Science.gov

Sample records for forcing parameters determination

  1. Evaluation of Three Methods for Determining EMG-Muscle Force Parameter Estimates for the Shoulder Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Christopher J.; Doro, Lisa Case; Langenderfer, Joseph E.; Mell, Amy G.; Maratt, Joseph D.; Carpenter, James E.; Hughes, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Accurate prediction of in vivo muscle forces is essential for relevant analyses of musculoskeletal biomechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three methods for predicting muscle forces of the shoulder by comparing calculated muscle parameters, which relate electromyographic activity to muscle forces. Methods Thirteen subjects performed sub-maximal, isometric contractions consisting of six actions about the shoulder and two actions about the elbow. Electromyography from 12 shoulder muscles and internal shoulder moments were used to determine muscle parameters using traditional multiple linear regression, principal-components regression, and a sequential muscle parameter determination process using principal-components regression. Muscle parameters were evaluated based on their sign (positive or negative), standard deviations, and error between the measured and predicted internal shoulder moments. Findings It was found that no method was superior with respect to all evaluation criteria. The sequential principal-components regression method most frequently produced muscle parameters that could be used to estimate muscle forces, multiple regression best predicted the measured internal shoulder moments, and the results of principal-components regression fell between those of sequential principal-components regression and multiple regression. Interpretation The selection of a muscle parameter estimation method should be based on the importance of the evaluation criteria. Sequential principal-components regression should be used if a greater number of physiologically accurate muscle forces are desired, while multiple regression should be used for a more accurate prediction of measured internal shoulder moments. However, all methods produced muscle parameters which can be used to predict in vivo muscle forces of the shoulder. PMID:17945401

  2. Compaction and Tensile Forces Determine the Accuracy of Folding Landscape Parameters from Single Molecule Pulling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Greg; Hyeon, Changbong; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2011-04-01

    We establish a framework for assessing whether the transition state location of a biopolymer, which can be inferred from single molecule pulling experiments, corresponds to the ensemble of structures that have equal probability of reaching either the folded or unfolded states (Pfold=0.5). Using results for the forced unfolding of a RNA hairpin, an exactly soluble model, and an analytic theory, we show that Pfold is solely determined by s, an experimentally measurable molecular tensegrity parameter, which is a ratio of the tensile force and a compaction force that stabilizes the folded state. Applications to folding landscapes of DNA hairpins and a leucine zipper with two barriers provide a structural interpretation of single molecule experimental data. Our theory can be used to assess whether molecular extension is a good reaction coordinate using measured free energy profiles.

  3. Compaction and tensile forces determine the accuracy of folding landscape parameters from single molecule pulling experiments.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Greg; Hyeon, Changbong; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2011-04-01

    We establish a framework for assessing whether the transition state location of a biopolymer, which can be inferred from single molecule pulling experiments, corresponds to the ensemble of structures that have equal probability of reaching either the folded or unfolded states (P(fold)=0.5). Using results for the forced unfolding of a RNA hairpin, an exactly soluble model, and an analytic theory, we show that P(fold) is solely determined by s, an experimentally measurable molecular tensegrity parameter, which is a ratio of the tensile force and a compaction force that stabilizes the folded state. Applications to folding landscapes of DNA hairpins and a leucine zipper with two barriers provide a structural interpretation of single molecule experimental data. Our theory can be used to assess whether molecular extension is a good reaction coordinate using measured free energy profiles. PMID:21517423

  4. Improved treatment of global positioning system force parameters in precise orbit determination applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigue, Y.; Lichten, S. M.; Muellerschoen, R. J.; Blewitt, G.; Heflin, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    Data collected from a worldwide 1992 experiment were processed at JPL to determine precise orbits for the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). A filtering technique was tested to improve modeling of solar-radiation pressure force parameters for GPS satellites. The new approach improves orbit quality for eclipsing satellites by a factor of two, with typical results in the 25- to 50-cm range. The resultant GPS-based estimates for geocentric coordinates of the tracking sites, which include the three DSN sites, are accurate to 2 to 8 cm, roughly equivalent to 3 to 10 nrad of angular measure.

  5. Specific force field parameters determination for the hybrid ab initio QM/MM LSCF method.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Nicolas; Assfeld, Xavier; Rivail, Jean-Louis

    2002-04-30

    The pure quantum mechanics method, called Local Self-Consistent Field (LSCF), that allows to optimize a wave function within the constraint that some predefined spinorbitals are kept frozen, is discussed. These spinorbitals can be of any shape, and their occupation numbers can be 0 or 1. Any post-Hartree-Fock method, based on the restricted or unrestricted Hartree-Fock Slater determinant, and Kohn-Sham-based DFT method are available. The LSCF method is easily applied to hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) procedure where the quantum and the classical parts are covalently bonded. The complete methodology of our hybrid QM/MM scheme is detailed for studies of macromolecular systems. Not only the energy but also the gradients are derived; thus, the full geometry optimization of the whole system is feasible. We show that only specific force field parameters are needed for a correct description of the molecule, they are given for some general chemical bonds. A careful analysis of the errors induced by the use of molecular mechanics in hybrid computation show that a general procedure can be derived to obtain accurate results at low computation effort. The methodology is applied to the structure determination of the crambin protein and to Menshutkin reactions between primary amines and chloromethane. PMID:11939595

  6. Partial hessian fitting for determining force constant parameters in molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixing; Ozhgibesov, Mikhail; Hirao, Hajime

    2016-10-01

    We present a new protocol for deriving force constant parameters that are used in molecular mechanics (MM) force fields to describe the bond-stretching, angle-bending, and dihedral terms. A 3 × 3 partial matrix is chosen from the MM Hessian matrix in Cartesian coordinates according to a simple rule and made as close as possible to the corresponding partial Hessian matrix computed using quantum mechanics (QM). This partial Hessian fitting (PHF) is done analytically and thus rapidly in a least-squares sense, yielding force constant parameters as the output. We herein apply this approach to derive force constant parameters for the AMBER-type energy expression. Test calculations on several different molecules show good performance of the PHF parameter sets in terms of how well they can reproduce QM-calculated frequencies. When soft bonds are involved in the target molecule as in the case of secondary building units of metal-organic frameworks, the MM-optimized geometry sometimes deviates significantly from the QM-optimized one. We show that this problem is rectified effectively by use of a simple procedure called Katachi that modifies the equilibrium bond distances and angles in bond-stretching and angle-bending terms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27497261

  7. Nonconservative force model parameter estimation strategy for TOPEX/Poseidon precision orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, S. B.; Marshall, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The TOPEX/Poseidon spacecraft was launched on August 10, 1992 to study the Earth's oceans. To achieve maximum benefit from the altimetric data it is to collect, mission requirements dictate that TOPEX/Poseidon's orbit must be computed at an unprecedented level of accuracy. To reach our pre-launch radial orbit accuracy goals, the mismodeling of the radiative nonconservative forces of solar radiation, Earth albedo an infrared re-radiation, and spacecraft thermal imbalances cannot produce in combination more than a 6 cm rms error over a 10 day period. Similarly, the 10-day drag modeling error cannot exceed 3 cm rms. In order to satisfy these requirements, a 'box-wing' representation of the satellite has been developed in which, the satellite is modelled as the combination of flat plates arranged in the shape of a box and a connected solar array. The radiative/thermal nonconservative forces acting on each of the eight surfaces are computed independently, yielding vector accelerations which are summed to compute the total aggregate effect on the satellite center-of-mass. Select parameters associated with the flat plates are adjusted to obtain a better representation of the satellite acceleration history. This study analyzes the estimation of these parameters from simulated TOPEX/Poseidon laser data in the presence of both nonconservative and gravity model errors. A 'best choice' of estimated parameters is derived and the ability to meet mission requirements with the 'box-wing' model evaluated.

  8. Force-Field Parameter Fitter

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-05-27

    ParFit is a flexible and extendable framework and library of classes for fitting force-field parameters to data from high-level ab-initio calculations on the basis of deterministic and stochastic algorithms. Currently, the code is fitting MM3 and Merck force-field parameters but could easily extend to other force-field types.

  9. Determination of forced convection parameters by interferometric imaging of the concentration field during growth of KDP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sunil; Muralidhar, K.

    2011-07-01

    Growth of a potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal from its aqueous solution has been considered under forced convection conditions. The KDP crystal is grown in a conventional top hanging geometry. Forced convection conditions are created by rotating the crystal about a vertical axis. The rotational RPM is varied in a cycle, creating an accelerated rotation (AR) paradigm. The effect of varying the rotational RPM on the concentration field around the crystal was investigated. Mach-Zehnder interferometry was adopted as an optical technique to image the evolving concentration fields. Six different experiments were performed to obtain the specific set of time periods and rotation rates of the acceleration cycle that result in a uniform concentration field around the growing crystal. The Reynolds number, an index of the strength of forced convection, was optimized through the experiments. The optimized parameters of the accelerated rotation cycle were found to be as follows: maximum rotation rate of 32 RPM, spin up period=40 s, spin down period=40 s, steady period=40 s, and stationary period=40 s. The parametric study further revealed that concentration was highly sensitive to the maximum rotation rate adopted during the AR cycle. It did not depend crucially on the time periods that could be varied by as much as ±25% around the respective average values. Finally, a KDP crystal was grown using the optimized forced convection parameters and the crystal quality was found to be good.

  10. The role of impulse parameters in force variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlton, L. G.; Newell, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    One of the principle limitations of the human motor system is the ability to produce consistent motor responses. When asked to repeatedly make the same movement, performance outcomes are characterized by a considerable amount of variability. This occurs whether variability is expressed in terms of kinetics or kinematics. Variability in performance is of considerable importance because for tasks requiring accuracy it is a critical variable in determining the skill of the performer. What has long been sought is a description of the parameter or parameters that determine the degree of variability. Two general experimental protocals were used. One protocal is to use dynamic actions and record variability in kinematic parameters such as spatial or temporal error. A second strategy was to use isometric actions and record kinetic variables such as peak force produced. What might be the important force related factors affecting variability is examined and an experimental approach to examine the influence of each of these variables is provided.

  11. Force-field parameters for beryllium complexes in amorphous layers.

    PubMed

    Emelyanova, Svetlana; Chashchikhin, Vladimir; Bagaturyants, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Unknown force-field parameters for metal organic beryllium complexes used in emitting and electron transporting layers of OLED structures are determined. These parameters can be used for the predictive atomistic simulations of the structure and properties of amorphous organic layers containing beryllium complexes. The parameters are found for the AMBER force field using a relaxed scan procedure and quantum-mechanical DFT calculations of potential energy curves for specific internal (angular) coordinates in a series of three Be complexes (Bebq2; Be(4-mpp)2; Bepp2). The obtained parameters are verified in calculations of some molecular and crystal structures available from either quantum-mechanical DFT calculations or experimental data. Graphical Abstract Beryllium complexes in amorphous layersᅟ. PMID:27550375

  12. Searching the Force Field Electrostatic Multipole Parameter Space.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Sofie; Jensen, Frank

    2016-04-12

    We show by tensor decomposition analyses that the molecular electrostatic potential for amino acid peptide models has an effective rank less than twice the number of atoms. This rank indicates the number of parameters that can be derived from the electrostatic potential in a statistically significant way. Using this as a guideline, we investigate different strategies for deriving a reduced set of atomic charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles capable of reproducing the reference electrostatic potential with a low error. A full combinatorial search of selected parameter subspaces for N-methylacetamide and a cysteine peptide model indicates that there are many different parameter sets capable of providing errors close to that of the global minimum. Among the different reduced multipole parameter sets that have low errors, there is consensus that atoms involved in π-bonding require higher order multipole moments. The possible correlation between multipole parameters is investigated by exhaustive searches of combinations of up to four parameters distributed in all possible ways on all possible atomic sites. These analyses show that there is no advantage in considering combinations of multipoles compared to a simple approach where the importance of each multipole moment is evaluated sequentially. When combined with possible weighting factors related to the computational efficiency of each type of multipole moment, this may provide a systematic strategy for determining a computational efficient representation of the electrostatic component in force field calculations. PMID:26925529

  13. CORRELATION OF AIRWAY RESISTANCE WITH FORCED RANDOM NOISE RESISTANCE PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The correlation between airway resistance (RAW) measured in a plethysmograph and three respiratory resistance parameters measured by forced random noise was evaluated. Forced random noise resistance parameters were the average resistance between 5 and 9 Hz (R5-9), the average res...

  14. Mathematical models use varying parameter strategies to represent paralyzed muscle force properties: a sensitivity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Frey Law, Laura A; Shields, Richard K

    2005-01-01

    Background Mathematical muscle models may be useful for the determination of appropriate musculoskeletal stresses that will safely maintain the integrity of muscle and bone following spinal cord injury. Several models have been proposed to represent paralyzed muscle, but there have not been any systematic comparisons of modelling approaches to better understand the relationships between model parameters and muscle contractile properties. This sensitivity analysis of simulated muscle forces using three currently available mathematical models provides insight into the differences in modelling strategies as well as any direct parameter associations with simulated muscle force properties. Methods Three mathematical muscle models were compared: a traditional linear model with 3 parameters and two contemporary nonlinear models each with 6 parameters. Simulated muscle forces were calculated for two stimulation patterns (constant frequency and initial doublet trains) at three frequencies (5, 10, and 20 Hz). A sensitivity analysis of each model was performed by altering a single parameter through a range of 8 values, while the remaining parameters were kept at baseline values. Specific simulated force characteristics were determined for each stimulation pattern and each parameter increment. Significant parameter influences for each simulated force property were determined using ANOVA and Tukey's follow-up tests (α ≤ 0.05), and compared to previously reported parameter definitions. Results Each of the 3 linear model's parameters most clearly influence either simulated force magnitude or speed properties, consistent with previous parameter definitions. The nonlinear models' parameters displayed greater redundancy between force magnitude and speed properties. Further, previous parameter definitions for one of the nonlinear models were consistently supported, while the other was only partially supported by this analysis. Conclusion These three mathematical models use

  15. Cell Forces and Cytoskeletal Order Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis

    2012-02-01

    Nematic, Smectic and Isotropic Order parameters have found wide-spread use in characterizing all manner of soft matter systems, but have not yet been applied to characterize and understand the structures within living cells, particularly cytoskeletal structures. Several examples will be used to illustrate the utility of such analyses, ranging from experiments on stem cells attached to or in various elastic matrices to embryonic heart tissue and simulations of membrane cytoskeletons under all manner of stressing. Recently developed theory will be shown to apply in general with account of cell contractility, matrix elasticity and dimensionality as well as cell shape and a newly defined ``cytoskeletal polarizability.'' The latter property of cells is likely different between different cell types due to different amounts of key cytoskeletal components with some types of stem cells being more polarizable than others. Evidence of coupling to the nucleus as a viscoelastic inclusion will also be presented. [4pt] References: (1) P. Dalhaimer, D.E. Discher, T. Lubensky. Crosslinked actin networks exhibit liquid crystal elastomer behavior, including soft-mode elasticity. Nature Physics 3: 354-360 (2007). (2) A. Zemel, F.Rehfeldt, A.E.X. Brown, D.E. Discher, and S.A. Safran. Optimal matrix rigidity in the self-polarization of stem cells. Nature Physics 6: 468 - 473 (2010).

  16. Force field parameter estimation of functional perfluoropolyether lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert; Seung Chung, Pil; Steckel, Janice A.; Jhon, Myung S.; Biegler, Lorenz T.

    2011-01-01

    The head disk interface in hard disk drive can be considered one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models .In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab-initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for the Zdol and Ztetraol were evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  17. Force Field Parameter Estimation of Functional Perfluoropolyether Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Chung, P.S.; Steckel, J; Jhon, M.S.; Biegler, L.T.

    2011-01-01

    The head disk interface in hard disk drive can be considered one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models .In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab-initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for the Zdol and Ztetraol were evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  18. Force Field Parameter Estimation of Functional Perfluoropolyether Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Chung, P.S.; Steckel, J; Jhon, M.S.; Biegler, L.T.

    2011-01-01

    The head disk interface in a hard disk drive can be considered to be one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models. In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for Zdol and Ztetraol were evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  19. Force Field Parameter Estimation of Functional Perfluoropolyether Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Chung, P S; Steckel, J A; Jhon, M S; Biegler, L T

    2011-01-01

    The head disk interface in hard disk drive can be considered one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models .In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab-initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for the Zdol and Ztetraolwere evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  20. Zero initial partial derivatives of satellite orbits with respect to force parameters nullify the mathematical basis of the numerical integration method for the determination of standard gravity models from space geodetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peiliang

    2015-04-01

    Satellite orbits have been routinely used to produce models of the Earth's gravity field. The numerical integration method is most widely used by almost all major institutions to determine standard gravity models from space geodetic measurements. As a basic component of the method, the partial derivatives of a satellite orbit with respect to the force parameters to be determined, namely, the unknown harmonic coefficients of the gravitational model, have been first computed by setting the initial values of partial derivatives to zero. In this talk, we first design some simple mathematical examples to show that setting the initial values of partial derivatives to zero is generally erroneous mathematically. We then prove that it is prohibited physically. In other words, setting the initial values of partial derivatives to zero violates the physics of motion of celestial bodies. To conclude, the numerical integration method, as is widely used today by major institutions to produce standard satellite gravity models, is simply incorrect mathematically. As a direct consequence, further work is required to confirm whether the numerical integration method can still be used as a mathematical foundation to produce standard satellite gravity models. More details can be found in Xu (2009, Sci China Ser D-Earth Sci, 52, 562-566).

  1. Brute force meets Bruno force in parameter optimisation: introduction of novel constraints for parameter accuracy improvement by symbolic computation.

    PubMed

    Nakatsui, M; Horimoto, K; Lemaire, F; Ürgüplü, A; Sedoglavic, A; Boulier, F

    2011-09-01

    Recent remarkable advances in computer performance have enabled us to estimate parameter values by the huge power of numerical computation, the so-called 'Brute force', resulting in the high-speed simultaneous estimation of a large number of parameter values. However, these advancements have not been fully utilised to improve the accuracy of parameter estimation. Here the authors review a novel method for parameter estimation using symbolic computation power, 'Bruno force', named after Bruno Buchberger, who found the Gröbner base. In the method, the objective functions combining the symbolic computation techniques are formulated. First, the authors utilise a symbolic computation technique, differential elimination, which symbolically reduces an equivalent system of differential equations to a system in a given model. Second, since its equivalent system is frequently composed of large equations, the system is further simplified by another symbolic computation. The performance of the authors' method for parameter accuracy improvement is illustrated by two representative models in biology, a simple cascade model and a negative feedback model in comparison with the previous numerical methods. Finally, the limits and extensions of the authors' method are discussed, in terms of the possible power of 'Bruno force' for the development of a new horizon in parameter estimation. PMID:22010755

  2. Identification of vehicle parameters and estimation of vertical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imine, H.; Fridman, L.; Madani, T.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to estimate the vertical forces and to identify the unknown dynamic parameters of a vehicle using the sliding mode observers approach. The estimation of vertical forces needs a good knowledge of dynamic parameters such as damping coefficient, spring stiffness and unsprung masses, etc. In this paper, suspension stiffness and unsprung masses have been identified by the Least Square Method. Real-time tests have been carried out on an instrumented static vehicle, excited vertically by hydraulic jacks. The vehicle is equipped with different sensors in order to measure its dynamics. The measurements coming from these sensors have been considered as unknown inputs of the system. However, only the roll angle and the suspension deflection measurements have been used in order to perform the observer. Experimental results are presented and discussed to show the quality of the proposed approach.

  3. Effect of velocity and added resistance on selected coordination and force parameters in front crawl.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Christophe; Brazier, Tim; Button, Chris; Seifert, Ludovic; Chollet, Didier

    2011-10-01

    The effect of (a) increasing velocity and (b) added resistance was examined on the stroke (stroke length, stroke rate [SR]), coordination (index of coordination [IdC], propulsive phases), and force (impulse and peaks) parameters of 7 national-level front crawl swimmers (17.14 ± 2.73 years of swimming; 57.67 ± 1.62 seconds in the 100-m freestyle). The additional resistance was provided by a specially designed parachute. Parachute swimming (PA) and free-swimming (F) conditions were compared at 5 velocities per condition. Video footage was used to calculate the stroke and coordination parameters, and sensors allowed the determination of force parameters. The results showed that (a) an increase in velocity (V) led to increases in SR, IdC, propulsive phase duration, and peak propulsive force (p < 0.05), but no significant change in force impulse per cycle, whatever the condition (PA or F); and (b) in PA conditions, significant increases in the IdC, propulsive phase duration, and force impulse and a decrease in SR were recorded at high velocities (p < 0.05). These results indicated that, in the F condition, swimmers adapted to the change in velocity by modifying stroke and coordination rather than force parameters, whereas the PA condition enhanced the continuity of propulsive action and force development. Added resistance, that is, "parachute training," can be used for specific strength training purposes as long as swimming is performed near maximum velocity. PMID:21912344

  4. Force Field Independent Metal Parameters Using a Nonbonded Dummy Model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cationic dummy atom approach provides a powerful nonbonded description for a range of alkaline-earth and transition-metal centers, capturing both structural and electrostatic effects. In this work we refine existing literature parameters for octahedrally coordinated Mn2+, Zn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+, as well as providing new parameters for Ni2+, Co2+, and Fe2+. In all the cases, we are able to reproduce both M2+–O distances and experimental solvation free energies, which has not been achieved to date for transition metals using any other model. The parameters have also been tested using two different water models and show consistent performance. Therefore, our parameters are easily transferable to any force field that describes nonbonded interactions using Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials. Finally, we demonstrate the stability of our parameters in both the human and Escherichia coli variants of the enzyme glyoxalase I as showcase systems, as both enzymes are active with a range of transition metals. The parameters presented in this work provide a valuable resource for the molecular simulation community, as they extend the range of metal ions that can be studied using classical approaches, while also providing a starting point for subsequent parametrization of new metal centers. PMID:24670003

  5. Force field independent metal parameters using a nonbonded dummy model.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Fernanda; Bauer, Paul; Barrozo, Alexandre; Amrein, Beat Anton; Purg, Miha; Aqvist, Johan; Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2014-04-24

    The cationic dummy atom approach provides a powerful nonbonded description for a range of alkaline-earth and transition-metal centers, capturing both structural and electrostatic effects. In this work we refine existing literature parameters for octahedrally coordinated Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), as well as providing new parameters for Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Fe(2+). In all the cases, we are able to reproduce both M(2+)-O distances and experimental solvation free energies, which has not been achieved to date for transition metals using any other model. The parameters have also been tested using two different water models and show consistent performance. Therefore, our parameters are easily transferable to any force field that describes nonbonded interactions using Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials. Finally, we demonstrate the stability of our parameters in both the human and Escherichia coli variants of the enzyme glyoxalase I as showcase systems, as both enzymes are active with a range of transition metals. The parameters presented in this work provide a valuable resource for the molecular simulation community, as they extend the range of metal ions that can be studied using classical approaches, while also providing a starting point for subsequent parametrization of new metal centers. PMID:24670003

  6. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  7. A preliminary study of using a strain-gauged balance and parameter estimation techniques for the determination of aerodynamic forces on a model in a very short duration wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. P.; Feik, R. A.

    1983-12-01

    This memo presents a preliminary study of a proposed method of measuring the aerodynamic forces on a supported model in an intermittent very short duration wind tunnel with a relatively high airflow dynamic pressure (of the orders of 200 microsec and 1/3 atmosphere respectively). A semiconductor strain gauged cantilever beam balance is used to record strain time histories associated with model displacement in response to aerodynamic force. The practical feasibility of obtaining sufficiently resolvable strains for the prescribed tunnel conditions with the given strain gauge configuration is established. The proposed method uses a system identification procedure to determine the system dynamic response characteristics using a known calibration force input. Subsequently, aerodynamic forces during a tunnel run follow from the recorded strain gauge time histories. The procedure has been demonstrated successfully using simulated data. However, the experimental situation did not lead to a successful analysis in the way proposed. Reasons for this are discussed and recommendations made for improvements. A brief series of shots in the ANU free piston shock tunnel also highlights the need to isolate as much as possible the model/balance from external vibrations.

  8. Direct computation of parameters for accurate polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Verstraelen, Toon Vandenbrande, Steven; Ayers, Paul W.

    2014-11-21

    We present an improved electronic linear response model to incorporate polarization and charge-transfer effects in polarizable force fields. This model is a generalization of the Atom-Condensed Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (DFT), approximated to second order (ACKS2): it can now be defined with any underlying variational theory (next to KS-DFT) and it can include atomic multipoles and off-center basis functions. Parameters in this model are computed efficiently as expectation values of an electronic wavefunction, obviating the need for their calibration, regularization, and manual tuning. In the limit of a complete density and potential basis set in the ACKS2 model, the linear response properties of the underlying theory for a given molecular geometry are reproduced exactly. A numerical validation with a test set of 110 molecules shows that very accurate models can already be obtained with fluctuating charges and dipoles. These features greatly facilitate the development of polarizable force fields.

  9. Development of force field parameters for molecular simulation of polylactide

    PubMed Central

    McAliley, James H.; Bruce, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Polylactide is a biodegradable polymer that is widely used for biomedical applications, and it is a replacement for some petroleum based polymers in applications that range from packaging to carpeting. Efforts to characterize and further enhance polylactide based systems using molecular simulations have to this point been hindered by the lack of accurate atomistic models for the polymer. Thus, we present force field parameters specifically suited for molecular modeling of PLA. The model, which we refer to as PLAFF3, is based on a combination of the OPLS and CHARMM force fields, with modifications to bonded and nonbonded parameters. Dihedral angle parameters were adjusted to reproduce DFT data using newly developed CMAP dihedral cross terms, and the model was further adjusted to reproduce experimentally resolved crystal structure conformations, melt density, volume expansivity, and the glass transition temperature of PLA. We recommend the use of PLAFF3 in modeling PLA in its crystalline or amorphous states and have provided the necessary input files required for the publicly available molecular dynamics code GROMACS. PMID:22180734

  10. Determination of range parameters of observation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareła, J.; Kastek, M.; Firmanty, K.; Trzaskawka, P.; Dulski, R.; Kucharz, J.

    2012-10-01

    Range parameters of observation devices can be determined on the basis of numerical simulations (NVTherm) or on the basis of measured characteristics. Those measurements can be conducted in both laboratory and field conditions. It is, however, difficult to carry on reliable field measurements of range parameters because they are strongly depended on atmospheric conditions. Thus the laboratory measurements are more favorable option. Analysis of literature and catalogue specifications reveal, that range parameters are given mainly on the basis of Johnson criteria or TTP model. The Johnson criteria has been used since the 50s and most of catalogue range specifications are determined according to it. There are also NATO standards, which describe the measurement procedures and methodology required to define the detection, recognition and identification ranges for standard NATO targets. For the determination of range parameters the following device characteristics must be known: minimal resolvable temperature for thermal imaging devices and minimal resolvable contrast for VIS devices. The TTP model offers a new approach to the determination of range characteristics of observation devices. It has been developed by U.S. Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate since the year 2000. It was created because the modified Johnson criteria did not yield reliable results in case of modern systems with digital image processing. In order to determine the range parameters using TTP model, the modulation transfer function MTF, presample MTF function, and 3D noise of a tested system must be known as well as its basic design data as optical magnification and display type. The paper describes the measurement stand, measurement methodology and the procedure for the determination of range parameters. The results for thermal and VIS cameras are also presented, and they are analyzed and compared with the results obtained from current methods, including the measurement

  11. Influence of atmospheric forcing parameters on land surface simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, H. P.; Mandal, M.; Bhattacharya, A.

    2015-12-01

    The quality of atmospheric forcing plays important role on land surface simulation using decoupled land surface modeling system. In the present study, the influence of the various atmospheric forcing parameters on land surface simulation is assessed through sensitivity experiments. Numerical experiments are conducted towards preparation of land surface analysis for the period Jan-2011 - Dec-2013 using offline 2D-Noah land surface model (LSM) based land data assimilation system (LDAS) over Indian region (5 - 39N, 60 - 100E) hereafter referred as LDASI. The surface temperature, specific humidity, horizontal winds and pressure as atmospheric forcing parameters are derived from Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). The downward (solar and thermal) radiation and precipitation is obtained from European Centre for Medium Range Forecast (ECMWF) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) respectively. The sensitivity experiments are conducted by introducing perturbation in one atmospheric forcing parameter at a time keeping the other parameters unchanged. Influence of temperature, specific humidity, downward (shortwave and long wave) radiation, rain-rate and wind speed is investigated by conducted 13 numerical experiments. It is observed that the land surface analysis from LDASI is most sensitive to the downward longwave radiation and least sensitive to wind speed. The analysis is also substantially influenced by the surface air temperature. The annual mean soil moisture at 5 cm is decreased by 12-15% if the downward long-wave radiation is increased by 20% and it is increased by 15% if the downward long-wave radiation is decreased by 20%. The influence is even more in the Himalayan region but the increase in long-wave radiation leads to increase in soil moisture and similar influence on decrease because downward long-wave radiation leads glacier melting. The annual mean soil temperature in the analysis is increased by 2.2 K if surface

  12. Determining Spacecraft Reaction Wheel Friction Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarani, Siamak

    2009-01-01

    Software was developed to characterize the drag in each of the Cassini spacecraft's Reaction Wheel Assemblies (RWAs) to determine the RWA friction parameters. This tool measures the drag torque of RWAs for not only the high spin rates (greater than 250 RPM), but also the low spin rates (less than 250 RPM) where there is a lack of an elastohydrodynamic boundary layer in the bearings. RWA rate and drag torque profiles as functions of time are collected via telemetry once every 4 seconds and once every 8 seconds, respectively. Intermediate processing steps single-out the coast-down regions. A nonlinear model for the drag torque as a function of RWA spin rate is incorporated in order to characterize the low spin rate regime. The tool then uses a nonlinear parameter optimization algorithm based on the Nelder-Mead simplex method to determine the viscous coefficient, the Dahl friction, and the two parameters that account for the low spin-rate behavior.

