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Sample records for foreign body injection

  1. Foreign body granulomas due to injectable aesthetic microimplants.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, C M; Soyer, H P; Schuller-Petrovic, S; Kerl, H

    1999-01-01

    We present two types of "new" foreign body granulomas caused by the injectable aesthetic microimplants Bioplastique and Artecoll. We report the clinical and histopathologic findings in five patients who had undergone treatment of mainly facial contour abnormalities with one of these implants. All patients were women, and the mean age was 45 years (age range 24-72 years). Two patients presented after treatment with Bioplastique; in three patients, augmentation was achieved by using Artecoll. Unsatisfactory cosmetic effects led to excision of the implants in four patients; in one patient, parts of the implant were excised during another cosmetic intervention. Subsequent histopathologic examination showed features of foreign body granulomas with distinctive cystic spaces. The clue to the diagnosis is the particular configuration of these cystic spaces and the characteristic shape of the foreign bodies. Bioplastique granuloma presents with irregularly shaped cystic spaces of varying size containing jagged, translucent, nonbirefringent foreign bodies whereas Artecoll granuloma shows numerous round vacuoles nearly identical in size and shape enclosing round and sharply circumscribed, translucent, nonbirefringent foreign bodies. These specific histopathologic findings unequivocally allow the correct diagnosis in spite of sparse clinical information. PMID:9888711

  2. Penis swelling due to foreign body reaction after injection of silicone.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Tobias; Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2010-09-01

    A 19-year-old man presented with phimosis and painful swelling of the penis four weeks after augmentation with silicone in Thailand. Histology revealed a foreign body reaction to silicone. Infectious causes were ruled out. Granulomatous foreign body reactions to silicone are common, but there are few case reports on reactions following silicone injection for penis enlargement. Foreign body reactions should be included in the differential diagnosis of penis swelling. PMID:20337774

  3. Foreign Body Granulomas.

    PubMed

    Molina-Ruiz, Ana M; Requena, Luis

    2015-07-01

    A large list of foreign substances may penetrate the skin and induce a foreign body granulomatous reaction. These particles can enter the skin by voluntary reasons or be caused by accidental inclusion of external substances secondary to cutaneous trauma. In these cases, foreign body granulomas are formed around such disparate substances as starch, cactus bristles, wood splinters, suture material, pencil lead, artificial hair, or insect mouthparts. The purpose of this article is to update dermatologists, pathologists, and other physicians on the most recent etiopathogenesis, clinical presentations, systemic associations, evaluation, and evidence-based management concerning foreign body granulomatous reactions of skin. PMID:26143429

  4. Unusual bronchial foreign body.

    PubMed

    Kuba, Paresh Kumar; Sharma, Jasvinder; Sharma, Ashok Kumar

    2015-11-01

    We present an unusual case of bronchial foreign body in an adult who presented with bronchiectasis more than two decades later. The patient was unaware of his accidental aspiration of the foreign body, and the final diagnosis was made intraoperatively. PMID:26113734

  5. Foreign body pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Rief, Peter; Belaj, Klara; Smaczny, Nicole; Augustin, Michael; Eller, Philipp; Brodmann, Marianne; Pilger, Ernst

    2013-06-01

    We report a case of a foreign body embolism caused by a tip of an explanted port-a-cath system. The embolus could be removed with a gooseneck snare catheter, the patient fully recovered. PMID:23765525

  6. [Colorectal foreign bodies].

    PubMed

    Thim, Troels; Laurberg, Søren

    2006-09-25

    A patient with a retained anally introduced colorectal foreign body or complications hereof needs appropriate treatment. The patient may be in danger and is certainly in discomfort. The problem is relatively rare; however, its incidence may be expected to increase. Guidelines for handling of the situation are lacking in many textbooks. Here, a suggestion for handling of a patient with a retained colorectal foreign body or complications hereof is presented. PMID:17032594

  7. [Foreign body stories].

    PubMed

    Stenz, Volker; Thurnheer, Robert; Widmer, Fritz; Krause, Martin

    2008-12-01

    Gastrointestinal and bronchial foreign bodies may cause significant clinical complications with a high degree of morbidity. In adults, a large variety of foreign bodies are accidentally or intentionally ingested, inserted or aspirated. In the majority of cases, the objects are expelled conservatively by coughing, vomiting or bowel movements. The risk for obstruction, perforation and penetration depends upon the type of object, those with sharp edges or tips having the highest risk. In these situations, the objects have to be removed by an endoscopic or an operative intervention. We present four foreign body stories including a young lady who swallowed a pen during sleep, a farmer who inserted a corncob into the rectum because of intractable diarrhoea, an elderly gentleman who aspirated a dental bridge while laughing and a cocain body packer who was caught at the border. Back ground, complications and removal procedures of the four cases are discussed. PMID:19048523

  8. Longstanding Endobronchial Foreign Body

    PubMed Central

    Trisolini, R.; Dore, R.; Bertolini, R.; Pasturenzi, L.; Catania, A. Fede; Gualtieri, G.; Torre, M.

    1999-01-01

    There are many circumstances in which the diagnosis of endobronchial inhalation of a foreign body (FB) can be missed. Generally, in such cases, within weeks or at most months from the event, clinical bronchopulmonary symptoms develop which allow a correct diagnosis to be made and significant complications to be avoided. We report the case of a patient in whom an endobronchial FB remained undiagnosed, because of lack of symptoms, for almost three years, and then caused signifiicant complications before being identified and removed. Problems related to diagnosis and therapy are discussed. PMID:18493510

  9. Foreign body ingestion in children

    PubMed Central

    Dereci, Selim; Koca, Tuğba; Serdaroğlu, Filiz; Akçam, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Foreign bodies ingested by the oral route enter into the gastrointestinal tract and are considered a significant health problem in the childhood. In this study, we evaluated the pediatric patients who presented to our hospital with the complaint of ingestion of foreign body. Material and Methods: The hospital records of all children who presented to our clinic because of ingestion of foreign body between January 2008 and January 2015 were examined retrospectively. The complaints at admission, the types of foreign bodies ingested, the localization of the foreign body in the gastrointestinal tract and the approaches and treatment methods used were examined. Results: Thirty-six (56%) of 64 patients included in the study were male and 28 (44%) were female and the mean age was 5.7±4.6 years (10 months–17 years). Thirty eight (59%) of 64 children who were included in the assessment were below the age of five years. The most common complaint at presentation was parental recognition of the ingested object and dysphagia. The most commonly ingested foreign bodies included coins, sewing pins, safety pins and hairclips. Nail clipper detected in the stomach, sewing pin which penetrated through the duodenal wall and stuck to hepatic parenchyma were the first pediatric cases in the literature. Upper esophagus was the most common location for foreign bodies. Endoscopic examinations were performed in 55 of 64 children. Conclusions: Early detection and treatment of ingested foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal system is important in terms of preventing possible complications. In our study, the most frequent foreign bodies detected in the upper digestive tract were coins and they were most frequently detected in the upper esophagus. Most of our patients were below the age of five years. Flexible endoscopic method was used commonly for treatment. PMID:26884693

  10. FOREIGN BODY REACTION TO BIOMATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James M.; Rodriguez, Analiz; Chang, David T.

    2008-01-01

    The foreign body reaction composed of macrophages and foreign body giant cells is the end-stage response of the inflammatory and wound healing responses following implantation of a medical device, prosthesis, or biomaterial. A brief, focused overview of events leading to the foreign body reaction is presented. The major focus of this review is on factors that modulate the interaction of macrophages and foreign body giant cells on synthetic surfaces where the chemical, physical, and morphological characteristics of the synthetic surface are considered to play a role in modulating cellular events. These events in the foreign body reaction include protein adsorption, monocyte/macrophage adhesion, macrophage fusion to form foreign body giant cells, consequences of the foreign body response on biomaterials, and cross-talk between macrophages/foreign body giant cells and inflammatory/wound healing cells. Biomaterial surface properties play an important role in modulating the foreign body reaction in the first two to four weeks following implantation of a medical device, even though the foreign body reaction at the tissue/material interface is present for the in vivo lifetime of the medical device. An understanding of the foreign body reaction is important as the foreign body reaction may impact the biocompatibility (safety) of the medical device, prosthesis, or implanted biomaterial and may significantly impact short- and long-term tissue responses with tissue-engineered constructs containing proteins, cells, and other biological components for use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Our perspective has been on the inflammatory and wound healing response to implanted materials, devices, and tissue-engineered constructs. The incorporation of biological components of allogeneic or xenogeneic origin as well as stem cells into tissue-engineered or regenerative approaches opens up a myriad of other challenges. An in depth understanding of how the immune system

  11. Uncommon, undeclared oesophageal foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Akenroye, M I; Osukoya, A T

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of unusual and undeclared oesophageal foreign bodies. A small double-rounded calabash or bottle gourd Lagenaria siceraria, stuffed with traditional medicine designed to acquire spiritual power. A whole tricotyledonous kola nut Cola nitida also designed to make medicine to gain love from a woman after passing it out in stool. Each case presented with a sudden onset of total dysphagia and history of ingestion of foreign bodies was not volunteered by any despite direct questioning. Plain radiograph of the neck and chest in either case did not reveal presence of foreign body. Both were successfully removed through rigid oesophagoscopy. PMID:22718184

  12. Management of rectal foreign bodies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Entrapped anorectal foreign bodies are being encountered more frequently in clinical practice. Although entrapped foreign bodies are most often related to sexual behavior, they can also result from ingestion or sexual assault. Methods Between 1999 and 2009, 15 patients with foreign bodies in the rectum were diagnosed and treated, at Izmir Training and Research Hospital, in Izmir. Information regarding the foreign body, clinical presentation, treatment strategies, and outcomes were documented. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of these unusual patients. Results All patients were males, and their mean age was 48 years (range, 33–68 years). The objects in the rectum of these 15 patients were an impulse body spray can (4 patients), a bottle (4 patients), a dildo (2 patient), an eggplant (1 patient), a brush (1 patient), a tea glass (1 patient), a ball point pen (1 patient) and a wishbone (1 patient, after oral ingestion). Twelve objects were removed transanally by anal dilatation under general anesthesia. Three patients required laparotomy. Routine rectosigmoidoscopic examination was performed after removal. One patient had perforation of the rectosigmoid and 4 had lacerations of the mucosa. None of the patients died. Conclusions Foreign bodies in the rectum should be managed in a well-organized manner. The diagnosis is confirmed by plain abdominal radiographs and rectal examination. Manual extraction without anaesthesia is only possible for very low-lying objects. Patients with high- lying foreign bodies generally require general anaesthesia to achieve complete relaxation of the anal sphincters to facilitate extraction. Open surgery should be reserved only for patients with perforation, peritonitis, or impaction of the foreign body. PMID:23497492

  13. Foreign Body Retrieval

    MedlinePlus

    ... body is an outside object like a splinter, rock or piece of metal or glass that gets ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  14. Foreign body in the nose

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as marbles), crayon pieces, erasers, paper wads, cotton, and beads. A foreign body in a child's ... DO NOT search the nose with cotton swabs or other tools. This may push the object further into the nose. DO NOT use tweezers or other tools to remove ...

