenic drugs, but most work only involves numerical simulations and analysis has lagged. A recent stochastic model of tumour-induced angiogenesis including blood vessel branching, elongation, and anastomosis captures some of its intrinsic multiscale structures, yet allows one to extract a deterministic integropartial differential description of the vessel tip density. Here we find that the latter advances chemotactically towards the tumour driven by a soliton (similar to the famous Korteweg-de Vries soliton) whose shape and velocity change slowly. Analysing these collective coordinates paves the way for controlling angiogenesis through the soliton, the engine that drives this process. PMID:27503562

  6. Fluid-driven metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Ulven, O. I.; Malthe-Sorenssen, A.

    2014-12-01

    Metamorphic processes in the Earth crust are almost invariably associated with fluid migration. Many lines of evidence suggest that fluid migration is intimately coupled both to the metamorphic reactions, and to associated deformation processes. Petrologic arguments suggest that all granulite facies and most amphibolite facies rocks are essentially dry (no free fluid phase) at normal geothermal gradients outside periods of heating-produced fluid generation. In addition, except at high pressure - low temperature condition, fluid-consuming reactions leads to an increase in solid volume and a potential clogging of any initial pore space. Hence, fluid migration in medium and high-grade metamorphic rocks is in general associated with some porosity producing process. Porosity generation may occur by either chemical or mechanical processes. In systems with high fluid fluxes, porosity may be produced by dissolution and transport of mass out of the system. Such fluxes can normally only be sustained over short length scales and limited time scales. In systems where the infiltrating fluid is far from equilibrium with the rock matrix, mechanical porosity generation can arise from local stresses generated by the volume change of volatilization reactions. Furthermore, it has become increasingly clear that crustal rocks may be under significant tectonic stress, even far from plate tectonic boundaries. In situations where the rocks are close to critically stressed, any stress perturbations caused by reaction driven changes in solid volume or fluid pressure gradients may lead to dilatant deformation and porosity production on a scale much larger than the characteristic length scales of the reacting rock units. Field observations, experimental studies and modeling results will be presented that focus on reaction driven porosity generation in systems subject to variable initial differential stresses.

  7. Does weightlifting increase residual force enhancement?

    PubMed

    Siebert, Tobias; Kurch, David; Blickhan, Reinhard; Stutzig, Norman

    2016-07-01

    The force maintained following stretching of an active muscle exceeds the isometric force at the same muscle length. This residual force enhancement (RFE) is different for various muscles. It is currently unknown whether training induces changes in RFE. Weightlifters perform a large number of eccentric contractions during training, and RFE might be functionally relevant. The aim of this study was to examine whether there is increased RFE in weightlifters versus a reference group. Therefore, we measured external reaction forces during a multi-joint leg extension in weightlifters (n=10) and a reference group (n=11) using a motor driven leg press dynamometer (ISOMED 2000). Steady state isometric forces after stretching were compared to the corresponding forces obtained during isometric reference contractions. Statistical analyses yielded a significant RFE for both groups (p<0.001), but there were no RFE differences between the groups (p=0.320). However, RFE tends to decrease slower in the weightlifting group versus the reference group. We conclude that long-term weightlifting has only a minor influence on RFE. We speculate that the specific training including a combination of eccentric and concentric exercises induced almost no changes in titin-isoform expression which may be responsible for generation of RFE after active muscle stretching. PMID:27234620

  8. Varying the effective buoyancy of cells using magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M.

    2004-06-01

    We introduce a magnetic force buoyancy variation (MFBV) technique that employs intense inhomogeneous magnetic fields to vary the effective buoyancy of cells and other diamagnetic systems in solution. Nonswimming Paramecia have been suspended, forced to sediment and driven to rise in solution using MFBV. Details of their response to MFBV have been used to determine the magnetic susceptibility of a single Paramecium. The use of MFBV as a means by which to suspend cell cultures indefinitely is also described.

  9. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  10. Efficacy of climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Lacis, A.; Schmidt, G. A.; Russell, G.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bell, N.; Cairns, B.; Canuto, V.; Chandler, M.; Cheng, Y.; Del Genio, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Fleming, E.; Friend, A.; Hall, T.; Jackman, C.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N.; Koch, D.; Lean, J.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K.; Menon, S.; Miller, R.; Minnis, P.; Novakov, T.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, Ja.; Perlwitz, Ju.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Shindell, D.; Stone, P.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.; Thresher, D.; Wielicki, B.; Wong, T.; Yao, M.; Zhang, S.

    2005-09-01

    We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the "efficacy" of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ˜110%, which increases to ˜145% when its indirect effects on stratospheric H2O and tropospheric O3 are included, yielding an effective climate forcing of ˜0.8 W/m2 for the period 1750-2000 and making CH4 the largest anthropogenic climate forcing other than CO2. Black carbon (BC) aerosols from biomass burning have a calculated efficacy ˜58%, while fossil fuel BC has an efficacy ˜78%. Accounting for forcing efficacies and for indirect effects via snow albedo and cloud changes, we find that fossil fuel soot, defined as BC + OC (organic carbon), has a net positive forcing while biomass burning BC + OC has a negative forcing. We show that replacement of the traditional instantaneous and adjusted forcings, Fi and Fa, with an easily computed alternative, Fs, yields a better predictor of climate change, i.e., its efficacies are closer to unity. Fs is inferred from flux and temperature changes in a fixed-ocean model run. There is remarkable congruence in the spatial distribution of climate change, normalized to the same forcing Fs, for most climate forcing agents, suggesting that the global forcing has more relevance to regional climate change than may have been anticipated. Increasing greenhouse gases intensify the Hadley circulation in our model, increasing rainfall in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), Eastern United States, and East Asia, while intensifying dry conditions in the subtropics including the Southwest United States, the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and an expanding Sahel. These features survive in model simulations that use all estimated forcings for the period 1880-2000. Responses to localized forcings, such

  11. Periodically driven DNA: Theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Kumar, Ravinder; Janke, Wolfhard

    2016-01-01

    We propose a generic model of driven DNA under the influence of an oscillatory force of amplitude F and frequency ν and show the existence of a dynamical transition for a chain of finite length. We find that the area of the hysteresis loop, Aloop, scales with the same exponents as observed in a recent study based on a much more detailed model. However, towards the true thermodynamic limit, the high-frequency scaling regime extends to lower frequencies for larger chain length L and the system has only one scaling (Aloop≈ν-1F2 ). Expansion of an analytical expression for Aloop obtained for the model system in the low-force regime revealed that there is a new scaling exponent associated with force (Aloop≈ν-1F2.5 ), which has been validated by high-precision numerical calculation. By a combination of analytical and numerical arguments, we also deduce that for large but finite L , the exponents are robust and independent of temperature and friction coefficient.

  12. Hydrodynamically Driven Colloidal Assembly in Dip Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosqui, Carlos E.; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-05-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of dip coating from a suspension and report a mechanism for colloidal assembly and pattern formation on smooth substrates. Below a critical withdrawal speed where the coating film is thinner than the particle diameter, capillary forces induced by deformation of the free surface prevent the convective transport of single particles through the meniscus beneath the film. Capillary-induced forces are balanced by hydrodynamic drag only after a minimum number of particles assemble within the meniscus. The particle assembly can thus enter the thin film where it moves at nearly the withdrawal speed and rapidly separates from the next assembly. The interplay between hydrodynamic and capillary forces produces periodic and regular structures below a critical ratio Ca2/3/Bo<0.7, where Ca and Bo are the capillary and Bond numbers, respectively. An analytical model and numerical simulations are presented for the case of two-dimensional flow with circular particles in suspension. The hydrodynamically driven assembly documented here is consistent with stripe pattern formations observed experimentally in dip coating.

  13. Periodically driven DNA: Theory and simulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Kumar, Ravinder; Janke, Wolfhard

    2016-01-01

    We propose a generic model of driven DNA under the influence of an oscillatory force of amplitude F and frequency ν and show the existence of a dynamical transition for a chain of finite length. We find that the area of the hysteresis loop, A_{loop}, scales with the same exponents as observed in a recent study based on a much more detailed model. However, towards the true thermodynamic limit, the high-frequency scaling regime extends to lower frequencies for larger chain length L and the system has only one scaling (A_{loop}≈ν^{-1}F^{2}). Expansion of an analytical expression for A_{loop} obtained for the model system in the low-force regime revealed that there is a new scaling exponent associated with force (A_{loop}≈ν^{-1}F^{2.5}), which has been validated by high-precision numerical calculation. By a combination of analytical and numerical arguments, we also deduce that for large but finite L, the exponents are robust and independent of temperature and friction coefficient. PMID:26871010

  14. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  15. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  16. Nonlinear Laser Driven Donut Wakefields for Positron and Electron Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J.; Mendonça, J. T.

    2014-05-01

    We show analytically and through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that nonlinear wakefields driven by Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses can lead to hollow electron self-injection and positron acceleration. We find that higher order lasers can drive donut shaped blowout wakefields with strong positron accelerating gradients comparable to those of a spherical bubble. Corresponding positron focusing forces can be more than an order of magnitude stronger than electron focusing forces in a spherical bubble. Required laser intensities and energies to reach the nonlinear donut shaped blowout are within state-of-the-art experimental conditions.

  17. Gradient Driven Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannell, David

    2005-01-01

    We have worked with our collaborators at the University of Milan (Professor Marzio Giglio and his group-supported by ASI) to define the science required to measure gradient driven fluctuations in the microgravity environment. Such a study would provide an accurate test of the extent to which the theory of fluctuating hydrodynamics can be used to predict the properties of fluids maintained in a stressed, non-equilibrium state. As mentioned above, the results should also provide direct visual insight into the behavior of a variety of fluid systems containing gradients or interfaces, when placed in the microgravity environment. With support from the current grant, we have identified three key systems for detailed investigation. These three systems are: 1) A single-component fluid to be studied in the presence of a temperature gradient; 2) A mixture of two organic liquids to be studied both in the presence of a temperature gradient, which induces a steady-state concentration gradient, and with the temperature gradient removed, but while the concentration gradient is dying by means of diffusion; 3) Various pairs of liquids undergoing free diffusion, including a proteidbuffer solution and pairs of mixtures having different concentrations, to allow us to vary the differences in fluid properties in a controlled manner.

  18. Compositionally Driven Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderlund, K. M.; Schubert, G.

    2014-12-01

    It is generally believed that compositional convection driven by inner core solidification is the main driver of the geodynamo. Thermal evolution considerations make it likely that compositional convection is also behind the present dynamos of Mercury and Ganymede as well as the early dynamos in the Moon, Mars and smaller solar system bodies. Compositional buoyancy can arise in several different ways, for example, through inner core solidification and FeS flotation with upward mixing and through freezing out and sinking of iron snow near the core-mantle boundary or deeper within the core. The mode of core cooling and freezing depends on conditions of temperature and pressure in the core and the concentration of light elements such as sulfur. Different distributions of compositional buoyancy will give rise to different patterns of core convection and dynamo magnetic fields. We report here the first results of a systematic study of the distribution of compositional buoyancy on the dynamo-generated magnetic fields, with an emphasis on Mars' core evolution due to iron rain.

  19. Beam Driven Stratospheric Airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onda, Masahiko

    2003-05-01

    Even though satellite, balloons and aircraft have served admirably as aerospace platforms for remote sensing and telecommunication, requirements for a new kind of platforms - an easily modifiable, sub-orbital platform - have been widely identified. The High-Altitude Long-Range Observational Platform(HALROP) was at first conceptualized as a solar power driven unmanned LTA (Lighter-Than-Air) vehicle or an airship to maintain a station-keeping position in the lower stratosphere for long-durations and to carry out missions such as high-resolution monitoring and high-speed informational relays. Nevertheless solar power is not available in winter seasons in the high-latitudinal regions. Therefore, alternative power sources are necessary and the candidates are surface-to-air transmission of microwave energy and high-power laser beams. The author introduces a wireless power transmission test by microwave carried in 1995 in Kobe, Japan, and then, discusses possibilities of using laser beam for powering such LTA platforms.

  20. Invention-driven marketing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, William E.

    1994-01-01

    Suppose you have just created a revolutionary bicycle suspension which allows a bike to be ridden over rough terrain at 60 miles per hour. In addition, suppose that you are deeply concerned about the plight of hungry children. Which should you do: be sure all hungry children have bicycles; transfer the technology for your new suspension to bicycle manufacturers worldwide; or start a company to supply premium sports bicycle based on your patented technology, and donate the profits to a charity which feeds hungry children? Woven through this somewhat trivial example is the paradox of technology transfer - the supplier (owner) may want to transfer technology; but to succeed, he or she must reformulate the problem as a user need for which there is a new and better solution. Successful technology transfer is little more than good marketing applied to an existing invention, process, or capability. You must identify who needs the technology, why they need it, why the new technology is better than alternatives, how much the customers are willing and able to pay for these benefits, and how to distribute products based on the technology tc the target customers. In market-driven development, the term 'technology transfer' is rarely used. The developers focus on studying user needs and designing solution They may have technology needs, but they don't have technology in search of a use.

  1. Fluid driven recipricating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached.

  2. Fluid driven reciprocating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1997-04-01

    An apparatus is described comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached. 13 figs.

  3. Pressure-driven flow in a channel with porous walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianlong; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    The finite-Reynolds-number three-dimensional flow in a channel bounded by one and two parallel porous walls is studied numerically. The porous medium is modelled by spheres in a simple cubic arrangement. The results for the slip velocity at the surface of the porous layers are compared with the phenomenological Beavers-Joseph model. It is found that the value of the slip coefficient is different for pressure-driven and shear-driven flow. A modification of the relation is suggested to deal with this feature. Furthermore, detailed results on the flow structure and the hydrodynamic forces and couple acting on the sphere layer bounding the porous medium are reported and their dependence on the Reynolds number illustrated. It is shown that, at finite Reynolds numbers, a lift force acts on the spheres, which may be expected to contribute to the the mobilization of bottom sediments.

  4. A photon-driven micromotor can direct nerve fibre growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Nieminen, Timo A.; Mohanty, Samarendra; Miotke, Jill; Meyer, Ronald L.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Berns, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal path-finding is important in the development of the nervous system, nerve repair and nerve regeneration. The behaviour of the growth cone at the tip of the growing axon determines the direction of axonal growth and migration. We have developed an optical-based system to control the direction of growth of individual axons (nerve fibres) using laser-driven spinning birefringent spheres. One or two optical traps position birefringent beads adjacent to growth cones of cultured goldfish retinal ganglion cell axons. Circularly polarized light with angular momentum causes the trapped bead to spin. This creates a localized microfluidic flow generating an estimated 0.17 pN shear force against the growth cone that turns in response to the shear. The direction of axonal growth can be precisely manipulated by changing the rotation direction and position of this optically driven micromotor. A physical model estimating the shear force density on the axon is described.

  5. Coulomb force as an entropic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tower

    2010-05-01

    Motivated by Verlinde’s theory of entropic gravity, we give a tentative explanation to the Coulomb’s law with an entropic force. When trying to do this, we find the equipartition rule should be extended to charges and the concept of temperature should be reinterpreted. If one accepts the holographic principle as well as our generalizations and reinterpretations, then Coulomb’s law, the Poisson equation, and the Maxwell equations can be derived smoothly. Our attempt can be regarded as a new way to unify the electromagnetic force with gravity, from the entropic origin. Possibly some of our postulates are related to the D-brane picture of black hole thermodynamics.

  6. Coulomb force as an entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Tower

    2010-05-15

    Motivated by Verlinde's theory of entropic gravity, we give a tentative explanation to the Coulomb's law with an entropic force. When trying to do this, we find the equipartition rule should be extended to charges and the concept of temperature should be reinterpreted. If one accepts the holographic principle as well as our generalizations and reinterpretations, then Coulomb's law, the Poisson equation, and the Maxwell equations can be derived smoothly. Our attempt can be regarded as a new way to unify the electromagnetic force with gravity, from the entropic origin. Possibly some of our postulates are related to the D-brane picture of black hole thermodynamics.

  7. Communication through Foreign Languages: An Economic Force in Chinese Enterprises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrandt, Herbert W.; Liu, Jinyun

    1991-01-01

    Second-language use by Chinese business managers illustrates that second-language competence is driven partly by economic and political forces. Although Russian language knowledge is typical of the older managers, English and Japanese are favored by younger managers, reflecting the wane of Russian political influence and the growing importance of…

  8. Mechanically driven centrifugal pyrolyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Linck, Martin Brendan; Bush, Phillip Vann

    2012-03-06

    An apparatus for fast pyrolysis of biomass and other solid organic materials including a vertically oriented cylindrical vessel having a solids outlet proximate the bottom thereof, a vapor outlet, a top wall forming at least one opening, and an adjacent heated side wall. Disposed within the cylindrical vessel and extending through the at least one opening in the top wall is a rotor having a rotatable shaft coincident with the longitudinal axis of the cylindrical vessel to which is attached at least one substantially vertically oriented blade having one edge connected directly or indirectly with the rotatable shaft and having an opposite edge spaced apart from the heated side wall, whereby a non-radial, preferably tangential, force is imparted on the feedstock in the cylindrical vessel. Also disclosed is a method for fast pyrolysis of biomass and other solid organic materials.

  9. Entropic forces drive contraction of cytoskeletal networks.

    PubMed

    Braun, Marcus; Lansky, Zdenek; Hilitski, Feodor; Dogic, Zvonimir; Diez, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    The cytoskeleton is a network of interconnected protein filaments, which provide a three-dimensional scaffold for cells. Remodeling of the cytoskeleton is important for key cellular processes, such as cell motility, division, or morphogenesis. This remodeling is traditionally considered to be driven exclusively by processes consuming chemical energy, such as the dynamics of the filaments or the action of molecular motors. Here, we review two mechanisms of cytoskeletal network remodeling that are independent of the consumption of chemical energy. In both cases directed motion of overlapping filaments is driven by entropic forces, which arise from harnessing thermal energy present in solution. Entropic forces are induced either by macromolecular crowding agents or by diffusible crosslinkers confined to the regions where filaments overlap. Both mechanisms increase filament overlap length and lead to the contraction of filament networks. These force-generating mechanisms, together with the chemical energy-dependent mechanisms, need to be considered for the comprehensive quantitative picture of the remodeling of cytoskeletal networks in cells. PMID:26996935

  10. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-11-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force.1-8 Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without unleashing the usual mathematical apparatus, which we believe is more of a hindrance than a help.

  11. Lathe tool force

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, J.D.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes a computer program that computes the forces exerted on a lathe tool as a part is being machined. The program is based on a mechanistic model which assumes that the normal force on the tool face is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the chip that is being removed from the part. This report gives transcripts of program runs, a comparison with experimentally measured forces, a bibliography, and a listing of the program.

  12. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  13. Bistability in a Driven-Dissipative Superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labouvie, Ralf; Santra, Bodhaditya; Heun, Simon; Ott, Herwig

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally study a driven-dissipative Josephson junction array, realized with a weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensate residing in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Engineered losses on one site act as a local dissipative process, while tunneling from the neighboring sites constitutes the driving force. We characterize the emerging steady states of this atomtronic device. With increasing dissipation strength γ the system crosses from a superfluid state, characterized by a coherent Josephson current into the lossy site, to a resistive state, characterized by an incoherent hopping transport. For intermediate values of γ , the system exhibits bistability, where a superfluid and an incoherent branch coexist. We also study the relaxation dynamics towards the steady state, where we find a critical slowing down, indicating the presence of a nonequilibrium phase transition.

  14. Bistability in a Driven-Dissipative Superfluid.

    PubMed

    Labouvie, Ralf; Santra, Bodhaditya; Heun, Simon; Ott, Herwig

    2016-06-10

    We experimentally study a driven-dissipative Josephson junction array, realized with a weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensate residing in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Engineered losses on one site act as a local dissipative process, while tunneling from the neighboring sites constitutes the driving force. We characterize the emerging steady states of this atomtronic device. With increasing dissipation strength γ the system crosses from a superfluid state, characterized by a coherent Josephson current into the lossy site, to a resistive state, characterized by an incoherent hopping transport. For intermediate values of γ, the system exhibits bistability, where a superfluid and an incoherent branch coexist. We also study the relaxation dynamics towards the steady state, where we find a critical slowing down, indicating the presence of a nonequilibrium phase transition. PMID:27341243

  15. Laser-Driven Mini-Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Enrique; Lin, Jun; Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B.

    2006-05-01

    Laser-driven mini-thrusters were studied using Delrin® and PVC (Delrin® is a registered trademark of DuPont) as propellants. TEA CO2 laser (λ = 10.6 μm) was used as a driving laser. Coupling coefficients were deduced from two independent techniques: force-time curves measured with a piezoelectric sensor and ballistic pendulum. Time-resolved ICCD images of the expanding plasma and combustion products were analyzed in order to determine the main process that generates the thrust. The measurements were also performed in a nitrogen atmosphere in order to test the combustion effects on thrust. A pinhole transmission experiment was performed for the study of the cut-off time when the ablation/air breakdown plasma becomes opaque to the incoming laser pulse.

  16. Arnold diffusion in a driven optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boretz, Yingyue; Reichl, L. E.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of time-periodic forces on matter has been a topic of growing interest since the advent of lasers. It is known that dynamical systems with 2.5 or more degrees of freedom are intrinsically unstable. As a consequence, time-periodic driven systems can experience large excursions in energy. We analyze the classical and quantum dynamics of rubidium atoms confined to a time-periodic optical lattice with 2.5 degrees of freedom. When the laser polarizations are orthogonal, the system consists of two 1.5 uncoupled dynamical systems. When laser polarizations are turned away from orthogonal, an Arnold web forms and the dynamics undergoes a fundamental change. For parallel polarizations, we find huge random excursions in the rubidium atom energies and significant entanglement of energies in the quantum dynamics.

  17. Power-stroke-driven actomyosin contractility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheshka, R.; Truskinovsky, L.

    2014-01-01

    In ratchet-based models describing actomyosin contraction the activity is usually associated with actin binding potential while the power-stroke mechanism, residing inside myosin heads, is viewed as passive. To show that contraction can be propelled directly through a conformational change, we propose an alternative model where the power stroke is the only active mechanism. The asymmetry, ensuring directional motion, resides in steric interaction between the externally driven power-stroke element and the passive nonpolar actin filament. The proposed model can reproduce all four discrete states of the minimal actomyosin catalytic cycle even though it is formulated in terms of continuous Langevin dynamics. We build a conceptual bridge between processive and nonprocessive molecular motors by demonstrating that not only the former but also the latter can use structural transformation as the main driving force.

  18. Laser-Driven Mini-Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Enrique; Lin Jun; Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B. Jr.

    2006-05-02

    Laser-driven mini-thrusters were studied using Delrin registered and PVC (Delrin registered is a registered trademark of DuPont) as propellants. TEA CO2 laser ({lambda} = 10.6 {mu}m) was used as a driving laser. Coupling coefficients were deduced from two independent techniques: force-time curves measured with a piezoelectric sensor and ballistic pendulum. Time-resolved ICCD images of the expanding plasma and combustion products were analyzed in order to determine the main process that generates the thrust. The measurements were also performed in a nitrogen atmosphere in order to test the combustion effects on thrust. A pinhole transmission experiment was performed for the study of the cut-off time when the ablation/air breakdown plasma becomes opaque to the incoming laser pulse.

  19. Wind-driven circulation in Titan's seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokano, Tetsuya; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-01-01

    Circulation in Titan's seas forced by wind is simulated by an ocean circulation model using surface wind data predicted by a global circulation model. Wind-driven circulation is insignificant throughout much of the annual cycle but becomes significant from late spring to late summer, when the wind stress becomes strong. The large-scale circulation in summer is predominantly southward near the sea surface and northward near the sea bottom. The sea surface current can get as fast as 5 cms-1 in some areas. Titan's rotation affects the vertical structure of sea currents in the form of an Ekman spiral if the wind is strong. The maximum wind setup at the shores is of the same order of magnitude as the tidal range. Wind stirring may reduce thermal stratification in summer but may be unable to destroy stratification of methane-rich liquids on top of ethane-rich liquids that can result from imbalances between evaporation and precipitation.