  13. Stellar Parameter Determination Using Bayesian Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekanayake, Gemunu B.; Wilhelm, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions of stars covering the wavelength range from far UV to far IR can be used to derive stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity and iron abundance) with a high reliability. For this purpose we are using a method based on Bayesian statistics, which make use of all available photometric data for a given star to construct stellar parameter probability distribution function (PDF) in order to determine the expectation values and their uncertainties in stellar parameters. The marginalized probabilities allow us to characterize the constraint for each parameter and estimate the influence of the quantity and quality of the photometric data on the resulting parameter values. We have obtained low resolution spectroscopy of blue horizontal branch, blue straggler and normal main sequence A, B, G and F stellar parameter standard stars using the McDonald observatory, 2.1m telescope to constrain both synthetic and empirical stellar libraries like Atlas9, MARCS, MILES and Pickles across a wide range in parameter space. This calibration process helps to evaluate the correlations between different stellar libraries and observed data especially in the UV part of the spectrum. When the calibration is complete the Bayesian analysis can be applied to large samples of data from GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS,WISE etc. We expect significant improvements to luminosity classification, distances and interstellar extinction using this technique.

  14. Determining wave direction using curvature parameters.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Eduardo Vitarelli; de Carvalho, João Luiz Baptista

    2016-01-01

    The curvature of the sea wave was tested as a parameter for estimating wave direction in the search for better results in estimates of wave direction in shallow waters, where waves of different sizes, frequencies and directions intersect and it is difficult to characterize. We used numerical simulations of the sea surface to determine wave direction calculated from the curvature of the waves. Using 1000 numerical simulations, the statistical variability of the wave direction was determined. The results showed good performance by the curvature parameter for estimating wave direction. Accuracy in the estimates was improved by including wave slope parameters in addition to curvature. The results indicate that the curvature is a promising technique to estimate wave directions.•In this study, the accuracy and precision of curvature parameters to measure wave direction are analyzed using a model simulation that generates 1000 wave records with directional resolution.•The model allows the simultaneous simulation of time-series wave properties such as sea surface elevation, slope and curvature and they were used to analyze the variability of estimated directions.•The simultaneous acquisition of slope and curvature parameters can contribute to estimates wave direction, thus increasing accuracy and precision of results. PMID:27408830

  15. Determination of kinetic parameters for biomass combustion.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, A; Pizarro, C; García, R; Bueno, J L; Lavín, A G

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a wide database of kinetic data for the most common biomass by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG). Due to the characteristic parameters of DTG curves, a two-stage reaction model is proposed and the kinetic parameters obtained from model-based methods with energy activation values for first and second stages in the range 1.75·10(4)-1.55·10(5)J/mol and 1.62·10(4)-2.37·10(5)J/mol, respectively. However, it has been found that Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose model-free methods are not suitable to determine the kinetic parameters of biomass combustion since the assumptions of these two methods were not accomplished in the full range of the combustion process. PMID:27233095

  16. Modeling radiation forces acting on satellites for precision orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Antreasian, P. G.; Rosborough, G. W.; Putney, B. H.

    1992-01-01

    Models of the TOPEX/Poseidon spacecraft are developed by means of finite-element analyses for use in generating acceleration histories for various orbit orientations which account for nonconservative radiation forces. The acceleration profiles are developed with an analysis based on the use of the 'box-wing' model in which the satellite is modeled as a combination of flat plates. The models account for the effects of solar, earth-albedo, earth-IR, and spacecraft-thermal radiation. The finite-element analysis gives the total force and induced accelerations acting on the satellite. The plate types used in the analysis have parameters that can be adjusted to optimize model performance according to the micromodel analysis and tracking observations. Acceleration related to solar radiation pressure is modeled effectively, and the techniques are shown to be useful for the precise orbit determinations required for spacecraft such as the TOPEX/Poseidon.

  17. Estimation of Transition-Metal Empirical Parameters for Molecular Mechanical Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Šebesta, Filip; Sláma, Vladislav; Melcr, Josef; Futera, Zdeněk; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2016-08-01

    Force-field parameters of the first row transition metals together with a few additional common elements such as those from the second (Rh, Ru) and third (Hg, Pt) rows of elements in ligated forms were determined based on the density functional theory calculations. Bonding characteristics were determined by averaging metal-ligand force constants in optimal geometries from several chosen complexes of each metal in the most common oxidation numbers and structural arrangements. Parameters of Lennard-Jones potential were determined based on a supermolecular model. Our determined molecular mechanical parameters are compared with presently available parameters published by other groups. We performed two different kinds of testing in order to demonstrate the reliability of these parameters in the case of ligated metallo complexes. First, the nonbonding potential was constructed for an additional set of 19 larger systems containing common complexes with organic molecules. The second test compares the Pt-O and Pt-H radial distribution functions for cisplatin in a box of TIP3P water with lately published studies. PMID:27337427

  18. Determining the Tsallis parameter via maximum entropy.

    PubMed

    Conroy, J M; Miller, H G

    2015-05-01

    The nonextensive entropic measure proposed by Tsallis [C. Tsallis, J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988)] introduces a parameter, q, which is not defined but rather must be determined. The value of q is typically determined from a piece of data and then fixed over the range of interest. On the other hand, from a phenomenological viewpoint, there are instances in which q cannot be treated as a constant. We present two distinct approaches for determining q depending on the form of the equations of constraint for the particular system. In the first case the equations of constraint for the operator Ô can be written as Tr(F(q)Ô)=C, where C may be an explicit function of the distribution function F. We show that in this case one can solve an equivalent maxent problem which yields q as a function of the corresponding Lagrange multiplier. As an illustration the exact solution of the static generalized Fokker-Planck equation (GFPE) is obtained from maxent with the Tsallis enropy. As in the case where C is a constant, if q is treated as a variable within the maxent framework the entropic measure is maximized trivially for all values of q. Therefore q must be determined from existing data. In the second case an additional equation of constraint exists which cannot be brought into the above form. In this case the additional equation of constraint may be used to determine the fixed value of q. PMID:26066124

  19. Automation of the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) II: assignment of bonded parameters and partial atomic charges.

    PubMed

    Vanommeslaeghe, K; Raman, E Prabhu; MacKerell, A D

    2012-12-21

    Molecular mechanics force fields are widely used in computer-aided drug design for the study of drug candidates interacting with biological systems. In these simulations, the biological part is typically represented by a specialized biomolecular force field, while the drug is represented by a matching general (organic) force field. In order to apply these general force fields to an arbitrary drug-like molecule, functionality for assignment of atom types, parameters, and partial atomic charges is required. In the present article, algorithms for the assignment of parameters and charges for the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) are presented. These algorithms rely on the existing parameters and charges that were determined as part of the parametrization of the force field. Bonded parameters are assigned based on the similarity between the atom types that define said parameters, while charges are determined using an extended bond-charge increment scheme. Charge increments were optimized to reproduce the charges on model compounds that were part of the parametrization of the force field. A "penalty score" is returned for every bonded parameter and charge, allowing the user to quickly and conveniently assess the quality of the force field representation of different parts of the compound of interest. Case studies are presented to clarify the functioning of the algorithms and the significance of their output data. PMID:23145473

  20. Parameters Determination of Oscillatory Impulse Current Waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shuji; Nishimura, Seisuke; Seki, Shingo

    This paper proposes numerical techniques to distil waveform parameters out of digitally measured data of oscillatory impulse current. The first method, to be used for liner circuit, based on a curve-fitting technique in which a smooth analytical curve is defined to fit the noise-superposed measured data. The waveform parameters are derived from the curve. The algorithm is examined its performance using a measured waveform data which is obtained from a circuit composed of linear elements only. It is not rare when impulse current is measured in a circuit with non-linear element, namely an arrester. After carefully observed behaviours of the circuit current when the non-linear element turns on and off, authors developed two algorithms capable to determine the parameters from the recorded data obtained from a circuit having a ZnO arrester. The developed algorithm processed the waveform data generated by TDG which is to be issued in 2009 as a part of IEC 61083-2. The details of the algorithm are to be demonstrated in the paper.

  1. Gravity and Tide Parameters Determined from Satellite and Spacecraft Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Robert A.

    2015-05-01

    As part of our work on the development of the Jovian and Saturnian satellite ephemerides to support the Juno and Cassini missions, we determined a number of planetary system gravity parameters. This work did not take into account tidal forces. In fact, we saw no obvious observational evidence of tidal effects on the satellite or spacecraft orbits. However, Lainey et al. (2009 Nature 459, 957) and Lainey et. al (2012 Astrophys. J. 752, 14) have published investigations of tidal effects in the Jovian and Saturnian systems, respectively. Consequently, we have begun a re-examination of our ephemeris work that includes a model for tides raised on the planet by the satellites as well as tides raised on the satellites by the planet. In this paper we briefly review the observations used in our ephemeris production; they include astrometry from the late 1800s to 2014, mutual events, eclipses, occultatons, and data acquired by the Pioneer, Voyager, Ulysses, Cassini, Galileo, and New Horizons spacecraft. We summarize the gravity parameter values found from our original analyses. Next we discuss our tidal acceleration model and its impact on the gravity parameter determination. We conclude with preliminary results found when the reprocessing of the observations includes tidal forces acting on the satellites and spacecraft.

  2. Determining safe limits for significant task parameters during manual lifting.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravindra Pratrap; Batish, Ajay; Singh, Tejinder Pal

    2014-04-01

    This experimental study investigated the effect of lifting task parameters (i.e., lifting weight, frequency, coupling, asymmetric angle, and vertical, horizontal, and travel distances) for various dynamic human lifting activities on the ground reaction forces of workers. Ten male workers loaded containers from different levels asymmetrically during experimental trials. The experimental design evolved using Taguchi's Fractional Factorial Experiments. Three factors (lifting weight, frequency, and vertical distance) were observed to be significant. The results showed that vertical reaction forces increase when workers lift weight from floor to shoulder height frequently. It was also observed that instantaneous loading rate increases with more weight, vertical distance, and frequency; a significant extra loading rate is required to change the lower level of load, frequency, and vertical distance to higher levels. Safe limits for significant factors were determined to result in optimal performance of the manual lifting task. PMID:24702682

  3. The use of impact force as a scale parameter for the impact response of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The building block approach is currently used to design composite structures. With this approach, the data from coupon tests are scaled up to determine the design of a structure. Current standard impact tests and methods of relating test data to other structures are not generally understood and are often used improperly. A methodology is outlined for using impact force as a scale parameter for delamination damage for impacts of simple plates. Dynamic analyses were used to define ranges of plate parameters and impact parameters where quasi-static analyses are valid. These ranges include most low-velocity impacts where the mass of the impacter is large, and the size of the specimen is small. For large-mass impacts of moderately thick (0.35-0.70 cm) laminates, the maximum extent of delamination damage increased with increasing impact force and decreasing specimen thickness. For large-mass impact tests at a given kinetic energy, impact force and hence delamination size depends on specimen size, specimen thickness, boundary conditions, and indenter size and shape. If damage is reported in terms of impact force instead of kinetic energy, large-mass test results can be applied directly to other plates of the same thickness.

  4. The use of impact force as a scale parameter for the impact response of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The building block approach is currently used to design composite structures. With this approach, the data from coupon tests is scaled up to determine the design of a structure. Current standard impact tests and methods of relating test data to other structures are not generally understood and are often used improperly. A methodology is outlined for using impact force as a scale parameter for delamination damage for impacts of simple plates. Dynamic analyses were used to define ranges of plate parameters and impact parameters where quasi-static analyses are valid. These ranges include most low velocity impacts where the mass of the impacter is large and the size of the specimen is small. For large mass impacts of moderately thick (0.35 to 0.70 cm) laminates, the maximum extent of delamination damage increased with increasing impact force and decreasing specimen thickness. For large mass impact tests at a given kinetic energy, impact force and hence delamination size depends on specimen size, specimen thickness, boundary conditions, and indenter size and shape. If damage is reported in terms of impact force instead of kinetic energy, large mass test results can be applied directly to other plates of the same size.

  5. Determining Supersymmetric Parameters With Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Taylor, Andrew M.; /Oxford U.

    2006-07-01

    In this article, we explore the ability of direct and indirect dark matter experiments to not only detect neutralino dark matter, but to constrain and measure the parameters of supersymmetry. In particular, we explore the relationship between the phenomenological quantities relevant to dark matter experiments, such as the neutralino annihilation and elastic scattering cross sections, and the underlying characteristics of the supersymmetric model, such as the values of {mu} (and the composition of the lightest neutralino), m{sub A} and tan {beta}. We explore a broad range of supersymmetric models and then focus on a smaller set of benchmark models. We find that by combining astrophysical observations with collider measurements, {mu} can often be constrained far more tightly than it can be from LHC data alone. In models in the A-funnel region of parameter space, we find that dark matter experiments can potentially determine m{sub A} to roughly {+-}100 GeV, even when heavy neutral MSSM Higgs bosons (A, H{sub 1}) cannot be observed at the LHC. The information provided by astrophysical experiments is often highly complementary to the information most easily ascertained at colliders.

  6. How Variability and Effort Determine Coordination at Large Forces.

    PubMed

    Kolossiatis, Michalis; Charalambous, Themistoklis; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Motor control is a challenging task for the central nervous system, since it involves redundant degrees of freedom, nonlinear dynamics of actuators and limbs, as well as noise. When an action is carried out, which factors does your nervous system consider to determine the appropriate set of muscle forces between redundant degrees-of-freedom? Important factors determining motor output likely encompass effort and the resulting motor noise. However, the tasks used in many previous motor control studies could not identify these two factors uniquely, as signal-dependent noise monotonically increases as a function of the effort. To address this, a recent paper introduced a force control paradigm involving one finger in each hand that can disambiguate these two factors. It showed that the central nervous system considers both force noise and amplitude, with a larger weight on the absolute force and lower weights on both noise and normalized force. While these results are valid for the relatively low force range considered in that paper, the magnitude of the force shared between the fingers for large forces is not known. This paper investigates this question experimentally, and develops an appropriate Markov chain Monte Carlo method in order to estimate the weightings given to these factors. Our results demonstrate that the force sharing strongly depends on the force level required, so that for higher force levels the normalized force is considered as much as the absolute force, whereas the role of noise minimization becomes negligible. PMID:26934193

  7. How Variability and Effort Determine Coordination at Large Forces

    PubMed Central

    Kolossiatis, Michalis; Charalambous, Themistoklis; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Motor control is a challenging task for the central nervous system, since it involves redundant degrees of freedom, nonlinear dynamics of actuators and limbs, as well as noise. When an action is carried out, which factors does your nervous system consider to determine the appropriate set of muscle forces between redundant degrees-of-freedom? Important factors determining motor output likely encompass effort and the resulting motor noise. However, the tasks used in many previous motor control studies could not identify these two factors uniquely, as signal-dependent noise monotonically increases as a function of the effort. To address this, a recent paper introduced a force control paradigm involving one finger in each hand that can disambiguate these two factors. It showed that the central nervous system considers both force noise and amplitude, with a larger weight on the absolute force and lower weights on both noise and normalized force. While these results are valid for the relatively low force range considered in that paper, the magnitude of the force shared between the fingers for large forces is not known. This paper investigates this question experimentally, and develops an appropriate Markov chain Monte Carlo method in order to estimate the weightings given to these factors. Our results demonstrate that the force sharing strongly depends on the force level required, so that for higher force levels the normalized force is considered as much as the absolute force, whereas the role of noise minimization becomes negligible. PMID:26934193

  8. Relativity Parameters Determined from Lunar Laser Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Newhall, X. X.; Dickey, J. O.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of 24 years of lunar laser ranging data is used to test the principle of equivalence, geodetic precession, the PPN parameters beta and gamma, and G/G. Recent data can be fitted with a rms scatter of 3 cm. (a) Using the Nordtvedt effect to test the principle of equivalence, it is found that the Moon and Earth accelerate alike in the Sun's field. The relative accelerations match to within 5 x 10(exp -13) . This limit, combined with an independent determination of y from planetary time delay, gives beta. Including the uncertainty due to compositional differences, the parameter beta differs from unity by no more than 0.0014; and, if the weak equivalence principle is satisfied, the difference is no more than 0.0006. (b) Geodetic precession matches its expected 19.2 marc sec/yr rate within 0.7%. This corresponds to a 1% test of gamma. (c) Apart from the Nordtvedt effect, beta and gamma can be tested from their influence on the lunar orbit. It is argued theoretically that the linear combination 0.8(beta) + 1.4(gamma) can be tested at the 1% level of accuracy. For solutions using numerically derived partial derivatives, higher sensitivity is found. Both 6 and y match the values of general relativity to within 0.005, and the linear combination beta+ gamma matches to within 0,003, but caution is advised due to the lack of theoretical understanding of these sensitivities. (d) No evidence for a changing gravitational constant is found, with absolute value of G/G less than or equal to 8 x lO(exp -12)/yr. There is significant sensitivity to G/G through solar perturbations on the lunar orbit.

  9. SPADES: a Stellar PArameters DEtermination Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posbic, H.; Katz, D.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Sbordone, L.; Gomez, A.; Arenou, F.

    2011-12-01

    With the large amounts of spectroscopic data available today and the very large surveys to come (e.g. Gaia), the need for automatic data analysis software is unquestionable. We thus developed an automatic spectra analysis program for the determination of stellar parameters: radial velocity, effective temperature, surface gravity, micro-turbulence, metallicity and the elemental abundances of the elements present in the spectral range. Target stars for this software should include all types of stars. The analysis method relies on a line by line comparison of the spectrum of a target star to a library of synthetic spectra. The idea is built on the experience acquired in developing the TGMET (Katz et al. 1998, Soubiran et al. 2003), ETOILE (Katz 2001) and Abbo (Bonifacio & Caffau 2003) software.The method is presented and the performances are illustrated with GIRAFFE-like simulated spectra with high resolution (R = 25000), with high and low signal to noise ratios (down to SNR = 30). These spectra should be close to what could be targeted by the Gaia-ESO Survey (GCDS).

  10. Extracting intrinsic dynamic parameters of biomolecular folding from single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Nam, Gi-Moon; Makarov, Dmitrii E

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule studies in which a mechanical force is transmitted to the molecule of interest and the molecular extension or position is monitored as a function of time are versatile tools for probing the dynamics of protein folding, stepping of molecular motors, and other biomolecular processes involving activated barrier crossing. One complication in interpreting such studies, however, is the fact that the typical size of a force probe (e.g., a dielectric bead in optical tweezers or the atomic force microscope tip/cantilever assembly) is much larger than the molecule itself, and so the observed molecular motion is affected by the hydrodynamic drag on the probe. This presents the experimenter with a nontrivial task of deconvolving the intrinsic molecular parameters, such as the intrinsic free energy barrier and the effective diffusion coefficient exhibited while crossing the barrier from the experimental signal. Here we focus on the dynamical aspect of this task and show how the intrinsic diffusion coefficient along the molecular reaction coordinate can be inferred from single-molecule measurements of the rates of biomolecular folding and unfolding. We show that the feasibility of accomplishing this task is strongly dependent on the relationship between the intrinsic molecular elasticity and that of the linker connecting the molecule to the force probe and identify the optimal range of instrumental parameters allowing determination of instrument-free molecular dynamics. PMID:26088347

  11. What Determines the Static Force Chains in Stressed Granular Media?

    PubMed

    Gendelman, Oleg; Pollack, Yoav G; Procaccia, Itamar; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Zylberg, Jacques

    2016-02-19

    The determination of the normal and transverse (frictional) interparticle forces within a granular medium is a long-standing, daunting, and yet unresolved problem. We present a new formalism that employs the knowledge of the external forces and the orientations of contacts between particles (of any given size), to compute all the interparticle forces. Having solved this problem, we exemplify the efficacy of the formalism showing that the force chains in such systems are determined by an expansion in the eigenfunctions of a newly defined operator. PMID:26943559

  12. Simulation-based Extraction of Key Material Parameters from Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsafi, Huseen; Peninngton, Gray

    Models for the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and sample interaction contain numerous material parameters that are often poorly known. This is especially true when dealing with novel material systems or when imaging samples that are exposed to complicated interactions with the local environment. In this work we use Monte Carlo methods to extract sample material parameters from the experimental AFM analysis of a test sample. The parameterized theoretical model that we use is based on the Virtual Environment for Dynamic AFM (VEDA) [1]. The extracted material parameters are then compared with the accepted values for our test sample. Using this procedure, we suggest a method that can be used to successfully determine unknown material properties in novel and complicated material systems. We acknowledge Fisher Endowment Grant support from the Jess and Mildred Fisher College of Science and Mathematics,Towson University.

  13. Isoelectronic determination of the thermal Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, G.; López, D.; Decca, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Differential force measurements between spheres coated with either nickel or gold and rotating disks with periodic distributions of nickel and gold are reported. The rotating samples are covered by a thin layer of titanium and a layer of gold. While titanium is used for fabrication purposes, the gold layer (nominal thicknesses of 21, 37, 47, and 87 nm) provides an isoelectronic environment, and is used to nullify the electrostatic contribution but allow the passage of long wavelength Casimir photons. A direct comparison between the experimental results and predictions from Drude and plasma models for the electrical permittivity is carried out. In the models, the magnetic permeability of nickel is allowed to change to investigate its effects. Possible sources of errors, both in the experimental and theoretical sides, are taken into account. It is found that a Drude response with magnetic properties of nickel taken into account is unequivocally ruled out. The full analysis of the data indicates that a dielectric plasma response with the magnetic properties of Ni included shows good agreement with the data. Neither a Drude nor a plasma dielectric response provide a satisfactory description if the magnetic properties of nickel are disregarded.

  14. Determining camera parameters for round glassware measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldner, F. O.; Costa, P. B.; Gomes, J. F. S.; Filho, D. M. E. S.; Leta, F. R.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays there are many types of accessible cameras, including digital single lens reflex ones. Although these cameras are not usually employed in machine vision applications, they can be an interesting choice. However, these cameras have many available parameters to be chosen by the user and it may be difficult to select the best of these in order to acquire images with the needed metrological quality. This paper proposes a methodology to select a set of parameters that will supply a machine vision system with the needed quality image, considering the measurement required of a laboratory glassware.

  15. Micromechanical cohesion force measurements to determine cyclopentane hydrate interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Joshi, Sanjeev E; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2012-06-15

    Hydrate aggregation and deposition are critical factors in determining where and when hydrates may plug a deepwater flowline. We present the first direct measurement of structure II (cyclopentane) hydrate cohesive forces in the water, liquid hydrocarbon and gas bulk phases. For fully annealed hydrate particles, gas phase cohesive forces were approximately twice that obtained in a liquid hydrocarbon phase, and approximately six times that obtained in the water phase. Direct measurements show that hydrate cohesion force in a water-continuous bulk may be only the product of solid-solid cohesion. When excess water was present on the hydrate surface, gas phase cohesive forces increased by a factor of three, suggesting the importance of the liquid or quasi-liquid layer (QLL) in determining cohesive force. Hydrate-steel adhesion force measurements show that, when the steel surface is coated with hydrophobic wax, forces decrease up to 96%. As the micromechanical force technique is uniquely capable of measuring hydrate-surface forces with variable contact time, the present work contains significant implications for hydrate applications in flow assurance. PMID:22484169

  16. Proximate determinants of bite force in Anolis lizards.

    PubMed

    Wittorski, Antoine; Losos, Jonathan B; Herrel, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Performance measures associated with the vertebrate jaw system may provide important insights into vertebrate ecology and evolution because of their importance in many ecologically relevant tasks. Previous studies have shown that in many taxa, evolution toward higher bite force has gone hand in hand with the evolution of larger body size. However, independent of differences in overall body size, bite force may vary depending on head size and shape as well. Moreover, the underlying musculature may also drive variation in bite force. Here, we investigate the proximate determinants of bite force in lizards of the genus Anolis. We dissected the jaw muscles and quantified muscle mass, fibre length, and cross-sectional area. Data were analysed for both sexes independently given the sexual dimorphism detected in the dataset. Our results show that the traits that explain bite force are similar in both males and females with overall body size and muscle mass being the principal determinants. Among the different muscles examined, the adductor externus and the pseudotemporalis groups were the best determinants of bite force. However, models run for males predicted the variation in bite force better than models for females, suggesting that selection on morphology improving bite force may be stronger in males. PMID:26471984

  17. Automated determination of volume phase hologram parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert D.; Stanley, James H.

    2015-03-01

    Commercially available ray tracing programs by themselves are not adequate for modelling optical systems with holographic gratings. In this paper, we describe a suite of tools that we have developed specifically for working with volume phase holograms. One tool measures the diffraction efficiency of a grating with respect to angle and position. Our automated measurement process is described. The measured diffraction data is analyzed to extract key grating parameters; such as, grating thickness and index modulation. The theoretical basis for this analysis is described. The extracted grating parameters can be used to ray trace expected performance for comparison with direct measurements. Such a methodology has allowed us to develop modelling capabilities that can be confidently used to compare design options and guide development activities. In our environment, data is collected and grating parameters are extracted using LabView; ray tracing is performed using Zemax. The concepts, however, are quite general. An example of measuring a grating recorded in a photopolymer and extracting its grating parameters is given. Results are compared to published datasheet specifications.

  18. Experimental determination of terahertz atmospheric absorption parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slocum, David M.; Goyette, Thomas M.; Giles, Robert H.; Nixon, William E.

    2015-05-01

    The terahertz frequency regime is often used as the `chemical fingerprint' region of the electromagnetic spectrum since many molecules exhibit a dense selection of rotational and vibrational transitions. Water is a major component of the atmosphere and since it has a large dipole moment the propagation of terahertz radiation will be dominated by atmospheric effects. This study will present the results of high-­-resolution broadband measurements of the terahertz atmospheric absorption and detail the technique for directly measuring the pressure broadening coefficients, absolute absorption coefficients, line positions, and continuum effects. Differences between these measured parameters and those tabulated in HITRAN will be discussed. Once the water vapor absorption was characterized, the same technique was used to measure the line parameters for methanol, a trace gas of interest within Earth's atmosphere. Methanol has a dense absorption spectrum in the terahertz frequency region and is an important molecule in fields such as environmental monitoring, security, and astrophysics. The data obtained in the present study will be of immediate use for the remote sensing community, as it is uncommon to measure this many independent parameters as well as to measure the absolute absorption of the transitions. Current models rely on tabulated databases of calculated values for the line parameters measured in this study. Differences between the measured data and those in the databases will be highlighted and discussed.

  19. External Load Affects Ground Reaction Force Parameters Non-uniformly during Running in Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John; Schaffner, Grant; Laughlin, Mitzi; Loehr, James; Hagan, R. Donald

    2004-01-01

    Long-term exposure to microgravity induces detrimefits to the musculcskdetal system (Schneider et al., 1995; LeBlanc et al., 2000). Treadmill exercise is used onboard the International Space Station as an exercise countermeasure to musculoskeletal deconditioning due to spaceflight. During locomotive exercise in weightlessness (0G), crewmembers wear a harness attached to an external loading mechanism (EL). The EL pulls the crewmember toward the treadmill, and provides resistive load during the impact and propulsive phases of gait. The resulting forces may be important in stimulating bone maintenance (Turner, 1998). The EL can be applied via a bungee and carabineer clip configuration attached to the harness and can be manipulated to create varying amounts of load levels during exercise. Ground-based research performed using a vertically mounted treadmill found that peak ground reaction forces (GRF) during running at an EL of less than one body weight (BW) are less than those that occur during running in normal gravity (1G) (Davis et al., 1996). However, it is not known how the GRF are affected by the EL in a true OG environment. Locomotion while suspended may result in biomechanics that differ from free running. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how EL affects peak impact force, peak propulsive force, loading rate, and impulse of the GRF during running in 0G. It was hypothesized that increasing EL would result in increases in each GRF parameter.

  20. Determining electrochemical parameters with dual electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1981-01-01

    Use of the two-electrode method for determining corrosion rates and Tafel constants is described. The method involves polarization resistance measurements, as well as polarization data further from the corrosion potential. Combined treatment of these data enables the determination of Tafel constants and corrosion rates. It is also shown that values for corrosion potentials can be obtained with good accuracy when exchange current densities of anodic and cathodic reactions are known. This method overcomes some of the earlier drawbacks of the two-electrode technique, such as the need for separate, three-electrode Tafel constant determinations.

  1. The Friction Force Determination of Large-Sized Composite Rods in Pultrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, S. N.; Krasnovskii, A. N.; Kazakov, I. A.

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays, the simple pull-force models of pultrusion process are not suitable for large sized rods because they are not considered a chemical shrinkage and thermal expansion acting in cured material inside the die. But the pulling force of the resin-impregnated fibers as they travels through the heated die is essential factor in the pultrusion process. In order to minimize the number of trial-and-error experiments a new mathematical approach to determine the frictional force is presented. The governing equations of the model are stated in general terms and various simplifications are implemented in order to obtain solutions without extensive numerical efforts. The influence of different pultrusion parameters on the frictional force value is investigated. The results obtained by the model can establish a foundation by which process control parameters are selected to achieve an appropriate pull-force and can be used for optimization pultrusion process.

