Science.gov

Sample records for forced rotating flows

  1. Tidally-forced flow in a rotating, stratified, shoaling basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Kraig B.

    2015-06-01

    Baroclinic flow of a rotating, stratified fluid in a parabolic basin is computed in response to barotropic tidal forcing using the nonlinear, non-hydrostatic, Boussinesq equations of motion. The tidal forcing is derived from an imposed, boundary-enhanced free-surface deflection that advances cyclonically around a central amphidrome. The tidal forcing perturbs a shallow pycnocline, sloshing it up and down over the shoaling bottom. Nonlinearities in the near-shore internal tide produce an azimuthally independent 'set-up' of the isopycnals that in turn drives an approximately geostrophically balanced, cyclonic, near-shore, sub-surface jet. The sub-surface cyclonic jet is an example of a slowly evolving, nearly balanced flow that is excited and maintained solely by forcing in the fast, super-inertial frequency band. Baroclinic instability of the nearly balanced jet and subsequent interactions between eddies produce a weak transfer of energy back into the inertia-gravity band as swirling motions with super-inertial vorticity stir the stratified fluid and spontaneously emit waves. The sub-surface cyclonic jet is similar in many ways to the poleward flows observed along eastern ocean boundaries, particularly the California Undercurrent. It is conjectured that such currents may be driven by the surface tide rather than by winds and/or along-shore pressure gradients.

  2. Turbulent flow in rib-roughened channel under the effect of Coriolis and rotational buoyancy forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, Filippo; Jacono, David Lo; Cresci, Irene; Arts, Tony

    2014-04-01

    The turbulent flow inside a rotating channel provided with transverse ribs along one wall is studied by means of two-dimensional time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The measurement set-up is mounted on the same rotating disk with the test section, allowing to obtain the same accuracy and resolution as in a non-rotating rig. The Reynolds number is 15 000, and the rotation number is 0.38. As the ribbed wall is heated, both the Coriolis force and the centrifugal force play a role in the fluid dynamics. The mean velocity fields highlight the major impact of the rotational buoyancy (characterized by a buoyancy number of 0.31) on the flow along the leading side of the duct. In particular, since the flow is directed radially outward, the near-wall layers experience significant centripetal buoyancy. The recirculation area behind the obstacles is enlarged to the point of spanning the whole inter-rib space. Also the turbulent fluctuations are significantly altered, and overall augmented, with respect to the non-buoyant case, resulting in higher turbulence levels far from the rib. On the other hand the centrifugal force has little or no impact on the flow along the trailing wall. Vortex identification, proper orthogonal decomposition, and two-point correlations are used to highlight rotational effects, and in particular to determine the dominant scales of the turbulent unsteady flow, the time-dependent behavior of the shear layer and of the recirculation bubble behind the wall-mounted obstacles, the lifetime and advection velocity of the coherent structures.

  3. Numerical and experimental study of flows in a rotating annulus with local convective forcing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolan, Hélène; Su, Sylvie; Wright, Susie; Young, Roland M. B.; Read, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We present a numerical and experimental study of flows in a rotating annulus convectively forced by local thermal forcing via a heated annular ring at the bottom near the external wall and a cooled circular disk near the centre at the top surface of the annulus. This new configuration is a variant of the classical thermally-driven annulus analogue of the atmosphere circulation, where thermal forcing was previously applied uniformly on the sidewalls. Two vertically and horizontally displaced heat sources/sinks are arranged so that, in the absence of background rotation, statically unstable Rayleigh-Bénard convection would be induced above the source and beneath the sink, thereby relaxing strong constraints placed on background temperature gradients in previous experimental configurations to better mimic in fine local vigorous convection events in tropics and polar regions whilst also facilitating baroclinic motion in midlatitude regions in the Earth's atmosphere. By using the Met Office/ Oxford Rotating Annulus Laboratory (MORALS) code, we have investigated a series of equilibrated, 2D axisymmetric flows for a large range of dimensionless parameters and characterized them in terms of velocity and temperature fields. Several distinct and different flow regimes were identified, depending upon the rotation rate and strength of differential heating. These regimes will be presented with reference to variations of horizontal Ekman layer thickness versus the thermal boundary layer thickness and corresponding scalings for various quantities such as the azimuthal velocity or the heat transport. Experimental investigation of the same setup is carried out with a 1m diameter cylindrical container on a rotating platform: local heating is produced with an electrically heated annular ring at the bottom of the tank and cooling is imposed through a circular disk near the centre of the tank at the upper surface, cooled with circulating water. Different unstable circulation regimes

  4. Nonlinear and detuning effects of the nutation angle in precessionally forced rotating cylinder flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan M.; Marques, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    The flow in a rapidly rotating cylinder forced to precess through a nutation angle α is investigated numerically, keeping all parameters constant except α , and tuned to a triadic resonance at α =1∘ . When increasing α , the flow undergoes a sequence of well-characterized bifurcations associated with triadic resonance, involving heteroclinic and homoclinic cycles, for α up to about 4∘. For larger α , we identify two chaotic regimes. In the first regime, with α between about 4∘ and 27∘, the bulk flow retains remnants of the helical structures associated with the triadic resonance, but there are strong nonlinear interactions between the various azimuthal Fourier components of the flow. For the larger α regime, large detuning effects lead to the triadic resonance dynamics being completely swamped by boundary layer eruptions. The azimuthal mean flow at large angles results in a large mean deviation from solid-body rotation and the flow is characterized by strong shear at the boundary layers with temporally chaotic eruptions.

  5. The effect of power-law body forces on a thermally driven flow between concentric rotating spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to determine the effect of power-law body forces on a thermally-driven axisymmetric flow field confined between concentric co-rotating spheres. This study is motivated by Spacelab geophysical fluid-flow experiments, which use an electrostatic force on a dielectric fluid to simulate gravity; this force exhibits a (1/r)sup 5 distribution. Meridional velocity is found to increase when the electrostatic body force is imposed, relative to when the body force is uniform. Correlation among flow fields with uniform, inverse-square, and inverse-quintic force fields is obtained using a modified Grashof number.

  6. The effect of power law body forces on a thermally-driven flow between concentric rotating spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to determine the effect of power-law body forces on a thermally-driven axisymmetric flow field confined between concentric co-rotating spheres. This study is motivated by Spacelab geophysical fluid-flow experiments, which use an electrostatic force on a dielectric fluid to simulate gravity; this force exhibits a (1/r)sup 5 distribution. Meridional velocity is found to increase when the electrostatic body force is imposed, relative to when the body force is uniform. Correlation among flow fields with uniform, inverse-square, and inverse-quintic force fields is obtained using a modified Grashof number.

  7. Mean and fluctuating basal forces generated by granular flows: Laboratory observations in a large vertically rotating drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, L.; Dietrich, W. E.; Sklar, L. S.

    2014-06-01

    A flowing granular mass generates forces on the boundary that drive near-bed grain dynamics, bed surface erosion, and energy dissipation. Few quantitative analyses exist of the controls on the dynamically fluctuating force caused by granular flows with wide-grain-size distributions and a liquid phase in the pores. To study the mechanisms controlling the boundary forces, we used a 225 cm2 load plate to measure the bed-normal force from a suite of granular flows in a 4 m diameter, 80 cm wide vertically rotating drum. We analyzed the time series of bed forces generated in flows composed of granular material for both narrow (gravel-water) and wide (muddy, sand-gravel-cobble) grain-size distributions. The tail of the force distribution was captured more closely by a generalized Pareto distribution than an exponential distribution, suggesting a way to predict empirically the force distribution. We show that the impulse on the bed, related to kinetic energy transferred to the bed from the granular collisions, is quantified by the standard deviation of the force. The mean bulk force equaled the static weight of the flow, whereas the force fluctuations, represented by the standard deviation and the averaged top 1% of force, were a near-linear function of effective grain diameter and flow velocity, and a ˜0.5 power function of an inertial stress scaling term. The force fluctuations depend on both Savage and Bagnold numbers. The correlations revealed in this study suggest that it may be possible to estimate dynamic forces on the bed from gross properties of the flows.

  8. The drift force on an object in an inviscid weakly-varying rotational flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, G.B.

    1995-12-31

    The force on any stationary object in an inviscid incompressible extensive steady flow is derived in terms of the added mass tensor and gradient of velocity of the undisturbed fluid. Taylor`s theorem is extended to flows with weak vorticity. There are possible applications to constitutive equations for two-phase flow.

  9. Examination of forced unsteady separated flow fields on a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Huyer, S. )

    1993-04-01

    The wind turbine industry faces many problems regarding the construction of efficient and predictable wind turbine machines. Steady state, two-dimensional wind tunnel data are generally used to predict aerodynamic loads on wind turbine blades. Preliminary experimental evidence indicates that some of the underlying fluid dynamic phenomena could be attributed to dynamic stall, or more specifically to generation of forced unsteady separated flow fields. A collaborative research effort between the University of Colorado and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was conducted to systematically categorize the local and global effects of three- dimensional forced unsteady flow fields.

  10. Active media under rotational forcing.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Villar, Vicente; Porteiro, Jose L F; Muñuzuri, Alberto P

    2006-10-01

    The bubble-free Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction has been used to study the effects of centrifugal forces on autowave propagation. The reaction parameters were chosen such that the system oscillates naturally creating target waves. In the present study, the system was forced to rotate with a constant velocity around a central axis. In studying the effects of such a forcing on the system, we focused on target dynamics. The system reacts to this forcing in different ways, the most spectacular being a dramatic increase in the period of the target, the effect growing stronger as we move away from the center of rotation. A numerical study was carried out using the two-variable Oregonator model, modified to include convective effects through the diffusion coefficient. The numerical results showed a good qualitative agreement with those of the experiments. PMID:17155149

  11. Current flow and pair creation at low altitude in rotation-powered pulsars' force-free magnetospheres: space charge limited flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timokhin, A. N.; Arons, J.

    2013-02-01

    We report the results of an investigation of particle acceleration and electron-positron plasma generation at low altitude in the polar magnetic flux tubes of rotation-powered pulsars, when the stellar surface is free to emit whatever charges and currents are demanded by the force-free magnetosphere. We apply a new 1D hybrid plasma simulation code to the dynamical problem, using Particle-in-Cell methods for the dynamics of the charged particles, including a determination of the collective electrostatic fluctuations in the plasma, combined with a Monte Carlo treatment of the high-energy gamma-rays that mediate the formation of the electron-positron pairs. We assume the electric current flowing through the pair creation zone is fixed by the much higher inductance magnetosphere, and adopt the results of force-free magnetosphere models to provide the currents which must be carried by the accelerator. The models are spatially one dimensional, and designed to explore the physics, although of practical relevance to young, high-voltage pulsars. We observe novel behaviour (a) When the current density j is less than the Goldreich-Julian value (0 < j/jGJ < 1), space charge limited acceleration of the current carrying beam is mild, with the full Goldreich-Julian charge density comprising the charge densities of the beam and a cloud of electrically trapped particles with the same sign of charge as the beam. The voltage drops are of the order of mc2/e, and pair creation is absent. (b) When the current density exceeds the Goldreich-Julian value (j/jGJ > 1), the system develops high voltage drops (TV or greater), causing emission of curvature gamma-rays and intense bursts of pair creation. The bursts exhibit limit cycle behaviour, with characteristic time-scales somewhat longer than the relativistic fly-by time over distances comparable to the polar cap diameter (microseconds). (c) In return current regions, where j/jGJ < 0, the system develops similar bursts of pair creation

  12. On rotational conical flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Carlo

    1952-01-01

    Some general properties of isoenergetic rotational conical fields are determined. For such fields, provided the physical parameters of the fluid flow are known on a conical reference surface, it being understood that they satisfy certain imposed conditions, it is shown how to construct the hodographs in the various meridional semiplanes, as the envelope of either the tangents to the hodographs or of the osculatory circles.

  13. Current Flow and Pair Creation at Low Altitude in Rotation-Powered Pulsars' Force-Free Magnetospheres: Space Charge Limited Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timokhin, A. N.; Arons, J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation of particle acceleration and electron-positron plasma generation at low altitude in the polar magnetic flux tubes of rotation-powered pulsars, when the stellar surface is free to emit whatever charges and currents are demanded by the force-free magnetosphere. We apply a new 1D hybrid plasma simulation code to the dynamical problem, using Particle-in-Cell methods for the dynamics of the charged particles, including a determination of the collective electrostatic fluctuations in the plasma, combined with a Monte Carlo treatment of the high-energy gamma-rays that mediate the formation of the electron-positron pairs.We assume the electric current flowing through the pair creation zone is fixed by the much higher inductance magnetosphere, and adopt the results of force-free magnetosphere models to provide the currents which must be carried by the accelerator. The models are spatially one dimensional, and designed to explore the physics, although of practical relevance to young, high-voltage pulsars. We observe novel behaviour (a) When the current density j is less than the Goldreich-Julian value (0 < j/j(sub GJ) < 1), space charge limited acceleration of the current carrying beam is mild, with the full Goldreich-Julian charge density comprising the charge densities of the beam and a cloud of electrically trapped particles with the same sign of charge as the beam. The voltage drops are of the order of mc(sup 2)/e, and pair creation is absent. (b) When the current density exceeds the Goldreich-Julian value (j/j(sub GJ) > 1), the system develops high voltage drops (TV or greater), causing emission of curvature gamma-rays and intense bursts of pair creation. The bursts exhibit limit cycle behaviour, with characteristic time-scales somewhat longer than the relativistic fly-by time over distances comparable to the polar cap diameter (microseconds). (c) In return current regions, where j/j(sub GJ) < 0, the system develops similar

  14. Rotating Bondi Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myeong-Gu; Han, Du-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of accretion flow onto a black hole are determined by the physical condition of gas at large radius. When the gas has no angular momentum and is polytropic, the accretion flow becomes the classic Bondi flow. The mass accretion rate in such case is an eigenvalue and uniquely determined by the density and the temperature of the surrounding gas for a given black hole mass. When the gas has angular momentum above some critical value, the angular momentum of the gas should be removed by viscosity to reach the black hole horizon. We study, within the slim disk approximation, rotating polytropic accretion flow with alpha viscosity as an an extension of the Bondi flow. The characteristics of the accretion flow are now determined by the temperature, density, and angular momentum of the gas at the outer boundary. We explore the effects of the viscosity parameter and the outer boundary radius on the physical characteristic of the flow, especially on the mass accretion rate, and compare the result with previous works of Park (2009) and Narayan & Fabian (2011).

  15. Deceleration of Alpha Particles in the Solar Wind by Instabilities and the Rotational Force: Implications for Heating, Azimuthal Flow, and the Parker Spiral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    2015-06-01

    Protons and alpha particles in the fast solar wind are only weakly collisional and exhibit a number of non-equilibrium features, including relative drifts between particle species. Two non-collisional mechanisms have been proposed for limiting differential flow between alpha particles and protons: plasma instabilities and the rotational force. Both mechanisms decelerate the alpha particles. In this paper, we derive an analytic expression for the rate {Q}{flow} at which energy is released by alpha-particle deceleration, accounting for azimuthal flow and conservation of total momentum. We show that instabilities control the deceleration of alpha particles at r\\lt {r}{crit}, and the rotational force controls the deceleration of alpha particles at r\\gt {r}{crit}, where {r}{crit}≃ 2.5 {AU} in the fast solar wind in the ecliptic plane. We find that {Q}{flow} is positive at r\\lt {r}{crit} and {Q}{flow}=0 at r≥slant {r}{crit}, consistent with the previous finding that the rotational force does not lead to a release of energy. We compare the value of {Q}{flow} at r\\lt {r}{crit} with empirical heating rates for protons and alpha particles, denoted {Q}p and {Q}α , deduced from in situ measurements of fast-wind streams from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft. We find that {Q}{flow} exceeds {Q}α at r\\lt 1 {AU}, and that {Q}{flow}/{Q}p decreases with increasing distance from the Sun from a value of about one at r = 0.29–0.42 AU to about 1/4 at 1 AU. We conclude that the continuous energy input from alpha-particle deceleration at r\\lt {r}{crit} makes an important contribution to the heating of the fast solar wind. We also discuss the implications of the alpha-particle drift for the azimuthal flow velocities of the ions and for the Parker spiral magnetic field.

  16. Numerical simulation of negative Magnus force on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Flow characteristics and fluid force on a sphere rotating along with axis perpendicular to mean air flow were investigated using Large Eddy Simulation at two different Reynolds numbers of 10,000 and 200,000. As a result of simulation, opposite flow characteristics around the sphere and displacement of the separation point were visualized depending on the Reynolds number even though the sphere rotates at the same rotation speed according to the Reynolds number. When Reynolds number is 10,000, flow characteristics agree with the flow field explained in the Magnus effect. However sphere rotates at the same rotation speed while increasing Reynolds number to 200,000, separation point moves in opposite direction and wake appears in the different direction. The reason of the negative Magnus force was discussed in terms of the boundary layer transition on the surface.

  17. On rotational forces in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.; Isenberg, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    Solar rotational forces affecting the flow of minor ions in the solar wind are considered as corotating with the sun. Cold, noninteracting charged particles in the magnetic and gravitational fields of the sun rotate with the angular velocity of the sun, and calculations of lowest bulk order velocities show that differences in particle velocities decrease with increasing distance from the sun. A centrifugal potential in the corotating frame implies that ion motion is independent of protons, with velocities determined by the potential, which monotonically decreases without limit. The potential dominates the initial kinetic energy of the particles, and the equality of velocities within the potential is not due to interactions between particles as claimed by Mackenzie et al. (1979).

  18. Instability and transition in rotating disk flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    The stability of three dimensional rotating disk flow and the effects of Coriolis forces and streamline curvature were investigated. It was shown that this analysis gives better growth rates than Orr-Sommerfeld equation. Results support the numerical prediction that the number of stationary vortices varies directly with the Reynolds number.

  19. Axisymmetric supersonic flow in rotating impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W

    1952-01-01

    General equations are developed for isentropic, frictionless, axisymmetric flow in rotating impellers with blade thickness taken into account and with blade forces eliminated in favor of the blade-surface function. It is shown that the total energy of the gas relative to the rotating coordinate system is dependent on the stream function only, and that if the flow upstream of the impeller is vortex-free, a velocity potential exists which is a function of only the radial and axial distances in the impeller. The characteristic equations for supersonic flow are developed and used to investigate flows in several configurations in order to ascertain the effect of variations of the boundary conditions on the internal flow and the work input. Conditions varied are prerotation of the gas, blade turning rate, gas velocity at the blade tips, blade thickness, and sweep of the leading edge.

  20. Stochastically forced zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Kaushik

    This thesis investigates the dynamics of multiple zonal jets, that spontaneously emerge on the barotropic beta-plane, driven by a homogenous and rapidly decorrelating forcing and damped by bottom drag. Decomposing the barotropic vorticity equation into the zonal-mean and eddy equations, and neglecting the eddy-eddy interactions, defines the quasi-linear (QL) system. Numerical solution of the QL system shows zonal jets with length scales comparable to jets obtained by solving the nonlinear (NL) system. Starting with the QL system, one can construct a deterministic equation for the evolution of the two-point single-time correlation function of the vorticity, from which one can obtain the Reynolds stress that drives the zonal mean flow. This deterministic system has an exact nonlinear solution, which is a homogenous eddy field with no jets. When the forcing is also isotropic in space, we characterize the linear stability of this jetless solution by calculating the critical stability curve in the parameter space and successfully comparing this analytic result with numerical solutions of the QL system. But the critical drag required for the onset of NL zonostrophic instability is up to a factor of six smaller than that for QL zonostrophic instability. The constraint of isotropic forcing is then relaxed and spatially anisotropic forcing is used to drive the jets. Meridionally drifting jets are observed whenever the forcing breaks an additional symmetry that we refer to as mirror, or reflexional symmetry. The magnitude of drift speed in our results shows a strong variation with both mu and beta: while the drift speed decreases almost linearly with decreasing mu, it actually increases as beta decreases. Similar drifting jets are also observed in QL, with the same direction (i.e. northward or southward) and similar magnitude as NL jet-drift. Starting from the laminar solution, and assuming a mean-flow that varies slowly with reference to the scale of the eddies, we obtain

  1. Turbulent Flow Between Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih-I, Pai

    1943-01-01

    The turbulent air flow between rotating cylinders was investigated. The distributions of mean speed and of turbulence were measured in the gap between a rotating inner and a stationary outer cylinder. The measurements led to the conclusion that the turbulent flow in the gap cannot be considered two dimensional, but that a particular type of secondary motion takes place. It is shown that the experimentally found velocity distribution can be fully understood under the assumption that this secondary motion consists of three-dimensional ring-shape vortices. The vortices occur only in pairs, and their number and size depend on the speed of the rotating cylinder; the number was found to decrease with increasing speed. The secondary motion has an essential part in the transmission of the moment of momentum. In regions where the secondary motion is negligible, the momentum transfer follows the laws known for homologous turbulence. Ring-shape vortices are known to occur in the laminar flow between rotating cylinders, but it was hitherto unknown that they exist even at speeds that are several hundred times the critical limit.

  2. Laboratory study of forced rotating shallow water turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espa, Stefania; Di Nitto, Gabriella; Cenedese, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    During the last three decades several authors have studied the appearance of multiple zonal jets in planetary atmospheres and in the Earths oceans. The appearance of zonal jets has been recovered in numerical simulations (Yoden & Yamada, 1993), laboratory experiments (Afanasyev & Wells, 2005; Espa et al., 2008, 2010) and in field measurements of the atmosphere of giant planets (Galperin et al., 2001). Recent studies have revealed the presence of zonation also in the Earths oceans, in fact zonal jets have been found in the outputs of Oceanic General Circulation Models-GCMs (Nakano & Hasumi, 2005) and from the analysis of satellite altimetry observations (Maximenko et al., 2005). In previous works (Espa et al., 2008, 2010) we have investigated the impact of the variation of the rotation rate and of the fluid depth on jets organization in decaying and forced regimes. In this work we show results from experiments performed in a bigger domain in which the fluid is forced continuously. The experimental set-up consists of a rotating tank (1m in diameter) where the initial distribution of vorticity has been generated via the Lorentz force in an electromagnetic cell. The latitudinal variation of the Coriolis parameter has been simulated by the parabolic profile assumed by the free surface of the rotating fluid. Flow measurements have been performed using an image analysis technique. Experiments have been performed changing the tank rotation rate and the fluid thickness. We have investigated the flow in terms of zonal and radial flow pattern, flow variability and jet scales.

  3. Forces and Torques on Rotating Spirochete Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Huber, Greg; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Spirochetes are a unique group of motile bacteria that are distinguished by their helical or flat-wave shapes and the location of their flagella, which reside within the tiny space between the bacterial cell wall and the outer membrane (the periplasm). In Borrelia burgdorferi, rotation of the flagella produces cellular undulations that drive swimming. How these shape changes arise due to the forces and torques that act between the flagella and the cell body is unknown. It is possible that resistive forces come from friction or from fluid drag, depending on whether or not the flagella are in contact with the cell wall. Here, we consider both of these cases. By analyzing the motion of an elastic flagellum rotating in the periplasmic space, we show that the flagella are most likely separated from the bacterial cell wall by a lubricating layer of fluid. This analysis then provides drag coefficients for rotation and sliding of a flagellum within the periplasm. PMID:22243185

  4. Forces and torques on rotating spirochete flagella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Huber, Greg; Wolgemuth, Charles W

    2011-12-23

    Spirochetes are a unique group of motile bacteria that are distinguished by their helical or flat-wave shapes and the location of their flagella, which reside within the tiny space between the bacterial cell wall and the outer membrane (the periplasm). In Borrelia burgdorferi, rotation of the flagella produces cellular undulations that drive swimming. How these shape changes arise due to the forces and torques that act between the flagella and the cell body is unknown. It is possible that resistive forces come from friction or from fluid drag, depending on whether or not the flagella are in contact with the cell wall. Here, we consider both of these cases. By analyzing the motion of an elastic flagellum rotating in the periplasmic space, we show that the flagella are most likely separated from the bacterial cell wall by a lubricating layer of fluid. This analysis then provides drag coefficients for rotation and sliding of a flagellum within the periplasm. PMID:22243185

  5. Forces and Torques on Rotating Spirochete Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Huber, Greg; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2011-12-01

    Spirochetes are a unique group of motile bacteria that are distinguished by their helical or flat-wave shapes and the location of their flagella, which reside within the tiny space between the bacterial cell wall and the outer membrane (the periplasm). In Borrelia burgdorferi, rotation of the flagella produces cellular undulations that drive swimming. How these shape changes arise due to the forces and torques that act between the flagella and the cell body is unknown. It is possible that resistive forces come from friction or from fluid drag, depending on whether or not the flagella are in contact with the cell wall. Here, we consider both of these cases. By analyzing the motion of an elastic flagellum rotating in the periplasmic space, we show that the flagella are most likely separated from the bacterial cell wall by a lubricating layer of fluid. This analysis then provides drag coefficients for rotation and sliding of a flagellum within the periplasm.

  6. On the effect of inertia and history forces on the slow motion of a spherical solid or gaseous inclusion in a solid-body rotation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelier, Fabien; Angilella, Jean-Régis; Souhar, Mohamed

    2005-12-01

    The motion of a spherical inclusion released in a vertical solid-body rotation flow is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Solid spheres and bubbles are considered. The particle Reynolds number, the Taylor number, the Weber number and the capillary number are smaller than unity. The motion equations of the inclusion are obtained by revisiting the hydrodynamic equations. The axial (vertical) motion and the horizontal motion are uncoupled, even though they are sensitive to the rotation rate of the flow. Analytical solutions of the particle motion equation are compared to experimental results obtained by releasing a particle in a rotating tank filled with silicone oil. For solid spheres and bubbles, both the terminal velocity and the particle ejection rate (or trapping rate) predicted by the theory agree with experiments, without any empirical adjustment. In particular, the experimental device enables us to check the validity of various theories involving solid or gaseous inclusions with or without inertia or history effects. It is observed that the mobility tensor obtained by writing the fluid motion equations in the rotating frame accurately predicts the horizontal particle trajectory, like the Boussinesq-Basset equation obtained by writing the fluid motion equations in the non-rotating frame and neglecting the horizontal contribution of inertia effects.

  7. Flow-induced vibrations of a rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourguet, Remi; Lo Jacono, David

    2013-11-01

    The flow-induced vibrations of a circular cylinder, free to oscillate in the cross-flow direction and subjected to a forced rotation about its axis, are studied by means of two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations, at a Reynolds number equal to 100. This problem serves as a paradigm to investigate the impact of symmetry breaking on the phenomenon of vortex-induced vibrations (VIV), previously described in the non-rotating case. The cylinder exhibits free oscillations up to a rotation rate close to 4. Under forced rotation, the vibration amplitude reaches 1.9 diameters, i.e. three times the maximum amplitude in the non-rotating case. Contrary to galloping responses, the free vibrations of the rotating cylinder are found to involve a condition of wake-body synchronization similar to the lock-in condition driving non-rotating cylinder VIV. A variety of flow patterns including novel asymmetric wake topologies is identified; it is shown that free oscillations may develop in the absence of vortex shedding. The symmetry breaking substantially alters the fluid force spectra and phasing mechanisms. The flow three-dimensional transition is found to occur at high rotation rates; its influence on the fluid-structure system behavior is analyzed.

  8. Effect of rotation rate on the forces of a rotating cylinder: Simulation and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, John A.; Ou, Yuh-Roung

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present numerical solutions to several optimal control problems for an unsteady viscous flow. The main thrust of this work is devoted to simulation and control of an unsteady flow generated by a circular cylinder undergoing rotary motion. By treating the rotation rate as a control variable, we can formulate two optimal control problems and use a central difference/pseudospectral transform method to numerically compute the optimal control rates. Several types of rotations are considered as potential controls, and we show that a proper synchronization of forcing frequency with the natural vortex shedding frequency can greatly influence the flow. The results here indicate that using moving boundary controls for such systems may provide a feasible mechanism for flow control.

  9. Microphotonic Forces from Superfluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuslan, D. L.; Harris, G. I.; Baker, C.; Sachkou, Y.; He, X.; Sheridan, E.; Bowen, W. P.

    2016-04-01

    In cavity optomechanics, radiation pressure and photothermal forces are widely utilized to cool and control micromechanical motion, with applications ranging from precision sensing and quantum information to fundamental science. Here, we realize an alternative approach to optical forcing based on superfluid flow and evaporation in response to optical heating. We demonstrate optical forcing of the motion of a cryogenic microtoroidal resonator at a level of 1.46 nN, roughly 1 order of magnitude larger than the radiation pressure force. We use this force to feedback cool the motion of a microtoroid mechanical mode to 137 mK. The photoconvective forces we demonstrate here provide a new tool for high bandwidth control of mechanical motion in cryogenic conditions, while the ability to apply forces remotely, combined with the persistence of flow in superfluids, offers the prospect for new applications.

  10. Acoustic streaming flows and sample rotation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Eugene

    1998-11-01

    Levitated drops in a gas can be driven into rotation by altering their surrounding convective environment. When these drops are placed in an acoustic resonant chamber, the symmetry characteristics of the steady streaming flows in the vicinity of the drops determine the rotational motion of the freely suspended fluid particles. Using ultrasonic standing waves around 22 kHz and millimeter-size electrostatically levitated drops, we have investigated the correlation between the convective flow characteristics and their rotational behavior. The results show that accurate control of the drop rotation axis and rate can be obtained by carefully modifying the symmetry characteristics of the chamber, and that the dominant mechanism for rotation drive is the drag exerted by the air flow over the drop surface. In addition, we found that the rotational acceleration depends on the drop viscosity, suggesting that this torque is initially strongly influenced by differential flows within the drop itself. [Work sponsored by NASA].

  11. Rotatable non-circular forebody flow controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskovitz, Cary A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a rotatable, non-circular forebody flow controller. The apparatus comprises a small geometric device located at a nose of a forebody of an aircraft and a non-circular cross-sectional area that extends toward the apex of the aircraft. The device is symmetrical about a reference plane and preferably attaches to an axle which in turn attaches to a rotating motor. The motor rotates the device about an axis of rotation. Preferably, a control unit connected to an aircraft flight control computer signals to the rotating motor the proper rotational positioning of the geometric device.