  20. Wind-driven circulation in Titan's seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokano, Tetsuya; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-04-01

    Circulation in Titan's seas forced by wind is simulated by an ocean circulation model using surface wind data predicted by a global circulation model. Wind-driven circulation is insignificant throughout much of the annual cycle, but becomes significant from late spring to late summer, when the wind stress becomes strong. The large-scale circulation in summer is predominantly southward near the sea surface and northward near the sea bottom. The sea surface current can get as fast as 5 cms-1 in some areas. Titan's rotation affects the vertical structure of sea currents in the form of an Ekman spiral if the wind is strong. The maximum wind set-up at the shores is of the same order of magnitude as the tidal range. Wind stirring may reduce thermal stratification in summer, but may be unable to destroy stratification of methane-rich liquids on top of ethane-rich liquids that can result from imbalances between evaporation and precipitation.

  1. Dynamics of antiferromagnets driven by spin current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Niu, Qian

    2014-02-01

    When a spin-polarized current flows through a ferromagnetic (FM) metal, angular momentum is transferred to the background magnetization via spin-transfer torques. In antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials, however, the corresponding problem is unsolved. We derive microscopically the dynamics of an AFM system driven by spin current generated by an attached FM polarizer, and find that the spin current exerts a driving force on the local staggered order parameter. The mechanism does not rely on the conservation of spin angular momentum, nor does it depend on the induced FM moments on top the AFM background. Two examples are studied: (i) A domain wall is accelerated to a terminal velocity by purely adiabatic effect where the Walker's breakdown is avoided. (ii) Spin injection modifies the AFM resonance frequency, and spin current injection triggers spin wave instability of local moments above a threshold.

  2. Edge convection driven by externally applied potentials

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2000-08-01

    A theoretical model of convection in collisional tokamak edge and scrape-off-layer plasmas is described. In the linear theory, any mechanism for poloidal and toroidal symmetry breaking of the equilibrium will drive ExB flows; this result stems from the parallel thermal and pressure forces in Ohm's law. In the nonlinear theory, the quadratic coupling of the perturbations leads to quasilinear-type fluxes in the vorticity, density, and temperature equations. If the convection is strong enough, these fluxes lead to an ambipolarity constraint on the equilibrium electric field and to increased transport of particles and energy. The theory shows qualitative agreement with some tokamak experiments in which potential perturbations are externally driven by radio frequency antennas. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Arnold diffusion in a driven optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Boretz, Yingyue; Reichl, L E

    2016-03-01

    The effect of time-periodic forces on matter has been a topic of growing interest since the advent of lasers. It is known that dynamical systems with 2.5 or more degrees of freedom are intrinsically unstable. As a consequence, time-periodic driven systems can experience large excursions in energy. We analyze the classical and quantum dynamics of rubidium atoms confined to a time-periodic optical lattice with 2.5 degrees of freedom. When the laser polarizations are orthogonal, the system consists of two 1.5 uncoupled dynamical systems. When laser polarizations are turned away from orthogonal, an Arnold web forms and the dynamics undergoes a fundamental change. For parallel polarizations, we find huge random excursions in the rubidium atom energies and significant entanglement of energies in the quantum dynamics. PMID:27078351

  4. Fluid flows and forces in development: functions, features and biophysical principles

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jonathan B.; Goetz, Jacky G.; Hill, Kent L.; Vermot, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Throughout morphogenesis, cells experience intracellular tensile and contractile forces on microscopic scales. Cells also experience extracellular forces, such as static forces mediated by the extracellular matrix and forces resulting from microscopic fluid flow. Although the biological ramifications of static forces have received much attention, little is known about the roles of fluid flows and forces during embryogenesis. Here, we focus on the microfluidic forces generated by cilia-driven fluid flow and heart-driven hemodynamics, as well as on the signaling pathways involved in flow sensing. We discuss recent studies that describe the functions and the biomechanical features of these fluid flows. These insights suggest that biological flow determines many aspects of cell behavior and identity through a specific set of physical stimuli and signaling pathways. PMID:22395739

  5. Mechanotransduction: use the force(s).

    PubMed

    Paluch, Ewa K; Nelson, Celeste M; Biais, Nicolas; Fabry, Ben; Moeller, Jens; Pruitt, Beth L; Wollnik, Carina; Kudryasheva, Galina; Rehfeldt, Florian; Federle, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction - how cells sense physical forces and translate them into biochemical and biological responses - is a vibrant and rapidly-progressing field, and is important for a broad range of biological phenomena. This forum explores the role of mechanotransduction in a variety of cellular activities and highlights intriguing questions that deserve further attention. PMID:26141078

  6. No fifth force?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Hopes that geophysicists might be able to document a fifth force of nature have diminished, as new measurements and analyses of earlier geodetic experiments have yielded no solid evidence of a non-Newtonian component of gravity.Modern physics recognizes four fundamental forces with distinct spheres of influence: The strong and weak nuclear forces operate over the range of one atom, while gravity and electromagnetism have an infinite range. Gravity measurements over a few centimeters in laboratories and over millions of kilometers in space continue to buttress Issac Newton's conclusion that the gravitational force between two objects decreases as the square of the distance between them.

  7. Electrodynamic force law controversy.

    PubMed

    Graneau, P; Graneau, N

    2001-05-01

    Cavalleri et al. [Phys. Rev. E 52, 2505 (1998); Eur. J. Phys. 17, 205 (1996)] have attempted to resolve the electrodynamic force law controversy. This attempt to prove the validity of either the Ampère or Lorentz force law by theory and experiment has revealed only that the two are equivalent when predicting the force on part of a circuit due to the current in the complete circuit. However, in our analysis of internal stresses, only Ampère's force law agrees with experiment. PMID:11415053

  8. Blast Wave Formation by Laser-Sustained Nonequilibrium Plasma in the Laser-Driven In-Tube Accelerator Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Yousuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Sawada, Keisuke; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2006-05-02

    Understanding the dynamics of laser-produced plasma is essentially important for increasing available thrust force in a gas-driven laser propulsion system such as laser-driven in-tube accelerator. A computer code is developed to explore the formation of expanding nonequilibrium plasma produced by laser irradiation. Various properties of the blast wave driven by the nonequilibrium plasma are examined. It is found that the blast wave propagation is substantially affected by radiative cooling effect for lower density case.

  9. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, David H.

    1986-01-01

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water.

  10. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, D.H.

    1984-08-30

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water. 1 fig.

  11. Fluctuation-induced casimir forces in granular fluids.

    PubMed

    Cattuto, C; Brito, R; Marconi, U Marini Bettolo; Nori, F; Soto, R

    2006-05-01

    We numerically investigate the behavior of driven noncohesive granular media and find that two fixed large intruder particles, immersed in a sea of small particles, experience, in addition to a short-range depletion force, a long-range repulsive force. The observed long-range interaction is fluctuation-induced and we propose a mechanism similar to the Casimir effect that generates it: The hydrodynamic fluctuations are geometrically confined between the intruders, producing an unbalanced renormalized pressure. An estimation based on computing the possible Fourier modes explains the repulsive force and is in qualitative agreement with the simulations. PMID:16712336

  12. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  13. Forces in yeast flocculation

    PubMed Central

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Flos, Marta Abellán; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2014-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (“flocculation”) is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding. PMID:25515338

  14. SCM-Forcing Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xie, Shaocheng; Tang,Shuaiqi; Zhang,Yunyan; Zhang,Minghua

    2016-07-01

    Single-Column Model (SCM) Forcing Data are derived from the ARM facility observational data using the constrained variational analysis approach (Zhang and Lin 1997 and Zhang et al., 2001). The resulting products include both the large-scale forcing terms and the evaluation fields, which can be used for driving the SCMs and Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and validating model simulations.

  15. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  16. Forces in yeast flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  17. Force Concept Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hestenes, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reports the rationale, design, validation, and uses of the "Force Concept Inventory," an instrument to assess the students' beliefs on force. Includes results and implications of two studies that compared the inventory with the "Mechanics Baseline." Includes a copy of the instrument. (MDH)

  18. Force Generation upon T Cell Receptor Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Husson, Julien; Chemin, Karine; Bohineust, Armelle; Hivroz, Claire; Henry, Nelly

    2011-01-01

    T cells are major players of adaptive immune response in mammals. Recognition of an antigenic peptide in association with the major histocompatibility complex at the surface of an antigen presenting cell (APC) is a specific and sensitive process whose mechanism is not fully understood. The potential contribution of mechanical forces in the T cell activation process is increasingly debated, although these forces are scarcely defined and hold only limited experimental evidence. In this work, we have implemented a biomembrane force probe (BFP) setup and a model APC to explore the nature and the characteristics of the mechanical forces potentially generated upon engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) and/or lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). We show that upon contact with a model APC coated with antibodies towards TCR-CD3, after a short latency, the T cell developed a timed sequence of pushing and pulling forces against its target. These processes were defined by their initial constant growth velocity and loading rate (force increase per unit of time). LFA-1 engagement together with TCR-CD3 reduced the growing speed during the pushing phase without triggering the same mechanical behavior when engaged alone. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was monitored simultaneously to verify the cell commitment in the activation process. [Ca2+]i increased a few tens of seconds after the beginning of the pushing phase although no strong correlation appeared between the two events. The pushing phase was driven by actin polymerization. Tuning the BFP mechanical properties, we could show that the loading rate during the pulling phase increased with the target stiffness. This indicated that a mechanosensing mechanism is implemented in the early steps of the activation process. We provide here the first quantified description of force generation sequence upon local bidimensional engagement of TCR-CD3 and discuss its potential role in a T cell mechanically

  19. Lorentz force velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Thess, A; Votyakov, E V; Kolesnikov, Y

    2006-04-28

    We describe a noncontact technique for velocity measurement in electrically conducting fluids. The technique, which we term Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV), is based on exposing the fluid to a magnetic field and measuring the drag force acting upon the magnetic field lines. Two series of measurements are reported, one in which the force is determined through the angular velocity of a rotary magnet system and one in which the force on a fixed magnet system is measured directly. Both experiments confirm that the measured signal is a linear function of the flow velocity. We then derive the scaling law that relates the force on a localized distribution of magnetized material to the velocity of an electrically conducting fluid. This law shows that LFV, if properly designed, has a wide range of potential applications in metallurgy, semiconductor crystal growth, and glass manufacturing. PMID:16712237

  20. Feeble forces and gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bars, Itzhak; Visser, Matt

    1987-03-01

    We develop a scenario in which feeble intermediate range forces emerge as an effect resulting from the compactification (à la Kaluza-Klein) of multidimensional theories. These feeble forces compete with gravity and in general permit different bodies to fall to earth with different accelerations. We show that these feeble forces are mediated by vectors (V) and/or scalars (S), whose dimensionless coupling constants are typically of order gv ≈ gs ≈ 10-10 Under certain plausible assumptions the ranges of these feeble forces are expected to be of order 1 m to 1 km. It is conjectured that the general strategy will prove applicable to realistic multidimensional theories such as the 10-dimensional superstring theories. We speculate that deviations from the standard gravitational force-similar to the ones reported recently as a “fifth force”-may be interpreted as evidence for higher dimensions.

  1. Conservative entropic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    2011-10-01

    Entropic forces have recently attracted considerable attention as ways to reformulate, retrodict, and perhaps even "explain" classical Newtonian gravity from a rather specific thermodynamic perspective. In this article I point out that if one wishes to reformulate classical Newtonian gravity in terms of an entropic force, then the fact that Newtonian gravity is described by a conservative force places significant constraints on the form of the entropy and temperature functions. (These constraints also apply to entropic reinterpretations of electromagnetism, and indeed to any conservative force derivable from a potential.) The constraints I will establish are sufficient to present real and significant problems for any reasonable variant of Verlinde's entropic gravity proposal, though for technical reasons the constraints established herein do not directly impact on either Jacobson'sor Padmanabhan's versions of entropic gravity. In an attempt to resolve these issues, I will extend the usual notion of entropic force to multiple heat baths with multiple "temperatures" and multiple "entropies".

  2. Coaxial needle insertion assistant with enhanced force feedback.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Danilo; Koseki, Yoshihiko; De Momi, Elena; Chinzei, Kiyoyuki; Okamura, Allison M

    2013-02-01

    Many medical procedures involving needle insertion into soft tissues, such as anesthesia, biopsy, brachytherapy, and placement of electrodes, are performed without image guidance. In such procedures, haptic detection of changing tissue properties at different depths during needle insertion is important for needle localization and detection of subsurface structures. However, changes in tissue mechanical properties deep inside the tissue are difficult for human operators to sense, because the relatively large friction force between the needle shaft and the surrounding tissue masks the smaller tip forces. A novel robotic coaxial needle insertion assistant, which enhances operator force perception, is presented. This one-degree-of-freedom cable-driven robot provides to the operator a scaled version of the force applied by the needle tip to the tissue, using a novel design and sensors that separate the needle tip force from the shaft friction force. The ability of human operators to use the robot to detect membranes embedded in artificial soft tissue was tested under the conditions of 1) tip force and shaft force feedback, and 2) tip force only feedback. The ratio of successful to unsuccessful membrane detections was significantly higher (up to 50%) when only the needle tip force was provided to the user. PMID:23193302

  3. Wave Forced Normal Modes on Fringing Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pequignet, A. N.; Becker, J. M.; Merrifield, M. M.; Aucan, J.

    2008-12-01

    In an effort to assess wave-driven coastal inundation at the shoreline of fringing reefs, pressure and current observations were collected at reefs on Guam (Ipan) and Oahu, Hawaii (Mokuleia) as part of the PILOT (Pacific Island Land-Ocean Typhoon) experiment. Similar to dissipative sandy beaches, nearshore surface elevation at both reefs is dominated by energy in the infragravity frequency band. Coherent infragravity oscillations across the reef tend to occur at discrete frequencies and with standing wave cross-shore structures that are consistent with open basin resonant modes. The modes are forced by swell wave groups, similar to a time-dependent setup. The resonant modes are most apparent during energetic wave events, in part because wave setup over the reef increases the low mode resonant frequencies to a range that is conducive to wave group forcing. Evidence of the excitation of resonant modes during tropical storm Man-Yi at Ipan, Guam is presented.

  4. Non-Equilibrium Casimir Force between Vibrating Plates

    PubMed Central

    Hanke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We study the fluctuation-induced, time-dependent force between two plates confining a correlated fluid which is driven out of equilibrium mechanically by harmonic vibrations of one of the plates. For a purely relaxational dynamics of the fluid we calculate the fluctuation-induced force generated by the vibrating plate on the plate at rest. The time-dependence of this force is characterized by a positive lag time with respect to the driving. We obtain two distinctive contributions to the force, one generated by diffusion of stress in the fluid and another related to resonant dissipation in the cavity. The relation to the dynamic Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field and possible experiments to measure the time-dependent Casimir force are discussed. PMID:23326401

  5. Direct Cytoskeleton Forces Cause Membrane Softening in Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-García, Ruddi; López-Montero, Iván; Mell, Michael; Egea, Gustavo; Gov, Nir S.; Monroy, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes are flexible cells specialized in the systemic transport of oxygen in vertebrates. This physiological function is connected to their outstanding ability to deform in passing through narrow capillaries. In recent years, there has been an influx of experimental evidence of enhanced cell-shape fluctuations related to metabolically driven activity of the erythroid membrane skeleton. However, no direct observation of the active cytoskeleton forces has yet been reported to our knowledge. Here, we show experimental evidence of the presence of temporally correlated forces superposed over the thermal fluctuations of the erythrocyte membrane. These forces are ATP-dependent and drive enhanced flickering motions in human erythrocytes. Theoretical analyses provide support for a direct force exerted on the membrane by the cytoskeleton nodes as pulses of well-defined average duration. In addition, such metabolically regulated active forces cause global membrane softening, a mechanical attribute related to the functional erythroid deformability. PMID:26083919

  6. Non-equilibrium Casimir force between vibrating plates.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We study the fluctuation-induced, time-dependent force between two plates confining a correlated fluid which is driven out of equilibrium mechanically by harmonic vibrations of one of the plates. For a purely relaxational dynamics of the fluid we calculate the fluctuation-induced force generated by the vibrating plate on the plate at rest. The time-dependence of this force is characterized by a positive lag time with respect to the driving. We obtain two distinctive contributions to the force, one generated by diffusion of stress in the fluid and another related to resonant dissipation in the cavity. The relation to the dynamic Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field and possible experiments to measure the time-dependent Casimir force are discussed. PMID:23326401

  7. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  8. Diffusion Driven Combustion Waves in Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldushin, A. P.; Matkowsky, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Filtration of gas containing oxidizer, to the reaction zone in a porous medium, due, e.g., to a buoyancy force or to an external pressure gradient, leads to the propagation of Filtration combustion (FC) waves. The exothermic reaction occurs between the fuel component of the solid matrix and the oxidizer. In this paper, we analyze the ability of a reaction wave to propagate in a porous medium without the aid of filtration. We find that one possible mechanism of propagation is that the wave is driven by diffusion of oxidizer from the environment. The solution of the combustion problem describing diffusion driven waves is similar to the solution of the Stefan problem describing the propagation of phase transition waves, in that the temperature on the interface between the burned and unburned regions is constant, the combustion wave is described by a similarity solution which is a function of the similarity variable x/square root of(t) and the wave velocity decays as 1/square root of(t). The difference between the two problems is that in the combustion problem the temperature is not prescribed, but rather, is determined as part of the solution. We will show that the length of samples in which such self-sustained combustion waves can occur, must exceed a critical value which strongly depends on the combustion temperature T(sub b). Smaller values of T(sub b) require longer sample lengths for diffusion driven combustion waves to exist. Because of their relatively small velocity, diffusion driven waves are considered to be relevant for the case of low heat losses, which occur for large diameter samples or in microgravity conditions, Another possible mechanism of porous medium combustion describes waves which propagate by consuming the oxidizer initially stored in the pores of the sample. This occurs for abnormally high pressure and gas density. In this case, uniformly propagating planar waves, which are kinetically controlled, can propagate, Diffusion of oxidizer decreases

  9. Apparatus for controlling an engine in a hydraulically driven vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Kitada, T.

    1987-01-27

    An apparatus is described for controlling the internal combustion engine of a hydraulically driven vehicle comprising: a transmission mechanism for transmitting the operation of a fuel control lever to a governor control lever and having a loose spring mechanism with a loose spring therein: a hydraulic decelerator cylinder connected to the transmission mechanism and having a spring and piston therein. The deceleration cylinder spring has a slightly larger spring force than the loose spring in the loose spring mechanism and applies a force absorbing action, in the absence of hydraulic force acting on the piston, to set the governor control lever in its deceleration position when the fuel control lever is moved to its full engine speed position and for moving the governor control lever to its full engine speed position when hydraulic force is applied to the piston; an electromagnetic valve for applying fluid pressure from a control pump driven by the engine to the piston in the decelerator cylinder and releasing the fluid pressure; and an electric circuit including switches operationally associated with levers for operating a hydraulic valve.

  10. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  11. Turbomachinery rotor forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, Norbert

    1988-01-01

    The fluid-induced forces, both steady and unsteady, acting upon an impeller of a centrifugal pump, and impeller blade-diffuser vane interaction in centrifugal pumps with vaned radial diffusers were evaluated experimentally and theoretically. Knowledge of the steady and unsteady forces, and the associated rotordynamic coefficients are required to effectively model the rotor dynamics of the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). These forces and rotordynamic coefficients were investigated using different impellers in combination with volutes and vaned diffusers, and axial inducers. These rotor forces are global. Local forces and pressures are also important in impeller-diffuser interaction, for they may cause cavitation damage and even vane failures. Thus, in a separate investigation, impeller wake, and impeller blade and diffuser vane pressure measurements were made. The nature of the rotordynamic forces is discussed, the experimental facility is described, and the measurements of unsteady forces and pressure are reported together with a brief and incomplete attempt to calculate these flows.

  12. Tendon-driven manipulators: Analysis, synthesis, and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jyh-Jone

    structures having pseudo-triangular structure matrix is enumerated. Thirdly, a method for assessing the kinematic/static performance of tendon-driven manipulators is developed. Transmission ellipsoids of the manipulators are investigated. A criterion for differentiating force transmission characteristics and a procedure for identifying least maximum-tendon-force are established.

  13. OOTW Force Design Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  14. Manual discrimination of force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Xiao-Dong; Tan, HONG-Z.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal design of human-machine interfaces for teleoperators and virtual-environment systems which involve the tactual and kinesthetic modalities requires knowledge of the human's resolving power in these modalities. The resolution of the interface should be appropriately matched to that of the human operator. We report some preliminary results on the ability of the human hand to distinguish small differences in force under a variety of conditions. Experiments were conducted on force discrimination with the thumb pushing an interface that exerts a constant force over the pushing distance and the index finger pressing against a fixed support. The dependence of the sensitivity index d' on force increment can be fit by a straight line through the origin and the just-noticeable difference (JND) in force can thus be described by the inverse of the slope of this line. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was measured by varying the a priori probabilities of the two alternatives, reference force and reference force plus an increment, in one-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice experiments. When plotted on normal deviate coordinates, the ROC's were roughly straight lines of unit slope, thus supporting the assumption of equal-variance normal distributions and the use of the conventional d' measure. The JND was roughly 6-8 percent for reference force ranging from 2.5 to 10 newtons, pushing distance from 5 to 30 mm, and initial finger-span from 45 to 125 mm. Also, the JND remained the same when the subjects were instructed to change the average speed of pushing from 23 to 153 mm/sec. The pushing was terminated by reaching either a wall or a well, and the JND's were essentially the same in both cases.

  15. Dilatonic Entropic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.

    2011-08-01

    We show in detail that the entropic force of the static spherically symmetric spacetimes with unusual asymptotics can be calculated through the Verlinde's arguments. We introduce three different holographic screen candidates, which are first employed thoroughly by Myung and Kim [Phys. Rev. D 81, 105012 (2010)] for Schwarzschild black hole solutions, in order to identify the entropic force arising between a charged dilaton black hole and a test particle. The significance of the dilaton parameter on the entropic force is highlighted, and shown graphically.

  16. Numerical study of librationally driven Flow in planetary interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguerre, Raphael; Karatekin, Ozgur; Noir, Jérôme

    2010-05-01

    Forced librations are observed for many planetary bodies. In the case of interior fluid layers, i.e. liquid cores or subsurface oceans, the resulting librational response could be different compared to that of a solid body. The coupling between the fluid layer and mantle depends strongly on the interior properties of the planet. Here we study numerically the properties of a librationally driven flow by taking into account both longitudinal and latitudinal forcing. The numerical method is based on an finite element approximation in meridian planes and a Fourier decomposition of the variables in the azimuthal direction (SFEMANS, Spectral Finite Element for Maxwell and Navier Stokes ). This allows us to specify the direction of rotation vector arbitrarily. In the case of longitudinal forcing we compare our solutions to the experimental results of Noir et al. 2009 obtained for cores with spherical shape. For latitudinal librations, we consider also the influence of ellipticity.

  17. Parameterization of the Lorentz to Coriolis Force Ratio in Planetary Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderlund, K. M.; Sheyko, A. A.; King, E. M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Lorentz to Coriolis force ratio is an important parameter for the dynamics of planetary cores: it is expected that dynamos with dominant Coriolis forces will be driven by fundamentally different archetypes of fluid motions than those with co-dominant Lorentz forces. Using a suite of geodynamo simulations, we have tested several parameterizations of the Lorentz to Coriolis force ratio against direct calculations and developed a scaling estimate to predict this ratio for planetary cores. Our results suggest that the Earth's core is likely to be in magnetostrophic balance where the Lorentz and Coriolis forces are comparable. The Lorentz force may also be significant in Jupiter's core, where it is predicted to be approximately a factor of ten less than the Coriolis force. Magnetic fields become increasingly sub-dominant for the other planets: the Coriolis force is predicted to exceed the Lorentz force by at least two orders of magnitude within the cores of Saturn, Uranus/Neptune, Ganymede, and Mercury.