  2. DETERMINATION OF TANGENTIAL AND NORMAL COMPONENTS OF ORAL FORCES

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Estevam Barbosa de Las; de Almeida, André França; Cimini, Carlos Alberto; Gomes, Paulo de Tarso Vida; Cornacchia, Tulimar Pereira Machado; Saffar, Jorge Milton Elian

    2007-01-01

    Oral forces applied to human teeth during biting and mastication are normally described in the literature only in terms of their axial components. The purpose of this study was to fully determine the spatial characteristics of the oral resultant force – its normal and tangential components - for a given individual. A load cell was especially manufactured to measure oral force and was temporarily implanted as a prosthetic device in the dental arch of a volunteer, replacing his missing upper first molar. The mastication and occlusion tests were carried out in such a way the cell should withstand the loads applied to the molar, and its state of strain was recorded by strain gauges attached to it. Based on the results of these tests and using balance equations, normal and tangential components of the resultant oral force were determined. For direct occlusion, without interposition any obstacle between cusps, a peak normal force of 135 N was recorded simultaneously to a tangential force of 44 N. For mastication of biscuits, a peak normal force of 133 N and a tangential force of 39 N were obtained. PMID:19089104

  3. Using explicit macroscopic feedback to determine efficacy of climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, B.; MacMartin, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Calculating efficacies of climate forcings has been a useful method of determining the importance of forcing agents relative to CO2. However, because the strength of internal feedbacks is dependent upon the climate state, efficacies are dependent upon the strengths of the applied forcings, and simulations designed to capture these efficacies have tradeoffs between simulation length and accurately capturing the steady state climate response. We propose an alternate method of determining a quantity similar to climate efficacy via adjusting the amount of forcing by feeding back the observed climate state. By balancing CO2 forcing with another climate forcing, many internal feedbacks are suppressed, which linearizes the climate response to the forcing and promotes rapid convergence of the simulation. We performed simulations in two fully coupled general circulation models of Earth's climate. Doubling the present day CO2 concentration requires a steady state solar reduction of approximately 2.5%; this answer can be obtained with a simulation of less than 30 years. With this method, the amount of solar reduction scales linearly with the logarithmic change in CO2 concentration. We explore similar calculations using other climate forcings. Because this method circumvents calculation of radiative forcing, intercomparison of values between different climate forcings is difficult and is a drawback of our method as compared to the original method of calculating efficacy. Feedback can be used to estimate the efficacy of solar reductions in models. The solar reduction that is required to maintain temperature in the presence of an instantaneous change in atmospheric CO2 concentrations is computed using feedback. The left-hand panel illustrates both the solar forcing as a function of time for offsetting 2×CO2, and the efficacy estimated as the mean solar reduction after the initial transient; extremely rapid convergence is obtained. The right-hand panel illustrates the linearity

  4. Comet brightness parameters: Definition, determination, and correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meisel, D. D.; Morris, C. S.

    1976-01-01

    The power-law definition of comet brightness is reviewed and possible systematic influences are discussed that can affect the derivation of m sub o and n values from visual magnitude estimates. A rationale for the Bobrovnikoff aperture correction method is given and it is demonstrated that the Beyer extrafocal method leads to large systematic effects which if uncorrected by an instrumental relationship result in values significantly higher than those derived according to the Bobrovnikoff guidelines. A series of visual brightness parameter sets are presented which have been reduced to the same photometric system. Recommendations are given to insure that future observations are reduced to the same system.

  5. a Method for Determining the Impact Force in Crash Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Y.; Isobe, D.; Saito, S.; Fujimoto, H.; Miki, Y.

    2000-11-01

    A method for measuring the impact force in crash testing is developed. In this method, a mass is made to collide with the object being tested and the instantaneous value of the impact force is measured as the inertial force acting on the mass. To realise linear motion with sufficiently small friction acting on the mass, a pneumatic linear bearing is used, and the velocity and acceleration of the mass, the moving part of the bearing, are measured using an optical interferometer. The relative combined standard uncertainty in determining the impact force in a three-point bending test is estimated to be 0.5×10 -2(0.5%) of the maximum value of the impact force.

  6. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  7. The necessity of physiological muscle parameters for computing the muscle forces: application to lower extremity loading during pedalling.

    PubMed

    Cadová, Michala; Vilímek, Miloslav

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine how the use of physiological parameters of muscles is important. This work is focused on musculoskeletal loading analysis during pedalling adopting two approaches: without (1) and with (2) the use of physiological parameters of muscles. The static-optimization approach together with the inverse dynamics problem makes it possible to obtain forces in individual muscles of the lower extremity. Input kinematics variables were examined in a cycling experiment. The significant difference in the resultant forces in one-joint and two-joint muscles using the two different approaches was observed. PMID:20131752

  8. Effect of hinge-moment parameters on elevator stick forces in rapid maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.; Greenberg, H.

    1976-01-01

    The importance of the stick force per unit normal acceleration as a criterion of longitudinal stability and the critical dependence of this gradient on elevator hinge moment parameters are investigated with special reference to transient effects for maneuvers of short duration. The analysis shows that different combinations of elevator parameters, which give the same stick force per unit acceleration in turns, give widely different force variations during the entries into and recoveries from steady turns and during maneuvers of short duration such as abrupt pull-ups. The stick force per unit acceleration is greater for abrupt than for gradual control movements.

  9. An improved method for determining force balance calibration accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Alice T.

    The results of an improved statistical method used at Langley Research Center for determining and stating the accuracy of a force balance calibration are presented. The application of the method for initial loads, initial load determination, auxiliary loads, primary loads, and proof loads is described. The data analysis is briefly addressed.

  10. Experimental Determination of the Multiplicity Deadtime Parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Menaa, N.; Croft, S.; Kane, S.C.; Philips, S.; Villani, M.; Evans, L.G.

    2008-07-01

    Definition, extraction, and application of dead-time parameters, in correlated neutron counting, are long standing, thorny issues. Traditionally, dead-time corrections have been estimated on the assumption of a simple paralyzing model, arising from the action of the discriminator in the charged amplifiers connected to the {sup 3}He proportional counters, using a fixed dead-time. Various schemes exist to apply the paralysable model to the multiplicity shift register histogram data. In principle, several methods could be used to estimate the dead-time parameter. The approach which is most widely applied involves measuring a series of Cf-252 sources spanning a wide dynamic range of counting rates. Ratios between the Singles, Doubles and Triples rates which ought to be independent of fissile mass are extracted. The dead-time is chosen so as to achieve the best independence in the ratios, characteristic of the fissioning system, over the counting range. These measurements can be quite laborious to conduct; require a set of Cf-252 sources matched in construction and isotopic composition; require long counts to achieve the requisite precision and involve a good deal of numerical analysis to interpret. In this work we present a simpler scheme which produces comparable values in a way that is easier to implement. In essence we place a near random neutron source, such as may be realized using Am/Li {alpha}-n sources, in the cavity and record the multiplicity histograms as one would for an assay. The variance to mean-squared is narrower than for a random counting experiment, however, as a result of the dead-time losses. A simple formula exists allowing the deadtime to be extracted from this measurement. In this paper, we present results for the traditional approach, the proposed approach and also a variation based on adjusting the total event rate by adding Am/Li sources to a single Cf-252 source fixed in position for the case of a pair of Passive Scrap Multiplicity Counters

  11. Kohlrausch Parameter Determination for Simple Chain Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, John; Dotson, Taylor; Heffernan, Julieanne; Dotson, Keenan; Budzien, Joanne; Adolf, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    The second Legendre polynomials of the end-to-end vector of freely jointed and freely rotating chains were extracted from molecular dynamics simulations and analyzed in terms of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) function. Of particular interest is the variation of the stretching exponent, β, as a function of state point and, consequently, of the detailed compliance with time-temperature superposition. A new analysis methodology is introduced that permits the determination of β at the needed level of precision. Detailed time-temperature superposition does not hold for freely-jointed or freely-rotating chain liquids. Indications of a breakdown in time-temperature superposition are also found in violations of Stokes-Einstein and Debye-Stokes-Einstein behavior.

  12. [A computer-controlled flexing test for determining the elastic parameters of highly flexible orthodontic wires].

    PubMed

    Plietsch, R; Bourauel, C; Drescher, D; Nellen, B

    1994-04-01

    Metals are the most commonly used materials in the construction of orthodontic appliances designed for the correction of malocclusions. Knowledge of the force systems at work is a prerequisite for judging the functionality of these appliances. The elasticity parameters (Young's E-moduli, strain limits) of the alloys employed can be drawn upon to calculate numerically forces and torsional moments. Both tensile tests and bending experiments are used to determine the E-moduli and strain limits of standard steel and highly flexible NiTi wires frequently used in orthodontics. However, parameters obtained by tensile tests are less suited for studying the mechanical properties of orthodontic appliances. Since bending deformation prevails, bending experiments should be preferred method for ascertaining the relevant parameters. This study, therefore, presents a new experimental method for testing the bend ability of highly flexible materials and the determination of the underlying material parameters. A comparison of calculated force systems with direct measurements revealed that bending parameters lead to an appropriate description of forces and moments generated during clinical treatment, whereas calculations based on tensile test parameters differ substantially. The bending test proposed here is, thus, a suitable means for dependably predicting the force systems produced by an orthodontic appliance and the test therefore can contribute to an accurate design of new types of therapeutic devices. PMID:8194813

  13. Determination of electroweak parameters at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Torrence, E.

    1996-09-01

    We present an improved measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry (A{sub LR}) for Z{sup 0} boson production by e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. The measurement was performed at a center-of-mass energy of 91.28 GeV with the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) during the 1994-95 running period. The luminosity-weighted average polarization of the SLC electron beam during this run was measured to be (77.23 {+-} 0.52)%. Using a sample of 93,644 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays, we measure the pole asymmetry A{sub LR}{sup 0} to be 0.1512 {+-} 0.0042(stat.) {+-} 0.0011(syst.) which is equivalent to an effective weak mixing angle of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.23100 {+-} 0.00054(stat.) {+-} 0.00014(syst.). We also present a preliminary direct measurement of the Z{sup 0}-lepton coupling asymmetries A{sub e}, A{sub {mu}}, and A{sub {tau}} extracted from the differential cross section observed in leptonic Z{sup 0} decays. We combine these results with our previous A{sub LR} measurement to obtain a combined determination of the weak mixing angle sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.23061 {+-} 0.00047.

  14. Determination of characteristic parameters of human postural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Johansson, R; Magnusson, M

    1989-01-01

    Posture control performance was quantified in three variables (swiftness, stiffness, damping). Subjects were tested with a force platform recording body sway induced by vibrators attached to the calf muscles. Parameter estimation was made with identification of a transfer function representing the stabilized inverted pendulum. It is conjectured that the state feedback parameters identified are suitable for use in assessing ability to maintain posture. PMID:2635507

  15. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J.E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J.P.; Jarvis, S.P.

    2006-01-15

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity.

  16. Determination of variable atom parameters in ionic crystals by electrostatic calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, T.; Morss, L.R.

    1987-03-01

    An electrostatic method to determine variable atom parameters in ionic crystals with experimentally determined unit cell parameters and space group is proposed. The atom parameters are usually chosen to give the maximum Madelung constant. However, when these atom parameters generate interatomic distances at least one of which is less than a critical distance, which comes from repulsion between atoms, the atom parameters corresponding to that distance are assigned. Applicability was examined for three cases: TiO/sub 2/ (rutile), UCl/sub 3/, and ..beta..-Rb/sub 2/GeF/sub 6/. Agreement between the atom parameters of this method and of literature was good. Some discussion is presented on the basis of this method. In ionic crystals, the atoms with variable parameters are set first using the geometrical arrangement which is the most stable in an electrostatic sense, and then real distances are fixed under the interaction of repulsive forces. 34 references, 7 figures, 5 tables.

  17. Paramfit: automated optimization of force field parameters for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Betz, Robin M; Walker, Ross C

    2015-01-15

    The generation of bond, angle, and torsion parameters for classical molecular dynamics force fields typically requires fitting parameters such that classical properties such as energies and gradients match precalculated quantum data for structures that scan the value of interest. We present a program, Paramfit, distributed as part of the AmberTools software package that automates and extends this fitting process, allowing for simplified parameter generation for applications ranging from single molecules to entire force fields. Paramfit implements a novel combination of a genetic and simplex algorithm to find the optimal set of parameters that replicate either quantum energy or force data. The program allows for the derivation of multiple parameters simultaneously using significantly fewer quantum calculations than previous methods, and can also fit parameters across multiple molecules with applications to force field development. Paramfit has been applied successfully to systems with a sparse number of structures, and has already proven crucial in the development of the Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement Lipid14 force field. PMID:25413259

  18. Experimental and analytical determination of stability parameters for a balloon tethered in a wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, L. T.; Bennett, R. M.; Bland, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and analytical techniques for determining stability parameters for a balloon tethered in a steady wind are described. These techniques are applied to a particular 7.64-meter-long balloon, and the results are presented. The stability parameters of interest appear as coefficients in linearized stability equations and are derived from the various forces and moments acting on the balloon. In several cases the results from the experimental and analytical techniques are compared and suggestions are given as to which techniques are the most practical means of determining values for the stability parameters.

  19. Parameters for the AMBER force field for the molecular mechanics modeling of the cobalt corrinoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, H. M.; Ngoma, B.; Egan, T. J.; Brown, K. L.

    2001-04-01

    Additional parameters for the AMBER force field have been developed for the molecular mechanics modeling of the cobalt corrinoids. Parameter development was based on a statistical analysis of the reported structures of these compounds. The resulting force field reproduces bond lengths, bond angles, and torsional angles within 0.01 Å, 0.8°, and 4.0° of the mean crystallographic values, respectively. Parameters for the Co-C bond length and the Co-C-C bond angle for modeling the alkylcobalamins were developed by modeling six alkylcobalamins. The validity of the force field was tested by comparing the results obtained with known experimental features of the structures of the cobalt corrinoids as well as with the results from their modeling using a parameter set for the MM2 force field that has been previously developed and extensively tested. The AMBER force field reproduces the structures of the cobalt corrinoids as well as the MM2 force field, although it tends to underestimate the corrin fold angle, the angle between mean planes through the corrin atoms in the northern and southern half of the molecules, respectively. The force field was applied to a study of the structures of 5'-deoxy-5'-(3-isoadenosyl)cobalamin, 2',5'-dideoxy-5'-adenosylcobalamin and 2',3',5'-trideoxy-5'-adenosylcobalamin. This expansion of the standard AMBER force field provides a force field that can be used for modeling the structures of the B 12-dependent proteins, the structures of some of which are now beginning to emerge. This was verified in a preliminary modeling of the coenzyme B 12 binding site of methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase.

  20. Close intramolecular sulfur-oxygen contacts: modified force field parameters for improved conformation generation.

    PubMed

    Lupyan, Dmitry; Abramov, Yuriy A; Sherman, Woody

    2012-11-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) offers an excellent data source to study small molecule conformations and molecular interactions. We have analyzed 130 small molecules from the CSD containing an intramolecular sulfur-oxygen distance less than the sum of their van der Waals (vdW) radii. Close S···O distances are observed in several important medicinal chemistry motifs (e.g. a carbonyl oxygen connected by a carbon or nitrogen linker to a sulfur) and are not treated well with existing parameters in the MMFFs or OPLS_2005 force fields, resulting in suboptimal geometries and energetics. In this work, we develop modified parameters for the OPLS_2005 force field to better treat this specific interaction in order to generate conformations close to those found in the CSD structures. We use a combination of refitting a force field torsional parameter, adding a specific atom pair vdW term, and attenuating the electrostatic interactions to obtain an improvement in the accuracy of geometry minimizations and conformational searches for these molecules. Specifically, in a conformational search 58 % of the cases produced a conformation less than 0.25 Å from the CSD crystal conformation with the modified OPLS force field parameters developed in this work. In contrast, 25 and 37 % produced a conformation less than 0.25 Å with the MMFFs and OPLS_2005 force fields, respectively. As an application of the new parameters, we generated conformations for the tyrosine kinase inhibitor axitinib (trade name Inlyta) that could be correctly repacked into three observed polymorphic structures, which was not possible with conformations generated using MMFFs or OPLS_2005. The improved parameters can be mapped directly onto physical characteristics of the systems that are treated inadequately with the molecular mechanics force fields used in this study and potentially other force fields as well. PMID:23053737

  1. VFFDT: A New Software for Preparing AMBER Force Field Parameters for Metal-Containing Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Suqing; Tang, Qing; He, Jian; Du, Shiyu; Xu, Shaofang; Wang, Chaojie; Xu, Yong; Lin, Fu

    2016-04-25

    Force fields are fundamental to molecular dynamics simulations. However, the incompleteness of force field parameters has been a long-standing problem, especially for metal-related systems. In our previous work, we adopted the Seminario method based on the Hessian matrix to systematically derive the zinc-related force field parameters for AMBER. In this work, in order to further simplify the whole protocol, we have implemented a user-friendly Visual Force Field Derivation Toolkit (VFFDT) to derive the force field parameters via simply clicking on the bond or angle in the 3D viewer, and we have further extended our previous program to support the Hessian matrix output from a variety of quantum mechanics (QM) packages, including Gaussian 03/09, ORCA 3.0, QChem, GAMESS-US, and MOPAC 2009/2012. In this toolkit, a universal VFFDT XYZ file format containing the raw Hessian matrix is available for all of the QM packages, and an instant force field parametrization protocol based on a semiempirical quantum mechanics (SQM) method is introduced. The new function that can automatically obtain the relevant parameters for zinc, copper, iron, etc., which can be exported in AMBER Frcmod format, has been added. Furthermore, our VFFDT program can read and write files in AMBER Prepc, AMBER Frcmod, and AMBER Mol2 format and can also be used to customize, view, copy, and paste the force field parameters in the context of the 3D viewer, which provides utilities complementary to ANTECHAMBER, MCPB, and MCPB.py in the AmberTools. PMID:26998926

  2. Application of Novel Lateral Tire Force Sensors to Vehicle Parameter Estimation of Electric Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kanghyun

    2015-01-01

    This article presents methods for estimating lateral vehicle velocity and tire cornering stiffness, which are key parameters in vehicle dynamics control, using lateral tire force measurements. Lateral tire forces acting on each tire are directly measured by load-sensing hub bearings that were invented and further developed by NSK Ltd. For estimating the lateral vehicle velocity, tire force models considering lateral load transfer effects are used, and a recursive least square algorithm is adapted to identify the lateral vehicle velocity as an unknown parameter. Using the estimated lateral vehicle velocity, tire cornering stiffness, which is an important tire parameter dominating the vehicle’s cornering responses, is estimated. For the practical implementation, the cornering stiffness estimation algorithm based on a simple bicycle model is developed and discussed. Finally, proposed estimation algorithms were evaluated using experimental test data. PMID:26569246

  3. Real-time transverse force sensing using fiber Bragg grating through direct Stokes parameters measurement.

    PubMed

    Su, Yang; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Baofu; Zhou, Hua

    2015-12-14

    Characteristics of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) transverse force sensor based on Stokes parameters are presented. Real-time force measurement is achieved through direct measurement of the Stokes parameters at single wavelength. A proportional relationship and linear fit are found between Stokes parameters and applied force. The sensitivity and dynamic range dependence on the state of polarization (SOP) of the incident light is investigated theoretically and experimentally. A maximum sensitivity of 0.037/N is experimentally achieved and it can be improved further by adjusting the incident SOP. This design significantly reduces system complexity and improves data processing speed, which has great practical value in real-time FBG sensing applications. PMID:26699020

  4. Application of Novel Lateral Tire Force Sensors to Vehicle Parameter Estimation of Electric Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kanghyun

    2015-01-01

    This article presents methods for estimating lateral vehicle velocity and tire cornering stiffness, which are key parameters in vehicle dynamics control, using lateral tire force measurements. Lateral tire forces acting on each tire are directly measured by load-sensing hub bearings that were invented and further developed by NSK Ltd. For estimating the lateral vehicle velocity, tire force models considering lateral load transfer effects are used, and a recursive least square algorithm is adapted to identify the lateral vehicle velocity as an unknown parameter. Using the estimated lateral vehicle velocity, tire cornering stiffness, which is an important tire parameter dominating the vehicle's cornering responses, is estimated. For the practical implementation, the cornering stiffness estimation algorithm based on a simple bicycle model is developed and discussed. Finally, proposed estimation algorithms were evaluated using experimental test data. PMID:26569246

  5. Determination of stellar parameters using binary system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blay, Georgina; Lovekin, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    Stellar parameters can be constrained more tightly with binary systems than can typically be done with single stars. We used a freely available binary fitting code to determine the best fitting parameters of a collection of potential eclipsing binary systems observed with the Kepler satellite. These model fits constrain the mass ratio, radii ratio, surface brightness ratio, and the orbital inclination of both stars in the binary system. The frequencies of these pulsations can then be determined and used to constrain asteroseismic models.

  6. Effect of including torsional parameters for histidine-metal interactions in classical force fields for metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Mera-Adasme, Raúl; Sadeghian, Keyarash; Sundholm, Dage; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2014-11-20

    Classical force-field parameters of the metal site of metalloproteins usually comprise only the partial charges of the involved atoms, as well as the bond-stretching and bending parameters of the metal-ligand interactions. Although for certain metal ligands such as histidine residues, the torsional motions at the metal site play an important role for the dynamics of the protein, no such terms have been considered to be crucial in the parametrization of the force fields, and they have therefore been omitted in the parametrization. In this work, we have optimized AMBER-compatible force-field parameters for the reduced state of the metal site of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and assessed the effect of including torsional parameters for the histidine-metal interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of the obtained results, we recommend that torsion parameters of the metal site are included when processes at the metal site are investigated or when free-energy calculations are performed. As the torsion parameters mainly affect the structure of the metal site, other kinds of structural studies can be performed without considering the torsional parameters of the metal site. PMID:25410708

  7. Method and Apparatus for Determining Operational Parameters of Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zybała, Rafał; Schmidt, Maksymilian; Kaszyca, Kamil; Ciupiński, Łukasz; Kruszewski, Mirosław J.; Pietrzak, Katarzyna

    2016-06-01

    The main aim of this work was to construct and test an apparatus for characterization of high temperature thermoelectric modules to be used in thermoelectric generator (TEGs) applications. The idea of this apparatus is based on very precise measurements of heat fluxes passing through the thermoelectric (TE) module, at both its hot and cold sides. The electrical properties of the module, under different temperature and load conditions, were used to estimate efficiency of energy conversion based on electrical and thermal energy conservation analysis. The temperature of the cold side, T c, was stabilized by a precise circulating thermostat (≤0.1°C) in a temperature range from 5°C to 90°C. The amount of heat absorbed by a coolant flowing through the heat sink was measured by the calibrated and certified heat flow meter with an accuracy better than 1%. The temperature of the hot side, T h, was forced to assumed temperature (T max = 450°C) by an electric heater with known power (P h = 0-600 W) with ample thermal insulation. The electrical power was used in calculations. The TE module, heaters and cooling plate were placed in an adiabatic vacuum chamber. The load characteristics of the module were evaluated using an electronically controlled current source as a load. The apparatus may be used to determine the essential parameters of TE modules (open circuit voltage, U oc, short circuit current, I sc, internal electrical resistance, R int, thermal resistance, R th, power density, and efficiency, η, as a function of T c and T h ). Several commercially available TE modules based on Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 alloys were tested. The measurements confirmed that the constructed apparatus was highly accurate, stable and yielded reproducible results; therefore, it is a reliable tool for the development of thermoelectric generators.

  8. Silicone hydrogel contact lens surface analysis by atomic force microscopy: shape parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldez, M. J.; Garcia-Resua, C.; Lira, M.; Sánchez-Sellero, C.; Yebra-Pimentel, E.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Average roughness (Ra) is generally used to quantify roughness; however it makes no distinction between spikes and troughs. Shape parameters as kurtosis (Rku) and skewness (Rsk) serve to distinguish between two profiles with the same Ra. They have been reported in many biomedical fields, but they were no applied to contact lenses before. The aim of this study is to analyze surface properties of four silicone hydrogel contact lenses (CL) by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) evaluating Ra, Rku and Rsk. Methods: CL used in this study were disposable silicone hydrogel senofilcon A, comfilcon A, balafilcon A and lotrafilcon B. Unworn CL surfaces roughness and topography were measured by AFM (Veeco, multimode-nanoscope V) in tapping modeTM. Ra, Rku and Rsk for 25 and 196 μm2 areas were determined. Results: Surface topography and parameters showed different characteristics depending on the own nature of the contact lens (Ra/Rku/Rsk for 25 and 196 μm2 areas were: senofilcon A 3,33/3,74/0,74 and 3,76/18,16/1,75; comfilcon A: 1,56/31,09/2,93 and 2,76/45,82/3,60; balafilcon A: 2,01/33,62/-2,14 and 2,54/23,36/-1,96; lotrafilcon B: 26,97/4,11/-0,34 and 29,25/2,82/-0,23). In lotrafilcon B, with the highest Ra, Rku showed a lower degree of peakedness of its distribution. Negative Rsk value obtained for balafilcon A showed a clear predominance of valleys in this lens. Conclusions: Kku and Rsk are two statistical parameters useful to analyse CL surfaces, which complete information from Ra. Differences in values distribution and symmetry were observed between CL.

  9. Determination of motility forces on isolated chromosomes with laser tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Khatibzadeh, Nima; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Bui, Ann A. M.; Rocha, Yesenia; Cruz, Gladys M.; Loke, Vince; Shi, Linda Z.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Berns, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative determination of the motility forces of chromosomes during cell division is fundamental to understanding a process that is universal among eukaryotic organisms. Using an optical tweezers system, isolated mammalian chromosomes were held in a 1064 nm laser trap. The minimum force required to move a single chromosome was determined to be ≈0.8–5 pN. The maximum transverse trapping efficiency of the isolated chromosomes was calculated as ≈0.01–0.02. These results confirm theoretical force calculations of ≈0.1–12 pN to move a chromosome on the mitotic or meiotic spindle. The verification of these results was carried out by calibration of the optical tweezers when trapping microspheres with a diameter of 4.5–15 µm in media with 1–7 cP viscosity. The results of the chromosome and microsphere trapping experiments agree with optical models developed to simulate trapping of cylindrical and spherical specimens. PMID:25359514

  10. Attitude determination and parameter estimation using vector observations - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    1989-01-01

    Procedures for attitude determination based on Wahba's loss function are generalized to include the estimation of parameters other than the attitude, such as sensor biases. Optimization with respect to the attitude is carried out using the q-method, which does not require an a priori estimate of the attitude. Optimization with respect to the other parameters employs an iterative approach, which does require an a priori estimate of these parameters. Conventional state estimation methods require a priori estimates of both the parameters and the attitude, while the algorithm presented in this paper always computes the exact optimal attitude for given values of the parameters. Expressions for the covariance of the attitude and parameter estimates are derived.

  11. [Influence of changed gas media on acoustic parameters of human forced exhalation].

    PubMed

    D'iachenko, A I; Korenbaum, V I; Shulagin, Iu A; Osipova, A A; Mikhaĭlovskaia, A N; Popova, Iu A; Kir'ianova, E V; Kostiv, A E; Mokerova, E S; Shin, S N; Pochekutova, I A

    2012-01-01

    In previous study it was shown that duration of tracheal forced expiratory noises is promising to reveal negative changes of lung function after dive. The objective is a study of parameters of tracheal forced expiratory noises in changed gas media. The first experiment involved 25 volunteers (22-60 years), performed forced exhalation under normal pressure with air, oxygen-helium and oxygen-krypton mixtures. The second experiment in the chamber involved 6 volunteers (25-46 years), which performed forced exhalation with air under normal pressure (0.1 MPa), and under elevated pressure 0.263 MPa with air and oxygen-helium mixture. In the first experiment the direct linear dependence on gas density was found for forced expiratory noises common duration in the band of 200-2000 Hz and for its durations in narrow 200-Hz bands, excluding high frequency range 1400-2000 Hz. In the second experiment a significant reversed dependence of high frequency durations and spectral energies in 200-Hz bands (1600-2000 Hz) on adiabatic gas compressibility. Individual dynamics of common duration of tracheal forced expiratory noises under model dive of 16.3 m (0.263 MPa) is more then the diagnostic threshold of this parameter for lung function decrease, previously obtained for divers under normal pressure. PMID:22567842

  12. Analysis of kinematic data and determination of ground reaction force of foot in slow squat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu-Shu; Guo, Yuan; An, Mei-Wen; Chen, Wei-Yi

    2013-02-01

    In the present paper, the ground reaction force (GRF) acting on foot in slow squat was determined through a force measuring system, and at the same time, the kinematic data of human squat were obtained by analyzing the photographed image sequences. According to the height and body weight, six healthy volunteers were selected, three men in one group and the other three women in another group, and the fundamental parameters of subjects were recorded, including body weight, height and age, etc. Based on the anatomy characteristics, some markers were placed on the right side of joints. While the subject squatted at slow speed on the force platform, the ground reaction forces on the forefoot and heel for each foot were obtained through calibrated force platform. The analysis results show that the reaction force on heel is greater than that on forefoot, and double feet have nearly constant force. Moreover, from processing and analyzing the synchronously photographed image sequences in squat, the kinematic data of human squat were acquired, including mainly the curves of angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration varied with time for knee, hip and ankle joints in a sagittal plane. The obtained results can offer instructive reference for photographing and analyzing the movements of human bodies, diagnosing some diseases, and establishing in the future appropriate mathematical models for the human motion.

  13. Determination of femto Newton forces and fluid viscosity using optical tweezers: application to Leishmania amazonensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma; de Castro, Archimedes B., Jr.; Neto, Vivaldo M.; Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Marques, Gustavo P.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this research is to use the displacements of a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) as a force transducer in mechanical measurements in life sciences. To do this we compared the theoretical optical and hydrodynamic models with experimental data under a broad variation of parameters such as fluid viscosity, refractive index, drag velocity and wall proximities. The laser power was measured after the objective with an integration sphere because normal power meters do not provide an accurate measurement for beam with high numerical apertures. With this careful laser power determination the plot of the optical force (calculated by the particle displacement) versus hydrodynamic force (calculated by the drag velocity) under very different conditions shows an almost 45 degrees straight line. This means that hydrodynamic models can be used to calibrate optical forces and vice-versa. With this calibration we observed the forces of polystyrene bead attached to the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for a serious tropical disease. The force range is from 200 femto Newtons to 4 pico Newtons and these experiments shows that OT can be used for infection mechanism and chemotaxis studies in parasites. The other application was to use the optical force to measure viscosities of few microliters sample. Our result shows 5% accuracy measurements.

