Science.gov

Sample records for forceps tweezers hooks

  1. The history and evolution of surgical instruments. VII. Spring forceps (tweezers), hooks and simple retractors.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, J.

    1996-01-01

    Instruments manufactured by bending a basic metal strip or rod, either about its middle to create spring forceps (tweezers), or towards one extremity to create hooks and retractors are related structures. Spring forceps depend on tension mediated at the bend (hoop) or fixed end which is transmitted as dynamic 'spring' to the jaws, whereas the bend of hooks and retractors remains fixed and static. If such instruments refine the digital postures of pinch, pincer and retraction during surgery, they have not supplanted these manual actions entirely. After a brief historical introduction, the structure, modifications, functions and controls of spring forceps are analysed. Importantly, this instrument enjoys both right and left-handed functions, some of which are ancient, some transient as haemostats and needle-holders, and some, including left-handed dissection, surprisingly recent. Hooks are sharp or blunt and, among other functions, pre-date the left-handed spring forceps for dissection; in general hooks function as retractors. Hand-held retractors are enlarged blunt hooks, the wide retracting contact surface reducing trauma to wound margins and viscera. The physical effort of employing these retractors deep in body cavities is abated by applying them autostatically around a square or circular frame. Images Figure 1 PMID:8943642

  2. Obstetrical Forceps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Marshall inventors Seth Lawson and Stanley Smeltzer display a pair of obstetrical forceps they designed. The forceps, made from composite space-age materials, measure the force applied during instrument-assisted delivery. The new forceps will help medical students get a feel for instrument-assisted deliveries before entering practice.

  3. Surgical forceps techniques.

    PubMed

    Malden, N

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers two new elevator and dental forceps techniques for the atraumatic removal of teeth to avoid a surgical procedure where possible. The techniques described should be applicable in relatively well defined but commonly occurring situations. The two techniques involve the unconventional use of conventional dental extraction forceps, with the aim of facilitating removal of the retained roots of certain teeth: the first for incisors, canines and premolars and the second for lower first molars. The term 'surgical forceps technique's is tentatively put forward as a description of these hybrid procedures. PMID:11819949

  4. The birth of forceps.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Sukhera; Ganesaratnam, Inithan; Jan, Haider

    2013-07-01

    Operative vaginal delivery has been described since the Middle Ages. During this time, however, labour would be sustained over several days and intrapartum death almost inevitable. In these circumstances, intervention involving the use of surgical instruments or even kitchen utensils would serve purely as an attempt to avoid maternal mortality. The establishment of forceps-assisted delivery as a means of avoiding both maternal and neonatal morbidity was initiated in the 16th century by the Chamberlen family and later developed over several centuries by leading obstetricians of the time including Simpson, Barnes and Keilland. The evolution of forceps is a fascinating story which is rich in history. Despite the development of Ventouse and the increasing use of Caesarean section for difficult delivery, forceps remain an integral part of obstetric practice. The striking resemblance of modern day forceps to the original instruments used by the Chamberlens is a testament to both the family's ingenuity and enterprise as well as the subsequent pioneering obstetricians who followed in their footsteps. PMID:23885296

  5. The birth of forceps

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Sukhera; Ganesaratnam, Inithan; Jan, Haider

    2013-01-01

    Operative vaginal delivery has been described since the Middle Ages. During this time, however, labour would be sustained over several days and intrapartum death almost inevitable. In these circumstances, intervention involving the use of surgical instruments or even kitchen utensils would serve purely as an attempt to avoid maternal mortality. The establishment of forceps-assisted delivery as a means of avoiding both maternal and neonatal morbidity was initiated in the 16th century by the Chamberlen family and later developed over several centuries by leading obstetricians of the time including Simpson, Barnes and Keilland. The evolution of forceps is a fascinating story which is rich in history. Despite the development of Ventouse and the increasing use of Caesarean section for difficult delivery, forceps remain an integral part of obstetric practice. The striking resemblance of modern day forceps to the original instruments used by the Chamberlens is a testament to both the family's ingenuity and enterprise as well as the subsequent pioneering obstetricians who followed in their footsteps. PMID:23885296

  6. Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Philip H.; Maragò, Onofrio M.; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    1. Introduction; Part I. Theory: 2. Ray optics; 3. Dipole approximation; 4. Optical beams and focusing; 5. Electromagnetic theory; 6. Computational methods; 7. Brownian motion; Part II. Practice: 8. Building an optical tweezers; 9. Data acquisition and optical tweezers calibration; 10. Photonic force microscope; 11. Wavefront engineering and holographic optical tweezers; 12. Advanced techniques; Part III. Applications: 13. Single molecule biophysics; 14. Cell biology; 15. Spectroscopy; 16. Optofluidics and lab on a chip; 17. Colloid science; 18. Microchemistry; 19. Aerosol science; 20. Statistical physics; 21. Nanothermodynamics; 22. Plasmonics; 23. Nanostructures; 24. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms; 25. Towards the quantum regime at the mesoscale; Index.

  7. Optical Tweezer Assembly and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    An Optical Tweezer, as the name implies, is a useful tool for precision manipulation of micro and nano scale objects. Using the principle of electromagnetic radiation pressure, an optical tweezer employs a tightly focused laser beam to trap and position objects of various shapes and sizes. These devices can trap micrometer and nanometer sized objects. An exciting possibility for optical tweezers is its future potential to manipulate and assemble micro and nano sized sensors. A typical optical tweezer makes use of the following components: laser, mirrors, lenses, a high quality microscope, stage, Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera, TV monitor and Position Sensitive Detectors (PSDs). The laser wavelength employed is typically in the visible or infrared spectrum. The laser beam is directed via mirrors and lenses into the microscope. It is then tightly focused by a high magnification, high numerical aperture microscope objective into the sample slide, which is mounted on a translating stage. The sample slide contains a sealed, small volume of fluid that the objects are suspended in. The most common objects trapped by optical tweezers are dielectric spheres. When trapped, a sphere will literally snap into and center itself in the laser beam. The PSD s are mounted in such a way to receive the backscatter after the beam has passed through the trap. PSD s used with the Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) technique provide highly precise data. Most optical tweezers employ lasers with power levels ranging from 10 to 100 miliwatts. Typical forces exerted on trapped objects are in the pico-newton range. When PSDs are employed, object movement can be resolved on a nanometer scale in a time range of milliseconds. Such accuracy, however, can only by utilized by calibrating the optical tweezer. Fortunately, an optical tweezer can be modeled accurately as a simple spring. This allows Hook s Law to be used. My goal this summer at NASA Glenn Research Center is the assembly and

  8. Composite redesign of obstetrical forceps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Seth W.; Smeltzer, Stan S.

    1994-01-01

    Due to the increase in the number of children being born recently, medical technology has struggled to keep pace in certain areas. In these areas, particular needs have arisen to which the subject of this paper is directed. In the area of obstetrics, the forceps design and function has remained relatively unchanged for a number of years. In an effort to advance the technology, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been asked by the obstetrical community to help in a redesign of the obstetric forceps. Traditionally the forceps design has been of tubular stainless steel, constructed in two halves which interlock and hinge to provide the gripping force necessary to aid in the delivery of an infant. The stainless steel material was used to provide for ease of cleaning and sterilization. However, one of the drawbacks of the non-flexible steel design is that excessive force can be placed upon an infants head which could result in damage or injury to the infant. The redesign of this particular obstetric tool involves applying NASA's knowledge of advanced materials and state of the art instrumentation to create a tool which can be used freely throughout the obstetrics community without the fear of injury to an infant being delivered.

  9. Split-mouth comparison of physics forceps and extraction forceps in orthodontic extraction of upper premolars.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Samyuktha; Narayanan, Vinod; Soh, Chen Loong

    2014-12-01

    We compared outcome variables (operative complications, inflammatory complications, and operating time) in patients being treated by orthodontic extraction of upper premolars with the Physics forceps or the universal extraction forceps. We organised a single blind, split-mouth clinical trial to compare the outcomes of the 2 groups (n=54 premolars). The Physics forceps group had lower mean (SD) visual analogue scores (VAS) for pain (0.59 (0.57)) on the first postoperative day than the other group (1.04 (0.85)) (p=0.03). There were no other significant differences between the 2 groups in any other variable studied. PMID:25015020

  10. Obstetrical Forceps Would Limit Force On An Infant's Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stan; Lawson, Seth

    1995-01-01

    Improved obstetrical forceps proposed to reduce injuries to newborn infants. Fabricated mostly of thermoplastic material. Reinforcing fibers added in hinge region of forceps. Combination of material, size, and shape chosen to make forceps yield elastically by amount keeping applied force from rising beyond maximum allowable value. Fiber-optic sensors for measuring strains embedded in forceps. Strain measurements used to compute tensile and compressive forces applied to infant's head.

  11. Lunar crane hook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, John Wilson, III; Cone, Alan E.; Garolera, Frank J.; German, David; Lindabury, David Peter; Luckado, Marshall Cleveland; Murphey, Craig; Rowell, John Bryan; Wilkinson, Brad

    1988-01-01

    The base and ball hook system is an attachment that is designed to be used on the lunar surface as an improved alternative to the common crane hook and eye system. The design proposed uses an omni-directional ball hook and base to overcome the design problems associated with a conventional crane hook. The base and ball hook is not sensitive to cable twist which would render a robotic lunar crane useless since there is little atmospheric resistance to dampen the motion of an oscillating member. The symmetric characteristics of the ball hook and base eliminates manual placement of the ball hook into the base; commonly associated with the typical hook and eye stem. The major advantage of the base and ball hook system is it's ease of couple and uncouple modes that are advantages during unmanned robotic lunar missions.

  12. 21 CFR 868.5780 - Tube introduction forceps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tube introduction forceps. 868.5780 Section 868.5780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5780 Tube introduction forceps....

  13. CP-OCT sensor guided SMART micro-forceps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Cheol; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-02-01

    Even the most stable hands have unintended movements on the order of 50-100 microns within 0-15 Hz. Micro-forceps are one of the frequently used microsurgical tools used to grasp thin layers of tissue during microsurgery. Here, a handheld Smart Micromanipulation Aided Robotic-surgery Tool (SMART) micro-forceps is developed by integrating a fiber-optic common-path optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) sensor into the micro-forceps. This forceps design could significantly improve performance by canceling unwanted hand tremor during the moment of a grasping. The basic grasping and peeling functions of the micro-forceps are evaluated in dry phantoms and in a biological tissue model.

  14. Optoelectronic integrated tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreehin, Simon J.; O'Faolin, Liam; Roberts, John; Krauss, Thomas; Dholakia, Kishan

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate the optical manipulation of microscopic particles within a single optoelectronic device, whose footprint measures 2mm by 3mm, and which is realised entirely in planar technology. The device is fabricated in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, and consists of two facing banks of lasers that are separated by an etched channel. Particles within this channel experience the simple trapping force of two counter-propagating beams. The lasers operate at a wavelength of 980nm, and each gives up to 10mW of power in a single transverse optical mode. This power is sufficient to deflect, decelerate and hold a variety of micron-scale particles, including fluorescent polymer spheres, and cells in solution. The first results were obtained using planar etched facets, giving highly divergent beams. More elegant beam shapes can be produced by etching curved facets. The main attractions of this technology are its size and self-alignment properties: Many devices can fit into a fraction of the space occupied by a traditional tweezer set-up. Using photo-lithography, the alignment of the lasers is 'perfect', avoiding the difficulties experienced in traditional tweezers. The concept we demonstrate is a truly integrated optical tweezer that is mass-producible and does not require any complex instrumentation to operate.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Efficacy of Physics Forceps versus Conventional Forceps in Orthodontic Extractions: A Prospective Randomized Split Mouth Study

    PubMed Central

    Managutti, Anil M; Menat, Shailesh; Agarwal, Arvind; Shah, Dishan; Patel, Jigar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tooth extraction is one of the most commonly performed procedures in dentistry. It is usually a traumatic procedure often resulting in immediate destruction and loss of alveolar bone and surrounding soft tissues. Various instruments have been described to perform atraumatic extractions which can prevent damage to the paradental structures. Recently developed physics forceps is one of the instruments which is claimed to perform atraumatic extractions. Aim The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of physics forceps with conventional forceps in terms of operating time, prevention of marginal bone loss & soft tissue loss, postoperative pain and postoperative complications following bilateral premolar extractions for orthodontic purpose. Materials and Methods In this prospective split-mouth study, outcomes of the 2 groups (n = 42 premolars) requiring extraction of premolars for orthodontic treatment purpose using Physics forceps and Conventional forceps were compared. Clinical outcomes in form of time taken, loss of buccal soft tissue and buccal cortical plate based on extraction defect classification system, postoperative pain and other complication associated with extraction were recorded and compared. Results Statistically significant reduction in the operating time was noted in physics forceps group. Marginal bone loss and soft tissue loss was also significantly lesser in physics forceps group when compared to conventional forceps group. However, there was no statistically significant difference in severity of postoperative pain between both groups. Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that physics forceps was more efficient in reducing operating time and prevention of marginal bone loss & soft tissue loss when compared to conventional forceps in orthodontically indicated premolar extractions.

  16. Interferometer Control of Optical Tweezers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses progress in using spatial light modulators and interferometry to control the beam profile of an optical tweezers. The approach being developed is to use a spatial light modulator (SLM) to control the phase profile of the tweezers beam and to use a combination of the SLM and interferometry to control the intensity profile. The objective is to perform fine and calculable control of the moments and forces on a tip or tool to be used to manipulate and interrogate nanostructures. The performance of the SLM in generating multiple and independently controllable tweezers beams is also reported. Concurrent supporting research projects are mentioned and include tweezers beam scattering and neural-net processing of the interference patterns for control of the tweezers beams.

  17. Devil's lens optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Jones, P H

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate an optical tweezers using a laser beam on which is imprinted a focusing phase profile generated by a Devil's staircase fractal structure (Cantor set). We show that a beam shaped in this way is capable of stably trapping a variety of micron- and submicron-sized particles and calibrate the optical trap as a function of the control parameters of the fractal structure, and explain the observed variation as arising from radiation pressure exerted by unfocused parts of the beam in the region of the optical trap. Experimental results are complemented by calculation of the structure of the focus in the regime of high numerical aperture. PMID:25968658

  18. Forceps-induced birth injury to the cornea.

    PubMed

    Alobaidy, Ruba; Srinivasan, Sathish

    2014-01-01

    A 72-year-old man was referred for cataract surgery in the right eye. On slit-lamp biomicroscopy he was noted to have a vertical split in the Descemet's membrane in the left cornea. Based on the appearance, orientation of the split and medical history of forceps delivery, a forceps injury to the left cornea was diagnosed. The break in Descemet's membrane is characteristically vertical due to the horizontal stretching of the globe which occurs with vertical compression of the globe between the orbit and the blade of the obstetric forceps. Forceps injuries are usually unilateral and affect the left eye as the most common fetal head position is left occiput anterior. In the immediate postpartum period the rupture in the Descemet's membrane leads to corneal oedema which eventually disappears leaving the visible edges of the break. This injury also leads to severe left eye astigmatism and secondary amblyopia. PMID:24717592

  19. Obstetric Forceps: A Species on the Brink of Extinction.

    PubMed

    Dildy, Gary A; Belfort, Michael A; Clark, Steven L

    2016-09-01

    Both resident training in the use of obstetric forceps and forceps deliveries are experiencing precipitous declines in the United States. Current minimum training requirements are insufficient to ensure competency in this skill. These trends bear striking similarities to observations regarding the decline and ultimate extinction of biologic species and portend the inevitable disappearance of this valuable skill from the obstetric armamentarium. Attempts by experienced teaching faculty to provide residents with experience in a few forceps deliveries are of little value and may do more harm than good. There would seem to be only two viable solutions to this dilemma: 1) abandon attempts to teach forceps and prepare residents for a real-world practice setting in which management of second-stage labor does not include the availability forceps delivery; or 2) prioritize the development of high-fidelity simulation models in which fetal head size and attitude and pelvic size and architecture can be continuously varied to allow residents to obtain sufficient experience to know both how and when to proceed with forceps delivery. We believe this latter approach is the sole alternative to inevitable extinction of this species. PMID:27500345

  20. Optical tweezers on biaxial crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we propose optical tweezers based on a biaxial crystal. To control the movement of opaque particles, we use the shift polarization interferometer. The results of experimental study of laser tweezers are shown. We demonstrates movement of a microparticle of toner using singular-optical trap, rotate a particle due to orbital momentum, conversion of two traps when changing the plane of polarizer transmission and converging of two traps.

  1. Development of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) forceps for intraocular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhisitkul, R B; Keller, C G

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To develop silicon microforceps for intraocular surgery using Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology, the application of microchip fabrication techniques for the production of controllable three dimensional devices on the micrometre scale. Methods: Prototype MEMS forceps were designed and manufactured for intraocular surgery. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate device tip construction. Designs using both thermal expansion actuators and conventional mechanical activation were tested in human cadaver eyes and in vivo rabbit eyes to assess functionality in standard vitreoretinal surgery. Results: MEMS forceps were constructed with various tip designs ranging from 100 μm to 2 mm in length. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed accurate construction of micro features such as forceps teeth as small as tens of micrometres. In surgical testing, the silicon forceps tips were effective in surgical manoeuvres, including grasping retinal membranes and excising tissue. The mechanical actuator design on a 20 gauge handle was more operational in the intraocular environment than the thermal expansion actuator design. While handheld operation was possible, the precision of the forceps was best exploited when mounted on a three axis micromanipulator. Conclusion: MEMS microforceps are feasible for conventional vitreoretinal surgery, and offer advances in terms of small scale, operating precision, and construction tolerance. PMID:16299136

  2. Undergraduate Construction of Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbell, Lawrence

    2012-10-01

    I will present a poster on the construction of optical tweezers. This will demonstrate the full process one must go through when working on a research project. First I sifted through the internet for papers and information pertaining to the tweezers. Afterwards I discussed the budget with the lab manager. Next I made purchases, however some items, such as the sample mount, needed to be custom made. These I built in the machine shop. Once the tweezers were operational I spent some time ensuring that the mirrors and lenses were adjusted just right, so that the trap performed at full strength. Finally, I used video data of the Brownian motion of trapped silica microspheres to get a reasonable estimate of the trapping stiffness with such particles. As a general note, all of this was done with the intent of leaving the tweezers for future use by other undergraduates. Because of this extra effort was taken to ensure the tweezers were as safe to use as possible. For this reason a visible LASER was chosen over an infrared LASER, in addition, the LASER was oriented parallel to the surface of the table in order to avoid stray upwards beams.

  3. Plasmon nano-optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Mathieu L.; Righini, Maurizio; Quidant, Romain

    2011-06-01

    Conventional optical tweezers, formed at the diffraction-limited focus of a laser beam, have become a powerful and flexible tool for manipulating micrometre-sized objects. Extending optical trapping down to the nanometre scale would open unprecedented opportunities in many fields of science, where such nano-optical tweezers would allow the ultra-accurate positioning of single nano-objects. Among the possible strategies, the ability of metallic nanostructures to control light at the subwavelength scale can be exploited to engineer such nano-optical traps. This Review summarizes the recent advances in the emerging field of plasmon-based optical trapping and discusses the details of plasmon tweezers along with their potential applications to bioscience and quantum optics.

  4. Coaxial atomic force microscope tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. A.; Aguilar, J. A.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate coaxial atomic force microscope (AFM) tweezers that can trap and place small objects using dielectrophoresis (DEP). An attractive force is generated at the tip of a coaxial AFM probe by applying a radio frequency voltage between the center conductor and a grounded shield; the origin of the force is found to be DEP by measuring the pull-off force versus applied voltage. We show that the coaxial AFM tweezers can perform three-dimensional assembly by picking up a specified silica microsphere, imaging with the microsphere at the end of the tip, and placing it at a target destination.

  5. Hooke's figurations: a figural drawing attributed to Robert Hooke.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Matthew C

    2010-09-20

    The experimental philosopher Robert Hooke (1635-1703) is known to have apprenticed to the leading painter Peter Lely on his first arrival in London in the late 1640s. Yet the relevance of Hooke's artistic training to his mature draughtsmanship and identity has remained unclear. Shedding light on that larger interpretive problem, this article argues for the attribution to Hooke of a figural drawing now in Tate Britain (T10678). This attributed drawing is especially interesting because it depicts human subjects and bears Hooke's name functioning as an artistic signature, both highly unusual features for his draughtsmanship. From evidence of how this drawing was collected and physically placed alongside images by leading artists in the early eighteenth century, I suggest how it can offer new insight into the reception of Hooke and his graphic work in the early Enlightenment. PMID:20973449

  6. Force sensing micro-forceps for robot assisted retinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Kuru, Ismail; Gonenc, Berk; Balicki, Marcin; Handa, James; Gehlbach, Peter; Taylor, Russell H; Iordachita, Iulian

    2012-01-01

    Membrane peeling is a standard vitreoretinal procedure, where the surgeon delaminates a very thin membrane from retina surface using surgical picks and forceps. This requires extremely delicate manipulation of the retinal tissue. Applying excessive forces during the surgery can cause serious complications leading to vision loss. For successful membrane peeling, most of the applied forces need to be very small, well below the human tactile sensation threshold. In this paper, we present a robotic system that combines a force sensing forceps tool and a cooperatively-controlled surgical robot. This combination allows us to measure the forces directly at the tool tip and use this information for limiting the applied forces on the retina. This may prevent many iatrogenic injuries and allow safer maneuvers during vitreoretinal procedures. We show that our system can successfully eliminate hand-tremor and excessive forces in membrane peeling experiments on the inner shell membrane of a chicken embryo. PMID:23366162

  7. Optical tweezers technique and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, HongLian; Li, ZhiYuan

    2013-12-01

    Since their advent in the 1980s, optical tweezers have attracted more and more attention due to their unique non-contact and non-invasion characteristics and their wide applications in physics, biology, chemistry, medical science and nanoscience. In this paper, we introduce the basic principle, the history and typical applications of optical tweezers and review our recent experimental works on the development and application of optical tweezers technique. We will discuss in detail several technological issues, including high precision displacement and force measurement in single-trap and dual-trap optical tweezers, multi-trap optical tweezers with each trap independently and freely controlled by means of space light modulator, and incorporation of cylindrical vector optical beams to build diversified optical tweezers beyond the conventional Gaussian-beam optical tweezers. We will address the application of these optical tweezers techniques to study biophysical problems such as mechanical deformation of cell membrane and binding energy between plant microtubule and microtubule associated proteins. Finally we present application of the optical tweezers technique for trapping, transporting, and patterning of metallic nanoparticles, which can be harnessed to manipulate surface plasmon resonance properties of these nanoparticles.

  8. MatLab program for precision calibration of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2004-06-01

    Optical tweezers are used as force transducers in many types of experiments. The force they exert in a given experiment is known only after a calibration. Computer codes that calibrate optical tweezers with high precision and reliability in the ( x, y)-plane orthogonal to the laser beam axis were written in MatLab (MathWorks Inc.) and are presented here. The calibration is based on the power spectrum of the Brownian motion of a dielectric bead trapped in the tweezers. Precision is achieved by accounting for a number of factors that affect this power spectrum. First, cross-talk between channels in 2D position measurements is tested for, and eliminated if detected. Then, the Lorentzian power spectrum that results from the Einstein-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck theory, is fitted to the low-frequency part of the experimental spectrum in order to obtain an initial guess for parameters to be fitted. Finally, a more complete theory is fitted, a theory that optionally accounts for the frequency dependence of the hydrodynamic drag force and hydrodynamic interaction with a nearby cover slip, for effects of finite sampling frequency (aliasing), for effects of anti-aliasing filters in the data acquisition electronics, and for unintended "virtual" filtering caused by the position detection system. Each of these effects can be left out or included as the user prefers, with user-defined parameters. Several tests are applied to the experimental data during calibration to ensure that the data comply with the theory used for their interpretation: Independence of x- and y-coordinates, Hooke's law, exponential distribution of power spectral values, uncorrelated Gaussian scatter of residual values. Results are given with statistical errors and covariance matrix. Program summaryTitle of program: tweezercalib Catalogue identifier: ADTV Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland. Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTV Computer for

  9. Stress analyses of B-52 pylon hooks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.; Schuster, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASTRAN finite element computer program was used in the two dimensional stress analysis of B-52 carrier aircraft pylon hooks: (1) old rear hook (which failed), (2) new rear hook (improved geometry), (3) new DAST rear hook (derated geometry), and (4) front hook. NASTRAN model meshes were generated by the aid of PATRAN-G computer program. Brittle limit loads for all the four hooks were established. The critical stress level calculated from NASTRAN agrees reasonably well with the values predicted from the fracture mechanics for the failed old rear hook.