  18. Hybrid-powered wheelchair: a combination of arm force and electrical power for propelling a wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Cremers, G B

    1989-01-01

    Many of the handicapped who could use a hand-driven wheelchair do not have sufficient arm force, arm movement and/or endurance for proper propulsion. Furthermore, there are users of electric wheelchairs who still have some arm functions and strength. In some cases a hand-driven chair, which can be propelled with reduced arm power, could be a better solution. By means of simulation, a study has been carried out to investigate the possibility of propelling a wheelchair by means of hybrid powering. Hybrid powering can be defined as a combination of arm force and electrical power. Using this hybrid principle, the necessary arm force can be decreased. PMID:2733008

  19. Causal reasoning with forces

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Phillip; Barbey, Aron K.

    2015-01-01

    Causal composition allows people to generate new causal relations by combining existing causal knowledge. We introduce a new computational model of such reasoning, the force theory, which holds that people compose causal relations by simulating the processes that join forces in the world, and compare this theory with the mental model theory (Khemlani et al., 2014) and the causal model theory (Sloman et al., 2009), which explain causal composition on the basis of mental models and structural equations, respectively. In one experiment, the force theory was uniquely able to account for people's ability to compose causal relationships from complex animations of real-world events. In three additional experiments, the force theory did as well as or better than the other two theories in explaining the causal compositions people generated from linguistically presented causal relations. Implications for causal learning and the hierarchical structure of causal knowledge are discussed. PMID:25653611

  20. Forces in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an activity to give students experience with the variables and forces impacting a moving body on an inclined plane by observing a ball as it rolls down an inclined PVC pipe of fixed length. Includes a student worksheet. (MKR)

  1. Strategic forces briefing

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.; Chrzanowski, P.; May, M.; Nordyke, M.

    1989-04-06

    The Strategic Forces Briefing'' is our attempt, accomplished over the past several months, to outline and highlight the more significant strategic force issues that must be addressed in the near future. Some issues are recurrent: the need for an effective modernized Triad and a constant concern for force survivability. Some issues derive from arms control: the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (SALT) are sufficiently advanced to set broad numerical limits on forces, but not so constraining as to preclude choices among weapon systems and deployment modes. Finally, a new administration faced with serious budgetary problems must strive for the most effective strategic forces limited dollars can buy and support. A review of strategic forces logically begins with consideration of the missions the forces are charged with. We begin the briefing with a short review of targeting policy and implementation within the constraints of available unclassified information. We then review each element of the Triad with sections on SLBMs, ICBMs, and Air-Breathing (bomber and cruise missile) systems. A short section at the end deals with the potential impact of strategic defense on offensive force planning. We consider ABM, ASAT, and air defense; but we do not attempt to address the technical issues of strategic defense per se. The final section gives a brief overview of the tritium supply problem. We conclude with a summary of recommendations that emerge from our review. The results of calculation on the effectiveness of various weapon systems as a function of cost that are presented in the briefing are by Paul Chrzanowski.

  2. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  3. Force user's manual, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.; Benten, Muhammad S.; Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Ramanan, Aruna V.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology for writing parallel programs for shared memory multiprocessors has been formalized as an extension to the Fortran language and implemented as a macro preprocessor. The extended language is known as the Force, and this manual describes how to write Force programs and execute them on the Flexible Computer Corporation Flex/32, the Encore Multimax and the Sequent Balance computers. The parallel extension macros are described in detail, but knowledge of Fortran is assumed.

  4. Motor-driven bacterial flagella and buckling instabilities.

    PubMed

    Vogel, R; Stark, H

    2012-02-01

    Many types of bacteria swim by rotating a bundle of helical filaments also called flagella. Each filament is driven by a rotary motor and a very flexible hook transmits the motor torque to the filament. We model it by discretizing Kirchhoff's elastic-rod theory and develop a coarse-grained approach for driving the helical filament by a motor torque. A rotating flagellum generates a thrust force, which pushes the cell body forward and which increases with the motor torque. We fix the rotating flagellum in space and show that it buckles under the thrust force at a critical motor torque. Buckling becomes visible as a supercritical Hopf bifurcation in the thrust force. A second buckling transition occurs at an even higher motor torque. We attach the flagellum to a spherical cell body and also observe the first buckling transition during locomotion. By changing the size of the cell body, we vary the necessary thrust force and thereby obtain a characteristic relation between the critical thrust force and motor torque. We present a elaborate analytical model for the buckling transition based on a helical rod which quantitatively reproduces the critical force-torque relation. Real values for motor torque, cell body size, and the geometry of the helical filament suggest that buckling should occur in single bacterial flagella. We also find that the orientation of pulling flagella along the driving torque is not stable and comment on the biological relevance for marine bacteria. PMID:22395533

  5. Van der Waals Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2006-03-01

    This should prove to be the definitive work explaining van der Waals forces, how to calculate them and take account of their impact under any circumstances and conditions. These weak intermolecular forces are of truly pervasive impact, and biologists, chemists, physicists and engineers will profit greatly from the thorough grounding in these fundamental forces that this book offers. Parsegian has organized his book at three successive levels of mathematical sophistication, to satisfy the needs and interests of readers at all levels of preparation. The Prelude and Level 1 are intended to give everyone an overview in words and pictures of the modern theory of van der Waals forces. Level 2 gives the formulae and a wide range of algorithms to let readers compute the van der Waals forces under virtually any physical or physiological conditions. Level 3 offers a rigorous basic formulation of the theory. Author is among the most highly respected biophysicists Van der Waals forces are significant for a wide range of questions and problems in the life sciences, chemistry, physics, and engineering, ranging up to the macro level No other book that develops the subject vigorously, and this book also makes the subject intuitively accessible to students who had not previously been mathematically sophisticated enough to calculate them

  6. Optical Bernoulli forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassagh, Ramis; Johnson, Steven G.

    2013-08-01

    By Bernoulli's law, an increase in the relative speed of a fluid around a body is accompanied by a decrease in the pressure. Therefore, a rotating body in a fluid stream experiences a force perpendicular to the motion of the fluid because of the unequal relative speed of the fluid across its surface. It is well known that light has a constant speed irrespective of the relative motion. Does a rotating body immersed in a stream of photons experience a Bernoulli-like force? We show that, indeed, a rotating dielectric cylinder experiences such a lateral force from an electromagnetic wave. In fact, the sign of the lateral force is the same as that of the fluid-mechanical analog as long as the electric susceptibility is positive (ɛ>ɛ0), but for negative-susceptibility materials (e.g., metals) we show that the lateral force is in the opposite direction. Because these results are derived from a classical electromagnetic scattering problem, Mie-resonance enhancements that occur in other scattering phenomena also enhance the lateral force.

  7. Data-driven batch schuduling

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, John; Denehy, Tim; Arpaci - Dusseau, Remzi; Livny, Miron; Arpaci - Dusseau, Andrea C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop data-driven strategies for batch computing schedulers. Current CPU-centric batch schedulers ignore the data needs within workloads and execute them by linking them transparently and directly to their needed data. When scheduled on remote computational resources, this elegant solution of direct data access can incur an order of magnitude performance penalty for data-intensive workloads. Adding data-awareness to batch schedulers allows a careful coordination of data and CPU allocation thereby reducing the cost of remote execution. We offer here new techniques by which batch schedulers can become data-driven. Such systems can use our analytical predictive models to select one of the four data-driven scheduling policies that we have created. Through simulation, we demonstrate the accuracy of our predictive models and show how they can reduce time to completion for some workloads by as much as 80%.

  8. Buoyancy-Driven Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, K D; Wheeler, E K; Benett, W; Stratton, P; Christian, A; Chen, A; Ortega, J; Weisgraber, T H; Goodson, K E

    2004-09-28

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) facilitates DNA detection by significantly increasing the concentration of specific DNA segments. A new class of PCR instruments uses a buoyancy-driven re-circulating flow to thermally cycle the DNA sample and benefits from reduced cycle times, low sample volumes, a miniaturized format, and low power consumption. This paper analyzes a specific buoyancy PCR device in a micro-channel ''race-track'' geometry to determine key parameters about PCR cycle times and other figures of merit as functions of device dimensions. The 1-D model balances the buoyancy driving force with frictional losses. A hydrostatic pressure imbalance concept is used between the left and right sides of the fluid loop to calculate the buoyancy driving force. Velocity and temperature distributions within the channels are determined from two-dimensional analysis of the channel section, with developing region effects included empirically through scaled values of the local Nusselt number. Good agreement between four independent verification steps validate the 1-D simulation approach: (1) analytical expressions for the thermal entrance length are compared against, (2) comparison with a full 3-D finite element simulation, (3) comparison with an experimental flow field characterization, and (4) calculation of the minimum PCR runtime required to get a positive PCR signal from the buoyancy-driven PCR device. The 1-D approach closely models an actual buoyancy-driven PCR device and can further be used as a rapid design tool to simulate buoyancy PCR flows and perform detailed design optimizations studies.

  9. Surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1988-01-01

    Thermocapillary flow is driven by a thermally induced surface tension variation along a liquid free surface. In the Earth-gravity environment such flows are usually overshadowed by buoyancy driven flows, but at reduced gravity conditions their influence could be significant. A comprehensive theoretical and experimental research program was stated 12 years ago and is still being continued. Past work done at Case Western Reserve University as well as work done by others is reviewed. The justification for low-gravity experiments is presented.

  10. Low frequency driven oscillations of cantilevers in viscous fluids at very low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranch, G. A.; Lane, J. E.; Miller, G. A.; Lou, J. W.

    2013-05-01

    The motion of submerged cantilevers driven by viscous fluids is experimentally investigated and a previously published theoretical model is verified over a broad range of Reynolds number covering 4×10-3≤Re≤2000 at frequencies up to 1 kHz. Both planar and cylindrical cantilevers are implemented using short length (few centimeters) fiber lasers, which are also used to measure the deflections. The driving forces are analyzed in detail illustrating how the dominant force transitions from a pressure related force to a viscous force depending on the Reynolds number of the fluid flow around the cantilever. Simplified, approximate expressions for the tip displacement of cantilevers oscillating in the highly viscous regime are also presented. These results will enable accurate, a priori, calculation of the motion of driven cantilevers over a range of dimensions, geometries, and fluid properties.

  11. Buoyancy-driven interannual sea level changes in the southeast tropical Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piecuch, Christopher G.; Ponte, Rui M.

    2012-03-01

    It is commonly held that interannual-to-decadal sea level variability patterns mainly represent the ocean's response to wind forcing. This view is based in part on modeling studies of wind-driven sea level changes along the tropical Pacific. However, because buoyancy forcing (and other generating mechanisms) are usually ignored, this paradigm may overemphasize the role of winds. Focusing on the southeast tropical Pacific, we use a data-constrained ocean state estimate to demonstrate that distinct mechanisms—including the ocean's response to buoyancy forcing as well as nonlinear processes—can also contribute to interannual sea level variability. Contrary to the notion that buoyancy-driven sea level changes are dynamically passive, such changes exhibit a strongly nonlocal, dynamically active character, made manifest in westward propagating waves. As similar findings apply elsewhere, accurate modeling of interannual-to-decadal regional sea level changes requires consideration of a variety of forcing mechanisms, including, but not limited to, the winds.

  12. Lenz's Law: Feel the Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawicki, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple, inexpensive system that allows students to have hands-on contact with simple experiments involving forces generated by induced currents. Discusses the use of a dynamic force sensor in making quantitative measurements of the forces generated. (JRH)

  13. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  14. Radiative Forcing by Contrails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meerkoetter, R.; Schumann, U.; Doelling, D. R.; Nakajima, T.; Tsushima, Y.

    1999-01-01

    A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmospheres The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 W/m(exp 2)a daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.

  15. A combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven molecular dynamics algorithm for the simulation of shock waves in rarefied gases

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Paolo Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.

    2009-12-10

    A novel combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven (ED/TD) algorithm to speed-up the Molecular Dynamics simulation of rarefied gases using realistic spherically symmetric soft potentials is presented. Due to the low density regime, the proposed method correctly identifies the time that must elapse before the next interaction occurs, similarly to Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics. However, each interaction is treated using Time-Driven Molecular Dynamics, thereby integrating Newton's Second Law using the sufficiently small time step needed to correctly resolve the atomic motion. Although infrequent, many-body interactions are also accounted for with a small approximation. The combined ED/TD method is shown to correctly reproduce translational relaxation in argon, described using the Lennard-Jones potential. For densities between {rho}=10{sup -4}kg/m{sup 3} and {rho}=10{sup -1}kg/m{sup 3}, comparisons with kinetic theory, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo, and pure Time-Driven Molecular Dynamics demonstrate that the ED/TD algorithm correctly reproduces the proper collision rates and the evolution toward thermal equilibrium. Finally, the combined ED/TD algorithm is applied to the simulation of a Mach 9 shock wave in rarefied argon. Density and temperature profiles as well as molecular velocity distributions accurately match DSMC results, and the shock thickness is within the experimental uncertainty. For the problems considered, the ED/TD algorithm ranged from several hundred to several thousand times faster than conventional Time-Driven MD. Moreover, the force calculation to integrate the molecular trajectories is found to contribute a negligible amount to the overall ED/TD simulation time. Therefore, this method could pave the way for the application of much more refined and expensive interatomic potentials, either classical or first-principles, to Molecular Dynamics simulations of shock waves in rarefied gases, involving vibrational nonequilibrium and chemical reactivity.

  16. Light driven microactuators: Design, fabrication, and mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Li-Hsin

    This dissertation is concerned with design, fabrication, and mathematical modeling of three different microactuators driven by light. Compared to electricity, electromagnetic wave is a wireless source of power. A distant light source can be delivered, absorbed, and converted to generate a driving force for a microactuator. The study of light-driven microsystems, still at its early stage, is already expanding the horizon for the research of microsystems. The microactuators of this dissertation include micro-cantilevers driven by pulsed laser, photo-deformable microshells coated with gold nanospheres, and a nano-particles coated micro-turbine driven by visible light. Experimental investigation and theoretical analysis of these microactuators showed interesting results. These microactuators were functioned based on cross-linked, multiple physics phenomenon, such as photo-heating, thermal expansion, photo-chemistry effect, plasomonics enhancement, and thermal convection in rarefied gas. These multiple physics effects dominate the function of a mechanical system, when the system size becomes small. The modeling results of the microactuators suggest that, to simulate a microscale mechanical system accurately, one has to take account the minimum dimension of the system and to consider the validity of a theoretical model. Examples of the building of different microstructures were shown to demonstrate the capacity of a digital-micromirror-device (DMD) based apparatus for three-dimensional, heterogeneous fabrication of polymeric microstructures.

  17. Database Driven 6-DOF Trajectory Simulation for Debris Transport Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Debris mitigation and risk assessment have been carried out by NASA and its contractors supporting Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight (RTF). As a part of this assessment, analysis of transport potential for debris that may be liberated from the vehicle or from pad facilities prior to tower clear (Lift-Off Debris) is being performed by MSFC. This class of debris includes plume driven and wind driven sources for which lift as well as drag are critical for the determination of the debris trajectory. As a result, NASA MSFC has a need for a debris transport or trajectory simulation that supports the computation of lift effect in addition to drag without the computational expense of fully coupled CFD with 6-DOF. A database driven 6-DOF simulation that uses aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for the debris shape that are interpolated from a database has been developed to meet this need. The design, implementation, and verification of the database driven six degree of freedom (6-DOF) simulation addition to the Lift-Off Debris Transport Analysis (LODTA) software are discussed in this paper.

  18. Development of a miniature motor-driven pulsatile LVAD driven by a fuzzy controller.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Makino, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Shuji; Yasuda, Takahiko; Akasaka, Yuta; Tani, Makiko; Inoue, Yusuke; Mitoh, Ayumu; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2007-01-01

    We have been developing a small, lightweight motor-driven pulsatile left ventricular assist device (LVAD) with a ball screw. The motor-driven LVAD consists of a brushless DC motor and a ball screw. The attractive magnetic force between Nd-Fe-B magnets (with a diameter of 5 mm and a thickness of 1.5 mm) mounted in holes in a silicone rubber sheet (thickness 2 mm) and an iron plate adhered onto the a diaphragm of the blood pump can provide optimum active blood filling during the pump filling phase. The LVAD has a stroke volume of 55 ml and an overall volume of 285 ml; it weighs 360 g. The controller mainly consists of a fuzzy logic position and velocity controller to apply doctors' and engineers' knowledge to control the LVAD. Each unit of the controller consists of a functionally independent program module for easy improvement of the controller's performance. The LVAD was evaluated in in vitro experiments using a mock circulation. A maximum pump outflow of 5.1 l/min was obtained at a drive rate of 95 bpm against an afterload of 95 mmHg, and active filling using the attractive magnetic force provided a pump output of 3.6 l/min at a drive rate of 75 bpm under a preload of 0 mmHg. The operating efficiency of the LVAD was measured at between 8% and 10.5%. While the LVAD can provide adequate pump outflow for cardiac assistance, further upgrading of the software and improvement of the blood pump are required to improve pump performance and efficiency. PMID:17846714

  19. Linear force device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide a mechanical force actuator which is lightweight and manipulatable and utilizes linear motion for push or pull forces while maintaining a constant overall length. The mechanical force producing mechanism comprises a linear actuator mechanism and a linear motion shaft mounted parallel to one another. The linear motion shaft is connected to a stationary or fixed housing and to a movable housing where the movable housing is mechanically actuated through actuator mechanism by either manual means or motor means. The housings are adapted to releasably receive a variety of jaw or pulling elements adapted for clamping or prying action. The stationary housing is adapted to be pivotally mounted to permit an angular position of the housing to allow the tool to adapt to skewed interfaces. The actuator mechanisms is operated by a gear train to obtain linear motion of the actuator mechanism.

  20. Carbohydrate force fields

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B. Lachele; Tessier, Matthew B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates present a special set of challenges to the generation of force fields. First, the tertiary structures of monosaccharides are complex merely by virtue of their exceptionally high number of chiral centers. In addition, their electronic characteristics lead to molecular geometries and electrostatic landscapes that can be challenging to predict and model. The monosaccharide units can also interconnect in many ways, resulting in a large number of possible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, both linear and branched. These larger structures contain a number of rotatable bonds, meaning they potentially sample an enormous conformational space. This article briefly reviews the history of carbohydrate force fields, examining and comparing their challenges, forms, philosophies, and development strategies. Then it presents a survey of recent uses of these force fields, noting trends, strengths, deficiencies, and possible directions for future expansion. PMID:25530813

  1. Patron-Driven Ebook Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breitbach, William; Lambert, Joy E.

    2011-01-01

    Selecting the most appropriate content for a community is a challenge librarians have faced since the dawn of libraries. Formal patron-driven acquisition (PDA) models have been around for at least a decade. These models attempt to collect materials based on known patron demand. Some libraries simply use a suggestion form, while others use…

  2. Acuity-driven gigapixel visualization.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Kaufman, Arie E

    2013-12-01

    We present a framework for acuity-driven visualization of super-high resolution image data on gigapixel displays. Tiled display walls offer a large workspace that can be navigated physically by the user. Based on head tracking information, the physical characteristics of the tiled display and the formulation of visual acuity, we guide an out-of-core gigapixel rendering scheme by delivering high levels of detail only in places where it is perceivable to the user. We apply this principle to gigapixel image rendering through adaptive level of detail selection. Additionally, we have developed an acuity-driven tessellation scheme for high-quality Focus-and-Context (F+C) lenses that significantly reduces visual artifacts while accurately capturing the underlying lens function. We demonstrate this framework on the Reality Deck, an immersive gigapixel display. We present the results of a user study designed to quantify the impact of our acuity-driven rendering optimizations in the visual exploration process. We discovered no evidence suggesting a difference in search task performance between our framework and naive rendering of gigapixel resolution data, while realizing significant benefits in terms of data transfer overhead. Additionally, we show that our acuity-driven tessellation scheme offers substantially increased frame rates when compared to naive pre-tessellation, while providing indistinguishable image quality. PMID:24051856

  3. Driven shielding capacitive proximity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor); McConnell, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A capacitive proximity sensing element, backed by a reflector driven at the same voltage as and in phase with the sensor, is used to reflect the field lines away from a grounded robot arm towards an intruding object, thus dramatically increasing the sensor's range and sensitivity.

  4. Data-Driven Proficiency Profiling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostafavi, Behrooz; Liu, Zhongxiu; Barnes, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Deep Thought is a logic tutor where students practice constructing deductive logic proofs. Within Deep Thought is a data-driven mastery learning system (DDML), which calculates student proficiency based on rule scores weighted by expert-decided weights in order to assign problem sets of appropriate difficulty. In this study, we designed and tested…

  5. Pattern Formation in Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymko, Katherine

    Model colloidal particles of two types, driven in opposite directions, will in two dimensions segregate into lanes, a phenomenon studied extensively by Lowen and co-workers [Dzubiella et al. Phys. Rev. E 65, 021402 (2002)]. We have simulated mixtures of oppositely-driven particles using three numerical protocols. We find that laning results from enhanced diffusion, in the direction perpendicular to the drive, of particles surrounded by particles of the opposite type, consistent with the observation of Vissers et al. [Soft Matter 7, 6, 2352 (2011)]. By comparing protocols we find that enhanced diffusion follows from a simple geometrical constraint: oppositely-driven particles must, in the time taken to encounter each other in the direction of the drive, diffuse in the perpendicular direction by about one particle diameter. This constraint implies that the effective lateral diffusion constant grows linearly with drive speed and as the square root of the packing fraction, a prediction supported by our numerics. By invoking an analogy between hard particles with environment-dependent mobilities and mutually attractive particles we argue that there exists an equilibrium system whose pattern-forming properties are similar to those of the driven system. Katherine Klymko acknowledges support from the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

  6. Planetary dynamos driven by helical waves - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, P. A.; Ranjan, A.

    2015-09-01

    In most numerical simulations of the Earth's core the dynamo resides outside the tangent cylinder and may be crudely classified as being of the α2 type. In this region the flow comprises a sea of thin columnar vortices aligned with the rotation axis, taking the form of alternating cyclones and anticyclones. The dynamo is thought to be driven by these columnar vortices within which the flow is observed to be highly helical, helicity being a crucial ingredient of planetary dynamos. As noted in Davidson, one of the mysteries of this dynamo cartoon is the origin of the helicity, which is observed to be positive in the south and negative in the north. While Ekman pumping at the mantle can induce helicity in some of the overly viscous numerical simulations, it is extremely unlikely to be a significant source within planets. In this paper we return to the suggestion of Davidson that the helicity observed in the less viscous simulations owes its existence to helical wave packets, launched in and around the equatorial plane where the buoyancy flux is observed to be strong. Here we show that such wave packets act as a potent source of planetary helicity, constituting a simple, robust mechanism that yields the correct sign for h north and south of the equator. Since such a mechanism does not rely on the presence of a mantle, it can operate within both the Earth and the gas giants. Moreover, our numerical simulations show that helical wave packets dispersing from the equator produce a random sea of thin, columnar cyclone/anticyclone pairs, very like those observed in the more strongly forced dynamo simulations. We examine the local dynamics of helical wave packets dispersing from the equatorial regions, as well as the overall nature of an α2-dynamo driven by such wave packets. Our local analysis predicts the mean emf induced by helical waves, an analysis that rests on a number of simple approximations which are consistent with our numerical experiments, while our global

  7. Self-repairing symmetry in jellyfish through mechanically driven reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Michael J.; Basinger, Ty; Yuan, William; Guo, Chin-Lin; Goentoro, Lea

    2015-01-01

    What happens when an animal is injured and loses important structures? Some animals simply heal the wound, whereas others are able to regenerate lost parts. In this study, we report a previously unidentified strategy of self-repair, where moon jellyfish respond to injuries by reorganizing existing parts, and rebuilding essential body symmetry, without regenerating what is lost. Specifically, in response to arm amputation, the young jellyfish of Aurelia aurita rearrange their remaining arms, recenter their manubria, and rebuild their muscular networks, all completed within 12 hours to 4 days. We call this process symmetrization. We find that symmetrization is not driven by external cues, cell proliferation, cell death, and proceeded even when foreign arms were grafted on. Instead, we find that forces generated by the muscular network are essential. Inhibiting pulsation using muscle relaxants completely, and reversibly, blocked symmetrization. Furthermore, we observed that decreasing pulse frequency using muscle relaxants slowed symmetrization, whereas increasing pulse frequency by lowering the magnesium concentration in seawater accelerated symmetrization. A mathematical model that describes the compressive forces from the muscle contraction, within the context of the elastic response from the mesoglea and the ephyra geometry, can recapitulate the recovery of global symmetry. Thus, self-repair in Aurelia proceeds through the reorganization of existing parts, and is driven by forces generated by its own propulsion machinery. We find evidence for symmetrization across species of jellyfish (Chrysaora pacifica, Mastigias sp., and Cotylorhiza tuberculata). PMID:26080418

  8. Self-repairing symmetry in jellyfish through mechanically driven reorganization.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Michael J; Basinger, Ty; Yuan, William; Guo, Chin-Lin; Goentoro, Lea

    2015-06-30

    What happens when an animal is injured and loses important structures? Some animals simply heal the wound, whereas others are able to regenerate lost parts. In this study, we report a previously unidentified strategy of self-repair, where moon jellyfish respond to injuries by reorganizing existing parts, and rebuilding essential body symmetry, without regenerating what is lost. Specifically, in response to arm amputation, the young jellyfish of Aurelia aurita rearrange their remaining arms, recenter their manubria, and rebuild their muscular networks, all completed within 12 hours to 4 days. We call this process symmetrization. We find that symmetrization is not driven by external cues, cell proliferation, cell death, and proceeded even when foreign arms were grafted on. Instead, we find that forces generated by the muscular network are essential. Inhibiting pulsation using muscle relaxants completely, and reversibly, blocked symmetrization. Furthermore, we observed that decreasing pulse frequency using muscle relaxants slowed symmetrization, whereas increasing pulse frequency by lowering the magnesium concentration in seawater accelerated symmetrization. A mathematical model that describes the compressive forces from the muscle contraction, within the context of the elastic response from the mesoglea and the ephyra geometry, can recapitulate the recovery of global symmetry. Thus, self-repair in Aurelia proceeds through the reorganization of existing parts, and is driven by forces generated by its own propulsion machinery. We find evidence for symmetrization across species of jellyfish (Chrysaora pacifica, Mastigias sp., and Cotylorhiza tuberculata). PMID:26080418

  9. [Forced spirometry procedure].