  14. Effect of hinge-moment parameters on elevator stick forces in rapid maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert T; Greenberg, Harry

    1944-01-01

    The importance of the stick force per unit normal acceleration as a criterion of longitudinal stability and the critical dependence of this gradient on elevator hinge-moment parameters have been shown in previous reports. The present report continues the investigation with special reference to transient effects for maneuvers of short duration.

  15. Coefficients of an analytical aerosol forcing equation determined with a Monte-Carlo radiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Taufiq; Moosmüller, H.; Chung, Chul E.

    2015-10-01

    Simple analytical equations for global-average direct aerosol radiative forcing are useful to quickly estimate aerosol forcing changes as function of key atmosphere, surface and aerosol parameters. The surface and atmosphere parameters in these analytical equations are the globally uniform atmospheric transmittance and surface albedo, and have so far been estimated from simplified observations under untested assumptions. In the present study, we take the state-of-the-art analytical equation and write the aerosol forcing as a linear function of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and replace the average upscatter fraction with the asymmetry parameter (ASY). Then we determine the surface and atmosphere parameter values of this equation using the output from the global MACR (Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation) model, as well as testing the validity of the equation. The MACR model incorporated spatio-temporally varying observations for surface albedo, cloud optical depth, water vapor, stratosphere column ozone, etc., instead of assuming as in the analytical equation that the atmosphere and surface parameters are globally uniform, and should thus be viewed as providing realistic radiation simulations. The modified analytical equation needs globally uniform aerosol parameters that consist of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth), SSA, and ASY. The MACR model is run here with the same globally uniform aerosol parameters. The MACR model is also run without cloud to test the cloud effect. In both cloudy and cloud-free runs, the equation fits in the model output well whether SSA or ASY varies. This means the equation is an excellent approximation for the atmospheric radiation. On the other hand, the determined parameter values are somewhat realistic for the cloud-free runs but unrealistic for the cloudy runs. The global atmospheric transmittance, one of the determined parameters, is found to be around 0.74 in case of the cloud-free conditions and around 1.03 with cloud. The surface

  16. Magellan spacecraft - Attitude determination, updates and gyro parameter calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, W. H.; Reddy, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed mathematical algorithm for onboard autonomous attitude determination and parameter calibration in the Magellan Venus-orbiting spacecraft has been developed, and its performance has been estimated. This algorithm uses a contamination reduction attitude profile and retractive star scan maneuvers to minimize the interparameter error contamination and to maximize the parameter observability. The details of the underlying theory and strategy are described, and an extensive performance analysis with worst-case parameter errors is reported which indicates that the in-flight attitude determination unit/parameter calibration (ADU/PC) algorithm will be able to meet all the different mission phase requirements with comfortable margins. The problem of nonexact mapping retrace due to uncertain performance of control authority is addressed, and its lack of impact on the system performance is demonstrated.

  17. Determination of photosynthetic parameters in two seawater-tolerant vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Nianwei; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Qian; Zhao, Wenqian

    2016-03-01

    It is difficult to determine the photosynthetic parameters of non-flat leaves/green stems using photosynthetic instruments, due to the unusual morphology of both organs, especially for Suaeda salsa and Salicornia bigelovii as two seawater-tolerant vegetables. To solve the problem, we developed a simple, practical, and effective method to measure and calculate the photosynthetic parameters (such as P N, g s, E) based on unit fresh mass, instead of leaf area. The light/CO2/temperature response curves of the plants can also be measured by this method. This new method is more effective, stable, and reliable than conventional methods for plants with non-flat leaves. In addition, the relative notes on measurements and calculation of photosynthetic parameters were discussed in this paper. This method solves technical difficulties in photosynthetic parameter determination of the two seawater-tolerant vegetables and similar plants.

  18. Determining Stand Parameters from Uas-Based Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, V.; Serifoglu, C.; Gungor, O.

    2016-06-01

    In Turkey, forest management plans are produced by terrestrial surveying techniques for 10 or 20 year periods, which can be considered quite long to maintain the sustainability of forests. For a successful forest management plan, it is necessary to collect accurate information about the stand parameters and store them in dynamic and robust databases. The position, number, height and closure of trees are among the most important stand parameters required for a forest management plan. Determining the position of each single tree is challenging in such an area consisting of too many interlocking trees. Hence, in this study, an object-based tree detection methodology has been developed in MATLAB programming language to determine the position of each tree top in a highly closed area. The developed algorithm uses the Canopy Height Model (CHM), which is computed from the Digital Terrain Model (DTM) and Digital Surface Model (DSM) generated by using the point cloud extracted from the images taken from a UAS (Unmanned Aerial System). The heights of trees have been determined by using the CHM. The closure of the trees has been determined with the written MATLAB script. The results show that the developed tree detection methodology detected more than 70% of the trees successfully. It can also be concluded that the stand parameters may be determined by using the UAS-based point clouds depending on the characteristics of the study area. In addition, determination of the stand parameters by using point clouds reduces the time needed to produce forest management plans.

  19. Heavy vehicle suspension parameters identification and estimation of vertical forces: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imine, H.; Madani, T.

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to estimate the vertical forces of heavy vehicle and identify the unknown dynamic parameters using sliding mode observer approach. This observation needs a good knowledge of dynamic parameters such as damping coefficient, spring stiffness, etc. In this paper, suspension stiffness and unsprung masses have been identified. Experimental results carried out on an instrumented tractor have been presented in order to show the quality of the state observation, parameters identification and force estimation. These estimation results are then compared to the measured one coming from the sensors installed in the tractor. Many scenarios have been tested. In this paper, the results coming from zigzag test have been shown and commented.

  20. A technique for determining thermal parameters using measured temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.; Dost, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a simple but accurate technique for determining thermal parameters during direct cooling of solid objects, in terms of the cooling coefficient, lag factor, thermal diffusivity, and heat transfer coefficient. Solid objects are assumed to be cooled in a fluid medium. In the modeling the objects are approximated to infinite slabs, infinite cylinders or spherical bodies. A one-dimensional unsteady-state heat transfer analysis is carried out under three different conditions: Bi < 0.01, 0.1 < Bi < 100, and Bi > 100. A technique is then developed for determining the thermal parameters during cooling of such objects. The developed technique is illustrated by examples using actual temperature measurements taken from the studies presented previously. Results show that the technique presented here is capable of determining the thermal parameters during such a cooling process accurately.

  1. The study of the role of the two-body force in determining level densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Po-Lin

    The study of the role of the two-body force in determining level densities explored the characteristics of the two-body force and their impact on nuclear level densities. Two different theoretical approaches, the statistical mechanical model and moment expansion method, were used for the determining the impact of the two-body force on level densities. Discrete levels in the lower excitation region were compiled to provide information about level density systematics. A shell model calculation for a number of light nuclei allowed a test of the input parameters including single particle energies and two-body matrix elements. Generally good agreement was found between the calculated and observed energies of low-lying states. A comparison of the results obtained with three widely used interactions for nuclei with mass numbers 18 and 20 allowed some insight into the two-body interaction and the possibilities for improving it. For the level density calculations twenty four nuclei with mass numbers between 20 and 41 were used. Both the values from tabulations of low-lying levels and the results from previous studies of level densities at 7 Mev and at 20 Mev were included. It was found that the parameters derived from the higher energy measurements gave poor results at energies below 5 Mev. The discrepancies appeared to be related to problems in determining one of the two parameters involved. Two approaches were used in an effort to improve the precision of this parameter. Both were reasonably successful. Calculations of the level of density using a super conducting model within a statistical mechanical framework and a full two-body interaction utilizing a moment method approach were completed. Both gave a reasonably good representation of the data. An examination of the significance of the analysis for future study of the two body force and of nuclear level densities is presented.

  2. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  3. Parameter sensitivity analysis of nonlinear piezoelectric probe in tapping mode atomic force microscopy for measurement improvement

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Rachael; Nima Mahmoodi, S.

    2014-02-21

    The equations of motion for a piezoelectric microcantilever are derived for a nonlinear contact force. The analytical expressions for natural frequencies and mode shapes are obtained. Then, the method of multiple scales is used to analyze the analytical frequency response of the piezoelectric probe. The effects of nonlinear excitation force on the microcantilever beam's frequency and amplitude are analytically studied. The results show a frequency shift in the response resulting from the force nonlinearities. This frequency shift during contact mode is an important consideration in the modeling of AFM mechanics for generation of more accurate imaging. Also, a sensitivity analysis of the system parameters on the nonlinearity effect is performed. The results of a sensitivity analysis show that it is possible to choose parameters such that the frequency shift minimizes. Certain parameters such as tip radius, microcantilever beam dimensions, and modulus of elasticity have more influence on the nonlinearity of the system than other parameters. By changing only three parameters—tip radius, thickness, and modulus of elasticity of the microbeam—a more than 70% reduction in nonlinearity effect was achieved.

  4. Atmosphere models and the determination of stellar parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.

    2014-11-01

    We present the basic concepts necessary to build atmosphere models for any type of star. We then illustrate how atmosphere models can be used to determine stellar parameters. We focus on the effects of line-blanketing for hot stars, and on non-LTE and three dimensional effects for cool stars. We illustrate the impact of these effects on the determination of the ages of stars from the HR diagram.

  5. Iterative methods for determination of parameters of spectroscopic binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworak, T. Z.

    The paper contains the description of iterative methods for determinations of geometric and physical parameters of spectroscopic binaries, especially for computation of orbit plane inclination i and radii of components, which cannot be determined from observations. These methods are based of some considerations given in the previous paper (Dworak 1975). The methods have been tested using data for eclipsing binaries, taken from the catalogues of Batten et al. (1978) and Koch et al. (1970).

  6. Automatic Determination of the Conic Coronal Mass Ejection Model Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, A.; Oates, T.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2009-01-01

    Characterization of the three-dimensional structure of solar transients using incomplete plane of sky data is a difficult problem whose solutions have potential for societal benefit in terms of space weather applications. In this paper transients are characterized in three dimensions by means of conic coronal mass ejection (CME) approximation. A novel method for the automatic determination of cone model parameters from observed halo CMEs is introduced. The method uses both standard image processing techniques to extract the CME mass from white-light coronagraph images and a novel inversion routine providing the final cone parameters. A bootstrap technique is used to provide model parameter distributions. When combined with heliospheric modeling, the cone model parameter distributions will provide direct means for ensemble predictions of transient propagation in the heliosphere. An initial validation of the automatic method is carried by comparison to manually determined cone model parameters. It is shown using 14 halo CME events that there is reasonable agreement, especially between the heliocentric locations of the cones derived with the two methods. It is argued that both the heliocentric locations and the opening half-angles of the automatically determined cones may be more realistic than those obtained from the manual analysis

  7. On the Accuracy of Atmospheric Parameter Determination in BAFGK Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikova, T.; Piskunov, N.; Shulyak, D.

    2015-04-01

    During the past few years, many papers determining the atmospheric parameters in FGK stars appeared in the literature where the accuracy of effective temperatures is given as 20-40 K. For main sequence stars within the 5 000-13 000 K temperature range, we have performed a comparative analysis of the parameters derived from the spectra by using the SME (Spectroscopy Made Easy) package and those found in the literature. Our sample includes standard stars Sirius, Procyon, δ Eri, and the Sun. Combining different spectral regions in the fitting procedure, we investigated an effect different atomic species have on the derived atmospheric parameters. The temperature difference may exceed 100 K depending on the spectral regions used in the SME procedure. It is shown that the atmospheric parameters derived with the SME procedure which includes wings of hydrogen lines in fitting agrees better with the results derived by the other methods and tools across a large part of the main sequence. For three stars—π Cet, 21 Peg, and Procyon—the atmospheric parameters were also derived by fitting a calculated energy distribution to the observed one. We found a substantial difference in the parameters inferred from different sets and combinations of spectrophotometric observations. An intercomparison of our results and literature data shows that the average accuracy of effective temperature determination for cool stars and for the early B-stars is 70-85 K and 170-200 K, respectively.

  8. Frontal sinus parameters in computed tomography and sex determination.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Mitra; Bakhtavar, Khadijeh; Moarefdoost, Jhale; Kamali, Artin; Rafeifar, Shahram

    2016-03-01

    The frontal sinus is a sturdy part of the skull that is likely to be retrieved for forensic investigations. We evaluated frontal sinus parameters in paranasal sinus computed tomography (CT) images for sex determination. The study was conducted on 200 normal paranasal sinus CT images of 100 men and 100 women of Persian origin. We categorized the studied population into three age groups of 20-34, 35-49 and ⩾ 50 years. The number of partial septa in the right frontal sinus and the maximum height and width were significantly different between the two sexes. The highest precision for sex determination was for the maximum height of the left frontal sinus (61.3%). In the 20-34 years age-group, height and width of the frontal sinus were significantly different between the two sexes and the height of the left sinus had the highest precision (60.8%). In the 35-49 years age-group, right anterior-posterior diameter had a sex determination precision of 52.3%. No frontal sinus parameter reached a statistically significant level for sex determination in the ⩾ 50 years age-group. The number of septa and scallopings were not useful in sex determination. Frontal sinus parameters did not have a high precision in sex determination among Persian adults. PMID:26980249

  9. Determination of Complex Microcalorimeter Parameters with Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saab, T.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lindeman, M. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J.

    2005-01-01

    The proper understanding and modeling of a microcalorimeter s response requires the accurate knowledge of a handful of parameters, such as C, G, alpha, . . . . While a few of these, such 8s the normal state resistance and the total thermal conductance to the heat bath (G) are directly determined from the DC IV characteristics, some others, notoriously the heat capacity (C) and alpha, appear in degenerate combinations in most measurable quantities. The case of a complex microcalorimeter, i.e. one in which the absorber s heat capacity is connected by a finite thermal impedance to the sensor, and subsequently by another thermal impedance to the heat bath, results in an added ambiguity in the determination of the individual C's and G's. In general, the dependence of the microcalorimeter s complex impedance on these parameters varies with frequency. This variation allows us to determine the individual parameters by fitting the prediction of the microcalorimeter model to the impedance data. We describe in this paper our efforts at characterizing the Goddard X-ray microcalorimeters. Using the parameters determined with this method we them compare the pulse shape and noise spectra predicted by the microcalorimeter model to data taken with the same devices.

  10. Intermolecular potential parameters and combining rules determined from viscosity data

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Lucas A.J.; Price, Phillip N.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2010-05-07

    The Law of Corresponding States has been demonstrated for a number of pure substances and binary mixtures, and provides evidence that the transport properties viscosity and diffusion can be determined from a molecular shape function, often taken to be a Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential, that requires two scaling parameters: a well depth {var_epsilon}{sub ij} and a collision diameter {sigma}{sub ij}, both of which depend on the interacting species i and j. We obtain estimates for {var_epsilon}{sub ij} and {sigma}{sub ij} of interacting species by finding the values that provide the best fit to viscosity data for binary mixtures, and compare these to calculated parameters using several 'combining rules' that have been suggested for determining parameter values for binary collisions from parameter values that describe collisions of like molecules. Different combining rules give different values for {sigma}{sub ij} and {var_epsilon}{sub ij} and for some mixtures the differences between these values and the best-fit parameter values are rather large. There is a curve in ({var_epsilon}{sub ij}, {sigma}{sub ij}) space such that parameter values on the curve generate a calculated viscosity in good agreement with measurements for a pure gas or a binary mixture. The various combining rules produce couples of parameters {var_epsilon}{sub ij}, {sigma}{sub ij} that lie close to the curve and therefore generate predicted mixture viscosities in satisfactory agreement with experiment. Although the combining rules were found to underpredict the viscosity in most of the cases, Kong's rule was found to work better than the others, but none of the combining rules consistently yields parameter values near the best-fit values, suggesting that improved rules could be developed.

  11. General AMBER Force Field Parameters for Diphenyl Diselenides and Diphenyl Ditellurides.

    PubMed

    Torsello, Mauro; Pimenta, Antonio C; Wolters, Lando P; Moreira, Irina S; Orian, Laura; Polimeno, Antonino

    2016-06-30

    The General AMBER Force Field (GAFF) has been extended to describe a series of selenium and tellurium diphenyl dichalcogenides. These compounds, besides being eco-friendly catalysts for numerous oxidations in organic chemistry, display peroxidase activity, i.e., can reduce hydrogen peroxide and harmful organic hydroperoxides to water/alcohols and as such are very promising antioxidant drugs. The novel GAFF parameters are tested in MD simulations in different solvents and the (77)Se NMR chemical shift of diphenyl diselenide is computed using structures extracted from MD snapshots and found in nice agreement with the measured value in CDCl3. The whole computational protocol is described in detail and integrated with in-house code to allow easy derivation of the force field parameters for analogous compounds as well as for Se/Te organocompounds in general. PMID:27267296

  12. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-15

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this 'thermal noise method' is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities.

  13. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids.

    PubMed

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-01

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this "thermal noise method" is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities. PMID:19334955

  14. Determining prestressing forces for inspection of prestressed concrete containments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    General Design Criterion 53, Provisions for Containment Testing and Inspection,'' of Appendix A, General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,'' to 10 CFR Part 50, Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities,'' requires, in part, that the reactor containment be designed to permit (1) periodic inspection of all important areas and (2) an appropriate surveillance program. Regulatory Guide 1.35, Inservice Inspection of Ungrouted Tendons in Prestressed Concrete Containment Structures,'' describes a basis acceptable to the NRC staff for developing an appropriate inservice inspection and surveillance program for ungrouted tendons in prestressed concrete containment structures of light-water-cooled reactors. This guide expands and clarifies the NRC staff position on determining prestressing forces to be used for inservice inspections of prestressed concrete containment structures.

  15. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  16. Integrated 3-parameter diagram for determining thermodynamic properties of fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guochang; Deng, Xiaoxue; Zhu, Mingshan

    1987-04-01

    The importance of thermodynamic properties of fluids has motivated recent studies in developing methods of calculating thermodynamic properties. Among the various methods, the use of computational diagrams is a commonly used engineering method. Conventional diagrams do not take into consideration the internal relationships among the various thermodynamic properties. The internal relationships of various thermodynamic properties are considered. The Lee-Kessler three-parameter equations were used to construct an integrated three-parameter diagram for determining the thermodynamic properties of fluids; the curves were generated using an ai-M/6 microcomputer with an attached Sr 6602 plotter. The diagram is considered sufficiently accurate for engineering calculations.

  17. Determination of Solubility Parameters of Ibuprofen and Ibuprofen Lysinate.

    PubMed

    Kitak, Teja; Dumičić, Aleksandra; Planinšek, Odon; Šibanc, Rok; Srčič, Stanko

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in formulating solid dispersions, which purposes mainly include solubility enhancement, sustained drug release and taste masking. The most notable problem by these dispersions is drug-carrier (in)solubility. Here we focus on solubility parameters as a tool for predicting the solubility of a drug in certain carriers. Solubility parameters were determined in two different ways: solely by using calculation methods, and by experimental approaches. Six different calculation methods were applied in order to calculate the solubility parameters of the drug ibuprofen and several excipients. However, we were not able to do so in the case of ibuprofen lysinate, as calculation models for salts are still not defined. Therefore, the extended Hansen's approach and inverse gas chromatography (IGC) were used for evaluating of solubility parameters for ibuprofen lysinate. The obtained values of the total solubility parameter did not differ much between the two methods: by the extended Hansen's approach it was δt = 31.15 MPa(0.5) and with IGC it was δt = 35.17 MPa(0.5). However, the values of partial solubility parameters, i.e., δd, δp and δh, did differ from each other, what might be due to the complex behaviour of a salt in the presence of various solvents. PMID:26633347

  18. Determination of Joint Roughness Coefficients Using Roughness Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sic; Kang, Seong-Seung; Jang, Bo-An

    2014-11-01

    This study used precisely digitized standard roughness profiles to determine roughness parameters such as statistical and 2D discontinuity roughness, and fractal dimensions. Our methods were based on the relationship between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC) values and roughness parameters calculated using power law equations. Statistical and 2D roughness parameters, and fractal dimensions correlated well with JRC values, and had correlation coefficients of over 0.96. However, all of these relationships have a 4th profile (JRC 6-8) that deviates by more than ±5 % from the JRC values given in the standard roughness profiles. This indicates that this profile is statistically different than the others. We suggest that fractal dimensions should be measured within the entire range of the divider, instead of merely measuring values within a suitable range. Normalized intercept values also correlated with the JRC values, similarly to the fractal dimension values discussed above. The root mean square first derivative values, roughness profile indexes, 2D roughness parameter, and fractal dimension values decreased as the sampling interval increased. However, the structure function values increased very rapidly with increasing sampling intervals. This indicates that the roughness parameters are not independent of the sampling interval, and that the different relationships between the JRC values and these roughness parameters are dependent on the sampling interval.

  19. Analysis of hydration parameter for sugars determined from viscosity and its relationship with solution parameters.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yukinori; Miyawaki, Osato

    2016-01-01

    The hydration parameter h was obtained from the viscosity B-coefficients and the partial molar volume of solute, V2, for various sugars and urea in aqueous solutions. The parameter h showed a good correlation with the parameter α, determined from the activity coefficient of water, representing the solute-solvent interaction. The parameter h also showed a good correlation with the number of equatorial-OH groups (e-OH) for sugars, suggesting that the sugar molecules with the higher e-OH fit more to the water-structure. From the temperature dependence of the parameter h (dh/dT), the negative dh/dT for sugars suggested their water-structure making activity while the positive dh/dT for urea corresponded to its structure breaking effect. From the Arrhenius plot, the activation energy for h, Ea, was determined to be as low as 10 kJ/mol for disaccharides suggesting the stable hydration structure. The Ea increased with a decrease in molecular weight for sugars. PMID:26213015

  20. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  1. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Joseph L; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models. PMID:25964997

  2. Forced unfolding of protein domains determines cytoskeletal rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, John

    2005-03-01

    Cells have recently been shown to have a power-law dynamic shear modulus over wide frequency range; the value of the exponent being non-universal, varying from 0.1-0.25 depending on cell type. This observation has been interpreted as evidence for the Soft Glassy Rheology (SGR) model, a trap-type glass model with an effective granular temperature. We propose a simple, alternative model of cytoskeletal mechanics based on the thermally activated, forced unfolding of domains in proteins cross-linking a stressed semi-flexible polymer gel. It directly relates a cell’s mechanical response to biophysical parameters of the cytoskeleton’s molecular constituents. Simulations indicate that unfolding events in a random network display a collective self-organization, giving rise to an exponential distribution of crosslink stress that can reproduce cell viscoelasticity. The model suggests natural explanations for the observed correlation between cell rheology and intracellular static stress, including those previously explained using the tensegrity concept. Moreover, our model provides insight into potential mechanisms of mechanotransduction as well as cell shape sensing and maintenance.

  3. Time Evolution of Force-Free Parameter and Free Magnetic Energy in Active Region NOAA 10365

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valori, G.; Romano, P.; Malanushenko, A.; Ermolli, I.; Giorgi, F.; Steed, K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Zuccarello, F.; Malherbe, J.-M.

    2015-02-01

    We describe the variation of the accumulated coronal helicity derived from the magnetic helicity flux through the photosphere in active region (AR) NOAA 10365, where several large flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occurred. We used SOHO/MDI full-disk line-of-sight magnetograms to measure the helicity flux, and the integral of GOES X-ray flux as a proxy of the coronal energy variations due to flares or CMEs. Using the linear force-free field model, we transformed the accumulated helicity flux into a time sequence of the force-free parameter α accounting for flares or CMEs via the proxy derived from GOES observations. This method can be used to derive the value of α at different times during the AR evolution, and is a partial alternative to the commonly used match of field lines with EUV loops. By combining the accumulated helicity obtained from the observations with the linear force-free theory, we describe the main phases of the emergence process of the AR, and relate them temporally with the occurrence of flares or CMEs. Additionally, a comparison with the loop-matching method of fixing alpha at each time independently shows that the proposed method may be helpful in avoiding unrealistic or undetermined values of alpha that may originate from an insufficient quality of the image used to identify coronal loops at a given time. For the relative intensity of the considered events, the linear force-free field theory implies that there is a direct correlation between the released energy on the one hand and the product of the coronal helicity with the variation of α due to the event on the other. Therefore, the higher the value of the accumulated coronal helicity, the smaller the force-free parameter variation required to produce the same decrease in the free energy during the CMEs.

  4. Determining the alpha dynamo parameter in incompressible homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Lantz, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Alpha, an important parameter in dynamo theory, is proportional to either the kinetic, current, magnetic, or velocity helicity of the fluctuating magnetic field and fluctuating velocity field. The particular helicity to which alpha is proportional depends on the assumptions used in deriving the first order smoothed equations that describe the alpha effect. In two cases, when alpha is proportional to either the magnetic helicity or velocity helicity, alpha is determined experimentally from two point measurements of the fluctuating fields in incompressible, homogeneous turbulence having arbitrary symmetry. For the other two possibilities, alpha is determined if the turbulence is isotropic.

  5. Determining hydrodynamic forces in bursting bubbles using DNA nanotube mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hariadi, Rizal F.; Winfree, Erik; Yurke, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the mechanical forces produced by fluid flows within the ocean is critical to understanding the ocean’s environmental phenomena. Such forces may have been instrumental in the origin of life by driving a primitive form of self-replication through fragmentation. Among the intense sources of hydrodynamic shear encountered in the ocean are breaking waves and the bursting bubbles produced by such waves. On a microscopic scale, one expects the surface-tension–driven flows produced during bubble rupture to exhibit particularly high velocity gradients due to the small size scales and masses involved. However, little work has examined the strength of shear flow rates in commonly encountered ocean conditions. By using DNA nanotubes as a novel fluid flow sensor, we investigate the elongational rates generated in bursting films within aqueous bubble foams using both laboratory buffer and ocean water. To characterize the elongational rate distribution associated with a bursting bubble, we introduce the concept of a fragmentation volume and measure its form as a function of elongational flow rate. We find that substantial volumes experience surprisingly large flow rates: during the bursting of a bubble having an air volume of 10 mm3, elongational rates at least as large as ϵ˙=1.0×108 s−1 are generated in a fragmentation volume of ∼2×10−6 μL. The determination of the elongational strain rate distribution is essential for assessing how effectively fluid motion within bursting bubbles at the ocean surface can shear microscopic particles and microorganisms, and could have driven the self-replication of a protobiont. PMID:26504222

  6. Determination of human arterial wall parameters from clinical data.

    PubMed

    Stålhand, Jonas

    2009-04-01

    This study suggests a method to compute the material parameters for arteries in vivo from clinically registered pressure-radius signals. The artery is modelled as a hyperelastic, incompressible, thin-walled cylinder and the membrane stresses are computed using a strain energy. The material parameters are determined in a minimisation process by tuning the membrane stress to the stress obtained by enforcing global equilibrium. In addition to the mechanical model, the study also suggests a preconditioning of the pressure-radius signal. The preconditioning computes an average pressure-radius cycle from all consecutive cycles in the registration and removes, or reduces, undesirable disturbances. The effect is a robust parameter identification that gives a unique solution. The proposed method is tested on clinical data from three human abdominal aortas and the results show that the material parameters from the proposed method do not differ significantly (p < 0.01) from the corresponding parameters obtained by averaging the result from consecutive cycles. PMID:18347824

  7. The determination of the constitutive parameters of a medium with application to a reinforced concrete pad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggio, A. J.; Burke, G. L.; Pennock, S. T.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the experimental and analytical efforts performed to determine the constitutive parameters of a reinforced concrete pad on which an aircraft (the NASA Boeing 757) was parked while its internal electromagnetic environment was measured. This concrete pad is part of the Large Electromagnetic System-Level Illuminator (LESLI) test facility at the Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. The relative dielectric constant, conductivity, index of refraction, and reflection coefficient have been determined over the frequency range of 0 to 300 MHz and are presented.

  8. The determination of the constitutive parameters of a medium with application to a reinforced concrete pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poggio, A. J.; Burke, G. L.; Pennock, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the experimental and analytical efforts performed to determine the constitutive parameters of a reinforced concrete pad on which an aircraft (the NASA Boeing 757) was parked while its internal electromagnetic environment was measured. This concrete pad is part of the Large Electromagnetic System-Level Illuminator (LESLI) test facility at the Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. The relative dielectric constant, conductivity, index of refraction, and reflection coefficient have been determined over the frequency range of 0 to 300 MHz and are presented.

  9. FAMA: An automatic code for stellar parameter and abundance determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Randich, Sofia; Friel, Eileen; Spina, Lorenzo; Jacobson, Heather; Cantat-Gaudin, Tristan; Donati, Paolo; Baglioni, Roberto; Maiorca, Enrico; Bragaglia, Angela; Sordo, Rosanna; Vallenari, Antonella

    2013-10-01

    Context. The large amount of spectra obtained during the epoch of extensive spectroscopic surveys of Galactic stars needs the development of automatic procedures to derive their atmospheric parameters and individual element abundances. Aims: Starting from the widely-used code MOOG by C. Sneden, we have developed a new procedure to determine atmospheric parameters and abundances in a fully automatic way. The code FAMA (Fast Automatic MOOG Analysis) is presented describing its approach to derive atmospheric stellar parameters and element abundances. The code, freely distributed, is written in Perl and can be used on different platforms. Methods: The aim of FAMA is to render the computation of the atmospheric parameters and abundances of a large number of stars using measurements of equivalent widths (EWs) as automatic and as independent of any subjective approach as possible. It is based on the simultaneous search for three equilibria: excitation equilibrium, ionization balance, and the relationship between log n(Fe i) and the reduced EWs. FAMA also evaluates the statistical errors on individual element abundances and errors due to the uncertainties in the stellar parameters. The convergence criteria are not fixed "a priori" but are based on the quality of the spectra. Results: In this paper we present tests performed on the solar spectrum EWs that assess the method's dependency on the initial parameters and we analyze a sample of stars observed in Galactic open and globular clusters. The current version of FAMA is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/558/A38

  10. Determination of some electrical parameters for composite inorganic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Benavente, J.; Ramos-Barrado, J.R.; Cabeza, A.