  12. Heat transfer in serpentine flow passages with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, S.; Takamura, J.; Yamawaki, S.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    1992-06-01

    Results are reported of an experimental study tracing heat transfer performance in a rotating serpentine flow passage of a square cross section. The test section is preceded by a hydrodynamic calming region. The test model is a blow-up (by seven times) of actual winding flow passages in rotor blades. It is concluded that the flow in the 180-deg bends exhibits strong 3D structure. The heat transfer coefficient in the bend is substantially higher than in the straight flow passages. The average heat transfer characteristics over the entire flow passage is greatly affected by flow at the 180-deg bends. Due to secondary flow induced by the Coriolis force, the heat transfer coefficient in the radially outward flow passages diminish on the leading surface, but increase on the trailing surface, with an increase in rotational speed. The trend is reversed in the radially inward flow passages.

  13. Numerical Study of Rotating Turbulence with External Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeung, P. K.; Zhou, Ye

    1998-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation at 256(exp 3) resolution have been carried out to study the response of isotropic turbulence to the concurrent effects of solid-body rotation and numerical forcing at the large scales. Because energy transfer to the smaller scales is weakened by rotation, energy input from forcing gradually builds up at the large scales, causing the overall kinetic energy to increase. At intermediate wavenumbers the energy spectrum undergoes a transition from a limited k(exp -5/3) inertial range to k(exp -2) scaling recently predicted in the literature. Although the Reynolds stress tensor remains approximately isotropic and three-components, evidence for anisotropy and quasi- two-dimensionality in length scales and spectra in different velocity components and directions is strong. The small scales are found to deviate from local isotropy, primarily as a result of anisotropic transfer to the high wavenumbers. To understand the spectral dynamics of this flow we study the detailed behavior of nonlinear triadic interactions in wavenumber space. Spectral transfer in the velocity component parallel to the axis of rotation is qualitatively similar to that in non-rotating turbulence; however the perpendicular component is characterized by a greatly suppressed energy cascade at high wavenumber and a local reverse transfer at the largest scales. The broader implications of this work are briefly addressed.

  14. Theoretical study of fluid forces on a centrifugal impeller rotating and whirling in a volute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsujimoto, Y.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Fluid forces on a rotating and whirling centrifugal impeller in a volute are analyzed with the assumption of a two-dimensional rotational, inviscid flow. For simplicity, the flow is assumed to be perfectly guided by the impeller vanes. The theory predicts the tangential and the radial force on the whirling impeller as functions of impeller geometry, volute spacing, and whirl ratio. A good qualitative agreement with experiment is found.

  15. Rotation Invariant Vortices for Flow Visualization.

    PubMed

    Günther, Tobias; Schulze, Maik; Theisel, Holger

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new class of vortex definitions for flows that are induced by rotating mechanical parts, such as stirring devices, helicopters, hydrocyclones, centrifugal pumps, or ventilators. Instead of a Galilean invariance, we enforce a rotation invariance, i.e., the invariance of a vortex under a uniform-speed rotation of the underlying coordinate system around a fixed axis. We provide a general approach to transform a Galilean invariant vortex concept to a rotation invariant one by simply adding a closed form matrix to the Jacobian. In particular, we present rotation invariant versions of the well-known Sujudi-Haimes, Lambda-2, and Q vortex criteria. We apply them to a number of artificial and real rotating flows, showing that for these cases rotation invariant vortices give better results than their Galilean invariant counterparts. PMID:26390472

  16. Flow Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOEpatents

    Walrath, David E.; Lindberg, William R.; Burgess, Robert K.; LaBelle, James

    2000-02-22

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. An axially aligned outlet may also increase the flow efficiency. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane. A seal separator may increase the useful life of the seal between the fixed and rotatable portions.

  17. Stress analysis of rotating propellers subject to forced excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgun, Ulas

    Turbine blades experience vibrations due to the flow disturbances. These vibrations are the leading cause for fatigue failure in turbine blades. This thesis presents the finite element analysis methods to estimate the maximum vibrational stresses of rotating structures under forced excitation. The presentation included starts with the derived equations of motion for vibration of rotating beams using energy methods under the Euler Bernoulli beam assumptions. The nonlinear large displacement formulation captures the centrifugal stiffening and gyroscopic effects. The weak form of the equations and their finite element discretization are shown. The methods implemented were used for normal modes analyses and forced vibration analyses of rotating beam structures. The prediction of peak stresses under simultaneous multi-mode excitation show that the maximum vibrational stresses estimated using the linear superposition of the stresses can greatly overestimate the stresses if the phase information due to damping (physical and gyroscopic effects) are neglected. The last section of this thesis also presents the results of a practical study that involves finite element analysis and redesign of a composite propeller.

  18. Computation of forced laminar convection in rotating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, J. W.

    1985-05-01

    Finite difference solutions are presented for forced laminar convection in a rotating cylindrical cavity with radial outflow. This forms a simple model of the cooling flow between two compressor disks in a gas turbine engine. If the fluid enters the cavity from a uniform radial source, it is shown that the local Nusselt number changes from that of a 'free disk' near the center of the cavity to that for Ekman layer flow at larger radii. With an axial inlet, the flow, and consequently, the heat transfer, is more complex. If vortex breakdown occurs, then the results are very similar to those for the radial inlet case, but otherwise a wall jet forms on the downstream disk, and the heat transfer from this disk may be several times that for the upstream disk. Variation of mean Nusselt number with rotational speed is qualitatively similar to previously published experimental measurements in turbulent flow. The effect of Prandtl number on heat transfer has also been demonstrated.

  19. Simulation Of Unsteady, Inviscid, Rotational, Transonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damodaran, Murali

    1992-01-01

    Report describes numerical simulation of two-dimensional, unsteady, inviscid rotational, transonic flow about rigid airfoil in such motions as pitching or plunging oscillations. Study demonstrates potential utility of computation in analyses of aeroelasticity of airfoils.

  20. Particle Rotation Effects in Rarefied Two-Phase Plume Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Jonathan M.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2005-05-01

    We evaluate the effects of solid particle rotation in high-altitude solid rocket exhaust plume flows, through the development and application of methods for the simulation of two phase flows involving small rotating particles and a nonequilibrium gas. Green's functions are derived for the force, moment, and heat transfer rate to a rotating solid sphere within a locally free-molecular gas, and integration over a Maxwellian gas velocity distribution is used to determine the influence of particle rotation on the heat transfer rate at the equilibrium limit. The use of these Green's functions for the determination of particle phase properties through the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method is discussed, and a procedure is outlined for the stochastic modeling of interphase collisions. As a test case, we consider the nearfield plume flow for a Star-27 solid rocket motor exhausting into a vacuum, and vary particle angular velocities at the nozzle exit plane in order to evaluate the influence of particle rotation on various flow properties. Simulation results show that rotation may lead to slightly higher particle temperatures near the central axis, but for the case considered the effects of particle rotation are generally found to be negligible.

  1. The effect of radial pressure force on rotating double tearing mode in compressible plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Qu; Xiong, Guo-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Qing

    2016-05-01

    The role of radial pressure force in the interlocking dynamics of double tearing modes (DTMs) is investigated by force balance analysis based on the compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model. It is found that the stability of symmetric DTMs is dominated by the radial pressure force rather than the field line bending force. Owing to the compressibility of rotating plasmas, unbalanced radial forces can just result in the rotating islands drift toward each other in the radial direction but do not trigger the explosive growth of the mode in the interlocking process, which is different from that of antisymmetric DTM without flow.

  2. Flow Transitions in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    1996-01-01

    Critical Rayleigh numbers have been measured in a liquid metal cylinder of finite height in the presence of a rotating magnetic field. Several different stability regimes were observed, which were determined by the values of the Rayleigh and Hartmann numbers. For weak rotating magnetic fields and small Rayleigh numbers, the experimental observations can be explained by the existence of a single non-axisymmetric meridional roll rotating around the cylinder, driven by the azimuthal component of the magnetic field. The measured dependence of rotational velocity on magnetic field strength is consistent with the existence of laminar flow in this regime.

  3. Separation of polymers by length in rotational flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfahani, Faihan; Kreft Pearce, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    We use a lattice-Boltzmann based Brownian dynamics simulation to determine if polymers of different lengths can be separated by a combination of a trapping force and fluid flow. We produce two counter-rotating vortices in the simulation, similar to the work of HIlgenfeldt, et al., that used rotational flow to separate colloids of different size. We can achieve separation of polymers that differ in length by as little as 30%. We expect that this technique could be used in a microfluidic device to analyze the size of long DNA fragments produced in common molecular biological tests.

  4. Low volume fraction rimming flow in a rotating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Ju; Tsai, Yu-Te; Liu, Ta-Jo; Wu, Ping-Yao

    2007-12-01

    An experimental study was carried out to examine how uniform rimming flow is established for a very small volume fraction of aqueous Newtonian solutions in a partially filled rotating horizontal cylinder. There exists a certain critical volume fraction (Vc) for each solution, where the rotational speed required to achieve uniform rimming flow takes a minimum value. Counterintuitively, it takes greater rotation speeds for both larger and smaller volume fractions than this. Axial instabilities are observed for liquid volume fractions above or below this critical value. For V >Vc the defects are mainly of shark-teeth and turbulent types, while for V rotational speed for V >Vc, but has very little effect for V flow found in the present study is 0.25%. The dimensionless minimum rotational speed Ω to achieve rimming flow is presented as a function of the dimensionless liquid volume fraction ϕ. The competing effects of fluid inertia and viscous force on rimming flow are demonstrated from a dimensionless plot of Ω versus ϕ.

  5. Instabilities In The Flow Between Rotating Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisy, F.; Gauthier, G.; Gondret, P.; Rabaud, M.

    Instabilities in the flow between two close rotating disks enclosed by a cylinder are investigated experimentally. This flow undergoes a large gallery of instability patterns, presented in the plane of parameters (Reb, Ret) of the Reynolds numbers based on the velocity of each disk and the distance between them. The corotation case and the counter-rotation case with low counter-rotation ratio are very similar to the rotor-stator case: instabilities of the Bödewadt type boundary layer leads to axisymmetric vortices and positive spirals. The counter-rotation case with higher counter-rotation ratio is more complex: above a given rotation ratio, the radial recirculation flow gets organized in a two-cell structure with the apparition of a stagnation circle on the slower disk. A new kind of instability pattern is observed, called negative spirals, that may coexist with the positive spirals (Gauthier et al, subm. J. Fluid Mech. 2001). This new spiral pattern seems to arise from an azimuthal shear layer instability, rather than a boundary layer instability as for the two other patterns. Negative spirals are characterized for different aspect ratios (azimuthal mode, phase velocity), allowing comparisons with recent numerical simulations (Lopez et al, to appear in J. Fluid Mech. 2002).

  6. Analysis of rotation-driven electrokinetic flow in microscale gap regions of rotating disk systems.

    PubMed

    Soong, C Y; Wang, S H

    2004-01-15

    In the present study, a novel theoretical model is developed for the analysis of rotating thermal-fluid flow characteristics in the presence of electrokinetic effects in the microscale gap region between two parallel disks under specified electrostatic, rotational, and thermal boundary conditions. The major flow configuration considered is a rotor-stator disk system. Axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations with consideration of electric body force stemming from streaming potential are employed in the momentum balance. Variations of the fluid viscosity and permittivity with the local fluid temperature are considered. Between two disks, the axial distribution of the electric potential is determined by the Poisson equation with the concentration distributions of positive and negative ions obtained from Nernst-Planck equations for convection-diffusion of the ions in the flow field. Effects of disk rotation and electrostatic and thermal conditions on the electrokinetic flow and thermal characteristics are investigated. The electrohydrodynamic mechanisms are addressed with an interpretation of the coupling nature of the electric and flow fields. Finally, solutions with electric potential determined by employing nonlinear or linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and/or invoking assumptions of constant properties are compared with the predictions of the present model for justification of various levels of approximation in solution of the electrothermal flow behaviors in rotating microfluidic systems. PMID:14654411

  7. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  8. Flow generated around particle clusters in a rotating ultrasonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, G

    1998-09-01

    A chamber cavity, which has a square cross section and pressure-release walls, is used to produce a well-defined, 160-kHz standing ultrasonic field. A suspension of latex microspheres in aqueous metrizamide fills the chamber. The chamber rotates about a horizontal axis producing the centripetal force necessary to contain the buoyant spheres in the axial region. At low particle concentrations, clusters of microspheres form at half-wavelength intervals near the axial positions of acoustic pressure amplitude (p0) minima, as expected because of rotational and acoustic radiation forces. At higher concentrations, additional particle distributions are often seen that suggest the presence of flow. When high concentrations of larger particles are used, small clusters also form at axial positions of p0 maxima. Theory for acoustic streaming in a rotating fluid predicts flow speeds that are too small to account for the observed flow. Reasonable agreement with observations is obtained using a theory for flow generated by the buoyant gravitational force acting on the clusters. PMID:9745732

  9. Turbulent Compressible Convection with Rotation. II. Mean Flows and Differential Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brummell, Nicholas H.; Hurlburt, Neal E.; Toomre, Juri

    1998-01-01

    The effects of rotation on turbulent, compressible convection within stellar envelopes are studied through three-dimensional numerical simulations conducted within a local f-plane model. This work seeks to understand the types of differential rotation that can be established in convective envelopes of stars like the Sun, for which recent helioseismic observations suggest an angular velocity profile with depth and latitude at variance with many theoretical predictions. This paper analyzes the mechanisms that are responsible for the mean (horizontally averaged) zonal and meridional flows that are produced by convection influenced by Coriolis forces. The compressible convection is considered for a range of Rayleigh, Taylor, and Prandtl (and thus Rossby) numbers encompassing both laminar and turbulent flow conditions under weak and strong rotational constraints. When the nonlinearities are moderate, the effects of rotation on the resulting laminar cellular convection leads to distinctive tilts of the cell boundaries away from the vertical. These yield correlations between vertical and horizontal motions that generate Reynolds stresses that can drive mean flows, interpretable as differential rotation and meridional circulations. Under more vigorous forcing, the resulting turbulent convection involves complicated and contorted fluid particle trajectories, with few clear correlations between vertical and horizontal motions, punctuated by an evolving and intricate downflow network that can extend over much of the depth of the layer. Within such networks are some coherent structures of vortical downflow that tend to align with the rotation axis. These yield a novel turbulent alignment mechanism, distinct from the laminar tilting of cellular boundaries, that can provide the principal correlated motions and thus Reynolds stresses and subsequently mean flows. The emergence of such coherent structures that can persist amidst more random motions is a characteristic of turbulence

  10. Turbulent Compressible Convection with Rotation. 2; Mean Flows and Differential Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brummell, Nicholas H.; Hurlburt, Neal E.; Toomre, Juri

    1998-01-01

    The effects of rotation on turbulent, compressible convection within stellar envelopes are studied through three-dimensional numerical simulations conducted within a local f-plane model. This work seeks to understand the types of differential rotation that can be established in convective envelopes of stars like the Sun, for which recent helioseismic observations suggest an angular velocity profile with depth and latitude at variance with many theoretical predictions. This paper analyzes the mechanisms that are responsible for the mean (horizontally averaged) zonal and meridional flows that are produced by convection influenced by Coriolis forces. The compressible convection is considered for a range of Rayleigh, Taylor, and Prandtl (and thus Rossby) numbers encompassing both laminar and turbulent flow conditions under weak and strong rotational constraints. When the nonlinearities are moderate, the effects of rotation on the resulting laminar cellular convection leads to distinctive tilts of the cell boundaries away from the vertical. These yield correlations between vertical and horizontal motions that generate Reynolds stresses that can drive mean flows, interpretable as differential rotation and meridional circulations. Under more vigorous forcing, the resulting turbulent convection involves complicated and contorted fluid particle trajectories, with few clear correlations between vertical and horizontal motions, punctuated by an evolving and intricate downflow network that can extend over much of the depth of the layer. Within such networks are some coherent structures of vortical downflow that tend to align with the rotation axis. These yield a novel turbulent alignment mechanism, distinct from the laminar tilting of cellular boundaries, that can provide the principal correlated motions and thus Reynolds stresses and subsequently mean flows. The emergence of such coherent structures that can persist amidst more random motions is a characteristic of turbulence

  11. Finite element forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.

    1981-01-01

    A capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axes of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical development of this capability is presented.

  12. Single point modeling of rotating turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadid, A. H.; Mansour, N. N.; Zeman, O.

    1994-01-01

    A model for the effects of rotation on turbulence is proposed and tested. These effects which influence mainly the rate of turbulence decay are modeled in a modified turbulent energy dissipation rate equation that has explicit dependence on the mean rotation rate. An appropriate definition of the rotation rate derived from critical point theory and based on the invariants of the deformation tensor is proposed. The modeled dissipation rate equation is numerically well behaved and can be used in conjunction with any level of turbulence closure. The model is applied to the two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model and is used to compute separated flows in a backward-facing step and an axisymmetric swirling coaxial jets into a sudden expansion. In general, the rotation modified dissipation rate model shows some improvements over the standard kappa-epsilon model.

  13. Single point modeling of rotating turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadid, A. H.; Mansour, N. N.; Zeman, O.

    1994-12-01

    A model for the effects of rotation on turbulence is proposed and tested. These effects which influence mainly the rate of turbulence decay are modeled in a modified turbulent energy dissipation rate equation that has explicit dependence on the mean rotation rate. An appropriate definition of the rotation rate derived from critical point theory and based on the invariants of the deformation tensor is proposed. The modeled dissipation rate equation is numerically well behaved and can be used in conjunction with any level of turbulence closure. The model is applied to the two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model and is used to compute separated flows in a backward-facing step and an axisymmetric swirling coaxial jets into a sudden expansion. In general, the rotation modified dissipation rate model shows some improvements over the standard kappa-epsilon model.

  14. Rotation-driven Shear Flow Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiueh, Tzihong

    1996-10-01

    A general treatment of stability is considered for an isentropic flow equilibrium against three-dimensional incompressible perturbations by taking into account the difference in the orientations of the system rotation and flow vorticity. It is shown that the aforementioned orientation difference can indeed generate a coupling that drives instabilities at the expense of the rotational energy. Two types of instability are identified, with one growing algebraically and the other growing exponentially; the parameter regimes for both instabilities are also located. The algebraically growing modes are destabilized more easily than the exponentially growing modes; for example, the former can be unstable when the angle between the rotation axis and the vorticity is beyond 70°.5, whereas the latter becomes unstable when this angle is greater than 90°. In addition, we find that even in the limit of small vorticity, the system may still be unstable algebraically at a considerable strength, in contrast to the case of exact zero vorticity, which is absolutely stable. This finding indicates the existence of structural instability for a rotating fluid. The present analysis is applied also to examination of the problem of shear mixing interior of an accreting white dwarf in the context of nova explosions. In order for the nuclear fuels to be blended deep inside the star and make the explosion, the high angular momentum accreted materials combined with the stellar materials should undergo shear flow instabilities. We find that the shear flow instabilities happen when the disk rotation axis is off by more than 900 from the star rotation axis. The instability has in general an exponential growth, on a timescale much shorter than that of the runaway nuclear burning.

  15. Rimming flows and pattern formation inside rapidly rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polezhaev, Denis; Dyakova, Veronika; Kozlov, Victor

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of fluid and granular medium in a rotating horizontal cylinder is experimentally studied. In a rapidly rotating cylinder liquid and granular medium coat the cylindrical wall under centrifugal force. In the cavity frame gravity field performs rotation and produces oscillatory fluid flow which is responsible for the series of novel effects of pattern formation, namely, axial segregation of heavy particles and pattern formation in the form of sand regular hills extended along the axis of rotation. At least two types of axial segregation are found: a) patterns of spatial period of the same order of magnitude as fluid layer thickness which induced by steady flows generated by inertial waves; b) fine patterns which manifests Gortler - Taylor vortices developing as a consequence of centrifugal instability of viscous boundary layer near the cylindrical wall. Under gravity, intensive fluid shear flow induces partial fluidization of annular layer of granular medium. The oscillatory motion is followed by onset of regular ripples extended along the axis of rotation. The work is supported by Russian Scientific Foundation (project 14-11-00476).

  16. Probe-rotating atomic force microscopy for determining material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we propose a probe-rotating atomic force microscope that enables scan in an arbitrary direction in the contact imaging mode, which is difficult to achieve using a conventional atomic force microscope owing to the orientation-dependent probe and the inability to rotate the probe head. To enable rotation of the probe about its vertical axis, we employed a compact and light probe head, the sensor of which is made of an optical disk drive pickup unit. Our proposed mechanical configuration, operating principle, and control system enables axial and lateral scan in various directions.

  17. Calculations of rotational flows using stream function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.; Yam, C.; Tang, K.; Dwyer, H.

    1989-01-01

    The stream function equation is solved for steady two-dimensional (and axisymmetric) rotational flows. Both finite differences and finite volumes discretization techniques are studied, using generalized body fitted coordinates and unstructured staggered grids, respectively. For inviscid transonic flows, a new artificial viscosity scheme which does not produce any artificial vorticity is introduced, for the stability of the mixed flow calculations and for capturing shocks. The solution of Euler equations, in primitive variables, are also considered. The effects of the artificial viscosity and numerical boundary conditions on the total enthalpy and the vorticity distributions are demonstrated.

  18. Flow in Rotating Serpentine Coolant Passages With Skewed Trip Strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, David G.N.; Steuber, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Laser velocimetry was utilized to map the velocity field in serpentine turbine blade cooling passages with skewed trip strips. The measurements were obtained at Reynolds and Rotation numbers of 25,000 and 0.24 to assess the influence of trips, passage curvature and Coriolis force on the flow field. The interaction of the secondary flows induced by skewed trips with the passage rotation produces a swirling vortex and a corner recirculation zone. With trips skewed at +45 deg, the secondary flows remain unaltered as the cross-flow proceeds from the passage to the turn. However, the flow characteristics at these locations differ when trips are skewed at -45 deg. Changes in the flow structure are expected to augment heat transfer, in agreement with the heat transfer measurements of Johnson, et al. The present results show that trips are skewed at -45 deg in the outward flow passage and trips are skewed at +45 deg in the inward flow passage maximize heat transfer. Details of the present measurements were related to the heat transfer measurements of Johnson, et al. to relate fluid flow and heat transfer measurements.

  19. Fluid flow through packings of rotating obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Rafael S.; Andrade, José S.; Andrade, Roberto F. S.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate through numerical simulation the nonstationary flow of a Newtonian fluid through a two-dimensional channel filled with an array of circular obstacles of distinct sizes. The disks may rotate around their respective centers, modeling a nonstationary, inhomogeneous porous medium. Obstacle sizes and positions are defined by the geometry of an Apollonian packing (AP). To allow for fluid flow, the radii of the disks are uniformly reduced by a factor 0.6 ≤s ≤0.8 for assemblies corresponding to the four first AP generations. The investigation is targeted to elucidate the main features of the rotating regime as compared to the fixed disk condition. It comprises the evaluation of the region of validity of Darcy's law as well as the study of the nonlinear hydraulic resistance as a function of the channel Reynolds number, the reduction factor s , and the AP generation. Depending on a combination of these factors, the resistance of rotating disks may be larger or smaller than that of the corresponding static case. We also analyze the flow redistribution in the interdisk channels as a result of the rotation pattern and characterize the angular velocity of the disks. Here, the striking feature is the emergence of a stable oscillatory behavior of the angular velocity for almost all disks that are inserted into the assemblies after the second generation.

  20. Numerical investigation of droplet motion in rotating viscous liquid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, V. A.; Tkachenko, A. S.; Usanina, A. S.

    2013-05-01

    The results of numerical investigation of the motion of a single droplet in a twisted flow of immiscible viscous liquid are presented. The motion trajectories of a droplet depending on its size, angular velocity of liquid rotation, and the physical parameters of the liquid and droplet have been determined. The values of the Reynolds, Bond, and Weber numbers along the droplet trajectory have been calculated. The effect of the Coriolis forces on the trajectory, velocity, and acceleration of the droplet in flow have been analyzed. The effect of the acceleration components of the droplet on the parameters of its motion is estimated. The numerical results are compared with experimental data.

  1. Turbulent rotating plane Couette flow: Reynolds and rotation number dependency of flow structure and momentum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Takuya; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Plane Couette flow under spanwise, anticyclonic system rotation [rotating plane Couette flow (RPCF)] is studied experimentally using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry for different Reynolds and rotation numbers in the fully turbulent regime. Similar to the laminar regime, the turbulent flow in RPCF is characterized by roll cells, however both instantaneous snapshots of the velocity field and space correlations show that the roll cell structure varies with the rotation number. All three velocity components are measured and both the mean flow and all four nonzero Reynolds stresses are obtained across the central parts of the channel. This also allows us to determine the wall shear stress from the viscous stress and the Reynolds stress in the center of the channel, and for low rotation rates the wall shear stress increases with increasing rotation rate as expected. The results show that zero absolute vorticity is established in the central parts of the channel of turbulent RPCF for high enough rotation rates, but also that the mean velocity profile for certain parameter ranges shows an S shape giving rise to a negative velocity gradient in the center of the channel. We find that from an analysis of the Reynolds stress transport equation using the present data there is a transport of the Reynolds shear stress towards the center of the channel, which may then result in a negative mean velocity gradient there.

  2. Experimental studies of rotating exchange flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, B.; Smeed, D. A.; Dalziel, S. B.; Lane-Serff, G. F.

    2007-02-01

    Ocean basins are connected by straits and passages, geometrically limiting important heat and salt exchanges which in turn influence the global thermohaline circulation and climate. Such exchange can be modeled in an idealized way by taking into consideration the density-driven two-layer flow along a strait under the influence of rotation. We use a laboratory model of a lock exchange between two reservoirs of different density through a flat-bottom channel with a horizontal narrows, set up on two different platforms: a 1 m diameter turntable, where density interface position was measured by dye attenuation, and the 14 m diameter turntable at Coriolis/LEGI (Grenoble, France), where correlation imaging velocimetry, a particle imaging technique, allowed us to obtain for the first time detailed measurements of the velocity fields in these flows. The influence of rotation is studied by varying a parameter, Bu, a type of Burger number given by the ratio of the Rossby radius to the channel width at the narrows. In addition, a two-layer version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Model (MICOM) is used, to study the cases with low Burger number. Results from experiments by Dalziel [1988. Two-layer hydraulics: maximal exchange flows. Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, see also ] are also included for comparison. Time-mean exchange fluxes for any Bu are in close agreement with the inviscid zero-potential vorticity theory of Dalziel [1990. Rotating two-layer sill flows. In: Pratt, L.J. (Ed.), The Physical Oceanography of Sea Straits. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, pp. 343-371] and Whitehead et al. [1974. Rotating hydraulics of strait and sill flows. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics 6, 101-125], who found that fluxes for Bu>1 mainly vary with channel width, similar to non-rotating flow, but for Bu<1 are only limited by the Rossby radius. We also show

  3. Forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Gallo, A. M.; Skalski, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    A new capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axis of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical, user's, programmer's and demonstration manuals for this new capability are presented.

  4. Flow structure on a rotating plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozen, C. A.; Rockwell, D.

    2012-01-01

    The flow structure on a rotating plate of low aspect ratio is characterized well after the onset of motion, such that transient effects are not significant, and only centripetal and Coriolis accelerations are present. Patterns of vorticity, velocity contours, and streamline topology are determined via quantitative imaging, in order to characterize the leading-edge vortex in relation to the overall flow structure. A stable leading-edge vortex is maintained over effective angles of attack from 30° to 75°, and at each angle of attack, its sectional structure at midspan is relatively insensitive to Reynolds number over the range from 3,600 to 14,500. The streamline topology, vorticity distribution, and circulation of the leading-edge vortex are determined as a function of angle of attack, and related to the velocity field oriented toward, and extending along, the leeward surface of the plate. The structure of the leading-edge vortex is classified into basic regimes along the span of the plate. Images of these regimes are complemented by patterns on crossflow planes, which indicate the influence of root and tip swirl, and spanwise flow along the leeward surface of the plate. Comparison with the equivalent of the purely translating plate, which does not induce the foregoing flow structure, further clarifies the effects of rotation.

  5. Flow induced force of labyrinth seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwatsubo, T.; Motooka, N.; Kawai, R.

    1982-01-01

    Flow induced instability force due to a labyrinth seal is analyzed. An approximate solution is given for the partial differential equation representing the flow in labyrinth seal and it is compared with the finite difference method in order to verify the accuracy of both methods. The effects of difference of inlet and outlet pressures of the seal, deflection of pressure and mass flow from the steady state, rotor diameter, seal clearance, seal interval and seal number on the flow induced force of the seal are investigated and it is known that some of these factors are very influential on the flow induced force.

  6. Flow Behavior Around Coupled, Rotating Turbines in Steady Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Matthew; Dabiri, John

    2012-11-01

    Counter-rotating vertical axis turbines (VATs) have been shown to yield increased power density in wind farms as compared to typical horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) farms. However, the governing physical mechanisms remain poorly understood. Scale model experiments in a free-surface water tunnel were conducted to characterize the effect of parameters such as turbine separation, tip speed ratio, and flow speed on the downstream flow field and the resulting vortex shedding from VATs. The flow field was visualized using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser induced fluorescence. The results are compared and contrasted with recent studies of counter-rotating circular cylinders to determine if suppression of vortex shedding plays a similarly important role in dictating the overall wake dynamics. This research was made possible through the generosity of Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Caltech SURF Program.

  7. Rotational flow in tapered slab rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Tony; Sams, Oliver C.; Majdalani, Joseph

    2006-10-01

    Internal flow modeling is a requisite for obtaining critical parameters in the design and fabrication of modern solid rocket motors. In this work, the analytical formulation of internal flows particular to motors with tapered sidewalls is pursued. The analysis employs the vorticity-streamfunction approach to treat this problem assuming steady, incompressible, inviscid, and nonreactive flow conditions. The resulting solution is rotational following the analyses presented by Culick for a cylindrical motor. In an extension to Culick's work, Clayton has recently managed to incorporate the effect of tapered walls. Here, an approach similar to that of Clayton is applied to a slab motor in which the chamber is modeled as a rectangular channel with tapered sidewalls. The solutions are shown to be reducible, at leading order, to Taylor's inviscid profile in a porous channel. The analysis also captures the generation of vorticity at the surface of the propellant and its transport along the streamlines. It is from the axial pressure gradient that the proper form of the vorticity is ascertained. Regular perturbations are then used to solve the vorticity equation that prescribes the mean flow motion. Subsequently, numerical simulations via a finite volume solver are carried out to gain further confidence in the analytical approximations. In illustrating the effects of the taper on flow conditions, comparisons of total pressure and velocity profiles in tapered and nontapered chambers are entertained. Finally, a comparison with the axisymmetric flow analog is presented.