    PubMed

    Cortés Aguilera, Antonio Javier

    2008-11-01

    Forced spirometry consists in a complementary test which is carried out in a health office in a workplace in order to determine the lung capacity of workers exposed to determined professional risks or those susceptible to determined working conditions which could lead to the development of respiratory problems. This test has been developed based on health vigilance laws under Article 22 of the Law for Prevention of Risks in the Workplace and requires that the technician, a nurse in a workplace, who performs it have some knowledge and skills regarding its use, following the norms for forced spirometry set by the Spanish Association for Pneumatology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR). PMID:19203116

  10. Air Force Seal Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, Ellen R.

    1996-01-01

    Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to control leakage at the required conditions. This presentation briefly describes current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engines.

  11. A simulated force generator with an adaptive command structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanes, P. Jeff

    2006-05-01

    The Force Laydown Automated Generator (FLAG) is a script-driven behavior model that automatically creates military formations from the platoon level up to division level for use in simulations built on the FLAMES simulation framework. The script allows users to define formation command structure, command relationships, vehicle type and equipment, and behaviors. We have used it to automatically generate more than 3000 units in a single simulation. Currently, FLAG is used in the Air Force Research Laboratory Munitions Directorate (AFRL/MN) to assist their Comprehensive Analysis Process (CAP). It produces a reasonable threat laydown of red forces for testing their blue concept weapons. Our success in the application of FLAG leads us to believe that it offers an invaluable potential for use in training environments and other applications that need a large number of reactive, adaptive forces - red or blue.

  12. Nonstationary Gravity Wave Forcing of the Stratospheric Zonal Mean Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    The role of gravity wave forcing in the zonal mean circulation of the stratosphere is discussed. Starting from some very simple assumptions about the momentum flux spectrum of nonstationary (non-zero phase speed) waves at forcing levels in the troposphere, a linear model is used to calculate wave propagation through climatological zonal mean winds at solstice seasons. As the wave amplitudes exceed their stable limits, a saturation criterion is imposed to account for nonlinear wave breakdown effects, and the resulting vertical gradient in the wave momentum flux is then used to estimate the mean flow forcing per unit mass. Evidence from global, assimilated data sets are used to constrain these forcing estimates. The results suggest the gravity-wave-driven force is accelerative (has the same sign as the mean wind) throughout most of the stratosphere above 20 km. The sense of the gravity wave forcing in the stratosphere is thus opposite to that in the mesosphere, where gravity wave drag is widely believed to play a principal role in decelerating the mesospheric jets. The forcing estimates are further compared to existing gravity wave parameterizations for the same climatological zonal mean conditions. Substantial disagreement is evident in the stratosphere, and we discuss the reasons for the disagreement. The results suggest limits on typical gravity wave amplitudes near source levels in the troposphere at solstice seasons. The gravity wave forcing in the stratosphere appears to have a substantial effect on lower stratospheric temperatures during southern hemisphere summer and thus may be relevant to climate.

  13. Bénard-Marangoni instability driven by moisture absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sangwoo; Jacobi, Ian; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol is a viscous liquid widely used in industry and known for its strong hygroscopic nature. While this unusual property has been well documented from the perspective of solution chemistry, its impact on the mechanical properties of glycerol remains largely unknown. Here, we report a spontaneous Bénard-Marangoni instability in pure glycerol driven by absorption of water vapor. Even under standard laboratory conditions, ambient humidity is sufficient to drive distinct Bénard-Marangoni convection cells for hours. We describe the mechanism of this instability in terms of the vapor transport process and competition between solutal and thermal Marangoni forces, and provide insight into potential uses and impact of this aspect of dynamics driven by moisture absorption in various common settings.

  14. Noise spectroscopy and decoherence mitigation during free and driven evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, William

    2014-03-01

    Gate operations in a quantum information processor are generally realized by tailoring specific periods of free and driven evolution of a quantum system. Unwanted environmental noise, which may be distinct during these two periods, acts to decohere the system and increase the gate error rate. In this talk, we review our work on noise spectroscopy of superconducting qubits (persistent-current qubits, transmons) undergoing both free and driven evolution, and we present dynamical decoupling methods that can mitigate coherent errors in both cases. We discuss these results in the context of our present work and future directions. This research was funded in part by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering, under Air Force Contract FA8721-05-C-0002.

  15. Radiative Forcing of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

  16. Kinetochore-independent chromosome segregation driven by lateral microtubule bundles

    PubMed Central

    Muscat, Christina C; Torre-Santiago, Keila M; Tran, Michael V; Powers, James A; Wignall, Sarah M

    2015-01-01

    During cell division, chromosomes attach to spindle microtubules at sites called kinetochores, and force generated at the kinetochore-microtubule interface is the main driver of chromosome movement. Surprisingly, kinetochores are not required for chromosome segregation on acentrosomal spindles in Caenorhabditis elegans oocytes, but the mechanism driving chromosomes apart in their absence is not understood. In this study, we show that lateral microtubule–chromosome associations established during prometaphase remain intact during anaphase to facilitate separation, defining a novel form of kinetochore-independent segregation. Chromosome dynamics during congression and segregation are controlled by opposing forces; plus-end directed forces are mediated by a protein complex that forms a ring around the chromosome center and dynein on chromosome arms provides a minus-end force. At anaphase onset, ring removal shifts the balance between these forces, triggering poleward movement along lateral microtubule bundles. This represents an elegant strategy for controlling chromosomal movements during cell division distinct from the canonical kinetochore-driven mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06462.001 PMID:26026148

  17. Mechanically-forced dynamos (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bars, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is a commonly accepted hypothesis that convection is responsible for planetary dynamos. However, the validity of the convective dynamo model can be questioned in various planets and moons as well as in asteroids, where the constraints from thermal evolution and compositional core models are sometimes difficult to reconcile with available data from paleomagnetism and in situ measurements. Over the last few years, researches have thus been pursued to find alternative mechanisms for sustaining intense three-dimensional motions in liquid cores, a necessary ingredient for planetary dynamo. In particular, mechanical forcings driven by libration, precession, nutation and tides, have received a renewed interest, following the first studies by Malkus in the 60's. A huge reservoir of energy is available in the rotational and orbital motions of all planetary systems. If planetary bodies were completely rigid and rotating at a constant spin rate, their fluid layers in the absence of convection would also behave rigidly and follow the spin of their boundaries. But small periodic perturbations of the shape of the core/mantle boundary (i.e. dynamic tides) and/or small periodic perturbations of the direction of the spin vector (i.e. precession and nutation) and/or small periodic perturbations of the spin rate (i.e. libration) systematically perturb this rigid state. Then, each of these small perturbations is capable of triggering instabilities in fluid layers, conveying energy from the spin and orbital motions to drive intense three-dimensional flows in the liquid cores. With the view to establish a general framework for planetary applications, I will present here the basic physical ingredients of these instabilities, which involve a resonance between the considered mechanical forcing and two inertial waves of the core. I will then review the numerical and experimental validations of this generic principle, and the few magnetohydrodynamic validations of their dynamo capacity

  18. The buoyancy-driven ocean circulation with realistic bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjermundsen, Ada; LaCasce, Joseph H.; Denstad, Liv

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to the wind-driven ocean circulation, where the concept of a Sverdrup interior and western boundary currents is generally accepted, we lack a simple dynamical framework for rationalizing the buoyancy-driven circulation. Thus most of our intuition is based on numerical solutions, primarily in idealized basins (e.g. Huck et al., 1999; Park and Bryan, 2001). Here we examine numerical solutions of the global circulation with realistic bathymetry, driven solely by surface buoyancy forcing. Explicit wind forcing is excluded, although vertical mixing is retained. The model (the MITgcm) is run with a hybrid resolution scheme, to capture approximately the variation of the deformation radius. The character of the resulting flow is consistent in many ways with the observed ocean circulation. There is inflow to and sinking in the Nordic Seas, baroclinic western boundary currents and an overturning streamfunction which closely resembles those obtained in full GCMs and in observations. Furthermore, the solutions share many features with solutions obtained with a linear analytical model (Pedlosky, 1969; LaCasce, 2004), suggesting the latter may be conceptually useful, despite lacking bathymetry. We discuss these points, as well as implications for the climate system in general. References: Pedlosky, J. (1969). Linear theory of the circulation of a stratified ocean. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 35, 185-205. Huck, T., A. J. Weaver and A. Colin de Verdière (1999). On the influence of the parameterization of lateral boundary layers on the thermohaline circulation in coarse-resolution ocean models. Journal of Marine Research, 57(3), 387-426. Park, Y. G. and K. Bryan (2001). Comparison of thermally driven circulations from a depth-coordinate model and an isopycnal-layer model. Part II: The difference and structure of the circulations. Journal of Physical Oceanography, 31(9), 2612-2624. LaCasce, J. H. (2004). Diffusivity and viscosity dependence in the linear thermocline

  19. Numerical Simulations of Boundary-Driven Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, K.; Brummell, N.; Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    An important topic of physics research is how magnetic fields are generated and maintained in the many astrophysical bodies where they are ubiquitously observed. Of particular interest, are reversals of magnetic fields of planets and stars, especially those of the Earth and the Sun. In an attempt to provide intuition on this problem, numerous physical dynamo experiments have been performed in different configurations. Recently, a tremendous breakthrough was made in the Von Karman sodium (VKS) experiments in France when the most realistic laboratory fluid dynamo to date was produced by driving an unconstrained flow in a cylinder of liquid sodium (Monchaux et al, 2007, PRL). One of the curiosities of the VKS experiment however is the effect of the composition of the impellers that drive the flow. Steel blades failed to produce a dynamo, but soft iron impellers, which have much higher magnetic permeability, succeeded. The role of the magnetic properties of the boundaries in boundary-driven dynamos is therefore clearly of interest. Kinematic and laminar numerical dynamo simulations (Giesecke et al, 2010, PRL & Gissinger et al, 2008 EPL) have shed some light but turbulent, nonlinear simulations are necessary. Roberts, Glatzmaier & Clune 2010 created a simplified model of the VKS setup by using three-dimensional numerical simulations in a spherical geometry with differential zonal motions of the boundary replacing the driving impellers of the VKS experiment. We have extended these numerical simulations further towards a more complete understanding of such boundary-forced dynamos. In particular, we have examined the effect of the magnetic boundary conditions - changes in the wall thickness, the magnetic permeability, and the electrical conductivity - on the mechanisms responsible for dynamo generation. Enhanced permeability, conductivity and wall thickness all help dynamo action to different degrees. We are further extending our investigations to asymmetric forcing to

  20. The Force of Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Carol

    2005-01-01

    "The Force of Ideas" describes a little-known aspect of both educational history and Viennese psychoanalysis during the interwar years: the movement for psychoanalytic pedagogy. The author traces her father's own story, beginning with his application to the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society for training as a psychoanalytic pedagogue, as a way to…

  1. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  2. Reduction in Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, R. Craig

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" reviews several concerns that must be addressed by school business administrators in districts facing declining enrollments and the need for reductions in force. The chapter first looks at the business administrator's significant role in planning for retrenchment. The chapter then…

  3. Reduction in Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phay, Robert

    Chapter 2 in a book on school law discusses the reasons for reduction in force (RIF) and presents a set of model regulations for school districts as the best means of minimizing legal problems resulting from RIF. The reasons for RIF include declining student enrollments; reduced turnover among teachers; changes in programs; and more constrained…

  4. Wearing Forces Spectacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Graham

    2012-01-01

    When providing training to teachers struggling with the concept of forces, the author encourages them to start with something within the experience of the children they are teaching. For example, show them photographs taken on windy days, such as that of a tree, and ask them to explain what is happening. This encourages the children to focus on…

  5. Forces in nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2002-02-01

    I investigate the properties of forces on bodies in theories governed by the generalized Poisson equation μ(|ϕ| /a0)ϕ] ∝ Gρ, for the potential ϕ produced by a distribution of sources ρ. This equation describes, inter alia, media with a response coefficient, μ, that depends on the field strength, such as in nonlinear, dielectric or diamagnetic, media; nonlinear transport problems with field-strength-dependent conductivity or diffusion coefficient; nonlinear electrostatics, as in the Born-Infeld theory; certain stationary potential flows in compressible fluids, in which case the forces act on sources or obstacles in the flow. The expressions for the force on a point charge are derived exactly for the limits of very low and very high charge. The force on an arbitrary body in an external field of asymptotically constant gradient, -g0, is shown to be F = Qg0, where Q is the total effective charge of the body. The corollary Q = 0 → F = 0 is a generalization of d'Alembert's paradox. I show that for G > 0 (as in Newtonian gravity) two point charges of the same (opposite) sign still attract (repel). The opposite is true for G < 0. I discuss its generalization to extended bodies and derive virial relations.

  6. Force limited vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of conducting lab vibration tests of spacecraft equipment was developed to more closely simulate the vibration environment experienced when the spacecraft is launched on a rocket. The improved tests are tailored to identify equipment design and workmanship problems without inducing artificial failures that would not have occurred at launch. These new, less destructive types of vibration tests are essential to JPL's protoflight test approach in which lab testing is conducted using the flight equipment, often one of a kind, to save time and money. In conventional vibration tests, only the input vibratory motion is specified; the feedback, or reaction force, between the test item and the vibration machine is ignored. Most test failures occur when the test item goes into resonance, and the reaction force becomes very large. It has long been recognized that the large reaction force is a test artifact which does not occur with the lightweight, flexible mounting structures characteristic of spacecraft and space vehicles. In new vibration tests, both the motion and the force provided to the test item by the vibration machine are controlled, so that the vibration ride experienced by the test item is as in flight.

  7. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  8. The Dynamic Force Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  9. Mining Task Force Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saskatchewan Inst. of Applied Science and Technology, Saskatoon.

    In fall 1988, the Board of Directors of the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) created a task force to study the training needs of the mining industry in the province and evaluate SIAST's responsiveness to those needs. After assessing the technological changes taking place in the industry, surveying manpower needs,…

  10. Lorentz force particle analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Thess, André; Moreau, René; Tan, Yanqing; Dai, Shangjun; Tao, Zhen; Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    A new contactless technique is presented for the detection of micron-sized insulating particles in the flow of an electrically conducting fluid. A transverse magnetic field brakes this flow and tends to become entrained in the flow direction by a Lorentz force, whose reaction force on the magnetic-field-generating system can be measured. The presence of insulating particles suspended in the fluid produce changes in this Lorentz force, generating pulses in it; these pulses enable the particles to be counted and sized. A two-dimensional numerical model that employs a moving mesh method demonstrates the measurement principle when such a particle is present. Two prototypes and a three-dimensional numerical model are used to demonstrate the feasibility of a Lorentz force particle analyzer (LFPA). The findings of this study conclude that such an LFPA, which offers contactless and on-line quantitative measurements, can be applied to an extensive range of applications. These applications include measurements of the cleanliness of high-temperature and aggressive molten metal, such as aluminum and steel alloys, and the clean manufacturing of semiconductors.

  11. Image force microscopy of molecular resonance: A microscope principle

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksa, I.; Uenal, K.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique in microscopy which extends the domain of atomic force microscopy to optical spectroscopy at the nanometer scale. We show that molecular resonance of feature sizes down to the single molecular level can be detected and imaged purely by mechanical detection of the force gradient between the interaction of the optically driven molecular dipole and its mirror image in a platinum coated scanning probe tip. This microscopy and spectroscopy technique is extendable to frequencies ranging from radio to infrared and the ultraviolet. PMID:20859536

  12. Globally coupled noisy oscillators with inhomogeneous periodic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, Michael; Larsen, Michael L.; Tsimring, Lev S.

    2004-12-01

    We study the collective properties of an array of nonlinear noisy oscillators driven by nonidentical periodic signals. We consider the case of a globally coupled array of harmonically forced, weakly nonlinear oscillators where there is a constant difference between the phases of the forcing signals applied to adjacent oscillators. This system is a prototypical model of a nonlinear phased array receiver. We derive analytical results for the array output in the limit of a large number of oscillators for the noise-free and noisy cases. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  13. Chiral drag force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Krishna; Sadofyev, Andrey V.

    2015-10-01

    We provide a holographic evaluation of novel contributions to the drag force acting on a heavy quark moving through strongly interacting plasma. The new contributions are chiral in the sense that they act in opposite directions in plasmas containing an excess of left- or right-handed quarks. The new contributions are proportional to the coefficient of the axial anomaly, and in this sense also are chiral. These new contributions to the drag force act either parallel to or antiparallel to an external magnetic field or to the vorticity of the fluid plasma. In all these respects, these contributions to the drag force felt by a heavy quark are analogous to the chiral magnetic effect (CME) on light quarks. However, the new contribution to the drag force is independent of the electric charge of the heavy quark and is the same for heavy quarks and antiquarks, meaning that these novel effects do not in fact contribute to the CME current. We show that although the chiral drag force can be non-vanishing for heavy quarks that are at rest in the local fluid rest frame, it does vanish for heavy quarks that are at rest in a suitably chosen frame. In this frame, the heavy quark at rest sees counterpropagating momentum and charge currents, both proportional to the axial anomaly coefficient, but feels no drag force. This provides strong concrete evidence for the absence of dissipation in chiral transport, something that has been predicted previously via consideration of symmetries. Along the way to our principal results, we provide a general calculation of the corrections to the drag force due to the presence of gradients in the flowing fluid in the presence of a nonzero chemical potential. We close with a consequence of our result that is at least in principle observable in heavy ion collisions, namely an anticorrelation between the direction of the CME current for light quarks in a given event and the direction of the kick given to the momentum of all the heavy quarks and

  14. On the Transition from Thermally-driven to Ponderomotively-driven Stimulated Brillouin Scattering and Filamentation of Light in Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Berger; E.J. Valeo; S. Brunner

    2005-04-04

    The dispersion properties of ion acoustic waves and their nonlinear coupling to light waves through ponderomotive and thermal forces are sensitive to the strength of electron-ion collisions. Here, we consider the growth rate of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) when the driven acoustic wave frequency and wavelength span the range of small to large compared to electron-ion collision frequency and mean free path respectively. We find in all cases the thermal contributions to the SBS growth rate are insignificant if the ion acoustic wave frequency is greater than the electron-ion collision frequency and the wavelength is much shorter than the electron-ion mean free path. On the other hand, the purely growing filamentation instability remains thermally driven for shorter wavelengths than SBS even when the growth rate is larger than the acoustic frequency.

  15. People Get Ready...A Call for Data-Driven Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyck, Brenda A.

    2006-01-01

    Fueled by a culture fascinated by numbers and increased accountability, data-driven instruction has become a mighty force as it joins with the tools of technology to handle the mammoth task of gathering, sorting, analyzing, and synthesizing data. Success stories from districts all over the country attest to the positive results of implementing…

  16. Artificial cognitive memory—changing from density driven to functionality driven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L. P.; Yi, K. J.; Ramanathan, K.; Zhao, R.; Ning, N.; Ding, D.; Chong, T. C.

    2011-03-01

    Increasing density based on bit size reduction is currently a main driving force for the development of data storage technologies. However, it is expected that all of the current available storage technologies might approach their physical limits in around 15 to 20 years due to miniaturization. To further advance the storage technologies, it is required to explore a new development trend that is different from density driven. One possible direction is to derive insights from biological counterparts. Unlike physical memories that have a single function of data storage, human memory is versatile. It contributes to functions of data storage, information processing, and most importantly, cognitive functions such as adaptation, learning, perception, knowledge generation, etc. In this paper, a brief review of current data storage technologies are presented, followed by discussions of future storage technology development trend. We expect that the driving force will evolve from density to functionality, and new memory modules associated with additional functions other than only data storage will appear. As an initial step toward building a future generation memory technology, we propose Artificial Cognitive Memory (ACM), a memory based intelligent system. We also present the characteristics of ACM, new technologies that can be used to develop ACM components such as bioinspired element cells (silicon, memristor, phase change, etc.), and possible methodologies to construct a biologically inspired hierarchical system.

  17. Traffic jams and hysteresis in driven one-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, O. M.; Hu, B.; Filippov, A.; Zeltser, A.

    1998-08-01

    The driven underdamped chain of anharmonically interacting atoms in the sinusoidal external potential is studied. It is shown that due to the interatomic interaction the system exhibits hysteresis for any nonzero rate of changing of the dc driving force. Before the transition to the running state the system passes through the traffic-jam inhomogeneous state. The system behavior is explained with the help of two simple models, the discrete lattice-gas model with two states of atoms, and the continuum mean-field model based on the Fokker-Planck equation.

  18. Streamer Waves Driven by Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Song, Hong-Qiang; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Wu, Zhao; Fu, Hui

    Between July 5th and July 7th 2004, two intriguing fast coronal mass ejection(CME)-streamer interaction events were recorded by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO). At the beginning of the events, the streamer was pushed aside from their equilibrium position upon the impact of the rapidly outgoing and expanding ejecta; then, the streamer structure, mainly the bright streamer belt, exhibited elegant large scale sinusoidal wavelike motions. The motions were apparently driven by the restoring magnetic forces resulting from the CME impingement, suggestive of magnetohydrodynamic kink mode propagating outwards along the plasma sheet of the streamer. The mode is supported collectively by the streamer structure and is therefore named "streamer wave" in the present study. With the whitelight coronagraph data, we show that the streamer wave has a period of about 1 hour, a wavelength varying from 2 to 4 solar radii, an amplitude of about a few tens of solar radii, and a propagating phase speed in the range 300 to 500 km/s. We also find that there is a tendency for the phase speed to decline with increasing heliocentric distance. These observations provide good examples of large scale wave phenomena carried by corona structures, and have significance in developing seismological techniques for diagnosing plasma and magnetic parameters in the outer corona.