    1994-12-31

    Composite inorganic membranes were obtained by deposition of an inorganic precipitate layer (uranyl phosphonate: UO{sub 2}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}) or UPP) on a commercial porous alumina membrane (Anopore{trademark}, 0.2 {mu}m pore size). Salt diffusion and membrane potential for the whole membrane were measured for NaCl and other electrolytes containing the precipitate generating ions, and for concentration ranging between 10{sup -4}M and 210{sup -2}M. Dielectric parameters (resistance and capacitance) were obtained from impedance spectroscopy measurements, and the equivalent circuits associated to the membrane/electrolyte systems were also determined. From the experimental results, other parameters such as cation transport numbers and ionic permeabilities were obtained. Concentration dependence of all these parameters was also considered. Measurements were carried out with the composite inorganic membrane and the alumina porous support. A comparison of the results found for both membranes gives information about the value of all these parameters in the layer formed by the inorganic UPP precipitate.

  11. Bicycle ergometer instrumentation to determine muscle and bone forces during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando

    1995-01-01

    It is hypothesized that bone loss experienced by astronauts in zero gravity conditions may be curtailed by appropriate exercise. According to Wolf's law, bone regenerates when muscles produce stresses by pulling on the bone during daily activity and/or exercise on Earth. to use this theory to prevent or decrease bone loss, one needs to quantify musculoskeletal loads and relate them to bone density changes. In the context of the space program, it is desirable to determine musculoskeletal loads during exercise (using the bicycle ergometer in this case) so that one may make similar measurements on Earth and in space. In this manner, load measurements on Earth may be used as reference to generate similar loads during exercise in space. The work reported in this document entails a musculoskeletal load measurement system that, when complete, will provide forces at muscle insertion points and other contact points, on bone. This data will be used by Dr. Beth A. Todd, who is also a SSF working with Dr. Shackelford, as input to a finite element model of bone sections to determine stress distributions. A bicycle ergometer has been instrumented to measure parameters needed to determine musculoskeletal forces during exercise. A primary feature of the system is its compactness. It uses small/light sensors without line-of-sight requirements. The system developed includes sensors, signal processing, a data acquisition system, and software to collect the data. The sensors used include optical encoders to measure position and orientation of the pedal (foot), accelerometers to determine kinematic parameters of the shank and thigh, load cells to measure pedal forces on the sagittal plane, and EMG probes to measure muscle activity. The signals are processed using anti-aliasing filters and amplifiers. The sensors' output is digitized using 30 channels of a board mounted inside a 486 class PC. A program sets the data acquisition parameters and collects data during a time period specified

  12. [Parameter determination of algae growth based on ecological tank experiment].

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Ding, Ling; Gao, Guang

    2005-05-01

    A dynamic simulation experiment of algae in an ecological tank was performed at the Taihu Laboratory for Lake Ecosystem Research. During the experiment, water from Taihu Lake was infused into the ecological tank and samples were taken continually to observe algae growth under varying conditions, such as temperature, sunlight and nutrients. Based on the experiment, an algae growth model, considering nitrogen and phosphorus cycle, was developed by using the advanced PHREEQC model. After that, a detailed calibration and validation of parameters in the model were done on the basis of experimental results. The least square method was used to determine the optimal set of parameters. The calculated values of algae and nutrient concentrations show fairly satisfying fittness with measured data. PMID:16124474

  13. Determination of critical anthropometric parameters for design of respirators

    SciTech Connect

    You-Hin Liau

    1982-12-01

    Anthropometric data were collected from 243 workers in a respirator fit-test programme, and an attempt was made to determine a correlation between these data and the Protection Factor obtained from quantitative fit-testing for half-mask respirators. Data were collected for two direct and five indirect facial measurements from front- and side-view slides of test subjects. For analysis, the data were normalized with relevant respirators dimensions (4 brands and 10 sizes). Results of linear regression analysis indicated that correlation coefficients between Protection Factor and anthropometric data (face length, mouth width, face width, nasal root breadth) were, respectively, 0.04, 0.22, 0.30 and 0.04. These correlation coefficients are for white males without facial hair. The analysis showed the 'critical' parameters to be mouth width and face width; however, a person with certain combinations of anthropometric parameters may provide a better correlation with Protection Factor.

  14. Sensitivity of the boundary layer energy fluxes to forcing parameters in a simple climate model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. S.; Dalu, G.; Lo, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Winter and summer surface temperatures and time-averaged boundary layer energy fluxes are calculated by utilizing the Saltzman-Ashe parameterization for boundary layer fluxes in a two-level static model. The results are found to agree with observed patterns. Within the framework of this simple model, sensitivity analyses of the time-averaged boundary layer energy fluxes are conducted. Based on these results some of the forcing parameters (such as the subsurface temperature, cloud cover, surface albedo, etc.) are arranged in a hierarchical order of importance. A generalized method of sensitivity analysis is also suggested.

  15. Global Cosmological Parameters Determined Using Classical Double Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Erick J.; Daly, Ruth A.; Wan, Lin

    2000-12-01

    A sample of 20 powerful extended radio galaxies with redshifts between zero and 2 were used to determine constraints on global cosmological parameters. Data for six radio sources were obtained from the VLA archive, analyzed, and combined with the sample of 14 radio galaxies used previously by Guerra & Daly to determine cosmological parameters. The new results are consistent with our previous results, and indicate that the current value of the mean mass density of the universe is significantly less than the critical value. A universe with Ωm of unity in matter is ruled out at 99.0% confidence, and the best-fitting values of Ωm in matter are 0.10+0.25-0.10 and -0.25+0.35-0.25 assuming zero space curvature and zero cosmological constant, respectively. Note that identical results obtain when the low-redshift bin, which includes Cygnus A, is excluded; these results are independent of whether the radio source Cygnus A is included. The method does not rely on a zero-redshift normalization. The radio properties of each source are also used to determine the density of the gas in the vicinity of the source, and the beam power of the source. The six new radio sources have physical characteristics similar to those found for the original 14 sources. The density of the gas around these radio sources is typical of gas in present-day clusters of galaxies. The beam powers are typically about 1045 ergs s-1.

  16. Interactive forces between lignin and cellulase as determined by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lignin is a complex polymer which inhibits the enzymatic conversion of cellulose to glucose in lignocellulose biomass for biofuel production. Cellulase enzymes irreversibly bind to lignin, deactivating the enzyme and lowering the overall activity of the hydrolyzing reaction solution. Within this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to compare the adhesion forces between cellulase and lignin with the forces between cellulase and cellulose, and to study the moiety groups involved in binding of cellulase to lignin. Results Trichoderma reesei, ATCC 26921, a commercial cellulase system, was immobilized onto silicon wafers and used as a substrate to measure forces involved in cellulase non-productive binding to lignin. Attraction forces between cellulase and lignin, and between cellulase and cellulose were compared using kraft lignin- and hydroxypropyl cellulose-coated tips with the immobilized cellulase substrate. The measured adhesion forces between kraft lignin and cellulase were on average 45% higher than forces between hydroxypropyl cellulose and cellulase. Specialized AFM tips with hydrophobic, -OH, and -COOH chemical characteristics were used with immobilized cellulase to represent hydrophobic, H-bonding, and charge-charge interactions, respectively. Forces between hydrophobic tips and cellulase were on average 43% and 13% higher than forces between cellulase with tips exhibiting OH and COOH groups, respectively. A strong attractive force during the AFM tip approach to the immobilized cellulase was observed with the hydrophobic tip. Conclusions This work shows that there is a greater overall attraction between kraft lignin and cellulase than between hydroxypropyl cellulose and cellulase, which may have implications during the enzymatic reaction process. Furthermore, hydrophobic interactions appear to be the dominating attraction force in cellulase binding to lignin, while a number of other interactions may establish the irreversible binding

  17. Semi-empirical determination of radiative parameters for Ag II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruczkowski, J.; Elantkowska, M.; Dembczyński, J.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the values of radiative parameters for Ag II by means of a semi-empirical method. The calculated values of oscillator strengths and lifetimes are, in majority of cases, in a very good agreement with accurate experimental data. Our calculation procedures allowed us to obtain the values of transition integrals and predict the values of oscillator strengths for the transitions in a wide spectral range and radiative lifetimes for excited levels. Moreover, the predicted values will be useful when the experimental values are not known.

  18. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  19. Behavior of temporal parameters of the ground reactive forces for the walking of postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    DE Sousa, Adriana Leite; Calçadas Dias Gabriel, Ronaldo Eugênio; Faria, Aurélio Marques; Aragão, Florbela R; Rodrigues Moreira, Maria Helena

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the influence of body composition and menopause characteristics on certain temporal parameters of the behavior of vertical and anteroposterior components of ground reactive forces, as well as the vertical and anteroposterior rates on the walking of postmenopausal women. The sample consisted of 67 postmenopausal women, average age 59 years. Body composition was assessed by octapolar bioimpedance and ground reactive force by the Kistler force platform. Vertical loading rate correlated positively with age (r = 0.02) and negatively with weight (r = -0.33). The relationship between the rates of vertical loading and unloading associated positively with menopause time (r = 0.27) but negatively with weight (r = -0.27). Vertical unloading rate showed a negative association with abdominal visceral adiposity (r = -0.27). The relationship between the times of the intermediate and final phases of the support correlated significantly with abdominal visceral adiposity (r = 0.25) and fat mass (r = 0.24). The study suggests that fat mass and abdominal visceral adiposity affect the support time, and increased abdominal visceral adiposity implies a slower pre-suspension phase during the walking of postmenopausal women. Hormone replacement therapy was shown to be an enhancer of steeper vertical loading and anteroposterior unloading and longer time in the double support phase, indicating a greater stability of postmenopausal women when walking. PMID:26686563

  20. Laser correlation spectroscopy for determining biochemical parameters of whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolevich, Alexander N.; Prigun, Natali P.

    1999-02-01

    Correlation spectroscopy methods are widely used to study dynamical, morphological and optical parameters of biological objects. This work makes an attempt to explore these methods (in particular, due to their expressively) for diagnosing whole blood under normal and pathological states (cardiovascular diseases). Not only morphological characteristics of blood elements are known to change under diseases, but also its biochemical composition does. However, the biochemical analysis of blood is rather time and labor consuming. The paper is directed to investigate the correlation between optical characteristics of light scattering by blood and its biochemical parameters. Samples of whole blood were in vitro investigated for ills with different diagnoses and extend of cardio-vascular diseases as well as for essentially healthy donors. Simultaneous with the above characteristics we have monitored volumetric concentration of lipoproteides, erythrocytes and hemoglobin. The analysis of obtained results has show that the width of spectrum is greater for samples from healthy persons then from ills. Comparison of measured data on frequency spectrum, diffuse reflectivity's, biochemical and morphological blood parameters of the studied samples has shown the high correlation between the spectrum halfwidth and concentration of lipoproteides, erythrocyte setting rate. Some poorer correlation with spectrum occurs for concentration of hemoglobin and cholesterol. Thus, these are revealed an opportunity to design on express non-invasive method for determining the possibility of atherosclerotic disease.

  1. Estimating first-order geometric parameters and monitoring contact transitions during force-controlled compliant motion

    SciTech Connect

    Schutter, J. de; Bruyninckx, H.; Dutre, S.; Geeter, J. de; Katupitiya, J.; Demey, S.; Lefebvre, T.

    1999-12-01

    This paper uses (linearized) Kalman filters to estimate first-order geometric parameters (i.e., orientation of contact normals and location of contact points) that occur in force-controlled compliant motions. The time variance of these parameters is also estimated. In addition, transitions between contact situations can be monitored. The contact between the manipulated object and its environment is general, i.e., multiple contacts can occur at the same time, and both the topology and the geometry of each single contact are arbitrary. The two major theoretical contributions are (1) the integration of the general contact model, developed previously by the authors, into a state-space form suitable for recursive processing; and (2) the use of the reciprocity constraint between ideal contact forces and motion freedoms as the measurement equation of the Kalman filter. The theory is illustrated by full 3-D experiments. The approach of this paper allows a breakthrough in the state of the art dominated by the classical, orthogonal contact models of Mason that can only cope with a limited (albeit important) subset of all possible contact situations.

  2. Transferability and additivity of dihedral parameters in polarizable and nonpolarizable empirical force fields.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Rosnik, Andreana M; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-09-30

    Recent advances in polarizable force fields have revealed that major reparameterization is necessary when the polarization energy is treated explicitly. This study is focused on the torsional parameters, which are crucial for the accurate description of conformational equilibria in biomolecules. In particular, attention is paid to the influence of polarization on the (i) transferability of dihedral terms between molecules, (ii) transferability between different environments, and (iii) additivity of dihedral energies. To this end, three polarizable force fields based on the induced point dipole model designed for use in AMBER are tested, including two recent ff02 reparameterizations. Attention is paid to the contributions due to short range interactions (1-2, 1-3, and 1-4) within the four atoms defining the dihedral angle. The results show that when short range 1-2 and 1-3 polarization interactions are omitted, as for instance in ff02, the 1-4 polarization contribution is rather small and unlikely to improve the description of the torsional energy. Conversely, when screened 1-2 and 1-3 interactions are included, the polarization contribution is sizeable and shows potential to improve the transferability of parameters between different molecules and environments as well as the additivity of dihedral terms. However, to reproduce intramolecular polarization effects accurately, further fine-tuning of the short range damping of polarization is necessary. PMID:26224547

  3. Filter parameter tuning analysis for operational orbit determination support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, J.; Cox, C.; Niklewski, D.; Mistretta, G.; Hart, R.

    1994-01-01

    The use of an extended Kalman filter (EKF) for operational orbit determination support is being considered by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD). To support that investigation, analysis was performed to determine how an EKF can be tuned for operational support of a set of earth-orbiting spacecraft. The objectives of this analysis were to design and test a general purpose scheme for filter tuning, evaluate the solution accuracies, and develop practical methods to test the consistency of the EKF solutions in an operational environment. The filter was found to be easily tuned to produce estimates that were consistent, agreed with results from batch estimation, and compared well among the common parameters estimated for several spacecraft. The analysis indicates that there is not a sharply defined 'best' tunable parameter set, especially when considering only the position estimates over the data arc. The comparison of the EKF estimates for the user spacecraft showed that the filter is capable of high-accuracy results and can easily meet the current accuracy requirements for the spacecraft included in the investigation. The conclusion is that the EKF is a viable option for FDD operational support.

  4. Analyzing a hydrocarbon reservoir by determining the response of that reservoir to tidal forces

    SciTech Connect

    Graebner, P.

    1991-08-20

    This patent describes a method for determining a component of the response of a hydrocarbons reservoir to tidal forces. It comprises measuring a variable responsive to tidal forces within the reservoir over a measurement time period; determining a theoretical earth-tide for the reservoir over the measurement time period; and determining the component of the response to tidal forces by comparing the variable measurements and the theoretical earth-tide determinations.

  5. A new Parameter to Determine Degree of Fragmentation of Rockslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordén Haug, Øystein; Rosenau, Matthias; Leever, Karen; Oncken, Onno

    2015-04-01

    characterize a sample proneness to fragmentation by a parameter (Seff) consisting of the estimated peak tensile stress in a samples normalized by its bulk cohesion. The peak tensile stresses in the sample is estimated from elastic thin plate theory (Kirchhoff's theory) modified with a factor (h/l)2 due to the samples non-negligible thickness, where h is the thickness and l is the length of the sample in the direction of travel. Combining the experimental test results and the new parameter Seff, we determine thresholds of the parameter value which discriminate whether fragmentation occur, as well as between intermediate and high degree of fragmentation. Since Seff is determine solely from initial conditions, this new parameter can be used to predict the degree of fragmentation. To test the applicability of our new parameter, we calculate the value of Seff for the Seymareh rock avalanche and find that its value predicts it to be within the range of highly fragmented materials, as expected.

  6. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature. PMID:12203646

  7. Determining the tube bundle streamlining critical parameters using the numerical experiment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunov, S. M.; Val'es, N. G.; Samolysov, A. V.; Marchevskaya, O. A.

    2015-08-01

    The article is devoted to development and application of mathematical models describing the most dangerous mechanisms through which vibrations are excited in tube bundles and blunt cylindrically shaped structures, and to development of reliable calculation methods for describing these models, which would make it possible to obtain prompt data for designing and subsequent operation of the considered structural elements. For solving such problems, a comprehensive approach is required, which should be based on a combined use of numerical experiments on computers and experimental investigations on full-scale equipment. The authors have developed a procedure for numerically investigating the hydrodynamic forces arising during stalled streamlining and the tube bundle vibrations caused by these forces. The procedure is based on using the developed mathematical model describing fluid-elastic excitation of vibrations in a bundle of elastic tubes placed in external cross flow. The problem of studying fluid-elastic excitation is brought to stability analysis, which is carried out with the assumption about a linear behavior of destabilizing forces for undisturbed state of elastic tubes. A theoretical investigation of the developed mathematical model was carried out, from which the necessary and sufficient condition of system stability has been obtained in terms of system dimensionless parameters (mass, damping, and velocity). An algorithm for numerically determining the matrices of linear hydrodynamic coupling coefficients for particular tube bundles is developed. The validity of the algorithm and the computer programs developed on its basis are checked by comparing the results of test calculations with the bank of known experimental data. A procedure is proposed for determining the matrices of linear hydrodynamic coupling coefficients in bundles having a regular layout of their cross section and a large number of tubes through calculating these matrices for a relatively small

  8. An improved method to determine neuromuscular properties using force laws - From single muscle to applications in human movements.

    PubMed

    Siebert, T; Sust, M; Thaller, S; Tilp, M; Wagner, H

    2007-04-01

    We evaluate an improved method for individually determining neuromuscular properties in vivo. The method is based on Hill's equation used as a force law combined with Newton's equation of motion. To ensure the range of validity of Hill's equation, we first perform detailed investigations on in vitro single muscles. The force-velocity relation determined with the model coincides well with results obtained by standard methods (r=.99) above 20% of the isometric force. In addition, the model-predicted force curves during work loop contractions very well agree with measurements (mean difference: 2-3%). Subsequently, we deduce theoretically under which conditions it is possible to combine several muscles of the human body to model muscles. This leads to a model equation for human leg extension movements containing parameters for the muscle properties and for the activation. To numerically determine these invariant neuromuscular properties we devise an experimental method based on concentric and isometric leg extensions. With this method we determine individual muscle parameters from experiments such that the simulated curves agree well with experiments (r=.99). A reliability test with 12 participants revealed correlations r=.72-.91 for the neuromuscular parameters (p<.01). Predictions of similar movements under different conditions show mean errors of about 5%. In addition, we present applications in sports practise and theory. PMID:17343950

  9. Force-Time Parameters and Physical Growth of Boys Ages 6 to 12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teeple, J.; Massey, B.

    1976-01-01

    Results of research on the influence of body size and composition on peak force and maximal rate of static strength exertion as measured from force-time curves indicates that rate of force production is somewhat independent of peak force, yet influenced by body size and composition, as is peak force. (MB)

  10. Determination of the Fracture Parameters in a Stiffened Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chung-Yi

    2000-01-01

    A modified J-integral, namely the equivalent domain integral, is derived for a three-dimensional anisotropic cracked solid to evaluate the stress intensity factor along the crack front using the finite element method. Based on the equivalent domain integral method with auxiliary fields, an interaction integral is also derived to extract the second fracture parameter, the T-stress, from the finite element results. The auxiliary fields are the two-dimensional plane strain solutions of monoclinic materials with the plane of symmetry at x(sub 3) = 0 under point loads applied at the crack tip. These solutions are expressed in a compact form based on the Stroh formalism. Both integrals can be implemented into a single numerical procedure to determine the distributions of stress intensity factor and T-stress components, T11, T13, and thus T33, along a three-dimensional crack front. The effects of plate thickness and crack length on the variation of the stress intensity factor and T-stresses through the thickness are investigated in detail for through-thickness center-cracked plates (isotropic and orthotropic) and orthotropic stiffened panels under pure mode-I loading conditions. For all the cases studied, T11 remains negative. For plates with the same dimensions, a larger size of crack yields larger magnitude of the normalized stress intensity factor and normalized T-stresses. The results in orthotropic stiffened panels exhibit an opposite trend in general. As expected, for the thicker panels, the fracture parameters evaluated through the thickness, except the region near the free surfaces, approach two-dimensional plane strain solutions. In summary, the numerical methods presented in this research demonstrate their high computational effectiveness and good numerical accuracy in extracting these fracture parameters from the finite element results in three-dimensional cracked solids.

  11. A novel criterion for determination of material model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Campos, A.; de-Carvalho, R.; Valente, R. A. F.

    2011-05-01

    Parameter identification problems have emerged due to the increasing demanding of precision in the numerical results obtained by Finite Element Method (FEM) software. High result precision can only be obtained with confident input data and robust numerical techniques. The determination of parameters should always be performed confronting numerical and experimental results leading to the minimum difference between them. However, the success of this task is dependent of the specification of the cost/objective function, defined as the difference between the experimental and the numerical results. Recently, various objective functions have been formulated to assess the errors between the experimental and computed data (Lin et al., 2002; Cao and Lin, 2008; among others). The objective functions should be able to efficiently lead the optimisation process. An ideal objective function should have the following properties: (i) all the experimental data points on the curve and all experimental curves should have equal opportunity to be optimised; and (ii) different units and/or the number of curves in each sub-objective should not affect the overall performance of the fitting. These two criteria should be achieved without manually choosing the weighting factors. However, for some non-analytical specific problems, this is very difficult in practice. Null values of experimental or numerical values also turns the task difficult. In this work, a novel objective function for constitutive model parameter identification is presented. It is a generalization of the work of Cao and Lin and it is suitable for all kinds of constitutive models and mechanical tests, including cyclic tests and Baushinger tests with null values.

  12. Effects of Multiple-Bond Ruptures on Kinetic Parameters Extracted from Force Spectroscopy Measurements: Revisiting Biotin-Streptavidin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Senli; Ray, Chad; Kirkpatrick, Andrea; Lad, Nimit; Akhremitchev, Boris B.

    2008-01-01

    Force spectroscopy measurements of the rupture of the molecular bond between biotin and streptavidin often results in a wide distribution of rupture forces. We attribute the long tail of high rupture forces to the nearly simultaneous rupture of more than one molecular bond. To decrease the number of possible bonds, we employed hydrophilic polymeric tethers to attach biotin molecules to the atomic force microscope probe. It is shown that the measured distributions of rupture forces still contain high forces that cannot be described by the forced dissociation from a deep potential well. We employed a recently developed analytical model of simultaneous rupture of two bonds connected by polymer tethers with uneven length to fit the measured distributions. The resulting kinetic parameters agree with the energy landscape predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. It is demonstrated that when more than one molecular bond might rupture during the pulling measurements there is a noise-limited range of probe velocities where the kinetic parameters measured by force spectroscopy correspond to the true energy landscape. Outside this range of velocities, the kinetic parameters extracted by using the standard most probable force approach might be interpreted as artificial energy barriers that are not present in the actual energy landscape. Factors that affect the range of useful velocities are discussed. PMID:18621812

  13. Determination of the Lambda parameter from full lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goeckeler, M.; Horsley, R.; Irving, A.C.; Rakow, P.E.L.; Pleiter, D.; Schierholz, G.; Stueben, H.

    2006-01-01

    We present a determination of the QCD parameter {lambda} in the quenched approximation (n{sub f}=0) and for two flavors (n{sub f}=2) of light dynamical quarks. The calculations are performed on the lattice using O(a) improved Wilson fermions and include taking the continuum limit. We find {lambda}{sub n{sub f}=0}{sup MS}=259(1)(19) MeV and {lambda}{sub n{sub f}=2}{sup MS}=261(17)(26) MeV, using r{sub 0}=0.467 fm to set the scale. Extrapolating our results to five flavors, we obtain for the running coupling constant at the mass of the Z boson {alpha}{sub s}{sup MS}(m{sub Z})=0.112(1)(2)

  14. Evolutionary determination of experimental parameters for ptychographical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shenfield, Alex; Rodenburg, John M.

    2011-06-15

    The Ptychographical Iterative Engine (PIE) algorithm is a recently developed novel method of Coherent Diffractive Imaging (CDI) that uses multiple overlapping diffraction patterns to reconstruct an image. This method has successfully produced high quality reconstructions at both optical and X-ray wavelengths but the need for accurate knowledge of the probe positions is currently a limiting factor in the production of high resolution reconstructions at electron wavelengths. This paper examines the shape of the search landscape for producing optimal image reconstructions in the specific case of electron microscopy and then shows how evolutionary search methods can be used to reliably determine experimental parameters in the electron microscopy case (such as the spherical aberration in the probe and the probe positions).

  15. Complementary interference method for determining optical parameters of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowiorski, K.; Kędzierski, J.; Raszewski, Z.; Kojdecki, M. A.; Chojnowska, O.; Garbat, K.; Miszczyk, E.; Piecek, W.

    2016-04-01

    Wedge cells of small apex angle, filled with liquid crystals, were used to determining optical characteristics as functions of temperature for three liquid crystalline mixtures recently produced and a reference nematic. The interference fringes appearing in polarised monochromatic light (of sodium yellow line) normally incident on the cell were exploited to measure the ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices in the reflection mode and birefringence in the transmission mode. The measurements were repeated using Abbe's refractometer for 6CHBT as the reference to verifying the precision. Additionally the order parameter was computed from birefringence as a function of temperature. The results confirm the usefulness of the method and provide the properties of two nematic liquid crystals of small and large birefringence and one smectic liquid crystal of medium birefringence, recently produced. The experimental systems served also to investigating phase transition between the liquid crystals and the isotropic liquid at near-clearing temperature.

  16. Probe-rotating atomic force microscopy for determining material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we propose a probe-rotating atomic force microscope that enables scan in an arbitrary direction in the contact imaging mode, which is difficult to achieve using a conventional atomic force microscope owing to the orientation-dependent probe and the inability to rotate the probe head. To enable rotation of the probe about its vertical axis, we employed a compact and light probe head, the sensor of which is made of an optical disk drive pickup unit. Our proposed mechanical configuration, operating principle, and control system enables axial and lateral scan in various directions.

  17. Numerical determination of the transmissibility characteristics of a squeeze film damped forced vibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, M. A.; Davis, P. K.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the governing equations of motion of a liquid squeeze film damped forced vibration system were carried out to examine the feasibility of using a liquid squeeze film to cushion and protect large structures, such as buildings, located in areas of high seismic activity. The mathematical model used was that for a single degree of freedom squeeze film damped spring mass system. The input disturbance was simulated by curve fitting actual seismic data with an eleventh order Lagranging polynomial technique. Only the normal component of the seismic input was considered. The nonlinear, nonhomogeneous governing differential equation of motion was solved numerically to determine the transmissibility over a wide range of physical parameters using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta technique. It is determined that a liquid squeeze film used as a damping agent in a spring-mass system can significantly reduce the response amplitude for a seismic input disturbance.

  18. Experimental determination of optimum gutter brush parameters and road sweeping criteria for different types of waste.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Magd M; Wang, Chong; Vanegas-Useche, Libardo V; Parker, Graham A

    2011-06-01

    The removal ability of gutter brushes for road sweeping for various debris types and different sweeping parameters is studied through experimental tests. The brushing test rig used comprises two commercial gutter brushes, a concrete test bed, and an asphalt test road with a gutter of 0.25 cm width and 10° slope. The brush-surface contact area is determined by sweeping sand on the concrete test bed. Sweeping problems are identified and discussed, and sweeping criteria for the different debris types are suggested. Also, optimum sweeping parameters are proposed for each debris type. In addition, debris removal mechanisms are discussed and analysed. The results indicate that for large heavy debris such as stones and gravel, it is not difficult to achieve large removal forces, because the steel bristles are relatively stiff. Conversely, high removal forces are not needed for particles of millimetre or micron sizes, but bristle curvature has to be appropriate to remove particles from road concavities. Finally, it is found that mud, especially dry mud on a rough surface, is the hardest debris to sweep, requiring a brush with a large tilt angle and a very large penetration to produce large removal forces. PMID:21277186

  19. The Relationship Between Biomechanical-Anthropometrical Parameters and the Force Exerted on the Head When Heading Free Kicks in Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Teymouri, Meghdad; Sadeghi, Heydar; Nabaei, Amir; Kasaeian, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Background: Soccer is a contact sport in which the players are frequently faced with the risk of injury. It has been shown that the force exerted on the head during heading can be as much as 500–1200 Newton (N). Objectives: The main objective of this study was to determine whether there was any relationship between the force exerted on the head and several biomechanical and anthropometrical parameters related to heading free kicks. Patients and Methods: A total of 16 semi-professional soccer players with at least 5 years experience participated in this study. The mean age, height, and weight of the study participants were 21.36 ± 5.67, 178 ± 5.99 cm, and 70.55 ± 8.55 kg, respectively. To measure the force exerted on the heads of the players, a pressure gauge was installed on their foreheads. Each participant was asked to defend the ball using the heading technique three times. A camera with a sampling frequency of 150 frames per second was used to record the moment of impact between the ball and head during each heading event. For each participant and replicate, the ball and head velocity (m/s) as well as the angular body changes (degrees) were calculated using MATLAB and AutoCAD softwares, respectively. Descriptive statistics, including means and standard deviations were used to describe the data. Pearson correlation coefficient (alpha = 0.05) was used to examine potential relationships between the variables of interest. Results: Significant correlations existed between the force exerted on the head during heading, participant age, body mass, body fat percentage, and head perimeter (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The study revealed the significance of anthropometric variables related to heading, such as age and head perimeter. Therefore, it was concluded that these variables should be considered when teaching and practicing the heading technique with players of different ages and anthropometric sizes. PMID:24719842

  20. Determination of Radiative Forcing of Saharan Dust using Combined TOMS and ERBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina; Herman, Jay R.; Weaver, Clark

    1999-01-01

    The direct radiative forcing of Saharan dust aerosols has been determined by combining aerosol information derived from Nimbus-7 TOMS with radiation measurements observed at the top of atmosphere (TOA) by NOAA-9 ERBE made during February-July 1985. Cloud parameters and precipitable water derived from the NOAA-9 HIRS2 instrument were used to aid in screening for clouds and water vapor in the analyses. Our results indicate that under "cloud-free" and "dry" conditions there is a good correlation between the ERBE TOA outgoing longwave fluxes and the TOMS aerosol index measurements over both land and ocean in areas under the influence of airborne Saharan dust. The ERBE TOA outgoing shortwave fluxes were also found to correlate well with the dust loading derived from TOMS over ocean. However, the calculated shortwave forcing of Saharan dust aerosols is very weak and noisy over land for the range of solar zenith angle viewed by the NOAA-9 ERBE in 1985. Sensitivity factors of the TOA outgoing fluxes to changes in aerosol index were estimated using a linear regression fit to the ERBE and TOMS measurements. The ratio of the shortwave-to-longwave response to changes in dust loading over the ocean is found to be roughly 2 to 3, but opposite in sign. The monthly averaged "clear-sky" TOA direct forcing of airborne Saharan dust was also calculated by multiplying these sensitivity factors by the TOMS monthly averaged "clear-sky" aerosol index. Both the observational and theoretical analyses indicate that the dust layer height, ambient moisture content as well as the presence of cloud all play an important role in determining the TOA direct radiative forcing due to mineral aerosols.