  10. The Hooked Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    Life is not easy, even for galaxies. Some indeed get so close to their neighbours that they get rather distorted. But such encounters between galaxies have another effect: they spawn new generations of stars, some of which explode. ESO's VLT has obtained a unique vista of a pair of entangled galaxies, in which a star exploded. Because of the importance of exploding stars, and particularly of supernovae of Type Ia [1], for cosmological studies (e.g. relating to claims of an accelerated cosmic expansion and the existence of a new, unknown, constituent of the universe - the so called 'Dark Energy'), they are a preferred target of study for astronomers. Thus, on several occasions, they pointed ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) towards a region of the sky that portrays a trio of amazing galaxies. MCG-01-39-003 (bottom right) is a peculiar spiral galaxy, with a telephone number name, that presents a hook at one side, most probably due to the interaction with its neighbour, the spiral galaxy NGC 5917 (upper right). In fact, further enhancement of the image reveals that matter is pulled off MCG-01-39-003 by NGC 5917. Both these galaxies are located at similar distances, about 87 million light-years away, towards the constellation of Libra (The Balance). ESO PR Photo 22/06 ESO PR Photo 22/06 The Hooked Galaxy and its Companion NGC 5917 (also known as Arp 254 and MCG-01-39-002) is about 750 times fainter than can be seen by the unaided eye and is about 40,000 light-years across. It was discovered in 1835 by William Herschel, who strangely enough, seems to have missed its hooked companion, only 2.5 times fainter. As seen at the bottom left of this exceptional VLT image, a still fainter and nameless, but intricately beautiful, barred spiral galaxy looks from a distance the entangled pair, while many 'island universes' perform a cosmic dance in the background. But this is not the reason why astronomers look at this region. Last year, a star exploded in the vicinity of the hook

  11. Utility of the Gyrus open forceps in hepatic parenchymal transection

    PubMed Central

    Porembka, Matthew R; Doyle, M B Majella; Hamilton, Nicholas A; Simon, Peter O; Strasberg, Steven M; Linehan, David C; Hawkins, William G

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate if the Gyrus open forceps is a safe and efficient tool for hepatic parenchymal transection. Background: Blood loss during hepatic transection remains a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality associated with liver surgery. Various electrosurgical devices have been engineered to reduce blood loss. The Gyrus open forceps is a bipolar cautery device which has recently been introduced into hepatic surgery. Methods: We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of all liver resections performed from November 2005 through November 2007. Patients undergoing resection of at least two liver segments where the Gyrus was the primary method of transection were included. Patient charts were reviewed; clinicopathological data were collected. Results: Of the 215 open liver resections performed during the study period, 47 patients met the inclusion criteria. Mean patient age was 61 years; 34% were female. The majority required resection for malignant disease (94%); frequent indications included colorectal metastasis (66%), hepatocellular carcinoma (6%) and cholangiocarcinoma (4%). Right hemihepatectomy (49%), left hemihepatectomy (13%) and right trisectionectomy (13%) were the most frequently performed procedures. A total of 26 patients (55%) underwent a major ancillary procedure concurrently. There were no operative mortalities. Median operative time was 220 min (range 97–398 min). Inflow occlusion was required in nine patients (19%) for a median time of 12 min (range 3–30 min). Median total estimated blood loss was 400 ml (range 10–2000 ml) and 10 patients (21%) required perioperative transfusion. All patients had macroscopically negative margins. Median length of stay was 8 days. Two patients (4%) had clinically significant bile leak. The 30-day postoperative mortality was zero. Conclusions: Use of the Gyrus open forceps appears to be a safe and efficient manner of hepatic parenchymal transection which allows

  12. J-Hook Latching Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. Bruce

    1992-01-01

    J-hook latching mechanism which joins modules of equipment together and holds cargoes in vehicles relatively simple, strong, and self-aligning. Objects brought together into coarse alignment, shaft turned, causing upper object, mounting bracket, and fixed nut to travel downward on left-handed thread and traveling nut upward on right-handed thread. This allows J-hook to turn under spring load and reach under receptacle.

  13. Cell rotation using optoelectronic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuan-Li; Huang, Yuan-Peng; Lu, Yen-Sheng; Hou, Max T; Yeh, J Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A cell rotation method by using optoelectronic tweezers (OET) is reported. The binary image of a typical OET device, whose light and dark sides act as two sets of parallel plates with different ac voltages, was used to create a rotating electric field. Its feasibility for application to electrorotation of cells was demonstrated by rotating Ramos and yeast cells in their pitch axes. The electrorotation by using OET devices is dependent on the medium and cells' electrical properties, the cells' positions, and the OET device's geometrical dimension, as well as the frequency of the electric field. PMID:21267435

  14. Fluorescence support in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Animas, J. G.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.; Ponce, L.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the development of an installation for proves for characterization by fluorescence of micrometer and nanometer particles supported on the trapping and manipulation by optical trapping technique (optical tweezers). The system features an laser operating at 480 nm, CCD camera for image acquisition, Thor Labs micrometric table X, Y, Z for the movement of the sample and the trap in the visual field. The design includes the use of intensity modulated optical trap, with the option of being used in pulsed, opening up possibilities for the use of resonant phenomena optomechanical type for particle capture.

  15. Dynamical stabilisation in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Philip H.; Richards, Christopher J.; Smart, Thomas J.; Cubero, David

    2015-03-01

    We present a study of dynamical stabilisation of an overdamped, microscopic pendulum realised using optical tweezers. We first derive an analytical expression for the equilibrium dynamically stabilised pendulum position in a regime of high damping and high modulation frequency of the pendulum pivot. This model implies a threshold behavior for stabilisation to occur, and a continuous evolution of the angular position which, unlike the underdamped case, does not reach the fully inverted position. We then test the theoretical predictions using an optically trapped microparticle subject to fluid drag force, finding reasonable agreement with the threshold and equilibrium behavior at high modulation amplitude. Analytical theory and experiments are complemented by Brownian motion simulations.

  16. Optoelectronic tweezers for medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Clemens; Neale, Steven; Menachery, Anoop; Barrett, Mike; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) allows the spatial patterning of electric fields through selected illumination of a photoconductive surface. This enables the manipulation of micro particles and cells by creating non-uniform electrical fields that then produce dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. The DEP responses of cells differ and can produce negative or positive (repelled or attracted to areas of high electric field) forces. Therefore OET can be used to manipulate individual cells and separate different cell types from each other. Thus OET has many applications for medical diagnostics, demonstrated here with work towards diagnosing Human African Trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness.

  17. Optical tweezers to study viruses.

    PubMed

    Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    A virus is a complex molecular machine that propagates by channeling its genetic information from cell to cell. Unlike macroscopic engines, it operates in a nanoscopic world under continuous thermal agitation. Viruses have developed efficient passive and active strategies to pack and release nucleic acids. Some aspects of the dynamic behavior of viruses and their substrates can be studied using structural and biochemical techniques. Recently, physical techniques have been applied to dynamic studies of viruses in which their intrinsic mechanical activity can be measured directly. Optical tweezers are a technology that can be used to measure the force, torque and strain produced by molecular motors, as a function of time and at the single-molecule level. Thanks to this technique, some bacteriophages are now known to be powerful nanomachines; they exert force in the piconewton range and their motors work in a highly coordinated fashion for packaging the viral nucleic acid genome. Nucleic acids, whose elasticity and condensation behavior are inherently coupled to the viral packaging mechanisms, are also amenable to examination with optical tweezers. In this chapter, we provide a comprehensive analysis of this laser-based tool, its combination with imaging methods and its application to the study of viruses and viral molecules. PMID:23737055

  18. Quantum limited particle sensing in optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.W.; Hsu, Magnus T. L.; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2009-12-15

    Particle sensing in optical tweezers systems provides information on the position, velocity, and force of the specimen particles. The conventional quadrant detection scheme is applied ubiquitously in optical tweezers experiments to quantify these parameters. In this paper, we show that quadrant detection is nonoptimal for particle sensing in optical tweezers and propose an alternative optimal particle sensing scheme based on spatial homodyne detection. A formalism for particle sensing in terms of transverse spatial modes is developed and numerical simulations of the efficacies of both quadrant and spatial homodyne detection are shown. We demonstrate that 1 order of magnitude improvement in particle sensing sensitivity can be achieved using spatial homodyne over quadrant detection.

  19. Hook Proteins: Association with Alzheimer Pathology and Regulatory Role of Hook3 in Amyloid Beta Generation

    PubMed Central

    Arsalan-Werner, Annika; Hilbrich, Isabel; Jäger, Carsten; Flach, Katharina; Suttkus, Anne; Lachmann, Ingolf; Arendt, Thomas; Holzer, Max

    2015-01-01

    Defects in intracellular transport are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Hook proteins are a family of cytoplasmic linker proteins that participate in endosomal transport. In this study we show that Hook1 and Hook3 are expressed in neurons while Hook2 is predominantly expressed in astrocytes. Furthermore, Hook proteins are associated with pathological hallmarks in AD; Hook1 and Hook3 are localized to tau aggregates and Hook2 to glial components within amyloid plaques. Additionally, the expression of Hook3 is reduced in AD. Modelling of Hook3 deficiency in cultured cells leads to slowing of endosomal transport and increases β-amyloid production. We propose that Hook3 plays a role in pathogenic events exacerbating AD. PMID:25799409

  20. Nasotracheal intubation with three indirect laryngoscopes assisted by standard or modified Magill forceps.

    PubMed

    Staar, S; Biesler, I; Müller, D; Pförtner, R; Mohr, C; Groeben, H

    2013-05-01

    We assessed the effect of modifying standard Magill forceps on the laryngeal introduction of an Eschmann stylet during nasotracheal intubations with three indirect laryngoscopes (Airtraq™, C-MAC(®) or GlideScope(®)) in patients with predicted difficult intubation. We allocated 50 participants to each laryngoscope. The stylet was advanced by one forceps followed by the other (standard or modified), with each sequence allocated to 25/50 for each laryngoscope. There were no differences in rates of failed tracheal intubation with the allocated laryngoscopes: 6/50, 5/50 and 5/50, respectively. An Eschmann stylet was advanced into the trachea less often with the standard forceps (65% vs 93%, p < 0.0001). Mean (SD) time for stylet advancement was longer with the standard forceps, 38 (30) vs 19 (19) s, p < 0.0001. In conclusion, the modified Magill forceps facilitated nasotracheal intubation, independent of the type of indirect laryngoscope. PMID:23480441

  1. Fiber-optic OCT sensor guided “SMART” micro-forceps for microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Song, Cheol; Park, Dong Yong; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Park, Seong Jin; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-01-01

    A handheld Smart Micromanipulation Aided Robotic-surgery Tool (SMART) micro-forceps guided by a fiber-optic common-path optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) sensor is presented. A fiber-optic CP-OCT distance and motion sensor is integrated into the shaft of a micro-forceps. The tool tip position is manipulated longitudinally through a closed loop control using a piezoelectric motor. This novel forceps design could significantly enhance safety, efficiency and surgical outcomes. The basic grasping and peeling functions of the micro-forceps are evaluated in dry phantoms and in a biological tissue model. As compared to freehand use, targeted grasping and peeling performance assisted by active tremor compensation, significantly improves micro-forceps user performance. PMID:23847730

  2. Robert Hooke's model of memory.

    PubMed

    Hintzman, Douglas L

    2003-03-01

    In 1682 the scientist and inventor Robert Hooke read a lecture to the Royal Society of London, in which he described a mechanistic model of human memory. Yet few psychologists today seem to have heard of Hooke's memory model. The lecture addressed questions of encoding, memory capacity, repetition, retrieval, and forgetting--some of these in a surprisingly modern way. Hooke's model shares several characteristics with the theory of Richard Semon, which came more than 200 years later, but it is more complete. Among the model's interesting properties are that (1) it allows for attention and other top-down influences on encoding; (2) it uses resonance to implement parallel, cue-dependent retrieval; (3) it explains memory for recency; (4) it offers a single-system account of repetition priming; and (5) the power law of forgetting can be derived from the model's assumptions in a straightforward way. PMID:12747488

  3. Robert Hooke, 1635-1703.

    PubMed

    Rowbury, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Robert Hooke was a polymath whose expertise during the 17th century spanned many different scientific areas. As a schoolboy on the Isle of Wight he was obsessed with the possibility of human flight and later became equally absorbed in cosmology and planetary motion. His skills as an artist were put to good use both as an architect following the Great Fire of London and before that in Micrographia. Although that book is best known for demonstrating the power of Hooke's microscope, Micrographia describes distant planetary bodies, the wave theory of light, the organic origin of fossils, and various other philosophical and scientific interests of its author The following thumbnail sketches of Hooke reveal him to be a man of enormous energy and imagination whose ideas were often pirated or under-rated. PMID:23094324

  4. Characterizing conical refraction optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C; McDougall, C; Rafailov, E; McGloin, D

    2014-12-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focusing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots, and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focusing on the trap stiffness, and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot, but benefit from rotational control. PMID:25490654

  5. Optical tweezers based on polarization interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.; Dominikov, Mykola M.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose optical tweezers based on a biaxial crystal. To control the movement of opaque particles, we use the shift polarization interferometer. The results of experimental study of laser tweezers are shown. We demonstrates movement of a microparticle of toner using singular-optical trap, rotate a particle due to orbital momentum, conversion of two traps when changing the plane of polarizer transmission and converging of two traps.

  6. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  7. 21 CFR 868.5420 - Ether hook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ether hook. 868.5420 Section 868.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5420 Ether hook. (a) Identification. An ether hook is a...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5420 - Ether hook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ether hook. 868.5420 Section 868.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5420 Ether hook. (a) Identification. An ether hook is a...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5420 - Ether hook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ether hook. 868.5420 Section 868.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5420 Ether hook. (a) Identification. An ether hook is a...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5420 - Ether hook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ether hook. 868.5420 Section 868.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5420 Ether hook. (a) Identification. An ether hook is a...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5420 - Ether hook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ether hook. 868.5420 Section 868.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5420 Ether hook. (a) Identification. An ether hook is a...

  12. Cytological Sampling Versus Forceps Biopsy During Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage and Analysis of Factors Predicting Success

    SciTech Connect

    Tapping, C. R.; Byass, O. R.; Cast, J. E. I.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of cytological sampling and forceps biopsy in obstructing biliary lesions and to identify factors predictive of success. Methods: Consecutive patients (n = 119) with suspected malignant inoperable obstructive jaundice treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage during 7 years were included (60 male; mean age 72.5 years). All patients underwent forceps biopsy plus cytological sampling by washing the forceps device in cytological solution. Patient history, procedural and pathological records, and clinical follow-up were reviewed. Statistical analysis included chi-square test and multivariate regression analysis. Results: Histological diagnosis after forceps biopsy was more successful than cytology: Sensitivity was 78 versus 61%, and negative predictive value was 30 versus 19%. Cytology results were never positive when the forceps biopsy was negative. The cytological sample was negative and forceps sample positive in 2 cases of cholangiocarcinoma, 16 cases of pancreatic carcinoma, and 1 case of benign disease. Diagnostic accuracy was predicted by low bilirubin (p < 0.001), aspartate transaminase (p < 0.05), and white cell count (p {<=} 0.05). Conclusions: This technique is safe and effective and is recommended for histological diagnosis during PTBD in patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures. Diagnostic yield is greater when bilirubin levels are low and there is no sepsis; histological diagnosis by way of forceps biopsy renders cytological sampling unnecessary.

  13. Hooke, Robert (1635-1703)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Scientist, born in Freshwater, Isle of Wight, England, educated at Christ Church College, Oxford where he met Boyle and was employed by him to construct his air pump, became professor of geometry at Gresham College, London. Discovered Hooke's law of elasticity. Worked on optics, simple harmonic motion and elasticity in strings. Published a monograph called Micrographia, containing beautiful pict...

  14. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. The tweezer-type epilator is an electrical device intended to remove hair. The energy provided at the tip of the tweezer used to remove hair may be radio frequency, galvanic...

  15. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. The tweezer-type epilator is an electrical device intended to remove hair. The energy provided at the tip of the tweezer used to remove hair may be radio frequency, galvanic...

  16. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. The tweezer-type epilator is an electrical device intended to remove hair. The energy provided at the tip of the tweezer used to remove hair may be radio frequency, galvanic...

  17. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. The tweezer-type epilator is an electrical device intended to remove hair. The energy provided at the tip of the tweezer used to remove hair may be radio frequency, galvanic...

  18. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. The tweezer-type epilator is an electrical device intended to remove hair. The energy provided at the tip of the tweezer used to remove hair may be radio frequency, galvanic...

  19. Magnetic Tweezers for the Measurement of Twist and Torque

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Lee, Mina; Ordu, Orkide; Kerssemakers, Jacob W. J.; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques make it possible to investigate the behavior of individual biological molecules in solution in real time. These techniques include so-called force spectroscopy approaches such as atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers, flow stretching, and magnetic tweezers. Amongst these approaches, magnetic tweezers have distinguished themselves by their ability to apply torque while maintaining a constant stretching force. Here, it is illustrated how such a “conventional” magnetic tweezers experimental configuration can, through a straightforward modification of its field configuration to minimize the magnitude of the transverse field, be adapted to measure the degree of twist in a biological molecule. The resulting configuration is termed the freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers. Additionally, it is shown how further modification of the field configuration can yield a transverse field with a magnitude intermediate between that of the “conventional” magnetic tweezers and the freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers, which makes it possible to directly measure the torque stored in a biological molecule. This configuration is termed the magnetic torque tweezers. The accompanying video explains in detail how the conversion of conventional magnetic tweezers into freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers and magnetic torque tweezers can be accomplished, and demonstrates the use of these techniques. These adaptations maintain all the strengths of conventional magnetic tweezers while greatly expanding the versatility of this powerful instrument. PMID:24894412

  20. Tomographic phase microscopy using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habaza, Mor; Gilboa, Barak; Roichman, Yael; Shaked, Natan T.

    2015-07-01

    We review our technique for tomographic phase microscopy with optical tweezers [1]. This tomographic phase microscopy approach enables full 3-D refractive-index reconstruction. Tomographic phase microscopy measures quantitatively the 3- D distribution of refractive-index in biological cells. We integrated our external interferometric module with holographic optical tweezers for obtaining quantitative phase maps of biological samples from a wide range of angles. The close-tocommon- path, off-axis interferometric system enables a full-rotation tomographic acquisition of a single cell using holographic optical tweezers for trapping and manipulating with a desired array of traps, while acquiring phase information of a single cell from all different angles and maintaining the native surrounding medium. We experimentally demonstrated two reconstruction algorithms: the filtered back-projection method and the Fourier diffraction method for 3-D refractive index imaging of yeast cells.

  1. Designing single-beam multitrapping acoustical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Glauber T; Baggio, André L

    2015-02-01

    The concept of a single-beam acoustical tweezer device which can simultaneously trap microparticles at different points is proposed and demonstrated through computational simulations. The device employs an ultrasound beam produced by a circular focused transducer operating at 1 MHz in water medium. The ultrasound beam exerts a radiation force that may tweeze suspended microparticles in the medium. Simulations show that the acoustical tweezer can simultaneously trap microparticles in the pre-focal zone along the beam axis, i.e. between the transducer surface and its geometric focus. As acoustical tweezers are fast becoming a key instrument in microparticle handling, the development of acoustic multitrapping concept may turn into a useful tool in engineering these devices. PMID:25304994

  2. The Twin Forceps: A New Instrument for SILS

    PubMed Central

    Rizzuto, Antonia; Donnici, Mario; Nudo, Paola; Sinopoli, Basilio; Sacco, Rosario; Danieli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In the last ten years, the single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is gaining more interest than the traditional laparoscopic surgery (LAP). Many studies make a comparison between the performances of the SILS and the LAP. The results show that the single incision laparoscopic surgery reduces pain, length of period of postoperative hospitalization, and loss of blood. This technique is also able to reduce the infection sites. In spite of many advantages, SILS reveals some problems: laparoscopic instruments triangulation and small workspace. The surgeon has to be more skillful to make a surgery in SILS because the surgeon has only three laparoscopic instruments and only one hole in the abdomen cavity. In this paper, a novel laparoscopic instrument to help the surgeon during a SILS operation is presented. This instrument is innovative forceps with double graspers. Different designs of this instrument are presented, with the final one which greatly simplifies both construction and operation. The initial experience in the laboratory with the innovative instrument is presented. The surgeon experienced in laparoscopic surgery and with the help of assistants performed a training program based on predetermined task performed in simulation box (laparoscopic box-trainer). PMID:26346966

  3. The Twin Forceps: A New Instrument for SILS.

    PubMed

    Rizzuto, Antonia; Donnici, Mario; Nudo, Paola; Sinopoli, Basilio; Sacco, Rosario; Danieli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In the last ten years, the single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is gaining more interest than the traditional laparoscopic surgery (LAP). Many studies make a comparison between the performances of the SILS and the LAP. The results show that the single incision laparoscopic surgery reduces pain, length of period of postoperative hospitalization, and loss of blood. This technique is also able to reduce the infection sites. In spite of many advantages, SILS reveals some problems: laparoscopic instruments triangulation and small workspace. The surgeon has to be more skillful to make a surgery in SILS because the surgeon has only three laparoscopic instruments and only one hole in the abdomen cavity. In this paper, a novel laparoscopic instrument to help the surgeon during a SILS operation is presented. This instrument is innovative forceps with double graspers. Different designs of this instrument are presented, with the final one which greatly simplifies both construction and operation. The initial experience in the laboratory with the innovative instrument is presented. The surgeon experienced in laparoscopic surgery and with the help of assistants performed a training program based on predetermined task performed in simulation box (laparoscopic box-trainer). PMID:26346966

  4. Fully dynamic multiple-beam optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Rene; Daria, Vincent; Gluckstad, Jesper

    2002-07-15

    We demonstrate a technique for obtaining fully dynamic multiple-beam optical tweezers using the generalized phase contrast (GPC) method and a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM). The GPC method facilitates the direct transformation of an input phase pattern to an array of high-intensity beams, which can function as efficient multiple optical traps. This straightforward process enables an adjustable number of traps and realtime control of the position, size, shape and intensity of each individual tweezer-beam in arbitrary arrays by encoding the appropriate phase pattern on the SLM. Experimental results show trapping and dynamic manipulation of multiple micro-spheres in a liquid solution. PMID:19436404

  5. Is forceps more useful than visualization for measurement of colon polyp size?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Park, Seun Ja; Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Tae Oh; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hyung Wook; Lee, Sang Heon; Baek, Dong Hoon; (BIGS), Busan Ulsan Gyeongnam Intestinal Study Group Society

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify whether the forceps estimation is more useful than visual estimation in the measurement of colon polyp size. METHODS: We recorded colonoscopy video clips that included scenes visualizing the polyp and scenes using open biopsy forceps in association with the polyp, which were used for an exam. A total of 40 endoscopists from the Busan Ulsan Gyeongnam Intestinal Study Group Society (BIGS) participated in this study. Participants watched 40 pairs of video clips of the scenes for visual estimation and forceps estimation, and wrote down the estimated polyp size on the exam paper. When analyzing the results of the exam, we assessed inter-observer differences, diagnostic accuracy, and error range in the measurement of the polyp size. RESULTS: The overall intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) of inter-observer agreement for forceps estimation and visual estimation were 0.804 (95%CI: 0.731-0.873, P < 0.001) and 0.743 (95%CI: 0.656-0.828, P < 0.001), respectively. The ICCs of each group for forceps estimation were higher than those for visual estimation (Beginner group, 0.761 vs 0.693; Expert group, 0.887 vs 0.840, respectively). The overall diagnostic accuracy for visual estimation was 0.639 and for forceps estimation was 0.754 (P < 0.001). In the beginner group and the expert group, the diagnostic accuracy for the forceps estimation was significantly higher than that of the visual estimation (Beginner group, 0.734 vs 0.613, P < 0.001; Expert group, 0.784 vs 0.680, P < 0.001, respectively). The overall error range for visual estimation and forceps estimation were 1.48 ± 1.18 and 1.20 ± 1.10, respectively (P < 0.001). The error ranges of each group for forceps estimation were significantly smaller than those for visual estimation (Beginner group, 1.38 ± 1.08 vs 1.68 ± 1.30, P < 0.001; Expert group, 1.12 ± 1.11 vs 1.42 ± 1.11, P < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: Application of the open biopsy forceps method when measuring colon polyp size could

  6. Rectal forceps biopsy procedure in cystic fibrosis: technical aspects and patients perspective for clinical trials feasibility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Measurements of CFTR function in rectal biopsies ex vivo have been used for diagnosis and prognosis of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) disease. Here, we aimed to evaluate this procedure regarding: i) viability of the rectal specimens obtained by biopsy forceps for ex vivo bioelectrical and biochemical laboratory analyses; and ii) overall assessment (comfort, invasiveness, pain, sedation requirement, etc.) of the rectal forceps biopsy procedure from the patients perspective to assess its feasibility as an outcome measure in clinical trials. Methods We compared three bowel preparation solutions (NaCl 0.9%, glycerol 12%, mannitol), and two biopsy forceps (standard and jumbo) in 580 rectal specimens from 132 individuals (CF and non-CF). Assessment of the overall rectal biopsy procedure (obtained by biopsy forceps) by patients was carried out by telephone surveys to 75 individuals who underwent the sigmoidoscopy procedure. Results Integrity and friability of the tissue specimens correlate with their transepithelial resistance (r = −0.438 and −0.305, respectively) and are influenced by the bowel preparation solution and biopsy forceps used, being NaCl and jumbo forceps the most compatible methods with the electrophysiological analysis. The great majority of the individuals (76%) did not report major discomfort due to the short procedure time (max 15 min) and considered it relatively painless (79%). Importantly, most (88%) accept repeating it at least for one more time and 53% for more than 4 times. Conclusions Obtaining rectal biopsies with a flexible endoscope and jumbo forceps after bowel preparation with NaCl solution is a safe procedure that can be adopted for both adults and children of any age, yielding viable specimens for CFTR bioelectrical/biochemical analyses. The procedure is well tolerated by patients, demonstrating its feasibility as an outcome measure in clinical trials. PMID:23688510

  7. A force calibration standard for magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Dulin, David; Cnossen, Jelmer; Köber, Mariana; van Oene, Maarten M.; Ordu, Orkide; Berghuis, Bojk A.; Hensgens, Toivo; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-12-01

    To study the behavior of biological macromolecules and enzymatic reactions under force, advances in single-molecule force spectroscopy have proven instrumental. Magnetic tweezers form one of the most powerful of these techniques, due to their overall simplicity, non-invasive character, potential for high throughput measurements, and large force range. Drawbacks of magnetic tweezers, however, are that accurate determination of the applied forces can be challenging for short biomolecules at high forces and very time-consuming for long tethers at low forces below ˜1 piconewton. Here, we address these drawbacks by presenting a calibration standard for magnetic tweezers consisting of measured forces for four magnet configurations. Each such configuration is calibrated for two commonly employed commercially available magnetic microspheres. We calculate forces in both time and spectral domains by analyzing bead fluctuations. The resulting calibration curves, validated through the use of different algorithms that yield close agreement in their determination of the applied forces, span a range from 100 piconewtons down to tens of femtonewtons. These generalized force calibrations will serve as a convenient resource for magnetic tweezers users and diminish variations between different experimental configurations or laboratories.