  19. Streamer Waves Driven by Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Song, H. Q.; Li, B.; Xia, L. D.; Wu, Z.; Fu, H.; Li, Xing

    2010-05-01

    Between 2004 July 5 and July 7, two intriguing fast coronal mass ejection (CME)-streamer interaction events were recorded by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. At the beginning of the events, the streamer was pushed aside from its equilibrium position upon the impact of the rapidly outgoing and expanding ejecta; then, the streamer structure, mainly the bright streamer belt, exhibited elegant large-scale sinusoidal wavelike motions. The motions were apparently driven by the restoring magnetic forces resulting from the CME impingement, suggestive of magnetohydrodynamic kink mode propagating outward along the plasma sheet of the streamer. The mode is supported collectively by the streamer-plasma sheet structure and is therefore named "streamer wave" in the present study. With the white light coronagraph data, we show that the streamer wave has a period of about 1 hr, a wavelength varying from 2 to 4 solar radii, an amplitude of about a few tens of solar radii, and a propagating phase speed in the range 300-500 km s-1. We also find that there is a tendency for the phase speed to decline with increasing heliocentric distance. These observations provide good examples of large-scale wave phenomena carried by coronal structures and have significance in developing seismological techniques for diagnosing plasma and magnetic parameters in the outer corona.

  20. A quasilinear formulation of turbulence driven current

    SciTech Connect

    McDevitt, C. J.; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2014-02-15

    Non-inductive current drive mechanisms, such as the familiar neoclassical bootstrap current correspond to an essential component to the realization of steady state tokamak operation. In this work, we discuss a novel collisionless mechanism through which a mean plasma current may be driven in the presence of microturbulence. In analogy with the traditional neoclassical bootstrap current drive mechanism, in which the collisional equilibrium established between trapped and passing electrons results in the formation of a steady state plasma current, here we show that resonant scattering of electrons by drift wave microturbulence provides an additional means of determining the equilibrium between trapped and passing electrons. The resulting collisionless equilibrium is shown to result in the formation of an equilibrium current whose magnitude is a function of the thermodynamic forces. A mean field formulation is utilized to incorporate the above components into a unified framework through which both collisional as well as collisionless current drive mechanisms may be self-consistently treated. Utilizing a linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator, the plasma current in the presence of both collisions as well as turbulent stresses is computed, allowing for the relative strength of these two mechanisms to be quantified as a function of collisionality and fluctuation amplitude.

  1. A swing driven by liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng

    Angular momentum in liquid crystals exists as flow, director reorientation, etc. However, it is hard to observe and measure angular momentum in liquid crystals by a direct mechanical approach. Torsion pendulum is a general tool to measure angular momentum by torque balance. Our torsion pendulum can harvest the angular momentum in liquid crystals to make it observable. The oscillation of the pendulum keeps increasing by constructively adding a small angular momentum of liquid crystals each period at the resonant frequency of the pendulum. Its similar to a swing driven by a force at its resonant frequency. For the torsion pendulum, a cage made of two aluminum discs, in which a liquid crystal cell is placed, is suspended between two thin tungsten wires. A gold mirror, which is a part of the optical lever system, is attached on one tungsten wire. As first demonstration, we fabricate a circular hybrid liquid crystal cell, which can induce concentric backflows to generate angular momentum. The alignment on the planar substrate is concentric and tangential. Due to the coupling between director rotation and flow, the induced backflow goes around the cell when we add electrical pulses between top and bottom substrates. The oscillation is observed by a position sensitive detector and analyzed on the basis of Eriksen-Leslie theory. With vacuum condition and synchronous driving system, the oscillation signal is improved. We demonstrate that this torsion pendulum can sensitively detect the angular momentum in liquid crystals.

  2. A quasilinear formulation of turbulence driven current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, C. J.; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2014-02-01

    Non-inductive current drive mechanisms, such as the familiar neoclassical bootstrap current correspond to an essential component to the realization of steady state tokamak operation. In this work, we discuss a novel collisionless mechanism through which a mean plasma current may be driven in the presence of microturbulence. In analogy with the traditional neoclassical bootstrap current drive mechanism, in which the collisional equilibrium established between trapped and passing electrons results in the formation of a steady state plasma current, here we show that resonant scattering of electrons by drift wave microturbulence provides an additional means of determining the equilibrium between trapped and passing electrons. The resulting collisionless equilibrium is shown to result in the formation of an equilibrium current whose magnitude is a function of the thermodynamic forces. A mean field formulation is utilized to incorporate the above components into a unified framework through which both collisional as well as collisionless current drive mechanisms may be self-consistently treated. Utilizing a linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator, the plasma current in the presence of both collisions as well as turbulent stresses is computed, allowing for the relative strength of these two mechanisms to be quantified as a function of collisionality and fluctuation amplitude.

  3. STREAMER WAVES DRIVEN BY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Song, H. Q.; Li, B.; Xia, L. D.; Wu, Z.; Fu, H.; Li Xing

    2010-05-01

    Between 2004 July 5 and July 7, two intriguing fast coronal mass ejection (CME)-streamer interaction events were recorded by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. At the beginning of the events, the streamer was pushed aside from its equilibrium position upon the impact of the rapidly outgoing and expanding ejecta; then, the streamer structure, mainly the bright streamer belt, exhibited elegant large-scale sinusoidal wavelike motions. The motions were apparently driven by the restoring magnetic forces resulting from the CME impingement, suggestive of magnetohydrodynamic kink mode propagating outward along the plasma sheet of the streamer. The mode is supported collectively by the streamer-plasma sheet structure and is therefore named 'streamer wave' in the present study. With the white light coronagraph data, we show that the streamer wave has a period of about 1 hr, a wavelength varying from 2 to 4 solar radii, an amplitude of about a few tens of solar radii, and a propagating phase speed in the range 300-500 km s{sup -1}. We also find that there is a tendency for the phase speed to decline with increasing heliocentric distance. These observations provide good examples of large-scale wave phenomena carried by coronal structures and have significance in developing seismological techniques for diagnosing plasma and magnetic parameters in the outer corona.

  4. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry.

  5. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems.

    PubMed

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry. PMID:26871188

  6. Transient Mixing Driven by Buoyancy Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, W. M. B.; Batur, C.; Zhong, H.

    2002-01-01

    Mixing driven by buoyancy-induced flows is of particular interest to microgravity processes, as the body force that governs the intensity of flow fields can be directly controlled. We consider a model experimental system to explore the dynamics of mixing which employs two miscible liquids inside a cavity separated initially by a divider. The two liquids are oriented vertically inside a rectangular cavity with constant width and height, and varying depths to span the range of a Hele-Shaw cell to a 3-D configuration. The two miscible liquids can be sufficiently diluted and died, for example water and deuterium oxide, such that a distinct interface exists across the divider. The transient mixing characteristic of the two fluids is addressed by following the Lagrangian history of the interface for various aspect ratios in the z-plane (depth variation) as well as a range of pulling velocities of the divider. The mixing characteristics of the two fluids are quantified from measurement of the length stretch of the interface and its flow field using respectively image processing techniques and Particle Imaging Velocimetry. Scaling analysis shows that the length stretch depends on four governing parameters, namely the Grashof number (Gr), Schmidt number (Sc), aspect ratio (Ar), and Reynolds number (Re). Variation of the Schmidt number is taken into account through thermophysical property variation. Thus our problem reduces to a codimension three bifurcation in parametric space for Gr, Ar, and Re.

  7. Driven Polymer Translocation into a Crosslinked Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sean, David; Slater, Gary

    2015-03-01

    In a typical polymer translocation setup, a thin membrane is used to separate two chambers and a polyelectrolyte is driven by an electric field to translocate from one side of the membrane to the other via a small nanopore. However, the high translocation rate that results from the forces required to drive this process makes optical and/or electrical analysis of the translocating polymer challenging. Using coarse-grained Langevin Dynamics simulations we investigate how the translocation process can be slowed down by placing a crosslinked gel on the trans-side of the membrane. Since the driving electric field is localized in the neighborhood of the nanopore, electrophoretic migration is only achieved by a ``pushing'' action from the polymer segment residing in the nanopore. For the case of a flexible polymer we find that the polymer fills the gel pores via multiple ``herniation'' processes, whereas for a semi-flexible chain in a tight gel there are no hernias and the polymer follows a smooth curvilinear path. Moreover, for the case of a semi-flexible polymer the gel makes the translocation process more uniform by reducing the acceleration at the end of the process.

  8. Pulsed Power Driven Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.

    1999-11-22

    Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology for obtaining high powers. Considerable progress has been made on developing light ion beams as a means of transporting this power to inertial fusion capsules. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of an adequate ion source. Alternatively, z-pinches can efficiently convert pulsed power into thermal radiation, which can be used to drive an inertial fusion capsule. However, a z-pinch driven fusion explosion will destroy a portion of the transmission line that delivers the electrical power to the z-pinch. They investigate several options for providing standoff for z-pinch driven fusion. Recyclable Transmission Lines (RTLs) appear to be the most promising approach.

  9. Schematic driven silicon photonics design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrostowski, Lukas; Lu, Zeqin; Flückiger, Jonas; Pond, James; Klein, Jackson; Wang, Xu; Li, Sarah; Tai, Wei; Hsu, En Yao; Kim, Chan; Ferguson, John; Cone, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Electronic circuit designers commonly start their design process with a schematic, namely an abstract representation of the physical circuit. In integrated photonics on the other hand, it is very common for the design to begin at the physical component level. In order to build large integrated photonic systems, it is crucial to design using a schematic-driven approach. This includes simulations based on schematics, schematic-driven layout, layout versus schematic verification, and post-layout simulations. This paper describes such a design framework implemented using Mentor Graphics and Lumerical Solutions design tools. In addition, we describe challenges in silicon photonics related to manufacturing, and how these can be taken into account in simulations and how these impact circuit performance.

  10. Magnetically driven quantum heat engine.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Enrique; Peña, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    We studied the efficiency of two different schemes for a magnetically driven quantum heat engine, by considering as the "working substance" a single nonrelativistic particle trapped in a cylindrical potential well, in the presence of an external magnetic field. The first scheme is a cycle, composed of two adiabatic and two isoenergetic reversible trajectories in configuration space. The trajectories are driven by a quasistatic modulation of the external magnetic-field intensity. The second scheme is a variant of the former, where the isoenergetic trajectories are replaced by isothermal ones, along which the system is in contact with macroscopic thermostats. This second scheme constitutes a quantum analog of the classical Carnot cycle. PMID:25353739

  11. Kaehler-driven tribrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Nolde, David E-mail: david.nolde@unibas.ch

    2012-11-01

    We discuss a new class of tribrid inflation models in supergravity, where the shape of the inflaton potential is dominated by effects from the Kaehler potential. Tribrid inflation is a variant of hybrid inflation which is particularly suited for connecting inflation with particle physics, since the inflaton can be a D-flat combination of charged fields from the matter sector. In models of tribrid inflation studied so far, the inflaton potential was dominated by either loop corrections or by mixing effects with the waterfall field (as in 'pseudosmooth' tribrid inflation). Here we investigate the third possibility, namely that tribrid inflation is dominantly driven by effects from higher-dimensional operators of the Kaehler potential. We specify for which superpotential parameters the new regime is realized and show how it can be experimentally distinguished from the other two (loop-driven and {sup p}seudosmooth{sup )} regimes.

  12. The universal response of fluid interiors to end-member models of mechanical forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannan, A. M.; Favier, B.; Ribeiro, A.; Le Bars, M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence generated in electrically conductive liquid interiors of planetary bodies may be due, in part, to mechanical forcing through geophysically relevant mechanisms of precession/nutation, librations, tidal forcing, and collisions. Using experimental particle image velocimetry techniques accompanied by selected high-resolution numerical simulations, we show, for the first time, the generation of bulk-filling turbulence driven by high frequency tidal forcing. The transition to sustained turbulence is characterized by a succession of resonances first between the tidally forced ellipsoidal base flow with two primary inertial modes and subsequently between secondary inertial modes and the primary inertial modes. Furthermore, deviations in the amplitude of the time-averaged retrograde zonal flow suggest an as yet unseen secondary flow transition that may promote additional turbulence. The turbulence generated by high frequency, low amplitude tidal forcing is similar to the libration-driven turbulent flows studied by Grannan et al. [2014] and Favier et al. [2015]. These works reveal the universal fluid response to elliptical instability driven by separate models that correspond, in geophysical terms, to two end member types of mechanical forcing. In the first, non-synchronous satellites possess elastically deformable boundaries such that shape of the distortion has a non-zero mean motion. In the second, the core-mantle boundary of a body possesses an inherently rigid or tidally frozen-in ellipsoidal shape in a synchronous orbit such that the mean motion of the elliptically deformed boundary is zero. Although the strength of the mechanical forcing is much weaker at planetary settings, the corresponding viscous dissipation is also weaker and thus may still permit the generation of the same turbulent flow found in both experiments and numerical simulations. The efficacy of such turbulent flows in magnetic field generation and dissipation is currently being pursued

  13. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Li; Wang Yu; Zhang Lizhe

    2010-05-28

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  14. DSMC Simulation of Microstructure Actuation by Knudsen Thermal Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikus, Aaron; Sebastiao, Israel; Strongrich, Andrew; Alexeenko, Alina

    2015-11-01

    Compact, low-power and highly accurate vacuum sensors are needed for emerging applications such as high-altitude communication platforms, small satellites and in-vacuum manufacturing processes. A novel MEMS-based pressure and gas sensor - Microelectromechanical In-plane Knudsen Radiometric Actuator (MIKRA) - has been developed at Purdue. MIKRA is based on Knudsen thermal force generated by rarefied flow driven by thermal gradients within the microstructure. The goal of this work is to model the rarefied gas flow in the MIKRA sensor to validate the numerical modeling of rarefied thermally-driven flows and gain insights for sensor design. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solver SPARTA is employed to numerically calculate the distribution of the flowfield and surface properties. The resulting forces on the colder shuttle beam are calculated and compared to the available experimental data as well as other numerical solvers. Both DSMC and experimental results suggest that the maximum forces occur at a Knudsen number of approximately 1. The streamlines indicate the presence of two small vortexes between the heated beam and the colder shuttle beam, and a larger one above these two beams. The DSMCsimulations, validated by experimental measurements, help understand the unique flow behaviors encountered in rarefied thermally-driven flows. NSF CBET grant #1055453.

  15. Formation and Collimation of Jets by Magnetic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.

    1999-12-01

    Recent development of theory and numerical simulations of magnetically driven jets from young stellar objects is reviewed. Topics to be discussed are: 1) Acceleration of jets: Magnetically driven jets are accelerated by both magneto-centrifugal force and magnetic pressure force. The former (latter) becomes important when magnetic field is strong (weak). The basic properties (i.e., terminal velocity and mass flux) of jets accelerated by these two forces is discussed in detail. We also discuss the condition of production of jets, which is applied to answer the following question: When do jets begin to be accelerated in the course of star formation ? 2) Collimation of jets: Magnetically driven jets can in principle be collimated by pinching effect of toroidal magnetic fields. Recently, some controvertial arguments have been put forward: Are all field lines (and jets) really collimated by pinching effect ? The current status of this issue is discussed. 3) Protostellar flares: Based on theory and numerical simulations, it has recently been recognized that the formation of jets has a close connection with occurrence of flares (possibly due to magnetic reconnection). We discuss how and when magnetic reconnection occurs in relation to jets.

  16. Heterogeneity in motor driven transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabei, Ali

    2015-03-01

    I will discuss quantitative analysis of particle tracking data for motor driven vesicles inside an insulin secreting cell. We use this method to study the dynamical and structural heterogeneity inside the cell. I will discuss our effort to explain the origin of observed heterogeneity in intracellular transport. Finally, I will explain how analyzing directional correlations in transport trajectories reveals self-similarity in the diffusion media.

  17. Thermocapillary driven turbulent heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaci, V.S.; Kao, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    For thermocapillary driven flows, the authors explain the foundations of the flow regimes described by Ma{sup 1/2} and Ma{sup 1/3} in the recent dimensional, computational and experimental study of Kamotani, Chang and Ostrach who follow different arguments than those presented here. Also, the authors introduce another regime described by Ma{sup 1/4} for laminar flow. Fig. 1 borrowed from Kamotani et al. (1996) illustrates the three flow regimes.

  18. Kinetics of accelerator driven devices

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.T.; Buksa, J.; Houts, M.

    1994-09-01

    Kinetic calculations were made to show that subcritical accelerator driven devices are robust and stable. The calculations show that large changes in reactivity that would lead to an uncontrollable excursion in a reactor would lead only to a new power level in subcritical device. Calculations were also made to show the rate of power changes resulting from startup and shutdown, and that methods also exist for continuously monitoring the reactivity of a subcritical system.

  19. Kinetics of accelerator driven devices

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R. T.; Buksa, John; Houts, Michael

    1995-09-15

    Kinetic calculations were made to show that subcritical accelerator driven devices are robust and stable. The calculations show that large changes in reactivity that would lead to an uncontrollable excursion in a reactor would lead only to a new power level in a subcritical device. Calculations were also made to show the rate of power changes resulting from startup and shutdown, and that methods also exist for continuously monitoring the reactivity of a subcritical system.

  20. Mission Driven Science at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Thackery, Michael; Wang, Michael; Young, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Mission driven science at Argonne means applying science and scientific knowledge to a physical and "real world" environment. Examples include testing a theoretical model through the use of formal science or solving a practical problem through the use of natural science. At the laboratory, our materials scientists are leading the way in producing energy solutions today that could help reduce and remove the energy crisis of tomorrow.

  1. Driven one-component plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzato, Felipe B.; Pakter, Renato; Levin, Yan

    2009-08-15

    A statistical theory is presented that allows the calculation of the stationary state achieved by a driven one-component plasma after a process of collisionless relaxation. The stationary Vlasov equation with appropriate boundary conditions is reduced to an ordinary differential equation, which is then solved numerically. The solution is then compared with the molecular-dynamics simulation. A perfect agreement is found between the theory and the simulations. The full current-voltage phase diagram is constructed.

  2. Effects of variation in external pulling force magnitude, elevation, and orientation on trunk muscle forces, spinal loads and stability.

    PubMed

    El Ouaaid, Z; Shirazi-Adl, A; Plamondon, A

    2016-04-11

    Nowadays in various daily, occupational and training activities, there are many occasions with forces supported in hands acting at various magnitudes, elevations, and orientations with substantial horizontal components. In this work, we aim to compute trunk muscle forces, stability, and spinal loads under pulling external forces applied at 3 elevations and 13 orientations. Under an identical upright standing posture and upper body weight, the trunk active-passive response is computed using a validated iterative finite element kinematics-driven model. Pulling forces of 80, 120, and 160N are resisted symmetrically in both hands held at 20, 40, and 60cm elevations above the L5-S1 and oriented each in upward (-90°), inclined upward (-75°, -60°, -45°, -30°, and -15°), horizontal (0°), inclined downward (15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 75°) and finally downward in gravity direction (90°). In addition, in all analyses, an antagonist moment of 10Nm is applied in order to generate rather small antagonist coactivity and intra-abdominal pressures of 8-12kPa are considered when abdominal muscles are active under upward pulling forces. Results demonstrated substantial differences in muscular response, spinal loads, and stability margin as the pulling force elevation, orientation, and magnitude altered. Compression and shear forces at lower lumbar levels peaked under forces at higher elevations acting with downward inclinations. Minimum spinal forces were computed at all elevations under pulling forces in the upward direction. Trunk stability was also maximum under these latter forces pulling upward. These findings have important consequences in rehabilitation, training, and design of safer occupational activities. PMID:26475220

  3. Force control in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nyeonju; Cauraugh, James H

    2015-05-01

    Force control deficits are common dysfunctions after a stroke. This review concentrates on various force control variables associated with motor impairments and suggests new approaches to quantifying force control production and modulation. Moreover, related neurophysiological mechanisms were addressed to determine variables that affect force control capabilities. Typically, post stroke force control impairments include: (a) decreased force magnitude and asymmetrical forces between hands, (b) higher task error, (c) greater force variability, (d) increased force regularity, and (e) greater time-lag between muscular forces. Recent advances in force control analyses post stroke indicated less bimanual motor synergies and impaired low-force frequency structure. Brain imaging studies demonstrate possible neurophysiological mechanisms underlying force control impairments: (a) decreased activation in motor areas of the ipsilesional hemisphere, (b) increased activation in secondary motor areas between hemispheres, (c) cerebellum involvement, and (d) relatively greater interhemispheric inhibition from the contralesional hemisphere. Consistent with identifying neurophysiological mechanisms, analyzing bimanual motor synergies as well as low-force frequency structure will advance our understanding of post stroke force control. PMID:25704075

  4. Edge-driven microplate kinematics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.; Gallo, David G.

    1993-01-01

    It is known from plate tectonic reconstructions that oceanic microplates undergo rapid rotation about a vertical axis and that the instantaneous rotation axes describing the microplate's motion relative to the bounding major plates are frequently located close to its margins with those plates, close to the tips of propagating rifts. We propose a class of edge-driven block models to illustrate how slip across the microplate margins, block rotation, and propagation of rifting may be related to the relative motion of the plates on either side. An important feature of these edge-driven models is that the instantaneous rotation axes are always located on the margins between block and two bounding plates. According to those models the pseudofaults or traces of disrupted seafloor resulting from the propagation of rifting between microplate and major plates may be used independently to approximately trace the continuous kinematic evolution of the microplate back in time. Pseudofault geometries and matching rotations of the Easter microplate show that for most of its 5 m.y. history, block rotation could be driven by the drag of the Nazca and Pacific plates on the microplate's edges rather than by a shear flow of mantle underneath.

  5. Is "Market-Driven" Good Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Discusses marketing and management strategies and evaluates the path most traveled; going beyond market-driven; proactive and reactive organizational positioning; ways to manage human and physical resources to make both market-driven and market-making contributions; and values necessary for an organization to move from market-driven to…

  6. Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Improved capacitive proximity sensors constructed by incorporating one or more additional driven shield(s). Sensitivity and range of sensor altered by adjusting driving signal(s) applied to shield(s). Includes sensing electrode and driven isolating shield that correspond to sensing electrode and driven shield.

  7. Force Feedback Joystick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    I-FORCE, a computer peripheral from Immersion Corporation, was derived from virtual environment and human factors research at the Advanced Displays and Spatial Perception Laboratory at Ames Research Center in collaboration with Stanford University Center for Design Research. Entrepreneur Louis Rosenberg, a former Stanford researcher, now president of Immersion, collaborated with Dr. Bernard Adelstein at Ames on studies of perception in virtual reality. The result was an inexpensive way to incorporate motors and a sophisticated microprocessor into joysticks and other game controllers. These devices can emulate the feel of a car on the skid, a crashing plane, the bounce of a ball, compressed springs, or other physical phenomenon. The first products incorporating I-FORCE technology include CH- Products' line of FlightStick and CombatStick controllers.

  8. Force Modulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  9. Suicide and Forced Marriage

    PubMed Central

    Pridmore, Saxby; Walter, Garry

    2013-01-01

    Background: The prevailing view that the vast majority of those who complete suicide have an underlying psychiatric disorder has been recently challenged by research on the contribution of “predicaments”, in the absence of mental illness, to suicide. In this paper, we sought data to support the notion that forced marriage may lead to suicide without the presence of psychiatric disorder. Methods: Historical records, newspapers, and the electronic media were searched for examples. Results: Two examples from ancient times and six from the last hundred years were located and described. Conclusion: These cases suggest that forced marriage may lead to suicide and complements earlier findings that loss of fortune, health, liberty, and reputation may lead to suicide in the absence of mental disorder. PMID:23983577

  10. Forces Driving Chaperone Action.

    PubMed

    Koldewey, Philipp; Stull, Frederick; Horowitz, Scott; Martin, Raoul; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-14

    It is still unclear what molecular forces drive chaperone-mediated protein folding. Here, we obtain a detailed mechanistic understanding of the forces that dictate the four key steps of chaperone-client interaction: initial binding, complex stabilization, folding, and release. Contrary to the common belief that chaperones recognize unfolding intermediates by their hydrophobic nature, we discover that the model chaperone Spy uses long-range electrostatic interactions to rapidly bind to its unfolded client protein Im7. Short-range hydrophobic interactions follow, which serve to stabilize the complex. Hydrophobic collapse of the client protein then drives its folding. By burying hydrophobic residues in its core, the client's affinity to Spy decreases, which causes client release. By allowing the client to fold itself, Spy circumvents the need for client-specific folding instructions. This mechanism might help explain how chaperones can facilitate the folding of various unrelated proteins. PMID:27293188

  11. Miniature drag force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilevered beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like that of a second order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  12. Air Force seal activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, Ellen R.