  1. Impact of parameter variation in fabrication of nanostructure by atomic force microscopy nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Dehzangi, Arash; Larki, Farhad; Hutagalung, Sabar D; Goodarz Naseri, Mahmood; Majlis, Burhanuddin Y; Navasery, Manizheh; Hamid, Norihan Abdul; Noor, Mimiwaty Mohd

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, we investigate the fabrication of Silicon nanostructure patterned on lightly doped (10(15) cm(-3)) p-type silicon-on-insulator by atomic force microscope nanolithography technique. The local anodic oxidation followed by two wet etching steps, potassium hydroxide etching for silicon removal and hydrofluoric etching for oxide removal, are implemented to reach the structures. The impact of contributing parameters in oxidation such as tip materials, applying voltage on the tip, relative humidity and exposure time are studied. The effect of the etchant concentration (10% to 30% wt) of potassium hydroxide and its mixture with isopropyl alcohol (10%vol. IPA ) at different temperatures on silicon surface are expressed. For different KOH concentrations, the effect of etching with the IPA admixture and the effect of the immersing time in the etching process on the structure are investigated. The etching processes are accurately optimized by 30%wt. KOH +10%vol. IPA in appropriate time, temperature, and humidity. PMID:23776479

  2. Determinants of contractile forces generated in disorganized actomyosin bundles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoon

    2015-04-01

    Actomyosin machinery is a fundamental engine consisting mostly of actin filaments, molecular motors, and passive cross-linkers, generating mechanical forces required for biological processes of non-muscle cells such as cell migration, cytokinesis, and morphogenesis. Although the molecular and physical properties of key elements in the actomyosin machinery have been characterized well, it still remains unclear how macroscopic force buildup and dissipation in actomyosin networks and bundles depend on the microscopic properties of individual cytoskeletal components and their local interactions. To bridge such a gap between macroscopic and microscopic scales, we have developed a three-dimensional computational model of actomyosin bundles clamped to an elastic substrate with minimal components: actin filaments, passive cross-linkers, and active motors. Our model accounts for several key features neglected by previous studies despite their significance for force generation, such as realistic structure and kinetics of the motors. Using the model, we systematically investigated how net tension in actomyosin bundles is governed via interplay between motors and cross-linkers. We demonstrated motors can generate large tension on a bundle in the absence of cross-linkers in a very inefficient, unstable manner. Cross-linkers help motors to generate their maximum potential forces as well as enhance overall connectivity, leading to much higher efficiency and stability. We showed further that the cross-linkers behave as a molecular clutch with tunable friction which has quite distinct effects on net tension depending on their cross-linking angles. We also examined the source of symmetry breaking between tensile and compressive forces during tension generation process and discussed how the length and dynamics of actin filaments and the stiffness of the elastic substrate can affect the generated tension. PMID:25103419

  3. 40 CFR 86.229-94 - Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Road load force, test weight, and... § 86.229-94 Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. (a) Flywheels, electrical forces, or other means of simulating test weight as shown in the table in this paragraph shall...

  4. 40 CFR 86.229-94 - Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Road load force, test weight, and... § 86.229-94 Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. (a) Flywheels, electrical forces, or other means of simulating test weight as shown in the table in this paragraph shall...

  5. 40 CFR 86.229-94 - Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Road load force, test weight, and... § 86.229-94 Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. (a) Flywheels, electrical forces, or other means of simulating test weight as shown in the table in this paragraph shall...

  6. 40 CFR 86.229-94 - Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Road load force, test weight, and... § 86.229-94 Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. (a) Flywheels, electrical forces, or other means of simulating test weight as shown in the table in this paragraph shall...

  7. Determination of optical and microstructural parameters of ceria films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae-Sik; Tokpanov, Yury S.; Hao, Yong; Jung, WooChul; Haile, Sossina M.

    2012-11-01

    Light-matter interactions are of tremendous importance in a wide range of fields from solar energy conversion to photonics. Here the optical dispersion behavior of undoped and 20 mol. % Sm doped ceria thin films, both dense and porous, were evaluated by UV-Vis optical transmission measurements, with the objective of determining both intrinsic and microstructural properties of the films. Films, ranging from 14 to 2300 nm in thickness, were grown on single crystal YSZ(100) and MgO(100) using pulsed laser deposition (both dense and porous films) and chemical vapor deposition (porous films only). The transmittance spectra were analyzed using an in-house developed methodology combining full spectrum fitting and envelope treatment. The index of refraction of ceria was found to fall between 2.65 at a wavelength of 400 nm and 2.25 at 800 nm, typical of literature values, and was relatively unchanged by doping. Reliable determination of film thickness, porosity, and roughness was possible for films with thickness ranging from 500 to 2500 nm. Physically meaningful microstructural parameters were extracted even for films so thin as to show no interference fringes at all.

  8. Determination of the key parameters affecting historic communications satellite trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1984-01-01

    Data representing 13 series of commercial communications satellites procured between 1968 and 1982 were analyzed to determine the factors that have contributed to the general reduction over time of the per circuit cost of communications satellites. The model by which the data were analyzed was derived from a general telecommunications application and modified to be more directly applicable for communications satellites. In this model satellite mass, bandwidth-years, and technological change were the variable parameters. A linear, least squares, multiple regression routine was used to obtain the measure of significance of the model. Correlation was measured by coefficient of determination (R super 2) and t-statistic. The results showed that no correlation could be established with satellite mass. Bandwidth-year however, did show a significant correlation. Technological change in the bandwidth-year case was a significant factor in the model. This analysis and the conclusions derived are based on mature technologies, i.e., satellite designs that are evolutions of earlier designs rather than the first of a new generation. The findings, therefore, are appropriate to future satellites only if they are a continuation of design evolution.

  9. Determination of fundamental asteroseismic parameters using the Hilbert transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, René; Schad, Ariane; Herzberg, Wiebke; Roth, Markus

    2015-06-01

    Context. Solar-like oscillations exhibit a regular pattern of frequencies. This pattern is dominated by the small and large frequency separations between modes. The accurate determination of these parameters is of great interest, because they give information about e.g. the evolutionary state and the mass of a star. Aims: We want to develop a robust method to determine the large and small frequency separations for time series with low signal-to-noise ratio. For this purpose, we analyse a time series of the Sun from the GOLF instrument aboard SOHO and a time series of the star KIC 5184732 from the NASA Kepler satellite by employing a combination of Fourier and Hilbert transform. Methods: We use the analytic signal of filtered stellar oscillation time series to compute the signal envelope. Spectral analysis of the signal envelope then reveals frequency differences of dominant modes in the periodogram of the stellar time series. Results: With the described method the large frequency separation Δν can be extracted from the envelope spectrum even for data of poor signal-to-noise ratio. A modification of the method allows for an overview of the regularities in the periodogram of the time series.

  10. Determining CME-driven shock parameters from remote sensing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, L.; Bothmer, V.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large scale eruptions of magnetized plasma propagating from the Sun into interplanetary space with speeds varying from a few tens to more than 2500 km s-1. They cause large-scale turbulence in the heliosphere and are the major drivers of space weather. Fast CMEs drive strong shocks in the corona and interplanetary medium and generate plasma turbulence in the post-shock regions ahead of the CME bodies. In this work results from the detailed analysis of a strong CME and shock event on April 3, 2010 are summarized. For this event the solar source region is identified and the CME and shock kinematics are determined from time series of white light images obtained by the SECCHI suite on board the STEREO spacecrafts. The shock's standoff distance, compression ratio and Mach number are derived. A comparison of the derived values with the in-situ measurements shows good agreement. Further comparison of the shock MHD parameters determined from remote sensing observations with in-situ data, including the calculation of power-spectra, will help validating the results and provide new insights into CME generated turbulence. The study will be extended to further events identified in STEREO observations.

  11. Determination of plasma parameters in solar zebra radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: We present a new method for determining the magnetic field strength and plasma density in the solar zebra radio sources. Methods: Using the double plasma resonance (DPR) model of the zebra emission, we analytically derived the equations for computing the gyroharmonic number s of selected zebra lines and then solved these equations numerically. Results: The method was successfully tested on artificially generated zebras and then applied to observed ones. The magnetic field strength and plasma density in the radio sources were determined. Simultaneously, we evaluated the parameter Lnb = 2Lb/ (2Ln - Lb), where Ln and Lb are the characteristic scale-heights of the plasma density and magnetic field strength in the zebra source, respectively. Computations show that the maximum frequency of the low-polarized zebras is about 8 GHz, in very good agreement with observations. For the high-polarized zebras, this limit is about four times lower. Microwave zebras are preferentially generated in the regions with steep gradients of the plasma density, such as in the transition region. In models with smaller density gradients, such as those with a barometric density profile, the microwave zebras cannot be produced owing to the strong bremsstrahlung and cyclotron absorptions. We also show that our DPR model is able to explain the zebras with frequency-equidistant zebra lines.

  12. A method for the on-site determination of prestressing forces using long-gauge fiber optic strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Jaber, H.; Glisic, B.

    2014-07-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) consists of the continuous or periodic measurement of structural parameters and their analysis with the aim of deducing information about the performance and health condition of a structure. The significant increase in the construction of prestressed concrete bridges motivated this research on an SHM method for the on-site determination of the distribution of prestressing forces along prestressed concrete beam structures. The estimation of the distribution of forces is important as it can give information regarding the overall performance and structural integrity of the bridge. An inadequate transfer of the designed prestressing forces to the concrete cross-section can lead to a reduced capacity of the bridge and consequently malfunction or failure at lower loads than predicted by design. This paper researches a universal method for the determination of the distribution of prestressing forces along concrete beam structures at the time of transfer of the prestressing force (e.g., at the time of prestressing or post-tensioning). The method is based on the use of long-gauge fiber optic sensors, and the sensor network is similar (practically identical) to the one used for damage identification. The method encompasses the determination of prestressing forces at both healthy and cracked cross-sections, and for the latter it can yield information about the condition of the cracks. The method is validated on-site by comparison to design forces through the application to two structures: (1) a deck-stiffened arch and (2) a curved continuous girder. The uncertainty in the determination of prestressing forces was calculated and the comparison with the design forces has shown very good agreement in most of the structures’ cross-sections, but also helped identify some unusual behaviors. The method and its validation are presented in this paper.

  13. Determining the Pollution Parameters of Degirmendere Stream (Trabzon, NE TURKEY)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnetci, M. O.; Hatipoglu, E.; Firat Ersoy, A.; Gultekin, F.

    2013-12-01

    The pollution parameters of Degirmendere Stream (Trabzon, TURKEY) are determined in this study. The study area is located between Maçka, 26 km to the south of Trabzon city, and the Black Sea. The area consists of Late Cretaceous volcano-sedimentary rocks, dacite, and basalt, overlain by Eocene volcanic rocks. Quaternary alluvium overlay all geological units following Degirmendere Stream bed. In-situ physical parameter measurements, anion-cation analysis, and heavy and pollutant element analysis on water samples were carried out for four months at four different locations on the stream. The stream's water temperature values were between 4.7 and 9.7oC, pH values were between 6.01 and 7.98, dissolved oxygen (DO) values were between 7.03 and 12.38 mg/l, electrical conductivity (EC) values were between 86 and 254 μS/cm. According to the Piper diagram, the stream water is classified as Ca-HCO3 type water. In the Schoeller diagram, the lines combining mek/l values of the ions in stream water are parallel. Al concentration in the stream water varied from 0.06 to 0.22 mg/l, Mn concentration varied from 0.1 to 0.36 mg/l, and Fe concentration varied from 0.01 to 0.12 mg/l. The stream water is classified as first class in point of temperature, pH, DO, total dissolved solids (TDS), NO3-, P, Pb, Fe, and Al; first and second class in point of NH4+; second class in point of Cu; and third class in point of NO2-, according to the Water Pollution Control Regulation of the Turkish Republic's Criteria for Inland Surface Water Classification. Results indicate waters of the Degirmendere Stream is very good-good for irrigation use according to the Wilcox diagram.

  14. Summary of longitudinal stability and control parameters as determined from Space Shuttle Challenger flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suit, William T.

    1989-01-01

    Estimates of longitudinal stability and control parameters for the space shuttle were determined by applying a maximum likelihood parameter estimation technique to Challenger flight test data. The parameters for pitching moment coefficient, C(m sub alpha), (at different angles of attack), pitching moment coefficient, C(m sub delta e), (at different elevator deflections) and the normal force coefficient, C(z sub alpha), (at different angles of attack) describe 90 percent of the response to longitudinal inputs during Space Shuttle Challenger flights with C(m sub delta e) being the dominant parameter. The values of C(z sub alpha) were found to be input dependent for these tests. However, when C(z sub alpha) was set at preflight predictions, the values determined for C(m sub delta e) changed less than 10 percent from the values obtained when C(z sub alpha) was estimated as well. The preflight predictions for C(z sub alpha) and C(m sub alpha) are acceptable values, while the values of C(z sub delta e) should be about 30 percent less negative than the preflight predictions near Mach 1, and 10 percent less negative, otherwise.

  15. Determining cosmological parameters with the latest observational data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Hong; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zhang, Xinmin

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we combine the latest observational data, including the WMAP five-year data (WMAP5), BOOMERanG, CBI, VSA, ACBAR, as well as the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and type Ia supernovae (SN) “union” compilation (307 sample), and use the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to determine the cosmological parameters, such as the equation of state (EoS) of dark energy, the curvature of the universe, the total neutrino mass, and the parameters associated with the power spectrum of primordial fluctuations. In a flat universe, we obtain the tight limit on the constant EoS of dark energy as w=-0.977±0.056(stat)±0.057(sys). For the dynamical dark energy models with the time evolving EoS parametrized as wde(a)=w0+w1(1-a), we find that the best-fit values are w0=-1.08 and w1=0.368, while the ΛCDM model remains a good fit to the current data. For the curvature of the universe Ωk, our results give -0.012<Ωk<0.009 (95% C.L.) when fixing wde=-1. When considering the dynamics of dark energy, the flat universe is still a good fit to the current data, -0.015<Ωk<0.018 (95% C.L.). Regarding the neutrino mass limit, we obtain the upper limits, ∑mν<0.533eV (95% C.L.) within the framework of the flat ΛCDM model. When adding the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Lyman-α forest power spectrum data, the constraint on ∑mν can be significantly improved, ∑mν<0.161eV (95% C.L.). However, these limits can be weakened by a factor of 2 in the framework of dynamical dark energy models, due to the obvious degeneracy between neutrino mass and the EoS of the dark energy model. Assuming that the primordial fluctuations are adiabatic with a power law spectrum within the ΛCDM model, we find that the upper limit on the ratio of the tensor to scalar is r<0.200 (95% C.L.) and the inflationary models with the slope ns≥1 are excluded at more than 2σ confidence level. However, in the framework of dynamical dark energy models, the allowed region in the parameter space of (ns,r) is

  16. DETERMINING UNCERTAINTY IN PHYSICAL PARAMETER MEASUREMENTS BY MONTE CARLO SIMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A statistical approach, often called Monte Carlo Simulation, has been used to examine propagation of error with measurement of several parameters important in predicting environmental transport of chemicals. These parameters are vapor pressure, water solubility, octanol-water par...

  17. U Geminorum: a Test Case for Orbital Parameters Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarría, Juan; de La Fuente, Eduardo; Costero, Rafael

    2007-08-01

    Due to its eclipsing nature and thorough observational studies, U Gem, in general, a good candidate for the analysis of standard and new methods in the determination of the orbital parameters in cataclysmic variables. Although in this interactive binary, these parameters are relatively well known, there are still discrepancies in the radial velocity semi-amplitude of the white dwarf, as obtained from the optical or the Ultraviolet data. Furthermore, the secondary star is not visible in the optical; consequently, its corresponding semi-amplitude has been derived from data obtained in the infrared region. For these reasons U Gem is an interesting case for testing new methods to derive orbital parameters based on optical observations only. High resolution spectroscopy of U Gem, covering the spectral region λ 5200-9100 Å, was obtained. The system was observed during quiescence, about 35 days after the onset of an outburst. We did not find a hot spot or gas stream around the outer boundaries of the accretion disk. Instead, we detected a strong narrow emission at the location of the secondary star. We measured the radial velocity curve from the wings of the double-peaked Hα emission line, and obtained a semi-amplitude value in excellent agreement with the ultraviolet results by Long & Gilliland (1999). We present also a new method to obtain K[2], based on the detection of the TiO band around λ 7050 Å. Our results are compared with published values derived from the near-infrared NaI line doublet. From a comparison of the TiO band with those of late type M stars, we find that a best fit is obtained for a M6 V star, contributing 5 percent of the total light at that spectral region. Assuming that the radial velocity semi-amplitudes reflect accurately the motion of the binary components, then from our results: K[em] = 108 km s-1 and K[abs] = 310 km s-1. For a revised inclination angle of i = 70o (Zhang et al. 1987) the system parameters become; M[wd] = 1.20 ± 0.05 M

  18. Thermodynamic properties of liquid Au–Cu–Sn alloys determined from electromotive force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhongnan; Hindler, Michael; Yuan, Wenxia; Mikula, Adolf

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the ternary Au–Cu–Sn system were determined with the electromotive force (EMF) method using a liquid electrolyte. Three different cross-sections with constant Au:Cu ratios of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3 were applied to measure the thermodynamic properties of the ternary system in the temperature range between the liquidus temperature of the alloys and 1023 K. The partial free energies of Sn in liquid Au–Cu–Sn alloys were obtained from EMF data. The integral Gibbs free energy and the integral enthalpy at 900 K were calculated by Gibbs–Duhem integration. The ternary interaction parameters were evaluated using the Redlich–Kister–Muggianu polynomial. PMID:22039311

  19. Determining charge state of graphene vacancy by noncontact atomic force microscopy and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Weinert, M.; Li, L.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene vacancies are engineered for novel functionalities, however, the charge state of these defects, the key parameter that is vital to charge transfer during chemical reactions and carrier scattering, is generally unknown. Here, we carried out atomic resolution imaging of graphene vacancy defects created by Ar plasma using noncontact atomic force microscopy, and made the first determination of their charge state by local contact potential difference measurements. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we show that graphene vacancies are typically positively charged, with size-dependent charge states that are not necessarily integer-valued. These findings provide new insights into carrier scattering by vacancy defects in graphene, as well as its functionalization for chemical sensing and catalysis, and underline the tunability of these functions by controlling the size of vacancy defect.

  20. Determining important parameters related to cyanobacterial alkaloid toxin exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Love, A H

    2005-09-16

    Science-based decision making required robust and high-fidelity mechanistic data about the system dynamics and impacts of system changes. Alkaloid cyanotoxins have the characteristics to warrant consideration for their potential threat. Since insufficient information is available to construct a systems model for the alkaloid cyanotoxins, saxitoxins, anatoxins, and anatoxin-a(S), an accurate assessments of these toxins as a potential threat for use for intentional contamination is not possible. Alkaloid cyanotoxin research that contributed to such a model has numerous areas of overlap for natural and intentional health effects issues that generates dual improvements to the state of the science. The use of sensitivity analyses of systems models can identify parameters that, when determined, result in the greatest impact to the overall system and may help to direct the most efficient use of research funding. This type of modeling-assisted experimentation may allow rapid progress for overall system understanding compared to observational or disciplinary research agendas. Assessment and management of risk from intentional contamination can be performed with greater confidence when mechanisms are known and the relationships between different components are validated. This level of understanding allows high-fidelity assessments that do not hamper legitimate possession of these toxins for research purposes, while preventing intentional contamination that would affect public health. It also allows for appropriate response to an intentional contamination event, even if the specific contamination had not been previous considered. Development of science-based decision making tools will only improve our ability to address the new requirements addressing potential threats to our nation.

  1. Determination of parameters of a nuclear reactor through noise measurements

    DOEpatents

    Cohn, C.E.

    1975-07-15

    A method of measuring parameters of a nuclear reactor by noise measurements is described. Noise signals are developed by the detectors placed in the reactor core. The polarity coincidence between the noise signals is used to develop quantities from which various parameters of the reactor can be calculated. (auth)

  2. Mathematical modeling of drying of potato slices in a forced convective dryer based on important parameters.

    PubMed

    Naderinezhad, Samira; Etesami, Nasrin; Poormalek Najafabady, Arefe; Ghasemi Falavarjani, Majid

    2016-01-01

    The effect of air temperature, air velocity, and sample shapes (circle and square with the same cross-sectional area) on kinetic drying of potato slices in a tunnel dryer was investigated experimentally and a suitable drying model was developed. The experiments of drying of potato slices were conducted at an air temperature of 45-70°C with an air velocity 1.60 and 1.81 m sec(-1). Results showed that drying temperature was the most effective parameter in the drying rate. The influence of air velocity was more profound in low temperature. The time for drying square slices was lower compared to the circle ones. Furthermore, drying data were fitted to different empirical models. Among the models, Midilli-Kucuk was the best to explain the single layer drying of potato slices. The parameters of this model were determined as functions of air velocity and temperature by multiple regression analysis for circle and square slices. Various statistical parameters were examined for evaluating the model. PMID:26788317

  3. Plasma parameters and electromagnetic forces induced by the magneto hydro dynamic interaction in a hypersonic argon flow experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cristofolini, Andrea; Neretti, Gabriele; Borghi, Carlo A.

    2012-08-01

    This work proposes an experimental analysis on the magneto hydro dynamic (MHD) interaction induced by a magnetic test body immersed into a hypersonic argon flow. The characteristic plasma parameters are measured. They are related to the voltages arising in the Hall direction and to the variation of the fluid dynamic properties induced by the interaction. The tests have been performed in a hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach 6 and Mach 15. The plasma parameters are measured in the stagnation region in front of the nozzle of the wind tunnel and in the free stream region at the nozzle exit. The test body has a conical shape with the cone axis in the gas flow direction and the cone vertex against the flow. It is placed at the nozzle exit and is equipped with three permanent magnets. In the configuration adopted, the Faraday current flows in a closed loop completely immersed into the plasma of the shock layer. The electric field and the pressure variation due to MHD interaction have been measured on the test body walls. Microwave adsorption measurements have been used for the determination of the electron number density and the electron collision frequency. Continuum recombination radiation and line radiation emissions have been detected. The electron temperature has been determined by means of the spectroscopic data by using different methods. The electron number density has been also determined by means of the Stark broadening of H{sub {alpha}} and the H{sub {beta}} lines. Optical imaging has been utilized to visualize the pattern of the electric current distribution in the shock layer around the test body. The experiments show a considerable effect of the electromagnetic forces produced by the MHD interaction acting on the plasma flow around the test body. A comparison of the experimental data with simulation results shows a good agreement.

  4. A test method for determining adhesion forces and Hamaker constants of cementitious materials using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lomboy, Gilson; Sundararajan, Sriram; Wang Kejin; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2011-11-15

    A method for determining Hamaker constant of cementitious materials is presented. The method involved sample preparation, measurement of adhesion force between the tested material and a silicon nitride probe using atomic force microscopy in dry air and in water, and calculating the Hamaker constant using appropriate contact mechanics models. The work of adhesion and Hamaker constant were computed from the pull-off forces using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts and Derjagin-Muller-Toropov models. Reference materials with known Hamaker constants (mica, silica, calcite) and commercially available cementitious materials (Portland cement (PC), ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS)) were studied. The Hamaker constants of the reference materials obtained are consistent with those published by previous researchers. The results indicate that PC has a higher Hamaker constant than GGBFS. The Hamaker constant of PC in water is close to the previously predicted value C{sub 3}S, which is attributed to short hydration time ({<=} 45 min) used in this study.

  5. Corruption of parameter behavior and regionalization by model and forcing data errors: A Bayesian example using the SNOW17 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Minxue; Hogue, Terri S.; Franz, Kristie J.; Margulis, Steven A.; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2011-07-01

    The current study evaluates the impacts of various sources of uncertainty involved in hydrologic modeling on parameter behavior and regionalization utilizing different Bayesian likelihood functions and the Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) algorithm. The developed likelihood functions differ in their underlying assumptions and treatment of error sources. We apply the developed method to a snow accumulation and ablation model (National Weather Service SNOW17) and generate parameter ensembles to predict snow water equivalent (SWE). Observational data include precipitation and air temperature forcing along with SWE measurements from 24 sites with diverse hydroclimatic characteristics. A multiple linear regression model is used to construct regionalization relationships between model parameters and site characteristics. Results indicate that model structural uncertainty has the largest influence on SNOW17 parameter behavior. Precipitation uncertainty is the second largest source of uncertainty, showing greater impact at wetter sites. Measurement uncertainty in SWE tends to have little impact on the final model parameters and resulting SWE predictions. Considering all sources of uncertainty, parameters related to air temperature and snowfall fraction exhibit the strongest correlations to site characteristics. Parameters related to the length of the melting period also show high correlation to site characteristics. Finally, model structural uncertainty and precipitation uncertainty dramatically alter parameter regionalization relationships in comparison to cases where only uncertainty in model parameters or output measurements is considered. Our results demonstrate that accurate treatment of forcing, parameter, model structural, and calibration data errors is critical for deriving robust regionalization relationships.

  6. On the ability of molecular dynamics force fields to recapitulate NMR derived protein side chain order parameters.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Evan S; Wand, A Joshua; Sharp, Kim A

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have become a central tool for investigating various biophysical questions with atomistic detail. While many different proxies are used to qualify MD force fields, most are based on largely structural parameters such as the root mean square deviation from experimental coordinates or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts and residual dipolar couplings. NMR derived Lipari-Szabo squared generalized order parameter (O(2) ) values of amide NH bond vectors of the polypeptide chain were also often employed for refinement and validation. However, with a few exceptions, side chain methyl symmetry axis order parameters have not been incorporated into experimental reference sets. Using a test set of five diverse proteins, the performance of several force fields implemented in the NAMDD simulation package was examined. It was found that simulations employing explicit water implemented using the TIP3 model generally performed significantly better than those using implicit water in reproducing experimental methyl symmetry axis O(2) values. Overall the CHARMM27 force field performs nominally better than two implementations of the Amber force field. It appeared that recent quantum mechanics modifications to side chain torsional angles of leucine and isoleucine in the Amber force field have significantly hindered proper motional modeling for these residues. There remained significant room for improvement as even the best correlations of experimental and simulated methyl group Lipari-Szabo generalized order parameters fall below an R(2) of 0.8. PMID:26990788

  7. Codon Usage Bias and Determining Forces in Taenia solium Genome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Ma, Xusheng; Luo, Xuenong; Ling, Houjun; Zhang, Xichen; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-12-01

    The tapeworm Taenia solium is an important human zoonotic parasite that causes great economic loss and also endangers public health. At present, an effective vaccine that will prevent infection and chemotherapy without any side effect remains to be developed. In this study, codon usage patterns in the T. solium genome were examined through 8,484 protein-coding genes. Neutrality analysis showed that T. solium had a narrow GC distribution, and a significant correlation was observed between GC12 and GC3. Examination of an NC (ENC vs GC3s)-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENC (the effective number of codons) values were detected below the expected curve, suggesting that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally. We also identified 26 optimal codons in the T. solium genome, all of which ended with either a G or C residue. These optimal codons in the T. solium genome are likely consistent with tRNAs that are highly expressed in the cell, suggesting that mutational and translational selection forces are probably driving factors of codon usage bias in the T. solium genome. PMID:26797435

  8. Codon Usage Bias and Determining Forces in Taenia solium Genome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xing; Ma, Xusheng; Luo, Xuenong; Ling, Houjun; Zhang, Xichen; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-01-01

    The tapeworm Taenia solium is an important human zoonotic parasite that causes great economic loss and also endangers public health. At present, an effective vaccine that will prevent infection and chemotherapy without any side effect remains to be developed. In this study, codon usage patterns in the T. solium genome were examined through 8,484 protein-coding genes. Neutrality analysis showed that T. solium had a narrow GC distribution, and a significant correlation was observed between GC12 and GC3. Examination of an NC (ENC vs GC3s)-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENC (the effective number of codons) values were detected below the expected curve, suggesting that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally. We also identified 26 optimal codons in the T. solium genome, all of which ended with either a G or C residue. These optimal codons in the T. solium genome are likely consistent with tRNAs that are highly expressed in the cell, suggesting that mutational and translational selection forces are probably driving factors of codon usage bias in the T. solium genome. PMID:26797435

  9. Online Determination of Graphene Lattice Orientation Through Lateral Forces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Fanhua; Li, Guangyong; Liu, Lianqing; Liu, Guangjie; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Yuechao; Wejinya, Uchechukwu C; Xi, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Rapid progress in graphene engineering has called for a simple and effective method to determine the lattice orientation on graphene before tailoring graphene to the desired edge structures and shapes. In this work, a wavelet transform-based frequency identification method is developed to distinguish the lattice orientation of graphene. The lattice orientation is determined through the different distribution of the frequency power spectrum just from a single scan line. This method is proven both theoretically and experimentally to be useful and controllable. The results at the atomic scale show that the frequencies vary with the lattice orientation of graphene. Thus, an adjusted angle to the desired lattice orientation (zigzag or armchair) can easily be calculated based on the frequency obtained from the single scan line. Ultimately, these results will play a critical role in wafer-size graphene engineering and in the manufacturing of graphene-based nanodevices. PMID:27484859

  10. Online Determination of Graphene Lattice Orientation Through Lateral Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Fanhua; Li, Guangyong; Liu, Lianqing; Liu, Guangjie; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Yuechao; Wejinya, Uchechukwu C.; Xi, Ning

    2016-08-01

    Rapid progress in graphene engineering has called for a simple and effective method to determine the lattice orientation on graphene before tailoring graphene to the desired edge structures and shapes. In this work, a wavelet transform-based frequency identification method is developed to distinguish the lattice orientation of graphene. The lattice orientation is determined through the different distribution of the frequency power spectrum just from a single scan line. This method is proven both theoretically and experimentally to be useful and controllable. The results at the atomic scale show that the frequencies vary with the lattice orientation of graphene. Thus, an adjusted angle to the desired lattice orientation (zigzag or armchair) can easily be calculated based on the frequency obtained from the single scan line. Ultimately, these results will play a critical role in wafer-size graphene engineering and in the manufacturing of graphene-based nanodevices.