  8. Optical tweezers study life under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazal, Furqan M.; Block, Steven M.

    2011-06-01

    Optical tweezers have become one of the primary weapons in the arsenal of biophysicists, and have revolutionized the new field of single-molecule biophysics. Today's techniques allow high-resolution experiments on biological macromolecules that were mere pipe dreams only a decade ago.

  9. 29 CFR 1915.113 - Shackles and hooks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... bends or springs the hook. (3) Hooks shall be inspected periodically to see that they have not been bent by overloading. Bent or sprung hooks shall not be used. Effective Date Note: At 76 FR 33609, June...

  10. Fatigue-Resistant Metal Hook-And-Loop Fastener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawaf, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Proposed metal hook-and-loop fastener engaged and disengaged many hundreds of times without breaking. Fastener opens by mechanical action. Translation moves hooks out of loops or pushes loops away from hooks. Hooks not required to flex and, therefore, do not fail by fatigue. Lifetime much greater than that of other metal hook-and-loop fasteners, depending on flexure for disengagement such as article, "Hook-and-Loop Metal Fastener" (MSC-21586).

  11. Force sensing micro-forceps with integrated fiber Bragg grating for vitreoretinal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xingchi; Balicki, Marcin A.; Kang, Jin U.; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Handa, James T.; Taylor, Russell H.; Iordachita, Iulian I.

    2012-01-01

    Vitreoretinal surgery is a technically demanding ophthalmologic discipline. One of the main technical challenges in vitreoretinal surgery is the lack of force sensing since the surgical maneuvers fall below the human sensory threshold. Previously, a 2-degree-of-freedom (DOF) force sensing instrument with a surgical pick was developed and tested. However, a more commonly used instrument for vitreoretinal surgery is the forceps, with which a surgeon can easily grasp and delaminate the scar tissue. We have designed, fabricated and calibrated a novel 20-gauge (Ga) microsurgical instrument with a 2-DOF force sensing forceps. Three fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are integrated into the customized AlconTM forceps tip. The redundant sensor configuration provides good compensation for temperature-related drift. The calibration data show that the tool can provide a force resolution of 0.25 mN. In order to test the functionality and performance, the forceps was evaluated in inner shell membrane peeling experiments with chicken embryos as well as in in-vivo rabbit experiments. The instrument has demonstrated the capability of being applied in the clinical environment, with consistent force measurements. The force exerted in inner shell membrane peeling is from 6.07 to 34.65 mN. The development of the 2-DOF force sensing micro-forceps has shown that the fabrication process is feasible and reliable, and it can be used to develop a future 3-DOF force sensing tool.

  12. Prospective randomized comparison of progressive dilational vs forceps dilational percutaneous tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, E; Cantais, E; Goutorbe, P; Salinier, L; Palmier, B

    2006-02-01

    This trial prospectively compares two methods of percutaneous tracheostomy, both routinely used in ICU: the Ciaglia progressive dilational tracheostomy and the Griggs forceps dilational tracheostomy. One hundred patients were randomized using a single-blinded envelope method to receive progressive or forceps percutaneous tracheostomy performed at the bedside. Operative time, the occurrence of hypoxaemia or hypercapnia and complications were recorded. The progressive technique took longer than the forceps technique (median 7 (range 2-26) vs. 4 (1-16) minutes, P = 0.0005). Hypercapnia occurred in both groups but was more marked with the progressive technique (56 (16) vs. 49 (13) mmHg, P = 0.0082). Minor complications (minor bleeding, transient hypoxaemia, damage to posterior tracheal wall without emphysema) were also more frequent with the progressive technique (31 vs. 9 complications, P < 0.0001). Six major complications occurred with the progressive technique, none with the forceps technique (P = 0.0085): tension pneumothorax, posterior tracheal wall injury with subcutaneous emphysema, loss of airway with hypoxaemia, loss of stoma with impossible re-catheterization, and two conversions to another technique. In conclusion, progressive dilational tracheostomy took longer, caused more hypercapnia and more minor and major difficulties than forceps dilational tracheostomy. PMID:16494150

  13. Radiology-guided forceps biopsy and airway stenting in severe airway stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zong-Ming; Wu, Gang; Han, Xin-Wei; Ren, Ke-Wei; Zhu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of radiology-guided forceps biopsy and airway stenting in patients with severe airway stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study involved 28 patients with severe airway stenosis who underwent forceps biopsy between October 2006 and September 2011. Chest multislice computed tomography was used to determine the location and extent of stenosis. Sixteen patients had tracheal stenosis, two patients had stenosis of the tracheal carina, six patients had stenosis of the left main bronchus, and four patients had stenosis of the right main bronchus. Forceps biopsy and stenting of the stenosed area were performed under fluoroscopic guidance in digital subtraction angiography and the biopsy specimens were analyzed histopathologically. We contacted the patients via phone call and utilized a standardized questionnaire to determine their medical condition during a postoperative three-month follow-up. RESULTS The technical success rate of radiology-guided forceps biopsy was 100%. Biopsy specimens were obtained in all patients. Dyspnea was relieved immediately after stent placement. No serious complications, such as tracheal hemorrhage or perforation, mediastinal emphysema, or asphyxia, occurred. CONCLUSION Radiology-guided forceps biopsy and airway stenting can be used for the emergency treatment of severe airway stenosis. This method appears to be safe and effective, and it may be an alternative therapeutic option in patients who cannot tolerate fiberoptic bronchoscopy. PMID:24808434

  14. What is hooking up? Examining definitions of hooking up in relation to behavior and normative perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Melissa A; Atkins, David C; Blayney, Jessica A; Dent, David V; Kaysen, Debra L

    2013-01-01

    Research has demonstrated ambiguity about the definition of hooking up among college students. The current research examined whether there were multiple definitions of hooking up among college students and how different definitions might be associated with the participant's own hooking up behavior and normative perceptions of peer hooking up behavior. A random sample (N = 1,468) of undergraduates (56.4% female) completed a Web-based survey composed of measures of drinking and sexual behavior. Open-ended definitions of hooking up were content-coded and analyzed using a mixture model to explore discrete definitions of hooking up among college students. Findings indicated three clusters of student definitions of hooking up: Cluster 1 had the broadest definition, referring to sex in general, not specific sexual acts, and to making out. Cluster 2 placed an emphasis on interpersonal and social aspects. Cluster 3 defined hooking up as sex with notable references to specific sexual acts. Results further indicated that hooking up behavior and normative perceptions differentiated these three groups of definitions. Clinical implications regarding the inconsistency of student definitions of hooking up and how they may impact negative consequences associated with hooking up are discussed. PMID:23057805

  15. What is Hooking Up? Examining Definitions of Hooking Up in Relation to Behavior and Normative Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Melissa A.; Atkins, David C.; Blayney, Jessica A.; Dent, David V.; Kaysen, Debra L.

    2012-01-01

    Research has demonstrated ambiguity about the definition of hooking up among college students. The current research examined whether there were multiple hooking up definitions among college students and how different definitions might be associated with participant's own hooking up behavior and normative perceptions of peer hooking up behavior. A random sample (N = 1,468) of undergraduates (56.4% female) completed a Web-based survey that was comprised of measures of drinking and sexual behavior. Open-ended definitions of hooking up were content coded and analyzed using a mixture model to explore discrete definitions of hooking up among college students. Findings indicated three clusters of student definitions of hooking up. Cluster 1 had the broadest definition, referring to sex in general, not specific sexual acts, and to making out. Cluster 2 placed an emphasis on interpersonal and social aspects. Cluster 3 defined hooking up as sex with notable references to specific sexual acts. Results further indicated that hooking up behavior and normative perceptions differentiated these three groups of definitions. Clinical implications regarding the inconsistency of student definitions of hooking up and how they may impact negative consequences associated with hooking up are discussed. PMID:23057805

  16. Transgressions: Teaching According to "bell hooks."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Susan E.; Fitzgerald, Linda May; Haack, Joel; Clayton, Scharron

    1998-01-01

    Four faculty members from different disciplines at the University of Northern Iowa discuss whether and to what extent they were engaging in the critical pedagogy proposed by bell hooks [sic], a writer on feminism, racism, pedagogy, and black intellectual life. They also consider the ways in which hooks's work informs their understanding of…

  17. Cooling system for three hook ring segment

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Christian X.; Eng, Darryl; Lee, Ching-Pang; Patat, Harry

    2014-08-26

    A triple hook ring segment including forward, midsection and aft mounting hooks for engagement with respective hangers formed on a ring segment carrier for supporting a ring segment panel, and defining a forward high pressure chamber and an aft low pressure chamber on opposing sides of the midsection mounting hook. An isolation plate is provided on the aft side of the midsection mounting hook to form an isolation chamber between the aft low pressure chamber and the ring segment panel. High pressure air is supplied to the forward chamber and flows to the isolation chamber through crossover passages in the midsection hook. The isolation chamber provides convection cooling air to an aft portion of the ring segment panel and enables a reduction of air pressure in the aft low pressure chamber to reduce leakage flow of cooling air from the ring segment.

  18. Designing physics video hooks for science students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, M.; McCauley, V.

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers an insight into the design structure of physics video hooks that were developed by the Science Education Resource design team in the school of education (SOE) in National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI Galway). A hook, is an instructional technique used to stimulate student attention (Hunter 1994, Lemov 2010), interest (Jewett 2013) and engagement (McCrory 2011, Riendeau 2013). The physics video hooks followed a design framework that is illustrated below by breaking down the centre of gravity (COG) hook. Various design principles and elements embedded within the COG hook are presented with examples and the time they occur within the video. The intention of this article is that the design can be replicated and modified to aid teachers and designers in the development of a multitude of classroom based multimedia resources.

  19. Evaluation of microsurgical tasks with OCT-guided and/or robot-assisted ophthalmic forceps

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haoran; Shen, Jin-Hui; Shah, Rohan J.; Simaan, Nabil; Joos, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time intraocular optical coherence tomography (OCT) visualization of tissues with surgical feedback can enhance retinal surgery. An intraocular 23-gauge B-mode forward-imaging co-planar OCT-forceps, coupling connectors and algorithms were developed to form a unique ophthalmic surgical robotic system. Approach to the surface of a phantom or goat retina by a manual or robotic-controlled forceps, with and without real-time OCT guidance, was performed. Efficiency of lifting phantom membranes was examined. Placing the co-planar OCT imaging probe internal to the surgical tool reduced instrument shadowing and permitted constant tracking. Robotic assistance together with real-time OCT feedback improved depth perception accuracy. The first-generation integrated OCT-forceps was capable of peeling membrane phantoms despite smooth tips. PMID:25780736

  20. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Charles R. P.; Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Cochran, Sandy; Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-04-14

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35 MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chamber. The manipulation capabilities were demonstrated experimentally with 45 and 90-μm-diameter polystyrene spheres. These capabilities bring the dexterity of acoustic tweezers substantially closer to that of optical tweezers.

  1. Optoelectronic Tweezers for Microparticle and Cell Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei-Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 micromillimeters or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or group of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  2. Optoelectronic tweezers for microparticle and cell manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 .mu.m or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or groups of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  3. Exploring unconventional capabilities of holographic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, R. J.; Pagliusi, P.; Provenzano, C.; Cipparrone, G.

    2011-06-01

    We report an investigation of manipulation and trapping capabilities of polarization holographic tweezers. A polarization gradient connected with a modulation of the ellipticity shows an optical force related to the polarization of the light that can influence optically isotropic particles. While in the case of birefringent particles an unconventional trapping in circularly polarized fringes is observed. A liquid crystal emulsion has been adopted to investigate the capabilities of the holographic tweezers. The unusual trapping observed for rotating bipolar nematic droplets has suggested the involvement of the lift hydrodynamic force responsible of the Magnus effect, originating from the peculiar optical force field. We show that the Magnus force which is ignored in the common approach can contribute to unconventional optohydrodynamic trapping and manipulation.

  4. The Smallest Tweezers in the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewalle, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    A pair of fine tweezers and a steady hand may well be enough to pick up a grain of sand, but what would you use to hold something hundreds of times smaller still, the size of only one micron? The answer is to use a device that is not mechanical in nature but that relies instead on the tiny forces that light exerts on small particles: "optical…

  5. Tweezers for Chimeras in Small Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelchenko, Iryna; Omel'chenko, Oleh E.; Zakharova, Anna; Wolfrum, Matthias; Schöll, Eckehard

    2016-03-01

    We propose a control scheme which can stabilize and fix the position of chimera states in small networks. Chimeras consist of coexisting domains of spatially coherent and incoherent dynamics in systems of nonlocally coupled identical oscillators. Chimera states are generally difficult to observe in small networks due to their short lifetime and erratic drifting of the spatial position of the incoherent domain. The control scheme, like a tweezer, might be useful in experiments, where usually only small networks can be realized.

  6. The Smallest Tweezers in the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewalle, Alexandre

    2008-11-01

    A pair of fine tweezers and a steady hand may well be enough to pick up a grain of sand, but what would you use to hold something hundreds of times smaller still, the size of only one micron? The answer is to use a device that is not mechanical in nature but that relies instead on the tiny forces that light exerts on small particles: "optical tweezers." In recent years, this technique has become central to nanotechnology for the manipulation of small particles, even individual molecules. It is also an ideal illustration of how classroom physics is applied to cutting-edge research, combining concepts such as the vector nature of momentum and force, Newton's laws, optics, the wave-particle duality of light, and thermodynamics. The physics behind optical tweezers has many layers of complexity, but it can be reduced to a basic principle: the conservation of momentum. This paper guides the reader through a much simplified demonstration of this "tweezing effect" using a question-answer approach, leaving the reader with the choice to treat each step as a problem exercise.

  7. Nanoprobes with optical tweezers for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Mark; McIntyre, David; Ostroverkhova, Oksana; Bychkova, Valeriya; Shvarev, Alexey

    2010-03-01

    We explore the use of sub-micron sized particles in optical tweezer traps as nanoprobes in microfluidic devices and biological cells. For applications that require high spatial resolution, the ability to suppress the particle's natural Brownian motion down to the nanometer or sub-nanometer scales is essential. However, the optical tweezer force scales with the volume of the particle making it difficult to confine and manipulate nanometer sized particles with high precision. To overcome this difficulty, we explore the possibility of using optically resonant particles as nanoprobes. The resonant particles should experience an increase in the optical tweezer force at wavelengths on the red side of the absorption resonance, resulting in a tighter confinement. We explore this phenomenon by measuring the trapping force acting on resonant particles (dye-filled polymeric and metallic particles) as a function of trapping laser wavelength and discuss the feasibility of using them as a high spatial resolution probe. In addition, we use similar particles as optically trapped nanoprobes to monitor temporal and spatial differences in an inhomogeneous environment; for example, we have developed pH-sensitive fluorescent nanoprobes for biological applications.

  8. Collisions of Biological Objects Using Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmerson, K.; Davies, B. J.; Kishore, R.; Phillips, W. D.; Mammen, M.; Choi, S.-K.; Whitesides, G. M.

    1997-04-01

    We have developed a new functional assay in which two mesoscale particles are caused to collide using two independently controlled optical tweezers. This assay involved measurement of the probability of adhesion on collision. Since the components of the solution, the orientation, and the relative collision velocity are all under the user's control, this assay can mimic closely a range of types of collisions involving biological objects. We illustrate the utility of our assay by evaluating the probability of adhesion of a single erythrocyte to a virus-coated microsphere, in the presence of a sialic acid-bearing inhibitor(M. Mammen, et al., Chemistry and Biology 3: 757-63 (1996).). This probability as a function of the concentration of the inhibitor is a measure of the effectiveness of the inhibitor; most of the inhibition constants obtained using optical tweezers agree well with those obtained from other techniques. Inhibition constants for the most effective inhibitors could not be measured using other types of assays; however, they were readily obtained using our optical tweezers based assay. The best inhibitor is the most potent inhibitor of attachment of influenza virus to erythrocytes ever measured.

  9. Digital holographic microscopy combined with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Yu, Lingfeng; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-02-01

    While optical tweezers have been widely used for the manipulation and organization of microscopic objects in three dimensions, observing the manipulated objects along axial direction has been quite challenging. In order to visualize organization and orientation of objects along axial direction, we report development of a Digital holographic microscopy combined with optical tweezers. Digital holography is achieved by use of a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer with digital recording of interference pattern of the reference and sample laser beams by use of a single CCD camera. In this method, quantitative phase information is retrieved dynamically with high temporal resolution, only limited by frame rate of the CCD. Digital focusing, phase-unwrapping as well as online analysis and display of the quantitative phase images was performed on a software developed on LabView platform. Since phase changes observed in DHOT is very sensitive to optical thickness of trapped volume, estimation of number of particles trapped in the axial direction as well as orientation of non-spherical objects could be achieved with high precision. Since in diseases such as malaria and diabetics, change in refractive index of red blood cells occurs, this system can be employed to map such disease-specific changes in biological samples upon immobilization with optical tweezers.

  10. Probing the Casimir force with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ether, D. S., Jr.; Pires, L. B.; Umrath, S.; Martinez, D.; Ayala, Y.; Pontes, B.; Araújo, G. R. de S.; Frases, S.; Ingold, G.-L.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Viana, N. B.; Nussenzveig, H. M.; Neto, P. A. Maia

    2015-11-01

    We propose to use optical tweezers to probe the Casimir interaction between microspheres inside a liquid medium for geometric aspect ratios far beyond the validity of the widely employed proximity force approximation. This setup has the potential for revealing unprecedented features associated to the non-trivial role of the spherical curvatures. For a proof of concept, we measure femtonewton double-layer forces between polystyrene microspheres at distances above 400 nm by employing very soft optical tweezers, with stiffness of the order of fractions of a fN/nm. As a future application, we propose to tune the Casimir interaction between a metallic and a polystyrene microsphere in saline solution from attraction to repulsion by varying the salt concentration. With those materials, the screened Casimir interaction may have a larger magnitude than the unscreened one. This line of investigation has the potential for bringing together different fields including classical and quantum optics, statistical physics and colloid science, while paving the way for novel quantitative applications of optical tweezers in cell and molecular biology.

  11. Writers Draw Visual Hooks: Children's Inquiry into Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, S. Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Drawing and writing in response to picturebook read-alouds, elementary children construct varying "visual hooks" in their sketches as effective visual devices for extending ideas for writing: the bubble hook, the zoom hook, and the group hook. This article reports on a 12-week qualitative study in which children in second grade develop as writers…

  12. Homage to Robert Hooke (1635-1703): new insights from the recently discovered Hooke Folio.

    PubMed

    Gest, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms were first observed by Robert Hooke and Antoni van Leeuwenhoek between 1665 and 1678. In 1665, Hooke published Micrographia, which depicted the details of 60 objects as seen in the microscope. One chapter was devoted to the microfungus Mucor, the first microbe observed by the human eye. Leeuwenhoek, despite having no scientific training, became the first to observe protozoa, red blood cells, the sperm cells of animals, and bacteria, which he described in numerous letters to the Royal Society of London. In 1677, Hooke became Secretary of the Royal Society and, in the same year, confirmed some of Leeuwenhoek's discoveries. The discovery in 2006 of more than 650 pages of Hooke's missing records (the "Hooke Folio") allows us to verify the proceedings of Royal Society meetings and promises to be an important new source of Hooke's views on the renaissance of science in the 17th century. PMID:19684374

  13. Kinematics of Hooke universal joint robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, William S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The singularity problem associated with wrist mechanisms commonly found on industrial manipulators can be alleviated by redesigning the wrist so that it functions as a three-axis gimbal system. This paper discussess the kinematics of gimbal robot wrists made of one and two Hooke universal joints. Derivations of the resolved rate motion control equations for the single and double Hooke universal joint wrists are presented using the three-axis gimbal system as a theoretical wrist model.

  14. Active laser tweezers microrheometry of microbial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, N.; Slapar, V.; Boric, M.; Stopar, D.; Babič, D.; Poberaj, I.

    2010-08-01

    Microbial biofilms are present on biotic and abiotic surfaces and have a significant impact on many fields in industry, health care and technology. Thus, a better understanding of processes that lead to development of biofilms and their chemical and mechanical properties is needed. In the following paper we report the results of active laser tweezers microrheology study of optically inhomogeneous extracellular matrix secreted by Visbrio sp. bacteria. One particle and two particle active microrheology were used in experiments. Both methods exhibited high enough sensitivity to detect viscosity changes at early stages of bacterial growth. We also showed that both methods can be used in mature samples where optical inhomogeneity becomes significant.

  15. Reusable acoustic tweezers for disposable devices

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Xie, Yuliang; Li, Sixing; Lata, James; Ren, Liqiang; Mao, Zhangming; Ren, Baiyang; Wu, Mengxi; Ozcelik, Adem

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate acoustic tweezers used for disposable devices. Rather than forming an acoustic resonance, we locally transmitted standing surface acoustic waves into a removable, independent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-glass hybridized microfluidic superstrate device for micromanipulation. By configuring and regulating the displacement nodes on a piezoelectric substrate, cells and particles were effectively patterned and transported into said superstrate, accordingly. With the label-free and contactless nature of acoustic waves, the presented technology could offer a simple, accurate, low-cost, biocompatible, and disposable method for applications in the fields of point-of-care diagnostics and fundamental biomedical studies. PMID:26507411

  16. Measurement of the Physical Properties during Laparoscopic Surgery Performed on Pigs by Using Forceps with Pressure Sensors.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Osaka, Kimito; Nagasaka, Manabu; Ogata, Masato; Yamada, Takahiro; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Here we developed a unique training system, a patient specific virtual reality simulator, for laparoscopic renal surgery. To develop the simulator, it was important to first identify the physical properties of the organ. Methods. We recorded the force measured during laparoscopic surgery performed on pigs by using forceps with pressure sensors. Several sensors, including strain gauges, accelerometers, and a potentiometer, are attached to the forceps. Results. Throughout the experiment, we measured the reaction force in response to the forceps movement in real time. Conclusions. The experiment showed the possibility of digitizing these physical properties in humans as well. PMID:25784932

  17. The Topic Is Sandy Hook: A Program for Gifted and Talented Students at Sandy Hook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, David

    "The Topic Is Sandy Hook" is an experiential 10-week program designed to provide special opportunities and educational experiences for 6th to 10th grade gifted and talented students. Sandy Hook, a natural resource in Monmouth County, New Jersey, is unique in its physical and historical features and provides an exceptionally rich environment in…

  18. Hooke, orbital motion, and Newton's Principia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    1994-04-01

    A detailed analysis is given of a 1685 graphical construction by Robert Hooke for the polygonal path of a body moving in a periodically pulsed radial field of force. In this example the force varies linearly with the distance from the center. Hooke's method is based directly on his original idea from the mid-1660s that the orbital motion of a planet is determined by compounding its tangential velocity with a radial velocity impressed by the gravitational attraction of the sun at the center. This hypothesis corresponds to the second law of motion, as formulated two decades later by Newton, and its geometrical implementation constitutes the cornerstone of Newton's Principia. Hooke's diagram represents the first known accurate graphical evaluation of an orbit in a central field of force, and it gives evidence that he demonstrated that his resulting discrete orbit is an approximate ellipse centered at the origin of the field of force. A comparable calculation to obtain orbits for an inverse square force, which Hooke had conjectured to be the gravitational force, has not been found among his unpublished papers. Such a calculation is carried out here numerically with the Newton-Hooke geometrical construction. It is shown that for orbits of comparable or larger eccentricity than Hooke's example, a graphical approach runs into convergence difficulties due to the singularity of the gravitational force at the origin. This may help resolve the long-standing mystery why Hooke never published his controversial claim that he had demonstrated that an attractive force, which is ``...in a duplicate proportion to the Distance from the Center Reciprocall...'' implies elliptic orbits.

  19. A compact holographic optical tweezers instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, G. M.; Bowman, R. W.; Linnenberger, A.; Dienerowitz, M.; Phillips, D. B.; Carberry, D. M.; Miles, M. J.; Padgett, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    Holographic optical tweezers have found many applications including the construction of complex micron-scale 3D structures and the control of tools and probes for position, force, and viscosity measurement. We have developed a compact, stable, holographic optical tweezers instrument which can be easily transported and is compatible with a wide range of microscopy techniques, making it a valuable tool for collaborative research. The instrument measures approximately 30×30×35 cm and is designed around a custom inverted microscope, incorporating a fibre laser operating at 1070 nm. We designed the control software to be easily accessible for the non-specialist, and have further improved its ease of use with a multi-touch iPad interface. A high-speed camera allows multiple trapped objects to be tracked simultaneously. We demonstrate that the compact instrument is stable to 0.5 nm for a 10 s measurement time by plotting the Allan variance of the measured position of a trapped 2 μm silica bead. We also present a range of objects that have been successfully manipulated.

  20. Optical tweezers calibration with Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkcan, Silvan; Richly, Maximilian U.; Le Gall, Antoine; Fiszman, Nicolas; Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Westbrook, Nathalie; Perronet, Karen; Alexandrou, Antigoni

    2014-09-01

    We present a new method for calibrating an optical-tweezer setup that is based on Bayesian inference1. This method employs an algorithm previously used to analyze the confined trajectories of receptors within lipid rafts2,3. The main advantages of this method are that it does not require input parameters and is insensitive to systematic errors like the drift of the setup. Additionally, it exploits a much larger amount of the information stored in the recorded bead trajectory than standard calibration approaches. The additional information can be used to detect deviations from the perfect harmonic potential or detect environmental influences on the bead. The algorithm infers the diffusion coefficient and the potential felt by a trapped bead, and only requires the bead trajectory as input. We demonstrate that this method outperforms the equipartition method and the power-spectrum method in input information required (bead radius and trajectory length) and in output accuracy. Furthermore, by inferring a higher order potential our method can reveal deviations from the assumed second-order potential. More generally, this method can also be used for magnetic-tweezer calibration.