  15. Acute appendicitis caused by foreign body ingestion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Heung; Lee, Dae Sup; Kim, Kwang Min

    2015-09-01

    Foreign bodies usually do not cause complications and pass through the gastrointestinal tract spontaneously. Usually endoscopic intervention is recommended within 24 hours. Cases of acute appendicitis caused by foreign bodies are very rare. In our case, we experienced successful endoscopic and surgical treatment of a patient with ingestion of razor blade and some unrecognizable foreign bodies. A 22-year-old soldier was admitted with a small quantity of hematemesis and epigastric pain. We performed emergent endoscopy and successfully removed several foreign bodies. After 17 days, we performed appendectomy to remove the remaining foreign body and to relieve the symptoms. There is no doubt that endoscopic intervention is definitely useful method to remove foreign bodies. If there is no spontaneous drainage of the foreign body from the appendix, an appendectomy must be considered to remove the foreign body and prevent surgical complications such as appendicitis, periappendiceal abscess, and perforation. PMID:26366386

  16. Treatment of intracranial foreign body.

    PubMed

    Karadas, Sevdegul; Dursun, Recep; Kiymaz, Nejmi

    2014-07-01

    Craniospinal penetrating foreign body (FB) injuries are interesting, but rarely observed, cases. They are important in terms of the complications that they may cause. The etiologies of craniospinal penetrating injuries and intracranial FB are also different. Though a sewing needle is more rarely seen in an intracranial FB, it may occur as atttempted infanticide or as a result of an accident especially in early childhood before the closure of fontanels. We detected an intracranial sewing needle in the head radiograph of a case admitted to the emergency department for another reason. We present this case since this is a rare injury and the etiologies of craniospinal penetrating foreign body have different characteristics. PMID:25255596

  17. Ingested and Aspirated Foreign Bodies.

    PubMed

    Green, S Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Esophageal and aspirated foreign bodies have important clinical significance, and both should be considered carefully when the history or physical examination findings raise sufficient suspicion. The published evidence regarding the diagnosis and management of foreign body ingestion or aspiration is weighted disproportionately with observational studies, case controls, expert opinion, and systematic reviews. Most of the publications would receive a categorization of C (observational studies including case-control and cohort design) and D (expert opinion, case reports, and clinical reasoning). One of the few prospective studies examining the diagnostic evaluation of foreign body aspiration in children could be considered level B evidence (randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews, or diagnostic studies with minor limitations). This study found that the medical history is the most important predictive part of the evaluation. There is evidence for considering bronchoscopy if there is significant history suggestive of foreign body aspiration, even in the setting of normal physical examination findings. (28). Most ingested foreign bodies spontaneously pass without incident. However, special attention should be paid to objects in the esophagus as well as to batteries and magnets. Based on a systematic review of the literature (level B evidence) and the potential for rapid and life-threatening damage, batteries in the esophagus should be removed immediately. (10) Other objects, such as coins, may be observed for passage in an asymptomatic patient. In addition, given the high risk of significant complications, ingestion of high-powered magnets should be quickly and carefully evaluated. Although single magnets are likely to pass without complication, multiple magnets or magnets ingested with other metal objects can cause significant damage and should be removed if there is any concern for mural entrapment, bowel perforation, or failure to progress. (10

  18. Not simply a foreign body

    SciTech Connect

    Foltan, R.; Hlousek, M.; Dundr, P.; Skalicky, M.; Hejnak, V.

    2008-02-15

    The presence of foreign biological substances in the human body can lead to violent immune reactions. This is the report of a very rare case involving not only the presence of a biological substance, but also a symbiotic relationship between a living plant (the common wheat grain, Triticum aestivum L.) and the human body. Black coal particles and one cereal grain were removed from the subgalea of the right parietal region of a 35-year-old man who had sustained injuries in a motor vehicle accident 16 days earlier. There were signs of germination of the grain, but no macroscopic or microscopic evidence of an inflammatory reaction. Grain germination was verified microscopically. There are various explanations for the absence of an immune reaction, but only coal-tar-induced immunosuppression can explain the observed phenomenon.

  19. Oroesophageal Fish Bone Foreign Body.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Up

    2016-07-01

    Fish bone foreign body (FFB) is the most frequent food-associated foreign body (FB) in adults, especially in Asia, versus meat in Western countries. The esophageal sphincter is the most common lodging site. Esophageal FB disease tends to occur more frequently in men than in women. The first diagnostic method is laryngoscopic examination. Because simple radiography of the neck has low sensitivity, if perforation or severe complications requiring surgery are expected, computed tomography should be used. The risk factors associated with poor prognosis are long time lapse after FB involvement, bone type, and longer FB (>3 cm). Bleeding and perforation are more common in FFB disease than in other FB diseases. Esophageal FB disease requires urgent treatment within 24 hours. However, FFB disease needs emergent treatment, preferably within 2 hours, and definitely within 6 hours. Esophageal FFB disease usually occurs at the physiological stricture of the esophagus. The aortic arch eminence is the second physiological stricture. If the FB penetrates the esophageal wall, a life-threatening aortoesophageal fistula can develop. Therefore, it is better to consult a thoracic surgeon prior to endoscopic removal. PMID:27461891

  20. Oroesophageal Fish Bone Foreign Body

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Up

    2016-01-01

    Fish bone foreign body (FFB) is the most frequent food-associated foreign body (FB) in adults, especially in Asia, versus meat in Western countries. The esophageal sphincter is the most common lodging site. Esophageal FB disease tends to occur more frequently in men than in women. The first diagnostic method is laryngoscopic examination. Because simple radiography of the neck has low sensitivity, if perforation or severe complications requiring surgery are expected, computed tomography should be used. The risk factors associated with poor prognosis are long time lapse after FB involvement, bone type, and longer FB (>3 cm). Bleeding and perforation are more common in FFB disease than in other FB diseases. Esophageal FB disease requires urgent treatment within 24 hours. However, FFB disease needs emergent treatment, preferably within 2 hours, and definitely within 6 hours. Esophageal FFB disease usually occurs at the physiological stricture of the esophagus. The aortic arch eminence is the second physiological stricture. If the FB penetrates the esophageal wall, a life-threatening aortoesophageal fistula can develop. Therefore, it is better to consult a thoracic surgeon prior to endoscopic removal. PMID:27461891

  1. Optoacoustic spectroscopic imaging of radiolucent foreign bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Leland; Maswadi, Saher; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2010-03-01

    One of the leading causes of medical malpractice claims in emergency medicine is the misdiagnosis of the presence of foreign bodies. Radiolucent foreign bodies are especially difficult to differentiate from surrounding soft tissue, gas, and bone. Current imaging modalities employed for the detection of foreign bodies include: X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound; however, there is no consensus as to which modality is optimal for diagnosis. Because many radiolucent foreign bodies have sufficient contrast for imaging in the optical domain, we are exploring the use of laser-induced optoacoustic imaging for the detection of foreign bodies, especially in craniofacial injuries, in which the foreign bodies are likely to lie within the penetration depth of visible and near infrared wavelengths. Tissue-simulating phantoms containing various common foreign bodies have been constructed. Images of these phantoms have been successfully generated using two laser-based optoacoustic imaging methods with different detection modalities. In order to enhance the image contrast, common foreign bodies are being scanned over a wide range of wavelengths to obtain the spectroscopic properties of the materials commonly associated with these foreign bodies. This spectroscopic characterization will help select specific wavelengths to be used for imaging specific objects and provide useful diagnostic data about the material properties of the object.

  2. Foreign Body in Left Main Bronchus.

    PubMed

    Dhadke, Shubhangi V; Chaudhari, Amit L; Deshpande, Neelima S; Dhadke, Vithal N; Sangle, Shashikala A

    2015-07-01

    Tracheobronchial foreign body (TFB) aspiration is rare in adults, although incidence rates increases with advancing age. We report a case of foreign body in left main bronchus in an adult female who had no risk factor. She was successfully treated with removal of betel nuts by bronchoscopy. Unusual presentation and high index of suspicion can help in proper management. PMID:26731835

  3. Perforated appendicitis caused by foreign body ingestion.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seong Kyu; Bae, Ok Suk; Hwang, Ilseon

    2012-04-01

    Most ingested foreign bodies pass through the gastrointestinal tract without any incident. However, foreign bodies lodged in the appendix can cause an inflammatory reaction with or without perforation. Here, we present a case of a 54-year-old woman with perforated appendicitis who consumed wild game containing a shot pellet. Five months before admission, she had eaten the meat of a pheasant that had been shot with a shotgun. Abdominal computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis of perforated appendicitis with abscess due to a foreign body. Subsequently, a laparoscopic appendectomy was performed. Follow-up radiographs obtained after the surgery did not identify the foreign body. Histolopathologic examination confirmed appendiceal perforation with focal inflammation secondary to a foreign body. PMID:22487649

  4. Aspirated tracheobronchial foreign bodies: a Jordanian experience.

    PubMed

    Mahafza, Tareq; Khader, Yousef

    2007-02-01

    We conducted a descriptive study of 524 patients who had been suspected of having aspirated a foreign body and who had been evaluated at one of two major hospitals in Jordan from January 1993 through December 2003. A tracheobronchial foreign body was found in 386 of these patients (73.7%). Most of them (66.8%) were younger than 2 years, and the male-to-female ratio was 3 to 2. The mean duration between aspiration and diagnosis was 48 hours. The most common presenting symptoms were cough (90.4% of foreign-body-positive patients), diminished air entry (66.8%), and dyspnea (65.0%). The most frequently aspirated objects were seeds (35.4%), particularly watermelon seeds, nuts (26.8%), and vegetables (25.3%). The most common site of foreign-body impaction was the right bronchus (60.9%). Rigid bronchoscopy was used to remove the foreign body in all cases. The complication rate was 3.4%. Our experience with aspirated tracheobronchial foreign bodies in Jordan was not substantially different from that reported in other countries. The only difference was that the most frequently aspirated foreign body in our study was seeds. PMID:17385621

  5. Neglected foreign body aspiration mimicking bronchial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Afghani, Reza; Khandashpour Ghomi, Mahmoud; Khandoozi, Seyed Reza; Yari, Behrouz

    2016-07-01

    Foreign body aspiration can occur in any age group, but it is more commonly seen in children. In adults, there is usually a predisposing condition that poses a risk of aspiration. If aspiration occurs, prompt diagnosis and extraction of the foreign body is needed to prevent early and late complications. We report a rare case of neglected foreign body aspiration in a 45-year-old schizophrenic opium addicted patient, which resulted in an occlusive lesion in the bronchus, mimicking bronchial carcinoma. PMID:27273232

  6. Techniques for Intravascular Foreign Body Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Woodhouse, Joe B.; Uberoi, Raman

    2013-08-01

    As endovascular therapies increase in frequency, the incidence of lost or embolized foreign bodies is increasing. The presence of an intravascular foreign body (IFB) is well recognized to have the potential to cause serious complications. IFB can embolize and impact critical sites such as the heart, with subsequent significant morbidity or mortality. Intravascular foreign bodies most commonly result from embolized central line fragments, but they can originate from many sources, both iatrogenic and noniatrogenic. The percutaneous approach in removing an IFB is widely perceived as the best way to retrieve endovascular foreign bodies. This minimally invasive approach has a high success rate with a low associated morbidity, and it avoids the complications related to open surgical approaches. We examined the characteristics, causes, and incidence of endovascular embolizations and reviewed the various described techniques that have been used to facilitate subsequent explantation of such materials.

  7. [A morbidity study of intraocular foreign bodies].

    PubMed

    Mocanu, C; Bădescu, S

    1993-01-01

    190 patients presenting intraocular foreign bodies, hospitalized between 1981-1991, are examined. The study of accidents: cases showed a clear prevalence of work accidents--127 cases (66.84%); 86 of these cases occurred in industry (45.26%), the rest of 41 occurred in agriculture (21.58%). The professions most exposed to such accidents are those of locksmith, mechanic in agriculture or automobile industry. The postsurgical evolution and the incidence of complications show that intraocular foreign bodies are wosse-making factors of ocular plagues, because of anatomical structures disorganization, transparency modifications and infectious complications implied, which determined the diminishing of visual acuity in 88.08% of cases. The big percentage of work accidents in the etiology of intraocular foreign bodies emphasize the great importance of foreign the work-protection rules (regarding a especially the wearing of protection glasses) and of introducing of automation in technological processes involving great risks. PMID:8507606

  8. Foreign body in the nose

    MedlinePlus

    Something stuck in the nose; Objects in the nose ... Curious young children may insert small objects into their nose in a normal attempt to explore their own bodies. Potential objects placed in the nose may include food, seeds, ...