  11. Comparative analysis of methods for determining bite force in the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Huber, Daniel Robert; Motta, Philip Jay

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have identified relationships between the forces generated by the cranial musculature during feeding and cranial design. Particularly important to understanding the diversity of cranial form amongst vertebrates is knowledge of the generated magnitudes of bite force because of its use as a measure of ecological performance. In order to determine an accurate morphological proxy for bite force in elasmobranchs, theoretical force generation by the quadratomandibularis muscle of the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias was modeled using a variety of morphological techniques, and lever-ratio analyses were used to determine resultant bite forces. These measures were compared to in vivo bite force measurements obtained with a pressure transducer during tetanic stimulation experiments of the quadratomandibularis. Although no differences were found between the theoretical and in vivo bite forces measured, modeling analyses indicate that the quadratomandibularis muscle should be divided into its constituent divisions and digital images of the cross-sections of these divisions should be used to estimate cross-sectional area when calculating theoretical force production. From all analyses the maximum bite force measured was 19.57 N. This relatively low magnitude of bite force is discussed with respect to the ecomorphology of the feeding mechanism of S. acanthias to demonstrate the interdependence of morphology, ecology, and behavior in organismal design. PMID:14695686

  12. Characterization of marine boundary layer aerosol from North Atlantic and European sources: Physical and chemical properties and climate forcing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Ulrike

    This thesis focuses on aerosol properties measured in Southwestern Portugal during the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Fundamental aerosol physical properties such as particle size distribution and hygroscopic properties are related to possible sources and aerosol transformation processes. From these fundamental properties we derive aerosol properties that are important for aerosol forcing of climate. First, a new method for calculating CCN spectra is proposed in this work and tested using sensitivity studies and comparisons to direct measurements. The measured and calculated CCN spectra differ on average by 30%, which at small supersaturations is similar to the measurement uncertainties. Second, aerosol number to volume ratios (R) are calculated and the fact that values of R are relatively constrained is explained based on observed correlations between size distribution parameters. Third, a simple parameterization of the humidity dependence of the submicron aerosol scattering coefficient has been derived, depending only on a volume weighted average diameter growth factor and the volume mean diameter of the dry size distribution. One set of empirical parameters can be used to parameterize all aerosol types characterized during the ACE-2 measurement period. Aerosol physical properties and climate forcing parameters in the North-East Atlantic Ocean were clearly affected by pollution outbreaks from Europe. The submicron particle volume increased by a factor of 5 in polluted conditions, the light scattering coefficient of dry particles increased on average by a factor of up to 10, CCN concentrations at supersaturations of 0.2% increased by a factor of 3--5. The aerosol fundamental properties vary often strongly with air mass history, but also show short-term variability that often has a characteristic diurnal scale. The number concentration of fine particles below 50nm and the particle hygroscopic growth factors are mostly dominated by diurnal processes

  13. Exploring the Parameter Space of the Coarse-Grained UNRES Force Field by Random Search: Selecting a Transferable Medium-Resolution Force Field

    PubMed Central

    HE, YI; XIAO, YI; LIWO, ADAM; SCHERAGA, HAROLD A.

    2009-01-01

    We explored the energy-parameter space of our coarse-grained UNRES force field for large-scale ab initio simulations of protein folding, to obtain good initial approximations for hierarchical optimization of the force field with new virtual-bond-angle bending and side-chain-rotamer potentials which we recently introduced to replace the statistical potentials. 100 sets of energy-term weights were generated randomly, and good sets were selected by carrying out replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations of two peptides with a minimal α-helical and a minimal β-hairpin fold, respectively: the tryptophan cage (PDB code: 1L2Y) and tryptophan zipper (PDB code: 1LE1). Eight sets of parameters produced native-like structures of these two peptides. These eight sets were tested on two larger proteins: the engrailed homeodomain (PDB code: 1ENH) and FBP WW domain (PDB code: 1E0L); two sets were found to produce native-like conformations of these proteins. These two sets were tested further on a larger set of nine proteins with α or α + β structure and found to locate native-like structures of most of them. These results demonstrate that, in addition to finding reasonable initial starting points for optimization, an extensive search of parameter space is a powerful method to produce a transferable force field. PMID:19242966

  14. Determining frequentist confidence limits using a directed parameter space search

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Schneider, Jeff

    2014-10-10

    We consider the problem of inferring constraints on a high-dimensional parameter space with a computationally expensive likelihood function. We propose a machine learning algorithm that maps out the Frequentist confidence limit on parameter space by intelligently targeting likelihood evaluations so as to quickly and accurately characterize the likelihood surface in both low- and high-likelihood regions. We compare our algorithm to Bayesian credible limits derived by the well-tested Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm using both multi-modal toy likelihood functions and the seven yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmic microwave background likelihood function. We find that our algorithm correctly identifies the location, general size, and general shape of high-likelihood regions in parameter space while being more robust against multi-modality than MCMC.

  15. Flexural Vibration Test of a Cantilever Beam with a Force Sensor: Fast Determination of Young's Modulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and very inexpensive undergraduate laboratory experiment for fast determination of Young's modulus at moderate temperatures with the aid of a force sensor. A strip-shaped specimen rigidly bolted to the force sensor forms a clamped-free cantilever beam. Placed in a furnace, it is subjected to free-bending vibrations followed by…

  16. Simple method for determination of parameters of cemented doublet.

    PubMed

    Mikš, Antonín; Pokorný, Petr

    2016-07-10

    This paper proposes a simple noninvasive method that makes it possible to calculate the inner design parameters of the cemented doublet using measurements of its chosen paraxial optical and geometrical parameters without any damage to the system under testing (e.g., dismantling). Derived formulas are based on the knowledge of measured values of the lenses thicknesses, the radii of curvatures of the first and the last doublet's surfaces, the paraxial focal length, and positions of the object and the image focal point. Practical usefulness of the proposed method is demonstrated on the real measurement of a known doublet. PMID:27409326

  17. Determining the Kinetic Parameters Characteristic of Microalgal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez Sancho, Maria Eugenie; And Others

    1991-01-01

    An activity in which students obtain a growth curve for algae, identify the exponential and linear growth phases, and calculate the parameters which characterize both phases is described. The procedure, a list of required materials, experimental conditions, analytical technique, and a discussion of the interpretations of individual results are…

  18. Determination of quantum-noise parameters of realistic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. A.; Vogel, W.; Khanbekyan, M.; Welsch, D.-G.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure is developed which allows one to measure all the parameters occurring in a complete model [A. A. Semenov , Phys. Rev. A 74, 033803 (2006)] of realistic leaky cavities with unwanted noise. The method is based on the reflection of properly chosen test pulses by the cavity.

  19. Determining crystal growth kinetic parameters using optical fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerkamp, M.; Lamb, D. W.; Lye, P. G.

    2012-12-01

    The capability of an 'intrinsic exposed core optical fibre sensor' (IECOFS) as a monitoring device of scale formation has been evaluated. The IECOFS has been used to measure kinetics parameters of calcium carbonate heterogeneous crystal growth such as the activation energy, the crystal growth rate and the induction time. The IECOFS was able to evaluate crystal growth inhibition through the use of chemical inhibitors.

  20. Unsaturated hydraulic parameters determined from direct and indirect methods

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, Lorraine E.; Hudson, David B.; Flint, Alan L.

    1997-10-22

    Hydraulic parameters are required for numerical simulations of unsaturated flow at Yucca Mountain, a vertically heterogeneous volcanic site for a potential high-level waste repository in the desert southwest. In this paper, direct measurements of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using a centrifuge with a specialized rotor are compared to those estimated using a predictive conductivity equation and two methods of measuring moisture retention.

  1. Analysis of Muscle Force-Velocity Parameter Changes in Elderly Women Resulting from Physical Activity--In Continuous Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skrzek, Anna; Stefanska, Malgorzata

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to evaluate changes in muscle force-velocity parameters (F-v) in elderly women subjected to physical exercise. The examinations encompassed 20 women, aged 62-71, who were students at the University of the Third Age in Wroclaw. The evaluation of flexors and extensors of the knee joint, as well as flexors and extensors of…

  2. Attitude determination of a high altitude balloon system. Part 2: Development of the parameter determination process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nigro, N. J.; Elkouh, A. F.

    1975-01-01

    The attitude of the balloon system is determined as a function of time if: (a) a method for simulating the motion of the system is available, and (b) the initial state is known. The initial state is obtained by fitting the system motion (as measured by sensors) to the corresponding output predicted by the mathematical model. In the case of the LACATE experiment the sensors consisted of three orthogonally oriented rate gyros and a magnetometer all mounted on the research platform. The initial state was obtained by fitting the angular velocity components measured with the gyros to the corresponding values obtained from the solution of the math model. A block diagram illustrating the attitude determination process employed for the LACATE experiment is shown. The process consists of three essential parts; a process for simulating the balloon system, an instrumentation system for measuring the output, and a parameter estimation process for systematically and efficiently solving the initial state. Results are presented and discussed.

  3. Modal parameter determination of a lightweight aerospace panel using laser Doppler vibrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Kleverson C.; Domingues, Allan C.; Pereira, Pedro P. de S.; Carneiro, Sergio H.; de Morais, Marcus V. G.; Fabro, Adriano T.

    2016-06-01

    The experimental determination of modal parameters, i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratio, are key in characterizing the dynamic behaviour of structures. Typically, such parameters are obtained from dynamic measurements using one or a set of accelerometers, for response measurements, along with force transducers from an impact hammer or an electrodynamic actuator, i.e. a shaker. However, lightweight structures, commonly applied in the aerospace industry, can be significantly affected by the added mass from accelerometers. Therefore, non-contact measurement techniques, like Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV), are a more suitable approach in determining the dynamic characteristics of such structures. In this article, the procedures and results of a modal test for a honeycomb sandwich panel for aerospace applications are presented and discussed. The main objectives of the test are the identification of natural frequencies and mode shapes in order to validate a numerical model, as well as the identification of the damping characteristics of the panel. A validated numerical model will be necessary for future detailed response analysis of the satellite, including vibroacoustic investigations to account for acoustic excitations encountered during launching. The numerical model using homogenised material properties is updated to fit the experimental results and very good agreement between experimental and numerically obtained natural frequencies and mode shapes.

  4. A system for the determination of planar force vectors from spontaneously active chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Andrew A; Cain, Blake W; Pakiraih, Joanna; Williams, James L

    2014-11-01

    Generally, a combination of kinematic, electromyographic (EMG), and force measurements are used to understand how an organism generates and controls movement. The chicken embryo has been a very useful model system for understanding the early stages of embryonic motility in vertebrates. Unfortunately, the size and delicate nature of embryos makes studies of motility during embryogenesis very challenging. Both kinematic and EMG recordings have been achieved in embryonic chickens, but two-dimensional force vector recordings have not. Here, we describe a dual-axis system for measuring force generated by the leg of embryonic chickens. The system employs two strain gauges to measure planar forces oriented with the plane of motion of the leg. This system responds to forces according to the principles of Pythagorean geometry, which allows a simple computational program to determine the force vector (magnitude and direction) generated during spontaneous motor activity. The system is able to determine force vectors for forces >0.5 mN accurately and allows for simultaneous kinematic and EMG recordings. This sensitivity is sufficient for force vector measurements encompassing most embryonic leg movements in midstage chicken embryos allowing for a more complete understanding of embryonic motility. Variations on this system are discussed to enable nonideal or alternative sensor arrangements and to allow for translation of this approach to other delicate model systems. PMID:25143544

  5. Instrument for the measurement and determination of chemical pulse column parameters

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, Norman J.; Morgan, John P.

    1990-01-01

    An instrument for monitoring and measuring pneumatic driving force pulse parameters applied to chemical separation pulse columns obtains real time pulse frequency and root mean square amplitude values, calculates column inch values and compares these values against preset limits to alert column operators to the variations of pulse column operational parameters beyond desired limits.

  6. Possibility of determination of the asymptotic level-density parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Kudyaev, G.A.; Ostapenko, Y.B.; Svirin, M.I.; Smirenkin, G.N.

    1988-02-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the fissility of nuclei to the parameters of the density of excited levels and conclude that the nuclei in the region of Pb are most favorable for an experimental estimate of the asymptotic parameter a-italic-tilde = ..cap alpha..A. The mean value ..cap alpha.. = 0.086 +- 0.009 MeV/sup -1/ is found from analysis of the fission of seven nuclei from /sup 201/Tl to /sup 213/At. This value is in agreement with the phenomenological description of the energy dependence a(U) (..cap alpha.. = 0.093 MeV/sup -1/) and with the theoretical prediction ..cap alpha.. = 0.09 MeV/sup -1/ obtained for a Woods-Saxon potential.

  7. Spectroscopic determination of kinetic parameters for frequency sweeping Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lesur, M.; Idomura, Y.; Shinohara, K.; Garbet, X.

    2010-12-15

    A method for analyzing fundamental kinetic plasma parameters, such as linear drive and external damping rate, based on experimental observations of chirping Alfven eigenmodes, is presented. The method, which relies on new semiempirical laws for nonlinear chirping characteristics, consists of fitting procedures between the so-called Berk-Breizman model and the experiment in a quasiperiodic chirping regime. This approach is applied to the toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) on JT-60 Upgrade (JT-60U) [N. Oyama et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104007 (2009)], which yields an estimation of the kinetic parameters and suggests the existence of TAEs far from marginal stability. Two collision models are considered, and it is shown that dynamical friction and velocity-space diffusion are essential to reproduce nonlinear features observed in experiments. The results are validated by recovering measured growth and decay of perturbation amplitude and by estimating collision frequencies from experimental equilibrium data.

  8. Interactions among thermal parameters determine offspring sex under temperature-dependent sex determination

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Daniel A.; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    In many animals, temperatures experienced by developing embryos determine offspring sex (e.g. temperature-dependent sex determination, TSD), but most studies focus strictly on the effects of mean temperature, with little emphasis on the importance of thermal fluctuations. In the jacky dragon (Amphibolurus muricatus), an Australian lizard with TSD, data from nests in the field demonstrate that offspring sex ratios are predictable from thermal fluctuations but not from mean nest temperatures. To clarify this paradox, we incubated eggs in a factorial experiment with two levels of mean temperature and three levels of diel fluctuation. We show that offspring sex is determined by an interaction between these critical thermal parameters. Intriguingly, because these two thermal descriptors shift in opposing directions throughout the incubation season, this interactive effect inhibits seasonal shifts in sex ratio. Hence, our results suggest that TSD can yield offspring sex ratios that resemble those produced under genotypic sex-determining systems. These findings raise important considerations for understanding the diversity of TSD reaction norms, for designing experiments that evaluate the evolutionary significance of TSD, and for predicting sex ratios under past and future climate change scenarios. PMID:20685704

  9. Automated inference procedure for the determination of cell growth parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Edouard A.; Koh, Eun Jee; Moffat, Jason; McMillen, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The growth rate and carrying capacity of a cell population are key to the characterization of the population's viability and to the quantification of its responses to perturbations such as drug treatments. Accurate estimation of these parameters necessitates careful analysis. Here, we present a rigorous mathematical approach for the robust analysis of cell count data, in which all the experimental stages of the cell counting process are investigated in detail with the machinery of Bayesian probability theory. We advance a flexible theoretical framework that permits accurate estimates of the growth parameters of cell populations and of the logical correlations between them. Moreover, our approach naturally produces an objective metric of avoidable experimental error, which may be tracked over time in a laboratory to detect instrumentation failures or lapses in protocol. We apply our method to the analysis of cell count data in the context of a logistic growth model by means of a user-friendly computer program that automates this analysis, and present some samples of its output. Finally, we note that a traditional least squares fit can provide misleading estimates of parameter values, because it ignores available information with regard to the way in which the data have actually been collected.

  10. Determination of combustion parameters using engine crankshaft speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taglialatela, F.; Lavorgna, M.; Mancaruso, E.; Vaglieco, B. M.

    2013-07-01

    Electronic engine controls based on real time diagnosis of combustion process can significantly help in complying with the stricter and stricter regulations on pollutants emissions and fuel consumption. The most important parameter for the evaluation of combustion quality in internal combustion engines is the in-cylinder pressure, but its direct measurement is very expensive and involves an intrusive approach to the cylinder. Previous researches demonstrated the direct relationship existing between in-cylinder pressure and engine crankshaft speed and several authors tried to reconstruct the pressure cycle on the basis of the engine speed signal. In this paper we propose the use of a Multi-Layer Perceptron neural network to model the relationship between the engine crankshaft speed and some parameters derived from the in-cylinder pressure cycle. This allows to have a non-intrusive estimation of cylinder pressure and a real time evaluation of combustion quality. The structure of the model and the training procedure is outlined in the paper. A possible combustion controller using the information extracted from the crankshaft speed information is also proposed. The application of the neural network model is demonstrated on a single-cylinder spark ignition engine tested in a wide range of speeds and loads. Results confirm that a good estimation of some combustion pressure parameters can be obtained by means of a suitable processing of crankshaft speed signal.

  11. Automated inference procedure for the determination of cell growth parameters.

    PubMed

    Harris, Edouard A; Koh, Eun Jee; Moffat, Jason; McMillen, David R

    2016-01-01

    The growth rate and carrying capacity of a cell population are key to the characterization of the population's viability and to the quantification of its responses to perturbations such as drug treatments. Accurate estimation of these parameters necessitates careful analysis. Here, we present a rigorous mathematical approach for the robust analysis of cell count data, in which all the experimental stages of the cell counting process are investigated in detail with the machinery of Bayesian probability theory. We advance a flexible theoretical framework that permits accurate estimates of the growth parameters of cell populations and of the logical correlations between them. Moreover, our approach naturally produces an objective metric of avoidable experimental error, which may be tracked over time in a laboratory to detect instrumentation failures or lapses in protocol. We apply our method to the analysis of cell count data in the context of a logistic growth model by means of a user-friendly computer program that automates this analysis, and present some samples of its output. Finally, we note that a traditional least squares fit can provide misleading estimates of parameter values, because it ignores available information with regard to the way in which the data have actually been collected. PMID:26871096

  12. Contact inhibition of locomotion determines cell–cell and cell–substrate forces in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Juliane; Camley, Brian A.; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Cells organized in tissues exert forces on their neighbors and their environment. Those cellular forces determine tissue homeostasis as well as reorganization during embryonic development and wound healing. To understand how cellular forces are generated and how they can influence the tissue state, we develop a particle-based simulation model for adhesive cell clusters and monolayers. Cells are contractile, exert forces on their substrate and on each other, and interact through contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL), meaning that cell–cell contacts suppress force transduction to the substrate and propulsion forces align away from neighbors. Our model captures the traction force patterns of small clusters of nonmotile cells and larger sheets of motile Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. In agreement with observations in a spreading MDCK colony, the cell density in the center increases as cells divide and the tissue grows. A feedback between cell density, CIL, and cell–cell adhesion gives rise to a linear relationship between cell density and intercellular tensile stress and forces the tissue into a nonmotile state characterized by a broad distribution of traction forces. Our model also captures the experimentally observed tissue flow around circular obstacles, and CIL accounts for traction forces at the edge. PMID:26903658

  13. Contact inhibition of locomotion determines cell-cell and cell-substrate forces in tissues.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Juliane; Camley, Brian A; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    2016-03-01

    Cells organized in tissues exert forces on their neighbors and their environment. Those cellular forces determine tissue homeostasis as well as reorganization during embryonic development and wound healing. To understand how cellular forces are generated and how they can influence the tissue state, we develop a particle-based simulation model for adhesive cell clusters and monolayers. Cells are contractile, exert forces on their substrate and on each other, and interact through contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL), meaning that cell-cell contacts suppress force transduction to the substrate and propulsion forces align away from neighbors. Our model captures the traction force patterns of small clusters of nonmotile cells and larger sheets of motile Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. In agreement with observations in a spreading MDCK colony, the cell density in the center increases as cells divide and the tissue grows. A feedback between cell density, CIL, and cell-cell adhesion gives rise to a linear relationship between cell density and intercellular tensile stress and forces the tissue into a nonmotile state characterized by a broad distribution of traction forces. Our model also captures the experimentally observed tissue flow around circular obstacles, and CIL accounts for traction forces at the edge. PMID:26903658

  14. Correlations between forced oscillation technique parameters and pulmonary densitovolumetry values in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Camilo, G B; Carvalho, A R S; Machado, D C; Mogami, R; Kasuki, L; Gadelha, M R; Melo, P L; Lopes, A J

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and pulmonary densitovolumetry in acromegalic patients and to examine the correlations between these findings. In this cross-sectional study, 29 non-smoking acromegalic patients and 17 paired controls were subjected to the FOT and quantification of lung volume using multidetector computed tomography (Q-MDCT). Compared with the controls, the acromegalic patients had a higher value for resonance frequency [15.3 (10.9-19.7) vs 11.4 (9.05-17.6) Hz, P=0.023] and a lower value for mean reactance [0.32 (0.21-0.64) vs 0.49 (0.34-0.96) cm H2O/L/s2, P=0.005]. In inspiratory Q-MDCT, the acromegalic patients had higher percentages of total lung volume (TLV) for nonaerated and poorly aerated areas [0.42% (0.30-0.51%) vs 0.25% (0.20-0.32%), P=0.039 and 3.25% (2.48-3.46%) vs 1.70% (1.45-2.15%), P=0.001, respectively]. Furthermore, the acromegalic patients had higher values for total lung mass in both inspiratory and expiratory Q-MDCT [821 (635-923) vs 696 (599-769) g, P=0.021 and 844 (650-945) vs 637 (536-736) g, P=0.009, respectively]. In inspiratory Q-MDCT, TLV showed significant correlations with all FOT parameters. The TLV of hyperaerated areas showed significant correlations with intercept resistance (rs=-0.602, P<0.001) and mean resistance (rs=-0.580, P<0.001). These data showed that acromegalic patients have increased amounts of lung tissue as well as nonaerated and poorly aerated areas. Functionally, there was a loss of homogeneity of the respiratory system. Moreover, there were correlations between the structural and functional findings of the respiratory system, consistent with the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:26445330

  15. Correlations between forced oscillation technique parameters and pulmonary densitovolumetry values in patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, G.B.; Carvalho, A.R.S.; Machado, D.C.; Mogami, R.; Kasuki, L.; Gadelha, M.R.; Melo, P.L.; Lopes, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and pulmonary densitovolumetry in acromegalic patients and to examine the correlations between these findings. In this cross-sectional study, 29 non-smoking acromegalic patients and 17 paired controls were subjected to the FOT and quantification of lung volume using multidetector computed tomography (Q-MDCT). Compared with the controls, the acromegalic patients had a higher value for resonance frequency [15.3 (10.9-19.7) vs 11.4 (9.05-17.6) Hz, P=0.023] and a lower value for mean reactance [0.32 (0.21-0.64) vs 0.49 (0.34-0.96) cm H2O/L/s2, P=0.005]. In inspiratory Q-MDCT, the acromegalic patients had higher percentages of total lung volume (TLV) for nonaerated and poorly aerated areas [0.42% (0.30-0.51%) vs 0.25% (0.20-0.32%), P=0.039 and 3.25% (2.48-3.46%) vs 1.70% (1.45-2.15%), P=0.001, respectively]. Furthermore, the acromegalic patients had higher values for total lung mass in both inspiratory and expiratory Q-MDCT [821 (635-923) vs 696 (599-769) g, P=0.021 and 844 (650-945) vs 637 (536-736) g, P=0.009, respectively]. In inspiratory Q-MDCT, TLV showed significant correlations with all FOT parameters. The TLV of hyperaerated areas showed significant correlations with intercept resistance (rs=−0.602, P<0.001) and mean resistance (rs=−0.580, P<0.001). These data showed that acromegalic patients have increased amounts of lung tissue as well as nonaerated and poorly aerated areas. Functionally, there was a loss of homogeneity of the respiratory system. Moreover, there were correlations between the structural and functional findings of the respiratory system, consistent with the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:26445330

  16. Relationship between foot posture measurements and force platform parameters during two balance tasks in older and younger subjects

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Carlos E.; da Silva, Rubens A.; Gil, André W.; Oliveira, Márcio R.; Nascimento, Juliana A.; Pires-Oliveira, Deise A. A.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare age-related differences in balance and anthropometric posture measurements of the foot and to determine any relationship between them. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty-eight older and 42 younger adults participated in this study. Foot posture was tested for four domains: 1) hallux flexion and extension range of motion using a goniometer, 2) navicular height and 3) length of the foot using a pachymeter, and 4) footprint (width of forefoot, arch index and hallux valgus). Balance was tested under two conditions on a force platform: bipodal in 60-s trials and unipodal in 30-s trials. The sway area of the center of pressure and velocity in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions were computed. [Results] Older individuals showed significantly poorer balance compared with younger adults under in the unipodal condition (center of pressure area 9.97 vs. 7.72 cm2). Older people presented a significantly lower hallux mobility and higher values for width of the forefoot and transverse arch index than younger adults. The correlations between all foot posture and center of pressure parameters varied across groups, from weak to moderate (r −0.01 to −0.46). Low hallux mobility was significantly related to higher center of pressure values in older people. [Conclusion] These results have clinical implications for balance and foot posture assessments. PMID:25931713

  17. Mechanical parameters determining pharyngeal collapsibility in patients with sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Oliven, Arie; Kaufman, Eran; Kaynan, Rotem; Oliven, Ron; Steinfeld, Uri; Tov, Nave; Odeh, Majed; Gaitini, Luis; Schwartz, Alan R; Kimmel, Eitan

    2010-10-01

    The relative impact of mechanical factors on pharyngeal patency in patients with obstructive sleep apnea is poorly understood. The present study was designed to evaluate parameters of the "tube law" on pharyngeal pressure-flow relationships and collapsibility in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. We developed a mathematical model that considered the collapsible segment of the pharynx to represent an orifice of varying diameter. The model enabled us to assess the effects of pharyngeal compliance (C), neutral cross-sectional area (A(o)), external peripharyngeal pressure (P(ex)), and the resistance proximal to the site of collapse on flow mechanics and pharyngeal collapsibility [critical pressure (P(crit))]. All parameters were measured in 15 patients with obstructive sleep apnea under propofol anesthesia, both at rest and during mandibular advancement and electrical stimulation of the genioglossus. The data was used both to confirm the validity of the model and to compare expected and actual relationships between the tube-law parameters and the pharyngeal pressure-flow relationship and collapsibility. We found a close correlation between predicted and measured P(crit) (R = 0.98), including changes observed during pharyngeal manipulations. C and A(o) were closely and directly interrelated (R = 0.93) and did not correlate with P(crit). A significant correlation was found between P(ex) and P(crit) (R = 0.77; P < 0.01). We conclude that the pharynx of patients with obstructive sleep apnea can be modeled as an orifice with varying diameter. Pharyngeal compliance and A(o) are closely interrelated. Pharyngeal collapsibility depends primarily on the surrounding pressure. PMID:20576847

  18. Determination of uncertainty in parameters extracted from single spectroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Sćepanović, Obrad R; Bechtel, Kate L; Haka, Abigail S; Shih, Wei-Chuan; Koo, Tae-Woong; Berger, Andrew J; Feld, Michael S

    2007-01-01

    The ability to quantify uncertainty in information extracted from spectroscopic measurements is important in numerous fields. The traditional approach of repetitive measurements may be impractical or impossible in some measurements scenarios, while chi-squared analysis does not provide insight into the sources of uncertainty. As such, a need exists for analytical expressions for estimating uncertainty and, by extension, minimum detectable concentrations or diagnostic parameters, that can be applied to a single noisy measurement. This work builds on established concepts from estimation theory, such as the Cramer-Rao lower bound on estimator covariance, to present an analytical formula for estimating uncertainty expressed as a simple function of measurement noise, signal strength, and spectral overlap. This formalism can be used to evaluate and improve instrument performance, particularly important for rapid-acquisition biomedical spectroscopy systems. We demonstrate the experimental utility of this expression in assessing concentration uncertainties from spectral measurements of aqueous solutions and diagnostic parameter uncertainties extracted from spectral measurements of human artery tissue. The measured uncertainty, calculated from many independent measurements, is found to be in good agreement with the analytical formula applied to a single spectrum. These results are intended to encourage the widespread use of uncertainty analysis in the biomedical optics community. PMID:18163828

  19. Determination of fluid viscosity and femto Newton forces of Leishmania amazonensis using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma; de Castro, Archimedes, Jr.; Neto, Vivaldo M.; de Y. Pozzo, Liliana; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2005-08-01

    The displacements of a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) can be used as a force transducer for mechanical measurements in life sciences such as the measurement of forces of living microorganisms or the viscosity of local fluids. The technique we used allowed us to measure forces on the 200 femto Newtons to 4 pico Newtons range of the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for a serious tropical disease. These observations can be used to understand the infection mechanism and chemotaxis of these parasites. The same technique was used to measure viscosities of few microliters sample with agreement with known samples better than 5%. To calibrate the force as a function of the microsphere displacement we first dragged the microsphere in a fluid at known velocity for a broad range of different optical and hydrodynamical parameters. The hydrodynamical model took into account the presence of two walls and the force depends on drag velocity, fluid viscosity and walls proximities, while the optical model in the geometric optics regime depends on the particle and fluid refractive indexes and laser power. To measure the high numerical (NA) aperture laser beam power after the objective we used an integration sphere to avoid the systematic errors of usual power meters for high NA beams. After this careful laser power measurement we obtained an almost 45 degrees straight line for the plot of the optical force (calculated by the particle horizontal displacement) versus hydrodynamic force (calculated by the drag velocity) under variation of all the parameters described below. This means that hydrodynamic models can be used to calibrate optical forces, as we have done for the parasite force measurement, or vice-versa, as we did for the viscosity measurements.