    1994-01-01

    Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Brush seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to reduce leakage at the required conditions. Likewise, challenges in engine mainshaft air/oil seals are also being addressed. Counter-rotating intershaft applications within the IHPTET initiative involve very high rubbing velocities. This viewgraph presentation briefly describes past and current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engine testing.

  13. Dynamic nanoindentation by instrumented nanoindentation and force microscopy: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Kalfon-Cohen, Estelle

    2013-01-01

    Summary Viscoelasticity is a complex yet important phenomenon that drives material response at different scales of time and space. Burgeoning interest in nanoscale dynamic material mechanics has driven, and been driven by two key techniques: instrumented nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy. This review provides an overview of fundamental principles in nanoindentation, and compares and contrasts these two techniques as they are used for characterization of viscoelastic processes at the nanoscale. PMID:24367751

  14. Modified entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Changjun

    2010-04-15

    The theory of statistical thermodynamics tells us the equipartition law of energy does not hold in the limit of very low temperatures. It is found the Debye model is very successful in explaining the experimental results for most of the solid objects. Motivated by this fact, we modify the entropic force formula which is proposed very recently. Since the Unruh temperature is proportional to the strength of the gravitational field, so the modified entropic force formula is an extension of the Newtonian gravity to the weak field. On the contrary, general relativity extends Newtonian gravity to the strong field case. Corresponding to Debye temperature, there exists a Debye acceleration g{sub D}. It is found the Debye acceleration is g{sub D}=10{sup -15} N kg{sup -1}. This acceleration is very much smaller than the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -4} N kg{sup -1} which is felt by Neptune and the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -10} N kg{sup -1} felt by the Sun. Therefore, the modified entropic force can be very well approximated by the Newtonian gravity in the Solar System and in the Galaxy. With this Debye acceleration, we find the current cosmic speeding up can be explained without invoking any kind of dark energy.

  15. Collisional Effects on Nonlinear Ion Drag Force for Small Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Haakonsen, C. B.

    2013-10-01

    Ion drag force arising from plasma flow past an embedded grain in a plasma is a vital part of dusty plasma dynamics. Ion-neutral collisions are often significant for experimental dusty plasmas. They are here included self-consistently in properly nonlinear comprehensive drag calculations, for the first time. The ion drag on a spherical grain is calculated using particle in cell codes SCEPTIC and COPTIC. Using ion velocity ``drift'' distribution appropriate for flow driven by a force field gives wake potential and force greatly different from a shifted Maxwellian distribution, regardless of collisionality level. The low-collisionality forces are shown to be consistent with estimates based upon cross-sections for scattering in a Yukawa (shielded) grain field, but only if nonlinear shielding length is used. Finite collisionality initially enhances the drag force, but only by up to a factor of 2. Larger collisionality eventually reduces the drag force. In the collisional regime, the drift distribution gives larger drag than the shift distribution even at velocities where their collisionless drags are equal. Comprehensive practical analytic formulas for force that fit the calculations are provided. Partially supported by NSF/DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER54982 and Science Graduate Fellowship Program DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  16. The competition between Lorentz and Coriolis forces in planetary dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderlund, Krista M.; Sheyko, Andrey; King, Eric M.; Aurnou, Jonathan M.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid motions within planetary cores generate magnetic fields through dynamo action. These core processes are driven by thermo-compositional convection subject to the competing influences of rotation, which tends to organize the flow into axial columns, and the Lorentz force, which tends to inhibit the relative movement of the magnetic field and the fluid. It is often argued that these forces are predominant and approximately equal in planetary cores; we test this hypothesis using a suite of numerical geodynamo models to calculate the Lorentz to Coriolis force ratio directly. Our results show that this ratio can be estimated by ( Λ i is the traditionally defined Elsasser number for imposed magnetic fields and Rm is the system-scale ratio of magnetic induction to magnetic diffusion). Best estimates of core flow speeds and magnetic field strengths predict the geodynamo to be in magnetostrophic balance where the Lorentz and Coriolis forces are comparable. The Lorentz force may also be significant, i.e., within an order of magnitude of the Coriolis force, in the Jovian interior. In contrast, the Lorentz force is likely to be relatively weak in the cores of Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Ganymede, and Mercury.

  17. Finger force perception during ipsilateral and contralateral force matching tasks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woo-Hyung; Leonard, Charles T.; Li, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare matching performance between ipsilateral and contralateral finger force matching tasks and to examine the effect of handedness on finger force perception. Eleven subjects were instructed to produce reference forces by an instructed finger (index – I or little – L finger) and to reproduce the same amount force by the same or a different finger within the hand (i.e., ipsilateral matching task), or by a finger of the other hand (i.e., contralateral matching task). The results of the ipsilateral and contralateral tasks in the present study commonly showed that 1) the reference and matching forces were matched closely when the two forces were produced by the same or homologous finger(s) such as I/I task; 2) the weaker little finger underestimated the magnitude of reference force of the index finger (I/L task), even with the higher level of effort (relative force), but the two forces were matched when considering total finger forces; 3) the stronger index finger closely matched the reference force of the little finger with the lower level of relative force (i.e., L/I task); 4) when considering the constant errors, I/L tasks showed an underestimation and L/I tasks showed an overestimation compared to I/I tasks. There was no handedness effect during ipsilateral tasks. During the contralateral task, the dominant hand overestimated the force of the non-dominant hand, while the non-dominant hand attempted to match the absolute force of the dominant hand. The overall results support the notion that the absolute, rather than relative, finger force is perceived and reproduced during ipsilateral and contralateral finger force matching tasks, indicating the uniqueness of finger force perception. PMID:18488212

  18. Force reflection with compliance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Two types of systems for force-reflecting control, which enables high force-reflection gain, are presented: position-error-based force reflection and low-pass-filtered force reflection. Both of the systems are combined with shared compliance control. In the position-error-based class, the position error between the commanded and the actual position of a compliantly controlled robot is used to provide force reflection. In the low-pass-filtered force reflection class, the low-pass-filtered output of the compliance control is used to provide force reflection. The increase in force reflection gain can be more than 10-fold as compared to a conventional high-bandwidth pure force reflection system, when high compliance values are used for the compliance control.

  19. Chemical shift driven geometry optimization.

    PubMed

    Witter, Raiker; Priess, Wolfram; Sternberg, Ulrich

    2002-01-30

    A new method for refinement of 3D molecular structures by geometry optimization is presented. Prerequisites are a force field and a very fast procedure for the calculation of chemical shifts in every step of optimization. To the energy, provided by the force field (COSMOS force field), a pseudoenergy, depending on the difference between experimental and calculated chemical shifts, is added. In addition to the energy gradients, pseudoforces are computed. This requires the derivatives of the chemical shifts with respect to the coordinates. The pseudoforces are analytically derived from the integral expressions of the bond polarization theory. Single chemical shift values attributed to corresponding atoms are considered for structural correction. As a first example, this method is applied for proton position refinement of the D-mannitol X-ray structure. A crystal structure refinement with 13C chemical shift pseudoforces is carried out. PMID:11924742

  20. Force control compensation method with variable load stiffness and damping of the hydraulic drive unit force control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Ba, Kaixian; Yu, Bin; Cao, Yuan; Zhu, Qixin; Zhao, Hualong

    2016-05-01

    Each joint of hydraulic drive quadruped robot is driven by the hydraulic drive unit (HDU), and the contacting between the robot foot end and the ground is complex and variable, which increases the difficulty of force control inevitably. In the recent years, although many scholars researched some control methods such as disturbance rejection control, parameter self-adaptive control, impedance control and so on, to improve the force control performance of HDU, the robustness of the force control still needs improving. Therefore, how to simulate the complex and variable load characteristics of the environment structure and how to ensure HDU having excellent force control performance with the complex and variable load characteristics are key issues to be solved in this paper. The force control system mathematic model of HDU is established by the mechanism modeling method, and the theoretical models of a novel force control compensation method and a load characteristics simulation method under different environment structures are derived, considering the dynamic characteristics of the load stiffness and the load damping under different environment structures. Then, simulation effects of the variable load stiffness and load damping under the step and sinusoidal load force are analyzed experimentally on the HDU force control performance test platform, which provides the foundation for the force control compensation experiment research. In addition, the optimized PID control parameters are designed to make the HDU have better force control performance with suitable load stiffness and load damping, under which the force control compensation method is introduced, and the robustness of the force control system with several constant load characteristics and the variable load characteristics respectively are comparatively analyzed by experiment. The research results indicate that if the load characteristics are known, the force control compensation method presented in this

  1. Force control compensation method with variable load stiffness and damping of the hydraulic drive unit force control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Ba, Kaixian; Yu, Bin; Cao, Yuan; Zhu, Qixin; Zhao, Hualong

    2016-04-01

    Each joint of hydraulic drive quadruped robot is driven by the hydraulic drive unit (HDU), and the contacting between the robot foot end and the ground is complex and variable, which increases the difficulty of force control inevitably. In the recent years, although many scholars researched some control methods such as disturbance rejection control, parameter self-adaptive control, impedance control and so on, to improve the force control performance of HDU, the robustness of the force control still needs improving. Therefore, how to simulate the complex and variable load characteristics of the environment structure and how to ensure HDU having excellent force control performance with the complex and variable load characteristics are key issues to be solved in this paper. The force control system mathematic model of HDU is established by the mechanism modeling method, and the theoretical models of a novel force control compensation method and a load characteristics simulation method under different environment structures are derived, considering the dynamic characteristics of the load stiffness and the load damping under different environment structures. Then, simulation effects of the variable load stiffness and load damping under the step and sinusoidal load force are analyzed experimentally on the HDU force control performance test platform, which provides the foundation for the force control compensation experiment research. In addition, the optimized PID control parameters are designed to make the HDU have better force control performance with suitable load stiffness and load damping, under which the force control compensation method is introduced, and the robustness of the force control system with several constant load characteristics and the variable load characteristics respectively are comparatively analyzed by experiment. The research results indicate that if the load characteristics are known, the force control compensation method presented in this

  2. Foundational Forces & Hidden Variables in Technology Commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Brandon

    2011-03-01

    The science of physics seems vastly different from the process of technology commercialization. Physics strives to understand our world through the experimental deduction of immutable laws and dependent variables and the resulting macro-scale phenomenon. In comparison, the~goal of business is to make a profit by addressing the needs, preferences, and whims of individuals in a market. It may seem that this environment is too dynamic to identify all the hidden variables and deduct the foundational forces that impact a business's ability to commercialize innovative technologies. One example of a business ``force'' is found in the semiconductor industry. In 1965, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore predicted that the number of transistors incorporated in a chip will approximately double every 24 months. Known as Moore's Law, this prediction has become the guiding principle for the semiconductor industry for the last 40 years. Of course, Moore's Law is not really a law of nature; rather it is the result of efforts by Intel and the entire semiconductor industry. A closer examination suggests that there are foundational principles of business that underlie the macro-scale phenomenon of Moore's Law. Principles of profitability, incentive, and strategic alignment have resulted in a coordinated influx of resources that has driven technologies to market, increasing the profitability of the semiconductor industry and optimizing the fitness of its participants. New innovations in technology are subject to these same principles. So, in addition to traditional market forces, these often unrecognized forces and variables create challenges for new technology commercialization. In this talk, I will draw from ethnographic research, complex adaptive theory, and industry data to suggest a framework with which to think about new technology commercialization. Intel's bio-silicon initiative provides a case study.

  3. Forces driving epithelial spreading in zebrafish gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Behrndt, Martin; Salbreux, Guillaume; Campinho, Pedro; Hauschild, Robert; Oswald, Felix; Roensch, Julia; Grill, Stephan W; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2012-10-12

    Contractile actomyosin rings drive various fundamental morphogenetic processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound healing. Actomyosin rings are generally thought to function by circumferential contraction. Here, we show that the spreading of the enveloping cell layer (EVL) over the yolk cell during zebrafish gastrulation is driven by a contractile actomyosin ring. In contrast to previous suggestions, we find that this ring functions not only by circumferential contraction but also by a flow-friction mechanism. This generates a pulling force through resistance against retrograde actomyosin flow. EVL spreading proceeds normally in situations where circumferential contraction is unproductive, indicating that the flow-friction mechanism is sufficient. Thus, actomyosin rings can function in epithelial morphogenesis through a combination of cable-constriction and flow-friction mechanisms. PMID:23066079

  4. Forcing continuous reconnection in hybrid simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Laitinen, T. V. Janhunen, P.; Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.

    2014-07-15

    We have performed hybrid simulations of driven continuous reconnection with open boundary conditions. Reconnection is started by a collision of two subsonic plasma fronts with opposite magnetic fields, without any specified magnetic field configuration as initial condition. Due to continued forced plasma inflow, a current sheet co-located with a dense and hot plasma sheet develops. The translational symmetry of the current sheet is broken by applying a spatial gradient in the inflow speed. We compare runs with and without localized resistivity: reconnection is initiated in both cases, but localized resistivity stabilizes it and enhances its efficiency. The outflow speed reaches about half of Alfvén speed. We quantify the conversion of magnetic energy to kinetic energy of protons and to Joule heating and show that with localized resistivity, kinetic energy of protons is increased on average five-fold in the reconnection in our simulation case.

  5. Axial force and efficiency tests of fixed center variable speed belt drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of how the axial force varies with the centerline force at different speed ratios, speeds, and loads, and how the drive's transmission efficiency is affected by these related forces is described. The tests, intended to provide a preliminary performance and controls characterization for a variable speed belt drive continuously variable transmission (CVT), consisted of the design and construction of an experimental test rig geometrically similar to the CVT, and operation of that rig at selected speed ratios and power levels. Data are presented which show: how axial forces exerted on the driver and driven sheaves vary with the centerline force at constant values of speed ratio, speed, and output power; how the transmission efficiency varies with centerline force and how it is also a function of the V belt coefficient; and the axial forces on both sheaves as normalized functions of the traction coefficient.

  6. The nature of the sunspot phenomenon. II - Internal overstable modes. [convectively driven Alfven wave role

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    It had been pointed out by Parker (1974) that the basic cause of the sunspot phenomenon is the enhanced heat transport in the magnetic field of the sunspot. The enhanced transport occurs through convective overstability which operates as a heat engine generating Alfven waves. The characteristics of the convective forces present are investigated along with questions concerning overstability and convectively driven Alfven waves. Relations regarding instability and convectively driven surface waves are discussed and attention is given to individual overstable Alfven modes. It is found that the form of an Alfven wave in the absence of convective forces is entirely arbitrary, so that waves with any arbitrary profile can be fitted into a vertical column of the field without disturbing the fluid outside. With the introduction of convective forces the situation changes so that the presence of lateral boundaries alters the form of the basic wave modes.

  7. Origins of wind-driven intraseasonal sea level variations in the North Indian Ocean coastal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, I.; Vialard, J.; Lengaigne, M.; Han, W.; McCreary, J.; Durand, F.; Muraleedharan, P. M.

    2013-11-01

    this paper, we show that a linear, continuously stratified ocean model reproduces observed wind-driven intraseasonal sea level variability in the coastal waveguide of the Northern Indian Ocean (NIO). Sensitivity experiments with intraseasonal wind forcing selectively applied in the equatorial region, Bay of Bengal, and Arabian Sea show that a large part of the basin-scale sea level variations are driven by zonal wind fluctuations along the equator. Within the NIO coastal waveguide, the contribution of remote equatorial forcing decreases from ~80-90% in the Andaman Sea to ~50% northeast of Sri Lanka and then increases to ~60-70% along the west coast of India. During the southwest monsoon, intraseasonal wind variations become stronger over the NIO, resulting in a larger contribution of local wind forcing to sea level variability along the west (up to 60%) and east (up to 40%) coasts of India.

  8. Adding Value to Force Diagrams: Representing Relative Force Magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, Paul

    2011-05-01

    Nearly all physics instructors recognize the instructional value of force diagrams, and this journal has published several collections of exercises to improve student skill in this area.1-4 Yet some instructors worry that too few students perceive the conceptual and problem-solving utility of force diagrams,4-6 and over recent years a rich variety of approaches has been proposed to add value to force diagrams. Suggestions include strategies for identifying candidate forces,6,7 emphasizing the distinction between "contact" and "noncontact" forces,5,8 and the use of computer-based tutorials.9,10 Instructors have suggested a variety of conventions for constructing force diagrams, including approaches to arrow placement and orientation2,11-13 and proposed notations for locating forces or marking action-reaction force pairs.8,11,14,15

  9. Pullout strength of power- and hand-driven staples in synthetic bone: effect of design parameters.

    PubMed

    Firoozbakhsh, K K; Moneim, M S; DeCoster, T A

    1992-01-01

    The pullout strength of power-driven and hand-driven staples of different sizes and different leg profiles was investigated in a synthetic bone model. Consistent material properties were reflected in the relatively small standard deviation in pullout strength, which was less than 7% of the mean value for power-driven and less than 10% of the mean value for hand-driven staples. An approximate linear relationship was shown to exist between the mean value of pullout strength and foam density. In paired studies, the mean value of pullout strength was significantly (p less than 0.0005) greater for the power-driven staples than similar size hand-driven staples. It was also shown that a square cross section creates significantly (p less than 0.017) more resistance to pullout force than a circular section of similar or even larger area. Although the pullout strength was not a function of the staple's width, the staple's leg length contributed to its pullout strength in a nonlinear fashion. This study suggests that narrow, long, power-driven staples of rectangular cross section have the best pullout strength for similar cross-sectional area. PMID:1556623

  10. Passive Joint Forces Are Tuned to Limb Use in Insects and Drive Movements without Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ache, Jan M.; Matheson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Limb movements are generally driven by active muscular contractions working with and against passive forces arising in muscles and other structures. In relatively heavy limbs, the effects of gravity and inertia predominate, whereas in lighter limbs, passive forces intrinsic to the limb are of greater consequence. The roles of passive forces generated by muscles and tendons are well understood, but there has been little recognition that forces originating within joints themselves may also be important, and less still that these joint forces may be adapted through evolution to complement active muscle forces acting at the same joint. Results We examined the roles of passive joint forces in insect legs with different arrangements of antagonist muscles. We first show that passive forces modify actively generated movements of a joint across its working range, and that they can be sufficiently strong to generate completely passive movements that are faster than active movements observed in natural behaviors. We further demonstrate that some of these forces originate within the joint itself. In legs of different species adapted to different uses (walking, jumping), these passive joint forces complement the balance of strength of the antagonist muscles acting on the joint. We show that passive joint forces are stronger where they assist the weaker of two antagonist muscles. Conclusions In limbs where the dictates of a key behavior produce asymmetry in muscle forces, passive joint forces can be coadapted to provide the balance needed for the effective generation of other behaviors. PMID:23871240

  11. On transition from Alfvén resonance to forced magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Q.; Wang, X.

    2014-07-15

    We revisit the transition from Alfvén resonance to forced magnetic reconnection with a focus on the property of their singularities. As the driven frequency tends to zero, the logarithmic singularity of Alfvén resonance shifts to the power-law singularity of forced reconnection, due to merging of the two resonance layers. The transition criterion depends on either kinetic effects or dissipations that resolve the singularity. As an example, a small but finite resistivity η is introduced to investigate the transition process. The transition threshold is then obtained as the driven frequency reaches a level of ∼O((η/k){sup 1/3})

  12. The Forces at Play in Optical Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocious, Jordan

    Optical force microscopy is a novel technique where mechanical detection with a cantilevered probe replaces the detection of photons to investigate optically induced processes and states. A theoretical and experimental analysis is performed here of the forces present in optical force microscopy operated in tapping mode, which reveals two dominant optically induced forces, the gradient force and the scattering force. Force-distance curves are reconstructed from experimental amplitude and phase information for glass, gold nanowires and molecular clusters of silicon naphtalocyanine samples. The scattering force is shown to be insensitive to both nano-scale tip-sample distances and sample polarizability and is dependent on the form of the tip. The gradient force demonstrates a z-4 tip-sample distance dependence, localized to a few nanometers, and is strongly dependent on the polarizability of the sample which enables spectroscopic imaging through force detection. The different distance-dependence and polarizability-dependence of the gradient and scattering forces give rise to a complex force-distance curve which determines imaging contrast along with the cantilever set-point, knowledge of which is essential for image interpretation.

  13. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  14. Radiative forcing of climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanswamy, V.; Shine, Keith; Leovy, Conway; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Rodhe, Henning; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Ding, M.; Lelieveld, Joseph; Edmonds, Jae A.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    An update of the scientific discussions presented in Chapter 2 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report is presented. The update discusses the atmospheric radiative and chemical species of significance for climate change. There are two major objectives of the present update. The first is an extension of the discussion on the Global Warming Potentials (GWP's), including a reevaluation in view of the updates in the lifetimes of the radiatively active species. The second important objective is to underscore major developments in the radiative forcing of climate due to the observed stratospheric ozone losses occurring between 1979 and 1990.

  15. Causal Entropic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissner-Gross, A. D.; Freer, C. E.

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in fields ranging from cosmology to computer science have hinted at a possible deep connection between intelligence and entropy maximization, but no formal physical relationship between them has yet been established. Here, we explicitly propose a first step toward such a relationship in the form of a causal generalization of entropic forces that we find can cause two defining behaviors of the human “cognitive niche”—tool use and social cooperation—to spontaneously emerge in simple physical systems. Our results suggest a potentially general thermodynamic model of adaptive behavior as a nonequilibrium process in open systems.

  16. Force measurements reveal how small binders perturb the dissociation mechanisms of DNA duplex sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistrova, Anastasia; Fresch, Barbara; Sluysmans, Damien; de Pauw, Edwin; Remacle, Françoise; Duwez, Anne-Sophie

    2016-06-01

    The force-driven separation of double-stranded DNA is crucial to the accomplishment of cellular processes like genome transactions. Ligands binding to short DNA sequences can have a local stabilizing or destabilizing effect and thus severely affect these processes. Although the design of ligands that bind to specific sequences is a field of intense research with promising biomedical applications, so far, their effect on the force-induced strand separation has remained elusive. Here, by means of AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy, we show the co-existence of two different mechanisms for the separation of a short DNA duplex and demonstrate how they are perturbed by small binders. With the support of Molecular Dynamics simulations, we evidence that above a critical pulling rate one of the dissociation pathways becomes dominant, with a dramatic effect on the rupture forces. Around the critical threshold, we observe a drop of the most probable rupture forces for ligand-stabilized duplexes. Our results offer a deep understanding of how a stable DNA-ligand complex behaves under force-driven strand separation.The force-driven separation of double-stranded DNA is crucial to the accomplishment of cellular processes like genome transactions. Ligands binding to short DNA sequences can have a local stabilizing or destabilizing effect and thus severely affect these processes. Although the design of ligands that bind to specific sequences is a field of intense research with promising biomedical applications, so far, their effect on the force-induced strand separation has remained elusive. Here, by means of AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy, we show the co-existence of two different mechanisms for the separation of a short DNA duplex and demonstrate how they are perturbed by small binders. With the support of Molecular Dynamics simulations, we evidence that above a critical pulling rate one of the dissociation pathways becomes dominant, with a dramatic effect

  17. Catastrophe-driven vs what?

    SciTech Connect

    Stever, H.G.

    1995-12-31

    The author notes that much has been accomplished by catastrophe-driven scientific effort. Examples include World War II and the social wars against crime, poverty and hunger and famine. A positive approach is suggested to be more appropriate as the drivers of science. Three tables are presented and outline a positive base for justifying scientific endeavor: (1) Examples of Major Societal Goals to Which Science and Technology Contribute. (2) Policy Areas That Would Benefit from the Articulation of Long-Term S&T Goals; and (3) Major Components of the Science and Technology Base.

  18. Driven discrete time quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Craig S.; Barkhofen, Sonja; Sansoni, Linda; Jex, Igor; Silberhorn, Christine

    2016-07-01

    We introduce the driven discrete time quantum walk (QW), where walkers are added during the walk instead of only at the beginning. This leads to interference in walker number and very different dynamics when compared to the original QW. These dynamics have two regimes, which we illustrate using the one-dimensional line. Then, we explore a search application which has certain advantages over current search protocols, namely that it does not require a complicated initial state nor a specific measurement time to observe the marked state. Finally, we describe a potential experimental implementation using existing technology.