  8. Turbulent plane Couette flow subject to strong system rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Knut H.; Andersson, Helge I.

    1997-09-01

    System rotation is known to substantially affect the mean flow pattern as well as the turbulence structure in rotating channel flows. In a numerical study of plane Couette flow rotating slowly about an axis aligned with the mean vorticity, Bech & Andersson (1996a) found that the turbulence level was damped in the presence of anticyclonic system rotation, in spite of the occurrence of longitudinal counter-rotating roll cells. Moreover, the turbulence anisotropy was practically unaffected by the weak rotation, for which the rotation number Ro, defined as the ratio of twice the imposed angular vorticity [Omega] to the shear rate of the corresponding laminar flow, was ±0.01. The aim of the present paper is to explore the effects of stronger anticyclonic system rotation on directly simulated turbulent plane Couette flow. Turbulence statistics like energy, enstrophy and Taylor lengthscales, both componental and directional, were computed from the statistically steady flow fields and supplemented by structural information obtained by conditional sampling.

  9. Dynamo action in dissipative, forced, rotating MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is an inherent feature of large-scale, energetic astrophysical and geophysical magnetofluids. In general, these are rotating and are energized through buoyancy and shear, while viscosity and resistivity provide a means of dissipation of kinetic and magnetic energy. Studies of unforced, rotating, ideal (i.e., non-dissipative) MHD turbulence have produced interesting results, but it is important to determine how these results are affected by dissipation and forcing. Here, we extend our previous work and examine dissipative, forced, and rotating MHD turbulence. Incompressibility is assumed, and finite Fourier series represent turbulent velocity and magnetic field on a 643 grid. Forcing occurs at an intermediate wave number by a method that keeps total energy relatively constant and allows for injection of kinetic and magnetic helicity. We find that 3-D energy spectra are asymmetric when forcing is present. We also find that dynamo action occurs when forcing has either kinetic or magnetic helicity, with magnetic helicity injection being more important. In forced, dissipative MHD turbulence, the dynamo manifests itself as a large-scale coherent structure that is similar to that seen in the ideal case. These results imply that MHD turbulence, per se, may play a fundamental role in the creation and maintenance of large-scale (i.e., dipolar) stellar and planetary magnetic fields.

  10. Precessing rotating flows with additional shear: Stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Cambon, C.

    2009-03-01

    We consider unbounded precessing rotating flows in which vertical or horizontal shear is induced by the interaction between the solid-body rotation (with angular velocity Ω0 ) and the additional “precessing” Coriolis force (with angular velocity -ɛΩ0 ), normal to it. A “weak” shear flow, with rate 2ɛ of the same order of the Poincaré “small” ratio ɛ , is needed for balancing the gyroscopic torque, so that the whole flow satisfies Euler’s equations in the precessing frame (the so-called admissibility conditions). The base flow case with vertical shear (its cross-gradient direction is aligned with the main angular velocity) corresponds to Mahalov’s [Phys. Fluids A 5, 891 (1993)] precessing infinite cylinder base flow (ignoring boundary conditions), while the base flow case with horizontal shear (its cross-gradient direction is normal to both main and precessing angular velocities) corresponds to the unbounded precessing rotating shear flow considered by Kerswell [Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. 72, 107 (1993)]. We show that both these base flows satisfy the admissibility conditions and can support disturbances in terms of advected Fourier modes. Because the admissibility conditions cannot select one case with respect to the other, a more physical derivation is sought: Both flows are deduced from Poincaré’s [Bull. Astron. 27, 321 (1910)] basic state of a precessing spheroidal container, in the limit of small ɛ . A Rapid distortion theory (RDT) type of stability analysis is then performed for the previously mentioned disturbances, for both base flows. The stability analysis of the Kerswell base flow, using Floquet’s theory, is recovered, and its counterpart for the Mahalov base flow is presented. Typical growth rates are found to be the same for both flows at very small ɛ , but significant differences are obtained regarding growth rates and widths of instability bands, if larger ɛ values, up to 0.2, are considered. Finally, both flow cases

  11. Fluid forces on rotating centrifugal impeller with whirling motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, H.; Ohashi, H.

    1980-01-01

    Fluid forces on a centrifugal impeller, whose rotating axis whirls with a constant speed, were calculated by using unsteady potential theory. Calculations were performed for various values of whirl speed, number of impeller blades and angle of blades. Specific examples as well as significant results are given.

  12. The flow external to a rotating torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabretto, Sophie A. W.; Denier, James P.; Mattner, Trent W.

    2016-08-01

    Imparting a sudden rotation to a torus (or other symmetric smooth object) in an otherwise quiescent, viscous fluid serves to generate boundary layers at the object's surface. These boundary layers are known to exhibit a finite-time singularity at the equator which manifests in a thickening of the boundary layer and subsequent development of an equatorial jet. Here we consider the post-collision flow dynamics, demonstrating that the equatorial jet serves to shed a finite amplitude toroidal vortex pair. The radial jet is also shown to develop an absolute instability at suitably high Reynolds numbers.

  13. The flow external to a rotating torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabretto, Sophie A. W.; Denier, James P.; Mattner, Trent W.

    2015-12-01

    Imparting a sudden rotation to a torus (or other symmetric smooth object) in an otherwise quiescent, viscous fluid serves to generate boundary layers at the object's surface. These boundary layers are known to exhibit a finite-time singularity at the equator which manifests in a thickening of the boundary layer and subsequent development of an equatorial jet. Here we consider the post-collision flow dynamics, demonstrating that the equatorial jet serves to shed a finite amplitude toroidal vortex pair. The radial jet is also shown to develop an absolute instability at suitably high Reynolds numbers.

  14. On the Behavior of Velocity Fluctuations in Rapidly Rotating Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, S. S.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The behavior of velocity fluctuations subjected to rapid rotation is examined. The rapid rotation considered is any arbitrary combination of two basic forms of rotation, reference frame rotation and mean flow rotation. It is recognized that the two types of rotating flows differ in the manner in which the fluctuating fields are advected. The first category is comprised of flows in rotating systems of which synoptic scale geophysical flows are a good example. In this class of flows the fluctuating velocity field advects and rotates with the mean flow. In the rapid rotation limit, the Taylor-Proudman theorem describes the behavior of this class of fluctuations. Velocity fluctuations that are advected without rotation by the mean flow constitute the second category which includes vortical flows of aerodynamic interest. The Taylor-Proudman theorem is not pertinent to I his class flows and a new result appropriate to this second category of fluctuations is derived. The present development demonstrates that the fluctuating velocity fields are rendered two-dimensional and horizontally non-divergent in the limit of any large combination of reference frame rotation and mean-flow rotation. The concommitant 'geostrophic' balance of the momentum equation is, however, dependent upon the form of rapid rotation. It is also demonstrated that the evolution equations of a two-dimensional fluctuating velocity fields are frame-indifferent with any imposed mean-flow rotation. The analyses and results of this paper highlight many fundamental aspects of rotating flows and have important consequences for their turbulence closures in inertial and non-inertial frames.

  15. Simulation of flow around rotating Savonius rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimatsu, Katsuya; Shinohara, Toshio

    1993-09-01

    Flow around Savonius rotors was simulated by solving 2-D (two-dimensional) Navier-Stokes equations. The equations were discretized by finite volume method for space and fractional step method for time. Convection terms were specially discretized by an upwinding scheme for unstructured grid. Only rotating rotors were simulated in this report. The values of parameters were as follows: Reynolds number, 10(exp 5); overlap ratio, zero and 0.16; and tip speed ratio, 0.25 to 1.75. Results showed good agreement with experimental data for the following points: optimum tip speed ratio is 0.75 to 1.0; overlapping is effective to increase power coefficient. Moreover, simulated flow fields showed that vortex shedding occur at not only tips of bucket but back of bucket and the shed vortex decrease torque.

  16. Analytical and Numerical Modeling of Strongly Rotating Rarefied Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev; Kumaran, Viswanathan

    2015-11-01

    Centrifugal gas separation processes effect separation by utilizing the difference in the mole fraction in a high speed rotating cylinder caused by the difference in molecular mass, and consequently the centrifugal force density. These have been widely used in isotope separation because chemical separation methods cannot be used to separate isotopes of the same chemical species. More recently, centrifugal separation has also been explored for the separation of gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. The efficiency of separation is critically dependent on the secondary flow generated due to temperature gradients at the cylinder wall or due to inserts, and it is important to formulate accurate models for this secondary flow. The widely used Onsager model for secondary flow is restricted to very long cylinders where the length is large compared to the diameter, the limit of high stratification parameter, where the gas is restricted to a thin layer near the wall of the cylinder, and it assumes that there is no mass difference in the two species while calculating the secondary flow. There are two objectives of the present analysis of the rarefied gas flow in a rotating cylinder. The first is to remove the restriction of high stratification parameter, and to generalize the solutions to low rotation speeds where the stratification parameter may be O(1), and to apply for dissimilar gases considering the difference in molecular mass of the two species. Secondly, we would like to compare the predictions with molecular simulations based on the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for rarefied gas flows, in order to quantify the errors resulting from the approximations at different aspect ratios, Reynolds number and stratification parameter.

  17. Energetics of geostrophic adjustment in rotating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Fang; Rongsheng, Wu

    2002-09-01

    Energetics of geostrophic adjustment in rotating flow is examined in detail with a linear shallow water model. The initial unbalanced flow considered first falls tinder two classes. The first is similar to that adopted by Gill and is here referred to as a mass imbalance model, for the flow is initially motionless but with a sea surface displacement. The other is the same as that considered by Rossby and is referred to as a momentum imbalance model since there is only a velocity perturbation in the initial field. The significant feature of the energetics of geostrophic adjustment for the above two extreme models is that although the energy conversion ratio has a large case-to-case variability for different initial conditions, its value is bounded below by 0 and above by 1 / 2. Based on the discussion of the above extreme models, the energetics of adjustment for an arbitrary initial condition is investigated. It is found that the characteristics of the energetics of geostrophic adjustment mentioned above are also applicable to adjustment of the general unbalanced flow under the condition that the energy conversion ratio is redefined as the conversion ratio between the change of kinetic energy and potential energy of the deviational fields.

  18. Bubble pinch-off in a rotating flow.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Raymond; Andersen, Anders; van der Meer, Devaraj; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-05-22

    We create air bubbles at the tip of a "bathtub vortex" which reaches to a finite depth. The bathtub vortex is formed by letting water drain through a small hole at the bottom of a rotating cylindrical container. The tip of the needlelike surface dip is unstable at high rotation rates and releases bubbles which are carried down by the flow. Using high-speed imaging we find that the minimal neck radius of the unstable tip decreases in time as a power law with an exponent close to 1/3. This exponent was found by Gordillo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 194501 (2005)10.1103/PhysRevLett.95.194501] to govern gas flow driven pinch-off, and indeed we find that the volume oscillations of the tip creates a considerable air flow through the neck. We argue that the Bernoulli pressure reduction caused by this air flow can become sufficient to overcome the centrifugal forces and cause the final pinch-off. PMID:19519033

  19. Applications of sweep frequency rotating force perturbation methodology in rotating machinery for dynamic stiffness identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muszynska, Agnes; Bently, Donald E.; Franklin, Wesley D.; Grant, John W.; Goldman, Paul

    1992-06-01

    This paper outlines the sweep frequency rotating force perturbation method for identifying the dynamic stiffness characteristics of rotor/bearing/seal systems. Emphasis is placed on nonsynchronous perturbation of rotating shafts in a sequence of constant rotative speeds. In particular, results of the identification of flexible rotor multi-mode parameters and identification of fluid forces in seals and bearings are given. These results, presented in the direct and quadrature dynamic stiffness formats, permit the separation of components for easy identification. Another example of the perturbation method application is the identification of the lateral-torsional coupling due to shaft anisotropy. Results of laboratory rig experiments, the identification algorithm, and data processing techniques are discussed.

  20. Forced-Flow Evaporative Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Wilbert E.; Niggemann, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Evaporative cooler absorbs heat efficiently under unusual gravitational conditions by using centrifugal force and vapor vortexes to maintain good thermal contact between heat-transfer surface and vaporizable coolant. System useful for cooling electronic or other equipment under low gravity encountered in spacecraft or under multiple-gravity conditions frequently experienced in high-performance airplanes.

  1. NASTRAN forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.; Gallo, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of a new capability developed and implemented in NASTRAN level 17.7 to analyze forced vibration of a cyclic structure rotating about its axis of symmetry are presented. Fans, propellers, and bladed shrouded discs of turbomachines are some examples of such structures. The capability includes the effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations on the rotating structure which can be loaded with: (1) directly applied loads moving with the structure and (2) inertial loas due to the translational acceleration of the axis of rotation (''base' acceleration). Steady-state sinusoidal or general periodic loads are specified to represent: (1) the physical loads on various segments of the complete structure, or (2) the circumferential harmonic components of the loads in (1). The cyclic symmetry feature of the rotating structure is used in deriving and solving the equations of forced motion. Consequently, only one of the cyclic sectors is modelled and analyzed using finite elements, yielding substantial savings in the analysis cost. Results, however, are obtained for the entire structure. A tuned twelve bladed disc example is used to demonstrate the various features of the capability.

  2. Particle image velocimetry measurements of massively separated turbulent flows with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Jan; Andersson, Helge I.

    2011-07-01

    Measurements of instantaneous velocity fields in the separated flow downstream of a backward-facing step in a rotating channel are presented for the first time. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were made for 13 different rotation numbers Ro at a bulk flow Reynolds number of about 5600. The expansion ratio 2:1 was the same as in the flow visualization study by Rothe and Johnston [ASME J. Fluids Eng. 101, 117 (1979)] which covered about the same range of Ro. The measured mean flow pattern exhibited substantial variations with the rate of system rotation. In particular, the length of the primary separation bubble decreased monotonically with increasing anti-cyclonic rotation and increased with increasing rate of cyclonic rotation, in keeping with the earlier observations. At the highest anti-cyclonic rotation rate, the flow field also separated from the planar wall where the shear layer flow was subjected to cyclonic rotation. The PIV data for the in-plane components of the Reynolds stress tensor were severely affected by the imposed system rotation. Almost all the striking affects of the Coriolis force observed herein could be explained by means of the exact production terms in the transport equation for the second-moments of the velocity fluctuations. These changes were in turn consistent with the observed alterations of the mean flow field.

  3. Effects of rotating flows on combustion and jet noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, I. R.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental investigations of combustion in rotating (swirling) flow have shown that the mixing and combustion processes were accelerated, flame length and noise levels significantly decreased, and flame stability increased relative to that obtained without rotation. Unsteady burning accompanied by a pulsating flame, violent fluctuating jet, and intense noise present in straight flow burning were not present in rotating flow burning. Correlations between theory and experiment show good agreement. Such effects due to rotating flows could lead to suppressing jet noise, improving combustion, reducing pollution, and decreasing aircraft engine size. Quantitative analysis of the aero-acoustic relationship and noise source characteristics are needed.-

  4. Internal flows and force matrices in axial flow inducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit

    1994-01-01

    Axial flow inducers such as those used in high speed rocket engine turbopumps are subject to complex internal flows and fluid-induced lateral and rotordynamic forces. An investigation of these internal flows was conducted using boundary layer flow visualization on the blades, hub and housing of unshrouded and shrouded inducers. Results showed that the blade boundary layer flows have strong radial components at off-design conditions and remain attached to the blade surface at all flow coefficients tested. The origin of upstream swirling backflow was found to be at the discharge plane of the inducer. In addition, flow reversal was observed at the suction side blade tip near the leading edge in a shrouded inducer. Re-entry of the hub boundary layer flow, a downstream backflow, into the blade passage area was observed at flow coefficients below design. For unshrouded inducers the radially outward flow near the blade tip mixed with the leakage flow to form the upstream backflow. The lateral and rotordynamic forces acting on an inducer due to an imposed whirl motion was also investigated at various flow coefficients. It was found that the rotordynamic force data at various whirl frequency ratios does not allow a normal quadratic fit; consequently the conventional inertial, stiffness and damping coefficients cannot be obtained and a definite whirl ratio describing the instability region does not result. Application of an actuator disk theory proved to be inaccurate in estimating the rotordynamic tangential force in a non-whirling inducer. The effect of upstream and downstream flow distortions on the rotordynamic and lateral forces on an inducer were studied. It was found that at flow coefficients below design, large lateral forces occurred in the presence of a downstream asymmetry. Results of inlet distortion experiments show that a strong inlet shear causes a significant increase in the lateral force. Cavitation was found to have important consequences for fluid

  5. Zonal flow regimes in rotating anelastic spherical shells (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastine, T.; Wicht, J.; Aurnou, J. M.; Heimpel, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    The surface zonal winds observed in the giant planets form a complex jet pattern with alternating prograde and retrograde direction. While the main equatorial band is prograde on the gas giants, both ice giants have a pronounced retrograde equatorial jet. The depth of these jets is however poorly known and highly debated. Theoretical scenarios range from "shallow models", that assume that these zonal flows are restricted to the outer stably stratified layer; to "deep models" that hypothesise that the surface winds are the signature of deep-seated convection. Most of the numerical models supporting the latter idea employed the Boussinesq approximation where compressibility effects are ignored. While this approximation is suitable for modelling the liquid iron core of terrestrial planets, this becomes questionable in the gas giants interiors, where density increases by several orders of magnitude. To tackle this problem, several numerical models using the "anelastic approximation" have been recently developed to study the compressibility effects while filtering out the fast acoustic waves. Here, we consider such anelastic models of rapidly-rotating spherical shells to explore the properties of the zonal winds in different regimes where either rotation or buoyancy dominates the force balance. We conduct several parameter studies to quantify the dependence of zonal flows on the background density stratification and the driving of convection. We find that the direction of the equatorial wind is controlled by the ratio of buoyancy and Coriolis force. The prograde equatorial band maintained by Reynolds stresses is found in the rotation-dominated regime. At low Ekman numbers, several alternating jets form at high latitude in a similar way to some previous Boussinesq calculations. In cases where buoyancy dominates Coriolis force, the angular momentum per unit mass is homogenised and the equatorial band is retrograde, reminiscent to those observed in the ice giants

  6. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of alpha effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is no strong prediction for a sign of alpha, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.

  7. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence.

    PubMed

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of α effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is no strong prediction for a sign of α, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other. PMID:26651796

  8. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-02

    Here, this article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of alpha effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is no strong prediction for a sign of alpha, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.

  9. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-02

    Here, this article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of alpha effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is nomore » strong prediction for a sign of alpha, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.« less

  10. NASTRAN forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.; Gallo, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of a new capability, developed and added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7, to conduct forced vibration analysis of turned cyclic structures rotating about their axis of symmetry, are presented. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations as well as those due to the translational acceleration of the axis of rotation, are included. The equations of motion are first derived for an arbitrary grid point of the cyclic sector finite element model and then extended for the complete model. The equations are solved by four principal steps: (1) transformation of applied loads at frequency-dependent circumferential harmonic components; (2) application of circumferential harmonic-dependent intersegment compatibility constraints; (3) solution of frequency-dependent circumferential harmonic components of displacements; and (4) recovery of frequency-dependent response in various segments of the total structure. Five interrelated examples are presented to illustrate the various features of the development.

  11. Hybrid RANS/LES of turbulent flow in a rotating rib-roughened channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Qian-Qiu; Wang, Bing-Chen

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of the Coriolis force on the flow field in a rib-roughened channel subjected to either clockwise or counter-clockwise system rotation using hybrid RANS/LES based on wall modelling. A simplified dynamic forcing scheme incorporating backscatter is proposed for the hybrid simulation approach. The flow is characterized by a Reynolds number of Re = 1.5 × 104 and a rotation number Ro ranging from -0.6 to 0.6. The mean flow speed and turbulence level near the roughened wall are enhanced under counter-clockwise rotation and suppressed under clockwise rotation. The Coriolis force significantly influences the stability of the wall shear layer and the free shear layers generated by the ribs. Consequently, it is interesting to observe that the classification of the roughness type relies not only on the pitch ratio, but also on the rotation number in the context of rotating rib-roughened flows. In order to validate the present hybrid approach, the first- and second-order statistical moments of the velocity field obtained from the simulations are thoroughly compared with the available laboratory measurement data.

  12. Comments on Frequency Swept Rotating Input Perturbation Techniques and Identification of the Fluid Force Models in Rotor/bearing/seal Systems and Fluid Handling Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, Agnes; Bently, Donald E.

    1991-01-01

    Perturbation techniques used for identification of rotating system dynamic characteristics are described. A comparison between two periodic frequency-swept perturbation methods applied in identification of fluid forces of rotating machines is presented. The description of the fluid force model identified by inputting circular periodic frequency-swept force is given. This model is based on the existence and strength of the circumferential flow, most often generated by the shaft rotation. The application of the fluid force model in rotor dynamic analysis is presented. It is shown that the rotor stability is an entire rotating system property. Some areas for further research are discussed.

  13. Direct numerical simulation of moderate-Reynolds-number flow past arrays of rotating spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations with an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method are used to investigate the effects of particle rotation on flows past random arrays of mono-disperse spheres at moderate particle Reynolds numbers. This study is an extension of a previous study of the authors [Q. Zhou and L.-S. Fan, "Direct numerical simulation of low-Reynolds-number flow past arrays of rotating spheres," J. Fluid Mech. 765, 396-423 (2015)] that explored the effects of particle rotation at low particle Reynolds numbers. The results of this study indicate that as the particle Reynolds number increases, the normalized Magnus lift force decreases rapidly when the particle Reynolds number is in the range lower than 50. For the particle Reynolds number greater than 50, the normalized Magnus lift force approaches a constant value that is invariant with solid volume fractions. The proportional dependence of the Magnus lift force on the rotational Reynolds number (based on the angular velocity and the diameter of the spheres) observed at low particle Reynolds numbers does not change in the present study, making the Magnus lift force another possible factor that can significantly affect the overall dynamics of fluid-particle flows other than the drag force. Moreover, it is found that both the normalized drag force and the normalized torque increase with the increase of the particle Reynolds number and the solid volume fraction. Finally, correlations for the drag force, the Magnus lift force, and the torque in random arrays of rotating spheres at arbitrary solids volume fractions, rotational Reynolds numbers, and particle Reynolds numbers are formulated.

  14. Potential flow and forces for incompressible viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chien-Cheng

    1992-06-01

    Forces on a finite body in an incompressible viscous flow are shown to be contributed by a potential flow and fluid elements of nonzero vorticity in a revealing formulation. The present study indicates that the potential flow pay also a geometric role in determining the contribution of the fluid elements. Consideration is given to a solid body moving through a fluid, fluid accelerating past a solid body and a solid body which oscillates in a uniform stream. The effects of induced-mass and inertial forces appear naturally in the formulation and are separated from the contribution due to the surface vorticity and that due to the vorticity within the flow. Physical significance of the present analysis for vortical flows about a finite body is illustrated by examples, e.g., flow past a circular cylinder or an ellipsoid of revolution.

  15. Forces and moments within layers of driven tearing modes with sheared rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, A. J.; Finn, J. M.; Hegna, C. C.; Terry, P. W.

    2015-10-01

    For driven low amplitude tearing modes in a plasma with sheared rotation, forces on tearing layers due to Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are calculated. First moments about the center of the tearing layer, also due to Maxwell and Reynolds stresses, are also calculated. The forces tend to cause the tearing mode to lock to the phase of the driving perturbation, and the moments determine the evolution of the rotation shear within the layer. These forces and moments are calculated for two constant-ψ regimes of tearing modes, namely, the viscoresistive (VR) regime and the resistive-inertial (RI) regime, and an ordering in terms of the constant-ψ small parameter ɛ ˜δΔ is introduced, with the velocity shear ordered as ˜ɛ . Here, δ is the layer width and Δ the logarithmic jump in the derivative of the flux function across the layer. The forces and first moments are reported to the lowest nonvanishing order in ɛ. The Reynolds moment is analogous to the effect that can drive zonal flows in other contexts. The treatment of the tearing layers is by means of variational principles using Padé approximants (A. J. Cole and J. M. Finn, Phys. Plasmas 21, 032508 (2014)). The usual result for the Maxwell force without rotation shear is recovered for both regimes. That is, the correction due to velocity shear is small; also, the lowest order contribution to the Reynolds force is zero. In the VR regime, we find no first moments up to second order in the constant-ψ parameter. In the RI regime, we find Nm is zero to at least order ɛ3 /2 . In the RI regime, the Reynolds moment Nr is found to be of order ɛ3 /2 and is proportional to minus the rotation shear in the layer; it thus tends to damp out any velocity shear across the layer.

  16. Effects of secondary flow on heat transfer in rotating passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joan G.; Moore, John

    1990-02-01

    Secondary flow in rotating cooling passages of jet engine turbine rotors is considered. A Navier-Stokes calculation procedure for turbulent flow is used to compute flow development in a radially outward flow channel, round a sharp 180 degree bend, and in the radially inward flow channel downstream. Areas of high and low heat transfer are explained by secondary flow development and quantitative results show regions of design interest.

  17. A Microfluidic Approach for Inducing Cell Rotation by Means of Hydrodynamic Forces.

    PubMed

    Torino, Stefania; Iodice, Mario; Rendina, Ivo; Coppola, Giuseppe; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic technology allows to realize devices in which cells can be imaged in their three-dimensional shape. However, there are still some limitations in the method, due to the fact that cells follow a straight path while they are flowing in a channel. This can result in a loss in information, since only one side of the cell will be visible. Our work has started from the consideration that if a cell rotates, it is possible to overcome this problem. Several approaches have been proposed for cell manipulation in microfluidics. In our approach, cells are controlled by only taking advantages of hydrodynamic forces. Two different devices have been designed, realized, and tested. The first device induces cell rotation in a plane that is parallel (in-plane) to the observation plane, while the second one induce rotation in a plane perpendicular (out-of-plane) to the observation plane. PMID:27548187

  18. Efficient forced vibration reanalysis method for rotating electric machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akira; Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Kuroishi, Masakatsu; Nakai, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Rotating electric machines are subject to forced vibration by magnetic force excitation with wide-band frequency spectrum that are dependent on the operating conditions. Therefore, when designing the electric machines, it is inevitable to compute the vibration response of the machines at various operating conditions efficiently and accurately. This paper presents an efficient frequency-domain vibration analysis method for the electric machines. The method enables the efficient re-analysis of the vibration response of electric machines at various operating conditions without the necessity to re-compute the harmonic response by finite element analyses. Theoretical background of the proposed method is provided, which is based on the modal reduction of the magnetic force excitation by a set of amplitude-modulated standing-waves. The method is applied to the forced response vibration of the interior permanent magnet motor at a fixed operating condition. The results computed by the proposed method agree very well with those computed by the conventional harmonic response analysis by the FEA. The proposed method is then applied to the spin-up test condition to demonstrate its applicability to various operating conditions. It is observed that the proposed method can successfully be applied to the spin-up test conditions, and the measured dominant frequency peaks in the frequency response can be well captured by the proposed approach.

  19. Biomechanics of Forearm Rotation: Force and Efficiency of Pronator Teres

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Gimeno, Pere; Galtés, Ignasi; Jordana, Xavier; Malgosa, Assumpció; Manyosa, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical models are useful to assess the effect of muscular forces on bone structure. Using skeletal remains, we analyze pronator teres rotational efficiency and its force components throughout the entire flexion-extension and pronation-supination ranges by means of a new biomechanical model and 3D imaging techniques, and we explore the relationship between these parameters and skeletal structure. The results show that maximal efficiency is the highest in full elbow flexion and is close to forearm neutral position for each elbow angle. The vertical component of pronator teres force is the highest among all components and is greater in pronation and elbow extension. The radial component becomes negative in pronation and reaches lower values as the elbow flexes. Both components could enhance radial curvature, especially in pronation. The model also enables to calculate efficiency and force components simulating changes in osteometric parameters. An increase of radial curvature improves efficiency and displaces the position where the radial component becomes negative towards the end of pronation. A more proximal location of pronator teres radial enthesis and a larger humeral medial epicondyle increase efficiency and displace the position where this component becomes negative towards forearm neutral position, which enhances radial curvature. Efficiency is also affected by medial epicondylar orientation and carrying angle. Moreover, reaching an object and bringing it close to the face in a close-to-neutral position improve efficiency and entail an equilibrium between the forces affecting the elbow joint stability. When the upper-limb skeleton is used in positions of low efficiency, implying unbalanced force components, it undergoes plastic changes, which improve these parameters. These findings are useful for studies on ergonomics and orthopaedics, and the model could also be applied to fossil primates in order to infer their locomotor form. Moreover, activity

  20. Vortex merger in rotating stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dritschel, David G.

    2002-03-01

    This paper describes the interaction of symmetric vortices in a three-dimensional quasi-geostrophic fluid. The initial vortices are taken to be uniform-potential-vorticity ellipsoids, of height 2h and width 2R, and with centres at (±d/2; 0, 0), embedded within a background flow having constant background rotational and buoyancy frequencies, f/2 and N respectively. This problem was previously studied by von Hardenburg et al. (2000), who determined the dimensionless critical merger distance d/R as a function of the height-to-width aspect ratio h/R (scaled by f/N). Their study, however, was limited to small to moderate values of h/R, as it was anticipated that merger at large h/R would reduce to that for two columnar two-dimensional vortices, i.e. d/R [approximate] 3.31. Here, it is shown that no such two-dimensional limit exists; merger is found to occur at any aspect ratio, with d [similar] h for h/R [dbl greater-than sign] 1.New results are also found for small to moderate values of h/R. In particular, our numerical simulations reveal that asymmetric merger is predominant, despite the initial conditions, if one includes a small amount of random noise. For small to moderate h/R, decreasing the initial separation distance d first results in a weak exchange of material, with one vortex growing at the expense of the other. As d decreases further, this exchange increases and leads to two dominant but strongly asymmetric vortices. Finally, for yet smaller d, rapid merger into a single dominant vortex occurs in effect the initial vortices exchange nearly all of their material with one another in a nearly symmetrical fashion.