  1. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  2. Quantitative Modeling and Optimization of Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Hao, Xiaomin; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic tweezers are a powerful tool to manipulate single DNA or RNA molecules and to study nucleic acid-protein interactions in real time. Here, we have modeled the magnetic fields of permanent magnets in magnetic tweezers and computed the forces exerted on superparamagnetic beads from first principles. For simple, symmetric geometries the magnetic fields can be calculated semianalytically using the Biot-Savart law. For complicated geometries and in the presence of an iron yoke, we employ a finite-element three-dimensional PDE solver to numerically solve the magnetostatic problem. The theoretical predictions are in quantitative agreement with direct Hall-probe measurements of the magnetic field and with measurements of the force exerted on DNA-tethered beads. Using these predictive theories, we systematically explore the effects of magnet alignment, magnet spacing, magnet size, and of adding an iron yoke to the magnets on the forces that can be exerted on tethered particles. We find that the optimal configuration for maximal stretching forces is a vertically aligned pair of magnets, with a minimal gap between the magnets and minimal flow cell thickness. Following these principles, we present a configuration that allows one to apply ≥40 pN stretching forces on ≈1-μm tethered beads. PMID:19527664

  3. Forceps insertion supporting system in laparoscopic surgery: image projection onto the abdominal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koishi, Takeshi; Ushiki, Suguru; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Hayashi, Hideki; Tsumura, Norimichi; Miyake, Yoichi

    2007-03-01

    Laparoscopic surgery without ventrotomy has been widely used in recent years for quick recovery and out of pain of patients. However, surgeons are required to accumulate various experiences for this surgery since the difficulty in perceiving the positions of tissues by the limited field of view (FOV) of laparoscopes and the operational difficulties of forceps. In this paper, we propose a new laparoscopic surgery supporting system using projected images. The image of the FOV of a laparoscope is projected directly onto the abdominal surface of a patient. The shape distortion of the projected images produced by the unevenness of the abdominal surface is corrected by grating projection. The distortion due to the viewing angle of the surgeon is also corrected by using an electromagnetic tracking sensor. It is shown that the proposed system is significant to laparoscopic surgery, particularly for forceps insertion, by experiments using a model of the abdomen made with a dry box.

  4. Touching the microworld with force-feedback optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Pacoret, Cécile; Bowman, Richard; Gibson, Graham; Haliyo, Sinan; Carberry, David; Bergander, Arvid; Régnier, Stéphane; Padgett, Miles

    2009-06-01

    Optical tweezers are a powerful tool for micromanipulation and measurement of picoNewton sized forces. However, conventional interfaces present difficulties as the user cannot feel the forces involved. We present an interface to optical tweezers, based around a low-cost commercial force feedback device. The different dynamics of the micro-world make intuitive force feedback a challenge. We propose a coupling method using an existing optical tweezers system and discuss stability and transparency. Our system allows the user to perceive real Brownian motion and viscosity, as well as forces exerted during manipulation of objects by a trapped bead. PMID:19506679

  5. Urethral foreign body: removal of degraded magnetic spheres using Hartmann ear forceps.

    PubMed

    Chung, Paul H; Traylor, Janelle; Baker, Linda A

    2014-11-01

    Lower urinary tract foreign bodies have been reported in both children and adults. It is helpful for urologists to review foreign body case reports to become familiar with alternative approaches for removal that may prove helpful during challenging cases. To our knowledge, we describe for the first time a degraded rare-earth magnet within the body and use of Hartmann ear forceps to remove a foreign body from the urethra under cystoscopic guidance through a limited urethrotomy. PMID:25443938

  6. Removal of a large foreign body in the rectosigmoid colon by colonoscopy using gastrolith forceps

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiao-Dong; Wu, Guang-Yao; Li, Song-Hu; Wen, Zong-Quan; Zhang, Fu; Yu, Shao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Rectal foreign bodies are man-made injury that occurs occasionally. The management depends on its depth and the consequence it caused. We here report a case of rectal foreign body (a glass bottle measuring about 38 mm × 75 mm) which was located 13-15 cm from the anus. The patient had no sign of perforation, and we managed to remove it using endoscopy with gastrolith forceps. PMID:27182529

  7. Forceps, Actual Use, and Potential Cesarean Section Prevention: Study in a Selected Mexican Population

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Yáñez, Rodrigo; Bayona-Soriano, Paulette; Hernández-Jimenez, Arturo; Contreras-Rendón, Alejandra; Chabat-Manzanera, Paulina; Nevarez-Bernal, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Assessment of the frequency of complications observed with various forceps and operative vaginal delivery (OVD) techniques performed at the ABC Medical Center (Mexico City) to evaluate their safety, bearing in mind the importance of decreasing our country's high cesarean section incidence. Methods. We reviewed 5,375 deliveries performed between the years 2007 and 2012, only 146 were delivered by OVD.  Results. Only 1.0% of the cases had a serious, life-threatening situation (uterine rupture). The Simpson forceps was the most favored instrument (46%) due to its simplicity of use, effectiveness, and familiarity. Prophylactic use was the most common indication (30.8%) and significant complications observed were vaginal lacerations (p = 0.016), relative risk (RR) of 3.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.15–10.04), and fourth degree perineal tear (p = 0.016), RR of 3.4 (95% CI: 1.15–10.04). Conclusions. Forceps use and other OVD techniques are a safe alternative to be considered, diminishing C-section incidence and its complications. PMID:26380111

  8. Use of a novel through-the-needle biopsy forceps in endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Shakhatreh, Mohammad H.; Naini, Sohrab Rahimi; Brijbassie, Alan A.; Grider, Douglas J.; Shen, Perry; Yeaton, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Pancreatic cysts are becoming more common. Their differential diagnosis includes benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions. Distinguishing the type of cyst helps in the management decision making. We report on a novel tissue acquisition device for pancreatic cysts. Methods: Data on two patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) – guided fine-needle aspiration with a new micro forceps device are presented. Results: Two patients had large pancreatic cystic lesions in the pancreatic head. Linear EUS was performed, and tissue samples were obtained with the Moray micro forceps through a 19-gauge needle. In both patients, mucinous columnar epithelium lined the cystic walls. One patient underwent surgical resection, and the other elected surveillance. Examination of the surgical specimen from the first patient confirmed the cyst was a side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), gastric type. Conclusions: The Moray micro forceps is a new tool that can be used to help determine the nature of pancreatic cysts and aid in their risk stratification and management. PMID:27092324

  9. Drawings of fossils by Robert Hooke and Richard Waller

    PubMed Central

    Kusukawa, Sachiko

    2013-01-01

    The drawings of fossils by Robert Hooke and Richard Waller that were the basis of the engravings in Hooke's Posthumous works (1705) are published here for the first time. The drawings show that both Hooke and Waller were proficient draftsmen with a keen eye for the details of petrified objects. These drawings provided Hooke with a polemic edge in making the case for the organic origins of ‘figured stones’.

  10. Investigating the potential applications of a Raman tweezer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, John Casey

    This thesis describes the construction of an Optical Tweezer apparatus to be used in conjunction with a confocal Raman spectrometer. The tweezer utilizes an infrared (e=1064 nm) laser directed into an inverted microscope with NA=1.4 oil immersion 100x objective lens that strongly focuses the laser light into a sample to function as a single-beam gradient force trap. The long term goal of this research program is to develop a single molecule Raman tweezers apparatus that allows one to control the position of a Raman nanoplasmonic amplifier. This thesis describes the construction of the Raman tweezer apparatus along with several Raman spectra obtained from optically trapped samples of polystyrene fluorescent orange, amine-modified latex beads. In addition, I explored the Raman spectra of bulk cytochrome c mixed with or injected onto Ag aggregates for SERs enhancement.

  11. A Pedagogy of Sight: Microscopic Vision in Robert Hooke's "Micrographia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Jordynn

    2009-01-01

    Robert Hooke's "Micrographia" (1665) holds an important place in the history of scientific visual rhetoric. Hooke's accomplishment lies not only in a stunning array of engravings, but also in a "pedagogy of sight"--a rhetorical framework that instructs readers how to view images in accordance with an ideological or epistemic program. Hooke not…

  12. Education as a Practice of Freedom: Reflections on bell hooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Specia, Akello; Osman, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper critically analyses the conceptions of bell hooks on education. It focuses on the relevance of hook's ideas to the classroom. It is a theoretical paper based on secondary data that seeks to contribute to the growing body of knowledge in education. The paper is a reflection of hook's reaction to education as a practice of freedom, the…

  13. Hooking Up and Identity Development of Female College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kooyman, Leslie; Pierce, Gloria; Zavadil, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Hooking up generally involves casual sex with noncommittal partners. Hooking up is prevalent on college campuses today and can negatively affect the identity development of female students. The authors examined this phenomenon with a feminist developmental perspective, evaluating hooking up in the context of sexual risk taking with physical and…

  14. Multiplexed spectroscopy with holographic optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibula, Matthew A.; McIntyre, David H.

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a multiplexed holographic optical tweezers system with an imaging spectrometer to manipulate multiple optically trapped nanosensors and detect multiple fluorescence spectra. The system uses a spatial light modulator (SLM) to control the positions of infrared optical traps in the sample so that multiple nanosensors can be positioned into regions of interest. Spectra of multiple nanosensors are detected simultaneously with the application of an imaging spectrometer. Nanosensors are capable of detecting changes in their environment such as pH, ion concentration, temperature, and voltage by monitoring changes in the nanosensors' emitted fluorescence spectra. We use streptavidin labeled quantum dots bound to the surface of biotin labeled polystyrene microspheres to measure temperature changes by observing a corresponding shift in the wavelength of the spectral peak. The fluorescence is excited at 532 nm with a wide field source.

  15. Optical tweezers for studying taxis in parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Fontes, A.; Stahl, C. V.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Ayres, D. C.; Almeida, D. B.; Farias, P. M. A.; Santos, B. S.; Santos-Mallet, J.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Giorgio, S.; Feder, D.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-04-01

    In this work we present a methodology to measure force strengths and directions of living parasites with an optical tweezers setup. These measurements were used to study the parasites chemotaxis in real time. We observed behavior and measured the force of: (i) Leishmania amazonensis in the presence of two glucose gradients; (ii) Trypanosoma cruzi in the vicinity of the digestive system walls, and (iii) Trypanosoma rangeli in the vicinity of salivary glands as a function of distance. Our results clearly show a chemotactic behavior in every case. This methodology can be used to study any type of taxis, such as chemotaxis, osmotaxis, thermotaxis, phototaxis, of any kind of living microorganisms. These studies can help us to understand the microorganism sensory systems and their response function to these gradients.

  16. Role of the Dc domain of the bacterial hook protein FlgE in hook assembly and function

    PubMed Central

    Moriya, Nao; Minamino, Tohru; Ferris, Hedda U.; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Ashihara, Masamichi; Kato, Takayuki; Namba, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar hook acts as a universal joint to smoothly transmit torque produced by the motor to the filament. The hook protein FlgE assembles into a 55 nm tubular structure with the help of the hook cap (FlgD). FlgE consists of four domains, D0, Dc, D1 and D2, arranged from the inner to the outer part of the tubular structure of the hook. The Dc domain contributes to the structural stability of the hook, but it is unclear how this Dc domain is responsible for the universal joint mechanism. Here, we carried out a deletion analysis of the FlgE Dc domain. FlgEΔ4/5 with deletion of residues 30 to 49 was not secreted into the culture media. FlgEΔ5 and FlgEΔ6 with deletions of residues 40 to 49 and 50 to 59, respectively, still formed hooks, allowing the export apparatus to export the hook-filament junction proteins FlgK and FlgL and flagellin FliC. However, these deletions inhibited the replacement of the FlgD hook cap by FlgK at the hook tip, thereby abolishing filament formation. Deletion of residues 50 to 59 significantly affected hook morphology. These results suggest that the Dc domain is responsible not only for hook assembly but also for FlgE export, the interaction with FlgK, and the polymorphic supercoiling mechanism of the hook.

  17. Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, De

    Raman scattering is an inelastic collision between the vibrating molecules inside the sample and the incident photons. During this process, energy exchange takes place between the photon and the scattering molecule. By measuring the energy change of the photon, the molecular vibration mode can be probed. The vibrational spectrum contains valuable information about the disposition of atomic nuclei and chemical bonds within a molecule, the chemical compositions and the interactions between the molecule and its surroundings. In this dissertation, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) technique is applied for the analysis of biological cells and human cells at single cell level. In LTRS, an individual cell is trapped in aqueous medium with laser tweezers, and Raman scattering spectra from the trapped cell are recorded in real-time. The Raman spectra of these cells can be used to reveal the dynamical processes of cell growth, cell response to environment changes, and can be used as the finger print for the identification of a bacterial cell species. Several biophysical experiments were carried out using LTRS: (1) the dynamic germination process of individual spores of Bacillus thuringiensis was detected via Ca-DPA, a spore-specific biomarker molecule; (2) inactivation and killing of Bacillus subtilis spores by microwave irradiation and wet heat were studied at single cell level; (3) the heat shock activation process of single B. subtilis spores were analyzed, in which the reversible transition from glass-like state at low temperature to liquid-like state at high temperature in spore was revealed at the molecular level; (4) the kinetic processes of bacterial cell lysis of E. coli by lysozyme and by temperature induction of lambda phage were detected real-time; (5) the fixation and rehydration of human platelets were quantitatively evaluated and characterized with Raman spectroscopy method, which provided a rapid way to quantify the quality of freeze-dried therapeutic

  18. Action at hooked or twisted-hooked DNA juxtapositions rationalizes unlinking preference of type-2 topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhirong; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Chan, Hue Sun

    2010-07-30

    The mathematical basis of the hypothesis that type-2 topoisomerases recognize and act at specific DNA juxtapositions has been investigated by coarse-grained lattice polymer models, showing that selective segment passages at hooked juxtapositions can result in dramatic reductions in catenane and knot populations. The lattice modeling approach is here extended to account for the narrowing of variance of linking number (Lk) of DNA circles by type-2 topoisomerases. In general, the steady-state variance of Lk resulting from selective segment passages at a specific juxtaposition geometry j is inversely proportional to the average linking number, Lk(j), of circles with the given juxtaposition. Based on this formulation, we demonstrate that selective segment passages at hooked juxtapositions reduce the variance of Lk. The dependence of this effect on model DNA circle size is remarkably similar to that observed experimentally for type-2 topoisomerases, which appear to be less capable in narrowing Lk variance for small DNA circles than for larger DNA circles. This behavior is rationalized by a substantial cancellation of writhe in small circles with hook-like juxtapositions. During our simulations, we uncovered a twisted variation of the hooked juxtaposition that has an even more dramatic effect on Lk variance narrowing than the hooked juxtaposition. For an extended set of juxtapositions, we detected a significant correlation between the Lk narrowing potential and the logarithmic decatenating and unknotting potentials for a given juxtaposition, a trend reminiscent of scaling relations observed with experimental measurements on type-2 topoisomerases from a variety of organisms. The consistent agreement between theory and experiment argues for type-2 topoisomerase action at hooked or twisted-hooked DNA juxtapositions. PMID:20460130

  19. Active depth-guiding handheld micro-forceps for membranectomy based on CP-SSOCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Gyeong Woo; Lee, Phillip; Gonenc, Berk; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Kang, Jin U.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a handheld motion-compensated micro-forceps system using common-path swept source optical coherence tomography with highly accurate depth-targeting and depth-locking for Epiretinal Membrane Peeling. Two motors and a touch sensor were used to separate the two independent motions: motion compensation and tool-tip manipulation. A smart motion monitoring and guiding algorithm was devised for precise and intuitive freehand control. Ex-vivo bovine eye experiments were performed to evaluate accuracy in a bovine retina retinal membrane peeling model. The evaluation demonstrates system capabilities of 40 um accuracy when peeling the epithelial layer of bovine retina.

  20. High-Resolution Optical Tweezers for Single-Molecule Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinming; Ma, Lu; Zhang, Yongli

    2013-01-01

    Forces hold everything together and determine its structure and dynamics. In particular, tiny forces of 1-100 piconewtons govern the structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules. These forces enable folding, assembly, conformational fluctuations, or directional movements of biomacromolecules over sub-nanometer to micron distances. Optical tweezers have become a revolutionary tool to probe the forces, structures, and dynamics associated with biomacromolecules at a single-molecule level with unprecedented resolution. In this review, we introduce the basic principles of optical tweezers and their latest applications in studies of protein folding and molecular motors. We describe the folding dynamics of two strong coiled coil proteins, the GCN4-derived protein pIL and the SNARE complex. Both complexes show multiple folding intermediates and pathways. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes translocate DNA to remodel chromatin structures. The detailed DNA translocation properties of such molecular motors have recently been characterized by optical tweezers, which are reviewed here. Finally, several future developments and applications of optical tweezers are discussed. These past and future applications demonstrate the unique advantages of high-resolution optical tweezers in quantitatively characterizing complex multi-scale dynamics of biomacromolecules. PMID:24058311

  1. Constructing Dual Beam Optical Tweezers for Undergraduate Biophysics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudelin, Brian; West-Coates, Devon; Del'Etoile, Jon; Grotzke, Eric; Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Optical tweezing, or trapping, is a modern physics technique which allows us to use the radiation pressure from laser beams to trap micron sized particles. Optical tweezers are commonly used in graduate level biophysics research but seldom used at the undergraduate level. Our goal is to construct a dual beam optical tweezers for future undergraduate biophysical research. Dual beam optical tweezers use two counter propagating laser beams to provide a stronger trap. In this study we discuss how the assembly of the dual beam optical tweezers is done through three main phases. The first phase was to construct a custom compressed air system to isolate the optical table from the vibrations from its surroundings so that we can measure pico-newton scale forces that are observed in biological systems. In addition, the biomaterial flow system was designed with a flow cell to trap biomolecules by combining several undergraduate semester projects. During the second phase we set up the optics to image and display the inside of the flow cell. Currently we are in the process of aligning the laser to create an effective trap and developing the software to control the data collection. This optical tweezers set up will enable us to study potential cancer drug interactions with DNA at the single molecule level and will be a powerful tool in promoting interdisciplinary research at the undergraduate level.

  2. How safe is gamete micromanipulation by laser tweezers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Tadir, Yona; Berns, Michael W.

    1998-04-01

    Laser tweezers, used as novel sterile micromanipulation tools of living cells, are employed in laser-assisted in vitro fertilization (IVF). For example, controlled spermatozoa transport with 1064 nm tweezers to human egg cells has been performed in European clinics in cases of male infertility. The interaction of approximately 100 mW near infrared (NIR) trapping beams at MW/cm2 intensity with human gametes results in low mean less than 2 K temperature increases and less than 100 pN trapping forces. Therefore, photothermal or photomechanical induced destructive effects appear unlikely. However, the high photon flux densities may induce simultaneous absorption of two NIR photons resulting in nonlinear interactions. These nonlinear interactions imply non-resonant two-photon excitation of endogenous cellular chromophores. In the case of less than 800 nm tweezers, UV- like damage effects may occur. The destructive effect is amplified when multimode cw lasers are used as tweezer sources due to longitudinal mode-beating effects and partial mode- locking. Spermatozoa damage within seconds using 760 nm traps due to formation of unstable ps pulses in a cw Ti:Sa ring laser is demonstrated. We recommend the use of greater than or equal to 800 nm traps for optical gamete micromanipulation. To our opinion, further basic studies on the influence of nonlinear effects of laser tweezers on human gamete are necessary.

  3. Hook Region Represented in a Cochlear Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Charles R.; Kim, Namkeun; Puria, Sunil

    2009-02-01

    The present interest is in discontinuities. Particularly the geometry of the hook region, with the flexible round window nearly parallel with the basilar membrane, is not represented by a standard box model, in which both stapes and round window are placed at the end. A better model represents the round window by a soft membrane in the wall of scala tympani, with the end closed. This complicates the analysis considerably. Features are that the significant compression wave, i.e., the fast wave, is of negligible magnitude in this region, and that significant evanescent waves occur because of the discontinuities at the beginning and end of the simulated round window. The effect of this on both high frequency, with maximum basilar membrane response in the hook region, and lower frequencies are determined.

  4. Low frequency dynamical stabilisation in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Christopher J.; Smart, Thomas J.; Jones, Philip H.; Cubero, David

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that a rigid pendulum with minimal friction will occupy a stable equilibrium position vertically upwards when its suspension point is oscillated at high frequency. The phenomenon of the inverted pendulum was explained by Kapitza by invoking a separation of timescales between the high frequency modulation and the much lower frequency pendulum motion, resulting in an effective potential with a minimum in the inverted position. We present here a study of a microscopic optical analogue of Kapitza's pendulum that operates in different regimes of both friction and driving frequency. The pendulum is realized using a microscopic particle held in a scanning optical tweezers and subject to a viscous drag force. The motion of the optical pendulum is recorded and analyzed by digital video microscopy and particle tracking to extract the trajectory and stable orientation of the particle. In these experiments we enter the regime of low driving frequency, where the period of driving is comparable to the characteristic relaxation time of the radial motion of the pendulum with finite stiffness. In this regime we find stabilization of the pendulum at angles other than the vertical (downwards) is possible for modulation amplitudes exceeding a threshold value where, unlike the truly high frequency case studied previously, both the threshold amplitude and equilibrium position are found to be functions of friction. Experimental results are complemented by an analytical theory for induced stability in the low frequency driving regime with friction.

  5. Probing the Casimir force with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia Neto, Paulo; Ether, Diney; Pires, Luis; Ayala, Yareni; Rosa, Felipe; Umrath, Stefan; Ingold, Gert; Viana, Nathan; Nussenzveig, Moyses

    2015-03-01

    Optical tweezers (OT) are single-beam laser traps for neutral particles, usually applied to dielectric microspheres immersed in a fluid. The stiffness is proportional to the trapping beam power, and hence can be tuned to very small values, allowing one to measure femtonewton forces, once the device is carefully calibrated. We employ OT to measure the Casimir (or retarded van der Waals) force between polystyrene beads in ethanol, for distances between 50 nanometers and 1 micrometer. The spherical beads have diameters ranging from 3 to 7 micrometers. We find a rather large correction to the widely employed Proximity Force approximation (PFA), since the ratio between distances and sphere radii is much larger than the typical values probed in recent experiments. For the comparison with experimental data, we compute the Casimir force using the scattering approach applied to the spherical geometry, including the contribution of double-layer forces. We also present experimental results for the total force between a mercury microdroplet and a polystyrene bead immersed in ethanol, with similar distances and diameters. In short, we probe the Casimir force with different materials in a regime far from the validity of PFA, such that the spherical geometry plays a non-trivial role.

  6. Magnetic tweezers microscope for cellular manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chen-Yuan; Huang, Hayden; Sutin, Jason D. B.; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Cragg, George E.; Gilbert, R.; Lee, Richard T.; Gratton, Enrico; Kamm, Roger D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; So, Peter T. C.

    2000-04-01

    We present the design of a magnetic tweezers microscope for cellular manipulation. Our design allows versatile and significant 3D stress application over a large sample region. For linear force application, forces up to 250 pN per 4.5 micrometers magnetic bead can be applied. Finite element analysis shows that variance in force level is around 10 percent within an area of 300 X 300 micrometers 2. Our eight-pole design potentially allows 3D liner force application and exertion of torsional stress. Furthermore, our design allows high resolution imaging using high numerical aperture objective. Both finite element analysis of magnetic field distribution and force calibration of our design are presented. As a feasibility study, we incubated fibronectin coated 4.5 micrometers polystyrene beads with Swiss 3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. Under application around 250 pN of force per magnetic particle, we observed relative movement between attached magnetic and polystyrene beads to be on the order of 1 micrometers . Elastic, viscoelastic, and creeping responses of cell surfaces were observed. Our results are consistent with previous observations using similar magnetic techniques.

  7. Rapid manufacture of monolithic micro-actuated forceps inspired by echinoderm pedicellariae.

    PubMed

    Leigh, S J; Bowen, J; Purssell, C P; Covington, J A; Billson, D R; Hutchins, D A

    2012-12-01

    The concept of biomimetics and bioinspiration has been used to enhance the function of materials and devices in fields ranging from healthcare to renewable energy. By developing advanced design and manufacturing processes, researchers are rapidly accelerating their ability to mimic natural systems. In this paper we show how micro-actuated forceps inspired by echinoderm pedicellarie have been produced using the rapid manufacturing technology of micro-stereolithography. The manufactured monolithic devices are composed of sets of jaws on the surface of thin polymer resin membranes, which serve as musculature for the jaws. The membranes are suspended above a pneumatic chamber with the jaws opened and closed through pneumatic pressure changes exerted by a simple syringe. The forceps can be used for tasks such as grasping of microparticles. Furthermore, when an object is placed in the centre of the membrane, the membrane flexes and the jaws of the device close and grasp the object in a responsive manner. When uncured liquid photopolymer is used to actuate the devices hydraulically instead of pneumatically, the devices exhibit self-healing behaviour, sealing the damaged regions and maintaining hydraulic integrity. The manufactured devices present exciting possibilities in fields such as micromanipulation and micro-robotics for healthcare. PMID:22791684

  8. Removal of Rectal Foreign Bodies Using Tenaculum Forceps Under Endoscopic Assistance

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Keun Joon; Kim, Boo Gyoung; Park, Sung Min; Ji, Jeong-Seon; Kim, Byung-Wook; Choi, Hwang

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of rectal foreign bodies is increasing by the day, though not as common as that of upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies. Various methods for removal of foreign bodies have been reported. Removal during endoscopy using endoscopic devices is simple and safe, but if the foreign body is too large to be removed by this method, other methods are required. We report two cases of rectal foreign body removal by a relatively simple and inexpensive technique. A 42-year-old man with a vibrator in the rectum was admitted due to inability to remove it by himself and various endoscopic methods failed. Finally, the vibrator was removed successfully by using tenaculum forceps under endoscopic assistance. Similarly, a 59-year-old man with a carrot in the rectum was admitted. The carrot was removed easily by using the same method as that in the previous case. The use of tenaculum forceps under endoscopic guidance may be a useful method for removal of rectal foreign bodies. PMID:26576143

  9. Atomic force microscopy combined with optical tweezers (AFM/OT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, F.; Zembrzycki, K.; Nakielski, P.; Pawłowska, S.; Kowalewski, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    The role of mechanical properties is essential to understand molecular, biological materials, and nanostructures dynamics and interaction processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the most commonly used method of direct force evaluation, but due to its technical limitations this single probe technique is unable to detect forces with femtonewton resolution. In this paper we present the development of a combined atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers (AFM/OT) instrument. The focused laser beam, on which optical tweezers are based, provides us with the ability to manipulate small dielectric objects and to use it as a high spatial and temporal resolution displacement and force sensor in the same AFM scanning zone. We demonstrate the possibility to develop a combined instrument with high potential in nanomechanics, molecules manipulation and biological studies. AFM/OT equipment is described and characterized by studying the ability to trap dielectric objects and quantifying the detectable and applicable forces. Finally, optical tweezers calibration methods and instrument applications are given.