  9. Foreign body embedded in anterior chamber angle.

    PubMed

    Graffi, Shmuel; Tiosano, Beatrice; Ben Cnaan, Ran; Bahir, Jonathan; Naftali, Modi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. We present a case of a metallic foreign body embedded in the anterior chamber angle. After standing in close proximity to a construction worker breaking a tile, a 26-year-old woman using soft contact lens for the correction of mild myopia presented to emergency department for evaluation of a foreign body sensation of her right eye. Methods and Results. Diagnosis was confirmed by gonioscopic examination and a noncontrast CT scan of head and orbits. The foreign body was removed by an external approach without utilizing a magnet. The patient's final outcome was favorable. Discussion. The above is a rare clinical situation, which is impossible to detect on slit-lamp examination without a gonioscopic view. Proper imaging and a specific management are mandatory in order to achieve favorable outcome. PMID:23091762

  10. Foreign Body Synovitis in the Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Rodger; Roberts, Jefferson

    2014-01-01

    Foreign body synovitis in the Pacific region typically involves a penetrating injury to a joint. The introduced biomaterial produces an inflammatory reaction or innoculates the tissue with bacteria, creating an infection. Each year millions of people visit the Hawaiian Islands to hike, surf, snorkel, and participate in other outdoor activities, creating an array of interactions between people and nature. The two most commonly reported penetrating foreign body joint injuries are sea urchin synovitis and synovitis due to implantation of organic material such as wood splinters or plant thorns. In this article we describe the presentation, infectious profile, and treatment of these joint injuries. PMID:25478302

  11. Foreign body synovitis in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Caleb; Stitt, Rodger; Roberts, Jefferson

    2014-11-01

    Foreign body synovitis in the Pacific region typically involves a penetrating injury to a joint. The introduced biomaterial produces an inflammatory reaction or innoculates the tissue with bacteria, creating an infection. Each year millions of people visit the Hawaiian Islands to hike, surf, snorkel, and participate in other outdoor activities, creating an array of interactions between people and nature. The two most commonly reported penetrating foreign body joint injuries are sea urchin synovitis and synovitis due to implantation of organic material such as wood splinters or plant thorns. In this article we describe the presentation, infectious profile, and treatment of these joint injuries. PMID:25478302

  12. [Intraorbital wood foreign body: a case study].

    PubMed

    Karim, A; Taha, I; Tachfouti, S; Benzakour, H; Bencherif, Z; Cherkaoui, O; Mohcine, Z; Daoudi, R

    2006-12-01

    A 12-year-old child had left orbital trauma by wood. He consulted 4 months after for orbital cellulitis with cutaneous fistula. The CT scan showed the presence of a left orbital wood foreign body extended to the homolateral cavernous sinus and intracranial. Extraction of the wood fragment associated with an adapted antibiotic treatment led to clinical improvement without visual recovery. A situation of orbital trauma and secondary orbital inflammatory syndrome must raise the suspicion of a foreign body of the orbit and motivate emergency imaging for optimal management of the disorder. PMID:17211317

  13. Foreign Body Reaction to Subcutaneous Implants.

    PubMed

    Kastellorizios, Michail; Tipnis, Namita; Burgess, Diane J

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneously implanted materials trigger the host's innate immune system, resulting in the foreign body reaction. This reaction consists of protein adsorption on the implant surface, inflammatory cell infiltration, macrophage fusion into foreign body giant cells, fibroblast activation and ultimately fibrous encapsulation. This series of events may affect the function of subcutaneous implants, such as inhibition of drug diffusion from long-acting drug delivery depots and medical device failure. The foreign body reaction is a complex phenomenon and is not yet fully understood; ongoing research studies aim to elucidate the cellular and molecular dynamics involved. Recent studies have revealed information about the specific role of macrophages and their differential activation towards pro- and anti-inflammatory states, as well as species differences in the timing of collagen deposition and fibrosis. Understanding of the diverse processes involved in the foreign body reaction has led to multiple approaches towards its negation. Delivery of tissue response modifiers, such as corticosteroids, NSAIDs, antifibrotic agents, and siRNAs, has been used to prevent or minimize fibrosis. Of these, delivery of dexamethasone throughout the implantation period is the most common method to prevent inflammation and fibrosis. More recent approaches employ surface modifications to minimize protein adsorption to 'ultra-low' levels and reduce fibrosis. However, the diverse nature of the processes involved in the foreign body reaction favor the use of corticosteroids due to their wide spectrum action compared to other approaches. To date, combination approaches, such as hydrophilic coatings that reduce protein adsorption combined with delivery of dexamethasone are the most effective. PMID:26306445

  14. Microsphere size influences the foreign body reaction.

    PubMed

    Zandstra, J; Hiemstra, C; Petersen, A H; Zuidema, J; van Beuge, M M; Rodriguez, S; Lathuile, A A; Veldhuis, G J; Steendam, R; Bank, R A; Popa, E R

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable poly-(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres (MSP) are attractive candidate vehicles for site-specific or systemic sustained release of therapeutic compounds. This release may be altered by the host's foreign body reaction (FBR), which is dependent on the characteristics of the implant, e.g. chemistry, shape or size. In this study, we focused on the characterisation of the influence of MSP size on the FBR. To this end we injected monodisperse MSP of defined size (small 5.8 µm, coefficient of variance (CV) 14 % and large 29.8 µm, CV 4 %) and polydisperse MSP (average diameter 34.1 µm, CV 51 %) under the skin of rats. MSP implants were retrieved at day 7, 14 and 28 after transplantation. The FBR was studied in terms of macrophage infiltration, implant encapsulation, vascularisation and extracellular matrix deposition. Although PLGA MSP of all different sizes demonstrated excellent in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility, significant differences were found in the characteristics of the FBR. Small MSP were phagocytosed, while large MSP were not. Large MSP occasionally elicited giant cell formation, which was not observed after implantation of small MSP. Cellular and macrophage influx and collagen deposition were increased in small MSP implants compared to large MSP. We conclude that the MSP size influences the FBR and thus might influence clinical outcome when using MSP as a drug delivery device. We propose that a rational choice of MSP size can aid in optimising the therapeutic efficacy of microsphere-based therapies in vivo. PMID:25350249

  15. [Foreign bodies (disk batteries) in the nose].

    PubMed

    Mazur, E M; Soldatskiĭ, Y U L; Ivanenko, A M; Denisova, O A; Severin, T V

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the results of analysis of the treatment of 8 children after the removal a disk battery from the nasal cavity. It was shown that the restoration of all the structures of the nasal cavity is possible if the foreign body remains in it during a short (up to 5 hours) time. The longer presence of such a body in the nasal cavity gives rise to post-traumatic defects, in the first place septal perforations and injuries to the inferior turbinated bone. In such cases, the foreign body must be immediately removed from the nasal cavity, and the child should be placed under thorough medical observation taking into consideration the long process of rejection of necrotic tissues and healing of the resulting defects. PMID:25734313

  16. Foreign body ingestion during dental implant procedures.

    PubMed

    Santos, Thiago de Santana; Antunes, Antonio Azoubel; Vajgel, André; Cavalcanti, Thames Bruno Barbosa; Nogueira, Luiz Ricardo Gomes de Caldas; Laureano Filho, José Rodrigues

    2012-03-01

    Two cases of swallowing of foreign material related to dental implants during dental practice are described. A conservative approach by clinical-radiographic follow-up was performed in both cases; however, one of the patients required colonoscopy under general anesthesia for the removal of the impacted foreign body from the intestinal region. These complications not only have associated economic cost but also carry the risk of malpractice litigation against the professional; thus, the surgeon was responsible for all the costs of hospital and surgery management of this case. Details of the clinical signs, radiographic examinations, type of treatment, and follow-up are presented. PMID:22446442

  17. The tracheobronchial foreign body in welder without the history of allotriophagy and foreign body aspiration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Lan; Bao, Zhang; Wang, Xue-Fen; Wang, Li-Hong; Zhou, Jian-Ying

    2016-09-01

    The typical chest computed tomography (CT) finding of the arc welders is ill-defined micronodules diffusely distributed in the lung. We report a rare case of tracheobronchial foreign body in welder without the history of allotriophagy and foreign body aspiration. We used the CT and mineralogical analysis in diagnosis and the flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope in therapy. The CT showed bronchiectasis with pulmonary infiltration of the right lower lobe and high-density shadow in the basal bronchus of the right lower lobe. The foreign bodies were removed by a fibreoptic bronchoscope. Semiquantitative chemical analyses showed that the constituent of foreign body was similar to the dregs which were collected in the same garage. This is an unusual case of the welding-related respiratory diseases, which is different from Welder's siderosis and broncholith. PMID:25619320

  18. Monitoring the presence of foreign bodies in the equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breslavets, A. V.; Bavykin, N. I.

    1974-01-01

    The methods for monitoring the presence of foreign bodies in radio electronic equipment are discussed. Descriptions of the structural design under the operating principle of the device for detecting foreign bodies weighing to 0.0026 grams are given.

  19. Comparison of pediatric airway foreign bodies over fifty years.

    PubMed

    White, David R; Zdanski, Carlton J; Drake, Amelia F

    2004-05-01

    Prevention and early recognition remain critical factors in the treatment of foreign body inhalation in children. Accidental inhalation of both organic and nonorganic foreign body material continues to be a cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. The University of North Carolina Department of Otolaryngology has collected foreign bodies acquired from the airways of young children since its inception in 1954. The authors reviewed 26 foreign bodies removed bronchoscopically from the airways of children during the years 1955 to 1960, and compared these to 27 foreign bodies collected from 1999 to 2003. Findings showed remarkable similarities in the types of foreign bodies aspirated. Organic foreign bodies were most commonly found. Differences existed in the type of organic foreign body aspirated, with popcorn being retrieved in 15% of cases during the later time period. Also, an increase in bronchoscopically removed small toy parts was found in the later group. PMID:15180015

  20. Foreign Body Mimicking a Dental Implant Radiographically.

    PubMed

    Demirkol, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Foreign bodies are often encountered in the maxillofacial region and can present in several ways. They frequently occur as a result of accidents, explosions, and gunshot injuries or because of iatrogenic factors in therapeutic interventions in daily dental practice. This report describes an unusual case of a broken elevator blade mimicking a dental implant embedded in alveolar bone radiographically, within the maxillary palatal mucosa during a traumatic maxillary right first molar extraction. PMID:26594991

  1. Infections and foreign bodies in ENT

    PubMed Central

    Kullar, Peter; Yates, Philip D

    2016-01-01

    Infections play a major role in the practice of ENT. Microbial penetration into tissues of the head and neck can initiate a focal reaction causing superficial self-resolving infections. However, some of these have the potential to develop into life-threatening disease. We provide an overview of the most common ENT infections with focus on the presentation, diagnosis and management. Foreign bodies of the ear, nose and throat are a common presentation to primary and emergency care. Most commonly these are seen in children and include plastic toys, beads and foodstuffs inserted into the ears and nose. Diagnosis is often delayed as insertion is usually not witnessed. In exceptional cases airway foreign bodies can present as a life-threatening emergency. Removal of foreign bodies can usually be achieved by a skilled practitioner with minimal complications. Methods of removal include suction catheters, syringing, and use of instrumentation. In adults, the treatment of oesophageal food bolus obstruction may require a combination of medical and surgical intervention. PMID:27057069

  2. [Removal of bronchial foreign bodies by suction with a bronchoscope].

    PubMed

    Mita, Y; Dobashi, K; Saitoh, R; Tsuchiya, S; Nakano, H; Watanabe, S; Makimoto, T; Ishihara, S; Mori, M

    1997-04-01

    We report two cases in which intrabronchial foreign bodies were removed with a fiberoptic bronchoscope. In both cases the foreign body was a seed of a small Japanese apricot. Atelectasis or obstructive pneumonia was seen on chest roentgenograms. The foreign bodies were associated with slight inflammation and polyps on the bronchial epithelium. The foreign bodies were removed by applying suction with a fiberoptic bronchoscope. This method may also be useful for removing other large, hard, uneven, and ball-like foreign bodies. PMID:9212671

  3. Evaluation and management of corneal foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Keeney, A H

    1975-10-01

    Insults from corneal foreigh bodies range from trivial windblown debris through destructive chemicals, penetrating wounds, and severe secondary infection. History and preliminary examination should begin concurrently, particularly in the case of chemically active compounds. Needed auxiliaries are topical anesthetics, oblique light, magnification, sterile sodium fluorescein for diagnostic staining of surface breaks, removal instruments, and topical antibiotics to reduce the potential of secondary infection. A steadied, seated position for the physician, resting posture with hands supported on the face, and an oblique approach tend to reduce the likelihood of unwanted perforations or scars. An irrigating stream of sterile saline delivered through a 25 gauge short needle on a 5 cc syringe will dislodge most recent foreign bodies. The sterile needle is also available as a spud. Corneal thickness varies from slightly above 1 mm in the periphery to less than 0.5 mm centrally. Therefore, it is essential to have clear visualization of the foreign body in relation to corneal depth. Dislodgment into the anterior chamber or incidental perforation of the cornea generally require hospitalization, intensive antibiotics, and steroid therapy. PMID:1206368

  4. Corneal Abrasions and Corneal Foreign Bodies.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faheem; House, Robert James; Feldman, Brad Hal