  1. MASS TRANSFER TO ROTATING DISKS AND ROTATING RINGS IN LAMINAR, TRANSITION, AND FULLY DEVELOPED TURBULENT FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Law Jr., C.G.; Pierini, P.; Newman, J.

    1980-07-01

    Experimental data and theoretical calculations are presented for the mass-transfer rate to rotating disks and rotating rings when laminar, transition, and fully developed turbulent flow exist upon different portions of the surface. Good agreement of data and the model is obtained for rotating disks and relatively thick rotating rings. Results of the calculations for thin rings generally exceed the experimental data measured in transition and turbulent flow. A y{sup +{sup 3}} form for the eddy diffusivity is used to fit the data. No improvement is noticed with a form involving both y{sup +{sup 3}} and y{sup +{sup 3}}.

  2. Laser velocimeter measurements of the flow fields around single- and counter-rotation propeller models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, D. M.; Sellers, W. L., III; Elliott, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A two-component LV system was used to make detailed measurements of the flow field around both a single-rotation and a counter-rotation propeller/nacelle. The conditions measured for the single-rotation tractor configuration include two different blade angles and two propeller advance ratios, and for the counter-rotation propeller configuration include both pusher and tractor mounts. The measurements show the increasing slipstream velocities and contraction with increasing blade angle and with decreasing advance ratios. Data for the counter-rotation system show that the aft propeller turns the flow in the opposite direction from the front propeller. Additionally, the LV system was used as a diagnostic tool to provide data to explain the large side force measured on the propeller/nacelle at angle-of-attack.

  3. Non-isothermal flow through a rotating straight duct with wide range of rotational and pressure driven parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahiduzzaman, Mohammad; Alam, Md. Mahmud; Ferdows, M.; Sivasankaran, S.

    2013-10-01

    Numerical study is performed to investigate the Non-isothermal flow in a rotating straight duct under various flow conditions. Spectral method is applied as a main tool for the numerical technique, where the Chebyshev polynomial, the Collocation methods, the Arc-length method and the Newton-Raphson method are also used as secondary tools. The characteristics of the flow mentioned above are described here. The incompressible viscous steady Non-isothermal flow through a straight duct of rectangular cross-section rotating at a constant angular velocity about the center of the duct cross-section is investigated numerically to examine the combined effects of Rotation parameter (Coriolis force), Grashof number (parameter which is used in heat, transfer studies involving free, forced or natural convection and is equql to , where L is the characteristic length, ρ the density, g the acceleration due to gravity, β the thermal expansion coefficient, Δ T the temperature difference, μ the viscosity and ν the kinematic viscosity of the fluid. The expansion coefficient β is a measure of the rate at which the volume V of the fluid changes with temperature at a given pressure P), Prandtl number, aspect ratio and Pressure-driven parameter (centrifugal force) on the flow. We examine the structures in case of rotation of the duct axis and the Pressure-driven parameter with large aspect ratio where other parameters are fixed. The calculations are carried out for 0 ≤ T r ≤ 300, 2 ≤ γ ≤ 6, G r = 100, P r = 7.0 and 0 ≤ P r ≤ 800 by applying the Spectral method. When Ω > 0 and the rotation is in the same direction as the Coriolis force enforces the centrifugal force, multiple solutions of Non-symmetric the secondary flow patterns with 10-vortex (maximum) are obtained in case of T r = 100 and 150 with large aspect ratio. The intense of the temperature field is very strong near the heated wall in all cases. Finally, the overall solutions of the problems considered in

  4. Forces on particles in microstreaming flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Thameem, Raqeeb

    2015-11-01

    In various microfluidic applications, vortical steady streaming from ultrasonically driven microbubbles is used in concert with a pressure-driven channel flow to manipulate objects. While a quantitative theory of this boundary-induced streaming is available, little work has been devoted to a fundamental understanding of the forces exerted on microparticles in boundary streaming flows, even though the differential action of such forces is central to applications like size-sensitive sorting. Contrary to other microfluidic sorting devices, the forces in bubble microstreaming act over millisecond times and micron length scales, without the need for accumulated deflections over long distances. Accordingly, we develop a theory of hydrodynamic forces on the fast time scale of bubble oscillation using the lubrication approximation, showing for the first time how particle displacements are rectified near moving boundaries over multiple oscillations in parallel with the generation of the steady streaming flow. The dependence of particle migration on particle size and the flow parameters is compared with experimental data. The theory is applicable to boundary streaming phenomena in general and demonstrates how particles can be sorted very quickly and without compromising device throughput. We acknowledge support by the National Science Foundation under grant number CBET-1236141.

  5. Subsychronous vibration of multistage centrifugal compressors forced by rotating stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    A multistage centrifugal compressor, in natural gas re-injection service on an offshore petroleum production platform, experienced subsynchronous vibrations which caused excessive bearing wear. Field performance testing correlated the subsynchronous amplitude with the discharge flow coefficient, demonstrating the excitation to be aerodynamic. Adding two impellers allowed an increase in the diffuser flow angle (with respect to tangential) to meet the diffuser stability criteria based on factory and field tests correlated using the theory of Senoo (for rotating stall in a vaneless diffuser). This modification eliminated all significant subsynchronous vibrations in field service, thus confirming the correctness of the solution. Other possible sources of aerodynamically induced vibrations were considered, but the judgment that those are unlikely has been confirmed by subsequent experience with other similar compressors.

  6. Turbulent flow and heat transfer in rotating channels and tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitiakov, V. Y.; Petropavlovskii, R. R.; Ris, V. V.; Smirnov, E. M.; Smirnov, S. A.

    This document is a reduction of the author's experimental results on turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer in rotating channels whose axes are parallel to the plane of rotation. Substantial dissimilarities of longitudinal velocity field profile and pulsational characteristics are caused by effects of stabilization and destabilization and secondary flow production. Local heat transfer coefficients vary over the perimeter of the tube section connecting detected flow peculiarities. It is shown that the increase in rotational intensity caused an increase in the relative dissimilarity of the local heat transfer coefficients and increased their mean value.

  7. Thermocapillary bubble flow and coalescence in a rotating cylinder: A 3D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhendal, Yousuf; Turan, A.; Al-mazidi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The process of thermocapillary bubbles rising in a rotating 3D cylinder in zero gravity was analysed and presented numerically with the aid of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) by means of the volume of fluid (VOF) method. Calculations were carried out to investigate in detail the effect of the rotational speed of the hosted liquid on the trajectory of both single and group bubbles driven by the Marangoni force in zero-gravity conditions. For rotational speeds from 0.25 to 2 rad/s, bubble displacement with angular motion was found to be directed between the hotter surface and the rotational axis. This is contrary to the conventional bubble flow from areas of high pressure to low pressure, radial direction, or from cold to hot regions, axial direction. The results demonstrate that for the ratio of rotational speeds to the thermocapillary bubble velocity larger than unity, the surface tension gradient is the dominant force and the bubble motion towards the hotter. On the other hand, for ratio less than 1, the bubble motion is dominated and is significantly affected by centrifugal force. As rotation speed increases, the amount of deflection increases and the Marangoni effect vanishes. The current study is novel in the sense that single- and multi-bubble motion incorporating thermocapillary forces in a rotating liquid in a zero-gravity environment has never been numerically investigated.

  8. Flow and heat transfer characteristics of orthogonally rotating channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Hiroshi

    1991-12-01

    Numerical analysis was conducted to predict the centripetal buoyant effect on flow and heat transfer characteristics in a channel rotating about a perpendicular axis. The conditions were assumed to be laminar, fully developed, and uniform heat flux. Calculation were conducted both for radially outward flow from the rotating axis and radially inward flow. The calculated results indicated that for radially outward flow buoyancy decreases the suction side friction and heat transfer while increasing pressure side friction and heat transfer. This trends were reversed for radially inward flow.

  9. Navier-Stokes solutions for rotating 3-D duct flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, B. N.

    1988-07-01

    This paper deals with the computation of three-dimensional viscous turbulent flow in a rotating rectangular duct of low aspect ratio using thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. Scalar form of an approximate factorization implicit scheme along with a modified q-omega turbulence model has been utilized for mean flow predictions. The predicted mean flow behavior has been favorably compared with the experimental data for mean axial velocity, channel pressure and cross-flow velocities at a flow Mach number of 0.05 and a rotational speed of 300 rpm.

  10. Pressure distribution, fluctuating forces and vortex shedding behavior of circular cylinder with rotatable splitter plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, F.; Wang, J. S.; Qiao, X. Q.; Huang, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies on the flow around a circular cylinder with fixed splitter plates have shown that the drag and lift can be reduced, and the primary vortex shedding can be suppressed obviously. In this study, a wind tunnel experiment on the flow around a circular cylinder with diameter D (40 mm) attached with ten splitter plates freely rotatable around the cylinder axis has been carried out with different ratios of length to cylinder diameter (L/D) from 0.5 to 6.0, in a range of Reynolds number from 3×104 to 6×104. The influences of the attachment of these rotatable splitter plates on the pressure distribution, fluctuating drag and lift forces and vortex shedding behavior were investigated. It is found that the splitter plates rotate to an off-axis equilibrium angle δ (on either side of the wake with equal probability) rather than align themselves with free stream due to the integrated effect of the pressure difference along the sides of the splitter plates. The plate length L/D is crucial in determining the equilibrium angle δ. Longer splitter plate causes smaller angle; δ remains zero, i.e., parallel to the flow direction, for L/D≥4. The mean pressures in the wake near the cylinder are higher than that of a bare cylinder. Further, the mean drag coefficients and the root-mean-square fluctuating lift coefficients, which are also largely determined by δ, are less than those of the corresponding bare cylinder, with a reduction up to about 30% and 90%, respectively. However, freely rotatable splitter plate develops a mean lift force towards the side the plate has deflected. In addition, the Strouhal number of fluctuating forces and correlation analysis are presented. The visualized flow structures show that the freely rotatable splitter plates elongate the vortex formation region, and the communication between the two shear layers on either side of the body is inhibited. For comparison, experiments of attaching fixed splitter plates with the same size were

  11. Flow and heat transfer model for a rotating cryogenic motor

    SciTech Connect

    Dykhuizen, R.C.; Baca, R.G.; Bickel, T.C.

    1993-08-01

    Development of a high-temperature, superconducting, synchronous motor for large applications (>1000 HP) could offer significant electrical power savings for industrial users. Presently 60% of all electric power generated in the United States is converted by electric motors. A large part of two power is utilized by motors 1000 HP or larger. The use of high-temperature superconducting materials with critical temperatures above that of liquid nitrogen (77 K) in the field winding would reduce the losses in these motors significantly, and therefore, would have a definite impact on the electrical power usage in the US. These motors will be 1/3 to 1/2 the size of conventional motors of similar power and, thus, offer potential savings in materials and floor space. The cooling of the superconducting materials in the field windings of the rotor presents a unique application of cryogenic engineering. The rotational velocity results in significant radial pressure gradients that affect the flow distribution of the cryogen. The internal pressure fields can result in significant nonuniformities in the two-phase flow of the coolant. Due to the variable speed design, the flow distribution has the potential to change during operation. A multiphase-flow computer model of the cryogenic cooling is developed to calculate the boiling heat transfer and phase distribution of the nitrogen coolant in the motor. The model accounts for unequal phase velocities and nonuniform cooling requirements of the rotor. The unequal radial pressure gradients in the inlet and outlet headers result in a larger driving force for flow in the outer cooling channels. The effect of this must be accounted for in the design of the motor. Continuing improvements of the model will allow the investigation of the transient thermal issues associated with localized quenching of the superconducting components of the motor.

  12. Flow and heat transfer model for a rotating cryogenic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykhuizen, R. C.; Baca, R. G.; Bickel, T. C.

    1993-08-01

    Development of a high-temperature, superconducting, synchronous motor for large applications (greater than 1000 HP) could offer significant electrical power savings for industrial users. Presently 60% of all electric power generated in the United States is converted by electric motors. A large part of this power is utilized by motors 1000 HP or larger. The use of high-temperature superconducting materials with critical temperatures above that of liquid nitrogen (77 K) in the field winding would reduce the losses in these motors significantly, and therefore, would have a definite impact on the electrical power usage in the U.S. These motors will be 1/3 to 1/2 the size of conventional motors of similar power and, thus, offer potential savings in materials and floor space. The cooling of the superconducting materials in the field windings of the rotor presents a unique application of cryogenic engineering. The rotational velocity results in significant radial pressure gradients that affect the flow distribution of the cryogen. The internal pressure fields can result in significant nonuniformities in the two-phase flow of the coolant. Due to the variable speed design, the flow distribution has the potential to change during operation. A multiphase-flow computer model of the cryogenic cooling is developed to calculate the boiling heat transfer and phase distribution of the nitrogen coolant in the motor. The model accounts for unequal phase velocities and nonuniform cooling requirements of the rotor. The unequal radial pressure gradients in the inlet and outlet headers result in a larger driving force for flow in the outer cooling channels. The effect of this must be accounted for in the design of the motor. Continuing improvements of the model will allow the investigation of the transient thermal issues associated with localized quenching of the superconducting components of the motor.

  13. Forced generation of solitary waves in a rotating fluid and their stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wooyoung

    The primary objective of this graduate research is to study forced generation of solitary waves in a rotating fluid and their stability properties. For axisymmetric flow of a non-uniformly rotating fluid within a long cylindrical tube, an analysis is presented to predict the periodic generation of upstream-advancing vortex solitons by axisymmetric disturbance steadily moving with a transcritical velocity as a forcing agent. The phenomenon is simulated using the forced Korteweg-de Vries (fKdV) equation to model the amplitude function of the Stokes stream function for describing this family of rotating flows of an inviscid and incompressible fluid. The numerical results for the weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive wave motion show that a sequence of well-defined axisymmetrical recirculating eddies is periodically produced and emitted to radiate upstream of the disturbance, soon becoming permanent in the form as a procession of vortex solitons, which we call vortons. Two primary flows, the Rankine vortex and the Burgers vortex, are adopted to exhibit in detail the process of producing the upstream vortons by the critical motion of a slender body moving along the central axis, with the Burgers vortex being found the more effective of the two in the generation of vortons. To investigate the evolution of free or forced waves within a tube of non-uniform radius, a new forced KdV equation is derived which models the variable geometry with variable coefficients. A set of section-mean conservation laws is derived specially for this class of rotational tube flows of an inviscid and incompressible fluid, in both differential and integral forms. A new aspect of stability theory is analyzed for possible instabilities of the axisymmetric solitary waves subject to non-axisymmetric disturbances. The present linear analysis based on the model equation involving the bending mode shows that the axisymmetric solitary wave is neutrally stable with respect to small bending mode

  14. Rotation of melting ice disks due to melt fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, S.; Adami, N.; Dubois, C.; Caps, H.; Vandewalle, N.; Darbois-Texier, B.

    2016-03-01

    We report experiments concerning the melting of ice disks (85 mm in diameter and 14 mm in height) at the surface of a thermalized water bath. During the melting, the ice disks undergo translational and rotational motions. In particular, the disks rotate. The rotation speed has been found to increase with the bath temperature. We investigated the flow under the bottom face of the ice disks by a particle image velocimetry technique. We find that the flow goes downwards and also rotates horizontally, so that a vertical vortex is generated under the ice disk. The proposed mechanism is the following. In the vicinity of the bottom face of the disk, the water eventually reaches the temperature of 4°C for which the water density is maximum. The 4°C water sinks and generates a downwards plume. The observed vertical vorticity results from the flow in the plume. Finally, by viscous entrainment, the horizontal rotation of the flow induces the solid rotation of the ice block. This mechanism seems generic: any vertical flow that generates a vortex will induce the rotation of a floating object.

  15. Zonal flow regimes in rotating anelastic spherical shells: An application to giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastine, T.; Wicht, J.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The surface zonal winds observed in the giant planets form a complex jet pattern with alternating prograde and retrograde direction. While the main equatorial band is prograde on the gas giants, both ice giants have a pronounced retrograde equatorial jet. We use three-dimensional numerical models of compressible convection in rotating spherical shells to explore the properties of zonal flows in different regimes where either rotation or buoyancy dominates the force balance. We conduct a systematic parameter study to quantify the dependence of zonal flows on the background density stratification and the driving of convection. In our numerical models, we find that the direction of the equatorial zonal wind is controlled by the ratio of the global-scale buoyancy force and the Coriolis force. The prograde equatorial band maintained by Reynolds stresses is found in the rotation-dominated regime. In cases where buoyancy dominates Coriolis force, the angular momentum per unit mass is homogenized and the equatorial band is retrograde, reminiscent to those observed in the ice giants. In this regime, the amplitude of the zonal jets depends on the background density contrast with strongly stratified models producing stronger jets than comparable weakly stratified cases. Furthermore, our results can help to explain the transition between solar-like (i.e. prograde at the equator) and the "anti-solar" differential rotations (i.e. retrograde at the equator) found in anelastic models of stellar convection zones. In the strongly stratified cases, we find that the leading order force balance can significantly vary with depth. While the flow in the deep interior is dominated by rotation, buoyancy can indeed become larger than Coriolis force in a thin region close to the surface. This so-called "transitional regime" has a visible signature in the main equatorial jet which shows a pronounced dimple where flow amplitudes notably decay towards the equator. A similar dimple is observed on

  16. Combined effects of rotation and rib-roughness - a dns study of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Helge I.; Narasimhamurthy, Vagesh D.

    2014-11-01

    The combined effects of system rotation and rib-roughness on turbulent channel flow have been investigated by means of direct numerical simulations. Square ribs were placed on both walls in a non-staggered arrangement and the channel was subjected to steady rotation about a spanwise axis for a series of rotation numbers up to Ro = 24. A pressure-loss reduction of about 20 per cent resulted from the imposed rotation at Ro = 6. In spite of the 10 per cent blockage due to the wall-mounted ribs, the flow field exhibited statistical streamwise homogeneity in the core region. The mean velocity varied linearly with a slope such that the mean fluid rotation exactly outweighed the imposed system rotation. The flow field in the vicinity of the ribs was affected differently at the two sides of the rotating channel. The separated flow region behind the ribs on the anti-cyclonic pressure side shrinked with increasing Ro due to the enhanced turbulent mixing caused by the Coriolis force. The original d-type roughness was thus turned into a k-type roughness.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic flow excited by rotating permanent magnets in an orthogonal container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, O.; Levy, A.; Mikhailovich, B.; Azulay, A.

    2014-09-01

    Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flow driven by a system of rotating permanent magnets in a container of orthogonal cross-section has been studied. The main objective of the work is to research the impact of magnetic forcing parameters (magnetic field value, magnets arrangement, and angular velocity of their rotation) on the generated hydrodynamic structures and flow modes. On this basis, we contemplate realizing required flow features by setting certain parameters of the driving magnetic system. A numerical study of the problem in the induction-free approximation without taking into account the effect of the variable component of electromagnetic force is presented. The parameters of spin-up modes and steady-state flow regimes have been calculated by three-dimensional direct numerical simulation based on COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3a software and experimentally verified on a specially designed setup using noninvasive Doppler ultrasound technique.

  18. Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test (FFFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test was designed to study flame spreading over solid fuels when air is flowing at a low speed in the same direction as the flame spread. Previous research has shown that in low-speed concurrent airflows, some materials are more flammable in microgravity than earth. This image shows a 10-cm flame in microgravity that burns almost entirely blue on both sides of a thin sheet of paper. The glowing thermocouple in the lower half of the flame provides temperature measurements.

  19. Wall forces on a sphere in a rotating liquid-filled cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; van der Molen, Jarich; van Wijngaarden, Leen; Sun, Chao

    2013-06-01

    We experimentally study the behavior of a particle slightly denser than the surrounding liquid in solid body rotating flow. Earlier work revealed that a heavy particle has an unstable equilibrium point in unbounded rotating flows [G. O. Roberts, D. M Kornfeld, and W. W Fowlis, J. Fluid Mech. 229, 555-567 (1991), 10.1017/S0022112091003166]. In the confinement of the rotational flow by a cylindrical wall a heavy sphere with density 1.05 g/cm3 describes an orbital motion in our experiments. This is due to the effect of the wall near the sphere, i.e., a repulsive force (FW). We model FW on the sphere as a function of the distance from the wall (L): FW∝L-4 as proposed by Takemura et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 495, 235-253 (2003), 10.1017/S0022112003006232]. Remarkably, the path evaluated from the model including FW reproduces the experimentally measured trajectory. In addition during an orbital motion the particle does not spin around its axis, and we provide a possible explanation for this phenomenon.

  20. Heat transfer in rotating serpentine passages with trips normal to the flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J. H.; Johnson, B. V.; Graziani, R. A.; Yeh, F. C.

    1991-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of buoyancy and Coriolis forces on heat transfer in turbine blade internal coolant passages. The experiments were conducted with a large scale, multipass, heat transfer model with both radially inward and outward flow. Trip strips on the leading and trailing surfaces of the radial coolant passages were used to produce the rough walls. An analysis of the governing flow equations showed that four parameters influence the heat transfer in rotating passages: coolant-to-wall temperature ratio, Rossby number, Reynolds number, and radius-to-passage hydraulic diameter ratio. The first three of these four parameters were varied over ranges which are typical of advanced gas turbine engine operating conditions. Results were correlated and compared to previous results from stationary and rotating similar models with trip strips. The heat transfer coefficients on surfaces, where the heat increased with rotation and buoyancy, varied by as much as a factor of four. Maximum values of the heat transfer coefficients with high rotation were only slightly above the highest levels obtained with the smooth wall model. The heat transfer coefficients on surfaces, where the heat transfer decreased with rotation, varied by as much as a factor of three due to rotation and buoyancy. It was concluded that both Coriolis and buoyancy effects must be considered in turbine blade cooling designs with trip strips and that the effects of rotation were markedly different depending upon the flow direction.

  1. Heat transfer in rotating serpentine passages with trips normal to the flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. H.; Johnson, B. V.; Graziani, R. A.; Yeh, F. C.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of buoyancy and Coriolis forces on heat transfer in turbine blade internal coolant passages. The experiments were conducted with a large scale, multipass, heat transfer model with both radially inward and outward flow. Trip strips on the leading and trailing surfaces of the radial coolant passages were used to produce the rough walls. An analysis of the governing flow equations showed that four parameters influence the heat transfer in rotating passages: coolant-to-wall temperature ratio, Rossby number, Reynolds number, and radius-to-passage hydraulic diameter ratio. The first three of these four parameters were varied over ranges which are typical of advanced gas turbine engine operating conditions. Results were correlated and compared to previous results from stationary and rotating similar models with trip strips. The heat transfer coefficients on surfaces, where the heat increased with rotation and buoyancy, varied by as much as a factor of four. Maximum values of the heat transfer coefficients with high rotation were only slightly above the highest levels obtained with the smooth wall model. The heat transfer coefficients on surfaces, where the heat transfer decreased with rotation, varied by as much as a factor of three due to rotation and buoyancy. It was concluded that both Coriolis and buoyancy effects must be considered in turbine blade cooling designs with trip strips and that the effects of rotation were markedly different depending upon the flow direction.

  2. Axisymmetric rotational stagnation-point flow impinging on a rotating disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Agrawal's (Q J Mech Appl Math, 10:42-44, 1957) stagnation-point flow problem is extended to flow impingement normal to a uniformly rotating disk. This is the analog of the extension of Homann's (Z Angew Math Mech (ZAMM), 16:153-164, 1936) stagnation flow when impinging on a rotating disk as reported by Hannah (Rep Mem Aerosp Res Coun Lond 2772, 1947). While both oncoming stagnation flows are axisymmetric, in the far field Homann's stagnation flow is irrotational while Agrawal's is rotational. A similarity reduction of the Navier-Stokes equations yields a pair of coupled ordinary differential equations governed by a dimensionless rotation rate σ. Integrations were carried out up to σ = 30 beyond which the equations become stiff and solution independence of integration length cannot be ensured. Results for the radial and azimuthal shear stresses are presented along with the strength of the flow induced into the boundary layer and the thickness of the azimuthal flow boundary layer. Analytic results found at σ = 0 are shown to be in excellent agreement with the numerical calculations. Sample velocity profiles for the radial and azimuthal flows are presented.

  3. Patterns of 3D flow in a rotating cylinder array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Anna; Dabiri, John; Koseff, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Experimental data are presented for large arrays of rotating, finite-height cylinders, which show that the three-dimensional flows are strongly dependent on the geometric and rotational configurations of the array. Two geometric configurations of the cylinders, each with two rotational configurations, were examined for a total of four arrays. 2D PIV was conducted in multiple intersecting horizontal and vertical sheets at a location far downstream of the leading edge of the array in order to build up a picture of the 3D developed flow patterns. It was found that the rotation of the cylinders drives the formation of streamwise and transverse flow patterns between cylinders. These horizontal flow patterns, by conservation of mass, drive vertical flows through the top of the array. As the array of rotating cylinders may provide insight into the flow kinematics of an array of vertical axis wind turbines, this planform flux is of particular interest as it would bring down into the array high kinetic energy fluid from above the array, thus increasing the energy resource available to turbines far downstream of the leading edge of the array.

  4. Alignment of dust particles by ion drag forces in subsonic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Piel, Alexander

    2011-07-15

    The role of ion drag forces for the alignment of dust particles is studied for subsonic flows. While alignment by wake-field attraction is a well known mechanism for supersonic flows, it is argued here that ion-scattering forces become more important in subsonic ion flows. A model of non-overlapping collisions is introduced and numerical results are discussed. For typical conditions of dusty plasma experiments, alignment by drag forces is found strong enough to overcome the destabilizing force from Coulomb repulsion between dust particles. It turns out that the major contribution to the horizontal restoring force originates from the transverse momentum transfer, which is usually neglected in ion drag force calculations because of an assumed rotational symmetry of the flow.

  5. 'Coriolis resonance' within a rotating duct. [flow induced vibrations in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurosaka, M.; Caruthers, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of the unsteady disturbances of a fixed frequency within a radial duct rotating at a set speed is presented. The flow is assumed to be compressible, inviscid, and of a fluid which is a perfect gas. Equations are developed for the steady and the unsteady parts of the flow in cylindrical coordinates. The unsteady disturbances are expressed by Fourier decomposition in angular position, distance into the duct, and in time. It is found that a resonance is possible when the frequency of flow disturbances is twice the shaft-rotation frequency, considering only the radial and tangential disturbances and not the radial and circumferential disturbances. The particular point at which the resonance occurs indicates the occurrence is due to the Coriolis force, which is only present in the radial and tangential directions. It is noted that the Coriolis force can only be present in open-ended ducts, such as those found in centrifugal compressors.

  6. Large eddy simulation of compressible turbulent channel and annular pipe flows with system and wall rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Sang

    The compressible filtered Navier-Stokes equations were solved using a second order accurate finite volume method with low Mach number preconditioning. A dynamic subgrid-scale stress model accounted for the subgrid-scale turbulence. The study focused on the effects of buoyancy and rotation on the structure of turbulence and transport processes including heat transfer. Several different physical arrangements were studied as outlined below. The effects of buoyancy were first studied in a vertical channel using large eddy simulation (LES). The walls were maintained at constant temperatures, one heated and the other cooled. Results showed that aiding and opposing buoyancy forces emerge near the heated and cooled walls, respectively. In the aiding flow, the turbulent intensities and heat transfer were suppressed at large values of Grashof number. In the opposing flow, however, turbulence was enhanced with increased velocity fluctuations. Another buoyancy study considered turbulent flow in a vertically oriented annulus. Isoflux wall boundary conditions with low and high heating were imposed on the inner wall while the outer wall was adiabatic. The results showed that the strong heating and buoyancy force caused distortions of the flow structure resulting in reduction of turbulent intensities, shear stress, and turbulent heat flux, particularly near the heated wall. Flow in an annular pipe with and without an outer wall rotation about its axis was first investigated at moderate Reynolds numbers. When the outer pipe wall was rotated, a significant reduction of turbulent kinetic energy was realized near the rotating wall. Secondly, a large eddy simulation has been performed to investigate the effect of swirl on the heat and momentum transfer in an annular pipe flow with a rotating inner wall. The simulations indicated that the Nusselt number and the wall friction coefficient increased with increasing rotation speed of the wall. It was also observed that the axial velocity

  7. Influence of an external force field on the dynamics of a free core and fluid in a rotating spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. G.; Kozlov, N. V.; Subbotin, S. V.

    2015-07-01

    This research involves experimental studies of the dynamics of a free spherical core and fluid motion in a spherical cavity rotating around the horizontal axis. The gravity field causes circular oscillations of the core in the reference frame of the cavity creating an averaged force in the Stokes boundary layer which makes the core rotate relative to the cavity (vibrational hydrodynamic top). The core rotates in the direction opposite to that of the cavity (lagging differential rotation). The research shows that the differential rotation intensity is determined by the ratio between the gravitational and centrifugal acceleration, as well as the ratio of the core size to the thickness of the Stokes layer. Various regimes of the fluid flow have been studied. The shape of subcritical flow is a circular-section column extended along the geometric continuation of the sphere. Increasing the differential rotation rate of the core results in various independent modes of instability of the column. One of such modes involves development of an azimuthal wave on the column boundary. The second mode is a system of two-dimensional vortices extended along the axis and rotating inside the column. It has been discovered that the development of supercritical structures causes changes in the differential rotation rate of the core.

  8. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  9. Computational studies of lobed forced mixer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Wu, S. S.; Yu, S. C. M.

    1998-03-01

    Full Navier-Stokes Analyses have been conducted for the flows behind the trailing edge of a lobed forced mixer. The governing equations are derived from the time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations and discretized in the finite-difference form. A simple two-layer eddy viscosity model has also been used to account for the turbulence. Computed results are compared with some of the velocity measurements using a laser-Doppler anemometer (Yu and Yip (1997)). In general, good agreement can be obtained in the streamwise mean velocity distribution but the decay of the streamwise circulation is underpredicted. Some suggestions to the discrepancy are proposed.

  10. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-09-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs.