  10. Mechanisms of HCV NS3 Helicase Monitored by Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    As one of the essential enzymes for viral genome replication, the hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase is one of the best characterized RNA helicases to date in understanding the mechanistic cycles in a helicase-catalyzed strand separation reaction. Recently, single-molecule studies on NS3, in particular the use of optical tweezers with sub-base pair spatial resolution, have allowed people to examine the potential elementary steps of NS3 in unwinding the double-stranded RNA fueled by ATP binding and hydrolysis. In this chapter, I detail the essential technical elements involved in conducting a high-resolution optical tweezers study of NS3 helicase, starting from the purification of the recombinant helicase protein from E. coli to setting up a high-resolution single-molecule experiment using optical tweezers. PMID:25579590

  11. Optical tweezers force measurements to study parasites chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Fontes, A.; Almeida, D. B.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Ayres, D. C.; Giorgio, S.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we propose a methodology to study microorganisms chemotaxis in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. Forces involved in the movement of unicellular parasites are very small, in the femto-pico-Newton range, about the same order of magnitude of the forces generated in an Optical Tweezers. We applied this methodology to investigate the Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) and Trypanossoma cruzi (T. cruzi) under distinct situations.

  12. Hook-up Sexual Experiences and Problem Behaviors Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Leanna; Young, Amy M.; Boyd, Carol J.; Fons, Courntey E.

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on the sexual phenomenon of “hooking-up.” A hook-up is defined as a single sexual encounter that may or may not include sexual intercourse with someone who is a stranger, brief acquaintance, or friend. The aim of this study was to document the prevalence of hook-ups in a sample of 1,011 urban, middle and high school students and to examine the relationship between hooking-up and a variety of problem behaviors, including, alcohol, cigarette, illicit drug use, truancy, and school suspensions. The results revealed that 28% of the sample had engaged in at least one hook-up experience, and this percentage increased with age. Hook-ups were correlated moderately with all problem behaviors examined. PMID:22039333

  13. Hook-Up Sexual Experiences and Problem Behaviors among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortunato, Leanna; Young, Amy M.; Boyd, Carol J.; Fons, Courtney E.

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the sexual phenomenon of "hooking up." A hook-up is defined as a single sexual encounter that may or may not include sexual intercourse with someone who is a stranger, brief acquaintance, or friend. The aim of this study was to document the prevalence of hook-ups in a sample of 1,011 urban middle and high school students and…

  14. Using laser tweezers to measure twitching motility in Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Maier, Berenike

    2005-06-01

    Dynamic properties of type IV pili are essential for their function in bacterial infection, twitching motility and gene transfer. Laser tweezers are versatile tools to study the molecular mechanism underlying pilus dynamics at the single molecule level. Recently, these optical tweezers have been used to monitor pilus elongation and retraction in vivo at a resolution of several nanometers. The force generated by type IV pili exceeds 100 pN making pili the strongest linear motors characterized to date. The study of pilus dynamics at the single molecule level sheds light on kinetics, force generation, switching and mechanics of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilus motor. PMID:15939360

  15. Magnetic tweezers for manipulation of magnetic particles in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, H.; Giesguth, M.; Dietz, K.-J.; Reiss, G.; Herth, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic tweezers gain increasing interest for applications in biology. Here, a setup of magnetic tweezers is introduced using micropatterned conducting lines on transparent glass slides. Magnetic particles of 1 μm diameter were injected in barley cell vacuoles using a microinject system under microscopic control. Time dependent tracking of the particles after application of a magnetic field was used to determine the viscosity of vacuolar sap in vivo relative to water and isolated vacuolar fluid. The viscosity of vacuolar sap in cells was about 2-fold higher than that of extracted vacuolar fluid and 5 times higher than that of water.

  16. Tunable optical tweezers for wavelength-dependent measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Brooke; Campbell, Gretchen K.; López-Mariscal, Carlos; Filgueira, Carly Levin; Huschka, Ryan; Halas, Naomi J.; Helmerson, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Optical trapping forces depend on the difference between the trap wavelength and the extinction resonances of trapped particles. This leads to a wavelength-dependent trapping force, which should allow for the optimization of optical tweezers systems, simply by choosing the best trapping wavelength for a given application. Here we present an optical tweezer system with wavelength tunability, for the study of resonance effects. With this system, the optical trap stiffness is measured for single trapped particles that exhibit either single or multiple extinction resonances. We include discussions of wavelength-dependent effects, such as changes in temperature, and how to measure them. PMID:22559522

  17. Marker-free cell discrimination by holographic optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, F.; Warber, M.; Zwick, S.; van der Kuip, H.; Haist, T.; Osten, W.

    2009-06-01

    We introduce a method for marker-free cell discrimination based on optical tweezers. Cancerous, non-cancerous, and drug-treated cells could be distinguished by measuring the trapping forces using holographic optical tweezers. We present trapping force measurements on different cell lines: normal pre-B lymphocyte cells (BaF3; "normal cells"), their Bcr-Abl transformed counterparts (BaF3-p185; "cancer cells") as a model for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and Imatinib treated BaF3-p185 cells. The results are compared with reference measurements obtained by a commercial flow cytometry system.

  18. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  19. Eyelid hook injury – A preventable domestic injury

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Nazri; Salleh, Rafidah

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the presentation and management of eyelid injury resulting from the hook of a rubber string. A seven-year-old boy presented with pain of the right upper eyelid. A rubber string with metal hook ends, snatched his right eye from below. The hook pierced through his upper eyelid from the conjunctival surface and remained in situ. However, there was no globe laceration noted. Removal was performed by reverse-tracking of the hook through the wound. The wound was stitched with 6’0 Vicryl sutures. Healing was excellent with minimal scarring. PMID:23960864

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided forceps biopsy from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions using a forward-viewing echoendoscope

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Ippei; Miyahara, Ryoji; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Funasaka, Kohei; Yamamura, Takeshi; Ohno, Eizaburo; Nakamura, Masanao; Kawashima, Hiroki; Watanabe, Osamu; Kobayashi, Makoto; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Nakamura, Shigeo; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic tissue acquisition techniques using needle-knife and biopsy forceps allow abundant tissue acquisition from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions; however, these techniques cannot capture real-time intratumor information. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided forceps biopsy (EUS-FB) from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions using a forward-viewing echoendoscope. Patients and methods: This study was a prospective case series. After mucosal cuts, several specimens were taken using a hot biopsy forceps under real-time EUS visualization. The incision was closed using hemoclips. Diagnostic yield, rate of diagnosable samples obtained under EUS visualization, procedure time, and adverse events were assessed. Results: Ten patients (median lesion size 16 mm, range 15 – 44 mm) underwent EUS-FB. The overall rate of histological diagnosis by EUS-FB was 100 % (10/10). The rate of diagnosable samples among all cases was 97.6 % (41/42). The median procedure times for EUS-FB and complete closure were 28.5 and 4.5 minutes, respectively. No adverse events occurred. Conclusions: This newly developed EUS-FB is feasible and allowed forceps biopsy from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions. Study registration: UMIN000015364 PMID:27556070

  1. Hook nozzle arrangement for supporting airfoil vanes

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1996-02-20

    A gas turbine engine`s nozzle structure includes a nozzle support ring, a plurality of shroud segments, and a plurality of airfoil vanes. The plurality of shroud segments are distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each airfoil vane is connected to a corresponding shroud segment so that the airfoil vanes are also distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each shroud segment has a hook engaging the nozzle support ring so that the shroud segments and corresponding airfoil vanes are supported by the nozzle support ring. The nozzle support ring, the shroud segments, and the airfoil vanes may be ceramic. 8 figs.

  2. Hook nozzle arrangement for supporting airfoil vanes

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A gas turbine engine's nozzle structure includes a nozzle support ring, a plurality of shroud segments, and a plurality of airfoil vanes. The plurality of shroud segments are distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each airfoil vane is connected to a corresponding shroud segment so that the airfoil vanes are also distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each shroud segment has a hook engaging the nozzle support ring so that the shroud segments and corresponding airfoil vanes are supported by the nozzle support ring. The nozzle support ring, the shroud segments, and the airfoil vanes may be ceramic.

  3. Trapping and patterning of biological objects using photovoltaic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubera, M.; Elvira, I.; García-Cabañes, A.; Bella, J. L.; Carrascosa, M.

    2016-01-01

    Photovoltaic tweezers are a recently proposed technique for manipulation and patterning of micro- and nano-objects. It is based in the dielectrophoretic forces associated to the electric fields induced by illumination of certain ferroelectrics due to the bulk photovoltaic effect. The technique has been applied to the patterning of dielectric and metal micro- and nano-particles. In this work, we report the use of photovoltaic tweezers to pattern biological objects on LiNbO3:Fe. Specifically, spores and pollen grains and their nanometric fragments have been trapped and patterned. 1D and 2D arrangements have been achieved by deposition in air or from a hexane suspension. The quality of patterns obtained with nanometric fragments is even better than previous results using photovoltaic tweezers with inorganic micro- and nano-particles. In fact, 1D patterns with a period of 2 μm, almost half of the minimum reported period achieved with photovoltaic tweezers, have been obtained with pollen fragments.

  4. Spin dynamics and Kondo physics in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yiheng; Lester, Brian J.; Brown, Mark O.; Kaufman, Adam M.; Long, Junling; Ball, Randall J.; Isaev, Leonid; Wall, Michael L.; Rey, Ana Maria; Regal, Cindy A.

    2016-05-01

    We propose to use optical tweezers as a toolset for direct observation of the interplay between quantum statistics, kinetic energy and interactions, and thus implement minimum instances of the Kondo lattice model in systems with few bosonic rubidium atoms. By taking advantage of strong local exchange interactions, our ability to tune the spin-dependent potential shifts between the two wells and complete control over spin and motional degrees of freedom, we design an adiabatic tunneling scheme that efficiently creates a spin-singlet state in one well starting from two initially separated atoms (one atom per tweezer) in opposite spin state. For three atoms in a double-well, two localized in the lowest vibrational mode of each tweezer and one atom in an excited delocalized state, we plan to use similar techniques and observe resonant transfer of two-atom singlet-triplet states between the wells in the regime when the exchange coupling exceeds the mobile atom hopping. Moreover, we argue that such three-atom double-tweezers could potentially be used for quantum computation by encoding logical qubits in collective spin and motional degrees of freedom. Current address: Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.

  5. Pulse laser assisted optical tweezers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tadao; Maeda, Saki; Honda, Ayae

    2012-01-01

    Optical tweezers which enables to trap micron to nanometer sized objects by radiation pressure force is utilized for manipulation of particles under a microscope and for measurement of forces between biomolecules. Weak force of optical tweezers causes some limitations such as particle adhesion or steric barrier like lipid membrane in a cell prevent further movement of objects. For biomedical applications we need to overcome these difficulties. We have developed a technique to exert strong instantaneous force by use of a pulse laser beam and to assist conventional optical tweezers. A pulse laser beam has huge instantaneous laser power of more than 1000 times as strong as a conventional continuous-wave laser beam so that the instantaneous force is strong enough to break chemical bonding and molecular force between objects and obstacles. We derive suitable pulse duration for pulse assist of optical tweezers and demonstrate particle manipulation in difficult situations through an experiment of particle removal from sticky surface of glass substrate. PMID:23366922

  6. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsifaki, D. G.; Kandyla, M.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects.

  7. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon.

    PubMed

    Kotsifaki, D G; Kandyla, M; Lagoudakis, P G

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects. PMID:27195446

  8. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    PubMed Central

    Kotsifaki, D. G.; Kandyla, M.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects. PMID:27195446

  9. Automated trapping, assembly, and sorting with holographic optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, Stephen C.; Germain, Vincent; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2008-01-01

    We combine real-time feature recognition with holographic optical tweezers to automatically trap, assemble, and sort micron-sized colloidal particles. Closed loop control will enable new applications of optical micromanipulation in biology, medicine, materials science, and possibly quantum computation. PMID:19096726

  10. [Enigmas surrounding an obstetric forceps belonging to Albertus Titsingh (1714-1790)].

    PubMed

    Lammes, F B

    2005-12-24

    In the collections of the Society of the Dutch Journal of Medicine there is a small box containing a small obstetric forceps modelled on that of the British physician Smellie and some documents with information about its origin. The instrument belonged to the Amsterdam surgeon-obstetrician Albertus Titsingh and is claimed in the documentation to have been used during the birth of the later King William I (1772-1843) in 1772. However, historical research indicates that this is very unlikely: it is an established fact that the birth of William I was rapid and successful, while Albertus Titsingh was an authoritative obstetrician in an 'obstetric climate' of biding one's time and taking no action until the natural powers have failed. PMID:16402520

  11. Design of 3-DOF Force Sensing Micro-Forceps for Robot Assisted Vitreoretinal Surgery*

    PubMed Central

    Gonenc, Berk; Handa, James; Gehlbach, Peter; Taylor, Russell H.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2014-01-01

    Vitreoretinal surgery is associated with serious complications that can easily stem from excessive tissue manipulation forces while the forces required for such surgery are routinely well below human tactile sensation. Despite the critical need in this area, there is still no practical vitreoretinal instrument that can sense both the axial and transverse tool-to-tissue interaction forces with sub-mN accuracy. In this study, we present the conceptual design and optimization of a 3 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) force sensing micro-forceps as the next generation of our force sensing instruments. 4 fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensors are integrated in the design to measure tool tip forces. PMID:24111028

  12. A Hooke׳s law-based approach to protein folding rate.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Prieto, Pablo J; Salgado, Jesús; García, Yamila; Sotomayor-Torres, Clivia M

    2015-01-01

    Kinetics is a key aspect of the renowned protein folding problem. Here, we propose a comprehensive approach to folding kinetics where a polypeptide chain is assumed to behave as an elastic material described by the Hooke׳s law. A novel parameter called elastic-folding constant results from our model and is suggested to distinguish between protein with two-state and multi-state folding pathways. A contact-free descriptor, named folding degree, is introduced as a suitable structural feature to study protein-folding kinetics. This approach generalizes the observed correlations between varieties of structural descriptors with the folding rate constant. Additionally several comparisons among structural classes and folding mechanisms were carried out showing the good performance of our model with proteins of different types. The present model constitutes a simple rationale for the structural and energetic factors involved in protein folding kinetics. PMID:25245368

  13. Hooked: Habits of the Chinese Permian gigantopterid Gigantonoclea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfullah, Leyla J.; Glasspool, Ian J.; Hilton, Jason

    2014-04-01

    Based upon anatomical evidence, Permian aged gigantopterid fossils are in general reconstructed as climbing or scrambling plants. Gigantonoclea, a genus of adpressed gigantopterid foliage from the Permian of northern China, has been reported to co-occur with hook-like organs that were interpreted as indicating a scrambling/climbing habit. We reinvestigated these hook-like structures and re-evaluated the nature of the co-occurrences in context with the flora preserved in each plant-bearing fossil 'bed' in the North China sedimentary succession. New findings show that the species Gigantonoclea hallei probably climbed using specially adapted clusters of compound grappling hook-like shoots borne on the stems. This structural arrangement comprising shoots of hooks is new to the scrambling/climbing concept in gigantopterids. However, a key figured specimen previously reported as showing intermediate hook-tipped leaf morphology on a sole pinnule tip is discounted as such and is reinterpreted as a 'normal' pinnule partially hidden under sediment that results in an unusual appearance to this pinnule tip. Adaptations for climbing or scrambling based upon 'hooked leaves' observed in Gigantonoclea lagrelii are no longer supported and are reinterpreted as incompletely expanded leaves where the vernation process was interrupted. These data weaken prior interpretations of G. lagrelii as a climber/scrambler and raise doubts about the ubiquity of hooks amongst the gigantopterids as structures enabling them to climb or scramble their way through the Permian world.

  14. Single-sided lateral-field and phototransistor-based optoelectronic tweezers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohta, Aaron (Inventor); Chiou, Pei-Yu (Inventor); Hsu, Hsan-Yin (Inventor); Jamshidi, Arash (Inventor); Wu, Ming-Chiang (Inventor); Neale, Steven L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Described herein are single-sided lateral-field optoelectronic tweezers (LOET) devices which use photosensitive electrode arrays to create optically-induced dielectrophoretic forces in an electric field that is parallel to the plane of the device. In addition, phototransistor-based optoelectronic tweezers (PhOET) devices are described that allow for optoelectronic tweezers (OET) operation in high-conductivity physiological buffer and cell culture media.

  15. Robert Hooke's Seminal Contribution to Orbital Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2005-03-01

    During the second half of the seventeenth century, the outstanding problem in astronomy was to understand the physical basis for Kepler’s laws describing the observed orbital motion of a planet around the Sun. In the middle 1660s,Robert Hooke (1635 1703) proposed that a planet’s motion is determined by compounding its tangential velocity with the change in radial velocity impressed by the gravitational attraction of the Sun, and he described his physical concept to Isaac Newton (1642 1726) in correspondence in 1679. Newton denied having heard of Hooke’s novel concept of orbital motion, but shortly after their correspondence he implemented it by a geometric construction from which he deduced the physical origin of Kepler’s area law,which later became Proposition I, Book I, of his Principia in 1687.Three years earlier, Newton had deposited a preliminary draft of it, his De Motu Corporum in Gyrum (On the Motion of Bodies), at the Royal Society of London, which Hooke apparently was able to examine a few months later, because shortly there-after he applied Newton’s construction in a novel way to obtain the path of a body under the action of an attractive central force that varies linearly with the distance from its center of motion (Hooke’s law). I show that Hooke’s construction corresponds to Newton’s for his proof of Kepler’s area law in his De Motu. Hooke’s understanding of planetary motion was based on his observations with mechanical analogs. I repeated two of his experiments and demonstrated the accuracy of his observations.My results thus cast new light on the significance of Hooke’s contributions to the development of orbital dynamics, which in the past have either been neglected or misunderstood.

  16. Mechanical force characterization in manipulating live cells with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanhua; Sun, Dong; Huang, Wenhao

    2011-02-24

    Laser trapping with optical tweezers is a noninvasive manipulation technique and has received increasing attentions in biological applications. Understanding forces exerted on live cells is essential to cell biomechanical characterizations. Traditional numerical or experimental force measurement assumes live cells as ideal objects, ignoring their complicated inner structures and rough membranes. In this paper, we propose a new experimental method to calibrate the trapping and drag forces acted on live cells. Binding a micro polystyrene sphere to a live cell and moving the mixture with optical tweezers, we can obtain the drag force on the cell by subtracting the drag force on the sphere from the total drag force on the mixture, under the condition of extremely low Reynolds number. The trapping force on the cell is then obtained from the drag force when the cell is in force equilibrium state. Experiments on numerous live cells demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed force calibration approach. PMID:21087769

  17. Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbock, L. J.; Otto, O.; Skarstam, D. R.; Jahn, S.; Chimerel, C.; Gornall, J. L.; Keyser, U. F.

    2010-11-01

    We combine for the first time optical tweezer experiments with the resistive pulse technique based on capillaries. Quartz glass capillaries are pulled into a conical shape with tip diameters as small as 27 nm. Here, we discuss the translocation of λ-phage DNA which is driven by an electrophoretic force through the nanocapillary. The resulting change in ionic current indicates the folding state of single λ-phage DNA molecules. Our flow cell design allows for the straightforward incorporation of optical tweezers. We show that a DNA molecule attached to an optically trapped colloid is pulled into a capillary by electrophoretic forces. The detected electrophoretic force is in good agreement with measurements in solid-state nanopores.

  18. Using optical tweezers to study mechanical properties of collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Naghmeh; Downing, Benjamin P. B.; Wieczorek, Andrew; Chan, Clara K. Y.; Welch, Robert Lindsay; Forde, Nancy R.

    2011-08-01

    The mechanical response of biological molecules at the microscopic level contributes significantly to their function. Optical tweezers are instruments that enable scientists to study mechanical properties at microscopic levels. They are based on a highly focused laser beam that creates a trap for microscopic objects such as dielectric spheres, viruses, bacteria, living cells and organelles, and then manipulates them by applying forces in the picoNewton range (a range that is biologically relevant). In this work, mechanical properties of single collagen molecules are studied using optical tweezers. We discuss the challenges of stretching single collagen proteins, whose length is much less than the size of the microspheres used as manipulation handles, and show how instrumental design and biochemistry can be used to overcome these challenges.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbazole-Linked Porphyrin Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi; Michelin, Clément; Bucher, Léo; Desbois, Nicolas; Gros, Claude P; Piant, Sébastien; Bolze, Frédéric; Fang, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Kadish, Karl M

    2015-08-17

    Herein the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, two-photon absorption and electrochemical properties of 3,6-disubstituted carbazole tweezers is reported. A dimer resulting from a Glaser homocoupling was isolated during a Sonogashira coupling reaction between a diethynyl-carbazole spacer and a 5-bromo-triarylporphyrin and the properties of this original compound were compared with the 3,6-disubstituted carbazole bisporphyrin tweezers. The dyads reported herein present a two-photon absorption maximum at 920 nm with two-photon absorption cross-section in the 1200 GM range. Despite a strong linear absorption in the Soret region and moderate fluorescence quantum yield, they both lead to a high brightness reaching 30 000 M(-1)  cm(-1) . PMID:26177731

  20. A microscopic steam engine implemented in an optical tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A.

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of improved steam engines at the end of the 18th century marked the start of the industrial revolution and the birth of classical thermodynamics. Currently, there is great interest in miniaturizing heat engines, but so far traditional heat engines operating with the expansion and compression of gas have not reached length scales shorter than one millimeter. Here, a micrometer-sized piston steam engine is implemented in an optical tweezer. The piston is a single colloidal microparticle that is driven by explosive vapourization of the surrounding liquid (cavitation bubbles) and by optical forces at a rate between a few tens of Hertz and one kilo-Hertz. The operation of the engine allows to exert impulsive forces with optical tweezers and induce streaming in the liquid, similar to the effect of transducers when driven at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies.

  1. A microscopic steam engine implemented in an optical tweezer.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of improved steam engines at the end of the 18th century marked the start of the industrial revolution and the birth of classical thermodynamics. Currently, there is great interest in miniaturizing heat engines, but so far traditional heat engines operating with the expansion and compression of gas have not reached length scales shorter than one millimeter. Here, a micrometer-sized piston steam engine is implemented in an optical tweezer. The piston is a single colloidal microparticle that is driven by explosive vapourization of the surrounding liquid (cavitation bubbles) and by optical forces at a rate between a few tens of Hertz and one kilo-Hertz. The operation of the engine allows to exert impulsive forces with optical tweezers and induce streaming in the liquid, similar to the effect of transducers when driven at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. PMID:25523395

  2. Fractures of the hook of hamate: radiographic signs

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, A.; Nelson, J.; Green, S.

    1985-01-01

    Isolated fractures of the hamulus, formerly considered rare, are being seen more frequently. Many of these injuries are sports related, particularly in golf, tennis, racquetball and baseball players. Failure to make an early diagnosis can result in severe pain and sometimes incapacitating disability. The authors studied the clinical and radiological findings in 12 patients who had fracture of the hook of the hamate. The proposed three radiographic signs of fracture that are readily seen on routine PA projections: absence of the hook of the hamate; sclerosis of the hook; and lack of cortical density, i.e., barely visible outline, of the hamulus.