    2015-09-01

    Corneal abrasions and corneal foreign bodies are frequently encountered ophthalmological injuries that are commonly diagnosed and managed by primary care physicians. The clinical course of a corneal epithelial defect can range from a relatively benign self-healing abrasion to a potentially sight-threatening complication such as a corneal ulcer, recurrent erosion, or traumatic iritis. A detailed clinical history regarding risk factors and exposure, along with a thorough slit lamp examination with fluorescein dye are essential for proper diagnosis and treatment, as well as to rule out penetrating globe injuries. Referral to an ophthalmologist is recommended in difficult cases or if other injuries are suspected. PMID:26319343

  5. Intralenticular metallic foreign body: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, S C

    2011-01-01

    A case of retained intralenticular iron piece with signs of mild anterior uveitis at the time of presentation is reported in a 45 year-old man. His vision improved with topical cycloplegics and corticosteroids. After six months, his vision deteriorated grossly due to cataract formation. He regained good vision following removal of foreign body, extracapsular extraction with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. This case highlights the conservative management of the condition till the patient develops cataract resulting in visual disability; and good visual recovery following cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation. PMID:22553673

  6. Foreign esophageal body impaction: multimodality imaging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    de Lucas, Enrique Marco; Ruiz-Delgado, María Luisa; García-Barón, Pedro Lastra; Sádaba, Pablo; Pagola, Miguel Angel

    2004-02-01

    We report a case of a portion of bran bread impacted in the cervical esophagus in an 88-year-old woman. A complete radiologic study including ultrasonography, computed tomography, and barium swallow was performed. These techniques confirmed and localized the foreign body, which was endoscopically removed. A complete radiologic assessment can guarantee the usefulness of esophagoscopy to avoid significant morbidity from unnecessary procedures in a patient in poor clinical condition. Ultrasonography and computed tomography are attractive and profitable options in these cases. PMID:15290496

  7. Diagnose of occult bronchial foreign body

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Pudasaini, Bigyan; Wang, Xue-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Occult bronchial foreign body can be very difficult to diagnose early in an adult patient without acute symptoms. This report describes a rare case of undetected Chinese medicine “Coptis chinensis” aspiration for 10 long years. Methods: A case was reported that a female patient complained of a 10-year history of productive cough. A battery of tests were given to confirm the diagnosis. Results: Chest computed tomography (CT) showed extensive bronchiectasis and multiple nodules, along with stenosis of left lower lobar bronchus. An extensive solid lesion with surrounding inflammatory granulation tissue was seen on her first bronchoscopy and biopsy revealed chronic mucosal inflammation. A neglected history of Coptis chinensis regularly kept in-mouth while sleeping for the last 10 years in this patient provided clues for a final diagnosis. Confirmatory diagnosis of bilateral tracheobronchial foreign bodies caused by recurrent inhalation of Coptis chinensis was made by a second bronchoscopy. Conclusions: This case clearly demonstrates that a precise medical history is often overlooked. A high index of suspicion, a precise medical history, radiographic features of chronic respiratory symptoms not explained by other conditions were keys to diagnosing this case. PMID:27495017

  8. Foreign Body Reaction to Implantable Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Vaddiraju, Santhisagar; Gu, Bing; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Burgess, Diane J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Implantable biosensors for continuous glucose monitoring can greatly improve diabetes management. However, their applications are still associated with some challenges and one of these is the gradual functionality loss postimplantation as a consequence of the foreign body response (FBR). Sensor miniaturization in combination with drug-eluting biocompatible coatings is a promising strategy to enhance in vivo performance. However, limited study has been performed to understand the effect of initial trauma and implant size on foreign body reaction as well as in vivo performance of implantable glucose sensors. Methods: Different initial trauma was induced by implanting composite coated dummy sensors into rats using various sized needles and 3 different-sized dummy sensors were implanted to examine the size effect. Histological evaluation was performed to relate the inflammatory cell counts and foreign body capsule thickness with the implantation needle size and sensor size respectively. The effect of biocompatible coating on the performance of implantable glucose sensors was determined using both coated amperometric glucose sensors and microdialysis probes. Results: The results revealed that the degree of acute inflammation was mainly controlled by the extent of the initial trauma: the greater the trauma, the greater the acute inflammatory response. Implant size did not affect the acute inflammatory phase. However, the extent of chronic inflammation and fibrous encapsulation were affected by sensor size: the smaller the size the less the extent of chronic inflammation and fibrous encapsulation. Glucose sensors implanted using 14 gauge needles showed significantly lower initial in vivo response compared to those implanted using 16 gauge needles. This was not observed for sensors with dexamethasone-eluting biocompatible coatings since inflammation was suppressed. Conclusions: The results of the current study indicate that the extent of the inflammatory

  9. My patient is injured: identifying foreign bodies with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lewis, David; Jivraj, Aman; Atkinson, Paul; Jarman, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Patients commonly present to the emergency department with a suspected retained foreign body, following penetrating injury. While plain radiography is often the first line in identifying radio-opaque foreign bodies, radiolucent foreign bodies such as wood and plastic can easily be missed. Furthermore, real-time visualization of such a foreign body can assist in its removal. This article evaluates the use of point-of-care ultrasound by emergency physicians in the identification and removal of soft-tissue foreign bodies along with describing the appropriate technique and highlighting the potential pitfalls. An illustrated case example is presented that highlights the benefits of point-of-care ultrasound foreign body detection and guided removal. PMID:27433254

  10. Forgotten Vaginal Foreign Body Presenting as Cervical Dystocia

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Anshuja; Chandra, Charu; Falodia, Swati

    2016-01-01

    Generally encountered in paediatrics age group, vaginal foreign body is a rare presentation in gynaecological clinics. Inserted as a part of sexual abuse, gratification or psychiatric disorder, these foreign bodies can present with a varied symptomatology. We report a case of 22-year-old female, a victim of domestic violence, who had a foreign body inserted in the vagina which was forgotten. Later it was discovered when she presented at term with cervical dystocia. PMID:27042536

  11. Pulmonary Foreign Body Granulomatosis in Dental Technician

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sung Jun; Koo, Gun Woo; Park, Dong Won; Kwak, Hyun Jung; Yhi, Ji Young; Moon, Ji-Yong; Kim, Sang-Heon; Sohn, Jang Won; Yoon, Ho Joo; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Soo; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Oh, Young-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Occupational lung diseases are caused by several toxic substances including heavy metals; however, the exact pathologic mechanisms remain unknown. In the workplace, dental technicians are often exposed to heavy metals such as cobalt, nickel, or beryllium and occasionally develop occupational lung diseases. We described a case of occupational lung disease in a patient who was employed as a dental technician for over a decade. A 31-year-old, non-smoking woman presented with productive cough and shortness of breath of several weeks duration. Chest computed tomography revealed a large number of scattered, bilateral small pulmonary nodules throughout the lung field, and multiple mediastinal lymph nodes enlargement. Percutaneous needle biopsy showed multifocal small granulomas with foreign body type giant cells suggestive of heavy metals inhalation. The patient's condition improved on simple avoidance strategy for several months. This case highlighted the importance of proper workplace safety. PMID:26508943

  12. Pulmonary Foreign Body Granulomatosis in Dental Technician.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung Jun; Koo, Gun Woo; Park, Dong Won; Kwak, Hyun Jung; Yhi, Ji Young; Moon, Ji-Yong; Kim, Sang-Heon; Sohn, Jang Won; Yoon, Ho Joo; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Soo; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Oh, Young-Ha; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2015-10-01

    Occupational lung diseases are caused by several toxic substances including heavy metals; however, the exact pathologic mechanisms remain unknown. In the workplace, dental technicians are often exposed to heavy metals such as cobalt, nickel, or beryllium and occasionally develop occupational lung diseases. We described a case of occupational lung disease in a patient who was employed as a dental technician for over a decade. A 31-year-old, non-smoking woman presented with productive cough and shortness of breath of several weeks duration. Chest computed tomography revealed a large number of scattered, bilateral small pulmonary nodules throughout the lung field, and multiple mediastinal lymph nodes enlargement. Percutaneous needle biopsy showed multifocal small granulomas with foreign body type giant cells suggestive of heavy metals inhalation. The patient's condition improved on simple avoidance strategy for several months. This case highlighted the importance of proper workplace safety. PMID:26508943

  13. Metallic Foreign Body in Heart Mimicking Moderator Band

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Darae; Yang, Pil-Sung; Choi, Jung-Ho; Seo, Jiwon; Chun, Kyeong-Hyeon; Lee, Sang-Eun; Hong, Geu-Ru; Joo, Hyun-Chel

    2015-01-01

    A foreign body in heart is rare, but it is more frequently encountered than the past as iatrogenic causes are increasing. Clinicians should be aware that foreign body could be mistaken for normal structure of heart. In order for accurate diagnosis, multi-imaging modalities should be used for information of exact location, mobility and hemodynamic effects. A decision to intervene should be made based on potential harms harbored by foreign bodies. Endovascular retrieval should be considered as an option. However, when fatal complications occur or when foreign bodies are embedded deeply, a surgical removal should be attempted. PMID:25837198

  14. Occult liver abscess following clinically unsuspected ingestion of foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B C; Mossey, J

    1997-01-01

    Two uncommon cases of foreign body (a wooden clothespin and a toothpick) perforation of the gur with associated pyogenic liver abscesses are presented. These cases illustrate the difficulties of preoperative diagnosis. The lack of history of ingestion of foreign bodies, variable clinical presentation of the conditions and radiolucent natures of the foreign bodies all play a role in impeding the diagnosis preoperatively. This report emphasizes the role of ultrasound and computed tomographic scan in evaluating similar cases. Any patient with known risk factors for ingestion of foreign body should arouse suspicion and be investigated further. PMID:9286481

  15. Foreign body aspiration in children: experience of 1160 cases.

    PubMed

    Eren, Sevval; Balci, Akin Eraslan; Dikici, Bünyamin; Doblan, Mehmet; Eren, Mehmet Nesimi

    2003-03-01

    Hospital records of 1160 children foreign body aspiration were reviewed. Bronchoscopy under general anaesthesia was performed on all patients. Foreign bodies were successfully removed in 1068 (92%) children. The majority, 885 (76.3%), presented with a definite history of foreign body aspiration. Bronchoscopy was negative in 85 (7.3%) children. Watermelon seeds, found in 414 (38.7%) children, were the most commonly aspirated foreign bodies. Open surgical procedures were required for 21 (1.8%) children. Bronchial rupture related to bronchoscopy occurred in four children, two of whom died post-operatively. The overall mortality rate was 0.8%. PMID:12648322

  16. Usefulness Of Glucocorticoids In The Management Of Foreign Body Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Pagán Rivera, Bryan L; Anselmi, Francisco Jaume; Torres, Maria Del Mar; Segarra, Amaury; Rivera, Jose Ramirez

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body aspiration can be a life-threatening emergency. An aspirated solid or semi-solid object may lodge in the larynx, trachea or other breathing airways. If the object is large enough to cause nearly complete obstruction of the airway, asphyxia may rapidly cause death. We report a 19-year old man admitted with right lower lobe pneumonia who spontaneously expelled a foreign body, one day after admission and glucocorticoids administration. Glucocorticoids should be considered in foreign body aspiration management because improvement of the inflammatory reaction may facilitate expontaneous expulsion or foreign body extraction PMID:26742192

  17. Emergency admissions due to swallowed foreign bodies in adults

    PubMed Central

    Erbil, Bülent; Karaca, Mehmet Ali; Aslaner, Mehmet Ali; İbrahimov, Zaur; Kunt, Mehmet Mahir; Akpinar, Erhan; Özmen, Mehmet Mahir

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study a retrospective analysis of patients who presented to the emergency departments (ED) with complaints related to foreign body ingestions. METHODS: Patients older than 16 years of age who presented to the ED between January 1st and December 31st of 2010 with complaints related to swallowed foreign bodies were identified from electronic health records and patient charts. RESULTS: A total of 100 patients presented with a complaint of foreign body ingestion during the study period. Overall, an X-ray was performed on 75 patients, and a fiberoptic evaluation was performed on 45 patients. A foreign body was detected in 46 (46%) patients. The diagnostic yield of the X-ray was 27 (36%) out of 75 patients, while the diagnostic yield of the fiberoptic evaluations was 21 (47%) out of 45 patients. The detected foreign bodies were mostly located in the esophagus (17 out of 46 foreign bodies detected). When the types of ingested foreign bodies were evaluated, 52 (52%) patients reported ingesting food, and 19 (19%) patients reported swallowing pins. An X-ray was performed on 33 patients with accidental food ingestions but yielded a positive result in only two cases. In 12 out of 21 patients with accidental food ingestion who underwent fiberoptic evaluation, the foreign material was detected and removed. CONCLUSION: Plain radiography is helpful in the localization of radiopaque swollen foreign bodies, while fiberoptic methods are useful as both diagnostic and therapeutic tools, regardless of radiopacity. PMID:24151363