  20. Determination of nuclear tracks parameters on sequentially etched PADC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwacik, Tomasz; Bilski, Pawel; Koerner, Christine; Facius, Rainer; Berger, Thomas; Nowak, Tomasz; Reitz, Guenther; Olko, Pawel

    Polyallyl Diglycol Carbonate (PADC) detectors find many applications in radiation protection. One of them is the cosmic radiation dosimetry, where PADC detectors measure the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles (from protons to heavy ions), supplementing TLD detectors in the role of passive dosemeter. Calibration exposures to ions of known LET are required to establish a relation between parameters of track observed on the detector and LET of particle creating this track. PADC TASTRAK nuclear track detectors were exposed to 12 C and 56 Fe ions of LET in H2 O between 10 and 544 keV/µm. The exposures took place at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan in the frame of the HIMAC research project "Space Radiation Dosimetry-Ground Based Verification of the MATROSHKA Facility" (20P-240). Detectors were etched in water solution of NaOH with three different temperatures and for various etching times to observe the appearance of etched tracks, the evolution of their parameters and the stability of the etching process. The applied etching times (and the solution's concentrations and temperatures) were: 48, 72, 96, 120 hours (6.25 N NaOH, 50 O C), 20, 40, 60, 80 hours (6.25 N NaOH, 60 O C) and 8, 12, 16, 20 hours (7N NaOH, 70 O C). The analysis of the detectors involved planimetric (2D) measurements of tracks' entrance ellipses and mechanical measurements of bulk layer thickness. Further track parameters, like angle of incidence, track length and etch rate ratio were then calculated. For certain tracks, results of planimetric measurements and calculations were also compared with results of optical track profile (3D) measurements, where not only the track's entrance ellipse but also the location of the track's tip could be directly measured. All these measurements have been performed with the 2D/3D measurement system at DLR. The collected data allow to create sets of V(LET in H2 O) calibration curves suitable for short, intermediate and

  1. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip–surface interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borysov, Stanislav S.; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2014-10-29

    Here we present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip–surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip–surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode.

  2. Collision rates and the determination of atmospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielfiedel, A.; Feautrier, N.; Guitou, M.; Belyaev, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    Non-LTE modelisation of stellar atmospheres requires an accurate knowledge of collisional rate coefficients (mainly with H atoms) that compete with radiative rates to populate the atomic levels. In the framework of the SAM-GAIA project, we carry out, with colleagues from Uppsala, St. Petersburg and Nice, an interdisciplinary work combining quantum chemistry, collision physics and astrophysical modeling. Present studies concern collisional excitation of Mg and O by H-atoms. In the particular case of Mg, 15 electronic states of the MgH molecule as well as the associated couplings that mix the states during the collision were calculated. The resulting cross sections and rate coefficients point out the sensitivity of the results with the quantum chemistry data. Our detailed calculations show that the usual approximate formulae (Drawin, Kaulakys) lead to errors by factors up to 10^6. Consequences on atmospheric parameters are analyzed.

  3. Determination of structure parameters in molecular tunnelling ionisation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Song-Feng; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2014-04-01

    We extracted the accurate structure parameters in a molecular tunnelling ionisation model (the so-called MO-ADK model) for 23 selected linear molecules including some inner orbitals. The molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behaviour are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials numerically constructed using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model. We show that the orientation-dependent ionisation rate reflects the shape of the ionising orbitals in general. The influences of the Stark shifts of the energy levels on the orientation-dependent ionisation rates of the polar molecules are studied. We also examine the angle-dependent ionisation rates (or probabilities) based on the MO-ADK model by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation calculations and with recent experimental measurements.

  4. Efficient Parameter Estimation of Generalizable Coarse-Grained Protein Force Fields Using Contrastive Divergence: A Maximum Likelihood Approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Maximum Likelihood (ML) optimization schemes are widely used for parameter inference. They maximize the likelihood of some experimentally observed data, with respect to the model parameters iteratively, following the gradient of the logarithm of the likelihood. Here, we employ a ML inference scheme to infer a generalizable, physics-based coarse-grained protein model (which includes Go̅-like biasing terms to stabilize secondary structure elements in room-temperature simulations), using native conformations of a training set of proteins as the observed data. Contrastive divergence, a novel statistical machine learning technique, is used to efficiently approximate the direction of the gradient ascent, which enables the use of a large training set of proteins. Unlike previous work, the generalizability of the protein model allows the folding of peptides and a protein (protein G) which are not part of the training set. We compare the same force field with different van der Waals (vdW) potential forms: a hard cutoff model, and a Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential with vdW parameters inferred or adopted from the CHARMM or AMBER force fields. Simulations of peptides and protein G show that the LJ model with inferred parameters outperforms the hard cutoff potential, which is consistent with previous observations. Simulations using the LJ potential with inferred vdW parameters also outperforms the protein models with adopted vdW parameter values, demonstrating that model parameters generally cannot be used with force fields with different energy functions. The software is available at https://sites.google.com/site/crankite/. PMID:24683370

  5. Energetics of shortening muscles in twitches and tetanic contractions. II. Force-determined shortening heat.

    PubMed

    Homsher, E; Mommaerts, W F; Ricchiuti, N V

    1973-12-01

    The extra heat liberation accompanying muscular shortening, the force-determined shortening heat, is defined as the difference between the heat produced when shortening occurs and that produced in an isometric contraction developing the same amount of force and performing the same amount of internal work. Based on this definition, the initial energy production in twitches and tetanic contractions (E) is given by E = A + f (P, t) + alpha(F)x + W, where A is the activation heat, f(P, t), the tension-related heat (a heat production associated with the development and maintenance of tension), alpha(F)x, the force-determined shortening heat, and W, the external work. It is demonstrated that this equation accurately accounts for the time-course of heat evolution and the total initial energy production in both twitches and tetani at 0 degrees C. The force-determined shortening heat is liberated, during shortening, in direct proportion to (a) the distance shortened, and (b) the force against which shortening occurs. The normalized value of the force-determined shortening heat coefficient, alpha(F)/P(o), is the same in both the twitch and the tetanus. Finally, this formulation of the muscle's energy production also accounts for the total energy production in afterload isotonic twitches at 20 degrees C, where a Fenn effect is not demonstrable. PMID:4548714

  6. Crushable structure performance determined from reconstructed dynamic forces during impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    A force reconstruction technique has been used to assess the dynamic performance of a crushable structure (a bomb nose) in both the axial (90{degrees}) and slapdown (30{degrees}) impact conditions. The dynamic force characteristics for the nose design, determined from these test results, have been used to write a dynamic force specification for a new nose design that will replace the old nose. The dynamic forces are reconstructed from measured acceleration responses with the Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT) developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Axial characterizations for the old nose are presented from tests at two SNL facilities: a rocket rail launcher facility and an 18-Inch horizontal actuator facility. The characterizations for the old nose are compared to the characterizations for two new nose designs. Slapdown characterizations for the old nose are presented. Incorporation of the test results into a dynamic force specification is discussed.

  7. Determination of the Performance Parameters of a Spectrophotometer: An Advanced Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Virgil W.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an advanced analytical chemistry laboratory experiment developed for the determination of the performance parameters of a spectrophotometer. Among the parameters are the baseline linearity with wavelength, wavelength accuracy and respectability, stray light, noise level and pen response time. (HM)

  8. Elastic Properties of Clay Minerals Determined by Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopycinska-Müller, M.; Prasad, M.; Rabe, U.; Arnold, W.

    Seismic wave propagation in geological formations is altered by the presence of clay minerals. Knowledge about the elastic properties of clay is therefore essential for the interpretation and modeling of the seismic response of clay-bearing formations. However, due to the layered structure of clay, it is very difficult to investigate its elastic properties. We measured elastic properties of clay using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM). The forces applied during the experiments were not higher than 50 nN. The adhesion forces were measured from the pull-off forces and included into our calculations by means of the Derjaguin-Mueller-Toporov model for contact mechanics. The obtained values of the elastic modulus for clay varied from 10 to 17 GPa depending on various parameters that describe the dynamics of a vibrating beam

  9. Method for experimental determination of flutter speed by parameter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1989-01-01

    A method for flight flutter testing is proposed which enables one to determine the flutter dynamic pressure from flights flown far below the flutter dynamic pressure. The method is based on the identification of the coefficients of the equations of motion at low dynamic pressures, followed by the solution of these equations to compute the flutter dynamic pressure. The initial results of simulated data reported in the present work indicate that the method can accurately predict the flutter dynamic pressure, as described. If no insurmountable difficulties arise in the implementation of this method, it may significantly improve the procedures for flight flutter testing.

  10. A method for determining stellar parameters from multicolor photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskij, S. G.

    2012-09-01

    Amethod for determining the most probable spectral types, color excesses E B- V , and distances of stars from multicolor photometry is described. The main idea of the method is modeling the photometric data using various models for the stellar spectra and the interstellar extinction law, and applying the maximum likelihood method. The reliability of the method is estimated using stars with known spectral types and WBVR photometry, based on the empirical library of stellar spectra of Pickles and the model for the interstellar extinction law developed by Fluks et al.

  11. Experimental Determination of Metal Fuel Point Defect Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; McCall, S

    2008-06-03

    Nuclear metallic fuels are one of many options for advanced nuclear fuel cycles because they provide dimensional stability, mechanical integrity, thermal efficiency, and irradiation resistance while the associated pyro-processing is technically relevant to concerns about proliferation and diversion of special nuclear materials. In this presentation we will discuss recent success that we have had in studying isochronal annealing of damage cascades in Pu and Pu(Ga) arising from the self-decay of Pu as well as the annealing characteristics of noninteracting point defect populations produced by ion accelerator irradiation. Comparisons of the annealing properties of these two populations of defects arising from very different source terms are enlightening and point to complex defect and mass transport properties in the plutonium specimens which we are only now starting to understand as a result of many follow-on studies. More importantly however, the success of these measurements points the way to obtaining important mass transport parameters for comparison with theoretical predictions or to use directly in existing and future materials modeling of radiation effects in nuclear metallic fuels. The way forward on such measurements and the requisite theory and modeling will be discussed.

  12. Micro-porous layer stochastic reconstruction and transport parameter determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hannach, Mohamed; Singh, Randhir; Djilali, Ned; Kjeang, Erik

    2015-05-01

    The Micro-Porous Layer (MPL) is a porous, thin layer commonly used in fuel cells at the interfaces between the catalyst layers and gas diffusion media. It is generally made from spherical carbon nanoparticles and PTFE acting as hydrophobic agent. The scale and brittle nature of the MPL structure makes it challenging to study experimentally. In the present work, a 3D stochastic model is developed to virtually reconstruct the MPL structure. The carbon nanoparticle and PTFE phases are fully distinguished by the algorithm. The model is shown to capture the actual structural morphology of the MPL and is validated by comparing the results to available experimental data. The model shows a good capability in generating a realistic MPL successfully using a set of parameters introduced to capture specific morphological features of the MPL. A numerical model that resolves diffusive transport at the pore scale is used to compute the effective transport properties of the reconstructed MPLs. A parametric study is conducted to illustrate the capability of the model as an MPL design tool that can be used to guide and optimize the functionality of the material.

  13. Ground Reaction Forces and Gait Parameters during Motorized and Non-Motorized Treadmill Walking and Runing on the International Space Station Treadmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagan, Ronald Donald; Norcross, Jason; DeWitt, John; Lee, Stuart M.; McCleary, Frank; Edwards, W. Brent

    2006-01-01

    Both motorized (T-M) and non-motorized (T-NM) treadmill locomotion are used on the International Space Station (ISS) as countermeasures to the deleterious effects of prolonged weightlessness. However, the ground reaction forces (GRF) and gait parameters of these exercise modes have not been examined. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in GRF and gait parameters exist while walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) on T-M and T-NM. Dissimilar GRF and gait parameters suggest that T-M and T-NM locomotion may elicit different physiologic effects. T-NM may result in a reduced stimulus to bone formation due to a lower LR, but an increased energy cost as a result of shorter, more frequent strides. Therefore, the usage of each mode should depend upon the desired training stimulus.

  14. Improved Force Field Parameters Lead to a Better Description of RNA Structure.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2015-09-01

    We compare the performance of two different RNA force fields in four water models in simulating the conformational ensembles r(GACC) and r(CCCC). With the increased sampling facilitated by multidimensional replica exchange molecular dynamics (M-REMD), populations are compared to NMR data to evaluate force field reliability. The combination of AMBER ff12 with vdW(bb) modifications and the OPC water model produces results in quantitative agreement with the NMR ensemble that have eluded us to date. PMID:26575892

  15. Determination of the Critical Parameters for Remote Microscope Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, R. C.; Herbach, B. A.; Johnston, J. C.; Bethea, M.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a program to determine the capabilities of Telescience as applied to Microgravity Materials Science the need for a remotely controlled microscope was recognized. For this purpose we equipped a microscope with an X-Y-Z positioning device and motors on the zoom and focus controls. Computer control of these devices allowed remote operation. A standard TV camera was mounted to the computer controlled video board which could compress the image in resolution and grey scale. The operator control console was programmed to display three still video pictures as well as provide command access. A standard data transfer network was used to transmit the video data files and the command interaction was via a high speed phone modem. This system, with the microscope in the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at LeRC and the control at RPI, was used to determine the accuracy of setting, time required to achieve setting and the operator ease factor. It was found that the focus setting could be established well within the resolution limit of the TV system and that each motion took about 50 seconds and approximately 12 minutes was required to reach ?best? focus. These times could be reduced significantly with operator experience. The operators were provided with ancillary equipment which provided assistance in making the necessary decisions and they reported satisfaction with the control.

  16. Experimental determination of visibility modeling parameters for aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Evelyn J.; Maurer, Tana; Murrill, Steven R.; Miller, Brian

    2010-04-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is presently engaged in research to quantify the visibility of aircraft under two important scenarios: aircraft observed directly by human operators in air traffic control towers (ATCT's), and aircraft observed by human operators through unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) sensors viewed through ground-based display systems. Previously, an ATCT visibility analysis software tool (FAA Vis) was developed by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in collaboration with the U.S. Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) and the FAA. This tool predicts the probability of detection, recognition, and identification of various aircraft by human observers as a function of range and ATCT height. More recently, a baseline version of a UAV See-And- Avoid visibility analysis software tool was also developed by ARL, again in collaboration with NVESD and the FAA. Important to the calibration of these tools is the empirical determination of target discrimination difficulty criteria. Consequently, a set of human perception experiments were designed and conducted to empirically determine the target recognition and identification discrimination difficulty criteria for a representative set of aircraft. This paper will report on the results and analyses of those experiments.

  17. The Social Determinants of Health in Military Forces of Iran: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Sanaeinasab, Hormoz; Ghanei, Mostafa; Mehrabi Tavana, Ali; Ravangard, Ramin; Karamali, Mazyar

    2015-01-01

    Providing effective health interventions and achieving equity in health need to apply the community-based approaches such as social determinants of health. In the military organizations, these determinants have received less attention from the military health researchers and policymakers. Therefore, this study aimed to identify and explain the social determinants affecting the health of military forces in Iran. This was a qualitative study which was conducted in 2014. The required data were collected through semistructured interviews and analyzed through Conventional Content Analysis. The studied sample consisted of 22 military health experts, policymakers, and senior managers selected using purposeful sampling method with maximum variation sampling. MAXQDA.2007 was used to analyze the collected data. After analyzing the collected data, two main contents, that is, “general social determinants of health” and “military social determinants of health,” with 22 themes and 90 subthemes were identified as the social determinants of military forces' health. Main themes were religious rule, spirituality promotion policies, international military factors, military command, and so forth. Given the role and importance of social factors determining the military forces' health, it can be recommended that the military organizations should pay more attention to these determinants in making policies and creating social, economic, and cultural structures for their forces. PMID:26379716

  18. Determination of Base Binding Strength and Base Stacking Interaction of DNA Duplex Using Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian-biao; Zhang, Chang-lin; Dong, Zai-li; Guan, Yi-fu

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2 pN and 14.0 ± 0.3 pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1 pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes. PMID:25772017

  19. U Geminorum: A Test Case for Orbital Parameter Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarría, Juan; de la Fuente, Eduardo; Costero, Rafael

    2007-07-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of U Gem was obtained during quiescence. We did not find a hot spot or gas stream around the outer boundaries of the accretion disk. Instead, we detected a strong narrow emission region near the location of the secondary star. We measured the radial velocity curve from the wings of the double-peaked Hα emission line and obtained a semiamplitude value that is in excellent agreement with that obtained from observations in the ultraviolet spectral region by Sion et al. We also present a new method to obtain K2, which enhances the detection of absorption or emission features arising in the late-type companion. Our results are compared with published values derived from the near-infrared Na I line doublet. From a comparison of the TiO band with those of late-type M stars, we find that a best fit is obtained for an M6 V star, contributing 5% of the total light at that spectral region. Assuming that the radial velocity semiamplitudes accurately reflect the motion of the binary components, then from our results Kem=107+/-2 km s-1 and Kabs=310+/-5 km s-1 using the inclination angle given by Zhang & Robinson, i=69.7deg+/-0.7deg, the system parameters become MWD=1.20+/-0.05 Msolar, MRD=0.42+/-0.04 Msolar, and a=1.55+/-0.02 Rsolar. Based on the separation of the double emission peaks, we calculate an outer disk radius of Rout/a~0.61, close to the distance of the inner Lagrangian point L1/a~0.63. Therefore, we suggest that, at the time of observations, the accretion disk was filling the Roche lobe of the primary and the matter leaving the L1 point was colliding with the disk directly, producing the hot spot at this location.

  20. Investigation of multimodal waveguides to determine parameters of covering layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auguściuk, Elżbieta; Zieliński, Jarosław

    2006-02-01

    Investigation of liquid thin layers deposited on multimodal waveguide with gradient - index profile has been presented. Properties of the layers have been studied by the generalized m-line spectroscopy method. Deposited on the planar waveguide thin liquid layers have been investigated on the range refractive index 1.0002 - 1.5300. The profile of refractive index of waveguide has not been deformed because of depositing of the thin layer. Depositing of the thin layer on multimodal planar waveguide has caused the change of coupling angle to the waveguide but proportionately to successive modes of the waveguide structure. This study will be helpful to determine, for instance, illness changes of diabetic patients (sugar level in blood).

  1. New laser technology to determine present weather parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. A.; Sandford, A. P.; Jones, G. E.; Richards, J.; Petzing, J.; Coupland, J. M.

    2006-07-01

    Present weather sensors are becoming increasingly important as a means to augment networks of automated weather stations and extend the capability of manned observations. The classification of hydrometeors is one of the principal tasks that is addressed by present weather sensors. In this paper, we discuss a new laser-based technology for this purpose. The system improves upon current precipitation monitors by using a derivative of phase Doppler anemometry techniques to accurately determine particle speed and size. The instrument is also capable of distinguishing between liquid droplets and solid polycrystalline hydrometeors and can be used to estimate visibility. The incorporation of this technology into a meteorological station with other sensors, such as temperature and relative humidity probes, leads to the accurate classification of particle type. The example data shown are taken from tests in Leicestershire, England and Utah, USA and show the differences between solid and liquid precipitation events.

  2. Gamete quality in fish: evaluation parameters and determining factors.

    PubMed

    Valdebenito, Iván I; Gallegos, Patricia C; Effer, Brian R

    2015-04-01

    The quality of fish gametes, both male and female, are determined by several factors (age, management, feeding, chemical and physical factors, water quality, etc.) that have an impact on the survivability of embryos, larvae and/or fry in the short or long term. One of the most important factors is gamete ageing, especially for those species that are unable to spawn naturally in hatcheries. The chemical and physical factors in hatcheries and the nutrition that they provide can significantly alter harvest quality, especially from females; as a rule, males are more tolerant of stress conditions produced by inadequate feeding, management and/or poor water conditions. The stress produced on broodstock by inadequate conditions in hatcheries can produce adverse effects on gamete quality, survival rates, and the embryonic eggs after hatching. PMID:24229714

  3. Determining the shear angle, forces, and sizes of shearing elements during metal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovrizhnykh, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    A new solution for the shear angle is proposed which is a generalization of the solution Lee-Shaffer solution and allows the determination of the cutting force and the shearing-element size. Merchant’s experimental data are processed taking into account the resistance force at the cutting edge, and it is shown that accounting for this force leads to the need to increase the internal friction angle in the calculated dependences in order to match theory with experiment. It is shown that the obtained theoretical results agree well with experimental results.

  4. Cross-bridge dependent cooperativity determines the cardiac force-length relationship.

    PubMed

    Levy, Carmit; Landesberg, Amir

    2006-05-01

    Opinions vary as to whether the dominant cooperativity mechanism, modulating the cardiac force-length-calcium relationships, depends on sarcomere length (SL), force, or calcium. We hypothesize that separately characterizing the dependence of the delay in the force response to length oscillations on SL, force and calcium allows testing these hypotheses; Oscillations imposed at the same SL, utilizing various calcium concentrations, entail similar delay if the cooperativity is exclusively length dependent. Oscillations at constant tetanic force, utilizing various SLs and calcium levels, entail similar delay when the cooperativity is exclusively force dependent. Force responses to large (102 +/- 13 nm/sarcomere) oscillations, at different SLs, extracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](o)s) and force, were studied in intact tetanized trabeculae, dissected from rats' right ventricles (N = 11). Tetanii (3.5 s) were obtained by utilizing cyclopiazonic acid (K-H, 25 degrees C). SL was measured by laser diffraction. Force responses to length oscillations lagged behind the length oscillations at short SL and low [Ca(2+)](o), yielding counterclockwise hystereses in the force-length plane: the force was higher during shortening than during lengthening. The area within the counterclockwise hysteresis represents the external work that originates from XB recruitment, and it increases as the phase delay increases. The phase decreases by 25.7 +/- 17.0 degrees for 0.1 microm sarcomere lengthening, at constant [Ca(2+)](o) (e.g. 45 +/- 9 degrees and 22 +/- 13 degrees for SL=1.89 +/- 0.01 and 1.99 +/- 0.01 microm, respectively, [Ca(2+)](o) = 3 mM). The phase decrease by 15 +/- 5.7 degrees for an increase of 1.5 mM in [Ca(2+)](o), at constant SL. However, maintaining the same force with different pairs of [Ca(2+)](o) and SL yields identical phase. The direct dependence of the phase on force indicates that XB recruitment is determined directly by the force and only indirectly by SL

  5. Practical implementation of the corrected force analysis technique to identify the structural parameter and load distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclère, Quentin; Ablitzer, Frédéric; Pézerat, Charles

    2015-09-01

    The paper aims to combine two objectives of the Force Analysis Technique (FAT): vibration source identification and material characterization from the same set of measurement. Initially, the FAT was developed for external load location and identification. It consists in injecting measured vibration displacements in the discretized equation of motion. Two developments exist: FAT and CFAT (Corrected Force Analysis Technique) where two finite difference schemes are used. Recently, the FAT was adapted for the identification of elastic and damping properties in a structure. The principal interests are that the identification is local and allows mapping of material characteristics, the identification can be made at all frequencies, especially in medium and high frequency domains. The paper recalls the development of FAT and CFAT on beams and plates and how it can be possible to extract material characteristics in areas where no external loads are applied. Experimental validations are shown on an aluminum plate with arbitrary boundary conditions, excited by a point force and where a piece of foam is glued on a sub-surface of the plate. Contactless measurements were made using a scanning laser vibrometer. The results of FAT and CFAT are compared and discussed for material property identifications in the regions with and without foam. The excitation force identification is finally made by using the identified material properties. CFAT gives excellent results comparable to a direct measurement obtained by a piezoelectric sensor. The relevance of the corrected scheme is then underlined for both source identification and material characterization from the same measurements.

  6. A finite element technique for accurate determination of interfacial adhesion force in MEMS using electrostatic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavezipur, M.; Li, G. H.; Laboriante, I.; Gou, W. J.; Carraro, C.; Maboudian, R.

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports on accurate analysis of adhesion force between polysilicon-polysilicon surfaces in micro-/nanoelectromechanical systems (M/NEMS). The measurement is carried out using double-clamped beams. Electrostatic actuation and structural restoring force are exploited to respectively initiate and terminate the contact between the two surfaces under investigation. The adhesion force is obtained by balancing the electrostatic and mechanical forces acting on the beam just before the separation of the two surfaces. Different finite element models are developed to simulate the coupled-field multiphysics problem. The effects of fringing field in the electrostatic domain and geometric nonlinearity and residual stress in the structural domain are taken into consideration. Moreover, the beam stiffness is directly obtained for the case of combined loading (electrostatic and adhesion). Therefore, the overall electrostatic and structural forces used to extract the actual adhesion force from measured data are determined with high accuracy leading to accurate values for the adhesion force. The finite element simulations presented in this paper are not limited to adhesion force measurement and can be used to design or characterize electrostatically actuated devices such as MEM tunable capacitors and micromirrors, RF switches and M/NEM relays.

  7. Actomyosin Cortical Mechanical Properties in Nonadherent Cells Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X; Logue, Jeremy S; Waterman, Clare M; Chadwick, Richard S

    2016-06-01

    The organization of filamentous actin and myosin II molecular motor contractility is known to modify the mechanical properties of the cell cortical actomyosin cytoskeleton. Here we describe a novel method, to our knowledge, for using force spectroscopy approach curves with tipless cantilevers to determine the actomyosin cortical tension, elastic modulus, and intracellular pressure of nonadherent cells. We validated the method by measuring the surface tension of water in oil microdrops deposited on a glass surface. We extracted an average tension of T ∼ 20.25 nN/μm, which agrees with macroscopic experimental methods. We then measured cortical mechanical properties in nonadherent human foreskin fibroblasts and THP-1 human monocytes before and after pharmacological perturbations of actomyosin activity. Our results show that myosin II activity and actin polymerization increase cortex tension and intracellular pressure, whereas branched actin networks decreased them. Interestingly, myosin II activity stiffens the cortex and branched actin networks soften it, but actin polymerization has no effect on cortex stiffness. Our method is capable of detecting changes in cell mechanical properties in response to perturbations of the cytoskeleton, allowing characterization with physically relevant parameters. Altogether, this simple method should be of broad application for deciphering the molecular regulation of cell cortical mechanical properties. PMID:27276270

  8. Determining photon energy absorption parameters for different soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Kucuk, Nil; Tumsavas, Zeynal; Cakir, Merve

    2013-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μs) for five different soil samples were measured at 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The soil samples were separately irradiated with 137Cs and 60Co (370 kBq) radioactive point gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″ × 2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, which had an energy resolution of 7% at 0.662 MeV for the gamma-rays from the decay of 137Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and the effective electron densities (Neff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μs values for the soil samples. Furthermore, the Zeff and Neff values of the soil samples were computed for the total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region ranging from 1 keV to 15 MeV. The experimental values of the soils were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. Sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils demonstrated poor photon energy absorption characteristics. However, clay loam and clay soils had good photon energy absorption characteristics. PMID:23179375

  9. Determining photon energy absorption parameters for different soil samples.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Tumsavas, Zeynal; Cakir, Merve

    2013-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μs) for five different soil samples were measured at 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The soil samples were separately irradiated with (137)Cs and (60)Co (370 kBq) radioactive point gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″ × 2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, which had an energy resolution of 7% at 0.662 MeV for the gamma-rays from the decay of (137)Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and the effective electron densities (Neff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μs values for the soil samples. Furthermore, the Zeff and Neff values of the soil samples were computed for the total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region ranging from 1 keV to 15 MeV. The experimental values of the soils were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. Sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils demonstrated poor photon energy absorption characteristics. However, clay loam and clay soils had good photon energy absorption characteristics. PMID:23179375

  10. STEP and STEPSPL: Computer programs for aerodynamic model structure determination and parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    The successful parametric modeling of the aerodynamics for an airplane operating at high angles of attack or sideslip is performed in two phases. First the aerodynamic model structure must be determined and second the associated aerodynamic parameters (stability and control derivatives) must be estimated for that model. The purpose of this paper is to document two versions of a stepwise regression computer program which were developed for the determination of airplane aerodynamic model structure and to provide two examples of their use on computer generated data. References are provided for the application of the programs to real flight data. The two computer programs that are the subject of this report, STEP and STEPSPL, are written in FORTRAN IV (ANSI l966) compatible with a CDC FTN4 compiler. Both programs are adaptations of a standard forward stepwise regression algorithm. The purpose of the adaptation is to facilitate the selection of a adequate mathematical model of the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients of an airplane from flight test data. The major difference between STEP and STEPSPL is in the basis for the model. The basis for the model in STEP is the standard polynomial Taylor's series expansion of the aerodynamic function about some steady-state trim condition. Program STEPSPL utilizes a set of spline basis functions.