  11. Modeling the dissipation rate in rotating turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Raj, Rishi; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of modifications to the modeled dissipation rate transport equation that have been proposed during the past two decades to account for rotational strains are examined. The models are subjected to two crucial test cases: the decay of isotropic turbulence in a rotating frame and homogeneous shear flow in a rotating frame. It is demonstrated that these modifications do not yield substantially improved predictions for these two test cases and in many instances give rise to unphysical behavior. An alternative proposal, based on the use of the tensor dissipation rate, is made for the development of improved models.

  12. Stability of unsteady flow in a rotating torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Richard; Hazel, Andrew; Clarke, Richard; Denier, James

    2011-11-01

    We consider the temporal evolution of a viscous incompressible fluid in a torus of finite curvature; a problem first investigated experimentally by Madden and Mullin (1994), herein referred to as MM. The system is initially in a state of rigid-body rotation (about the axis of rotational symmetry) and the container's rotation rate is then changed impulsively. We describe the transient flow that is induced at small values of the Ekman number, over a time scale that is comparable to one complete rotation of the container. We show that (rotationally symmetric) eruptive singularities (of the boundary layer) occur at the inner or outer bend of the pipe for a decrease or an increase in rotation rate respectively. Moreover, there is a ratio of initial-to-final rotation frequencies for which eruptive singularities can occur at both the inner and outer bend simultaneously. We also demonstrate that the flow is susceptible to non-axisymmetric inflectional instabilities. The inflectional instability arises as a consequence of the developing eruption and is shown to be in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations of MM. Detailed quantitative comparisons are made between asymptotic predictions and finite (but small) Ekman number Navier-Stokes computations using a finite-element method.

  13. Asymptotically reduced equations for rapidly rotating and stably stratified flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, David; Julien, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Observations by van Haren & Millot (2005) of the deep Western Mediterranean Sea and by Timmermans et al. (2006) of the deep Canadian Basin find vertical fluid motions to be as significant as horizontal motions for ocean dynamics. Since the classical quasi-geostrophic equations do not allow for such vertical motions reduced equations for geostrophically balanced flow with O(1) vertical motions are presented alongside their numerical solutions and results. The reduced equations describe flow constrained by rapid rotation and stable stratification and, in fact, are the stably stratified counterpart to the reduced equations used by Julien et al. in successful studies of rapidly rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection. Specifically, the equations are valid in the small Rossby number (Ro 1) and O(1) Froude number limit. The focus here is a comparison to similar studies of rotating and stratified flow by Smith & Waleffe (2002), Wingate et al. (2011), and Marino et al. (2013) among others.

  14. Boundary Layer Flow over a Rotating Permeable Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, K.; Rao, K.

    1994-06-01

    This paper examines the effect of permeability on boundary layerflow over an infinite permeable bed rotatingin a mass of still fluid occupying the upper half space.The slip boundar condition proposed by Beavers and Joseph1) isemployed to analyse the dynamic coupling of boundary layer flowwith the Darcy flow induced in the bed due to transfer of momentumby seepage into the porous medium,occupying the lower half space below the fluid.The effect of permeability and rotation on the componentsof slip velocity and shear stress in the radialand transverse directions is examined.Rotation and tangential slip are found to cause axial flow reversalin the boundary layer.Dependence of the location of point of flow reversalon rotation and permeability has been also studied.

  15. Drag Force Anemometer Used in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.

    1998-01-01

    To measure the drag on a flat cantilever beam exposed transversely to a flow field, the drag force anemometer (beam probe) uses strain gauges attached on opposite sides of the base of the beam. This is in contrast to the hot wire anemometer, which depends for its operation on the variation of the convective heat transfer coefficient with velocity. The beam probe retains the high-frequency response (up to 100 kHz) of the hot wire anemometer, but it is more rugged, uses simpler electronics, is relatively easy to calibrate, is inherently temperature compensated, and can be used in supersonic flow. The output of the probe is proportional to the velocity head of the flow, 1/2 rho u(exp 2) (where rho is the fluid density and u is the fluid velocity). By adding a static pressure tap and a thermocouple to measure total temperature, one can determine the Mach number, static temperature, density, and velocity of the flow.

  16. Effect of advanced and delayed rotation on the dominant flow pattern and its temporal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uksul, Esra; Krishna, Swathi; Mulleners, Karen

    2015-11-01

    During a flapping cycle of an insect, complex time dependent flows are produced as the wing reciprocates, producing a maximum lift at the stroke reversals. By flipping the wing rapidly at the end of each stroke, the insect modulates the flow around the wing and hence the aerodynamic forces necessary to hover. The duration and starting point of the flip play an important role in determining the amount of lift produced. To understand and tailor the effect of wing kinematics on the aerodynamic performance we focussed on the vortex dynamics of the flow field. Phase-averaged data from particle image velocimetry was used to evaluate the flow features inherent to changes in rotation during a stroke of a flat plate, which is modelled based on hoverfly characteristics. The period of rotation is one-third of the total time period. A +10% phase shift is used for delayed rotation, a -10% phase shift for advanced rotation. Vortex detection methods like the λ2 and Γ2 criteria are used to determine the effect of a delay or early rotation on the trajectories, size, shape and location of the prominent vortical structures. Proper orthogonal decomposition is used to study the influence of the phase-shifts on the dominant mode structure and the related time-scales.

  17. A theoretical study of fluid forces on a centrifugal impeller rotating and whirling in a vaned diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu; Acosta, Allan J.; Yoshida, Yoshiki

    1989-01-01

    The fluid forces on a centrifugal impeller rotating and whirling in a vaned diffuser are analyzed on the assumption that the number of impeller and diffuser vanes is so large that the flows are perfectly guided by the vanes. The flow is taken to be two dimensional, inviscid, and incompressible, but the effects of impeller and diffuser losses are taken into account. It is shown that the interaction with the vaned diffuser may cause destabilizing fluid forces. From these discussions, it is found that the whirling forces are closely related to the steady head-capacity characteristics of the impeller. This physical understanding of the whirling forces can be applied also to the cases with volute casings. At partial capacities, it is shown that the impeller forces change greatly when the flow rate and whirl velocity are near to the impeller or vaned diffuser attributed rotating stall onset capacity, and the stall propagation velocity, respectively. In such cases the impeller forces may become destabilizing for impeller whirl.

  18. Flow regimes in model viscoelastic fluids in a circular couette system with independently rotating cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumert, Brandon Max; Muller, Susan J.

    1997-03-01

    Flow visualization of two highly elastic, nonshear-thinning polyisobutylene/polybutene fluids in the gap between concentric cylinders was performed over a range of shear rates and choices of relative cylinder rotations. The observed secondary flows are discussed in terms of destabilizing elastic and centrifugal forces. In the more viscous, more elastic fluid, instabilities are found to be independent of the choice of rotating cylinder and due entirely to elasticity. At the lowest shear rates examined, the first detectable secondary flows are steady counter-rotating vortices forming after a shearing time more than five orders of magnitude greater than the characteristic relaxation time of the fluid. At somewhat higher shear rates, a much more rapidly appearing oscillatory flow is observed to evolve into the steady vortex structure. In the less elastic fluid, the structure first detectable at the lowest shear rates is again steady vortices regardless of the choice of driving cylinder. At all shear rates examined, only elastic stationary vortices are observed in the absence of centrifugal destabilization (outer cylinder rotating). Secondary flows are significantly stronger in the presence of the centrifugal destabilization due to a rotating inner cylinder. Interaction of elasticity and centrifugal forces is found to generate a number of axially translating vortex structures, many of which are described here for the first time. At a shear rate more than five times the critical, another family of instability is observed which closely resembles a purely elastic instability observed by Baumert and Muller (1995). These experimental results are expected to provide a challenging test of numerical simulations of these viscoelastic flows.

  19. Flow regimes in model viscoelastic fluids in a circular couette system with independently rotating cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Baumert, B.M.; Muller, S.J.

    1997-03-01

    Flow visualization of two highly elastic, nonshear-thinning polyisobutylene/polybutene fluids in the gap between concentric cylinders was performed over a range of shear rates and choices of relative cylinder rotations. The observed secondary flows are discussed in terms of destabilizing elastic and centrifugal forces. In the more viscous, more elastic fluid, instabilities are found to be independent of the choice of rotating cylinder and due entirely to elasticity. At the lowest shear rates examined, the first detectable secondary flows are steady counter-rotating vortices forming after a shearing time more than five orders of magnitude greater than the characteristic relaxation time of the fluid. At somewhat higher shear rates, a much more rapidly appearing oscillatory flow is observed to evolve into the steady vortex structure. In the less elastic fluid, the structure first detectable at the lowest shear rates is again steady vortices regardless of the choice of driving cylinder. At all shear rates examined, only elastic stationary vortices are observed in the absence of centrifugal destabilization (outer cylinder rotating). Secondary flows are significantly stronger in the presence of the centrifugal destabilization due to a rotating inner cylinder. Interaction of elasticity and centrifugal forces is found to generate a number of axially translating vortex structures, many of which are described here for the first time. At a shear rate more than five times the critical, another family of instability is observed which closely resembles a purely elastic instability observed by Baumert and Muller (1995). These experimental results are expected to provide a challenging test of numerical simulations of these viscoelastic flows. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Numerical simulation of fluid flow and heat transfer in a thin liquid film over a rotating disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Faghri, A.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a numerical simulation of the flow field and associated heat transfer coefficient are presented for the free surface flow of a thin liquid film adjacent to a horizontal rotating disk. The computation has been performed for different flow rates and rotational velocities using a three-dimensional boundary-fitted coordinate system. Since the geometry of the free surface is unknown and dependent on flow rate, rate of rotation, and other parameters, an interative procedure had to be used to ascertain its location. The computed film height agreed well with existing experimental measurements. The flow was dominated by inertia near the entrance and close to the free surface, and dominated by centrifugal force at larger radii and adjacent to the disk. The rotation enhanced the heat transfer coefficient by a significant amount.

  1. Heat transfer in rotating serpentine passages with trips skewed to the flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Wagner, J. H.; Steuber, G. D.; Yeh, F. C.

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of buoyancy and Coriolis forces on heat transfer in turbine blade internal coolant passages. The experiments were conducted with a large scale, multi-pass, heat transfer model with both radially inward and outward flow. Trip strips, skewed at 45 deg to the flow direction, were machined on the leading and trailing surfaces of the radial coolant passages. An analysis of the governing flow equations showed that four parameters influence the heat transfer in rotating passages: coolant-to-wall temperature, rotation number, Reynolds number, and radius-to-passage hydraulic diameter ratio. The first three of these four parameters were varied over ranges which are typical of advanced gas turbine engine operating conditions. Results were correlated and compared to previous results from similar stationary and rotating models with smooth walls and with trip strips normal to the flow direction. The heat transfer coefficients on surfaces, where the heat transfer decreased with rotation and buoyancy, decreased to as low as 40 percent of the value without rotation. However, the maximum values of the heat transfer coefficients with high rotation were only slightly above the highest levels previously obtained with the smooth wall models. It was concluded that (1) both Coriolis and buoyancy effects must be considered in turbine blade cooling designs with trip strips, (2) the effects of rotation are markedly different depending upon the flow direction, and (3) the heat transfer with skewed trip strips is less sensitive to buoyancy than the heat transfer in models with either smooth or normal trips. Therefore, skewed trip strips rather than normal trip strips are recommended and geometry-specific tests are required for accurate design information.

  2. Heat transfer in rotating serpentine passages with trips skewed to the flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Wagner, J. H.; Steuber, G. D.; Yeh, F. C.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of buoyancy and Coriolis forces on heat transfer in turbine blade internal coolant passages. The experiments were conducted with a large scale, multi-pass, heat transfer model with both radially inward and outward flow. Trip strips, skewed at 45 deg to the flow direction, were machined on the leading and trailing surfaces of the radial coolant passages. An analysis of the governing flow equations showed that four parameters influence the heat transfer in rotating passages: coolant-to-wall temperature, rotation number, Reynolds number, and radius-to-passage hydraulic diameter ratio. The first three of these four parameters were varied over ranges which are typical of advanced gas turbine engine operating conditions. Results were correlated and compared to previous results from similar stationary and rotating models with smooth walls and with trip strips normal to the flow direction. The heat transfer coefficients on surfaces, where the heat transfer decreased with rotation and buoyancy, decreased to as low as 40 percent of the value without rotation. However, the maximum values of the heat transfer coefficients with high rotation were only slightly above the highest levels previously obtained with the smooth wall models. It was concluded that (1) both Coriolis and buoyancy effects must be considered in turbine blade cooling designs with trip strips, (2) the effects of rotation are markedly different depending upon the flow direction, and (3) the heat transfer with skewed trip strips is less sensitive to buoyancy than the heat transfer in models with either smooth or normal trips. Therefore, skewed trip strips rather than normal trip strips are recommended and geometry-specific tests are required for accurate design information.

  3. Influence of Flow Rotation Within a Cooling Tower on the Aerodynamic Interaction with Crosswind Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, M. M. Hemmasian; Dobrego, K. V.

    2014-03-01

    Environmental crosswind changes the aerodynamic pattern inside a cooling tower, destroys uniform and axisymmetric distribution of flow at its inlet and outlet, and may degrade fill zone performance. In this paper, the effect of flow rotation in the over-shower zone of a natural draft cooling tower (NDCT) on the aerodynamic interaction with crosswind is studied numerically. The 3D geometry of an actual NDCT and three models of induced rotation velocity fields are utilized for simulation. It is demonstrated that flow rotation results in homogenization of the aerodynamic field in the over-shower zone. The inhomogeneity of the velocity field in the outlet cross section decreases linearly with rotation intensification. The effect of main stream switching under strong wind conditions is found. It is shown that even moderate flow rotation eliminates this effect.

  4. Pattern formation and three-dimensional instability in rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Erik A.; Aubry, Nadine; Sorensen, Jens N.

    1997-03-01

    A fluid flow enclosed in a cylindrical container where fluid motion is created by the rotation of one end wall as a centrifugal fan is studied. Direct numerical simulations and spatio-temporal analysis have been performed in the early transition scenario, which includes a steady-unsteady transition and a breakdown of axisymmetric to three-dimensional flow behavior. In the early unsteady regime of the flow, the central vortex undergoes a vertical beating motion, accompanied by axisymmetric spikes formation on the edge of the breakdown bubble. As traveling waves, the spikes move along the central vortex core toward the rotating end-wall. As the Reynolds number is increased further, the flow undergoes a three-dimensional instability. The influence of the latter on the previous patterns is studied.

  5. Flow instabilities behind rotating bluff bodies for moderate Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goujon-Durand, Sophie; Gibi?Ski, Kornel; Skarysz, Maciej; Wesfreid, Jose Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    We present experiments to study the flow behind 3D bodies (spheres, disks and propellers) rotating about an axis aligned with the streamwise direction. The experiments has been performed in a water channel using LIF visualizations and PIV measurements. We study the flow evolution and the different flow regimes as a function of two control parameters: the Reynolds number Re and the dimensionless rotation or swirl rate Ω which is the ratio of the maximum azimuthal velocity of the body to the free stream velocity. In the present investigation, we covers the range of Re smaller than 400 and Ω from 0 to 4 in some cases. Different wakes regimes such as an axisymmetric base flow (or n-symmetric in the case of propellers), low frequency helicoidal states and higher frequency state are observed. The transitions between states are studied measuring the amplitude of the azimuthal modes components of the streamwise vorticity obtained by Fourier decomposition.

  6. One-dimensional analysis of the hydrodynamic and thermal characteristics of thin film flows including the hydraulic jump and rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, S.; Hankey, W.; Faghri, A.; Swanson, T.

    1990-01-01

    The flow of a thin liquid film with a free surface along a horizontal plane that emanates from a pressurized vessel is examined numerically. In one g, a hydraulic jump was predicted in both plane and radial flow, which could be forced away from the inlet by increasing the inlet Froude number or Reynolds number. In zero g, the hydraulic jump was not predicted. The effect of solid-body rotation for radial flow in one g was to 'wash out' the hydraulic jump and to decrease the film height on the disk. The liquid film heights under one g and zero g were equal under solid-body rotation because the effect of centrifugal force was much greater than that of the gravitational force. The heat transfer to a film on a rotating disk was predicted to be greater than that of a stationary disk because the liquid film is extremely thin and is moving with a very high velocity.

  7. Multiple solutions in a rotating annulus flow model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Huei-Iin; Miller, Timothy L.; Butler, Karen A.

    1993-01-01

    A series of numerical experiments is conducted for rotating annulus flow using Miller et al.'s (1992) Geophysical Flow Simulation (GFS) model; a mixture of 25-percent upwind-differencing and 75-percent center-differencing is employed to approximate the temperature advective terms. Attention is given to the wavenumber selection time and wavenumber regimes, the sensitivity in the wavenumber transition regions, and hysteresis and irregular wavenumber selections.

  8. External forcing modulates Pine Island Glacier flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianson, K. A.; Bushuk, M.; Holland, D.; Dutrieux, P.; Joughin, I.; Parizek, B. R.; Alley, R. B.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Heywood, K. J.; Jenkins, A.; Nicholls, K. W.; Webber, B.; Muto, A.; Stanton, T. P.

    2015-12-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, Mercer first suggested the Eemian sea-level high stand was a result of a collapse of the marine portions of the West Antarctic ice sheet. Recently, special attention has been paid to West Antarctica's Amundsen Sea Embayment due to its steeply sloping retrograde beds that are well below sea level, and observations of rapid grounding-line retreat, high ice-shelf basal-melt rates, and basin-wide glacier thinning and acceleration. Despite this focus, accurate assessments of the past and future behavior of this embayment remain elusive due to a lack of understanding of calving processes and ice-ocean interactions. Here we present a continuous two-year (2012-2014) time series of oceanographic, borehole, glaciological, and seismological observations of Pine Island Glacier ice shelf, its sub-ice ocean cavity, and the adjacent Amundsen Sea. With these data, we captured the ice shelf's response to a large fluctuation in the temperature of the water (~1 °C) entering the sub-ice-ocean cavity. Initially, the ice shelf slowed by 5%, but, by the end of 2014, it had nearly recovered its earlier speed. The generally smooth changes in ice flow were punctuated by rapid (2-3 week), high-amplitude (~2.5% of the background speed) speedups and slowdowns. Satellite and seismological observations indicate that rapid speedups are caused by reduction of lateral drag along the ice stream's shear margins as a large iceberg calves and that rapid slowdowns may be due to periodic regrounding on bed highs at low tide. Coupled ice-stream/ice-shelf/ocean-plume flowband modeling informed by these new data indicates that the more-gradual changes in speed are related to ocean temperature, ice-front position, and past ice-flow history. Our observations highlight an ice shelf's rapid response to external forcings and that past ice-flow behavior affects subsequent ice response to external forcing. Thus, long-term, multifaceted investigations are necessary to determine whether a

  9. Numerical and experimental study of rotating jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwon; Che, Zhizhao; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir

    2015-11-01

    Rotating jets are investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. The experiments are performed on a rotating jet rig and the effects of a range of parameters controlling the liquid jet are investigated, e.g. jet flow rate, rotation speed, jet diameter, etc. Different regimes of the jet morphology are identified, and the dependence on several dimensionless numbers is studied, e.g. Reynolds number, Weber number, etc. The breakup process of droplets is visualized through high speed imaging. Full three-dimensional direct numerical simulations are performed using BLUE, a massively parallel two-phase flow code. The novel interface algorithms in BLUE track the gas-liquid interface through a wide dynamic range including ligament formation, break up and rupture. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  10. Large-scale behavior and statistical equilibria in rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mininni, P. D.; Dmitruk, P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Pouquet, A.

    2011-01-01

    We examine long-time properties of the ideal dynamics of three-dimensional flows, in the presence or not of an imposed solid-body rotation and with or without helicity (velocity-vorticity correlation). In all cases, the results agree with the isotropic predictions stemming from statistical mechanics. No accumulation of excitation occurs in the large scales, although, in the dissipative rotating case, anisotropy and accumulation, in the form of an inverse cascade of energy, are known to occur. We attribute this latter discrepancy to the linearity of the term responsible for the emergence of inertial waves. At intermediate times, inertial energy spectra emerge that differ somewhat from classical wave-turbulence expectations and with a trace of large-scale excitation that goes away for long times. These results are discussed in the context of partial two dimensionalization of the flow undergoing strong rotation as advocated by several authors.

  11. Experimental Study of the Flow in a Rotating CVD Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sun; Meng, Jiandong; Jaluria, Yogesh

    2013-11-01

    An experimental model is developed to study the rotating, vertical, impinging chemical vapor deposition reactor. Deposition occurs only when the system has enough thermal energy. Therefore, understanding the fluid flow and thermal characteristics of the system would provide a good basis to model the thin film deposition process. The growth rate and the uniformity of the film are the two most important factors in the CVD process and these depend strongly on the flow and the thermal transport within the system. Operating parameters, such as inflow velocity, susceptor temperature and rotational speed, are used to create different design simulations. Fluid velocities and temperature distributions are recorded to obtain the effects of different operating parameters. Velocities are recorded by using a rotameter and a hot wire anemometer. The temperatures are recorded by using thermocouples and an infrared thermometer. The effects of buoyancy and rotation are examined. The expermental study is also coupled with a numerical study for validation of the numerical model and to expand the domain. Comparisons between the two models are presented, indicating fair agreement. The numerical model also includes simulation of Gallium Nitride (GaN) thin film deposition. This simulation thus includes mass transport and gas kinetics, along with the flow and heat transfer within the system. A three dimensional simulation is needed due to the rotation of the susceptor. The results obtained as well as the underlying fluid flow phenomena are discussed.

  12. Energetic dynamics of a rotating horizontal convection model with wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskova, Varvara; White, Brian; Scotti, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    We present a new test case for rotating horizontal convection, where the flow is driven by differential buoyancy forcing along a horizontal surface. This simple model is used to understand and quantify the influence of surface heating and cooling and wind stress on the Meridional Overturning Circulation. The domain is a rectangular basin with surface cooling at both ends (the poles) and surface warming in the middle (equatorial) region. To model the effect of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, reentrant channel is placed near the Southern pole. Free-slip boundary conditions are imposed in the closed box, while zonally periodic boundary conditions are enforced in the channel. The problem is solved numerically using a 3D DNS model based on a finite-volume AMR solver for the Boussinesq Navier-Stokes equations with rotation. The relative contributions of surface buoyancy and wind forcing and the energetic balance are analyzed at a Rayleigh number of 108 and a relatively high aspect ratio of [5, 10, 1] in zonal, meridional and vertical directions, respectively. The overall dynamics, including large-scale overturning, baroclinic eddying, and turbulent mixing are investigated using the local Available Potential Energy framework introduced in [Scotti and White, J. Fluid Mech., 2014]. This research is part of the Blue Waters sustained-petascale computing project, supported by the NSF (awards OCI-0725070, ACI-1238993 and ACI-14-44747) and the state of Illinois.

  13. Turbulent Compressible Convection with Rotation. Part 1; Flow Structure and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brummell, Nicholas H.; Hurlburt, Neal E.; Toomre, Juri

    1996-01-01

    The effects of Coriolis forces on compressible convection are studied using three-dimensional numerical simulations carried out within a local modified f-plane model. The physics is simplified by considering a perfect gas occupying a rectilinear domain placed tangentially to a rotating sphere at various latitudes, through which a destabilizing heat flux is driven. The resulting convection is considered for a range of Rayleigh, Taylor, and Prandtl (and thus Rossby) numbers, evaluating conditions where the influence of rotation is both weak and strong. Given the computational demands of these high-resolution simulations, the parameter space is explored sparsely to ascertain the differences between laminar and turbulent rotating convection. The first paper in this series examines the effects of rotation on the flow structure within the convection, its evolution, and some consequences for mixing. Subsequent papers consider the large-scale mean shear flows that are generated by the convection, and the effects of rotation on the convective energetics and transport properties. It is found here that the structure of rotating turbulent convection is similar to earlier nonrotating studies, with a laminar, cellular surface network disguising a fully turbulent interior punctuated by vertically coherent structures. However, the temporal signature of the surface flows is modified by inertial motions to yield new cellular evolution patterns and an overall increase in the mobility of the network. The turbulent convection contains vortex tubes of many scales, including large-scale coherent structures spanning the full vertical extent of the domain involving multiple density scale heights. Remarkably, such structures align with the rotation vector via the influence of Coriolis forces on turbulent motions, in contrast with the zonal tilting of streamlines found in laminar flows. Such novel turbulent mechanisms alter the correlations which drive mean shearing flows and affect the

  14. Computation of flow and heat transfer in rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, M

    2001-05-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations have been used to model the flow and the heat transfer that occurs in the internal cooling-air systems of gas turbines. Computations are performed to study the effect of gap ratio, Reynolds number and the mass flow rate on the flow and the heat transfer structure inside isothermal and heated rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air. Computations are compared with some of the recent experimental work on flow and heat transfer in rotating-cavities. The agreement between the computed and the available experimental data is reasonably good. PMID:11460668

  15. Network flow model of force transmission in unbonded and bonded granular media.

    PubMed

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Tobin, Steven T; Cil, Mehmet; Alshibli, Khalid; Behringer, Robert P

    2015-06-01

    An established aspect of force transmission in quasistatic deformation of granular media is the existence of a dual network of strongly versus weakly loaded particles. Despite significant interest, the regulation of strong and weak forces through the contact network remains poorly understood. We examine this aspect of force transmission using data on microstructural fabric from: (I) three-dimensional discrete element models of grain agglomerates of bonded subspheres constructed from in situ synchrotron microtomography images of silica sand grains under unconfined compression and (II) two-dimensional assemblies of unbonded photoelastic circular disks submitted to biaxial compression under constant volume. We model force transmission as a network flow and solve the maximum flow-minimum cost (MFMC) problem, the solution to which yields a percolating subnetwork of contacts that transmits the "maximum flow" (i.e., the highest units of force) at "least cost" (i.e., the dissipated energy from such transmission). We find the MFMC describes a two-tier hierarchical architecture. At the local level, it encapsulates intraconnections between particles in individual force chains and in their conjoined 3-cycles, with the most common configuration having at least one force chain contact experiencing frustrated rotation. At the global level, the MFMC encapsulates interconnections between force chains. The MFMC can be used to predict most of the force chain particles without need for any information on contact forces, thereby suggesting the network flow framework may have potential broad utility in the modeling of force transmission in unbonded and bonded granular media. PMID:26172702

  16. Network flow model of force transmission in unbonded and bonded granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Tobin, Steven T.; Cil, Mehmet; Alshibli, Khalid; Behringer, Robert P.

    2015-06-01

    An established aspect of force transmission in quasistatic deformation of granular media is the existence of a dual network of strongly versus weakly loaded particles. Despite significant interest, the regulation of strong and weak forces through the contact network remains poorly understood. We examine this aspect of force transmission using data on microstructural fabric from: (I) three-dimensional discrete element models of grain agglomerates of bonded subspheres constructed from in situ synchrotron microtomography images of silica sand grains under unconfined compression and (II) two-dimensional assemblies of unbonded photoelastic circular disks submitted to biaxial compression under constant volume. We model force transmission as a network flow and solve the maximum flow-minimum cost (MFMC) problem, the solution to which yields a percolating subnetwork of contacts that transmits the "maximum flow" (i.e., the highest units of force) at "least cost" (i.e., the dissipated energy from such transmission). We find the MFMC describes a two-tier hierarchical architecture. At the local level, it encapsulates intraconnections between particles in individual force chains and in their conjoined 3-cycles, with the most common configuration having at least one force chain contact experiencing frustrated rotation. At the global level, the MFMC encapsulates interconnections between force chains. The MFMC can be used to predict most of the force chain particles without need for any information on contact forces, thereby suggesting the network flow framework may have potential broad utility in the modeling of force transmission in unbonded and bonded granular media.

  17. Toward a Turbulence Constitutive Relation for Rotating Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    In rapidly rotating turbulent flows the largest scales of the motion are in approximate geostrophic balance. Single-point turbulence closures, in general, cannot attain a geostrophic balance. This article addresses and resolves the possibility of constitutive relation procedures for single-point second order closures for a specific class of rotating or stratified flows. Physical situations in which the geostrophic balance is attained are described. Closely related issues of frame-indifference, horizontal nondivergence, Taylor-Proudman theorem and two-dimensionality are, in the context of both the instantaneous and averaged equations, discussed. It is shown, in the absence of vortex stretching along the axis of rotation, that turbulence is frame-indifferent. A derivation and discussion of a geostrophic constraint which the prognostic equations for second-order statistics must satisfy for turbulence approaching a frame-indifferent limit is given. These flow situations, which include rotating and nonrotating stratified flows, are slowly evolving flows in which the constitutive relation procedures are useful. A nonlinear non-constant coefficient representation for the rapid-pressure strain covariance appearing in the Reynolds stress and heat flux equations consistent with the geostrophic balance is described. The rapid-pressure strain model coefficients are not constants determined by numerical optimization but are functions of the state of the turbulence as parameterized by the Reynolds stresses and the turbulent heat fluxes. The functions are valid for all states of the turbulence attaining their limiting values only when a limit state is achieved. These issues are relevant to strongly vortical flows as well as flows such as the planetary boundary layers, in which there is a transition from a three-dimensional shear driven turbulence to a geostrophic or horizontal turbulence.