  18. The Endoscopic Removal of Eroded Foreign Bodies in the Ureter.

    PubMed

    Kurz, David Anthony; Mucksavage, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    A complication of using foreign materials in surgery is potential erosion into nearby tissues. The endoscopic removal of foreign bodies that have eroded into the urinary tract is a safe and minimally invasive option that has previously been described, most commonly in the bladder and urethra. We present the case of a patient who had a remote history of a pyeloplasty and was found to have different foreign bodies eroding into the ureter causing symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first case where a patient presented with two different types of ureteral foreign body erosions that were each effectively treated endoscopically. PMID:27579409

  19. Iatrogenic Displacement of a Foreign Body into the Periapical Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Alvaro; Solís, Rodrigo; Díaz, Mariana; Vázquez, Josué

    2014-01-01

    The presence of a foreign body in the periapical tissues can cause endodontic failure by triggering an inflammatory response and a subsequent foreign body reaction. This inflammatory response, which can occur to varying degrees, appears radiographically as a radiolucency that can remain asymptomatic for many years. A foreign object can reach the apical region by accident or iatrogenic procedures during dental procedures. The aim of the present case report is to describe the endodontic surgical treatment of an iatrogenic displacement of a foreign body (a metal fragment) into the periapical tissues and to describe its clinical and radiographic follow-up over a period of 52 months. PMID:25478244

  20. The Endoscopic Removal of Eroded Foreign Bodies in the Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Mucksavage, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A complication of using foreign materials in surgery is potential erosion into nearby tissues. The endoscopic removal of foreign bodies that have eroded into the urinary tract is a safe and minimally invasive option that has previously been described, most commonly in the bladder and urethra. We present the case of a patient who had a remote history of a pyeloplasty and was found to have different foreign bodies eroding into the ureter causing symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first case where a patient presented with two different types of ureteral foreign body erosions that were each effectively treated endoscopically. PMID:27579409

  1. Endourological Treatment of Foreign Bodies in the Urinary System

    PubMed Central

    Basar, M. Murad

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In this retrospective study, nature, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, and endoscopic treatment of urinary system foreign bodies were evaluated. Methods: A total of 8 cases were treated with endoscopic surgery between February 15, 2007 and June 12, 2012. Clinical findings, radiologic diagnosis, and management were reviewed. Results: We observed that urinary tract foreign bodies were generally secondary to iatrogenic causes; however, bladder/urethral foreign bodies could also be due to self-insertion. Clinical findings were different secondary to their location in the urinary system. All foreign bodies were treated endoscopically. Conclusions: Foreign bodies of the urinary system can successfully be treated with endoscopic modalities without any complications. PMID:25392629

  2. Lens siderosis resulting from a small intralenticular metallic foreign body

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mehul A.; Shah, Shreya M.; Teori, Pritesh; Israni, Anjli

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of lens siderosis with an undetectable intraocular foreign body by imaging. An 8-year-old boy presented with diminution of vision in the left eye since 3 months. His parents gave a preceding uncertain history of a foreign body injury to his left eye 3 months ago while playing. Presenting visual acuity in the left eye was perception of hand movements. Slit-lamp examination revealed a total white cataract with brownish-pigmented spots on the anterior capsule of the lens, but no intraocular foreign body was found. There was also no evidence of an intraocular foreign body on ultrasonography. Patient underwent cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation. During the operation, a small (2×1×1 mm in size) intralenticular foreign body of metal material was found and removed carefully with a magnet. The patient regained 20/30 vision after surgery.

  3. [Endoscopic management of foreign bodies in the digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Sebastián Domingo, J J; De Diego Lorenzo, A; Santos Castro, L; Castellanos Franco, D; Menchén, P

    1990-04-01

    From 1983 to 1989, the Unidad de Endoscopias has attended 424 cases of foreign bodies located in the gastrointestinal tract, most of them in the esophagus. The mean age of the patients was 49 years. The commonest foreign bodies were food particles and the most common symptom was acute dysphagia. The most frequent localization of impaction was the cricopharyngeal sphincter (Killian's mouth). In 89% of the cases the foreign body could be removed endoscopically. The most common underlying pathology was hiatal hernia. There were severe complications related to the presence of the foreign body in 4.5% of the cases; one death was due to aorto-esophageal fistula. Foreign bodies, mainly impacted food particles (p less than 0.001), are most frequent in patients over 65, mainly females (p less than 0.01). PMID:2390340

  4. Foreign body reaction due to skin filler: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Juliana Y; Domaneschi, Carina; Migliari, Dante A; Sousa, Suzana Orsini Machado de

    2006-04-01

    Aquamid represents a new generation of soft-tissue fillers for aesthetic facial correction and reconstruction due to its reduced quantity of particles (2.5% of polyacrylamide) and high concentration of water (97.5%). It is a biocompatible, atoxic, homogeneous, and stable product. Additionally, it has good viscosity and elasticity, and it is very simple to use. Although reported in less than 1% of the cases, adverse effects such as pain, swelling, and erythema may occur, which may be the result of inappropriate injection procedure. This article reports the first case of an intraoral foreign body reaction resulting from Aquamid application in the nasolabial fold. Possible causes for this reaction, the chemical composition of the product, and the histopathologic aspects are discussed. PMID:16545711

  5. Foreign Body Granulomas after the Use of Dermal Fillers: Pathophysiology, Clinical Appearance, Histologic Features, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Min

    2015-01-01

    A foreign body granuloma is a non-allergic chronic inflammatory reaction that is mainly composed of multinucleated giant cells. Foreign body granulomas may occur after the administration of any dermal filler. Factors such as the volume of the injection, impurities present in the fillers, and the physical properties of fillers affect granuloma formation. The formation of granulomas involves five phases: protein adsorption, macrophage adhesion, macrophage fusion, and crosstalk. The clinical and pathologic features of granulomas vary depending on the type of filler that causes them. Foreign body granulomas can be treated effectively with intralesional corticosteroid injections. Surgical excisions of granulomas tend to be incomplete because granulomas have ill-defined borders and moreover, surgical excisions may leave scars and deformities. PMID:25798398

  6. Radiology of foreign bodies: how do we image them?

    PubMed

    Ingraham, Christopher R; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Robinson, Jeffrey D; Linnau, Ken F

    2015-08-01

    To assess the sensitivity of detecting the most commonly encountered foreign bodies in Emergency Radiology using all imaging modalities (conventional radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging). The following materials were inserted into a pig-leg phantom and imaged using conventional radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging: Plastics #1, 2, 3, 5, and compostable plastic; dry and wet wood, aluminum, gravel, glass (tinted and non-tinted), and Salmon and Halibut fish bones. The visibility of plastic is variable on both conventional radiography and computed tomography, depending on composition, but all types of plastic are well visualized on ultrasound. Wood is most easily identified and localized on both computed tomography and ultrasound, is only faintly visible on conventional radiography, and is not well visualized on magnetic resonance imaging. Gravel, glass, and aluminum are well visualized on all modalities, with the exception of magnetic resonance imaging, where there is significant artifact surrounding the foreign body. Fish bones (Halibut and Salmon) are well visualized on conventional radiography, computed tomography, and ultrasound. Conventional radiography and computed tomography are great modalities for detecting foreign bodies of various compositions. Computed tomography is particularly useful at localizing the foreign body and determining its relationship to surrounding structures and its depth of involvement. All foreign bodies are visualized on ultrasound if the location is known and the foreign body is in the plane of the transducer. Magnetic resonance imaging is not helpful in detecting foreign bodies. PMID:25648360

  7. Impacted foreign bodies in orbital region: review of nine cases.

    PubMed

    Santos, Thiago de Santana; Melo, Auremir Rocha; Moraes, Hécio Henrique Araújo de; Almeida Júnior, Paulo; Dourado, Edwaldo

    2010-01-01

    Orbital injuries with a foreign body may result in severe structural and functional damage to the eye or orbital contents. Management and prognosis depend on the composition and location of the foreign body and whether there is secondary infection. Metallic objects and glass are the most frequently encountered and well-tolerated, whereas organic foreign bodies can elicit an inflammatory reaction and lead to serious complications. Despite the modern imaging methods, it is often difficult to identify and locate organic intraorbital foreign bodies. This paper presents a review of nine cases of impacted foreign bodies in the orbital region and discusses the diagnosis and treatment of this kind of injury. The following data were collected: age, gender, etiology of injury, occurrence of fracture, anatomical location of fracture, type of object, signs and symptoms, type of imaging exam used, approach, transoperative complication and occurrence of death. Foreign body injuries in the orbital region can be treated with a combination of clinical suspicion, basic knowledge and diagnostic tests and depend on the skill and experience of the surgeon, thereby decreasing the surgical risk of iatrogenic injury in relation to the inherent risk of retaining an organic intraorbital foreign body. PMID:21225129

  8. A bizarre foreign body in the appendix: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Antonacci, Nicola; Labombarda, Marcello; Ricci, Claudio; Buscemi, Salvatore; Casadei, Riccardo; Minni, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Foreign bodies are rare causes of appendicitis and, in most cases, ingested foreign bodies pass through the alimentary tract asymptomatically. However, ingested foreign bodies may sometimes remain silent within the appendix for many years without an inflammatory response. Despite the fact that cases of foreign-body-induced appendicitis have been documented, sharp and pointed objects are more likely to cause perforations and abscesses, and present more rapidly after ingestion. Various materials, such as needles and drill bits, as well as organic matter, such as seeds, have been implicated as causes of acute appendicitis. Clinical presentation can vary from hours to years. Blunt foreign bodies are more likely to remain dormant for longer periods and cause appendicitis through obstruction of the appendiceal lumen. We herein describe a patient presenting with a foreign body in his appendix which had been swallowed 15 years previously. The contrast between the large size of the foreign body, the long clinical history without symptoms and the total absence of any histological inflammation was notable. We suggest that an elective laparoscopic appendectomy should be offered to such patients as a possible management option. PMID:23805364

  9. A bizarre foreign body in the appendix: A case report.

    PubMed

    Antonacci, Nicola; Labombarda, Marcello; Ricci, Claudio; Buscemi, Salvatore; Casadei, Riccardo; Minni, Francesco

    2013-06-27

    Foreign bodies are rare causes of appendicitis and, in most cases, ingested foreign bodies pass through the alimentary tract asymptomatically. However, ingested foreign bodies may sometimes remain silent within the appendix for many years without an inflammatory response. Despite the fact that cases of foreign-body-induced appendicitis have been documented, sharp and pointed objects are more likely to cause perforations and abscesses, and present more rapidly after ingestion. Various materials, such as needles and drill bits, as well as organic matter, such as seeds, have been implicated as causes of acute appendicitis. Clinical presentation can vary from hours to years. Blunt foreign bodies are more likely to remain dormant for longer periods and cause appendicitis through obstruction of the appendiceal lumen. We herein describe a patient presenting with a foreign body in his appendix which had been swallowed 15 years previously. The contrast between the large size of the foreign body, the long clinical history without symptoms and the total absence of any histological inflammation was notable. We suggest that an elective laparoscopic appendectomy should be offered to such patients as a possible management option. PMID:23805364

  10. Foreign Bodies in Trachea: A 25-years of Experience

    PubMed Central

    Altuntas, Bayram; Aydın, Yener; Eroglu, Atilla

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Tracheobronchial foreign body aspirations may cause cardiopulmonary arrest and sudden death. The incidence in children is higher than in adults. Rapid diagnosis and treatment is live saving. In this paper, we aimed to present our experience in tracheal foreign body aspirations and rigid bronchoscopy for 25-years. Materials and Methods: From January 1990 to January 2015, 805 patients with suspected tracheobronchial foreign body aspiration were admitted to our department. Hundred and twelve patients with tracheal foreign body were included in this study. We evaluated patients’ records, retrospectively. Age, gender, clinical symptoms, physical examination findings, radiological evidences, type of foreign body and intervention types were noted. Results: Sixty-five of the patients were female (58%) and 47 patients were male (42%), and mean age was 8.1 years (8 month-58 years). Coughing was the main symptom (n=112, 100%). Other symptoms and findings included dyspnoea and bilateral decreased lung sounds (n=73, 65.1%), bilateral rhonchi (n=68, 60.7%) and cyanosis (n=41, 36.6%). Rigid bronchoscopy was performed in all patients. The most common foreign body was nuts (n=75, 67%). The main radiologic finding was radiopaque image of the related foreign body in 27 patients (n=27, 24.1%). Cardio-pulmonary arrest occurred in 11 patients and two of them died. Conclusion: Tracheobronchial aspirations of foreign bodies are life-threatening events. If not diagnosed and treated rapidly, distressful results can be seen. Warning people by skilled persons on this topic will reduce the incidence of foreign body aspirations. PMID:27551175