  19. Photocell System Driven by Mechanoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, Nao; Xu, Chao-Nan; Imai, Yusuke; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2007-04-01

    A mechanoluminescence driven photocell system consisting of a mechanoluminescent (ML) material and a photocell was prepared. The ML material developed in our laboratory is the world’s first material developed for a practical use in the elastic deformation region. In this system, the ML composite (an epoxy pellet including europium-doped strontium aluminate (SAO:E), one of the most efficient ML materials) was used as a light source, and a silicon solar cell was used as the photoelectric converter. With the application of compressive stress to the ML composite pellet in the system, the photocurrent corresponding to the mechanoluminescence was successfully observed.

  20. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  1. Ontology-Driven Information Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tissot, Florence; Menzel, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Ontology-driven information integration (ODII) is a method of computerized, automated sharing of information among specialists who have expertise in different domains and who are members of subdivisions of a large, complex enterprise (e.g., an engineering project, a government agency, or a business). In ODII, one uses rigorous mathematical techniques to develop computational models of engineering and/or business information and processes. These models are then used to develop software tools that support the reliable processing and exchange of information among the subdivisions of this enterprise or between this enterprise and other enterprises.

  2. Electric winds driven by time oscillating corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Aaron M.; Cademartiri, Ludovico; Whitesides, George M.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the formation of steady gas flows—so-called electric winds—created by point-plane corona discharges driven by time oscillating (ac) electric fields. By varying the magnitude and frequency of the applied field, we identify two distinct scaling regimes: (i) a low frequency (dc) regime and (ii) a high frequency (ac) regime. These experimental observations are reproduced and explained by a theoretical model describing the transport and recombination of ions surrounding the discharge and their contribution to the measured wind velocity. The two regimes differ in the spatial distribution of ions and in the process by which ions are consumed. Interestingly, we find that ac corona discharges generate strong electric forces localized near the tip of the point electrode, while dc corona discharges generate weaker forces distributed throughout the interelectrode region. Consequently, the velocity of the electric winds (>1 m/s) generated by ac discharges is largely independent of the position of the counter electrode. The unified theoretical description of dc and ac electric winds presented here reconciles previous observations of winds driven by dc corona and ac dielectric barrier discharges; insights from the model should also prove useful in the design of other plasma actuators.

  3. Geometry-induced superdiffusion in driven crowded systems.

    PubMed

    Bénichou, Olivier; Bodrova, Anna; Chakraborty, Dipanjan; Illien, Pierre; Law, Adam; Mejía-Monasterio, Carlos; Oshanin, Gleb; Voituriez, Raphaël

    2013-12-27

    Recent molecular dynamics simulations of glass-forming liquids revealed superdiffusive fluctuations associated with the position of a tracer particle (TP) driven by an external force. Such an anomalous response, whose mechanism remains elusive, has been observed up to now only in systems close to their glass transition, suggesting that this could be one of its hallmarks. Here, we show that the presence of superdiffusion is in actual fact much more general, provided that the system is crowded and geometrically confined. We present and solve analytically a minimal model consisting of a driven TP in a dense, crowded medium in which the motion of particles is mediated by the diffusion of packing defects, called vacancies. For such nonglass-forming systems, our analysis predicts a long-lived superdiffusion which ultimately crosses over to giant diffusive behavior. We find that this trait is present in confined geometries, for example long capillaries and stripes, and emerges as a universal response of crowded environments to an external force. These findings are confirmed by numerical simulations of systems as varied as lattice gases, dense liquids, and granular fluids. PMID:24483787

  4. Electromagnetically driven, fast opening and closing gas jet valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Elliott, Kristi Wilson; Geddes, C. G. R.; van Mourik, R. A.; Leemans, W. P.; Murphy, H.; Clover, M.

    2011-03-01

    The design and performance are presented of an electromagnetically driven gas valve [M. Krishnan, J. Wright, and T. Ma, Proceedings of the 13th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop, Santa Cruz, CA, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1086 (AIP, New York, 2008)] that opens in <100μs, closes in <500μs, and can operate at pressures of ˜1000psia to drive supersonic nozzles. Such a valve has applications to laser-plasma accelerators, where the fast opening and closing would allow sharper edges to the flow and also allow higher rep-rate operation without loading the vacuum chamber. The valve action is effected by a flyer plate accelerated by the electromagnetic impulse of a low inductance, spiral wound, strip-line coil driven by a capacitor. Gas flows out of the valve when the seal between this flyer plate and the valve seat is broken. The electromagnetic force greatly exceeds the restoring forces provided by a spring and the gas pressure against the valve seat. Piezoresistive sensor and laser interferometer measurements of flow show that the valve opens in ˜100μs for all pressures up to 800 psia. The closing time is 500μs, set by the spring constant and mass. The prototype valve has been operated with helium at 0.5 Hz and at 500 psia for ˜1 hour at a time with no cooling.

  5. Computations of wind-driven ocean-induced magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachl, Libor; Einspigel, David; Martinec, Zdenek

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of computations of the secondary magnetic field induced by ocean motions. Ocean velocities are computed using the baroclinic ocean model LSOMG. The velocities are then used to determine the Lorentz force which is plugged into the magnetic induction code TLAM as a principal forcing. The TLAM is a 2D magnetic induction code based on the thin-shell approximation (Vivier et al., 2004; Tyler et al., 1997). In this approximation, the equation of magnetic induction simplifies significantly, time derivatives of main and induced magnetic fields are neglected as well as the self-induction term. The price for simplification of governing equations is the limited applicability of the resulting system. It is only suitable for slowly evolving processes. In order to meet the condition, we restrict ourselves to the wind (buoyancy) driven ocean circulation, although the LSOMG model is able to model both tidally- and wind-driven circulations. We assess the accuracy of thin-shell approximation in our setup by comparing the results with the Swarm satellite magnetic data. References Tyler, R. H., Mysak, L. A., and Oberhuber, J. M, 1997. Electromagnetic fields generated by a three dimensional global ocean circulation. J. Geophys. Res., 102, 5531-5551. Vivier, F., Meier-Reimer, E., and Tyler, R. H., 2004. Simulations of magnetic fields generated by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current at satellite altitude: Can geomagnetic measurements be used to monitor the flow? Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L10306, doi:10.1029/2004GL019804.

  6. Photochemically driven redox chemistry induces protocell membrane pearling and division.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ting F; Adamala, Katarzyna; Zhang, Na; Szostak, Jack W

    2012-06-19

    Prior to the evolution of complex biochemical machinery, the growth and division of simple primitive cells (protocells) must have been driven by environmental factors. We have previously demonstrated two pathways for fatty acid vesicle growth in which initially spherical vesicles grow into long filamentous vesicles; division is then mediated by fluid shear forces. Here we describe a different pathway for division that is independent of external mechanical forces. We show that the illumination of filamentous fatty acid vesicles containing either a fluorescent dye in the encapsulated aqueous phase, or hydroxypyrene in the membrane, rapidly induces pearling and subsequent division in the presence of thiols. The mechanism of this photochemically driven pathway most likely involves the generation of reactive oxygen species, which oxidize thiols to disulfide-containing compounds that associate with fatty acid membranes, inducing a change in surface tension and causing pearling and subsequent division. This vesicle division pathway provides an alternative route for the emergence of early self-replicating cell-like structures, particularly in thiol-rich surface environments where UV-absorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could have facilitated protocell division. The subsequent evolution of cellular metabolic processes controlling the thiol:disulfide redox state would have enabled autonomous cellular control of the timing of cell division, a major step in the origin of cellular life. PMID:22665773

  7. Superflow of resonantly driven polaritons against a defect

    SciTech Connect

    Cancellieri, E.; Marchetti, F. M.; Tejedor, C.; Szymanska, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    In the linear-response approximation, coherently driven microcavity polaritons in the pump-only configuration are expected to satisfy the Landau criterion for superfluidity at either strong enough pump powers or small flow velocities. Here, we solve nonperturbatively the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation describing the resonantly driven polariton system. We show that, even in the limit of asymptotically large densities, where in linear-response approximation the system satisfies the Landau criterion, the fluid always experiences a residual drag force when flowing through the defect. We explain the result in terms of the polariton lifetime being finite, finding that the equilibrium limit of zero drag can only be recovered in the case of perfect microcavities. In general, both the drag force exerted by the defect on the fluid, as well as the height of Cherenkov radiation, and the percentage of particles scattered by the defect, show a smooth crossover rather than a sharp thresholdlike behavior typical of superfluids which obey the Landau criterion.

  8. The stiffness variation of a micro-ring driven by a traveling piecewise-electrode.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingjie; Yu, Tao; Hu, Yuh-Chung

    2014-01-01

    In the practice of electrostatically actuated micro devices; the electrostatic force is implemented by sequentially actuated piecewise-electrodes which result in a traveling distributed electrostatic force. However; such force was modeled as a traveling concentrated electrostatic force in literatures. This article; for the first time; presents an analytical study on the stiffness variation of microstructures driven by a traveling piecewise electrode. The analytical model is based on the theory of shallow shell and uniform electrical field. The traveling electrode not only applies electrostatic force on the circular-ring but also alters its dynamical characteristics via the negative electrostatic stiffness. It is known that; when a structure is subjected to a traveling constant force; its natural mode will be resonated as the traveling speed approaches certain critical speeds; and each natural mode refers to exactly one critical speed. However; for the case of a traveling electrostatic force; the number of critical speeds is more than that of the natural modes. This is due to the fact that the traveling electrostatic force makes the resonant frequencies of the forward and backward traveling waves of the circular-ring different. Furthermore; the resonance and stability can be independently controlled by the length of the traveling electrode; though the driving voltage and traveling speed of the electrostatic force alter the dynamics and stabilities of microstructures. This paper extends the fundamental insights into the electromechanical behavior of microstructures driven by electrostatic forces as well as the future development of MEMS/NEMS devices with electrostatic actuation and sensing. PMID:25230308

  9. Lateral Casimir force beyond the proximity-force approximation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robson B; Neto, Paulo A Maia; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    2006-03-17

    We argue that the appropriate variable to study a nontrivial geometry dependence of the Casimir force is the lateral component of the Casimir force, which we evaluate between two corrugated metallic plates outside the validity of the proximity-force approximation. The metallic plates are described by the plasma model, with arbitrary values for the plasma wavelength, the plate separation, and the corrugation period, the corrugation amplitude remaining the smallest length scale. Our analysis shows that in realistic experimental situations the proximity-force approximation overestimates the force by up to 30%. PMID:16605712

  10. Uncertainty in NIST Force Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Tom

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses upon the uncertainty of force calibration measurements at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The uncertainty of the realization of force for the national deadweight force standards at NIST is discussed, as well as the uncertainties associated with NIST’s voltage-ratio measuring instruments and with the characteristics of transducers being calibrated. The combined uncertainty is related to the uncertainty of dissemination for force transfer standards sent to NIST for calibration. PMID:27308181

  11. Myoelectric hand prosthesis force control through servo motor current feedback.

    PubMed

    Sono, Tálita Saemi Payossim; Menegaldo, Luciano Luporini

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the prehension force closed-loop control design of a mechanical finger commanded by electromyographic signal (EMG) from a patient's arm. The control scheme was implemented and tested in a mechanical finger prototype with three degrees of freedom and one actuator, driven by arm muscles EMG of normal volunteers. Real-time indirect estimation of prehension force was assessed by measuring the DC servo motor actuator current. A model of the plant comprising finger, motor, and grasped object was proposed. Model parameters were identified experimentally and a classical feedback phase-lead compensator was designed. The controlled mechanical finger was able to provide a more accurate prehension force modulation of a compliant object when compared to open-loop control. PMID:19681841

  12. Resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Cantrell, Sean A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope and methodology called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features.

  13. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  14. Force reflecting hand controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaffee, Douglas A. (Inventor); Snow, Edward R. (Inventor); Townsend, William T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A universal input device for interfacing a human operator with a slave machine such as a robot or the like includes a plurality of serially connected mechanical links extending from a base. A handgrip is connected to the mechanical links distal from the base such that a human operator may grasp the handgrip and control the position thereof relative to the base through the mechanical links. A plurality of rotary joints is arranged to connect the mechanical links together to provide at least three translational degrees of freedom and at least three rotational degrees of freedom of motion of the handgrip relative to the base. A cable and pulley assembly for each joint is connected to a corresponding motor for transmitting forces from the slave machine to the handgrip to provide kinesthetic feedback to the operator and for producing control signals that may be transmitted from the handgrip to the slave machine. The device gives excellent kinesthetic feedback, high-fidelity force/torque feedback, a kinematically simple structure, mechanically decoupled motion in all six degrees of freedom, and zero backlash. The device also has a much larger work envelope, greater stiffness and responsiveness, smaller stowage volume, and better overlap of the human operator's range of motion than previous designs.

  15. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  16. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  17. Force-Field Parameter Fitter

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-05-27

    ParFit is a flexible and extendable framework and library of classes for fitting force-field parameters to data from high-level ab-initio calculations on the basis of deterministic and stochastic algorithms. Currently, the code is fitting MM3 and Merck force-field parameters but could easily extend to other force-field types.

  18. Electronic Force Gage for Welders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. W.; Gates, G.

    1983-01-01

    Welding force monitored in process. Electronic force gage uses strain gage on deformable member. Oscilloscope trace of welding force photographed and compared with standard trace during calibration and troubleshooting of resistance welding equipment. Adaptable to small scale resistance welding in electronics industry.

  19. Gradient and scattering forces in photoinduced force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahng, Junghoon; Brocious, Jordan; Fishman, Dmitry A.; Huang, Fei; Li, Xiaowei; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar; Potma, Eric Olaf

    2014-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis of the dominant forces measured in photoinduced force microscopy is presented. It is shown that when operated in the noncontact and soft-contact modes, the microscope is sensitive to the optically induced gradient force (Fg) and the scattering force (Fsc). The reconstructed force-distance curve reveals a tip-dependent scattering force in the 30-60 pN range. Whereas the scattering force is virtually insensitive to the nanoscopic tip-sample distance, the gradient force shows a z-4 dependence and is manifest only for tip-sample distances of a few nm. Measurements on glass, gold nanowires, and molecular clusters of silicon naphtalocyanine confirm that the gradient force is strongly dependent on the polarizability of the sample, enabling spectroscopic imaging through force detection. The nearly constant Fsc and the spatially dependent Fg give rise to a complex force-distance curve, which varies from point to point in the specimen and dictates the image contrast observed for a given set point of the cantilevered tip.

  20. Performance evaluation of a six-axis generalized force-reflecting teleoperator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannaford, Blake; Wood, Laurie; Mcaffee, Douglas A.; Zak, Haya

    1991-01-01

    Work in real-time distributed computation and control has culminated in a prototype force-reflecting telemanipulation system having a dissimilar master (cable-driven force-reflecting hand controller) and a slave (PUMA 560 robot with custom controller), an extremely high sampling rate (1000 Hz), and a low loop computation delay (5 msec). In a series of experiments with this system and five trained test operators covering more than 100 hours of teleoperation, performance was measured in a series of generic and application-driven tasks with and without force feedback, and with control shared between teleoperation and local sensor referenced control. All performance measures improved as capability was added along a spectrum of capabilities ranging from pure position control through force-reflecting teleoperation and shared control. Performance was optimal for the bare-handed operator.

  1. Interfacial force sensor with force-feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, S.A.; Houston, J.E.; Smith, B.K.

    1990-01-01

    A new interfacial force microscope capable of measuring the forces between two surfaces over the entire range of surface separations, up to contact, has been developed. The design is centered around a differential capacitance displacement sensor where the common capacitor plate is supported by torsion bars. A force-feedback control system balances the interfacial forces at the sensor, maintaining the common capacitor plate at its rest position. This control eliminates the instability which occurs with the conventional cantilever-based force sensors when the attractive force gradient exceeds the mechanical stiffness of the cantilever. The ability to measure interfacial forces at surface separations smaller than this instability point using the feedback control is demonstrated. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Magnetically driven quantum heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Enrique; Pena, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    In analogy with classical thermodynamics, a quantum heat engine generates useful mechanical work from heat, by means of a reversible sequence of transformations (trajectories), where the ``working substance'' is of quantum mechanical nature. Several theoretical implementations for a quantum heat engine have been discussed in the literature, such as entangled states in a qubit, quantum mechanical versions of the Otto cycle, and photocells. In this work, we propose yet a different alternative by introducing the concept of a magnetically driven quantum heat engine. We studied the efficiency of such system, by considering as the ``working substance'' a single nonrelativistic particle trapped in a cylindrical potential well, as a model for a semiconductor quantum dot, in the presence of an external magnetic field. The trajectories are driven by a quasistatic modulation of the external magnetic-field intensity, while the system is in contact with macroscopic thermostats. The external magnetic field modulation allows to modify the effective geometric confinement, in analogy with a piston in a classical gas. E. Munoz acknowledges financial support from Fondecyt under Contract 1141146.

  3. Assessing respondent-driven sampling.

    PubMed

    Goel, Sharad; Salganik, Matthew J

    2010-04-13

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a network-based technique for estimating traits in hard-to-reach populations, for example, the prevalence of HIV among drug injectors. In recent years RDS has been used in more than 120 studies in more than 20 countries and by leading public health organizations, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. Despite the widespread use and growing popularity of RDS, there has been little empirical validation of the methodology. Here we investigate the performance of RDS by simulating sampling from 85 known, network populations. Across a variety of traits we find that RDS is substantially less accurate than generally acknowledged and that reported RDS confidence intervals are misleadingly narrow. Moreover, because we model a best-case scenario in which the theoretical RDS sampling assumptions hold exactly, it is unlikely that RDS performs any better in practice than in our simulations. Notably, the poor performance of RDS is driven not by the bias but by the high variance of estimates, a possibility that had been largely overlooked in the RDS literature. Given the consistency of our results across networks and our generous sampling conditions, we conclude that RDS as currently practiced may not be suitable for key aspects of public health surveillance where it is now extensively applied. PMID:20351258

  4. On Rank Driven Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerman, J. J. P.; Prieto, F. J.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate a class of models related to the Bak-Sneppen (BS) model, initially proposed to study evolution. The BS model is extremely simple and yet captures some forms of "complex behavior" such as self-organized criticality that is often observed in physical and biological systems. In this model, random fitnesses in are associated to agents located at the vertices of a graph . Their fitnesses are ranked from worst (0) to best (1). At every time-step the agent with the worst fitness and some others with a priori given rank probabilities are replaced by new agents with random fitnesses. We consider two cases: The exogenous case where the new fitnesses are taken from an a priori fixed distribution, and the endogenous case where the new fitnesses are taken from the current distribution as it evolves. We approximate the dynamics by making a simplifying independence assumption. We use Order Statistics and Dynamical Systems to define a rank-driven dynamical system that approximates the evolution of the distribution of the fitnesses in these rank-driven models, as well as in the BS model. For this simplified model we can find the limiting marginal distribution as a function of the initial conditions. Agreement with experimental results of the BS model is excellent.

  5. Assessing respondent-driven sampling

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Sharad; Salganik, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a network-based technique for estimating traits in hard-to-reach populations, for example, the prevalence of HIV among drug injectors. In recent years RDS has been used in more than 120 studies in more than 20 countries and by leading public health organizations, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. Despite the widespread use and growing popularity of RDS, there has been little empirical validation of the methodology. Here we investigate the performance of RDS by simulating sampling from 85 known, network populations. Across a variety of traits we find that RDS is substantially less accurate than generally acknowledged and that reported RDS confidence intervals are misleadingly narrow. Moreover, because we model a best-case scenario in which the theoretical RDS sampling assumptions hold exactly, it is unlikely that RDS performs any better in practice than in our simulations. Notably, the poor performance of RDS is driven not by the bias but by the high variance of estimates, a possibility that had been largely overlooked in the RDS literature. Given the consistency of our results across networks and our generous sampling conditions, we conclude that RDS as currently practiced may not be suitable for key aspects of public health surveillance where it is now extensively applied. PMID:20351258

  6. Piezoelectrically-driven Thermoacoustic Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Daniel George

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration is an emerging refrigeration technology which does not require any moving parts or harmful refrigerants in its operation. This technology uses acoustic waves to pump heat across a temperature gradient. The vast majority of thermoacoustic refrigerators to date have used electromagnetic loudspeakers to generate the acoustic input. In this thesis, the design, construction, operation, and modeling of a piezoelectrically-driven thermoacoustic refrigerator are detailed. This refrigerator demonstrates the effectiveness of piezoelectric actuation in moving 0.3 W of heat across an 18 degree C temperature difference with an input power of 7.6 W. The performance characteristics of this class of thermoacoustic-piezoelectric refrigerators are modeled by using DeltaEC software and the predictions are experimentally validated. The obtained results confirm the validity of the developed model. Furthermore, the potential of piezoelectric actuation as effective means for driving thermoacoustic refrigerators is demonstrated as compared to the conventional electromagnetic loudspeakers which are heavy and require high actuation energy. The developed theoretical and experimental tools can serve as invaluable means for the design and testing of other piezoelectrically-driven thermoacoustic refrigerator configurations.

  7. Superdiffusion in dispersions of active colloids driven by an external field and their sedimentation equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Fu; Wei, Hsien-Hung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-04-01

    The diffusive behaviors of active colloids with run-and-tumble movement are explored by dissipative particle dynamics simulations for self-propelled particles (force dipole) and external field-driven particles (point force). The self-diffusion of tracers (solvent) is investigated as well. The influences of the active force, run time, and concentration associated with active particles are studied. For the system of self-propelled particles, the normal diffusion is observed for both active particles and tracers. The diffusivity of the former is significantly greater than that of the latter. For the system of field-driven particles, the superdiffusion is seen for both active particles and tracers. In contrast, it is found that the anomalous diffusion exponent of the former is slightly less than that of the latter. The anomalous diffusion is caused by the many-body, long-range hydrodynamic interactions. In spite of the superdiffusion, the sedimentation equilibrium of field-driven particles can be acquired and the density profile is still exponentially decayed. The sedimentation length of field-driven particles is always greater than that of self-propelled particles.

  8. Superdiffusion in dispersions of active colloids driven by an external field and their sedimentation equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Fu; Wei, Hsien-Hung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-04-01

    The diffusive behaviors of active colloids with run-and-tumble movement are explored by dissipative particle dynamics simulations for self-propelled particles (force dipole) and external field-driven particles (point force). The self-diffusion of tracers (solvent) is investigated as well. The influences of the active force, run time, and concentration associated with active particles are studied. For the system of self-propelled particles, the normal diffusion is observed for both active particles and tracers. The diffusivity of the former is significantly greater than that of the latter. For the system of field-driven particles, the superdiffusion is seen for both active particles and tracers. In contrast, it is found that the anomalous diffusion exponent of the former is slightly less than that of the latter. The anomalous diffusion is caused by the many-body, long-range hydrodynamic interactions. In spite of the superdiffusion, the sedimentation equilibrium of field-driven particles can be acquired and the density profile is still exponentially decayed. The sedimentation length of field-driven particles is always greater than that of self-propelled particles. PMID:27176356

  9. A comparison of fixed-base and driven-base modal testing of an electronics package

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Martinez, D.R.; Nord, A.R.