  3. Retrieval of Embolized Intracardiac Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Line: Novel Percutaneous Technique by Utilizing a Flexible Biopsy Forceps

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Arindam; Sarkar, Achyut; Ahmed, Imran; Patil, Shailesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral catheter embolization to the heart is common but infrequently reported. In view of the hazardous complications of thrombosis, embolism, infection, arrhythmia and even death, percutaneous retrieval of such foreign bodies is usually attempted. Previously reported percutaneous technique of retrieval mainly involved the snaring technique. Herein, we report a novel nonsurgical retrieval technique for successful removal of a 46 cm long embolized intracardiac peripherally inserted central catheter by utilizing a flexible biopsy forceps. To the best of our knowledge, the use of flexible biopsy forceps for retrieval has hitherto been unreported and this case report therefore adds to the repertoire of percutaneous retrieval techniques for safe and easy removal of embolized catheters to the heart. PMID:26900421

  4. Cluster formation in ferrofluids induced by holographic optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Masajada, Jan; Bacia, Marcin; Drobczyński, Sławomir

    2013-10-01

    Holographic optical tweezers were used to show the interaction between a strongly focused laser beam and magnetic nanoparticles in ferrofluid. When the light intensity was high enough, magnetic nanoparticles were removed from the beam center and formed a dark ring. The same behavior was observed when focusing vortex or Bessel beams. The interactions between two or more separated rings of magnetic nanoparticles created by independent optical traps were also observed. PMID:24081086

  5. Optical tweezers and manipulation of PMMA beads in various conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsifaki, D. G.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2009-07-01

    Laser optical trapping and micromanipulation of microparticles or cells and subcellular structures have gained remarkable interest in biomedical research and applications. Several laser sources are employed for the combination of a laser scalpel with an optical tweezers device, under microscopic control. However, although the principles and the mechanisms of pulsed laser ablation have been well described for macroscopic interventions, the microbeam operation, under microscopic guidance, necessitates further experiments and investigations. We present experimental results of controlled micro-ablation of PMMA beads of 3-8 μm diameters, trapped by laser tweezers in various media e.g. solutes of different index of refraction. An optical tweezers system, based on a continuous wave He-Ne laser emitting at 632.8 nm, was tested on beads and, despite the low power of the He-Ne laser, the optical trap was stable. Another optical system, based on a cw Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1.06 μm, was tested on microspheres too. Successful beads ablation was carried out by irradiation with multiple, or even a single nitrogen laser pulse of 7 ns pulse duration at a wavelength of 337 nm. The ablative perforation of the microspheres was estimated by controlling the laser fluence. Moreover, shape deformations of PMMA microspheres were observed. The experimentally obtained results are theoretically explained via the spatial intensity distribution based on Mie light scattering theory. Furthermore, the appearance of laser ablation holes in the back side of microspheres is explained by the ablation triggered shock waves propagation. The role of the stretching forces action is also discussed. Additionally, we report experimental results on measuring the optical trap force of PMMA beads. A powerful optical tweezers system based on a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser was used in order to estimate the trapping efficiency for several beads diameter.

  6. Multispectral optical tweezers for molecular diagnostics of single biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Corey; Fardad, Shima; Sincore, Alex; Vangheluwe, Marie; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Optical trapping of single biological cells has become an established technique for controlling and studying fundamental behavior of single cells with their environment without having "many-body" interference. The development of such an instrument for optical diagnostics (including Raman and fluorescence for molecular diagnostics) via laser spectroscopy with either the "trapping" beam or secondary beams is still in progress. This paper shows the development of modular multi-spectral imaging optical tweezers combining Raman and Fluorescence diagnostics of biological cells.

  7. Electromagnetic tweezers with independent force and torque control.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chang; Lionberger, Troy A; Wiener, Diane M; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic tweezers are powerful tools to manipulate and study the mechanical properties of biological molecules and living cells. In this paper we present a novel, bona fide electromagnetic tweezer (EMT) setup that allows independent control of the force and torque applied via micrometer-sized magnetic beads to a molecule under study. We implemented this EMT by combining a single solenoid that generates force (f-EMT) with a set of four solenoids arranged into a symmetric quadrupole to generate torque (τ-EMT). To demonstrate the capability of the tweezers, we attached optically asymmetric Janus beads to single, tethered DNA molecules. We show that tension in the piconewton force range can be applied to single DNA molecules and the molecule can simultaneously be twisted with torques in the piconewton-nanometer range. Furthermore, the EMT allows the two components to be independently controlled. At various force levels applied to the Janus bead, the trap torsional stiffness can be continuously changed simply by varying the current magnitude applied to the τ-EMT. The flexible and independent control of force and torque by the EMT makes it an ideal tool for a range of measurements where tensional and torsional properties need to be studied simultaneously on a molecular or cellular level. PMID:27587135

  8. Optical tweezers theory near a flat surface: a perturbative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Dutra, Rafael S.; Maia Neto, Paolo A.; Nussenzveig, H. Moyses

    We propose a perturbative calculation of the optical force exercised by a focused laser beam on a microsphere of arbitrary radius that is localized near a flat glass surface in a standard optical tweezers setup. Starting from the Mie-Debye representation for the electric field of a Gaussian laser beam, focused by an objective of high numerical aperture, we derive a recursive series that represents the multiple reflections that describe the reverberation of laser light between the microsphere and the glass slide. We present numerical results for the axial component of the optical force and the axial trap stiffness. Numerical results for a configuration typical in biological applications--a microsphere of 0.5 µm radius at a distance around 0.25 µm from the surface--show a 37 [1] Viana N B, Rocha M S. Mesquita O N, et al. (2007) Towards absolute calibration of optical tweezers. Phys Rev E 75:021914-1-14. [2] Dutra R S, Viana N B, Maia Neto P A, et al. (2014) Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers. Phys Rev A 90:013825-1-13. Rafael S. Dutra thanks the Brazilian ``Science without Borders'' program for a postdoctoral scholarship.

  9. Magnetic Forces and DNA Mechanics in Multiplexed Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    van Loenhout, Marijn T. J.; Burnham, Daniel R.; Dekker, Cees

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers (MT) are a powerful tool for the study of DNA-enzyme interactions. Both the magnet-based manipulation and the camera-based detection used in MT are well suited for multiplexed measurements. Here, we systematically address challenges related to scaling of multiplexed magnetic tweezers (MMT) towards high levels of parallelization where large numbers of molecules (say 103) are addressed in the same amount of time required by a single-molecule measurement. We apply offline analysis of recorded images and show that this approach provides a scalable solution for parallel tracking of the xyz-positions of many beads simultaneously. We employ a large field-of-view imaging system to address many DNA-bead tethers in parallel. We model the 3D magnetic field generated by the magnets and derive the magnetic force experienced by DNA-bead tethers across the large field of view from first principles. We furthermore experimentally demonstrate that a DNA-bead tether subject to a rotating magnetic field describes a bicircular, Limaçon rotation pattern and that an analysis of this pattern simultaneously yields information about the force angle and the position of attachment of the DNA on the bead. Finally, we apply MMT in the high-throughput investigation of the distribution of the induced magnetic moment, the position of attachment of DNA on the beads, and DNA flexibility. The methods described herein pave the way to kilo-molecule level magnetic tweezers experiments. PMID:22870220

  10. A GSO tweezers-type coincidence detector for tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Higashi, Tatsuya; Senda, Michio

    2013-07-01

    A Gd2SiO5 (GSO) tweezers-type coincidence detector was developed and tested for tumor detection in procedures such as (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-guided surgery. The detector consists of a pair of GSO scintillators, a pair of metal-packaged small-sized photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), and a coincidence circuit. Because the GSO scintillators are located on the tips of tweezers, a target organ such as a lymph node or the colon can be easily positioned between them. The size of a single GSO was 8 × 14 × 14 mm. The results show that the energy resolution was 30 % full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and the timing resolution was 6 ns FWHM for 511-keV gamma photons. The point-spread function perpendicular to the detector was 4.5 mm FWHM, and the point-spread function parallel to the detector was 7.5 mm FWHM. The absolute sensitivity of the coincidence detector was 0.6% at the center of the detector when the two GSOs were 5 mm apart. Background counts due to the accidental and scatter coincidence were 2 cps up to 48 MBq from the positron source contained in a 20-cm-diameter, 20-cm-high cylindrical phantom. From these results, we conclude that the proposed tweezers-type coincidence detector is useful for tumor detection by the use of FDG, such as that in radio-guided surgery. PMID:23283753

  11. Asymmetric forceps increase fighting success among males of similar size in the maritime earwig

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Nicole E.; Zink, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Extreme asymmetric morphologies are hypothesized to serve an adaptive function that counteracts sexual selection for symmetry. However direct tests of function for asymmetries are lacking, particularly in the context of animal weapons. The weapon of the maritime earwig, Anisolabis maritima, exhibits sizeable variation in the extent of directional asymmetry within and across body sizes, making it an ideal candidate for investigating the function of asymmetry. In this study, we characterized the extent of weapon asymmetry, characterized the manner in which asymmetric weapons are used in contests, staged dyadic contests between males of different size classes and analyzed the correlates of fighting success. In contests between large males, larger individuals won more fights and emerged as the dominant male. In contests between small males, however, weapon asymmetry was more influential in predicting overall fighting success than body size. This result reveals an advantage of asymmetric weaponry among males that are below the mean size in the population. A forceps manipulation experiment suggests that asymmetry may be an indirect, correlate of a morphologically independent factor that affects fighting ability. PMID:22984320

  12. Bohlin transformation: the hidden symmetry that connects Hooke to Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggio, Maria Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Hooke's name is familiar to students of mechanics thanks to the law of force that bears his name. Less well-known is the influence his findings had on the founder of mechanics, Isaac Newton. In a lecture given some twenty years ago, W Arnol'd pointed out the outstanding contribution to science made by Hooke, and also noted the controversial issue of the attribution of important discoveries to Newton that were actually inspired by Hooke. It therefore seems ironic that the two most famous force laws, named after Hooke and Newton, are two geometrical aspects of the same law. This relationship, together with other illuminating aspects of Newtonian mechanics, is described in Arnol'd's book and is worth remembering in standard physics courses. In this didactical paper the duality of the two forces is expounded and an account of the more recent contributions to the subject is given.

  13. Astronaut James Newman with latch hook for tether device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut James H. Newman, mission specialist, shows off a latch hook for a tether device used during the STS-51 extravehicular activity (EVA) on September 16, 1993. Newman, on Discovery's middeck, appears surrounded by sleep restraints.

  14. Sleep Loses Out for Many Hooked on Video Games

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159434.html Sleep Loses Out for Many Hooked on Video Games ... Bloodborne," "Fallout" and "Call of Duty" worth losing sleep over? For plenty of gamers, the answer is ...

  15. Relationship between tornadoes and hook echoes on April 3, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Radar observations of tornado families occurring on April 3, 1974 are discussed. Of the 93 tornadoes included in the sample, 81% were associated with hook-like echoes with appendages at least 40 deg to the south of the echo movement. At least one tornado was associated with 62% of the hook-like echoes observed. All of the tornadoes with intensities of F 4 and F 5 were produced by hook-like echoes; the mean intensity of all tornadoes associated with this type of echo was F 3, while the mean intensity of the remaining tornadoes was F1. The tornadic hook-like echoes moved to the right of the non-tornadic echoes forming a tornado line in advance of the squall line. Some tornadoes were associated with 'spiral' echoes.

  16. 14. DETAIL OF ROOF TRUSS STRUCTURE AND HAY HOOK CABLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF ROOF TRUSS STRUCTURE AND HAY HOOK CABLE AND PULLEY SYSTEM LOCATED ON WEST END OF BARN. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - James H. Lane Ranch, Barn, One Mile South of Richfield on Highway 26, Richfield, Lincoln County, ID

  17. Sleep Loses Out for Many Hooked on Video Games

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159434.html Sleep Loses Out for Many Hooked on Video Games ... Bloodborne," "Fallout" and "Call of Duty" worth losing sleep over? For plenty of gamers, the answer is ...

  18. Performance of barbed and barbless hooks in a marine recreational fishery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaeffer, Jeffrey S.; Hoffman, Elizabeth M.

    2002-01-01

    We used an angling study to examine catch per unit effort (CPUE), bait loss, and total landings by anglers fishing with natural bait on barbed and barbless hooks in a nearshore marine sport fishery located in the Gulf of Mexico near St. Petersburg, Florida. Anglers fished half the day with a barbed hook and half the day with a barbless hook. We also recorded anatomical hook placement, severity of injury or bleeding, and hook extraction times for each landed fish. Bait loss, CPUE, and mean length of catch did not differ between gears, but anglers landed 22% more fish with barbed hooks. Loss of hooked fish was significantly higher with barbless hooks, and efficiency appeared to vary among species. Mean unhooking times were significantly shorter with barbless hooks. Anatomical hook placement did not differ between gears and most fish were hooked in the jaws. Bleeding did not differ between gears because bleeding was influenced strongly by hook placement, but barbless hooks reduced unhooking injuries. In this fishery, barbless hooks probably did not reduce hooking mortality and conferred only slight benefits at the expense of reduced catches.

  19. Linear microrheology with optical tweezers of living cells 'is not an option'!

    PubMed

    Tassieri, Manlio

    2015-08-01

    Optical tweezers have been successfully adopted as exceptionally sensitive transducers for microrheology studies of complex fluids. Despite the general trend, in this article I explain why a similar approach should not be adopted for microrheology studies of living cells. This conclusion is acheived on the basis of statistical mechanics principles that indicate the unsuitability of optical tweezers for such purpose. PMID:26100967

  20. Esophageal Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Assisted by an Overtube with a Traction Forceps: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kuangi; Sakai, Eiji; Tashima, Tomoaki; Minato, Yohei; Ohno, Akiko; Ito, Takafumi; Tsuji, Yosuke; Chiba, Hideyuki; Yamawaki, Makoto; Hemmi, Hideyuki; Nakaya, Teruo; Fukushima, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is technically difficult. To make it safer, we developed a novel method using overtube with a traction forceps (OTF) for countertraction during submucosal dissection. We conducted an ex vivo animal study and compared the clinical outcomes between OTF-ESD and conventional method (C-ESD). A total of 32 esophageal ESD procedures were performed by four beginner and expert endoscopists. After circumferential mucosal incision for the target lesion, structured as the isolated pig esophagus 3 cm long, either C-ESD or OTF-ESD was randomly selected for submucosal dissection. All the ESD procedures were completed as en bloc resections, while perforation only occurred in a beginner's C-ESD procedure. The dissection time for OTF-ESD was significantly shorter than that for C-ESD for both the beginner and expert endoscopists (22.8 ± 8.3 min versus 7.8 ± 4.5 min, P < 0.001, and 11.3 ± 4.4 min versus 5.9 ± 2.5 min, P = 0.01, resp.). The frequency and volume of the submucosal injections were significantly smaller for OTF-ESD than for C-ESD (1.3 ± 0.6 times versus 2.9 ± 1.5 times, P < 0.001, and 5.3 ± 2.8 mL versus 15.6 ± 7.3 mL, P < 0.001, resp.). Histologically, muscular injury was more common among the C-ESD procedures (80% versus 13%, P = 0.009). Our results indicated that the OTF-ESD technique is useful for the safe and easy completion of esophageal ESD. PMID:27528866

  1. Esophageal Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Assisted by an Overtube with a Traction Forceps: An Animal Study.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Ken; Fu, Kuangi; Sakai, Eiji; Nonaka, Kouichi; Tashima, Tomoaki; Minato, Yohei; Ohno, Akiko; Ito, Takafumi; Tsuji, Yosuke; Chiba, Hideyuki; Yamawaki, Makoto; Hemmi, Hideyuki; Nakaya, Teruo; Fukushima, Junichi; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is technically difficult. To make it safer, we developed a novel method using overtube with a traction forceps (OTF) for countertraction during submucosal dissection. We conducted an ex vivo animal study and compared the clinical outcomes between OTF-ESD and conventional method (C-ESD). A total of 32 esophageal ESD procedures were performed by four beginner and expert endoscopists. After circumferential mucosal incision for the target lesion, structured as the isolated pig esophagus 3 cm long, either C-ESD or OTF-ESD was randomly selected for submucosal dissection. All the ESD procedures were completed as en bloc resections, while perforation only occurred in a beginner's C-ESD procedure. The dissection time for OTF-ESD was significantly shorter than that for C-ESD for both the beginner and expert endoscopists (22.8 ± 8.3 min versus 7.8 ± 4.5 min, P < 0.001, and 11.3 ± 4.4 min versus 5.9 ± 2.5 min, P = 0.01, resp.). The frequency and volume of the submucosal injections were significantly smaller for OTF-ESD than for C-ESD (1.3 ± 0.6 times versus 2.9 ± 1.5 times, P < 0.001, and 5.3 ± 2.8 mL versus 15.6 ± 7.3 mL, P < 0.001, resp.). Histologically, muscular injury was more common among the C-ESD procedures (80% versus 13%, P = 0.009). Our results indicated that the OTF-ESD technique is useful for the safe and easy completion of esophageal ESD. PMID:27528866

  2. Engineering Evaluation of International Low Impact Docking System Latch Hooks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, J.; Patin, R.; Figert, J.

    2013-01-01

    The international Low Impact Docking System (iLIDS) provides a structural arrangement that allows for visiting vehicles to dock with the International Space Station (ISS) (Fig 1). The iLIDS docking units are mechanically joined together by a series of active and passive latch hooks. In order to preserve docking capability at the existing Russian docking interfaces, the iLIDS latch hooks are required to conform to the existing Russian design. The latch hooks are classified as being fail-safe. Since the latch hooks are fail-safe, the hooks are not fracture critical and a fatigue based service life assessment will satisfy the structural integrity requirements. Constant amplitude fatigue testing to failure on four sets of active/passive iLIDS latch hooks was performed at load magnitudes of 10, 11, and 12 kips. Failure analysis of the hook fatigue failures identified multi-site fatigue initiation that was effectively centered about the hook mid-plane (consistent with the 3D model results). The fatigue crack initiation distribution implies that the fatigue damage accumulation effectively results in a very low aspect ratio surface crack (which can be simulated as thru-thickness crack). Fatigue damage progression resulted in numerous close proximity fatigue crack initiation sites. It was not possible to determine if fatigue crack coalescence occurs during cyclic loading or as result of the fast fracture response. The presence of multiple fatigue crack initiation sites on different planes will result in the formation of ratchet marks as the cracks coalesce. Once the stable fatigue crack becomes unstable and the fast fracture advances across the remaining ligament and the plane stress condition at a free-surface will result in failure along a 45 deg. shear plane (slant fracture) and the resulting inclined edge is called a shear lip. The hook thickness on the plane of fatigue crack initiation is 0.787". The distance between the shear lips on this plane was on the order of 0

  3. A simple optical tweezers for trapping polystyrene particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiddiq, Minarni; Nasir, Zulfa; Yogasari, Dwiyana

    2013-09-01

    Optical tweezers is an optical trap. For decades, it has become an optical tool that can trap and manipulate any particle from the very small size like DNA to the big one like bacteria. The trapping force comes from the radiation pressure of laser light which is focused to a group of particles. Optical tweezers has been used in many research areas such as atomic physics, medical physics, biophysics, and chemistry. Here, a simple optical tweezers has been constructed using a modified Leybold laboratory optical microscope. The ocular lens of the microscope has been removed for laser light and digital camera accesses. A laser light from a Coherent diode laser with wavelength λ = 830 nm and power 50 mW is sent through an immersion oil objective lens with magnification 100 × and NA 1.25 to a cell made from microscope slides containing polystyrene particles. Polystyrene particles with size 3 μm and 10 μm are used. A CMOS Thorlabs camera type DCC1545M with USB Interface and Thorlabs camera lens 35 mm are connected to a desktop and used to monitor the trapping and measure the stiffness of the trap. The camera is accompanied by camera software which makes able for the user to capture and save images. The images are analyzed using ImageJ and Scion macro. The polystyrene particles have been trapped successfully. The stiffness of the trap depends on the size of the particles and the power of the laser. The stiffness increases linearly with power and decreases as the particle size larger.

  4. Interferometer-Controlled Optical Tweezers Constructed for Nanotechnology and Biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to control microparticles was developed in-house at the NASA Glenn Research Center in support of the nanotechnology project under NASA's Aerospace Propulsion and Power Base Research Program. A prototype interferometer-controlled optical tweezers was constructed to manipulate scanning probe microscope (SPM) tips. A laser beam passed through a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and a microscope objective then produced an optical trap from the coaxial beams. The trap levitated and generated the coarse motion of a 10-mm polystyrene sphere used to simulate a SPM tip. The interference between the beams provided fine control of the forces and moments on the sphere. The interferometer included a piezoelectric-scanned mirror to modulate the interference pattern. The 10-mm sphere was observed to oscillate about 1 mm as the mirror and fringe pattern oscillated. The prototype tweezers proved the feasibility of constructing a more sophisticated interferometer tweezers to hold and manipulate SPM tips. The SPM tips are intended to interrogate and manipulate nanostructures. A more powerful laser will be used to generate multiple traps to hold nanostructures and SPM tips. The vibrating mirror in the interferometer will be replaced with a spatial light modulator. The modulator will allow the optical phase distribution in one leg of the interferometer to be programmed independently at 640 by 480 points for detailed control of the forces and moments. The interference patterns will be monitored to measure the motion of the SPM tips. Neuralnetwork technology will provide fast analysis of the interference patterns for diagnostic purposes and for local or remote feedback control of the tips. This effort also requires theoretical and modeling support in the form of scattering calculations for twin coherent beams from nonspherical particles.

  5. Role of condenser iris in optical tweezer detection system.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Akbar; Reihani, S Nader S

    2011-10-15

    Optical tweezers have proven to be very useful in various scientific fields, from biology to nanotechnology. In this Letter we show, both by theory and experiment, that the interference intensity pattern at the back focal plane of the condenser consists of two distinguishable areas with anticorrelated intensity changes when the bead is moved in the axial direction. We show that the space angle defining the border of two areas linearly depends on the NA of the objective. We also propose a new octant photodiode, which could significantly improve the axial resolution compared to the commonly used quadrant photodiode technique. PMID:22002384

  6. Single molecule studies of helicases with magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Hodeib, Samar; Raj, Saurabh; Manosas, M; Zhang, Weiting; Bagchi, Debjani; Ducos, Bertrand; Allemand, Jean-François; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Helicases are a broad family of enzymes that perform crucial functions in DNA replication and in the maintenance of DNA and RNA integrity. A detailed mechanical study of helicases on DNA and RNA is possible using single molecule manipulation methods. Among those, magnetic tweezers (or traps) present a convenient, moderate throughput assay (tens of enzymes can be monitored simultaneously) that allow for high resolution (single base-pair) studies of these enzymes in various conditions and on various substrates (double and single stranded DNA and RNA). Here we discuss various implementation of the basic assay relevant for these studies. PMID:27371121

  7. Single optical tweezers based on elliptical core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Li; Chen, Yunhao; Liu, Zhihai; Zhang, Yaxun; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2016-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new single optical tweezers based on an elliptical core fiber, which can realize the trapped yeast cell rotation with a precise and simple control. Due to the elliptical shape of the fiber core, the LP11 mode beam can propagate stably. When we rotate the fiber tip, the LP11 mode beam will also rotate along with the fiber tip, which helps to realize the trapped micro-particle rotation. By using this method, we can easily realize the rotation of the trapped yeast cells, the rotating angle of the yeast cell is same as the elliptical core fiber tip.

  8. Microfluidic system for single cell sorting with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Thomas; Becsi, Laszlo; Talkenberg, Marc; Wagner, Michael; Weber, Petra; Mescheder, Ulrich; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2010-11-01

    A microfluidic system was developed and combined with optical tweezers for single cell sorting. This system consists of a glass chip of 300 μm thickness with an etched crosswise channel structure, a silicon layer for sealing and a PMMA substrate for tubular coupling. Selected cells are trapped and moved in perpendicular direction to the main flow for recovery in special reservoirs and further evaluation (e.g. by polymerase chain reaction, PCR). In addition, maximum light doses and exposure times for maintaining cell viability were determined.

  9. Optical Tweezers for Sample Fixing in Micro-Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Amenitsch, H.; Rappolt, M.; Sartori, B.; Laggner, P.; Cojoc, D.; Ferrari, E.; Garbin, V.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, Ch.

    2007-01-19

    In order to manipulate, characterize and measure the micro-diffraction of individual structural elements down to single phospholipid liposomes we have been using optical tweezers (OT) combined with an imaging microscope. We were able to install the OT system at the microfocus beamline ID13 at the ESRF and trap clusters of about 50 multi-lamellar liposomes (< 10 {mu}m large cluster). Further we have performed a scanning diffraction experiment with a 1 micrometer beam to demonstrate the fixing capabilities and to confirm the size of the liposome cluster by X-ray diffraction.

  10. Optical tweezers: Characterization and systems approach to high bandwidth force estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Hullas

    In recent times, the hard boundaries between classical fields of sciences have almost disappeared. There is a cross-pollination of ideas between sciences, engineering and mathematics. This work investigates a modern tool of micro-manipulation of microscopic particles that is used primarily by bio-physicists and bio-chemists for single cell, single molecule studies. This tool called the Optical Tweezers can trap microscopic dielectric particles using radiation pressure of light. Optical tweezers is increasingly being used in bio-assays as it provides a means to observe bio-molecules non invasively and offers a spatial resolution in nanometers and force resolution in femto-Newtons at millisecond timescales. In this work, physics governing the operating principle behind optical tweezers is presented, followed by a step by step procedure to build an optical tweezers system having measurement and actuation capability along with a controller logic for feedback implementation. The working of optical tweezers system is presented using a spring mass damper model and the traditional methods of optical tweezers characterization are discussed. A comprehensive view of Optical tweezers is then presented from a system theoretic perspective, underlying the limitations of traditional methods of tweezers characterization that are based on the first principle. The role of feedback in Optical tweezers is presented along with the fundamental limitations that the plant model imposes on optical tweezers performance to be used as a force sensor for fast dynamics input force. The purpose of optical tweezers as a pico-newton force probe is emphasized and a classical controls based method to improve the bandwidth of force estimation using an ad-hoc approach of system inversion is presented. The efficacy of system inversion based method in improving the force probe capability of feedback enhanced optical tweezers is validated by experimental results. It is shown experimentally that the system

  11. The Wire-Grasping Method as a New Technique for Forceps Biopsy of Biliary Strictures: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study of Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yasunobu; Ueda, Kazuki; Kawaji, Yuki; Tamura, Takashi; Itonaga, Masahiro; Yoshida, Takeichi; Maeda, Hiroki; Magari, Hirohito; Maekita, Takao; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao; Kato, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Transpapillary forceps biopsy is an effective diagnostic technique in patients with biliary stricture. This prospective study aimed to determine the usefulness of the wire-grasping method as a new technique for forceps biopsy. Methods Consecutive patients with biliary stricture or irregularities of the bile duct wall were randomly allocated to either the direct or wire-grasping method group. In the wire-grasping method, forceps in the duodenum grasps a guide-wire placed into the bile duct beforehand, and then, the forceps are pushed through the papilla without endoscopic sphincterotomy. In the direct method, forceps are directly pushed into the bile duct alongside a guide-wire. The primary endpoint was the success rate of obtaining specimens suitable for adequate pathological examination. Results In total, 32 patients were enrolled, and 28 (14 in each group) were eligible for analysis. The success rate was significantly higher using the wire-grasping method than the direct method (100% vs 50%, p=0.016). Sensitivity and accuracy for the diagnosis of cancer were comparable in patients with the successful procurement of biopsy specimens between the two methods (91% vs 83% and 93% vs 86%, respectively). Conclusions The wire-grasping method is useful for diagnosing patients with biliary stricture or irregularities of the bile duct wall. PMID:27021502

  12. Eos Interviews Robert Van Hook, Former AGU Interim Executive Director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-08-01

    Robert Van Hook, who served as AGU's interim executive director since January 2009, led the organization during a transition period that began with the retirement of long-serving executive director A. F. (“Fred”) Spilhaus Jr. Van Hook's tenure concluded on 30 August when Christine McEntee assumed her position as AGU's new executive director (see Eos, 91(17), 153, 156, 2010). During his tenure at AGU, which overlapped with a global economic recession, Van Hook helped to guide the organization through key structural governance changes, strategic planning, and upgrades in technology, human resources, and accounting. He also helped to revitalize public outreach and member services, among many other efforts. Van Hook, president of Transition Management Consulting, recently reflected upon his tenure, the transition period, and the future of AGU. Van Hook credits AGU's strong volunteer leadership—including past presidents Tim Killeen and Tim Grove, current president Mike McPhaden, and president-elect Carol Finn—for courage in moving the organization through a successful transition. “They were the ones who shoved the boat off from the shore. I was lucky enough to be invited into the boat,” he said. He also credits the staff for their resiliency and commitment to supporting AGU's science.