  11. Unusual foreign body in the larynx: a bee.

    PubMed

    İlhan, Ethem; Yaman, Handan; Dost, Burhan; Köse, Gökçe Akman; Yaman, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body lodgement in the larynx is a rare situation. Our review of the literature revealed no living foreign body in larynx except for laryngeal leeches and anisakiasis. In this article, we report a patient with unusual laryngeal foreign body lodgement: a bee which presented with sudden odynophagia and stinging sensation in throat. The bee was detected on the laryngeal mucosa in indirect laryngoscopic examination and removed immediately under general anesthesia in apneic period. In this case report, we describe the importance of detailed anamnesis and laryngeal examination even if the patient has no severe symptoms. PMID:26211866

  12. Foreign body resulting in chronic otomastoiditis and facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Roshan Kumar; Gupta, Bhumika; Panda, Naresh K

    2015-02-01

    We present a case of a foreign body in the ear of 5-year-old girl child. She presented with features of chronic suppurative otitis media with facial nerve palsy. On exploration exuberant granulation was found in attic and middle ear. A foreign body (seed) was found buried within the granulation tissue which was removed. Bony facial canal was dehiscent in the tympanic segment. She had recovery of facial nerve function. The case is being reported to increase awareness among otolaryngologist and to consider foreign body as a differential diagnosis in cases of complicated CSOM; especially in children. PMID:25500549

  13. Coelomic Transport and Clearance of Durable Foreign Bodies by Starfish (Asterias rubens).

    PubMed

    Olsen, Trine Bottos; Christensen, Frederik Ekholm Gaardsted; Lundgreen, Kim; Dunn, Paul H; Levitis, Daniel A

    2015-04-01

    Echinoderms have excellent healing and regeneration abilities, but little is known about how they deal with the related challenge of durable foreign bodies that become lodged within their bodies. Here we report a novel mechanism for foreign body elimination in starfish. When injected into the arm of a starfish, passive integrated transponder tags and magnets of similar dimensions are eliminated at a rate approximating 10% per day. These objects are forcefully ejected through the body wall at the distal tip of an arm. Ultrasound images reveal that foreign bodies are moved within the body cavity, and tracking of magnets injected into starfish suggests that the movements are haphazard rather than directed. Constrictions of the body wall near the foreign object are the likely mechanism for this transport process. Open questions include the ecological relevance of this behavior, why clearance occurs through the distal tips of the arms, the neurological and muscular control of this behavior, what other animals use this mechanism, and the range of objects starfish can eliminate in this way. PMID:25920718

  14. Nasal Foreign Body, Dislodged and Lost - Can the Adenoids Help?

    PubMed

    Jotdar, Arijit; Dutta, Mainak; Mukhopadhyay, Subrataataata

    2015-06-01

    Foreign body in the nasal cavity is one of the most common paediatric otolaryngology emergencies and needs to be promptly addressed. The incidence of nasal foreign body getting dislodged secondary to unsuccessful attempts to take it out is quite high and can be potentially dangerous as it might cause fatal airway compromise. The chances of it getting impacted and retained in the nasopharynx are practical, although such cases are seldom encountered for primarily nasal foreign bodies. Nevertheless, the nasopharynx should always be looked for as a site of impaction of hidden foreign objects. Presence of enlarged adenoids could be of help as it may prevent accidental lodgement of displaced foreign body in the airway, but might also result in difficulty in locating and retrieving the foreign body because it acts as an anchor-pad with its grooves and crevasses. This report presents a rare, interesting case of a child with enlarged adenoids anchoring a metallic ring and describes the clinical presentations and relevant management of a nasal foreign body dislodged and lost in the nasopharynx. PMID:26266143

  15. Intracranial metallic foreign bodies in a man with a headache.

    PubMed

    Pelin, Zerrin; Kaner, Tuncay

    2012-10-01

    We report the case of a 22-year old man with intracranial metallic foreign bodies who presented complaining of a headache. His history of headaches had begun when he was five years old and continued with increasing severity. Six months before hospital admission, nausea and vomiting began to accompany his headache. Computed tomography scan revealed that 2 metallic foreign bodies were located adjacent to the vertex and another was next to the ambient cistern. The location and position of foreign bodies suggested that they were introduced in infancy through the anterior fontanelle before its closure in an unsuccessful homicide attempt. This case is one of the few reported cases combining headache and intracranial foreign bodies and we discuss the relationship between headache and these metallic materials. PMID:23355931

  16. [Two rare case report of maxillary sinus foreign body].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongliang; Zhu, Jiajing; Ma, Zhancheng

    2015-11-01

    The maxillary sinus is the largest paranasal sinuses. Foreign bodies of nosal sinus can caused by car accidents, firearm attacks, or iatrogeniccause. We reported two rare cases of foreign body of pulp needle and loach. The clinical manifestations might include facial numbness, facial paresthesia, swelling, nasal congestion, facial pain, eye discomfort, limited mouth opening and relapse and etc. Both CT scan and the medical history were helpful in diagnosis. Functional endoscopic surgery would be the first choice of treatment. PMID:26911073

  17. Unusual Foreign Body in a Routine Lateral Cephalogram

    PubMed Central

    James, Jean; S, Praveen; V.P, Latheef; S, Sreehari

    2015-01-01

    Routine radiographs made in the orthodontic office can often give way to detection and diagnosis of unusual syndromes, signs or foreign bodies. A case report of one such accidental detection of a very unusual foreign body within the nasal cavity of an orthodontic patient has been presented here to emphasize the importance of routine radiographic views, which over and above aiding in Orthodontic diagnosis, can also often detect potentially life threatening problems in the Oro-facial region. PMID:25859532

  18. Survey of Foreign Body Aspiration in Airways and Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Samarei, R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Foreign body aspiration is a very serious problem and the diversity of clinical protests in each geographic region has its own characteristics and common problems of childhood that is an important cause of mortality and morbidity. No area is separate from this problem and conducting this research is due to achieve basic information regarding foreign body aspiration. Materials and Methods: This was performed as descriptive - cross sectional study on 200 cases that has been hospitalized in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Urmia due to foreign body aspiration problem from 2009 to 2011. And all cases of foreign body aspiration records extracted and analyzed using SPSS 16 software. Results: Foreign body aspiration under 4 years was 57% and was more common in males than females; approximately 74% of patients were hospitalized in the first 10 days and 13% of patients did not remember the initial incident that led to the aspiration. Cough and shortness of breath and reduced lung sounds and wheezing were common symptoms. Chest radiographic findings are not specific and can be normal of a high percentage. The most common aspirated foreign body was food especially sunflower seeds. Right bronchus with 55% of cases was more common than the left bronchus and all patients were treated with rigid bronchoscopy, 24% of patients had complications, 15% had hospitalized with pneumonia. Totally, 75% of patients were urban residents. Discussion: We need to understand all the aspects related to foreign body aspiration and education to the community, to recognize symptoms and type of foreign body in terms of geographical area and to create a strong clinical suspicion in physicians and awareness of its prevalence that by reducing the incidence and early detecting and treatment can reduce the mortality and morbidity and prevent additional expenses. PMID:25363168

  19. Intraorbital foreign body: clinical presentation, radiological appearance and management.

    PubMed

    Al-Mujaini, Abdullah; Al-Senawi, Rana; Ganesh, Anuradha; Al-Zuhaibi, Sana; Al-Dhuhli, Humoud

    2008-03-01

    Intraorbital foreign bodies usually occur after a high velocity injury such as gunshot or industrial accidents; more rarely they occur following trivial trauma. A retained foreign body can give rise to serious complications, the most devastating of which is loss of the eye. This retrospective, interventional case report reviews the clinical features, radiological appearance and surgical management of two patients who presented at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman with intraorbital foreign bodies. Details of ocular history, preoperative ocular examination findings including visual acuity, surgical procedure and subsequent management were noted. The two patients, aged 10 years and 9 years old respectively, sustained orbital trauma with sharp objects. Both patients were found to have intraorbital foreign bodies that were documented clearly by computed tomography (CT) scans of the orbit. The first patient presented straight after injury, had no ocular involvement, underwent immediate surgical exploration and ended up with full recovery. The second patient presented to us after a delay of 4 days, and was found to have endophthalmitis. This patient ultimately lost all visual function in the affected eye. A CT scan is the modality of choice for orbital foreign body detection and localization. Early surgical exploration and foreign body extraction greatly influence the visual prognosis and final outcome. PMID:21654960

  20. Rectal foreign bodies: imaging assessment and medicolegal aspects.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Antonio; Miele, Vittorio; Pinto, Fabio; Mizio, Veronica Di; Panico, Maria Rita; Muzj, Carlo; Romano, Luigia

    2015-02-01

    The amount of patients presenting at the emergency hospitals with retained rectal foreign bodies appears recently to have increased. Foreign objects retained in the rectum may result from direct introduction through the anus (more common) or from ingestion. Affected individuals often make ineffective attempts to extract the object themselves, resulting in additional delay of medical care and potentially increasing the risk of complications. The goals of radiological patient assessment are to identify the type of object retained, its location, and the presence of associated complications. Plain film radiographs still play an important role in the assessment of retained rectal foreign bodies. PMID:25639182

  1. Foreign body gingivitis: An iatrogenic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.D.; Wysocki, G.P. )

    1990-06-01

    Gingival biopsy specimens from eight patients exhibiting a localized, erythematous, or mixed erythematous/leukoplakic gingivitis that was refractory to conventional periodontal therapy were examined histologically and by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Histologic examination revealed variable numbers of small, usually subtle, sometimes equivocal, and occasionally obvious foci of granulomatous inflammation. Special stains for fungi and acid-fast bacilli were consistently negative. In all cases, the granulomatous foci contained particles of foreign material that were often inconspicuous and easily overlooked during routine histologic examination. Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of these foreign particles disclosed Ca, Al, Si, Ti, and P in most lesions. However, other elements such as Zr, V, Ag, and Ni were found only in specific biopsy specimens. By comparing the elemental analyses, clinical features, and history of the lesions, strong evidence for an iatrogenic source of the foreign material was found in one case, and good evidence in five cases. In the remaining two patients, the source of the foreign particles remains unresolved.

  2. [Intraoperative ultrasound diagnosis in the removal of intraocular foreign bodies].

    PubMed

    Andreev, A A; Gundarova, R A; Kodzov, M B

    2008-01-01

    The paper provides a rationale and indications for diascleral removal of foreign bodies from the anterior chamber of the eyeball, by intraoperatively using ultrasound study. The clinical material presents 148 cases of diascleral removal of foreign (49 magnetic and 49 amagnetic) bodes impacted into the tunics of the anterior eye without evident opacities of optical media and without signs of endophthalmitis. The paper provides a pathogenetic rationale for the method that is lowly traumatic and highly effective (foreign bodies being removed in 99.9% of cases) due to the high precision of location of a scleral cut in the projection of foreign body bedding owing to intraoperative sound usage. A model clinical case of fragment removal is also shown in the paper. The specific features of criteria for using the method are described, by taking into account the anatomic characteristics of orbital eyeball location. PMID:18756799

  3. Asymptomatic Intracranial Foreign Body: An Incidental Finding on Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoudi, Mohammadreza; Shahbazzadegan, Bita; Pezeshki, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intracranial needles are rare entities. Intracranial foreign bodies due to non-missile intracranial penetrations are one of the most rarely encountered situations in neurosurgery. Sewing needles are among the more unusual foreign bodies that may be found in the brain. Although uncommon, foreign body cases are important and interesting. Foreign bodies enter the body through trauma or iatrogenic injuries. Needles are mostly inserted through fontanelles, cranial sutures, and more rarely through the orbits in infancy for the purpose of killing unwanted babies. Case Presentation This article presents a case of intracranial foreign body found upon radiography. A 24-year-old female, who two days prior to presentation suffered only once from dizziness, and was otherwise healthy. Conclusions Because this incident may have occurred during the patient’s neonatal period, it may be a case of child abuse. In spite of the very limited number of cases in the literature, having a stepmother, a stepfather, or a babysitter, being the youngest child, or having family members who suffer from psychiatric disorders, (especially if these relatives are responsible for child care), living in a society that allows homicide of children born from extramarital relationships, and being female have been suggested as possible risk factors. PMID:27626006

  4. Foreign body detected by patients using metal detectors.

    PubMed

    Giddins, G E

    1995-06-01

    A positive response from a metal detector when run over an area of the body is a strong positive indicator of the presence of a metallic object. If there is a possibility of a buried metallic foreign body this positive finding should not be ignored. PMID:7582415

  5. [Treatment of patients with foreign bodies in rectum].