  18. Forced-flow planar chromatography in the rear view mirror.

    PubMed

    Kalász, Huba

    2015-03-01

    Mobile phase progress in planar stationary phase can be evoked by either external or internal forces. An internal force is capillarity, while gravity, electric field, a pump and centrifugal forces belong to external forces. Overpressured layer chromatography gives a widely used special chapter of forced-flow planar chromatography, a special bridge between high-performance liquid column chromatography and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). A simple and special rule characterizes the progress of mobile phase. Optimal efficiency is composed by the doubled effect of flow resulting from the pump-forced mobile phase (convex profile of laminar flow) and capillary forces on the dry stationary phase (concave laminar flow). This review describes the most important aspects of forced-flow TLC, including how the set-ups are developed and also the progress of detection methods used. PMID:25681205

  19. The effect of oscillating force field on the dynamics of free inner core in a rotating fluid-filled spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. G.; Kozlov, N. V.; Subbotin, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    This research involves experimental studies of the dynamics of a free spherical core in a fluid-filled spherical cavity rotating around the horizontal axis and subject to vibration perpendicular to the rotation axis. The core stays in the center of the cavity under the action of a centrifugal force (the core density is less than the fluid density). The vibration manifests itself in resonance regions when the vibration frequency coincides with one of the core's natural frequencies. The amplitude of the core oscillations and generation of its intensive differential rotation rise steeply, with the differential rotation lagging or leading, depending on the frequency of the core oscillations. Excitation of leading rotation is accompanied by the core shift from the cavity center to one of the poles with the core rotation axis deviated from the cavity rotation axis. The research shows that the superposition of different force fields, oscillating vibrational field, and static gravitational force field determines the differential rotation rate of the core. The gravity field causes the lagging circular oscillations of the core with respect to the cavity, and consequently its steady lagging differential rotation, which decreases as the cavity rotation rate increases. The research shows that 2D steady flow in the form of a Taylor-Proudman column accompanies the differential rotation of the core. The resulting flow is a linear superposition of flows excited independently by gravity and vibration. The instability of the flow manifests itself, as an azimuthal two-dimensional wave is propagating on the Taylor-Proudman column boundary, and depends on the flow structure.

  20. On the rotation of dust particulates in the ion flow*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Osamu

    2000-10-01

    Finite size effect of dust particulates floating in the ion flow was studied in connection to the wake formation [1]. Now we study rotational motion of finite size dust particulates placed in the sheath region of low temperature discharge plasma. The potential drop in the sheath region produces a flow of ions toward a boundary or an electrode. The presence of neighboring dust particulates will produce necessarily an inhomogeneous flow structure around a test dust particulate [2]. In our simplified model, a flow with velocity shear is assumed to be present. A test dust particulate placed in a shear flow is shown to start its rotation. Because of its negative charge, the rotating dust particulate will carry a magnetic moment. Spinning motion of dust particulates in the presence of external magnetic field is also discussed. *Supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) from Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. [1] O. Ishihara, S.V. Vladimirov, and N. Cramer, Phys. Rev. E 61, 7246 (2000). [2] O. Ishihara, Phys. Plasmas 5 357 (1998).

  1. Observation of turbulent flow with three zones in a rotating annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinney, Harry L.; Aubert, Julien; Jung, Sunghwan

    2002-11-01

    We have conducted experiments on turbulent flow in a rapidly rotating annulus (outer radius r=43 cm) that was forced by pumping water through a ring of 120 holes (0.25 cm diameter, r_f=27 cm)(J. Aubert, S. Jung, and H.L. Swinney, Geophys. Res. Lett., to appear). The water was pumped in through a semi-circle of 60 holes and out through a semi-circle of 60 holes on the other side of the annulus. Although the net vorticity injected was zero, a zonal flow developed with a co-rotating jet between two counter-rotating jets. Such zonal jets arise similarly from small scale forcing in planetary flows. The annulus has a sloping bottom (β-plane), which provides a reservoir of potential vorticity, q=ω + β (r-r_f), where ω is the vorticity and β is the β-plane parameter. Our study indicates that the potential vorticity is well-mixed, and that the strength of the zonal flow has an upper bound imposed by complete depletion of the β-plane potential vorticity reservoir.

  2. Flow of magnetized grains in a rotating drum.

    PubMed

    Lumay, G; Vandewalle, N

    2010-10-01

    We have experimentally investigated the influence of a magnetic interaction between the grains on the flow of a granular material in a rotating drum. The magnetic cohesion is induced by applying a homogeneous external magnetic field B oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the gravity g. The drum rotating speed has been selected to obtain a continuous flow when the magnetic field is switched off. We show that, for both magnetic field orientations, the cohesion is able to induce a transition between the continuous flow regime to the discrete avalanche regime. The avalanche dynamics is periodic when B⊥g and irregular when B∥g. Moreover, the maximal angle of stability θ(m) increases strongly with the cohesion strength and could be higher than 90° when B⊥g. A toy model based on the stability of a magnetic block on a magnetic inclined plane is proposed to explain this behavior. PMID:21230228

  3. The Lorenz energy cycle in simulated rotating annulus flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, R. M. B.

    2014-05-01

    Lorenz energy cycles are presented for a series of simulated differentially heated rotating annulus flows, in the axisymmetric, steady, amplitude vacillating, and structurally vacillating flow regimes. The simulation allows contributions to the energy diagnostics to be identified in parts of the fluid that cannot be measured in experiments. These energy diagnostics are compared with laboratory experiments studying amplitude vacillation, and agree well with experimental time series of kinetic and potential energy, as well as conversions between them. Two of the three major energy transfer paradigms of the Lorenz energy cycle are identified—a Hadley-cell overturning circulation, and baroclinic instability. The third, barotropic instability, was never dominant, but increased in strength as rotation rate increased. For structurally vacillating flow, which matches the Earth's thermal Rossby number well, the ratio between energy conversions associated with baroclinic and barotropic instabilities was similar to the measured ratio in the Earth's mid-latitudes.

  4. Transitional and weakly turbulent flow in a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, J.; Fraňa, K.; Cramer, A.

    2006-07-01

    The early stage of turbulent flow driven by a rotating magnetic field is studied via direct numerical simulations and electric potential measurements for the case of a cylindrical geometry. The numerical results show that the undisturbed flow remains stable up to the linear stability limit (Tac), whereas small perturbations may initiate a nonlinear transition at subcritical Taylor numbers. The observed instabilities occur randomly as isolated pairs of Taylor-Görtler vortices, which grow from spots to long tubes until they are dissipated in the lid boundary layers. At 7.5Tac, the flow is governed by large-scale three-dimensional fluctuations and may be characterized as weakly turbulent. Taylor-Görtler vortices provide the major turbulence mechanism, apart from oscillations of the rotation axis. As the vortices tend to align with the azimuthal direction, they result in a locally two-dimensional turbulence pattern.

  5. Structure parameters in rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, George H.; Sather, D.

    1986-01-01

    It is well-known that a number of steady state problems in fluid mechanics involving systems of nonlinear partial differential equations can be reduced to the problem of solving a single operator equation of the form: v + lambda Av + lambda B(v) = 0, v is the summation of H, lambda is the summation of one-dimensional Euclid space, where H is an appropriate (real or complex) Hilbert space. Here lambda is a typical load parameter, e.g., the Reynolds number, A is a linear operator, and B is a quadratic operator generated by a bilinear form. In this setting many bifurcation and stability results for problems were obtained. A rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow was studied, and it showed that, in general, the superposition of a Poiseuille flow on a rotating Couette channel flow is destabilizing.

  6. Dynamics and Statistical Mechanics of Rotating and non-Rotating Vortical Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Chjan

    2013-12-18

    Three projects were analyzed with the overall aim of developing a computational/analytical model for estimating values of the energy, angular momentum, enstrophy and total variation of fluid height at phase transitions between disordered and self-organized flow states in planetary atmospheres. It is believed that these transitions in equilibrium statistical mechanics models play a role in the construction of large-scale, stable structures including super-rotation in the Venusian atmosphere and the formation of the Great Red Spot on Jupiter. Exact solutions of the spherical energy-enstrophy models for rotating planetary atmospheres by Kac's method of steepest descent predicted phase transitions to super-rotating solid-body flows at high energy to enstrophy ratio for all planetary spins and to sub-rotating modes if the planetary spin is large enough. These canonical statistical ensembles are well-defined for the long-range energy interactions that arise from 2D fluid flows on compact oriented manifolds such as the surface of the sphere and torus. This is because in Fourier space available through Hodge theory, the energy terms are exactly diagonalizable and hence has zero range, leading to well-defined heat baths.

  7. Heat transfer in rotating serpentine passages with trips skewed to the flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Wagner, J. H.; Steuber, G. D.; Yeh, F. C.

    1992-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of buoyancy and Coriolis forces on heat transfer in turbine blade internal coolant passages. The experiments were conducted with a large scale, multi-pass heat transfer model with both radially inward and outward flow. An analysis of the governing flow equations showed that four parameters influence the heat transfer in rotating passages: coolant-to-wall temperature, rotation number, Reynolds number, and radius-to-passage hydraulic diameter ratio. Results were correlated and compared to previous results from similar stationary and rotating models with smooth walls and with trip strips normal to the flow direction. It was concluded that (1) both Coriolis and buoyancy must be considered in turbine blade cooling designs with trip strips, (2) the effects of rotation are markedly different depending upon the flow direction, and (3) the heat transfer with skewed trip strips is less sensitive to buoyancy than the heat transfer models with either smooth or normal trips. Therefore, skewed trip strips rather than normal trip strips are recommended and geometry-specific tests are required for accurate design.

  8. Heat transfer in rotating serpentine passages with trips skewed to the flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Wagner, J. H.; Steuber, G. D.; Yeh, F. C.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of buoyancy and Coriolis forces on heat transfer in turbine blade internal coolant passages. The experiments were conducted with a large scale, multi-pass heat transfer model with both radially inward and outward flow. An analysis of the governing flow equations showed that four parameters influence the heat transfer in rotating passages: coolant-to-wall temperature, rotation number, Reynolds number, and radius-to-passage hydraulic diameter ratio. Results were correlated and compared to previous results from similar stationary and rotating models with smooth walls and with trip strips normal to the flow direction. It was concluded that (1) both Coriolis and buoyancy must be considered in turbine blade cooling designs with trip strips, (2) the effects of rotation are markedly different depending upon the flow direction, and (3) the heat transfer with skewed trip strips is less sensitive to buoyancy than the heat transfer models with either smooth or normal trips. Therefore, skewed trip strips rather than normal trip strips are recommended and geometry-specific tests are required for accurate design.

  9. Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics in fully developed rotating turbulent flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biferale, Luca; Bonaccorso, Fabio; Mazzitelli, Irene; Lanotte, Alessandra; Perlekar, Prasad; Musacchio, Stefano; Hinsberg, Michel; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    We present results concerning both Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics for turbulent under rotation at small and large Rossby numbers. Concerning the Eulerian statistics we discuss the effects of the presence of strong coherent large-scale vortical structures on the small-scale statistics. Concerning Lagrangian properties, we discuss the effects of preferential sampling at changing the inertial properties of the particles also due to the centrifugal and Coriolis forces. Supported by the ERC AdG NewTURB num. 339032.

  10. Tornado-like flows driven by magnetic body forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbeth, Gunter; Grants, Ilmars; Vogt, Tobias; Eckert, Sven

    2014-11-01

    Alternating magnetic fields produce well-defined flow-independent body forces in electrically conducting media. This property is used to construct a laboratory analogue of the Fiedler chamber with a room-temperature liquid metal as working fluid. A continuously applied rotating magnetic field (RMF) provides the source of the angular momentum. A pulse of a much stronger travelling magnetic field drives a converging flow at the metal surface, which focuses this angular momentum towards the axis of the container. The resulting vortex is studied experimentally and numerically. In a certain range of the ratio of both driving actions the axial velocity changes its direction in the vortex core, resembling the subsidence in an eye of a tropical cyclone or a large tornado. During the initial deterministic spin-up stage the vortex is well described by axisymmetric direct numerical simulation. Being strong enough the flow develops a funnel-shaped surface depression that enables visual observation of the vortex structure. As the RMF strength is increased the eyewall diameter grows until it breaks down to multiple vortices. A number of further observed similarities to tornado-like vortices will be discussed. The work is supported by the German Helmholtz Association in frame of the LIMTECH alliance.

  11. On the flow generated by rotating flat plates of low aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVoria, Adam C.

    Low-aspect-ratio propulsors typically allow for high maneuverability at low-to-moderate speeds. This has made them the subject of much recent research aimed at employing such appendages on autonomous vehicles which are required to navigate tumultuous environments. This experimental investigation focuses on the fluid dynamic aspects associated with overly-simplified versions of such biologically-inspired propulsors. In doing so, fundamental contributions are made to the research area. The unsteady, three-dimensional flow of a low-aspect-ratio, trapezoidal flat plate undergoing rotation from rest at a 90° angle of attack and Reynolds numbers of O(103) is investigated experimentally. The objectives are to develop a straightforward protocol for vortex saturation, and to understand the effects of the root-to-tip flow for different velocity programs. The experiments are conducted in a glass-walled tank, and digital particle image velocimetry is used to obtain planar velocity measurements. A formation-parameter definition is investigated and is found to reasonably predict the state corresponding to the pinch-off of the initial tip vortex across the velocity programs tested. The flow in the region near the tip is relatively insensitive to Reynolds number over the range studied. The component normal to the plate is unaffected by total rotational amplitude while the tangential component has dependence on this angle. Also, an estimate of the first tip-vortex pinch-off time is obtained from the near-tip velocity data and agrees very well with values estimated using circulation. The angle of incidence of the bulk root-to-tip flow relative to the plate normal becomes more oblique with increasing rotational amplitude. Accordingly, the peak magnitude of the tangential velocity is also increased and as a result advects fluid momentum away from the plate at a higher rate. The more oblique impingement of the root-to-tip flow for increasing rotational amplitude is shown to have a

  12. Mesoscopic simulation of single DNA dynamics in rotational flows.

    PubMed

    Ranjith, S Kumar

    2015-08-01

    In this numerical study, the transport and dynamics of an isolated DNA in rotational flow generated in a microchannel have been investigated using dissipative particle dynamics. Often, inertial flow through microchannels with a sudden change in surface structure facilitates a re-circulation or vortex region. The conformation and mobility of the bio-polymer under the influence of such rotating fluid inside a square cavity of the microchannel is analyzed. The flexible polymer chain is found to migrate towards the rotating region and follows the vortex streamline. The orientation, size and tumbling period of polymer strands are affected by the strength of the microvortex. At elevated flow rates, the macromolecule prefers to remain inside the vortex and a hydrodynamic trap is formed. Moreover, residence time of the single molecule in the microcavity is significantly influenced by the chain length and flow strength. Further, it has been demonstrated that, such entrapment duration can be strategically altered by modifying the hydrophobicity of the microchannel. PMID:26314257

  13. Flow past tandem cylinders under forced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yingchen; Aydin, Tayfun B.; Ekmekci, Alis

    2014-01-01

    Flow past two cylinders in tandem arrangement under forced vibration has been studied experimentally employing the hydrogen bubble visualization technique. The Reynolds number, based on the cylinder diameter, is fixed at Re=250. In stationary state of the two cylinders with P/D=2.0, dual vortex shedding frequencies fL (St=0.14) and fH (St=0.18) are identified. fL is associated with the shear layer reattachment behavior and fH is related to the single bluff body behavior. Under a variety of forced vibrations of the two cylinders at a fixed vibration amplitude A/D=0.25, diverse and highly-repetitive vortex patterns are yielded. They are classified into two typical modes—a low-frequency mode and a high-frequency mode. The two modes are represented by two vortex patterns yielded from in-phase vibration of the two cylinders with P/D=2.0 and at vibration frequencies fe≈fL and fe≈fH. The difference between the two modes is on the number of vortices formed per vibration cycle. For the low-frequency mode, the number is four; for the high-frequency model, it is two. In both modes, the vortex formation is phase-locked to the cylinder motion. For a specified mode with a fixed vortex number per cycle, the way the vortices evolve in the wake can be somewhat different by changing the vibration frequency, pitch ratio, as well as the vibration type. These affecting factors have been examined in this work, and the associated vortex patterns have been characterized and compared.

  14. Equations for Adiabatic but Rotational Steady Gas Flows without Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Manfred

    1947-01-01

    This paper makes the following assumptions: 1) The flowing gases are assumed to have uniform energy distribution. ("Isoenergetic gas flows," that is valid with the same constants for the the energy equation entire flow.) This is correct, for example, for gas flows issuing from a region of constant pressure, density, temperature, end velocity. This property is not destroyed by compression shocks because of the universal validity of the energy law. 2) The gas behaves adiabatically, not during the compression shock itself but both before and after the shock. However, the adiabatic equation (p/rho(sup kappa) = C) is not valid for the entire gas flow with the same constant C but rather with an appropriate individual constant for each portion of the gas. For steady flows, this means that the constant C of the adiabatic equation is a function of the stream function. Consequently, a gas that has been flowing "isentropically",that is, with the same constant C of the adiabatic equation throughout (for example, in origination from a region of constant density, temperature, and velocity) no longer remains isentropic after a compression shock if the compression shock is not extremely simple (wedge shaped in a two-dimensional flow or cone shaped in a rotationally symmetrical flow). The solution of nonisentropic flows is therefore an urgent necessity.

  15. The Rotational Spectrum and Anharmonic Force Field of Chlorine Dioxide, OClO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Holger S. P.; Sorensen, G.; Birk, Manfred; Friedl, Randy R.

    1997-01-01

    The ground state rotational and quartic centrifugal distortion constants, their vibrational changes, and the sextic centrifugal distortion constants were used in a calculation of the quartic force field together with data from infrared studies.

  16. The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars in hydrostatic equilibrium is investigated by using the method of the energy principle. It is shown that this effect is to inhibit the onset of instability.

  17. The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars in hydrostatic equilibrium is investigated by using the method of the energy principle. It is shown that this effect is to inhibit the onset of instability.

  18. Granular flow along the interior surface of rotating cones

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.; Walton, O.R.

    1984-04-26

    Relationships are developed between the effective cone half-angle, ..cap alpha../sub eff/, and the actual cone half-angle, ..cap alpha.., for subcritical flow of granular material along the inside surface of a rotating cone. Rotational speed must be high enough to keep the granular material against the wall. If ..cap alpha../sub eff/ is between the wall friction angle, phi/sub w/ and the angle of repose, phi/sub r/, the flowrate may be controlled at the exit and depends on the exit aperture area and the rotational speed. Laboratory experiments show that exit control is possible over the entire range of effective cone half-angles from phi/sub w/ < ..cap alpha../sub eff/ < phi/sub r/ and even beyond these limits. The most uniform thickness of granular material is obtained when the cone half-angle is close to phi/sub r/.

  19. Measuring Photospheric Rotational and Meridional Flows Using Magnetic Feature Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Derek

    2016-05-01

    Long-lived rotational and meridional flows are important ingredients of the solar cycle. Using magnetic field images to measure these flows on the solar surface has typically been performed by cross-correlating thin longitudinal strips or square patches across sufficiently long time gaps. Here, I use one month of SDO/HMI line-of-sight magnetic field observations, combined with the SWAMIS magnetic feature tracking algorithm to measure the motion of individual features in these magnetograms. By controlling for perturbations due to short-lived flows and due to false motions from feature interactions, I effectively isolate the long-lived flows traced by the magnetic features. This allows me to produce high-fidelity differential rotation measurements with well-characterized variances and covariances of the fit parameters. I also produce medium-fidelity measurements of the much weaker meridional flow that is broadly consistent with previous results, showing a peak flow of 16.7 m/s at 45 degrees latitude. This work shows that measuring the motions of individual features in photospheric magnetograms can produce high precision results in relatively short time spans, which suggests that high resolution non-longitudinally averaged photospheric velocity residual measurements could be produced to compare with coronal results, and to provide other diagnostics of the solar dynamo. This work has been partially supported by NASA Grants NNX11AP03G and NNX14AJ67G.

  20. Experimental analysis and flow visualization of a thin liquid film on a stationary and rotating disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, S.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W.

    1991-01-01

    The mean thickness of a thin liquid film of deionized water with a free surface on a stationary and rotating horizontal disk has been measured with a nonobtrusive capacitance technique. The measurements were taken when the rotational speed ranged from 0-300 rpm and the flow rate varied from 7.0-15.0 lpm. A flow visualization study of the thin film was also performed to determine the characteristics of the waves on the free surface. When the disk was stationary, a circular hydraulic jump was present on the disk. Upstream from the jump, the film thickness was determined by the inertial and frictional forces on the fluid, and the radial spreading of the film. The surface tension at the edge of the disk affected the film thickness downstream from the jump. For the rotating disk, the film thickness was dependent upon the inertial and frictional forces near the center of the disk and the centrifugal forces near the edge of the disk.

  1. Confinement of Plasma along Shaped Open Magnetic Fields from the Centrifugal Force of Supersonic Plasma Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Teodorescu, C.; Young, W. C.; Swan, G. W. S.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.

    2010-08-20

    Interferometric density measurements in plasmas rotating in shaped, open magnetic fields demonstrate strong confinement of plasma parallel to the magnetic field, with density drops of more than a factor of 10. Taken together with spectroscopic measurements of supersonic ExB rotation of sonic Mach 2, these measurements are in agreement with ideal MHD theory which predicts large parallel pressure drops balanced by centrifugal forces in supersonically rotating plasmas.

  2. The flow of interpretation. The collateral interpretation, force and flow.

    PubMed

    Duncan, D

    1989-01-01

    This paper was presented to a Conference on the theme 'The Formulation of Interpretations in Clinical Practice'. It suggests that, impressionistically in line with the identification of psychoanalysis with natural science, an unconscious metaphor which sees interpretation as something like a force inserted on a physical particle has been more influential conceptually than the unconscious metaphor naturally complementary to it, that of interpretation as something like a liquid in flow. The concept of 'the collateral interpretation' is introduced. Loosely speaking, this is what an analyst thinks he would interpret at any given moment. It is tentative, unformed, and changes kaleidoscopically. It accommodates psychoanalytic concepts. It is suggested that examination of the mode of operation of 'the collateral interpretation' is important in understanding the formulation of interpretations. A single session is used for clinical illustration. PMID:2606603

  3. Experiments on Thermal Convection in Rotating Spherical Shells With Radial Gravity: The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, John E.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments designed to study the fluid dynamics of buoyancy driven circulations in rotating spherical shells were conducted on the United States Microgravity Laboratory 2 spacelab mission. These experiments address several aspects of prototypical global convection relevant to large scale motions on the Sun, Earth, and on the giant planets. The key feature is the consistent modeling of radially directed gravity in spherical geometry by using dielectric polarization forces. Imagery of the planforms of thermally driven flows for rapidly-rotating regimes shows an initial separation and eventual merger of equatorial and polar convection as the heating (i.e. the Rayleigh number) is increased. At low rotation rates, multiple-states of motion for the same external parameters were observed.

  4. 3D imaging of particle-scale rotational motion in cyclically driven granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Matt; Powers, Dylan; Cooper, Eric; Losert, Wolfgang

    Recent experimental advances have enabled three-dimensional (3D) imaging of motion, structure, and failure within granular systems. 3D imaging allows researchers to directly characterize bulk behaviors that arise from particle- and meso-scale features. For instance, segregation of a bidisperse system of spheres under cyclic shear can originate from microscopic irreversibilities and the development of convective secondary flows. Rotational motion and frictional rotational coupling, meanwhile, have been less explored in such experimental 3D systems, especially under cyclic forcing. In particular, relative amounts of sliding and/or rolling between pairs of contacting grains could influence the reversibility of both trajectories, in terms of both position and orientation. In this work, we apply the Refractive Index Matched Scanning technique to a granular system that is cyclically driven and measure both translational and rotational motion of individual grains. We relate measured rotational motion to resulting shear bands and convective flows, further indicating the degree to which pairs and neighborhoods of grains collectively rotate.

  5. Steady particulate flows in a horizontal rotating cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Altobelli, S.A.; Tanaka, T.; Tsuji, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Results of discrete element method (DEM) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments are compared for monodisperse granular materials flowing in a half-filled horizontal rotating cylinder. Because opacity is not a problem for MRI, a long cylinder with an aspect ratio {approximately}7 was used and the flow in a thin transverse slice near the center was studied. The particles were mustard seeds and the ratio of cylinder diameter to particle diameter was approximately 50. The parameters compared were dynamic angle of repose, velocity field in a plane perpendicular to the cylinder axis, and velocity fluctuations at rotation rates up to 30 rpm. The agreement between DEM and MRI was good when the friction coefficient and nonsphericity were adjusted in the simulation for the best fit. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Steady particulate flows in a horizontal rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Altobelli, S. A.; Tanaka, T.; Tsuji, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Results of discrete element method (DEM) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments are compared for monodisperse granular materials flowing in a half-filled horizontal rotating cylinder. Because opacity is not a problem for MRI, a long cylinder with an aspect ratio ˜7 was used and the flow in a thin transverse slice near the center was studied. The particles were mustard seeds and the ratio of cylinder diameter to particle diameter was approximately 50. The parameters compared were dynamic angle of repose, velocity field in a plane perpendicular to the cylinder axis, and velocity fluctuations at rotation rates up to 30 rpm. The agreement between DEM and MRI was good when the friction coefficient and nonsphericity were adjusted in the simulation for the best fit.

  7. Retinal flow is sufficient for steering during observer rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li; Warren, William H Jr

    2002-01-01

    How do people control locomotion while their eyes are simultaneously rotating? A previous study found that during simulated rotation, they can perceive a straight path of self-motion from the retinal flow pattern, despite conflicting extraretinal information, on the basis of dense motion parallax and reference objects. Here we report that the same information is sufficient for active control ofjoystick steering. Participants steered toward a target in displays that simulated a pursuit eye movement. Steering was highly inaccurate with a textured ground plane (motion parallax alone), but quite accurate when an array of posts was added (motion parallax plus reference objects). This result is consistent with the theory that instantaneous heading is determined from motion parallax, and the path of self-motion is determined by updating heading relative to environmental objects. Retinal flow is thus sufficient for both perceiving self-motion and controlling self-motion with a joystick; extraretinal and positional information can also contribute, but are not necessary.

  8. Precession of a rapidly rotating cylinder flow: traverse through resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Marques, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    The flow in a rapidly rotating cylinder that is titled and also rotating around another axis can undergo sudden transitions to turbulence. Experimental observations of this have been associated with triadic resonances. The experimental and theoretical results are well-established in the literature, but there remains a lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms at play in the sudden transition from laminar to turbulent flow with very small variations in the governing parameters. Here, we present direct numerical simulations of a traverse in parameter space through an isolated resonance, and describe in detail the bifurcations involved in the sudden transition. U.S. National Science Foundation Grant CBET-1336410 and Spanish Ministry of Education and Science Grant (with FEDER funds) FIS2013-40880.

  9. Finite-amplitude solutions in rotating Hagen-Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Benoît; Kumar, Abhishek; Govindarajan, Rama

    2015-11-01

    While the pipe Poiseuille base flow is linearly stable at all Reynolds numbers, a small amount of rotation of the pipe around its axis induces linear instability beyond a low critical Reynolds number Rc ~= 83 [Pedley, J. Fluid Mech. 1969]. More recently [Fernandez-Feria and del Pino, Phys. Fluids 2002], this configuration has been shown to become absolutely unstable at Reynolds numbers of the same order of magnitude. Using direct numerical simulations, we investigate here finite-amplitude solutions resulting from saturation of exponentially growing small-amplitude initial perturbations. The base flow depends on two dynamical parameters (axial Reynolds number and rotation rate) and the initial perturbation is characterized by its axial wavenumber and its azimuthal mode number. The range of nonlinear waves prevailing in this configuration, the associated nonlinear dispersion relation and the spatial structure of these solutions are systematically obtained by exploring the parameter space. Funding from CEFIPRA is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Flow of an electrorheological fluid between eccentric rotating cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Průša, Vít; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2012-01-01

    Electrorheological fluids have numerous potential applications in vibration dampers, brakes, valves, clutches, exercise equipment, etc. The flows in such applications are complex three-dimensional flows. Most models that have been developed to describe the flows of electrorheological fluids are one-dimensional models. Here, we discuss the behavior of two fully three-dimensional models for electrorheological fluids. The models are such that they reduce, in the case of simple shear flows with the intensity of the electric field perpendicular to the streamlines, to the same constitutive relation, but they would not be identical in more complicated three-dimensional settings. In order to show the difference between the two models, we study the flow of these fluids between eccentrically placed rotating cylinders kept at different potentials, in the setting that corresponds to technologically relevant problem of flow of electrorheological fluid in journal bearing. Even though the two models have quite a different constitutive structure, due to the assumed forms for the velocity and pressure fields, the models lead to the same velocity field but to different pressure fields. This finding illustrates the need for considering the flows of fluids described by three-dimensional constitutive models in complex geometries, and not restricting ourselves to flows of fluids described by one-dimensional models or simple shear flows of fluids characterized by three-dimensional models.

  11. Unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a robotic hand and its flow field.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hideki; Nakashima, Motomu; Ozaki, Takashi; Matsuuchi, Kazuo

    2013-07-26

    This study aims to clarify the mechanism of generating unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a hand during swimming in order to directly measure the forces, pressure distribution, and flow field around the hand by using a robotic arm and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The robotic arm consisted of the trunk, shoulder, upper arm, forearm, and hand, and it was independently computer controllable in five degrees of freedom. The elbow-joint angle of the robotic arm was fixed at 90°, and the arm was moved in semicircles around the shoulder joint in a plane perpendicular to the water surface. Two-component PIV was used for flow visualization around the hand. The data of the forces and pressure acting on the hand were sampled at 200Hz and stored on a PC. When the maximum resultant force acting on the hand was observed, a pair of counter-rotating vortices appeared on the dorsal surface of the hand. A vortex attached to the hand increased the flow velocity, which led to decreased surface pressure, increasing the hydrodynamic forces. This phenomenon is known as the unsteady mechanism of force generation. We found that the drag force was 72% greater and the lift force was 4.8 times greater than the values estimated under steady flow conditions. Therefore, it is presumable that swimmers receive the benefits of this unsteady hydrodynamic force. PMID:23764175

  12. Unsteady laminar flow with convective heat transfer through a rotating curved square duct with small curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Rabindra Nath; Roy, Titob; Shaha, Poly Rani; Yanase, Shinichiro

    2016-07-01

    Unsteady laminar flow with convective heat transfer through a curved square duct rotating at a constant angular velocity about the center of curvature is investigated numerically by using a spectral method, and covering a wide range of the Taylor number -300≤Tr≤1000 for the Dean number Dn = 1000. A temperature difference is applied across the vertical sidewalls for the Grashof number Gr = 100, where the outer wall is heated and the inner wall cooled, the top and bottom walls being adiabatic. Flow characteristics are investigated with the effects of rotational parameter, Tr, and the pressure-driven parameter, Dn, for the constant curvature 0.001. Time evolution calculations as well as their phase spaces show that the unsteady flow undergoes through various flow instabilities in the scenario `multi-periodic → chaotic → steady-state → periodic → multi-periodic → chaotic', if Tr is increased in the positive direction. For negative rotation, however, time evolution calculations show that the flow undergoes in the scenario `multi-periodic → periodic → steady-state', if Tr is increased in the negative direction. Typical contours of secondary flow patterns and temperature profiles are obtained at several values of Tr, and it is found that the unsteady flow consists of two- to six-vortex solutions if the duct rotation is involved. External heating is shown to generate a significant temperature gradient at the outer wall of the duct. This study also shows that there is a strong interaction between the heating-induced buoyancy force and the centrifugal-Coriolis instability in the curved channel that stimulates fluid mixing and consequently enhances heat transfer in the fluid.