  13. Interdependence of the Rad50 hook and globular domain functions

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Marcel; Kochańczyk, Tomasz; Tous, Cristina; Aguilera, Andrés; Krężel, Artur; Petrini, John H J

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Rad50 contains a conserved Zn2+ coordination domain (the Rad50 hook) that functions as a homodimerization interface. Hook ablation phenocopies Rad50 deficiency in all respects. Here we focused on rad50 mutations flanking the Zn2+-coordinating hook cysteines. These mutants impaired hook-mediated dimerization, but recombination between sister chromatids was largely unaffected. This may reflect that cohesin-mediated sister chromatid interactions are sufficient for double strand break repair. However, Mre11 complex functions specified by the globular domain, including Tel1 (ATM) activation, nonhomologous end-joining, and DNA double strand break end resection were affected, suggesting that dimerization exerts a broad influence on Mre11 complex function. These phenotypes were suppressed by mutations within the coiled coil and globular ATPase domain, suggesting a model in which conformational changes in the hook and globular domains are transmitted via the extended coils of Rad50. We propose that transmission of spatial information in this manner underlies the regulation of Mre11 complex functions. PMID:25601756

  14. Invited Article: A review of haptic optical tweezers for an interactive microworld exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacoret, Cécile; Régnier, Stéphane

    2013-08-01

    This paper is the first review of haptic optical tweezers, a new technique which associates force feedback teleoperation with optical tweezers. This technique allows users to explore the microworld by sensing and exerting picoNewton-scale forces with trapped microspheres. Haptic optical tweezers also allow improved dexterity of micromanipulation and micro-assembly. One of the challenges of this technique is to sense and magnify picoNewton-scale forces by a factor of 1012 to enable human operators to perceive interactions that they have never experienced before, such as adhesion phenomena, extremely low inertia, and high frequency dynamics of extremely small objects. The design of optical tweezers for high quality haptic feedback is challenging, given the requirements for very high sensitivity and dynamic stability. The concept, design process, and specification of optical tweezers reviewed here are focused on those intended for haptic teleoperation. In this paper, two new specific designs as well as the current state-of-the-art are presented. Moreover, the remaining important issues are identified for further developments. The initial results obtained are promising and demonstrate that optical tweezers have a significant potential for haptic exploration of the microworld. Haptic optical tweezers will become an invaluable tool for force feedback micromanipulation of biological samples and nano- and micro-assembly parts.

  15. Invited article: a review of haptic optical tweezers for an interactive microworld exploration.

    PubMed

    Pacoret, Cécile; Régnier, Stéphane

    2013-08-01

    This paper is the first review of haptic optical tweezers, a new technique which associates force feedback teleoperation with optical tweezers. This technique allows users to explore the microworld by sensing and exerting picoNewton-scale forces with trapped microspheres. Haptic optical tweezers also allow improved dexterity of micromanipulation and micro-assembly. One of the challenges of this technique is to sense and magnify picoNewton-scale forces by a factor of 10(12) to enable human operators to perceive interactions that they have never experienced before, such as adhesion phenomena, extremely low inertia, and high frequency dynamics of extremely small objects. The design of optical tweezers for high quality haptic feedback is challenging, given the requirements for very high sensitivity and dynamic stability. The concept, design process, and specification of optical tweezers reviewed here are focused on those intended for haptic teleoperation. In this paper, two new specific designs as well as the current state-of-the-art are presented. Moreover, the remaining important issues are identified for further developments. The initial results obtained are promising and demonstrate that optical tweezers have a significant potential for haptic exploration of the microworld. Haptic optical tweezers will become an invaluable tool for force feedback micromanipulation of biological samples and nano- and micro-assembly parts. PMID:24007046

  16. Determination of motility forces on isolated chromosomes with laser tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Khatibzadeh, Nima; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Bui, Ann A. M.; Rocha, Yesenia; Cruz, Gladys M.; Loke, Vince; Shi, Linda Z.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Berns, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative determination of the motility forces of chromosomes during cell division is fundamental to understanding a process that is universal among eukaryotic organisms. Using an optical tweezers system, isolated mammalian chromosomes were held in a 1064 nm laser trap. The minimum force required to move a single chromosome was determined to be ≈0.8–5 pN. The maximum transverse trapping efficiency of the isolated chromosomes was calculated as ≈0.01–0.02. These results confirm theoretical force calculations of ≈0.1–12 pN to move a chromosome on the mitotic or meiotic spindle. The verification of these results was carried out by calibration of the optical tweezers when trapping microspheres with a diameter of 4.5–15 µm in media with 1–7 cP viscosity. The results of the chromosome and microsphere trapping experiments agree with optical models developed to simulate trapping of cylindrical and spherical specimens. PMID:25359514

  17. Use of optical tweezers to probe epithelial mechanosensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cellular mechanosensation mechanisms have been implicated in a variety of disease states. Specifically in renal tubules, the primary cilium and associated mechanosensitive ion channels are hypothesized to play a role in water and salt homeostasis, with relevant disease states including polycystic kidney disease and hypertension. Previous experiments investigating ciliary-mediated cellular mechanosensation have used either fluid flow chambers or micropipetting to elicit a biological response. The interpretation of these experiments in terms of the ``ciliary hypothesis'' has been difficult due the spatially distributed nature of the mechanical disturbance-several competing hypotheses regarding possible roles of primary cilium, glycocalyx, microvilli, cell junctions, and actin cytoskeleton exist. I report initial data using optical tweezers to manipulate individual primary cilia in an attempt to elicit a mechanotransduction response-specifically, the release of intracellular calcium. The advantage of using laser tweezers over previous work is that the applied disturbance is highly localized. I find that stimulation of a primary cilium elicits a response, while stimulation of the apical surface membrane does not. These results lend support to the hypothesis that the primary cilium mediates transduction of mechanical strain into a biochemical response in renal epithelia.

  18. EAARL Coastal Topography - Sandy Hook 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of Gateway National Recreation Area's Sandy Hook Unit in New Jersey, acquired on May 16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Robert Hooke and the Royal Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Neil

    2000-01-01

    Many physics students only come across Hooke when they learn his law of stretching springs, which is a pity because it is just one of his contributions to progress in science, and a minor one at that. His, Micrographia, the first great book of microscopical observations, arouses admiration to this day. He was also active in horology, astronomy, geology and surveying, and he took part in biological experiments, transfusing blood between animals. Much of his work was done while he was curator of experiments for the Royal Society, in which he was involved almost from its foundation. This was by no means a full-time occupation, however. After the Great Fire of London, Hooke was appointed one of the three surveyors for the rebuilding of the city. One of the others was Christopher Wren, a lifelong friend. In this role Hooke was responsible for the design of several buildings, including the Monument. Nichols writes about all these activities, as well as Hooke's childhood, his education at Westminster School, the University of Oxford when Hooke was an undergraduate, and the founding of the Royal Society. The book draws on research for a master's degree. Turning a dissertation into a popular book is risky. The author has avoided the pitfall of making it too academic, but the result is not satisfying. Nichols seems overawed by Hooke and his work, frequently seeming to credit Hooke with a far-reaching influence that he did not necessarily have. There may be a case for lauding Hooke as the father of English microscopy, the father of English meteorology, and the founder of English geology and earth sciences, but it needs to be made much more critically, even in a popular work. Hooke was full of good ideas, but he rarely continued long enough to put them into practice. There is no doubt that Hooke proposed using a balance wheel and spring to improve the timekeeping of a watch, for example, but he did not have a watch made to his design until after Christiaan Huygens had

  20. Structure and dynamics of single DNA molecules manipulated by magnetic tweezers and or flow

    PubMed Central

    Leuba, Sanford H.; Wheeler, Travis B.; Cheng, Chao-Min; LeDuc, Philip R.; Fernández-Sierra, Mónica; Quiñones, Edwin

    2009-01-01

    Here we describe experiments which employ magnetic tweezers and or microfluidics to manipulate single DNA molecules. We describe the use of magnetic tweezers coupled to an inverted microscope as well as the use of a magnetic tweezers setup with an upright microscope. Using a chamber prepared via soft lithography, we also describe a microfluidic device for the manipulation of individual DNA molecules. Finally, we present some past successful examples of using these approaches to elucidate unique information about protein-nucleic acid interactions. PMID:19015032

  1. Inducing trauma into neuroblastoma cells and synthetic neural networks using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Patrick William

    The laser tweezers have become a very useful tool in the fields of physics, chemistry, and biology. My intent is to use the laser tweezers to induce trauma into neuroblastoma cells, cells that resemble neural cells when treated with retinoic acid, to try to surmise what happens when neural cells and networks are disrupted or destroyed. The issues presented will deal with the obtaining, maintenance, and differentiation of the cells, as well as the inner operations of the laser tweezers themselves, and what kind of applications it has been applied to, as well as to my work in this project.

  2. Retrospective study: The diagnostic accuracy of conventional forceps biopsy of gastric epithelial compared to endoscopic submucosal dissection (STROBE compliant).

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; Lv, Xueyou; Lin, Yiming; Li, Dejian; Chen, Lihua; Ji, Feng; Li, Youming; Yu, Chaohui

    2016-07-01

    Conventional forceps biopsy (CFB) is the most popular way to screen for gastric epithelial neoplasia (GEN) and adenocarcinoma of gastric epithelium. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy between conventional forceps biopsy and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD).Four hundred forty-four patients who finally undertook ESD in our hospital were enrolled from Jan 1, 2009 to Sep 1, 2015. We retrospectively assessed the characteristics of pathological results of CFB and ESD.The concordance rate between CFB and ESD specimens was 68.92% (306/444). Men showed a lower concordance rate (63.61% vs 79.33%; P = 0.001) and concordance patients were younger (P = 0.048). In multivariate analysis, men significantly had a lower concordance rate (coefficient -0.730, P = 0.002) and a higher rate of pathological upgrade (coefficient -0.648, P = 0.015). Locations of CFB did not influence the concordance rate statistically.The concordance rate was relatively high in our hospital. According to our analysis, old men plus gastric fundus or antrum of CFB were strongly suggested to perform ESD if precancerous lesions were found. And young women with low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia could select regular follow-up. PMID:27472723

  3. Problem in Two Unknowns: Robert Hooke and a Worm in Newton's Apple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstock, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the place that Robert Hooke has in science history versus the scientific contributions he made. Examines the relationship between Hooke and his contemporary, Isaac Newton, and Hooke's claims that Newton built on his ideas without receiving Newton's recognition. (26 references) (MDH)

  4. In vitro Antioxidant of a Water-Soluble Polysaccharide from Dendrobium fimhriatum Hook.var.oculatum Hook

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Aoxue; Fan, Yijun

    2011-01-01

    A water-soluble crude polysaccharide (DFHP) obtained from the aqueous extracts of the stem of Dendrobium fimhriatum Hook.var.oculatum Hook through hot water extraction followed by ethanol precipitation, was found to have an average molecular weight (Mw) of about 209.3 kDa. Monosaccharide analysis revealed that DFHP was composed of mannose, glucose and galactose in a content ratio of 37.52%; 43.16%; 19.32%. The investigation of antioxidant activity in vitro showed that DFHP is a potential antioxidant. PMID:21747725

  5. TweezPal - Optical tweezers analysis and calibration software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Natan

    2010-11-01

    Optical tweezers, a powerful tool for optical trapping, micromanipulation and force transduction, have in recent years become a standard technique commonly used in many research laboratories and university courses. Knowledge about the optical force acting on a trapped object can be gained only after a calibration procedure which has to be performed (by an expert) for each type of trapped objects. In this paper we present TweezPal, a user-friendly, standalone Windows software tool for optical tweezers analysis and calibration. Using TweezPal, the procedure can be performed in a matter of minutes even by non-expert users. The calibration is based on the Brownian motion of a particle trapped in a stationary optical trap, which is being monitored using video or photodiode detection. The particle trajectory is imported into the software which instantly calculates position histogram, trapping potential, stiffness and anisotropy. Program summaryProgram title: TweezPal Catalogue identifier: AEGR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 44 891 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 792 653 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Borland Delphi Computer: Any PC running Microsoft Windows Operating system: Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, Vista, 7 RAM: 12 Mbytes Classification: 3, 4.14, 18, 23 Nature of problem: Quick, robust and user-friendly calibration and analysis of optical tweezers. The optical trap is calibrated from the trajectory of a trapped particle undergoing Brownian motion in a stationary optical trap (input data) using two methods. Solution method: Elimination of the experimental drift in position data. Direct calculation of the trap stiffness from the positional

  6. Hooking up: gender differences, evolution, and pluralistic ignorance.

    PubMed

    Reiber, Chris; Garcia, Justin R

    2010-01-01

    "Hooking-up"--engaging in no-strings-attached sexual behaviors with uncommitted partners--has become a norm on college campuses, and raises the potential for disease, unintended pregnancy, and physical and psychological trauma. The primacy of sex in the evolutionary process suggests that predictions derived from evolutionary theory may be a useful first step toward understanding these contemporary behaviors. This study assessed the hook-up behaviors and attitudes of 507 college students. As predicted by behavioral-evolutionary theory: men were more comfortable than women with all types of sexual behaviors; women correctly attributed higher comfort levels to men, but overestimated men's actual comfort levels; and men correctly attributed lower comfort levels to women, but still overestimated women's actual comfort levels. Both genders attributed higher comfort levels to same-gendered others, reinforcing a pluralistic ignorance effect that might contribute to the high frequency of hook-up behaviors in spite of the low comfort levels reported and suggesting that hooking up may be a modern form of intrasexual competition between females for potential mates. PMID:22947808

  7. 3. This machine in building #7 plated the hooks used ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. This machine in building #7 plated the hooks used on the cross chains in tire chains, by the 'pean' or mechanical process. This process was replaced when coated wire was introduced. - American Chain & Cable Company, East Princess Street (400 Block), York, York County, PA

  8. CAMERA IS ON CATWALK ABOVE MTR. CRANE HOOK LOWERS TOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CAMERA IS ON CATWALK ABOVE MTR. CRANE HOOK LOWERS TOP PLUG ONTO REACTOR. NOTE PLANK-LIKE BRIDGE (WALKWAY) TO BALCONY AT UPPER RIGHT. INL NEGATIVE NO. 4502. Unknown Photographer, probable date 3/31/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. Development of an externally powered prosthetic hook for amputees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchak, A., Jr.; Allen, J. R.; Bontrager, E. L.

    1973-01-01

    The powered hook with trigger finger appears to be a useful adaptation of a terminal device for an amputee when performing vocational activities involving the use of a powered tool requiring a trigger control. The proportional control system includes transducers and amplifiers and appears to have widespread application for control of any external power, whether it be in the orthotic or prosthetic field.

  10. School Safety in a Post-Sandy Hook World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trump, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    In this report the author, who is a school safety expert, provides information about school safety in a post-Sandy Hook world. He presents the following: (1) Continuum of Threats and Responses; (2) The role social media plays; (3) Reliable Best Practices; (4) Policy and Funding--Climate and Context; (5) Policy and Funding--Things to Avoid; and (6)…

  11. Anharmonic Vibrations of an "Ideal" Hooke's Law Oscillator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomchick, John; McKelvey, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a model describing the vibrations of a mass connected to fixed supports by "ideal" Hooke's law springs which may serve as a starting point in the study of the properties of irons in a crystal undergoing soft mode activated transition. (SL)

  12. Mechanical properties of a giant liposome studied using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitamichi, Yoko; Ichikawa, Masatoshi; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2009-09-01

    The mechanical properties of a micrometer-sized giant liposome are studied by deforming it from the inside using dual-beam optical tweezers. As the liposome is extended, its shape changes from a sphere to a lemon shape, and finally, a tubular part is generated. The surface tension σ and the bending rigidity κ of the lipid membrane are obtained from the measured force-extension curve. In a one-phase liposome, it was found that σ increases as the charged component increases but κ remains approximately constant. In a two-phase liposome, the characteristic deformation and the force-extension curve differ from those observed for the one-phase liposome.

  13. Skewed Brownian Fluctuations in Single-Molecule Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Daniel R.; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Henighan, Thomas; Dekker, Cees

    2014-01-01

    Measurements in magnetic tweezers rely upon precise determination of the position of a magnetic microsphere. Fluctuations in the position due to Brownian motion allows calculation of the applied force, enabling deduction of the force-extension response function for a single DNA molecule that is attached to the microsphere. The standard approach relies upon using the mean of position fluctuations, which is valid when the microsphere axial position fluctuations obey a normal distribution. However, here we demonstrate that nearby surfaces and the non-linear elasticity of DNA can skew the distribution. Through experiment and simulations, we show that such a skewing leads to inaccurate position measurements which significantly affect the extracted DNA extension and mechanical properties, leading to up to two-fold errors in measured DNA persistence length. We develop a simple, robust and easily implemented method to correct for such mismeasurements. PMID:25265383

  14. Investigating collagen self-assembly with optical tweezers microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Nancy; Shayegan, Marjan; Altindal, Tuba

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Assembled from individual triple-helical proteins to make strong fibres, collagen is a beautiful example of a hierarchical self-assembling system. Using optical tweezers to perform microrheology measurements, we explore the dynamics of interactions between collagens responsible for their self-assembly and examine the development of heterogeneous mechanics during assembly into fibrillar gels. Telopeptides, short non-helical regions that flank the triple helix, have long been known to facilitate fibril self-assembly. We find that their removal not only slows down fibril nucleation but also results in a significant frequency-dependent reduction in the elastic modulus of collagens in solution. We interpret these results in terms of a model in which telopeptides facilitate transient intermolecular interactions, which enhance network connectivity in solution and lead to more rapid assembly in fibril-forming conditions. Current address: Department of Physics, McGill University.

  15. Using Optical Tweezers to Study Cell Mechanics during Airway Reopening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, Huseyin; Wang, Jing; Ghadiali, Samir; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Patients suffering from the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) must be mechanically ventilated in order to survive. However, these ventilation protocols may generate injurious hydrodynamic stresses especially during low tidal volume (VT) ventilation when the flow of micron-sized air bubbles displace the surrounding liquid. In-vitro studies in our lab revealed that microbubble flows can severally damage lung epithelial cells (EC). The degree of injury was elevated for sub-confluent monolayers in small channel heights. Under these conditions, the micromechanics of individual EC may influence the degree of cellular injury. To investigate the role of cell mechanics, we used an oscillating Optical Tweezers (OT) technique to measure the intrinsic mechanical properties of EC before and after the flow of microbubbles. Knowledge of how the EC's micromechanical properties influence cell viability may lead to the development of novel treatment therapies that enhance the EC's ability to withstand injurious hydrodynamic stresses during ventilation treatment.

  16. A tunable line optical tweezers instrument with nanometer spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Rogers, W Benjamin; Crocker, John C

    2014-04-01

    We describe a simple scanning-line optical tweezers instrument for measuring pair interactions between micrometer-sized colloidal particles. Our instrument combines a resonant scanning mirror and an acousto-optic modulator. The resonant scanning mirror creates a time-averaged line trap whose effective one-dimensional intensity profile, and corresponding trapping potential energy landscape can be programmed using the acousto-optic modulator. We demonstrate control over the confining potential by designing and measuring a family of one-dimensional harmonic traps. By adjusting the spring constant, we balance scattering-induced repulsive forces between a pair of trapped particles, creating a flat potential near contact that facilitates interaction measurements. We also develop a simple method for extracting the out-of-plane motion of trapped particles from their relative brightness, allowing us to resolve their relative separation to roughly 1 nm. PMID:24784615

  17. Operational Regimes and Physics Present in Optoelectronic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Justin K.; Jamshidi, Arash; Ohta, Aaron T.; Hsu, Hsan-Yin; Wu, Ming C.

    2008-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) are a powerful light-based technique for the manipulation of micro- and nanoscopic particles. In addition to an optically patterned dielectrophoresis (DEP) force, other light-induced electrokinetic and thermal effects occur in the OET device. In this paper, we present a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of various fluidic, optical, and electrical effects present during OET operation. These effects include DEP, light-induced ac electroosmosis, electrothermal flow, and buoyancy-driven flow. We present finite-element modeling of these effects to establish the dominant mode for a given set of device parameters and bias conditions. These results are confirmed experimentally and present a comprehensive outline of the operational regimes of the OET device. PMID:19079767

  18. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: construction, optimization, and calibration.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Richard D L; Jenkins, Matthew C; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2009-08-01

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45 degrees, smaller angles give a full 2pi phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method. PMID:19725658

  19. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: Construction, optimization, and calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Hanes, Richard D. L.; Jenkins, Matthew C.; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2009-08-15

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45 deg., smaller angles give a full 2{pi} phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method.

  20. Near-field-magnetic-tweezer manipulation of single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jie; Skoko, Dunja; Marko, John F

    2004-07-01

    We have developed an instrument for micromanipulation of single DNA molecules end labeled with 3-microm-diameter paramagnetic particles. A small, permanent magnet that can be moved as close as 10 microm to the particle being manipulated can generate forces in excess of 200 pN, significantly larger than obtained in other recent "magnetic-tweezer" studies. Our instrument generates these forces in the focal plane of a microscope objective, allowing straightforward real-time observation of molecule extension with a position resolution of approximately 30 nm. We show how our magnetic manipulation system can be combined with manipulation and force measurement using glass micropipettes to allow rapid switching between measurements in fixed-force and fixed-extension ensembles. We demonstrate the use of our system to study formation of DNA loops by an enzyme which strongly binds two copies of a specific 6-base-pair sequence. PMID:15324086

  1. Microrheology Using Optical Tweezers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatwright, Thomas; Levine, Alex; Dennin, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Microrheological techniques have been used successfully to determine mechanical properties of materials important in cellular structure. Also critical to cellular mechanical functions are biological membranes. Many aspects of biological membranes can be modeled using Langmuir monolayers, which are single layers surfactants at the air-water interface. The macroscopic mechanical properties of Langmuir monolayers have been extensively characterized. In contrast to macroscopic measurements, we report on experimental methods for studying the rheological properties of Langmuir monolayers on the micron scale. A water immersion optical tweezers system is used to trap ˜1 micron diameter beads in a monolayer. The passive motion of the trapped beads is recorded at high frequency and the complex shear modulus is calculated. Preliminary microrheological data of a fatty acid monolayer showing dependence on surface pressure will be presented. Experimental obstacles will also be discussed.

  2. Trapping particles using waveguide-coupled gold bowtie plasmonic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pin-Tso; Chu, Heng-Yi; Lu, Tsan-Wen; Lee, Po-Tsung

    2014-12-21

    We propose and demonstrate a trapping configuration integrating coupled waveguides and gold bowtie structures to form near-field plasmonic tweezers. Compared with excitation from the top, waves coupled through the waveguide can excite specific bowties on the waveguide and trap particles precisely. Thus this scheme is more efficient and compact, and will assist the circuit design on a chip. With lightning rod and gap effects, the gold bowtie structures can generate highly concentrated resonant fields and induce trapping forces as strong as 652 pN W(-1) on particles with diameters as small as 20 nm. This trapping capability is investigated numerically and verified experimentally with observations of the transport, trapping, and release of particles in the system. PMID:25288366

  3. iTweezers: optical micromanipulation controlled by an Apple iPad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, R. W.; Gibson, G.; Carberry, D.; Picco, L.; Miles, M.; Padgett, M. J.

    2011-04-01

    The 3D interactive manipulation of multiple particles with holographic optical tweezers is often hampered by the control system. We use a multi-touch interface implemented on an Apple iPad to overcome many of the limitations of mouse-based control, and demonstrate an elegant and intuitive interface to multi-particle manipulation. This interface connects to the tweezers system hardware over a wireless network, allowing it to function as a remote monitor and control device.