    PubMed

    Biriukov, Iu V; Volkov, O V; An, V K; Borisov, E Iu; Dodina, A N

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of treatment results in 112 patients with foreign bodies in the rectum, aged from 16 to 80 years, was carried out. 99.1% of the patients were men. All the patients were examined and treated in proctology department of the Moscow municipal clinical hospital N 67 from 1969 to 1998. The examination was made by standard scheme, including rectal touch, rectoromanoscopy, X-ray and ultrasonic examinations. In 107 patients the foreign body was removed without surgery, 5 patients required laparotomy. When possible it was removed by fingers and also with use of forceps. When small foreign bodies could not be reached by finger, they were removed through rectoscope. Foreign bodies of big sizes, proximal end of which was in the sigmoid colon, were removed under anasthesia with the help of the assistant who fixed the foreign body through the abdominal wall in the left ileac region. In impossibility of the subject removal by these methods and presence of complications (perforation, peritonitis), laparotomy with subsequent transanal subject removal without colon section was performed, in case of perforation--with wound suturing or colostomy. PMID:10958068

  6. Western view of the management of gastroesophageal foreign bodies

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Aurora; Rábago, Luis; Triana, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The best modality for foreign body removal has been the subject of much controversy over the years. We have read with great interest the recent article by Souza Aguiar Municipal Hospital, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, describing their experience with the management of esophageal foreign bodies in children. Non-endoscopic methods of removing foreign bodies (such as a Foley catheter guided or not by fluoroscopy) have been successfully used at this center. These methods could be an attractive option because of the following advantages: Shorter hospitalization time; easy to perform; no need for anesthesia; avoids esophagoscopy; and lower costs. However, the complications of these procedures can be severe and potentially fatal if not performed correctly, such as bronchoaspiration, perforation, and acute airway obstruction. In addition, it has some disadvantages, such as the inability to directly view the esophagus and the inability to always retrieve foreign bodies. Therefore, in Western countries clinical practice usually recommends endoscopic removal of foreign bodies under direct vision and with airway protection whenever possible. PMID:27170838

  7. Western view of the management of gastroesophageal foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Aurora; Rábago, Luis; Triana, Paloma

    2016-05-10

    The best modality for foreign body removal has been the subject of much controversy over the years. We have read with great interest the recent article by Souza Aguiar Municipal Hospital, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, describing their experience with the management of esophageal foreign bodies in children. Non-endoscopic methods of removing foreign bodies (such as a Foley catheter guided or not by fluoroscopy) have been successfully used at this center. These methods could be an attractive option because of the following advantages: Shorter hospitalization time; easy to perform; no need for anesthesia; avoids esophagoscopy; and lower costs. However, the complications of these procedures can be severe and potentially fatal if not performed correctly, such as bronchoaspiration, perforation, and acute airway obstruction. In addition, it has some disadvantages, such as the inability to directly view the esophagus and the inability to always retrieve foreign bodies. Therefore, in Western countries clinical practice usually recommends endoscopic removal of foreign bodies under direct vision and with airway protection whenever possible. PMID:27170838

  8. Review of models for titanium as a foreign body.

    PubMed

    Frydman, Alon; Simonian, Krikor

    2014-12-01

    A growing number of theories has evolved attempting to explain the process of dental implant failure. Titanium implants utilized outside of the mouth have exhibited breakdown through a foreign body reaction. Phenomena occurring in the body, such as passive dissolution, osteolysis and metallosis, have not been discussed relative to dental implants. The dental community must consider the full spectrum of implant interactions within the body to understand the differences and similarities within the mouth. PMID:25928960

  9. Ocular surface foreign bodies: novel findings mimicking ocular malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Maudgil, A; Wagner, B E; Rundle, P; Rennie, I G; Mudhar, H S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Malignant melanoma of the eye is an uncommon condition that is important to recognise. We describe three cases in which ocular foreign bodies have masqueraded as ocular malignant melanoma. Methods Interventional case reports. Results Case 1 describes diathermy-induced carbon particle implantation, during plaque therapy for the treatment of uveal melanoma, mimicking recurrence with extra-scleral invasion. Case 2 shows a foreign body called ‘mullite' mimicking conjunctival melanoma. Case 3 demonstrates a conjunctival foreign body called ‘illite' that mimicked a limbal melanocytic lesion, clinically thought to be either melanocytoma or melanoma. Conclusion This report highlights the importance of careful history taking, examination, and appropriate biopsy in cases of suspected malignant melanoma, to prevent unnecessary and potentially radical treatment. PMID:25104745

  10. Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma Induced by a Foreign Body Granuloma.

    PubMed

    Slovak, Jennifer E; Kieves, Nina R; Haynes, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    An 8 yr old spayed female Italian greyhound was presented with a mass in the cranial abdomen. Preliminary evaluation of the dog revealed a large, cavitary, irregularly shaped mass with no definitive association with any abdominal organs. During an exploratory celiotomy, a 16 cm × 12 cm × 6 cm mass was removed. On subsequent histopathology, extraskeletal osteosarcoma induced by a foreign body granuloma was diagnosed. The foreign body granuloma, based on histopathological findings, was suspected to be secondary to a retained surgical sponge from her routine ovariohysterectomy performed 7 yr prior to presentation. Animals with granulomas induced by foreign bodies can remain asymptomatic for years; however, those granulomas can progress to extraskeletal osteosarcomas, which carry a poor prognosis. PMID:26355582

  11. Management of an unusual presentation of foreign body aspiration.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, H H; Bu-Saba, N; Baraka, A; Mroueh, S

    1992-08-01

    Foreign body aspiration is a very common problem in children and toddlers and still a serious and sometimes fatal condition. We are reporting on a 2-year-old white asthmatic male who choked on a chick pea and presented with subcutaneous emphysema, and on chest X-ray with an isolated pneumomediastinum but not pneumothorax. On review of the literature an isolated pneumomediastinum without pneumothorax was rarely reported. This presented a challenge in management mainly because of the technique that we had to use in order to undergo bronchoscopy and removal of the foreign body. Apnoeic diffusion oxygenation was used initially while the foreign body was removed piecemeal, and afterwards intermittent positive pressure ventilation was used. The child did very well, and his subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum remarkably improved immediately post surgery. PMID:1402375

  12. [Foreign body in the orbital cone: case report].

    PubMed

    Leal Filho, Manoel Baldoino; de Almeida, Bruno Ribeiro; Aguiar, Aline de Almeida Xavier; Vieira, Marcelo Adriano C S; de Morais, Ricardo Keyson P; Dantas, Karoline da Silva

    2003-06-01

    Orbital injuries may be associated with the presence of foreign bodies in which long retention leads to damages such as loss of vision or cerebral abscess. We present the case of a 21-year-old male patient that developed ptosis, limitation of movements and an inflammatory reaction in the right eye after being hit by a tree branch. A CT scan of the orbits revealed an increased density in the right orbital cone. After the neurosurgical approach for the removal of the foreign body, a wooden fragment measuring 2.0x0.3 cm, the patient had a good outcome without visual deficits, ptosis regression and resolution of the inflammatory process. The postoperative CT scan didn't identify any remaining foreign body fragment. This case calls attention to the fact that the wooden splinter presented on CT scan with high density (136 HU) two months after the trauma and was removed by a supraorbital craniotomy. PMID:12894292

  13. An unusual intracranial metallic foreign bodies and panhypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Lakouichmi, Mohammed; Baïzri, Hicham; Mouhsine, Abdelilah; Boukhira, Abderrahmane; Akhaddar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    A 49 years old man, with a history of aggression at the age of 18 years by a pair of scissors, who consulted for unilateral migraine headaches look straight. Paraclinical explorations concluded that trauma to anterior pituitary by a metallic foreign body from the right nostril to the sella, responsible for panhypopituitarism and sinusitis. The headaches are frequent causes of consultation, often treated symptomatically but rarely explored. The direct trauma to the pituitary gland, by a metallic foreign body, is exceptional. We report the case of neglected panhypopituitarism, discovered 31 years after injury with a pair of scissors. PMID:25667695

  14. Foreign body aspiration through tracheotomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Figueiredoi, Ricardo R; Machado, Walter S

    2005-01-01

    A 70 year-old man, with a 7-year tracheotomy because of a laryngeal tumor, had an accident during daily canulla cleansing procedure, aspirating a piece of the cleaning brush. Chest radiograph showed metallic foreign body at the right inferior bronchus. Rigid bronchoscopy was performed under general anesthesia, with no resistance in passing the tube through the glottis. The foreign body was easily removed and the patient had no complications. After leaving the hospital, the patient was sent to the ENT service where he used to be followed up. PMID:16446923

  15. Child abuse: multiple foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wadhera, Raman; Kalra, Vijay; Gulati, Sat Paul; Ghai, Anju

    2013-02-01

    The incidents of foreign body ingestion in infants and children are usually viewed as accidents, but these events may be a form of child abuse. We are reporting a case of child abuse who presented with multiple foreign bodies in the gastrointestinal tract. Physicians are required to report abuse when they have reason to believe or to suspect that it occurred. The purpose of reporting is not punishment of the perpetrator - it is the protection of the child. It is certainly in the best interest of the child, because child abuse is a recurrent and usually escalating problem that exposes the child to substantial risk. PMID:23164499

  16. A rare case of foreign body impaction requiring oesophagotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sahota, RS; Elloy, MD; Conboy, PJ

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of ingestion of a large stone in a male patient with a known psychiatric disorder. Failure of endoscopic removal necessitated retrieval of the impacted stone by an open oesophagotomy. This case highlights an important yet unusual presentation and management of an oesophageal foreign body. PMID:24992403

  17. A rare case of foreign body impaction requiring oesophagotomy.

    PubMed

    Mallick, F R; Sahota, R S; Elloy, M D; Conboy, P J

    2014-07-01

    We report a rare case of ingestion of a large stone in a male patient with a known psychiatric disorder. Failure of endoscopic removal necessitated retrieval of the impacted stone by an open oesophagotomy. This case highlights an important yet unusual presentation and management of an oesophageal foreign body. PMID:24992403

  18. Rectal Foreign Bodies: What Is the Current Standard?

    PubMed Central

    Cologne, Kyle G.; Ault, Glenn T.