    1989-08-01

    This paper compares results for a fixed-base and a driven-base modal test of an electronics package. A fixed-base modal test uses the common testing procedure of attaching the structure to a large inertial mass which is freely suspended. The problem with this approach is that the input levels are typically limited by the strength of the structure and stinger attachment. An attractive alternative to fixed-base modal testing is to use high force shaker-tables to provide a driven-base input. Some of the issues of concern are: properly simulating the fixed boundary conditions, applying modal estimation algorithms to motion-to-motion frequency response functions vs. motion-to-force frequency response functions, non-linearity effects and testing at very low input levels vs. levels equal to those of the field environment, complications involved with shaker resonances, exciting the ''response-critical'' modes of the structure, and consistency of the modal parameters using driven-base tests vs. fixed-base modal tests. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the adequacy of using vibration shake tables to excite the fixed-based modes of the system. A direct comparison of the modes acquired using fixed-base and driven-base excitation for the electronics package shows very close agreement. A discussion of the theory for driven-base testing is given, as well as a brief presentation of analytical predictions for the structure. 4 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  11. Erosion and basal forces in granular flow experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanvitale, Nicoletta; Bowman, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    Extreme mass wasting avalanche events such as rock, snow and ice avalanches, debris flows, and pyroclastic flows are among the most hazardous geological phenomena. These events driven by gravity, can travel for long distance and high speed, increasing their volumes as they can entertain material along their path. The erosion of material and its entrainment can greatly affect the overall dynamics of transportation, either enhancing or impeding the avalanche mobility depending on flow dynamics and characteristics of the substrate. However, the mechanisms and processes acting at the base as they travel over deformable or erodible substrates are still poor understood. Experiments, simulations and field measurements indicate that large fluctuations can occur in basal forces and stresses, which may be the result of non-uniform load transfer within the mass, and rolling, bouncing and sliding of the particles along the bed. In dense granular materials, force distributions can propagate through filamentary chain structures that carry a large fraction of the forces within the system. Photoelastic experiments on two-dimensional, monodisperse, gravity-driven flows have shown that force chains can transmit high localized forces to the boundary of dense granular flows. Here we describe the preliminary setup and results of 2D experiments on polydisperse granular flows of photoelastic disks down a small flume designed to acquire the forces exerted at the boundaries of the flow and to analyze their effects on an erodible bed. The intended outcome of this research is to provide better information on the complex mechanism of erosion and its effects on avalanche behaviour.

  12. Force Generation by Endocytic Actin Patches in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Anders E.; Bayly, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The deformation of the gel is treated using a finite-element approach. We explore the effects and interplay of three different types of force driving invagination: 1), forces perpendicular to the membrane, generated by differences between actin polymerization rates at the edge of the patch and those at the center; 2), the inherent curvature of the coat-protein layer; and 3), forces parallel to the membrane that buckle the coat protein layer, generated by an actomyosin contractile ring. We find that with optimistic estimates for the stall stress of actin gel growth and the shear modulus of the actin gel, actin polymerization can generate almost enough force to overcome the turgor pressure. In combination with the other mechanisms, actin polymerization can the force over the critical value. PMID:24739159

  13. Numerical modelling of iceberg calving force responsible for glacial earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, Amandine; Yastrebov, Vladislav; Castelnau, Olivier; Mangeney, Anne; Stutzmann, Eleonore; Montagner, Jean-Paul

    2016-04-01

    Glacial earthquakes is a class of seismic events of magnitude up to 5, occurring primarily in Greenland, in the margins of large marine-terminated glaciers with near-grounded termini. They are caused by calving of cubic-kilometer scale unstable icebergs which penetrate the full-glacier thickness and, driven by the buoyancy forces, capsize against the calving front. These phenomena produce seismic energy including surface waves with dominant energy between 10-150 s of period whose seismogenic source is compatible with the contact force exerted on the terminus by the iceberg while it capsizes. A reverse motion and posterior rebound of the terminus have also been measured and associated with the fluctuation of this contact force. Using a finite element model of iceberg and glacier terminus coupled with simplified fluid-structure interaction model, we simulate calving and capsize of icebergs. Contact and frictional forces are measured on the terminus and compared with laboratory experiments. We also study the influence of geometric factors on the force history, amplitude and duration at the laboratory and field scales. We show first insights into the force and the generated seismic waves exploring different scenarios for iceberg capsizing.

  14. Microfluidics, Chromatography, and Atomic-Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A Raman-and-atomic-force microscope (RAFM) has been shown to be capable of performing several liquid-transfer and sensory functions essential for the operation of a microfluidic laboratory on a chip that would be used to perform rapid, sensitive chromatographic and spectro-chemical analyses of unprecedentedly small quantities of liquids. The most novel aspect of this development lies in the exploitation of capillary and shear effects at the atomic-force-microscope (AFM) tip to produce shear-driven flow of liquids along open microchannels of a microfluidic device. The RAFM can also be used to perform such functions as imaging liquids in microchannels; removing liquid samples from channels for very sensitive, tip-localized spectrochemical analyses; measuring a quantity of liquid adhering to the tip; and dip-pen deposition from a chromatographic device. A commercial Raman-spectroscopy system and a commercial AFM were integrated to make the RAFM so as to be able to perform simultaneous topographical AFM imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) at the AFM tip. The Raman-spectroscopy system includes a Raman microprobe attached to an optical microscope, the translation stage of which is modified to accommodate the AFM head. The Raman laser excitation beam, which is aimed at the AFM tip, has a wavelength of 785 nm and a diameter of about 5 m, and its power is adjustable up to 10 mW. The AFM is coated with gold to enable tip-localized SERS.

  15. Near and far-wall effects on the three-dimensional motion of bacteria-driven microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew R.; Wright Carlsen, Rika; Sitti, Metin

    2013-04-01

    Bio-hybrid microrobots have been heavily studied due to their potential applications as minimally invasive medical microdevices. Though most researchers have focused on two-dimensional and near-wall motion, this letter uses a defocused optical tracking method to quantify the three-dimensional motion of 5 μm diameter polystyrene beads driven by attached Serratia marcescens bacteria. Away from walls the beads trace out helical trajectories, demonstrating kinematics produced by near-constant forces and torques. Near-wall motion is observed to be more stochastic. The motion of beads driven by single bacteria is analyzed in detail, providing an understanding of the forces and torques on the beads.

  16. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. L.; Hill, R. J.; Chellppannair, T.; Zenit, R.; Zenit, R.; Spelt, P. D. M.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1a nd Re >> 1, for which comparisons are made with kinetic theory and numerical simulations. Here Re = gamma(a(exp 2)/nu is the Reynolds number and We = rho(gamma(exp 2))a(exp 3)/sigma is the Weber number; gamma is the shear rate, a is the bubble radius, nu is the kinematic viscosity of the liquid, rho is the density of the liquid, and sigma is the surface tension of the gas/liquid interface. Kang et al. calculated the bubble phase pressure and velocity variance of sheared bubble suspensions under conditions where the bubbles are spherical and the liquid phase velocity field can be approximated using potential flow theory, i.e. We= 0 and Re >> 1. Such conditions can be achieved in an experiment using gas bubbles, with a radius of O(0.5mm), in water. The theory requires that there be no average relative motion of the gas and liquid phases, hence the motivation for an experimental program in microgravity. The necessity of performing preliminary, Earth based experiments, however, requires performing experiments where the gas phase rises in the liquid, which significantly complicates the comparison of experiments with theory. Rather than comparing experimental results with theory for a uniform, homogeneous shear flow, experiments can be compared directly with solutions of the averaged equations of motion for bubble suspensions. This requires accounting for the significant lift force acting on the gas phase when the bubbles rise parallel to the average velocity of the sheared suspension. Shear flows can be produced in which the bubble phase pressure gradient, arising from shear induced collisions amongst the bubbles, balances a body force (centrifugal or gravitational) on the gas phase. A steady, non-uniform gas volume fraction

  17. Hydrogel Actuation by Electric Field Driven Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Daniel Humphrey

    the applied electric field. We extend the use of ionoprinting to develop multi-responsive bilayer gel systems capable of more complex shape transformation. The localized crosslinked regions determine the bending axis as the gel responds to the external environment. The bending can be tuned to reverse direction isothermally by changing the solvent quality or by changing the temperature at a fixed concentration. The multi-responsive behavior is caused by the volume transitions of a non-ionic, thermos-sensitive hydrogel coupled with a superabsorbent ionic hydrogel. Lastly, electric field driven microparticle assembly, using dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces, organized colloidal microparticles within a hydrogel matrix. The use of DEP forces enables rapid, efficient and precise control over the colloidal distribution. The resulting supracolloidal endoskeleton structures impart directional bending as the hydrogel shrinks. We compare the ordered particles structures to random particle distributions in affecting the hydrogel sheet bending response. This study demonstrates a universal technique for imparting directional properties in hydrogels towards new generations of hybrid soft materials.

  18. Forced spaser oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisyansky, Alexander A.; Andrianov, Eugeney S.; Dorofeenko, Alexander V.; Pukhov, Alexander A.; Vinogradov, Alexey P.

    2012-10-01

    We study oscillations of a spaser driven by an external optical wave. When the frequency of the external field is shifted from the frequency of an autonomous spaser, the spaser exhibits stochastic oscillations at low field intensity. The plasmon oscillations lock to the frequency of the external field only when the field amplitude exceeds a threshold value. We find a region of external field amplitude and the frequency detuning (the Arnold tongue) for which the spaser becomes synchronized with the external wave. We obtain the conditions upon the amplitude and frequency of the external field (the curve of compensation) at which the spaser's dipole moment oscillates with a phase shift of π relatively to the external wave. For these values of the amplitude and frequency, the loss in the metal nanoparticles within the spaser is exactly compensated for by the gain. It is expected that if these conditions are not satisfied, then due to loss or gain of energy, the amplitude of the wave travelling along the system of spasers either tends to the curve of compensation or leave the Arnold tongue. We also consider cooperative phenomena showing that in a chain of interacting spasers, depending on the values of the coupling constants, either all spasers oscillate in phase or a nonlinear autowave travels in the system. In the latter scenario, the traveling wave is harmonic, unlike excitations in other nonlinear systems. Due to the nonlinear nature of the system, any initial distribution of spaser states evolves into one of these steady states.

  19. Updates on Force Limiting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Scharton, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The following conventional force limiting methods currently practiced in deriving force limiting specifications assume one-dimensional translation source and load apparent masses: Simple TDOF model; Semi-empirical force limits; Apparent mass, etc.; Impedance method. Uncorrelated motion of the mounting points for components mounted on panels and correlated, but out-of-phase, motions of the support structures are important and should be considered in deriving force limiting specifications. In this presentation "rock-n-roll" motions of the components supported by panels, which leads to a more realistic force limiting specifications are discussed.

  20. Parallel computation with the force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology, called the force, supports the construction of programs to be executed in parallel by a force of processes. The number of processes in the force is unspecified, but potentially very large. The force idea is embodied in a set of macros which produce multiproceossor FORTRAN code and has been studied on two shared memory multiprocessors of fairly different character. The method has simplified the writing of highly parallel programs within a limited class of parallel algorithms and is being extended to cover a broader class. The individual parallel constructs which comprise the force methodology are discussed. Of central concern are their semantics, implementation on different architectures and performance implications.

  1. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R. J.; Zenit, R.; Chellppannair, T.; Koch, D. L.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Sangani, A.

    1998-11-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1 and Re >> 1 , so that the bubbles are relatively undeformed and the flow is inviscid and approximately irrotational. Nitrogen is introduced through an array of capillaries at the base of a .2x.02x2 m channel filled with an aqueous electrolyte solution (0.06 molL-1 MgSO_4). The rising bubbles generate a unidirectional shear flow, where the denser suspension at the lower surface of the channel falls, while the less dense suspension at the upper surface rises. Hot-film anemometry is used to measure the resulting gas volume fraction and fluid velocity profiles. The bubble collision rate with the sensor is related to the gas volume fraction and the mean and variance of the bubble velocity using an experimentally measured collision surface area for the sensor. Bubble collisions with the sensor are identified by the characteristic slope of the hot-film anemometer signal when bubbles collide with the sensor. It is observed that the steady shear flow develops a bubble phase pressure gradient across the channel gap as the bubbles interchange momentum through direct collisions. The discrete phase presssure gradient balances the buoyancy force driving bubbles toward the upper surface resulting in a steady void fraction profile across the gap width. The strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and by the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion (Kang et al. 1997; Spelt and Sangani, 1998), for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  2. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    1990-05-01

    This is an expanded version of the third Dirac Memorial Lecture, given in 1988 by the Nobel Laureate Abdus Salam. Salam's lecture presents an overview of the developments in modern particle physics from its inception at the turn of the century to the present theories seeking to unify all the fundamental forces. In addition, two previously unpublished lectures by Paul Dirac, and Werner Heisenberg are included. These lectures provide a fascinating insight into their approach to research and the developments in particle physics at that time. Nonspecialists, undergraduates and researchers will find this a fascinating book. It contains a clear introduction to the major themes of particle physics and cosmology by one of the most distinguished contemporary physicists.

  3. Silicon force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  4. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century. PMID:25029818

  5. Force protection: today's reality.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Ron

    2004-11-11

    Most US infrastructure and major chemical manufacturing facilities as well as their supporting utility systems are inherently vulnerable to a terrorist attack. Force protection is a military and civilian term used to protect personnel and critical facilities and assets against would-be aggressors or terrorists. The war on terrorism is a 200-300-year war. Terrorist attacks on US soil could become as common-place as in the State of Israel. It is very easy to penetrate infrastructure or plants as evidenced by vulnerability assessments performed for states, cities, plants, and military facilities by Versar and others around the country. Chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive weapons can be readily used to attack facilities in the US. This paper will explain some of those vulnerabilities, outline the current DoD standard as it relates to vulnerability assessments, and explain how this may be used in commercial applications to deter potential aggressors. PMID:15573418

  6. Force Limit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  7. Forced Migration: Refugee Populations

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Joyceen S.

    2015-01-01

    Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that manifests in various contexts. This article describes the impact of the movement of large numbers of people in several African countries, producing a unique type of migrant—the refugee. We describe issues that refugee movements create on fragile health care systems, situations that precipitate refugee movements, certain human rights violations that are of particular concern such as gender based violence (GBV) and child soldiers, and lastly, implications for nursing practice and policy. We use examples from several countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current literature, as well as the international experience of the authors, this article presents an overview of forced migration and discusses opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

  8. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  9. Normal Force and Drag Force in Magnetorheological Finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, C.; Shafrir, S.N.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2010-01-13

    The material removal in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is known to be controlled by shear stress, tau, which equals drag force, Fd, divided by spot area, As. However, it is unclear how the normal force, Fn, affects the material removal in MRF and how the measured ratio of drag force to normal force Fd/Fn, equivalent to coefficient of friction, is related to material removal. This work studies, for the first time for MRF, the normal force and the measured ratio Fd/Fn as a function of material mechanical properties. Experimental data were obtained by taking spots on a variety of materials including optical glasses and hard ceramics with a spot-taking machine (STM). Drag force and normal force were measured with a dual load cell. Drag force decreases linearly with increasing material hardness. In contrast, normal force increases with hardness for glasses, saturating at high hardness values for ceramics. Volumetric removal rate decreases with normal force across all materials. The measured ratio Fd/Fn shows a strong negative linear correlation with material hardness. Hard materials exhibit a low “coefficient of friction”. The volumetric removal rate increases with the measured ratio Fd/Fn which is also correlated with shear stress, indicating that the measured ratio Fd/Fn is a useful measure of material removal in MRF.

  10. Microphotonic Forces from Superfluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuslan, D. L.; Harris, G. I.; Baker, C.; Sachkou, Y.; He, X.; Sheridan, E.; Bowen, W. P.

    2016-04-01

    In cavity optomechanics, radiation pressure and photothermal forces are widely utilized to cool and control micromechanical motion, with applications ranging from precision sensing and quantum information to fundamental science. Here, we realize an alternative approach to optical forcing based on superfluid flow and evaporation in response to optical heating. We demonstrate optical forcing of the motion of a cryogenic microtoroidal resonator at a level of 1.46 nN, roughly 1 order of magnitude larger than the radiation pressure force. We use this force to feedback cool the motion of a microtoroid mechanical mode to 137 mK. The photoconvective forces we demonstrate here provide a new tool for high bandwidth control of mechanical motion in cryogenic conditions, while the ability to apply forces remotely, combined with the persistence of flow in superfluids, offers the prospect for new applications.

  11. Force measurements during vibration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, D.O.; Coleman, R.G.

    1993-12-31

    Experimental measurements of force into a ``rigid`` test item representing a typical system level vibration test were conducted to evaluate several methods of force measurements. The methods evaluated included: (1) Direct measurement with force gages between the test item and the fixturing; (2) Measurement of the force at the shaker/fixture interface and correcting the force required to drive the fixturing using two methods, (a) mass subtraction and (b) SWAT (sum of weighted accelerations technique), (3) Force deduced from voltage and current needed to drive the test item. All of the methods worked over a limited frequency range of five to a few hundred Hertz. The widest bandwidth was achieved with force at the shaker/fixture interface with SWAT corrections and from the voltage and current measurements.

  12. Future Air Force systems.

    PubMed

    Tremaine, S A

    1986-10-01

    Planning for the future is under way in earnest at the Aeronautical Systems Division (ASD) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It has been statistically established that it takes from 14-16 years from the generation of a new system idea to enter into engineering development. With this unpleasing, but realistic, schedule in mind, ASD has, during the last 3 years, been initiating long-term planning projects that are pre-starts for new system ideas. They are generated from throughout the Air Force and are locally managed and funded. Through this process, which spans from 12-14 months, specific and revolutionary new ideas for the systems of the future are generated. This article addresses more than a dozen specific new ideas in work at ASD today. These ideas range from a need to replace the C-130 type aircraft after the year 2000 to planning a follow-on to the B-18 well into the 21st century. Among other specific projects are investigation into an immortal fighter intended to be free of reliability and maintenance demands for an especially long period of operation, a new training system and advanced trainer to replace the T-38, a transatmospheric vehicle that could operate in the 100,000-500,000 foot flight region (30,480-152,400 m), and a new means of defending against hostile cruise missile launchers and cruise missiles. Other ideas are also addressed. The article concludes with emphasis on systems that can operate hypersonically in and out of the known atmosphere and greater use of airbreathing propulsion systems operating between Mach 3 and Mach 6. PMID:3778403

  13. MHD generators as pulse power sources for arc-driven railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, N.; Raugi, M.; Tellini, A.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the performances of an electromagnetic launch system constituted by an arc driven railgun powered by a MHD generator are investigated. A small bore plasma driven railgun for fusion fuel pellet injection is examined considering as pulse power source a MHD generator having characteristics taken from operating devices. The analysis of the railgun and generator has been carried out by means of a lumped parameter equivalent network model that takes into account drag force and ablation effects and allowing the evaluation of the main electrical and thermodynamic quantity distributions of the plasma arc.

  14. Chin force in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars. PMID:21952980

  15. Estimating propulsive forces--sink or swim?

    PubMed

    Lauder, M A; Dabnichki, P

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of hydrodynamic force estimation in swimming as calculated by the quasi-static approach. To achieve this a full-scale mechanical arm was developed, built and tested. The mechanical arm, covered with a prosthetic shell and driven at the shoulder was used to simulate a single plane underwater rotation at four elbow configurations. A computer program controlled the shoulder movement to achieve a replicable angular velocity profile for each arm movement. A strain gauge system was used to directly measure the generated arm torque. Repeated trials were conducted at fixed elbow angles of 110 degrees, 135 degrees, 160 degrees and 180 degrees. All trials were filmed using a three-dimensional underwater set-up. Each trial was digitised at 25 Hz and the hydrodynamic drag force profile of the hand calculated using the quasi-static procedure. From these data, the estimated shoulder torque was calculated and compared to the direct measurement of shoulder torque from the mechanical arm. The results showed that the arm produced a repeatable movement through the water. The shoulder torque profiles using the direct measure (the arm) and the indirect measures (quasi-static approach) differed considerably. The quasi-static approach appears not to accurately reflect the hydrodynamic force profile generated by the arm movement in swimming. Furthermore, it seems that the swimmer's hand contribution is overstated in up to date studies. It is essential that the propulsive mechanisms in swimming be further investigated if factors underpinning an optimal technique are to be established. PMID:16045915

  16. Molecular Mechanotransduction: how forces trigger cytoskeletal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlicher, Allen

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical stresses elicit cellular reactions mediated by chemical signals. Defective responses to forces underlie human medical disorders, such as cardiac failure and pulmonary injury. Despite detailed knowledge of the cytoskeleton's structure, the specific molecular switches that convert mechanical stimuli into chemical signals have remained elusive. Here we identify the actin-binding protein, filamin A (FLNa) as a central mechanotransduction element of the cytoskeleton by using Fluorescence Loss After photoConversion (FLAC), a novel high-speed alternative to FRAP. We reconstituted a minimal system consisting of actin filaments, FLNa and two FLNa-binding partners: the cytoplasmic tail of ß-integrin, and FilGAP. Integrins form an essential mechanical linkage between extracellular and intracellular environments, with ß integrin tails connecting to the actin cytoskeleton by binding directly to filamin. FilGAP is a FLNa-binding GTPase-activating protein specific for Rac, which in vivo regulates cell spreading and bleb formation. We demonstrate that both externally-imposed bulk shear and myosin II driven forces differentially regulate the binding of integrin and FilGAP to FLNa. Consistent with structural predictions, strain increases ß-integrin binding to FLNa, whereas it causes FilGAP to dissociate from FLNa, providing a direct and specific molecular basis for cellular mechanotransduction. These results identify the first molecular mechanotransduction element within the actin cytoskeleton, revealing that mechanical strain of key proteins regulates the binding of signaling molecules. Moreover, GAP activity has been shown to switch cell movement from mesenchymal to amoeboid motility, suggesting that mechanical forces directly impact the invasiveness of cancer.

  17. Signal Processing in Periodically Forced Gradient Frequency Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Chul; Large, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory instability at the Hopf bifurcation is a dynamical phenomenon that has been suggested to characterize active non-linear processes observed in the auditory system. Networks of oscillators poised near Hopf bifurcation points and tuned to tonotopically distributed frequencies have been used as models of auditory processing at various levels, but systematic investigation of the dynamical properties of such oscillatory networks is still lacking. Here we provide a dynamical systems analysis of a canonical model for gradient frequency neural networks driven by a periodic signal. We use linear stability analysis to identify various driven behaviors of canonical oscillators for all possible ranges of model and forcing parameters. The analysis shows that canonical oscillators exhibit qualitatively different sets of driven states and transitions for different regimes of model parameters. We classify the parameter regimes into four main categories based on their distinct signal processing capabilities. This analysis will lead to deeper understanding of the diverse behaviors of neural systems under periodic forcing and can inform the design of oscillatory network models of auditory signal processing. PMID:26733858

  18. Asynchronous Event-Driven Particle Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A

    2007-08-30

    We present, in a unifying way, the main components of three asynchronous event-driven algorithms for simulating physical systems of interacting particles. The first example, hard-particle molecular dynamics (MD), is well-known. We also present a recently-developed diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo (DKMC) algorithm, as well as a novel stochastic molecular-dynamics algorithm that builds on the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). We explain how to effectively combine event-driven and classical time-driven handling, and discuss some promises and challenges for event-driven simulation of realistic physical systems.

  19. Asynchronous Event-Driven Particle Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A

    2007-02-28

    We present in a unifying way the main components of three examples of asynchronous event-driven algorithms for simulating physical systems of interacting particles. The first example, hard-particle molecular dynamics (MD), is well-known. We also present a recently-developed diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo (DKMC) algorithm, as well as a novel event-driven algorithm for Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). Finally, we describe how to combine MD with DSMC in an event-driven framework, and discuss some promises and challenges for event-driven simulation of realistic physical systems.

  20. Acoustically driven arrayed waveguide grating.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Poveda, A; Hernández-Mínguez, A; Gargallo, B; Biermann, K; Tahraoui, A; Santos, P V; Muñoz, P; Cantarero, A; de Lima, M M

    2015-08-10

    We demonstrate compact tunable phased-array wavelength-division multiplexers driven by surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in the low GHz range. The devices comprise two couplers, which respectively split and combine the optical signal, linked by an array of single-mode waveguides (WGs). Two different layouts are presented, in which multi-mode interference couplers or free propagating regions were separately employed as couplers. The multiplexers operate on five equally distributed wavelength channels, with a spectral separation of 2 nm. A standing SAW modulates the refractive index of the arrayed WGs. Each wavelength component periodically switches paths between the output channel previously asigned by the design and the adjacent channels, at a fixed applied acoustic power. The devices were monolithically fabricated on (Al,Ga)As. A good agreement between theory and experiment is achieved. PMID:26367971