  4. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  5. Measuring red blood cell aggregation forces using double optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Heloise P; Fontes, Adriana; Thomaz, André; Castro, Vagner; Cesar, Carlos L; Barjas-Castro, Maria L

    2013-04-01

    Classic immunohematology approaches, based on agglutination techniques, have been used in manual and automated immunohematology laboratory routines. Red blood cell (RBC) agglutination depends on intermolecular attractive forces (hydrophobic bonds, Van der Walls, electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonds) and repulsive interactions (zeta potential). The aim of this study was to measure the force involved in RBC aggregation using double optical tweezers, in normal serum, in the presence of erythrocyte antibodies and associated to agglutination potentiator solutions (Dextran, low ionic strength solution [LISS] and enzymes). The optical tweezers consisted of a neodymium:yattrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser beam focused through a microscope equipped with a minicam, which registered the trapped cell image in a computer where they could be analyzed using a software. For measuring RBC aggregation, a silica bead attached to RBCs was trapped and the force needed to slide one RBC over the other, as a function of the velocities, was determined. The median of the RBC aggregation force measured in normal serum (control) was 1 × 10(-3) (0.1-2.5) poise.cm. The samples analyzed with anti-D showed 2 × 10(-3) (1.0-4.0) poise.cm (p < 0.001). RBC diluted in potentiator solutions (Dextran 0.15%, Bromelain and LISS) in the absence of erythrocyte antibodies, did not present agglutination. High adherence was observed when RBCs were treated with papain. Results are in agreement with the imunohematological routine, in which non-specific results are not observed when using LISS, Dextran and Bromelain. Nevertheless, false positive results are frequently observed in manual and automated microplate analyzer using papain enzyme. The methodology proposed is simple and could provide specific information with the possibility of meansuration regarding RBC interaction. PMID:23402665

  6. Extending the Range for Force Calibration in Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J.; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates. PMID:25992733

  7. Extending the range for force calibration in magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates. PMID:25992733

  8. The value of forceps biopsy and core needle biopsy in prediction of pathologic complete remission in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan-Hong; Liu, Guo-Chen; Kong, Ling-Heng; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pathological complete remission (pCR) after treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) have better long-term outcome and may receive conservative treatments in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The study aimed to evaluate the value of forceps biopsy and core needle biopsy in prediction of pCR in LARC treated with nCRT. In total, 120patients entered this study. Sixty-one consecutive patients received preoperative forceps biopsy during endoscopic examination. Ex vivo core needle biopsy was performed in resected specimens of another 43 consecutive patients. The accuracy for ex vivo core needle biopsy was significantly higher than forceps biopsy (76.7% vs. 36.1%; p < 0.001). The sensitivity for ex vivo core needle biopsy was significantly lower in good responder (TRG 3) than poor responder (TRG ≤ 2) (52.9% vs. 94.1%; p = 0.017). In vivo core needle biopsy was further performed in 16 patients with good response. Eleven patients had residual cancer cells in final resected specimens, among whom 4 (36.4%) patients were biopsy positive. In conclusion, routine forceps biopsy was of limited value in identifying pCR after nCRT. Although core needle biopsy might further identify a subset of patients with residual cancer cells, the accuracy was not substantially increased in good responders. PMID:26416245

  9. Nasotracheal intubation in a difficult airway using the Storz C-MAC Videolaryngoscope, the Boedeker Bougie endotracheal introducer, and the Boedeker curved forceps.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Thomas A; Bernhagen, Mary A; Boedeker, Ben H

    2012-01-01

    Airway management has multiple indications for nasotracheal intubation. In this study, we focus on its indication in difficult airways. This work describes a modified procedure of nasotracheal intubation using the new Storz CMAC® Videolaryngoscope, the malleable Boedeker Bougie and the curved Boedeker Forceps in the intubation of a difficult airway manikin. PMID:22357008

  10. Biliary hemostasis using an endoscopic plastic stent placement for uncontrolled hemobilia caused by transpapillary forceps biopsy (with video).

    PubMed

    Shinjo, Kunihiro; Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Toru; Kawata, Noboru; Uemura, Sunao; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    A 78-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for the examination and treatment of jaundice. A transpapillary forceps biopsy for a long distal bile duct stricture was performed using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Immediately after the biopsy, massive bleeding was observed from the orifice of the papilla. Although hemobilia was pulsatile, an endoscopic biliary plastic stent placement was very effective in achieving hemostasis. However, a nasal biliary catheter was required because a blood clot clogged the stent on the following day. Although covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS) placement has been reported for achieving endoscopic hemostasis for bleeding, we chose to use a plastic stent to reduce the risk of post-procedure pancreatitis. The placement of both an endoscopic biliary plastic stent and a nasobiliary drainage catheter can be an alternative hemostatic tool to CSEMSs. PMID:26960930

  11. Shang Ring versus forceps-guided adult male circumcision: a randomized controlled effectiveness study in southwestern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    KANYAGO, Samuel; RIDING, David M; MUTAKOOHA, Elichum; de la O, Alcides Lopez; SIEDNER, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Adult male circumcision (AMC) reduces HIV transmission but uptake is limited in part by current surgical methods. We randomized HIV-uninfected men (n=138) to receive Shang ring (SR) or forceps-guided (FG) AMC from a locally-trained surgeon. In as-treated analyses, more SR procedures were completed within 10 minutes (79% vs 0%, p<0.01) and more subjects reported high satisfaction (77% vs 58%, p=0.03). Healing time and pain scores were similar, though minor complication rates were higher in SR subjects (56% vs 24%, p<0.01). SR circumcision is a rapid and acceptable method of AMC and should be further evaluated to increase uptake of AMC. PMID:23599013

  12. A New Surgical Approach for the Treatment of Conjunctivochalasis: Reduction of the Conjunctival Fold with Bipolar Electrocautery Forceps

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Eduardo; Muñoz, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To report a new surgical technique for the treatment of conjunctivochalasis. Methods. A new surgical technique in which specially designed bipolar electrocautery forceps facilitate the complete reduction of the conjunctival folds without creating lesions near the corneoscleral limbus was designed. A retrospective revision of the medical records of patients treated with this technique between the years 2011 and 2013 was made, and eighteen eyes of sixteen patients with conjunctivochalasis treated with this new technique were included. Results. All the eyes treated showed a significant improvement with no evidence of scar lesions after a mean follow-up time of 10 months. Conclusions. The surgical technique presented here could be a good alternative for the management of conjunctivochalasis. PMID:27200408

  13. Automated multi-parametric sorting of micron-sized particles via multi-trap laser tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaputa, Daniel S.

    The capabilities of laser tweezers have rapidly expanded since the first demonstration by Ashkin and co-workers in 1970 of the ability to trap particles using optical energy. Laser tweezers have been used to measure piconewton forces in many biological and material science application, sort bacteria, measure DNA bond strength, and even perform microsurgery. The laser tweezers system developed for this dissertation foreshadows the next generation of laser tweezer systems that provide automated particle sorted based upon multiple criteria. Many laser tweezer sorting applications today entail the operator sorting cells from a bulk sample, one by one. This dissertation demonstrates the technologies of pattern recognition and image processing that allow for an entire microscope slide to be sorted without any operator intervention. We already live in an automated world where the cars we drive are built by machines instead of humans. The technology is there, and the only factors limiting the advancements of fully automated biological instrumentation is the lack of developers with the appropriate knowledge sets. This dissertation introduces the concept of sorting particles via a multi-parametric approach where several parameters such as size, fluorescence, and Raman spectra are used as sorting criteria. Since the advent of laser tweezers, several groups have demonstrated the ability to sort cells and other particle by size, or by fluorescence, or by any other parameter, but to our knowledge there does not exist a laser tweezer sorting system that can sort particles based upon multiple parameters. Sorting via a single parameter can be a severe limitation as the method lacks the robustness and class specificity that exists when sorting based upon multiple parameters. Simply put, it makes more sense to determine the worth of a baseball card by considering it's condition as well as it's age, rather then solely upon its condition. By adding another parameter such as the name of

  14. Short-term prospective study of hooking up among college students.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jesse; Fincham, Frank D; Moore, Jon

    2011-04-01

    Hook ups are casual sexual encounters (ranging from kissing to intercourse) between two people with no clear mutual expectation of further interactions or a committed relationship. This study utilized a short-term prospective design to examine predictors of hooking up in a sample of young adults (N = 394). Hooking up over the past year, positive reactions to prior hook ups, alcohol use, and loneliness were associated with hooking up over a 4-month period. Alcohol use was a stronger predictor for women than men. Thoughtfulness about relationship transitions and religiosity were significant predictors of hooking up in univariate analyses, but were not significant in multivariate analyses. Young adults who reported more depressive symptoms and feelings of loneliness at Time 1 and subsequently engaged in penetrative hook ups reported fewer depressive symptoms and lower feelings of loneliness at Time 2 as compared to young adults who did not hook up. However, young adults who reported fewer depressive symptoms and were less lonely at Time 1 and engaged in penetrative hook ups over the 4 month period reported more depressive symptoms and greater feelings of loneliness at Time 2 as compared to young adults who did not hook up. Implications for relationship education programs are offered. PMID:21203816

  15. On the reliability of hook echoes as tornado indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    A study of radar echoes associated with the tornadoes of the 3 April 1974 outbreak was performed to evaluate the usefulness of echo shape as an indicator of tornadic thunderstorms. The hook shape was usually successful in characterizing an echo as tornadic, with a false alarm rate of 16%. Because hook echoes were relatively rare, however, a less restrictive shape called distinctive was more successful at detecting tornadic thunderstorms, identifying 65% of the tornadic echoes. An echo had a distinctive shape if it possessed a marked appendage on its right rear flank or was in the shape of a spiral, comma or line echo wave pattern (LEWP). Characteristics of the distinctive echo are given.

  16. Studying Hooke's Law by Using a Pogo Stick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolás

    2011-05-01

    Perhaps the pogo stick was little Robert Hooke's favorite childhood toy, consisting of a stiff spring inserted in a tube fixed at the upper end and connected to a moveable rod at the other. Hand grips and a foot rest are connected to the tube. The idea is to jump on it taking advantage of the force provided by the spring when it is compressed. Figure 1 shows a schematic of a pogo stick.

  17. Studying Hooke's Law by Using a Pogo Stick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Perhaps the pogo stick was little Robert Hooke's favorite childhood toy, consisting of a stiff spring inserted in a tube fixed at the upper end and connected to a moveable rod at the other. Hand grips and a foot rest are connected to the tube. The idea is to jump on it taking advantage of the force provided by the spring when it is compressed.…

  18. Calcaneal Tuberosity Fixation Using a Locking Compression Hook Plate.

    PubMed

    Agni, Nickil; Fearon, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Calcaneal tuberosity fractures account for 1% to 3% of all calcaneal fractures. Surgical fixation is particularly challenging owing to osteoporosis and numerous comorbidities and risk factors in this patient population. Numerous techniques have been proposed; however, we describe the use of a locking compression hook plate in the treatment of type 2 fracture patterns. This has the advantage of providing stable fixation in osteoporotic bone, avoiding the disadvantages of soft tissue and metalwork irritation that have been described with other techniques. PMID:27067200

  19. Computer-automated program for calibration of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. D.; Foley, T. W.; Chang, A. N.; Mowa, S.; Burris, J. L.; Hester, B. C.

    2012-10-01

    An optical tweezers (OT) system uses focused laser light to contain and manipulate nano-scale to micro-scale particles. Trap stiffness is the quantitative measurement of the ability to trap a particle. For some techniques, this measurement depends on an accurate knowledge of the particle's position in time. A position sensing detector (PSD) is used to track particle motion by detecting laser light from the trapping region. The PSD outputs voltages corresponding to the x- and y-coordinates of particle motion, providing a means of knowing the location of the particle in time. An OT system requires a calibration to convert the measured voltages into accurate distances. This process is time-consuming and frequently needs to be repeated, however, with the growing availability of computer-aided data acquisition and control, the complete process can now be automated, reducing time spent by researchers and increasing level of accuracy of future measurements. We have developed a program written in LabVIEW that will, after initialization, 1) via image processing, calibrate the pixel size of the camera, 2) calibrate the optical tweezer position detector by controlling a motorized mirror to move a trapped bead through a detection laser with simultaneous position detector signal measurements, 3) re-align the trap beam and the detection beam by motorized mirror control, 4) measure position data for the same trapped particle being illuminated by the detection beam, and 5) analyze the position signal via the power spectrum method and equipartition method to give two trap stiffness values for comparison. Previous automated calibration methods require additional and sometimes costly equipment as well as some precalibration of stage motion or pixel size. Here, the user only needs to input the known size of the bead (provided by the manufacturer) into the program, insert their prepared slide into their microscope, input some parameters and make selections, and click "start" in order

  20. Fracture of the hook of the hamate in athletes.

    PubMed

    Stark, H H; Jobe, F W; Boyes, J H; Ashworth, C R

    1977-07-01

    During an eight-year period, four tennis players, seven golfers, and nine baseball players were seen with a fracture of the hook of the hamate. Eighteen of these twenty patients were disabled by pain and after the fracture fragment was removed, all eighteen were relieved so that they returned to their athletic pursuits. Two patients were asymptomatic, their old fracture being discovered accidentally when they were treated for other injuries. Nineteen of the twenty patients had been examined before coming under our care, but the correct diagnosis had been made in only two. Conservative treatment, including rest, physical therapy, and injections of steroids into the wrist and hand, had not been beneficial. From the history and findings, we believe that these fractures were caused by a direct blow against the hook of the hamate caused by the handle of the tennis racket, golf club, or bat during a swing, and not by indirect force produced by the ligaments and muscles attached to the hook. The fracture was demonstrated in all twenty patients by a roentgenogram (profile view) of the carpal tunnel. PMID:873952

  1. Fiber optical tweezers for microscale and nanoscale particle manipulation and force sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuxiang

    2011-12-01

    Optical tweezers have been an important tool in biology and physics for studying single molecules and colloidal systems. Most of current optical tweezers are built with microscope objectives, which are: i) expensive, ii) bulky and hard to integrate, iii) sensitive to environmental fluctuations, iv) limited in terms of working distances from the substrate, and v) rigid with the requirements on the substrate (transparent substrate made with glass and with a fixed thickness). These limitations of objective-based optical tweezers prevent them from being miniaturized. Fiber optical tweezers can provide a solution for cost reduction and miniaturization, and these optical tweezers can be potentially used in microfluidic systems. However, the existing fiber optical tweezers have the following limitations: i) low trapping efficiency due to weakly focused beams, ii) lack of the ability to control the positions of multiple particles simultaneously, and iii) limited functionalities. The overall objective of this dissertation work is to further the fundamental understanding of fiber optical tweezers through experimental study and modeling, and to develop novel fiber optical tweezers systems to enhance the capability and functionalities of fiber optical tweezers as microscale and nanoscale manipulators/sensors. The contributions of this dissertation work are summarized as follows. i) An enhanced understanding of the inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers (DFOTs) system has been achieved. Stable three dimensional (3D) optical trapping of a single micron-sized particle has been experimentally demonstrated. This is the first time that the trapping efficiency has been calibrated and the stiffness of the trap has been obtained in the experiments, which has been carried out by using two methods: the drag force method and power spectrum analysis. Such calibration enables the system to be used as a picoNewton-level force sensor in addition to a particle manipulator. The influence of

  2. Automatic real time evaluation of red blood cell elasticity by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Diógenes S.; Silva, Diego C. N.; Williams, Ajoke J.; Bezerra, Marcos A. C.; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E.

    2015-05-01

    Optical tweezers have been used to trap, manipulate, and measure individual cell properties. In this work, we show that the association of a computer controlled optical tweezers system with image processing techniques allows rapid and reproducible evaluation of cell deformability. In particular, the deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) plays a key role in the transport of oxygen through the blood microcirculation. The automatic measurement processes consisted of three steps: acquisition, segmentation of images, and measurement of the elasticity of the cells. An optical tweezers system was setup on an upright microscope equipped with a CCD camera and a motorized XYZ stage, computer controlled by a Labview platform. On the optical tweezers setup, the deformation of the captured RBC was obtained by moving the motorized stage. The automatic real-time homemade system was evaluated by measuring RBCs elasticity from normal donors and patients with sickle cell anemia. Approximately 150 erythrocytes were examined, and the elasticity values obtained by using the developed system were compared to the values measured by two experts. With the automatic system, there was a significant time reduction (60 × ) of the erythrocytes elasticity evaluation. Automated system can help to expand the applications of optical tweezers in hematology and hemotherapy.

  3. Automatic real time evaluation of red blood cell elasticity by optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Moura, Diógenes S; Silva, Diego C N; Williams, Ajoke J; Bezerra, Marcos A C; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E

    2015-05-01

    Optical tweezers have been used to trap, manipulate, and measure individual cell properties. In this work, we show that the association of a computer controlled optical tweezers system with image processing techniques allows rapid and reproducible evaluation of cell deformability. In particular, the deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) plays a key role in the transport of oxygen through the blood microcirculation. The automatic measurement processes consisted of three steps: acquisition, segmentation of images, and measurement of the elasticity of the cells. An optical tweezers system was setup on an upright microscope equipped with a CCD camera and a motorized XYZ stage, computer controlled by a Labview platform. On the optical tweezers setup, the deformation of the captured RBC was obtained by moving the motorized stage. The automatic real-time homemade system was evaluated by measuring RBCs elasticity from normal donors and patients with sickle cell anemia. Approximately 150 erythrocytes were examined, and the elasticity values obtained by using the developed system were compared to the values measured by two experts. With the automatic system, there was a significant time reduction (60×) of the erythrocytes elasticity evaluation. Automated system can help to expand the applications of optical tweezers in hematology and hemotherapy. PMID:26026527

  4. Dispersive light-matter interaction in programmable optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Bianca J.; Horvath, Milena S. J.; Deb, Amita B.; Kjørgaard, Niels

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a robust interrogation system using frequency modulation spectroscopy to measure the quantum state-dependent phase shift incurred on an off-resonant optical probe when transmitted by an atomic medium. Recently, our focus has been on extending this technique for the detection of Feshbach resonances in 87Rb atoms. Feshbach resonance is a mechanism which allows the atomic interaction strength to be precisely tuned via an external magnetic field. To access a Feshbach resonance atoms must be independently prepared in certain internal states, during which we utilize programmable optical tweezers to perform precise spatial micro-manipulation of the ensemble in laser "test-tubes." We use our dispersive probing system to identify the resonant magnetic field value in a sample with a dense "ball" geometry. An important design consideration for such a probing scheme is the three-dimensional mode-matching at the interface between light and the atomic sample when coupled by the dispersive interaction. We discuss challenges which dealing with this new geometry compared to the previously used prolate geometry, and consider the possibility of dipole-dipole interactions in our sample leading to cooperative light scattering processes.

  5. Probing DNA Helicase Kinetics with Temperature‐Controlled Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Gollnick, Benjamin; Carrasco, Carolina; Zuttion, Francesca; Gilhooly, Neville S.; Dillingham, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Motor protein functions like adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis or translocation along molecular substrates take place at nanometric scales and consequently depend on the amount of available thermal energy. The associated rates can hence be investigated by actively varying the temperature conditions. In this article, a thermally controlled magnetic tweezers (MT) system for single‐molecule experiments at up to 40 °C is presented. Its compact thermostat module yields a precision of 0.1 °C and can in principle be tailored to any other surface‐coupled microscopy technique, such as tethered particle motion (TPM), nanopore‐based sensing of biomolecules, or super‐resolution fluorescence imaging. The instrument is used to examine the temperature dependence of translocation along double‐stranded (ds)DNA by individual copies of the protein complex AddAB, a helicase‐nuclease motor involved in dsDNA break repair. Despite moderately lower mean velocities measured at sub‐saturating ATP concentrations, almost identical estimates of the enzymatic reaction barrier (around 21–24 k B T) are obtained by comparing results from MT and stopped‐flow bulk assays. Single‐molecule rates approach ensemble values at optimized chemical energy conditions near the motor, which can withstand opposing loads of up to 14 piconewtons (pN). Having proven its reliability, the temperature‐controlled MT described herein will eventually represent a routinely applied method within the toolbox for nano‐biotechnology. PMID:25400244

  6. Probing the bulk viscosity of particles using aerosol optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Rory; Bones, David L.; Reid, Jonathan P.

    2012-10-01

    Holographic aerosol optical tweezers can be used to trap arrays of aerosol particles allowing detailed studies of particle properties and processes at the single particle level. Recent observations have suggested that secondary organic aerosol may exist as ultra-viscous liquids or glassy states at low relative humidity, potentially a significant factor in influencing their role in the atmosphere and their activation to form cloud droplets. A decrease in relative humidity surrounding a particle leads to an increased concentration of solute in the droplet as the droplet returns to equilibrium and, thus, an increase in the bulk viscosity. We demonstrate that the timescales for condensation and evaporation processes correlate with particle viscosity, showing significant inhibition in mass transfer kinetics using ternary sucrose/sodium chloride/water droplets as a proxy to atmospheric multi-component aerosol. We go on to study the fundamental process of aerosol coagulation in aerosol particle arrays, observing the relaxation of non-spherical composite particles formed on coalescence. We demonstrate the use of bright-field imaging and elastic light scattering to make measurements of the timescale for the process of binary coalescence contrasting the rheological properties of aqueous sucrose and sodium chloride aerosol over a range of relative humidities.

  7. Optical tweezers as manufacturing and characterization tool in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Ghadiri, R.; Ksouri, S. I.; Gurevich, E. L.; Ostendorf, A.

    2014-09-01

    Pumping and mixing of small volumes of liquid samples are basic processes in microfluidic applications. Among the number of different principles for active transportation of the fluids microrotors have been investigated from the beginning. The main challenge in microrotors, however, has been the driving principle. In this work a new approach for a very simple magnetic driving principle has been realized. More precisely, we take advantage of optical grippers to fabricate various microrotors and introduce an optical force method to characterize the fluid flow generated by rotating the structures through magnetic actuation. The microrotors are built of silica and magnetic microspheres which are initially coated with Streptavidin or Biotin molecules. Holographic optical tweezers (HOT) are used to trap, to position, and to assemble the microspheres with the chemical interaction of the biomolecules leading to a stable binding. Using this technique, complex designs of microrotors can be realized. The magnetic response of the magnetic microspheres enables the rotation and control of the structures through an external magnetic field. The generated fluid flow around the microrotor is measured optically by inserting a probe particle next to the rotor. While the probe particle is trapped by optical forces the flow force leads to a displacement of the particle from the trapping position. This displacement is directly related to the flow velocity and can be measured and calibrated. Variations of the microrotor design and rotating speed lead to characteristic flow fields.

  8. Dielectrophoretic Tweezers and Micropost Arrays for Cell and Particle Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Tom; Lee, Hakho; Westervelt, Robert

    2005-03-01

    We describe a micromanipulator system that uses dielectrophoresis to capture and release cells or particles. Dielectrophoretic tweezers are capable of applying hundreds of piconewtons of force to micron scale objects suspended in liquid and precisely positioning objects in three dimensions. Metal electrodes on either side of a sharp pipette tip provide the electric field gradient necessary. This manipulation technique compliments our micropost array (1) for the manipulation of particles in a microfluidic system. We will discuss applications of dielectrophoresis using hybrid integrated circuit/microfluidic devices (2) with applications that include cell sorting and tissue assembly. This work made possible by a gift from Phillip Morris and the NSEC NSF grant PHY-0117795. 1. T. P. Hunt H. Lee and R. M. Westervelt, ``Addressable micropost array for the dielectrophoretic manipulation of particles in fluid," Appl. Phys. Lett. In Press. 2. H. Lee, et Al. ``An IC/ microfluidic hybrid microsystem for 2D magnetic manipulation of individual biological cells," To appear in IEEE ISSCC, Feb. 2005.

  9. Torsional sensing of small-molecule binding using magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Lipfert, Jan; Klijnhout, Sven; Dekker, Nynke H

    2010-11-01

    DNA-binding small molecules are widespread in the cell and heavily used in biological applications. Here, we use magnetic tweezers, which control the force and torque applied to single DNAs, to study three small molecules: ethidium bromide (EtBr), a well-known intercalator; netropsin, a minor-groove binding anti-microbial drug; and topotecan, a clinically used anti-tumor drug. In the low-force limit in which biologically relevant torques can be accessed (<10 pN), we show that ethidium intercalation lengthens DNA ∼1.5-fold and decreases the persistence length, from which we extract binding constants. Using our control of supercoiling, we measure the decrease in DNA twist per intercalation to be 27.3±1° and demonstrate that ethidium binding delays the accumulation of torsional stress in DNA, likely via direct reduction of the torsional modulus and torque-dependent binding. Furthermore, we observe that EtBr stabilizes the DNA duplex in regimes where bare DNA undergoes structural transitions. In contrast, minor groove binding by netropsin affects neither the contour nor persistence length significantly, yet increases the twist per base of DNA. Finally, we show that topotecan binding has consequences similar to those of EtBr, providing evidence for an intercalative binding mode. These insights into the torsional consequences of ligand binding can help elucidate the effects of small-molecule drugs in the cellular environment. PMID:20624816

  10. Manipulating and assembling metallic beads with Optoelectronic Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuailong; Juvert, Joan; Cooper, Jonathan M; Neale, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) or light-patterned dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been developed as a micromanipulation technology for controlling micro- and nano-particles with applications such as cell sorting and studying cell communications. Additionally, the capability of moving small objects accurately and assembling them into arbitrary 2D patterns also makes OET an attractive technology for microfabrication applications. In this work, we demonstrated the use of OET to manipulate conductive silver-coated Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microspheres (50 μm diameter) into tailored patterns. It was found that the microspheres could be moved at a max velocity of 3200 μm/s, corresponding to 4.2 nano-newton (10(-9) N) DEP force, and also could be positioned with high accuracy via this DEP force. The underlying mechanism for this strong DEP force is shown by our simulations to be caused by a significant increase of the electric field close to the particles, due to the interaction between the field and the silver shells coating the microspheres. The associated increase in electrical gradient causes DEP forces that are much stronger than any previously reported for an OET device, which facilitates manipulation of the metallic microspheres efficiently without compromise in positioning accuracy and is important for applications on electronic component assembling and circuit construction. PMID:27599445