  13. Flow interaction and noise from a counter rotating propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jin-Deog; Walls, James L.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1991-01-01

    The aerodynamic interaction between the forward and rear rotors in a counter rotating propeller (CRP) system, has been examined using a conditional sampling technique applied to three-dimensional thermal anemometer data. The technique effectively freezes the rotors in any desired relative position and provides the inter-rotor flow field. Axial, radial and circumferential mean flow between rotors is shown relative to the 'fixed' forward rotor for various 'fixed' aft rotor positions. Acoustic far field noise data have also been collected for the same operating conditions. The acoustic results are presented with emphasis on the blade passing frequencies and interaction tone of the CRP.

  14. Flow between a stationary and a rotating disk shrouded by a co-rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, J. M.

    1996-10-01

    Boundary layers on stationary and rotating disks have received much attention since von Kármán's [Z. Angew. Math. Mech. 1, 233 (1921)] and Bödewadt's [Z. Angew. Math. Mech. 20, 241 (1940)] studies of the cases with disks of infinite radius. Theoretical treatments have focused on similarity treatments leading to conflicting ideas about existence and uniqueness, and where self-similar solutions exist, whether they are physically realizable. The coupling between the boundary layer flows and the interior flow between them, while being of practical importance in a variety of situations such as turbomachinery and ocean circulations, is not well understood. Here, a numerical treatment of the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations, together with some experiments for the case of finite stationary and rotating disks bounded by a co-rotating sidewall is presented. We show that in the long time limit, solutions are steady and essentially self-similar. Yet the transients are not. In particular, axisymmetric waves propagate in the stationary disk boundary layer when the vortex lines entering the boundary layer develop inflection points, and there are subsequent eruptions of vortical flow out of the boundary layer deep into the interior at large Reynolds numbers.

  15. Pressure change and transport process on flames formed in a stretched, rotating flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    1999-08-01

    Flame characteristics in a stretched, rotating flow have been investigated by numerical simulation of tubular laminar flames for lean hydrogen, methane, and propane/air mixtures. Twin planar flames in counterflow have been also simulated for comparison. A fixed inlet velocity at the porous wall of the burner was assumed in all cases, and the cylindrical containing tube (radius R = 9.5 mm) was either maintained stationary or rotated. Results showed that, within the range studied, the flame temperatures always increase monotonically with increasing fuel concentration, and at the same time the reaction zones move outwards. However, while the introduction of rotation also causes a monotonic temperature increase of hydrogen and methane air mixtures, that of a propane/air mixture decreases. The temperature change with rotation becomes smaller with an increase of the fuel concentration. As a consequence of the centrifugal force, {rho}{nu}{sub {theta}}{sup 2}/r, induced by the rotation, a pressure gradient is formed in the cylindrical containing tube, with low pressure along the axis. The pressure gradient at the outer, unburnt edge of the flame reaction zone becomes smaller as the fuel concentration increases. The resultant decreased mass transport by pressure diffusion provides an explanation for part of the above-mentioned temperature change associated with rotation. The remainder of the effect is associated with changed stretch characteristics of the flames.

  16. Modeling turbulence in flows with a strong rotational component

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, D.E.; O`Rourke, P.J.

    1993-11-01

    We consider the effectiveness of various turbulence models in flows with a strong rotational component. To evaluate the models, we implement them into a one-dimensional test code and make comparisons with experimental data for swirling flow in a cylinder. The K - {epsilon} type turbulence models do poorly in predicting the experimental results. However, we find that the incorporation of a Reynolds stress evolution equation gives good agreement with the experimentally measured mean flow. Modeling the pressure-strain correlation tensor correctly is the key for obtaining good results. A combination of Launder`s basic model together with Yakhot`s dissipation rate equation {sup 3} works best in predicting both the mean flow and the turbulence intensity.

  17. Large-scale anisotropy in stably stratified rotating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, R.; Mininni, P. D.; Rosenberg, D. L.; Pouquet, A.

    2014-08-28

    We present results from direct numerical simulations of the Boussinesq equations in the presence of rotation and/or stratification, both in the vertical direction. The runs are forced isotropically and randomly at small scales and have spatial resolutions of up to $1024^3$ grid points and Reynolds numbers of $\\approx 1000$. We first show that solutions with negative energy flux and inverse cascades develop in rotating turbulence, whether or not stratification is present. However, the purely stratified case is characterized instead by an early-time, highly anisotropic transfer to large scales with almost zero net isotropic energy flux. This is consistent with previous studies that observed the development of vertically sheared horizontal winds, although only at substantially later times. However, and unlike previous works, when sufficient scale separation is allowed between the forcing scale and the domain size, the total energy displays a perpendicular (horizontal) spectrum with power law behavior compatible with $\\sim k_\\perp^{-5/3}$, including in the absence of rotation. In this latter purely stratified case, such a spectrum is the result of a direct cascade of the energy contained in the large-scale horizontal wind, as is evidenced by a strong positive flux of energy in the parallel direction at all scales including the largest resolved scales.

  18. Large-scale anisotropy in stably stratified rotating flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marino, R.; Mininni, P. D.; Rosenberg, D. L.; Pouquet, A.

    2014-08-28

    We present results from direct numerical simulations of the Boussinesq equations in the presence of rotation and/or stratification, both in the vertical direction. The runs are forced isotropically and randomly at small scales and have spatial resolutions of up tomore » $1024^3$ grid points and Reynolds numbers of $$\\approx 1000$$. We first show that solutions with negative energy flux and inverse cascades develop in rotating turbulence, whether or not stratification is present. However, the purely stratified case is characterized instead by an early-time, highly anisotropic transfer to large scales with almost zero net isotropic energy flux. This is consistent with previous studies that observed the development of vertically sheared horizontal winds, although only at substantially later times. However, and unlike previous works, when sufficient scale separation is allowed between the forcing scale and the domain size, the total energy displays a perpendicular (horizontal) spectrum with power law behavior compatible with $$\\sim k_\\perp^{-5/3}$$, including in the absence of rotation. In this latter purely stratified case, such a spectrum is the result of a direct cascade of the energy contained in the large-scale horizontal wind, as is evidenced by a strong positive flux of energy in the parallel direction at all scales including the largest resolved scales.« less

  19. Granular flow in a rotating drum: Experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C. Y.; Stark, C. P.; Capart, H.; Li, L.; Smith, B.; Grinspun, E.

    2015-12-01

    Erosion at the base of a debris flow fundamentally controls how large the flow will become and how far it will travel. Experimental observations of this important phenomenon are rather limited, and this lack has led theoretical treatments to making ad hoc assumptions about the basal process. In light of this, we carried out a combination of laboratory experiments and theoretical analysis of granular flow in a rotating drum, a canonical example of steady grain motion in which entrainment rates can be precisely controlled. Our main result is that basal sediment is entrained as the velocity profile adjusts to imbalance in the flow of kinetic energy.Our experimental apparatus consisted of a 40cm-diameter drum, 4cm-deep, half-filled with 2.3mm grains. Rotation rates varied from 1-70 rpm. We varied the effective scale by varying effective gravity from 1g to 70g on a geotechnical centrifuge. The field of grain motion was recorded using high-speed video and mapped using particle tracking velocimetry. In tandem we developed a depth-averaged theory using balance equations for mass, momentum and kinetic energy. We assumed a linearized GDR Midi granular rheology [da Cruz, 2005] and a Coulomb friction law along the sidewalls [Jop et al., 2005]. A scaling analysis of our equations yields a dimensionless "entrainment number" En, which neatly parametrizes the flow geometry in the drum for a wide range of variables, e.g., rotation rate and effective gravity. At low En, the flow profile is planar and kinetic energy is balanced locally in the flow layer. At high En, the flow profile is sigmoidal (yin-yang shaped) and the kinetic energy is dominated by longitudinal, streamwise transfer. We observe different scaling behavior under each of these flow regimes, e.g., between En and kinetic energy, surface slope and flow depth. Our theory correctly predicts their scaling exponents and the value of En at which the regime transition takes place. We are also able to make corrections for

  20. An experimental study of flow past a rotationally oscillating cylinder.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Lopez, Carlos; Probst, Oliver; Askari, Davood; Yang, Yingchen

    2012-11-01

    Flow past a circular cylinder executing sinusoidal rotary oscillations about its own axis is studied experimentally. The experiments are carried out at Re = 185, oscillation amplitudes varying from π/8 to π, and forcing frequency ratios varying from 0 to 5. It is found that the phenomenon of lock-on occurs in a forcing frequency range which depends not only on the oscillation amplitude but also the downstream location from the cylinder. The experimentally measured lock-on diagram in the forcing amplitude and frequency plane is presented at various downstream locations ranging from 2 to 23 diameters. The upper limit of the lock-on forcing frequency band depends strongly on the downstream location whereas the lower limit is fairly insensitive. The far field wake decouples, after the lock-on at higher forcing frequencies and behaves more like a regular Karman vortex street from a stationary cylinder with a vortex shedding frequency mostly lower than the one from a stationary cylinder. The dependence of circulation values of shed vortices on the forcing frequency revealed a universal decay curve independent of forcing amplitude beyond forcing frequency of ~ 1.0.

  1. Structural dynamic modeling and stability of a rotating blade under gravitational force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Seungmin; Chung, Jintai; Hee Yoo, Hong

    2013-05-01

    Turbine blade lengths have been increasing in recent wind energy system designs in order to enhance power generation capacity. A longer blade length makes the structural system more flexible and often results in an undesirable, large dynamic response, which should be avoided in the design of the system. In the present study, the equations of motion of a rotating wind turbine blade undergoing gravitational force are derived, while considering tilt and pitch angles. Since the gravitational force acting on the rotating blade creates an oscillating axial force, this results in oscillating stiffness terms in the governing equations. The validity of the derived rotating blade model is evaluated by comparing its transient responses to those obtained by using a commercial finite element code. Effects of rotating speed, tilt angle, and pitch angle of the wind turbine blade on its dynamic stability characteristics are investigated.

  2. Two-fluid confined flow in a cylinder driven by a rotating end wall.

    PubMed

    Brady, P T; Herrmann, M; Lopez, J M

    2012-01-01

    The flow of two immiscible fluids completely filling an enclosed cylinder and driven by the rotation of the bottom end wall is studied numerically. The simulations are in parameter regimes where there is significant advection of angular momentum, i.e., the disk rotation rate is fast compared to the viscous diffusion time. We consider two classes of scenarios. The first consists of cases that are straightforward to reproduce in physical experiments where only the rotation rate and the viscosity ratio of the fluids are varied. Then we isolate different forces acting on the system such as inertia, surface tension, and gravity by studying variations in individual governing parameters. The viscosity ratio determines how quickly the upper fluid equilibriates dynamically to the flow in the lower fluid and plays a major role in determining how vortex lines are bent in the neighborhood of the interface between the two fluids. This in turn determines the structure of the interfacial layer between the two swirling fluids, which is responsible for the flow in the upper fluid. The simulations show that even when there is significant interfacial deformation, both the dynamics and the equilibrium flow are dominated by vortex bending rather than vortex stretching. The simulations show that for the range of immiscible fluids considered, surface tension effects are significant. Increased surface tension reduces the degree to which the interface is deformed and the limit of zero surface tension is not an appropriate approximation. PMID:22400659

  3. Dynamics of a tightly coupled mechanism for flagellar rotation. Bacterial motility, chemiosmotic coupling, protonmotive force.

    PubMed

    Meister, M; Caplan, S R; Berg, H C

    1989-05-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a molecular engine that couples the flow of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane to rotation of the flagellar filament. We analyze the steady-state behavior of an explicit mechanical model in which a fixed number of protons carries the filament through one revolution. Predictions of this model are compared with experimentally determined relationships between protonmotive force, proton flux, torque, and speed. All such tightly coupled mechanisms produce the same torque when the motor is stalled but vary greatly in their behavior at high speed. The speed at zero load predicted by our model is limited by the rates of association and dissociation of protons at binding sites on the rotor and by the mobility of force generators containing transmembrane channels that interact with these sites. Our analysis suggests that more could be learned about the motor if it were driven by an externally applied torque backwards (at negative speed) or forwards at speeds greater than the zero-load speed. PMID:2720081

  4. Effects of surface thermal forcing on stratified flow past an isolated obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Jon

    1992-02-01

    The present study investigates basic aspects of the flow of a density-stratified fluid past three-dimensional obstacles for Froude number is approximately O(1) and isolated surface thermal forcing representative of diurnally varying mesoscale flows past mountainous islands such as Hawaii. In order to minimize parameter space, we have excluded the effects of friction, rotation, nonuniform ambient flow, and the complexities of realistic surface boundary layer and terrain. Through simple scaling arguments, we deduce that the parameter eta* controls thermally forced flows for a given Froude number, and we provide crude estimates of a flow response for a range of eta*. The principal question addressed is for what values of eta* will a transition occur from the low-Froude-number flow regime, characterized by the stagnation and splitting of the lower upwind flow, to the regime in which flow passes over rather than around the obstacle. We show that the linear theory captures such a tendency consistently with simple scaling arguments. To provide quantitative measures of flow variability with the Froude number and eta*, we employ an efficient isentropic numerical code and summarize the results of numerous simulations in the form of a regime diagram. The principal result is a simple criterion for the transition of a heated flow from the blocked to unblocked flow regime. We illustrate the relevance of the idealized study to natural flows with an example of applications to a flow past the Hawaiian Archipelago.

  5. Interplay between toroidal rotation and flow shear in turbulence stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.; Manas, P.; Peeters, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    The interplay between toroidal rotation u, parallel flow shear u', and perpendicular flow shear γE in the stabilisation of tokamak turbulence is investigated in non-linear flux-tube gyrokinetic simulations. The simulations are performed for a reference L-mode DIII-D plasma (the so-called shortfall case) at r /a =0.8 , varying the flow parameters around their nominal values. Depending on the respective signs of u, u', and γE, turbulence is found to be enhanced, reduced, or unchanged. When the coupling is favorable, the overall effect on the non-linear heat fluxes can be very large, even at moderate flow values. The ion heat flux is, for instance, decreased by a factor of 3 when the direction of the parallel flow shear is reversed with respect to its nominal value. Even more surprising, keeping u' and γE at their nominal values, the ion heat flux decreases by more than 50% when the toroidal flow is reversed. The relevance of this mechanism in the experiments which depends on the ability to decouple u, u', and γE is discussed. The interplay between u and u' observed in the non-linear simulations qualitatively follows the linear stability results and is interpreted in the frame of a simple fluid model.

  6. Stratified Rotating Flow over and around Isolated Three-Dimensional Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, D. L.; Davies, P. A.; Holland, W. R.; Biolley, F.; Honji, H.

    1987-06-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments have been conducted on the flow of a linearly stratified rotating fluid past isolated obstacles of revolution (conical and cosine-squared profiles). Laboratory experiments are considered for a range of Rossby, Ekman and Burger numbers, the pertinent dynamical parameters of the system. In these experiments, inertial, Coriolis, pressure, viscous and buoyancy forces all play a significant role. Emphasis is given to examining the nature of the time development of the flow fields as well as its long-time behaviour, including eddy shedding. It is shown, for example, that increased stratification tends to diminish the steering effect of the obstacle, other parameters being fixed, at elevation levels above the topography. At levels below the top of the obstacle, increased stratification tends to force the fluid around rather than over the body and this, in turn, tends to develop vortex shedding at smaller Reynolds numbers than would occur in corresponding lower stratification cases. Data for the cone reveal that the Strouhal number for the eddy-shedding regime is relatively insensitive to the values of Ro, Ek and S for the range of parameters investigated. Stratification tends to induce lee waves in the topography wake, and the nature of this lee-wave pattern is modified by the presence of rotation. For example, it is demonstrated that for vertically upward rotation, the lee waves on the right, facing downstream, have a larger amplitude than their counterparts at the same location on the left. The steering effects, as predicted by a three-level quasigeostrophic numerical model, are shown to be in good agreement with the laboratory results for a narrow range of parameter space. The numerical model is used to examine the effects of rotation, friction and stratification in modifying the flow. The quasigeostrophic numerical simulations do not produce eddy shedding, and it is concluded that a full, primitive equation numerical model would be

  7. Qualitative Changes in Flow Pattern in the Coating Flow inside a Rotating Cylinder.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoroddsen, S. T.

    1996-11-01

    We describe experimental work on the flow patterns in coating flow inside a partially-filled circular cylinder, which is rotated about its horizontally placed axis of symmetry. A prominent front forms at the bottom of the cylinder, associated with a recirculating region. This front is initially straight along the span. For a limited range of parameters, the front develops robust spanwise undulations, named shark teeth (S. T. Thoroddsen & L. Mahadevan, ``Experimental study of coating flows in a partially-filled horizontally rotating cylinder''), Experiments in Fluids (in press).. An intricate three-dimensional flow field is associated with these patterns. We study here the qualitative changes in the flow field associated with the transition of these shark teeth into waves traveling spanwise along the front. The wavelength and speed of these waves is investigated.

  8. Flow and heat simultaneously induced by two stretchable rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkyilmazoglu, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    An exact solution for the steady state Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates is presented in this work. It serves to investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer occurring between two stretchable disks rotating co-axially at constant distance apart. The governing equations of motion and energy are first transformed into a set of nonlinear differential equation system by the use of von Karman similarity transformations, which are later solved numerically. The small Reynolds number case allows us to extract closed-form solutions for the physical phenomenon. The effects of the same or opposite direction rotation, as well as the stretching parameter and the Reynolds number, are discussed on the flow and heat characteristics. The main physical implication of the results is that stretching action of a disk surface alters considerably the classical flow behavior occurring between two disks and the physically interesting quantities like the torque and heat transfer are elucidated in the presence of a new physical mechanism; that is the surface stretching in the current research.

  9. Rotating polygon instability of a swirling free surface flow.

    PubMed

    Tophøj, L; Mougel, J; Bohr, T; Fabre, D

    2013-05-10

    We explain the rotating polygon instability on a swirling fluid surface [G. H. Vatistas, J. Fluid Mech. 217, 241 (1990) and Jansson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 174502 (2006)] in terms of resonant interactions between gravity waves on the outer part of the surface and centrifugal waves on the inner part. Our model is based on potential flow theory, linearized around a potential vortex flow with a free surface for which we show that unstable resonant states appear. Limiting our attention to the lowest order mode of each type of wave and their interaction, we obtain an analytically soluble model, which, together with estimates of the circulation based on angular momentum balance, reproduces the main features of the experimental phase diagram. The generality of our arguments implies that the instability should not be limited to flows with a rotating bottom (implying singular behavior near the corners), and indeed we show that we can obtain the polygons transiently by violently stirring liquid nitrogen in a hot container. PMID:23705710

  10. Force-coupling method for flows with ellipsoidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Keaveny, E. E.; Maxey, M. R.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    2009-06-01

    The force-coupling method, previously developed for spherical particles suspended in a liquid flow, is extended to ellipsoidal particles. In the limit of Stokes flow, there is an exact correspondence with known analytical results for isolated particles. More generally, the method is shown to provide good approximate results for the particle motion and the flow field both in viscous Stokes flow and at finite Reynolds number. This is demonstrated through comparison between fully resolved direct numerical simulations and results from the numerical implementation of the force-coupling method with a spectral/hp element scheme. The motion of settling ellipsoidal particles and neutrally buoyant particles in a Poiseuille flow are discussed.

  11. Direct optical monitoring of flow generated by bacterial flagellar rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, Silke R.; Nedev, Spas; Carretero-Palacios, Sol; Lohmüller, Theobald E-mail: feldmann@lmu.de; Feldmann, Jochen E-mail: feldmann@lmu.de; Mader, Andreas; Opitz, Madeleine

    2014-03-03

    We report on a highly sensitive approach to measure and quantify the time dependent changes of the flow generated by the flagella bundle rotation of single bacterial cells. This is achieved by observing the interactions between a silica particle and a bacterium, which are both trapped next to each other in a dual beam optical tweezer. In this configuration, the particle serves as a sensitive detector where the fast-Fourier analysis of the particle trajectory renders, it possible to access information about changes of bacterial activity.

  12. Detailed Validation Assessment of Turbine Stage Disc Cavity Rotating Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjiyani, Shezan

    The subject of this thesis is concerned with the amount of cooling air assigned to seal high pressure turbine rim cavities which is critical for performance as well as component life. Insufficient air leads to excessive hot annulus gas ingestion and its penetration deep into the cavity compromising disc life. Excessive purge air, adversely affects performance. Experiments on a rotating turbine stage rig which included a rotor-stator forward disc cavity were performed at Arizona State University. The turbine rig has 22 vanes and 28 blades, while the rim cavity is composed of a single-tooth rim lab seal and a rim platform overlap seal. Time-averaged static pressures were measured in the gas path and the cavity, while mainstream gas ingestion into the cavity was determined by measuring the concentration distribution of tracer gas (carbon dioxide). Additionally, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure fluid velocity inside the rim cavity between the lab seal and the overlap. The data from the experiments were compared to an 360-degree unsteady RANS (URANS) CFD simulations. Although not able to match the time-averaged test data satisfactorily, the CFD simulations brought to light the unsteadiness present in the flow during the experiment which the slower response data did not fully capture. To interrogate the validity of URANS simulations in capturing complex rotating flow physics, the scope of this work also included to validating the CFD tool by comparing its predictions against experimental LDV data in a closed rotor-stator cavity. The enclosed cavity has a stationary shroud, a rotating hub, and mass flow does not enter or exit the system. A full 360 degree numerical simulation was performed comparing Fluent LES, with URANS turbulence models. Results from these investigations point to URANS state of art under-predicting closed cavity tangential velocity by 32% to 43%, and open rim cavity effectiveness by 50% compared to test data. The goal of this thesis

  13. THE FORCE-FREE MAGNETOSPHERE OF A ROTATING BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2013-03-10

    We revisit the Blandford-Znajek process and solve the fundamental equation that governs the structure of the steady-state force-free magnetosphere around a Kerr black hole. The solution depends on the distributions of the magnetic field angular velocity {omega} and the poloidal electric current I. These are not arbitrary. They are determined self-consistently by requiring that magnetic field lines cross smoothly the two singular surfaces of the problem: the inner ''light surface'' located inside the ergosphere and the outer ''light surface'' which is the generalization of the pulsar light cylinder. We find the solution for the simplest possible magnetic field configuration, the split monopole, through a numerical iterative relaxation method analogous to the one that yields the structure of the steady-state axisymmetric force-free pulsar magnetosphere. We obtain the rate of electromagnetic extraction of energy and confirm the results of Blandford and Znajek and of previous time-dependent simulations. Furthermore, we discuss the physical applicability of magnetic field configurations that do not cross both ''light surfaces''.

  14. The Force-Free Magnetosphere of a Rotating Black Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Papadopoulos, Demetrios B.

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the Blandford-Znajek process and solve the fundamental equation that governs the structure of the steady-state force-free magnetosphere around a Kerr black hole. The solution depends on the distributions of the magnetic field angular velocity and the poloidal electric current. These are not arbitrary. They are determined self-consistently by requiring that magnetic field lines cross smoothly the two singular surfaces of the problem: the inner "light surface" located inside the ergosphere and the outer "light surface" which is the generalization of the pulsar light cylinder.We find the solution for the simplest possible magnetic field configuration, the split monopole, through a numerical iterative relaxation method analogous to the one that yields the structure of the steady-state axisymmetric force-free pulsar magnetosphere. We obtain the rate of electromagnetic extraction of energy and confirm the results of Blandford and Znajek and of previous time-dependent simulations. Furthermore, we discuss the physical applicability of magnetic field configurations that do not cross both "light surfaces."

  15. MASS ACCRETION RATE OF ROTATING VISCOUS ACCRETION FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Myeong-Gu

    2009-11-20

    The mass accretion rate of transonic spherical accretion flow onto compact objects such as black holes is known as the Bondi accretion rate, which is determined only by the density and the temperature of gas at the outer boundary. A rotating accretion flow has angular momentum, which modifies the flow profile from the spherical Bondi flow, and hence its mass accretion rate, but most work on disc accretion has taken the mass flux to be given with the relation between that parameter and external conditions left uncertain. Within the framework of a slim alpha disk, we have constructed global solutions of the rotating, viscous, hot accretion flow in the Paczynski-Wiita potential and determined its mass accretion rate as a function of density, temperature, and angular momentum of gas at the outer boundary. We find that the low angular momentum flow resembles the spherical Bondi flow and its mass accretion rate approaches the Bondi accretion rate for the same density and temperature at the outer boundary. The high angular momentum flow on the other hand is the conventional hot accretion disk with advection, but its mass accretion rate can be significantly smaller than the Bondi accretion rate with the same boundary conditions. We also find that solutions exist only within a limited range of dimensionless mass accretion rate m-dotident toM-dot/M-dot{sub B}, where M-dot is the mass accretion rate and M-dot{sub B} is the Bondi accretion rate: when the temperature at the outer boundary is equal to the virial temperature, solutions exist only for 0.05approx

  16. Intense Flows Driven by Mechanical Forcing in Non-axisymmetric Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannan, A. M.; Le Bars, M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present laboratory experimental results that simulate two geophysically relevant mechanical forcings that can drive intense fluid motions in the interior fluid layer of non-axisymmetric containers; libration and tidal distortions. Longitudinal libration refers to the small periodic oscillations of a satellite's mean rotation rate as it orbits a primary body and is replicated using an oscillating hard acrylic ellipsoid. Tidal forcing refers to the rotating gravitational distortion of a body in orbit and is replicated using a deformable silicone sphere. We use a particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique to measure the 2D velocity field in the nearly equatorial plane over hundreds of librational and tidal cycles. First, while the theoretical base flow for each mechanism is nearly identical, we verify the base flow induced by the tidal distortion and a time-averaged zonal flow that scales as the square of the tidal forcing and is expected to be small in planets. Additionally, for a fixed tidal distortion, a polar vortex first identified by Suess (1970) is re-examined that may drive an intense vortex at planetary settings. Second, we investigate the characteristics of turbulence in the bulk fluid layer generated via an elliptical instability of librational and tidal forcing. An elliptic instability is the triadic resonance of two inertial modes whose non-dimensional frequencies are between [-2-2] with the mechanically induced base flow. This is called libration driven elliptical instability (LDEI) and tidal driven elliptical instability (TDEI) respectively. We characterize the evolution of the turbulent flow that displays either intermittent large cycles of growth and decay or smaller cycles of saturation while also investigating the cascade of energy inside the inertial mode frequency regime. The existence of these types of intense flows may play an important in understanding the thermal evolution and magnetic field generation in bodies subject to mechanical

  17. Reaching during virtual rotation: context specific compensations for expected coriolis forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, J. V.; DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Subjects who are in an enclosed chamber rotating at constant velocity feel physically stationary but make errors when pointing to targets. Reaching paths and endpoints are deviated in the direction of the transient inertial Coriolis forces generated by their arm movements. By contrast, reaching movements made during natural, voluntary torso rotation seem to be accurate, and subjects are unaware of the Coriolis forces generated by their movements. This pattern suggests that the motor plan for reaching movements uses a representation of body motion to prepare compensations for impending self-generated accelerative loads on the arm. If so, stationary subjects who are experiencing illusory self-rotation should make reaching errors when pointing to a target. These errors should be in the direction opposite the Coriolis accelerations their arm movements would generate if they were actually rotating. To determine whether such compensations exist, we had subjects in four experiments make visually open-loop reaches to targets while they were experiencing compelling illusory self-rotation and displacement induced by rotation of a complex, natural visual scene. The paths and endpoints of their initial reaching movements were significantly displaced leftward during counterclockwise illusory rotary displacement and rightward during clockwise illusory self-displacement. Subjects reached in a curvilinear path to the wrong place. These reaching errors were opposite in direction to the Coriolis forces that would have been generated by their arm movements during actual torso rotation. The magnitude of path curvature and endpoint errors increased as the speed of illusory self-rotation increased. In successive reaches, movement paths became straighter and endpoints more accurate despite the absence of visual error feedback or tactile feedback about target location. When subjects were again presented a stationary scene, their initial reaches were indistinguishable from pre

  18. Studies in Forced and Time Varying Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Chester E.

    2005-01-01

    The reasearch focused on two areas; (a) the dynamics of forced turbulent flows and (b) time filtered Large Eddy Simulations (TLES). The dynamics of turbulent flows arising from external forcing of the turbulence are poorly understood. In particular, here are many unanswered questions relating the basic dynamical balances and the existence or nonexistence of statistical equilibrium of forced turbulent flows. This research used rapid distortion theory and direct numerical simulations to explore these questions. The properties of the temporally filtered Navier-Stokes equations were also studied.

  19. Force and torque on spherical particles in micro-channel flows using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Suo, Jin; Edwards, Erin E; Anilkumar, Ananyaveena; Sulchek, Todd; Giddens, Don P; Thomas, Susan N

    2016-07-01

    To delineate the influence of hemodynamic force on cell adhesion processes, model in vitro fluidic assays that mimic physiological conditions are commonly employed. Herein, we offer a framework for solution of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to estimate the forces resulting from fluid flow near a plane acting on a sphere that is either stationary or in free flow, and we compare these results to a widely used theoretical model that assumes Stokes flow with a constant shear rate. We find that while the full three-dimensional solutions using a parabolic velocity profile in CFD simulations yield similar translational velocities to those predicted by the theoretical method, the CFD approach results in approximately 50% larger rotational velocities over the wall shear stress range of 0.1-5.0 dynes cm(-2). This leads to an approximately 25% difference in force and torque calculations between the two methods. When compared with experimental measurements of translational and rotational velocities of microspheres or cells perfused in microfluidic channels, the CFD simulations yield significantly less error. We propose that CFD modelling can provide better estimations of hemodynamic force levels acting on perfused microspheres and cells in flow fields through microfluidic devices used for cell adhesion dynamics analysis. PMID:27493783

  20. Force and torque on spherical particles in micro-channel flows using computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Suo, Jin; Edwards, Erin E.; Anilkumar, Ananyaveena; Sulchek, Todd; Giddens, Don P.

    2016-01-01

    To delineate the influence of hemodynamic force on cell adhesion processes, model in vitro fluidic assays that mimic physiological conditions are commonly employed. Herein, we offer a framework for solution of the three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to estimate the forces resulting from fluid flow near a plane acting on a sphere that is either stationary or in free flow, and we compare these results to a widely used theoretical model that assumes Stokes flow with a constant shear rate. We find that while the full three-dimensional solutions using a parabolic velocity profile in CFD simulations yield similar translational velocities to those predicted by the theoretical method, the CFD approach results in approximately 50% larger rotational velocities over the wall shear stress range of 0.1–5.0 dynes cm−2. This leads to an approximately 25% difference in force and torque calculations between the two methods. When compared with experimental measurements of translational and rotational velocities of microspheres or cells perfused in microfluidic channels, the CFD simulations yield significantly less error. We propose that CFD modelling can provide better estimations of hemodynamic force levels acting on perfused microspheres and cells in flow fields through microfluidic devices used for cell adhesion dynamics analysis. PMID:27493783

  1. Angular Momentum Transport in Turbulent Flow between Independently Rotating Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Paoletti, M. S.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2011-01-14

    We present measurements of the angular momentum flux (torque) in Taylor-Couette flow of water between independently rotating cylinders for all regions of the ({Omega}{sub 1}, {Omega}{sub 2}) parameter space at high Reynolds numbers, where {Omega}{sub 1} ({Omega}{sub 2}) is the inner (outer) cylinder angular velocity. We find that the Rossby number Ro=({Omega}{sub 1}-{Omega}{sub 2})/{Omega}{sub 2} fully determines the state and torque G as compared to G(Ro={infinity}){identical_to}G{sub {infinity}.} The ratio G/G{sub {infinity}} is a linear function of Ro{sup -1} in four sections of the parameter space. For flows with radially increasing angular momentum, our measured torques greatly exceed those of previous experiments [Ji et al., Nature (London), 444, 343 (2006)], but agree with the analysis of Richard and Zahn [Astron. Astrophys. 347, 734 (1999)].

  2. SOLAR ROTATION EFFECTS ON THE HELIOSHEATH FLOW NEAR SOLAR MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Borovikov, Sergey N.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Ebert, Robert W.

    2012-05-01

    The interaction between fast and slow solar wind (SW) due to the Sun's rotation creates corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which further interact with each other creating complex plasma structures at large heliospheric distances. We investigate the global influence of CIRs on the SW flow in the inner heliosheath between the heliospheric termination shock (TS) and the heliopause. The stream interaction model takes into account the major global effects due to slow-fast stream interaction near solar minima. The fast and slow wind parameters are derived from the Ulysses observations. We investigate the penetration of corotating structures through the TS and their further propagation through the heliosheath. It is shown that the heliosheath flow structure may experience substantial modifications, including local decreases in the radial velocity component observed by Voyager 1.

  3. The flow field in a rotating detonation-wave engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Schwer, Douglas

    2011-11-01

    Rotating detonation-wave engines (RDE) are a form of continuous detonation-wave engine. They potentially provide further gains than an intermittent or pulsed detonation-wave engine (PDE). However, significantly less work has been on this concept when compared to the PDE. In this talk, we present the detailed flow field in an idealized RDE, primarily consisting of two concentric cylinders. A premixed detonable mixture is injected into the annulus between the two concentric cylinders. Once a detonation is initiated, it keeps travelling around in the annulus as long as there is fresh detonable mixture ahead of it. Hence, the injection process is critically important to the stability and performance of the RDE. Furthermore, we show that the flow field is quite complex consisting of multiple shock waves and the outflow is primarily axial, although the detonation-wave is travelling around circumferentially. Sponsored by the NRL 6.1 Computational Physics Task Area.

  4. Asymptotic and Numerical Methods for Rapidly Rotating Buoyant Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooms, Ian G.

    This thesis documents three investigations carried out in pursuance of a doctoral degree in applied mathematics at the University of Colorado (Boulder). The first investigation concerns the properties of rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection -- thermal convection in a rotating infinite plane layer between two constant-temperature boundaries. It is noted that in certain parameter regimes convective Taylor columns appear which dominate the dynamics, and a semi-analytical model of these is presented. Investigation of the columns and of various other properties of the flow is ongoing. The second investigation concerns the interactions between planetary-scale and mesoscale dynamics in the oceans. Using multiple-scale asymptotics the possible connections between planetary geostrophic and quasigeostrophic dynamics are investigated, and three different systems of coupled equations are derived. Possible use of these equations in conjunction with the method of superparameterization, and extension of the asymptotic methods to the interactions between mesoscale and submesoscale dynamics is ongoing. The third investigation concerns the linear stability properties of semi-implicit methods for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations, focusing in particular on the linear stability of IMEX (Implicit-Explicit) methods and exponential integrators applied to systems of ordinary differential equations arising in the numerical solution of spatially discretized nonlinear partial differential equations containing both dispersive and dissipative linear terms. While these investigations may seem unrelated at first glance, some reflection shows that they are in fact closely linked. The investigation of rotating convection makes use of single-space, multiple-time-scale asymptotics to deal with dynamics strongly constrained by rotation. Although the context of thermal convection in an infinite layer seems somewhat removed from large-scale ocean dynamics, the asymptotic

  5. Unsteady flow field in a mini VAWT with relative rotation blades: analysis of temporal results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayeul-Lainé, A. C.; Simonet, S.; Bois, G.

    2013-12-01

    The present wind turbine is a small one which can be used on roofs or in gardens. This turbine has a vertical axis. Each turbine blade combines a rotating movement around its own axis and around the main rotor axis. Due to this combination of movements, flow around this turbine is highly unsteady and needs to be modelled by unsteady calculation. The present work is an extended study starting in 2009. The benefits of combined rotating blades have been shown. The performance coefficient of this kind of turbine is very good for some blade stagger angles. Spectral analysis of unsteady results on specific points in the domain and temporal forces on blades was already presented for elliptic blades. The main aim here is to compare two kinds of blades in case of the best performances.

  6. On the Inertial Force Experienced by a Solid Body Undergoing Rotation about Two Axes

    SciTech Connect

    Christov, I. C.; Christov, C. I.

    2009-10-29

    The theory of rigid body motion is used to derive the governing equations, in terms of the Eulerian angles, of a top rotating about two axes. Then, a formula for the 'lifting' component of the net inertial force (as function of the angle of inclination, the top's two angular velocities and its moments of inertia) is derived for a particular motion termed constrained nutation. In a distinguished limit, the critical value of the angle of inclination, i.e., the value for which the vertical component of the net inertial force acting on the top overcomes the weight of the rotating system, is calculated.

  7. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris‒flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris‒flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris‒flow events had a large‒magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time‒averaged mean force), high‒frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time‒averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ~ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time‒averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (~ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse‒grained granular surges and water‒rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite

  8. Coupling of rotational cortical flow, asymmetric midbody positioning, and spindle rotation mediates dorsoventral axis formation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepika; Pohl, Christian

    2014-02-10

    Cortical flows mediate anteroposterior polarization in Caenorhabditis elegans by generating two mutually exclusive membrane domains. However, factors downstream of anteroposterior polarity that establish the dorsoventral axis remain elusive. Here, we show that rotational cortical flow orthogonal to the anteroposterior axis during the division of the AB blastomere in the two-cell embryo positions the cytokinetic midbody remnant of the previous division asymmetrically at the future ventral side of the embryo. In the neighboring P1 blastomere, astral microtubules contact a transient PAR-2-dependent actin coat that forms asymmetrically onto the midbody remnant-P1 interface. Ablation of the midbody remnant or perturbation of rotational cortical flow reveals that microtubule-midbody remnant contacts are crucial for P1 spindle rotation and dorsoventral axis formation. Thus, our findings suggest a mechanism for dorsoventral patterning that relies on coupling of anteroposterior polarity, rotational cortical flow, midbody remnant positioning, and spindle orientation. PMID:24525186

  9. Tool design in friction stir processing: dynamic forces and material flow

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Clark; K. S. Miller; C. R. Tolle

    2006-08-01

    Friction stir processing involves severe plastic flow within the material; the nature of this flow determines the final morphology of the weld, the resulting microstructures, and the presence or absence of defects such as internal cavities or "wormholes." The forces causing this plastic flow are a function of process parameters, including spindle speed, travel speed, and tool design and angle. Some of these forces are directly applied or a result of the mechanical constraints and compliance of the apparatus, while others are resolved forces resulting from an interaction of these applied forces and tool forces governed by processing parameters, and can be diminished or even reversed in sign with appropriate choices of process parameters. The present investigation is concerned mostly with the friction stir processing of 6061-T6 aluminum plates in a low-cost apparatus built from a commercial milling machine. A rotating dynamometer allows in-process measurement of actual spindle speed, torque, and forces in the x-, y-, and z-directions, as well as force control on these axes. Two main types of tool, both unthreaded, were used. The first had a pin about 4 mm in diameter and 4 mm in length, with a shoulder about 10 mm in diameter, and produced wormhole defects; the second, with a tapered pin about 5 mm long, a base diameter of about 6 mm, a tip diameter of about 4 mm, and a shoulder diameter (flat or dished) of about 19 mm, produced sound welds over a wide range of parameters.

  10. Magnetic forces associated with bursty bulk flows in Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Tomas; Hamrin, Maria; Nilsson, Hans; Kullen, Anita; Pitkänen, Timo

    2015-05-01

    We present the first direct measurements of magnetic forces acting on bursty bulk flow plasma in the magnetotail. The magnetic forces are determined using Cluster multispacecraft measurements. We analyze 67 bursty bulk flow (BBF) events and show that the curvature part of the magnetic force is consistently positive, acting to accelerate the plasma toward Earth between approximately 10 and 20 RE geocentrical distances, while the magnetic field pressure gradient increasingly brakes the plasma as it moves toward Earth. The net result is that the magnetic force accelerates the plasma at distances greater than approximately 14 RE, while it acts to decelerate it within that distance. The magnetic force, together with the thermal pressure gradient force, will determine the dynamics of the BBFs as they propagate toward the near-Earth tail region. The determination of the former provides an important clue to the ultimate fate of BBFs in the inner magnetosphere.

  11. On the nonlinear interfacial instability of rotating core-annular flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coward, Aidrian V.; Hall, Philip

    1993-01-01

    The interfacial stability of rotating core-annular flows is investigated. The linear and nonlinear effects are considered for the case when the annular region is very thin. Both asymptotic and numerical methods are used to solve the flow in the core and film regions which are coupled by a difference in viscosity and density. The long-term behavior of the fluid-fluid interface is determined by deriving its nonlinear evolution in the form of a modified Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. We obtain a generalization of this equation to three dimensions. The flows considered are applicable to a wide array of physical problems where liquid films are used to lubricate higher or lower viscosity core fluids, for which a concentric arrangement is desired. Linearized solutions show that the effects of density and viscosity stratification are crucial to the stability of the interface. Rotation generally destabilizes non-axisymmetric disturbances to the interface, whereas the centripetal forces tend to stabilize flows in which the film contains the heavier fluid. Nonlinear affects allow finite amplitude helically travelling waves to exist when the fluids have different viscosities.

  12. Air-structure coupling features analysis of mining contra-rotating axial flow fan cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Sun, W.; Li, F.; Zhang, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between contra-rotating axial flow fan blade and working gas has been studied by means of establishing air-structure coupling control equation and combining Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational solid mechanics (CSM). Based on the single flow channel model, the Finite Volume Method was used to make the field discrete. Additionally, the SIMPLE algorithm, the Standard k-ε model and the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian dynamic grids technology were utilized to get the airflow motion by solving the discrete governing equations. At the same time, the Finite Element Method was used to make the field discrete to solve dynamic response characteristics of blade. Based on weak coupling method, data exchange from the fluid solver and the solid solver was processed on the coupling interface. Then interpolation was used to obtain the coupling characteristics. The results showed that the blade's maximum amplitude was on the tip of the last-stage blade and aerodynamic force signal could reflect the blade working conditions to some extent. By analyzing the flow regime in contra-rotating axial flow fan, it could be found that the vortex core region was mainly in the blade surface, the hub and the blade clearance. In those regions, the turbulence intensity was very high. The last-stage blade's operating life is shorter than that of the pre-stage blade due to the fatigue fracture occurs much more easily on the last-stage blade which bears more stress.

  13. Three-dimensional analytic probabilities of coupled vibrational-rotational-translational energy transfer for DSMC modeling of nonequilibrium flows

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-04-15

    A three-dimensional, nonperturbative, semiclassical analytic model of vibrational energy transfer in collisions between a rotating diatomic molecule and an atom, and between two rotating diatomic molecules (Forced Harmonic Oscillator–Free Rotation model) has been extended to incorporate rotational relaxation and coupling between vibrational, translational, and rotational energy transfer. The model is based on analysis of semiclassical trajectories of rotating molecules interacting by a repulsive exponential atom-to-atom potential. The model predictions are compared with the results of three-dimensional close-coupled semiclassical trajectory calculations using the same potential energy surface. The comparison demonstrates good agreement between analytic and numerical probabilities of rotational and vibrational energy transfer processes, over a wide range of total collision energies, rotational energies, and impact parameter. The model predicts probabilities of single-quantum and multi-quantum vibrational-rotational transitions and is applicable up to very high collision energies and quantum numbers. Closed-form analytic expressions for these transition probabilities lend themselves to straightforward incorporation into DSMC nonequilibrium flow codes.

  14. Reynolds-Stress and Triple-Product Models Applied to Flows with Rotation and Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Predictions for Reynolds-stress and triple product turbulence models are compared for flows with significant rotational effects. Driver spinning cylinder flowfield and Zaets rotating pipe case are to be investigated at a minimum.

  15. Statistical equilibria of the coupled barotropic flow and shallow water flow on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xueru

    The motivation of this research is to build equilibrium statistical models that can apply to explain two enigmatic phenomena in the atmospheres of the solar system's planets: (1) the super-rotation of the atmospheres of slowly-rotating terrestrial planets---namely Venus and Titan, and (2) the persistent anticyclonic large vortex storms on the gas giants, such as the Great Red Spot (GRS) on Jupiter. My thesis is composed of two main parts: the first part focuses on the statistical equilibrium of the coupled barotropic vorticity flow (non-divergent) on a rotating sphere; the other one has to do with the divergent shallow water flow rotating sphere system. The statistical equilibria of these two systems are simulated in a wide range of parameter space by Monte Carlo methods based on recent energy-relative enstrophy theory and extended energy-relative enstrophy theory. These kind of models remove the low temperatures defect in the old classical doubly canonical energy-enstrophy theory which cannot support any phase transitions. The other big difference of our research from previous work is that we work on the coupled fluid-sphere system, which consists of a rotating high density rigid sphere, enveloped by a thin shell of fluid. The sphere is considered to have infinite mass and angular momentum; therefore, it can serve as a reservoir of angular momentum. Unlike the fluid sphere system itself, the coupled fluid sphere system allows for the exchange of angular momentum between the atmosphere and the solid planet. This exchange is the key point in any model that is expected to capture coherent structures such as the super-rotation and GRS-like vortices problems in planetary atmospheres. We discovered that slowly-rotating planets can have super-rotation at high energy state. All known slowly-rotating cases in the solar system---Venus and Titan---have super-rotation. Moreover, we showed that the anticyclonicity in the GRS-like structures is closely associated with the

  16. Computation of turbulent rotating channel flow with an algebraic Reynolds stress model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warfield, M. J.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1986-01-01

    An Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model has been implemented to modify the Kolmogorov-Prandtl eddy viscosity relation to produce an anisotropic turbulence model. The eddy viscosity relation becomes a function of the local turbulent production to dissipation ratio and local turbulence/rotation parameters. The model is used to predict fully-developed rotating channel flow over a diverse range of rotation numbers. In addition, predictions are obtained for a developing channel flow with high rotation. The predictions are compared with the experimental data available. Good predictions are achieved for mean velocity and wall shear stress over most of the rotation speeds tested. There is some prediction breakdown at high rotation (rotation number greater than .10) where the effects of the rotation on turbulence become quite complex. At high rotation and low Reynolds number, the laminarization on the trailing side represents a complex effect of rotation which is difficult to predict with the described models.

  17. A continuous-flow biodiesel production process using a rotating packed bed.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hung; Huang, Yu-Hang; Lin, Rong-Hsien; Shang, Neng-Chou

    2010-01-01

    The continuous-flow transesterification of soybean oil with methanol using a rotating packed bed (RPB) for the production of fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) is presented herein. The RPB, which provides high centrifugal force and has an adjustable rotational speed, is employed as a novel transesterification reactor. In this study, biodiesel is synthesized via the methanolysis of soybean oil using potassium hydroxide as the catalyst. The following variables were investigated for their effects on transesterification efficiency: the methanol-oil molar ratio, the estimated hydraulic retention time, the rotational speed of the packed-bed rotator, the reaction temperature, and the catalyst dosage. The yield of the fatty acid methyl esters (Y(FAME)) in the RPB system depends significantly on the experimental conditions, which influence the residence time distribution, the transesterification reaction rate, and the micromixing intensity. Due to its excellent micromixing characteristics, the RPB system shows satisfactory transesterification efficiency. The values of Y(FAME), productivity of FAMEs (P(FAME)), and P(FAME) per unit reactor volume (P(FAME)/V(R)) in the RPB are used to evaluate the performance for biodiesel production and allow for further comparison with other continuous transesterification reactors. Consequently, a RPB is considered a practical transesterification reactor with high transesterification efficiency. PMID:19751970

  18. Stability of rotating stratified shear flow: an analytical study.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Cambon, C

    2010-02-01

    We study the stability problem of unbounded shear flow, with velocity U(i)=Sx(3)delta(i1), subjected to a uniform vertical density stratification, with Brunt-Väisälä frequency N, and system rotation of rate Omega about an axis aligned with the spanwise (x(2)) direction. The evolution of plane-wave disturbances in this shear flow is governed by a nonhomogeneous second-order differential equation with time-dependent coefficients. An analytical solution is found to be described by Legendre functions in terms of the nondimensional parameter sigma(phi)(2)=R(R+1)sin(2) phi+R(i), where R=(2Omega/S) is the rotation number, phi is the angle between the horizontal wave vector and the streamwise axis, and R(i)=N(2)/S(2) is the Richardson number. The long-time behavior of the solution is analyzed using the asymptotic representations of the Legendre functions. On the one hand, linear stability is analyzed in terms of exponential growth, as in a normal-mode analysis: the rotating stratified shear flow is stable if R(i)>1/4, or if 00, or if R(R+1)<0

  19. Computed Tomography Analysis of Postsurgery Femoral Component Rotation Based on a Force Sensing Device Method versus Hypothetical Rotational Alignment Based on Anatomical Landmark Methods: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, Stefan W.; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Leffers, Kevin J.; Johnson, Clint W.; Dettmer, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Rotation of the femoral component is an important aspect of knee arthroplasty, due to its effects on postsurgery knee kinematics and associated functional outcomes. It is still debated which method for establishing rotational alignment is preferable in orthopedic surgery. We compared force sensing based femoral component rotation with traditional anatomic landmark methods to investigate which method is more accurate in terms of alignment to the true transepicondylar axis. Thirty-one patients underwent computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis with femoral rotation established via a force sensor. During surgery, three alternative hypothetical femoral rotational alignments were assessed, based on transepicondylar axis, anterior-posterior axis, or the utilization of a posterior condyles referencing jig. Postoperative computed tomography scans were obtained to investigate rotation characteristics. Significant differences in rotation characteristics were found between rotation according to DKB and other methods (P < 0.05). Soft tissue balancing resulted in smaller deviation from anatomical epicondylar axis than any other method. 77% of operated knees were within a range of ±3° of rotation. Only between 48% and 52% of knees would have been rotated appropriately using the other methods. The current results indicate that force sensors may be valuable for establishing correct femoral rotation. PMID:26881086

  20. Gravitomagnetic Field of the Universe and Coriolis Force on the Rotating Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veto, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Machian effect of distant masses of the universe in the frame of reference of the rotating Earth is demonstrated using the gravitomagnetic approach of general relativity. This effect appears in the form of a gravitomagnetic Lorentz force acting on moving bodies on the Earth. The gravitomagnetic field of the universe--deduced from a simple…

  1. Stochastic Rotation Dynamics simulations of wetting multi-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Thomas; Sanchez de La Lama, Marta; Brinkmann, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Multi-color Stochastic Rotation Dynamics (SRDmc) has been introduced by Inoue et al. [1,2] as a particle based simulation method to study the flow of emulsion droplets in non-wetting microchannels. In this work, we extend the multi-color method to also account for different wetting conditions. This is achieved by assigning the color information not only to fluid particles but also to virtual wall particles that are required to enforce proper no-slip boundary conditions. To extend the scope of the original SRDmc algorithm to e.g. immiscible two-phase flow with viscosity contrast we implement an angular momentum conserving scheme (SRD+mc). We perform extensive benchmark simulations to show that a mono-phase SRDmc fluid exhibits bulk properties identical to a standard SRD fluid and that SRDmc fluids are applicable to a wide range of immiscible two-phase flows. To quantify the adhesion of a SRD+mc fluid in contact to the walls we measure the apparent contact angle from sessile droplets in mechanical equilibrium. For a further verification of our wettability implementation we compare the dewetting of a liquid film from a wetting stripe to experimental and numerical studies of interfacial morphologies on chemically structured surfaces.

  2. The Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test (FFFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test was designed to study flame spreading over solid fuels when air is flowing at a low speed concurrent airflows, some materials are more flammable in microgravity than earth. 1.5 cm flame in microgravity that melts a polyethylene cylinder into a liquid ball.

  3. Turbulent Flows Driven by the Mechanical Forcing of an Ellipsoidal Container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, Benjamin; Le Bars, Michael; Grannan, Alexander; Ribeiro, Adolfo; Aurnou, Jonathan; Irphe Team; Spinlab Team

    2015-11-01

    We present a combination of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations modelling geophysically relevant mechanical forcings. Libration and tides correspond to the periodic perturbation of a body's rotation rate and shape, and are both due to gravitational interactions with orbiting companions. Such mechanical forcings can convey a fraction of the rotational energy available and generate intense turbulence in the fluid interior of satellites and planets. We investigate the fluid motions inside a librating or tidally deformed triaxial ellipsoidal container filled with an incompressible fluid. In both cases, the turbulent flow is driven by the elliptic instability which is a triadic resonance between two inertial modes and the base flow. We characterize the transition to turbulence as triadic resonances develop while also investigating both intermittent and sustained regimes. It is shown that the flow is largely independent of the properties of the mechanical forcing, hinting at a possible universal behaviour of the saturated elliptical instability. The existence of such intense flows may play an important role in understanding the thermal and magnetic evolution of celestial bodies. This work was funded by the French Agence Nationale pour la Recherche and the National Science Foundation Geophysics Program.

  4. Flow of Fluid and Particle Assemblages in Rotating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John; Hiltner, David; Niederhaus, Charles; Kleis, Stanley; Hudson, Ed; Gonda, Steve

    2004-01-01

    NASA-designed bioreactors have been highly successful in growing three-dimensional tissue structures in a low shear environment both on earth and in space. The goal of the present study is to characterize the fluid flow environment within the HFB-S bioreactor and determine the spatial distribution of particles that mimic cellular tissue structures. The results will be used to obtain optimal operating conditions of rotation rates and media perfusehnfuse rates which are required for cell culture growth protocols. Two types of experiments have been performed so far. First, we have performed laser florescent dye visualization of the perfusion loop to determine the mixing times within the chamber. The second type of experiments involved particles which represent cellular tissue to determine the spatial distribution with the chamber. From these experiments we established that mixing times were largely dependant on the speed ratio and sign of the difference between the spinner and the dome. The shortest mixing times occurred when the spinner rotates faster than the dome and longest mixing times occurs with no relative motion between the dome and spinner. Also, we have determined the spatial and temporal distribution of particle assemblages within the chamber.

  5. Viscous boundary layers in rotating fluids driven by periodic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Cogley, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper analyzes the boundary layers formed in a rotating fluid by an oscillating flow over an infinite half plate, with particular attention paid to the effects of unsteadiness, the critical latitude effect and the structure of the solution to the boundary layer equations at resonance. The Navier-Stokes boundary layer equations are obtained through an asymptotic expansion with the incorporation of the Rossby and Ekman numbers and are analyzed as the sum of a nonlinear steady solution and a linearized unsteady solution. The solution is predominantly composed of two inertial wave vector components, one circularly polarized to the left and the other circularly polarized to the right. The problem considered here has relevance in oceanography and meteorology, with special reference to the unsteady atmospheric boundary layer.

  6. Tokamak Plasma Flows Induced by Local RF Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiale; Gao, Zhe

    2015-10-01

    The tokamak plasma flows induced by the local radio frequency (RF) forces in the core region are analyzed. The effective components of local RF forces are composed of the momentum absorption term and the resonant parallel momentum transport term (i.e. the parallel component of the resonant ponderomotive forces). Different momentum balance relations are employed to calculate the plasma flows depending on different assumptions of momentum transport. With the RF fields solved from RF simulation codes, the toroidal and poloidal flows by these forces under the lower hybrid current drive and the mode conversion ion cyclotron resonance heating on EAST-like plasmas are evaluated. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405218, 11325524, 11375235 and 11261140327), in part by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB111002, 2013GB112001 and 2013GB112010), and the Program of Fusion Reactor Physics and Digital Tokamak with the CAS “One-Three-Five” Strategic Planning

  7. Controlled 3D rotation of biological cells using optical multiple-force clamps

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Wakida, Shin-ich

    2014-01-01

    Controlled three-dimensional (3D) rotation of arbitrarily shaped objects in the observation space of optical microscopes is essential for realizing tomographic microscope imaging and offers great flexibility as a noncontact micromanipulation tool for biomedical applications. Herein, we present 3D rotational control of inhomogeneous biological samples using 3D optical multiple-force clamps based on time-shared scanning with a fast focus-tunable lens. For inhomogeneous samples with shape and optical anisotropy, we choose diatoms and their fragments, and demonstrate interactive and controlled 3D rotation about arbitrary axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates. We also outline the hardware setup and 3D rotation method for our demonstrations. PMID:25071968

  8. ROTATING ACCRETION FLOWS: FROM INFINITY TO THE BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jason; Ostriker, Jeremiah; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-04-20

    Accretion onto a supermassive black hole of a rotating inflow is a particularly difficult problem to study because of the wide range of length scales involved. There have been broadly utilized analytic and numerical treatments of the global properties of accretion flows, but detailed numerical simulations are required to address certain critical aspects. We use the ZEUS code to run hydrodynamical simulations of rotating, axisymmetric accretion flows with Bremsstrahlung cooling, considering solutions for which the centrifugal balance radius significantly exceeds the Schwarzschild radius, with and without viscous angular momentum transport. Infalling gas is followed from well beyond the Bondi radius down to the vicinity of the black hole. We produce a continuum of solutions with respect to the single parameter M-dot{sub B}/ M-dot{sub Edd}, and there is a sharp transition between two general classes of solutions at an Eddington ratio of M-dot{sub B}/M-dot{sub Edd}{approx}few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}. Our high inflow solutions are very similar to the standard Shakura and Sunyaev results. But our low inflow results are to zeroth order the stationary Papaloizou and Pringle solution, which has no accretion. To next order in the small, assumed viscosity they show circulation, with disk and conical wind outflows almost balancing inflow. These solutions are characterized by hot, vertically extended disks, and net accretion proceeds at an extremely low rate, only of order {alpha} times the inflow rate. Our simulations have converged with respect to spatial resolution and temporal duration, and they do not depend strongly on our choice of boundary conditions.

  9. Forced vibration analysis of rotating structures with application to vertical axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobitz, D. W.

    Predictive methods for the dynamic analysis of wind turbine systems are important for assessing overall structural integrity and fatigue life. For the former, the identification of resonance points (spectral analysis) is of primary concern. For the latter forced vibration analysis is necessary. These analyses are complicated by the fact that, for a spinning turbine, the stress-producing deformations take place in both fixed and rotating reference systems simultaneously. As an example, the tower of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) must be analyzed in a fixed frame, and the rotor in a rotating one. Forced vibration analysis is further complicated in that accurate models need to be developed for aeroload prediction. Methods which are available for forced vibration analysis of both horizontal and vertical axis machines are identified and the method which was developed for vertical axis wind turbines is emphasized, with some comparisons of the predictions to experimental data.

  10. Laminar Flow About a Rotating Body of Revolution in an Axial Airstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, H.

    1956-01-01

    We have set ourselves the problem of calculating the laminar flow on a body of revolution in an axial flow which simultaneously rotates about its axis. The problem mentioned above, the flow about a rotating disk in a flow, which we solved some time ago, represents the first step in the calculation of the flow on the rotating body of revolution in a flow insofar as, in the case of a round nose, a small region about the front stagnation point of the body of revolution may be replaced by its tangential plane. In our problem regarding the rotating body of revolution in a flow, for laminar flow, one of the limiting cases is known: that of the body which is in an axial approach flow but does not rotate. The other limiting case, namely the flow in the neighborhood of a body which rotates but is not subjected to a flow is known only for the rotating circular cylinder, aside from the rotating disk. In the case of the cylinder one deals with a distribution of the circumferential velocity according to the law v = omega R(exp 2)/r where R signifies the cylinder radius, r the distance from the center, and omega the angular velocity of the rotation. The velocity distribution as it is produced here by the friction effect is therefore the same as in the neighborhood of a potential vortex. When we treat, in what follows, the general case of the rotating body of revolution in a flow according to the calculation methods of Prandtl's boundary-layer theory, we must keep in mind that this solution cannot contain the limiting case of the body of revolution which only rotates but is not subjected to a flow. However, this is no essential limitation since this case is not of particular importance for practical purposes.