    2012-01-01

    Rectal foreign bodies represent a challenging and unique field of colorectal trauma. The approach includes a careful history and physical examination, a high index of suspicion for any evidence of perforation, a creative approach to nonoperative removal, and appropriate short-term follow-up to detect any delayed perforation. PMID:24294123

  19. Visual diagnosis: Rectal foreign body: A primer for emergency physicians

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present a case that is occasionally seen within emergency departments, namely a rectal foreign body. After presentation of the case, a discussion concerning this entity is given, with practical information on necessity of an accurate and thorough history and removal of the object for clinicians. PMID:22152071

  20. FOREIGN BODY IN THE NASOPHARYNX; MASQUERADING AS PHARYNGOTONSILLITIS.

    PubMed

    Enyuma, C O A; Offiong, M; Adekanye, A; Akpan, U; Ezeanyagu, N; Uffiah, O

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body (FB) in the aerodigestive tracts has been commonly reported but findings of impacted foreign bodies in the nasopharynx following inhalation/ingestion are very rare. Most of the FB gets lodged as a result of forceful vomiting, coughing,and digital manoeuvres for removal of FB in the oropharynx. Several objects have been identified lodged in the nasopharynx. No age group is spared although most victims are children under 10 years of age. Foreign bodies in the nasopharynx can be uneventful or potentially dangerous depending on type, size and location as it may cause sudden airway obstruction, or local pressure necrosis of alimentary or respiratory tract or both. Presentation in children is usually with a history of swallowed FB which may not be witnessed in children, choking, cough, bluish discolouration, breathlessness, drooling of saliva, halitosis, rhinorrhoea, snoring, stridor, dysphagia, vomiting and dysphonia. A foreign body in the nasopharynx is a challenge to patient, parents, the physician and the ENT surgeon, as it may be miss-diagnosed, in the index case, as Pharyngotonsilitis. The index patient, a 14 month child,was presented with a two days history of fever, drooling of saliva, mouth breathing, and digital manipulation. Lateral imaging of the post nasal space following initial treatment with antibiotics, aided the diagnosis of a periwinkle shell in the nasopharyngx that was removed during a nasopharyngoscopy under general anaesthesia without complication and subsequently discharged home. This emphasizes a high index of suspicion for FB in the nasopharynx in children with history of missing foreign body, digital manipulation, drooling of saliva and mouth breathing. Lateral X-ray of the postnasal space, neck, chest and abdomen should be the minimum investigation required. PMID:27487618

  1. Nasopharyngeal foreign body triggered by a blind finger sweep.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takaaki; Inoue, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 1-year-old boy suddenly began choking and coughing after ingesting a coin. The child's mother attempted to extract the coin by inserting her fingers in his mouth and sweeping the oral cavity. The mother felt the object momentarily with her fingertips but was unable to retrieve it, and brought her son to a local hospital for assistance. The patient was referred to our emergency department (ED) for possible oesophageal obstruction by a foreign body based on the X-ray findings. On arrival at our ED, the child exhibited mild gagging but presented no respiratory symptoms and normal pulmonary examination. The chest X-ray revealed a nasopharyngeal foreign body. The patient was placed under procedural sedation and emergency removal was successfully completed by an otolaryngologist. Subsequently, the patient was discharged without complications. PMID:27605001

  2. Thoracoscopic removal of an intrapulmonary foreign body in a child.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Abhishek; Dhua, Anjan Kumar; Maddur, Srinivas; Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Kashyap, Lokesh

    2016-08-01

    A 9-year-old boy presented to our institution 6 months after falling on a needle that pierced his left chest wall. He presented to us after multiple unsuccessful attempts to have this foreign body removed at other hospitals. A thoracoscopic removal was successfully undertaken aided by fluoroscopy. This report shows how the needle's position and location were precisely defined by fluoroscopy, despite the needle being invisible on thoracoscopy. PMID:27255976

  3. [Suture foreign body reaction as a mammographic pitfall].

    PubMed

    Plagborg, G J; Andersen, H K

    2000-02-14

    A mammographic pitfall is presented. After lumpectomy owing to cancer in the breast a woman developed an immediate allergic reaction presumably caused by the subcutaneous sutures (vicryl). After adjuvant irradiation the breast became swollen and mammography gave suspicion of a recurrent breast cancer. Surgical excision was performed and examination of the biopsy specimen showed a foreign body reaction to the suture material with fibrosis and eosinophilia. PMID:10740437

  4. Terrorist bombings: foreign bodies from the Boston Marathon bombing.

    PubMed

    Brunner, John; Singh, Ajay K; Rocha, Tatiana; Havens, Joaquim; Goralnick, Eric; Sodickson, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    On April 15, 2013, 2 improvised explosive devices detonated at the 117th Boston Marathon, killing 3 people and injuring 264 others. In this article, the foreign bodies and injuries that presented at 2 of the responding level 1 trauma hospitals in Boston-Brigham and Women׳s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital--are reviewed with a broader discussion of blast injuries and imaging strategies. PMID:25639179

  5. Tracheoesophageal fistula following disc battery ingestion and foreign body impaction

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghnejad Tabari, Ahmad; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Rouzrokh, Mohsen; Seyyedi, Javad; Khaleghnejad Tabari, Nasibeh; Razavi, Sajad; Talebian, Mahshid

    2011-01-01

    Background: Ingestion of foreign bodies may result in the formation of a tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), which causes severe morbidity in children. We describe four cases of TEF, who underwent emergent surgery for repair. Case presentation: In this report, we present about four patients aged between 9 months to 2.5 years, who referred due to disc battery ingestion. There were two boys and two girls. The common symptoms were cough, cyanosis, and dysphagia, choking and vomiting. The diagnosis was performed through an x-ray, barium swallow and CT Scan. All batteries were impacted in the esophagus, two in upper, one in the middle, and one in lower esophagus position. All disc batteries were removed endoscopically, but had tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). All the patients underwent TEF repaired surgically. There was no morbidity in four patients, but one patient developed moderate esophageal stenosis, which was repaired by staged dilatation. There was no mortality in our cases. Conclusion: Long-term impaction of foreign bodies may result in tracheoesophageal fistula. This complication may be seen earlier with alkaline disc batteries. Removal of these foreign bodies should be followed carefully for the diagnosis and treatment of these fistulas. PMID:24551442

  6. Oesophagus obstruction due to ingestion of multiple foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Karadas, Sevdegul; Cegin, Muhammet Bilal; Sayir, Fuat; Gonullu, Hayriye; Olmez, Sehmuz

    2016-04-01

    The ingestion of a foreign body (FB) is a potentially serious condition. In children, the most common years for FB ingestion are from the age of 6 months to 6 years. FB ingestion also occurs in those with psychiatric disorders or mental retardation and among adult prisoners and alcoholics. Most ingested FBs spontaneously pass out of the body via the gastrointestinal system. An endoscopic or surgical approach is only needed if the object fails to progress through the gastrointestinal tract. All objects impacted in the oesophagus require urgent treatment. This study reports a case of multiple FB ingestion and provides a literature review. PMID:27122280

  7. Ultrasound-guided removal of foreign bodies: personal experience.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Leonardo; Leonardi, Anna; Bini, Amedeo; Sabato, Chiara; Nicotera, Paolo; Spano', Emanuela; Mariani, Davide; Genovese, Eugenio A; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2009-05-01

    Foreign bodies (FBs) retained in the soft tissues are a common reason for medical consultation, and usually consist of wooden or metal splinters or glass shards. Failure to remove foreign bodies is likely to give rise to acute or late complications, such as allergies, inflammation or infection, that may be severe. The surgical removal of an FB is invasive, costly and technically challenging. The procedure may fail in some cases and carries the risk of complications. Our study describes a technique for the ultrasound-guided removal of an FB, devised from our experience, and demonstrates its advantages over the standard surgical procedure. Sixty-two patients (43 males and 19 females aged from 9 to 65 years, median age 31 years) presented at our institution between October 2005 and June 2008 with suspected foreign bodies retained in the soft tissues of various body districts. Radiographic and/or ultrasound diagnosis was established by a radiologist expert in musculoskeletal sonography. The same radiologist helped by a nurse subsequently undertook the ultrasound-guided removal in the outpatient's clinic according to the technique described in the paper. ATL 5000 and PHILIPS iu22 ultrasound systems were used with high-frequency linear-array probes, sterile material, local anaesthetic (lidocaine 2%), scapels and surgical forceps. Antibiotic prophylaxis with amoxicillin and clavulanic acid were prescribed to all patients for 7 days after the procedure. Ninety-five FBs (39 glass, 35 metal, 17 vegetable, 2 plastic, 2 stone) were successfully removed under ultrasound guidance in all patients and the procedure took between 15 and 30 min. No complications arose either during or after the procedure. Seventy-five skin incisions were made and the wounds closed with Steri-Strips in 73/75 cases, whereas skin sutures were used in 2/75 cases. No complications arose either during or after the procedure. Ultrasound-guided removal of an FB retained in the soft tissues is a good

  8. Itraorbital organic foreign body – radiological methods in diagnosis – case report

    PubMed Central

    Shein-Filipowicz, Agnieszka; Kaźmierczak, Radosław; Kostkiewicz, Bogusław; Sempińska-Szewczyk, Joanna; Sankowski, Artur

    2010-01-01

    Summary Intraorbital foreign bodies, especially non-metallic ones, remain an important diagnostic and therapeutic problem. Organic foreign bodies contain large quantities of bacterial flora contributing to rapid onset of inflammation which may promptly damage the optic nerve. Further progression of inflammation may involve the structures of central nervous system. US examination is a preliminary, commonly available diagnostic method, although it is not always successful in visualizing foreign bodies. CT scan remains a standard investigation used to visualize intraorbital foreign bodies, although with organic foreign bodies, its results may be inconclusive. MRI allows for visualization and precise identification of foreign bodies, which is vital for surgery. The issue of intraorbital foreign bodies is an interdisciplinary problem requiring the co-operation between ophthalmologists and neurosurgeons. PMID:22802793

  9. Inhaled Foreign Bodies In Pediatric Patients: Proven Management Techniques In The Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Maraynes, Megan; Agoritsas, Konstantinos

    2015-10-01

    Foreign body inhalation affects thousands of children every year, and it remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Inhaled organic or inorganic foreign bodies can become lodged in the posterior nasopharynx, larynx, trachea, or bronchi. Presentation of foreign body inhalation can range from nonspecific respiratory symptoms to respiratory failure associated with a choking episode. In this issue, an in-depth review of the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of inhaled foreign bodies is presented. Risk factors for foreign body inhalation and clinical clues to diagnosis, as well as emergent management of inhaled foreign bodies are reviewed. A systematic approach, as described in this issue, will aid in timely and accurate diagnosis and treatment of inhaled foreign bodies, thereby limiting future complications and morbidity. PMID:26510331

  10. [The foreign particles injection induces stable hyaline cells differentiation in the hemolymph of the blowfly Calliphora vicina larvae].

    PubMed

    Kind, T V

    2008-01-01

    The stable hyaline cells (thrombocytoids precursors) are prevailing haemocytes type in young larvae of Calliphora vicina. Their concentration decreased significantly during the crop emptying and became completely absent in wandering larvae. However, the injection of foreign particles into the haemocoel induced evident increase in the number of stable hyaline cells by means of transformation from prohaemocytes within 24 h after the treatment. Maximum of hyaline cells concentration is achieved on the 2-3 day when the part of them starts to transform into prothrombocytoids. Injection of both abiotic (charcoal) and biotic (human erythrocytes) foreign particles exerts an identical effect. Puncture of the body wall, bacterial immunization and injection of saline did not induce hyaline cells appearance. In crop emptying larvae, the stable hyaline cells originate within the clusters of undifferentiated steam cells, i. e. prohaemocytes. After the completion of crop emptying in wandering and diapausing larvae, preliminary dedifferentiation of very young plasmatocytes may be also observed. It is suggested that specification of the stable hyaline cells is induced by thrombocytoids after engulfing of the injected foreign particles and forming of their agglutinates. PMID:18959187

  11. [One case of fungal sinusitis foreign body in nasal sinus].

    PubMed

    Yan, Xudong; Li, Na; Liu, Pei

    2015-08-01

    A young female complained repeated nasal discharge for over three months with discomfort of right cheek, and oral antibiotics had less effect. She has a history of "root canal therapy" five years before. Physical examination found purulent secretion in the right middle nasal meatus, and light tenderness in the right side of the maxillary sinus area. The CT scan of paranasal sinus shown possible fungal infection of right maxillary sinus. Finally the nasal endoscopic surgery confirmed the fungus ball of right maxillary sinus with foreign body (the root canal filling material). PMID:26685411

  12. Oesophageal Foreign Bodies--from Diagnostic Challenge to Therapeutic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Dragoş; Predescu, Irina; Sarafoleanu, Codruţ; Constantinoiu, Silviu

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion of foreign bodies, common in the emergency services, remains a challenge for physicians despite preventive measures and technical progress due to the frequency and possible complications, serious complications that can darken vital prognosis or may be a source of remote morbidity. Clinical experience at "St. Mary" Hospital included, between 2000-2015, 39 patients diagnosed with FB ingestion, of which 26 fixed in the oesophagus, with the remaining 13 having spontaneously progressed along the digestive tract (5 recovered from the stomach, 6 naturally evacuated, and 2 cases with colic perforation). Oesophageal foreign bodies occur consecutively to (in)voluntary ingestion, the vast majority of them passing unnoticed. The most frequently encountered types are coins, batteries, needles, various sharps objects, food, bone fragments, cartilages, pieces of plastic, glass, etc., FB impaction at oesophageal level being usually conditioned by the 3 anatomical narrowings. Typically, FB ingestion occurs at extreme ages, 60% of patients being pre-school children (<6 years), with an even higher percentage--between 70-80% between 6 months and 2 years of age--and only 15% elderly, frequently edentulous. Usual clinical signs, in the absence of complications, are: dysphagia, hypersialorrhoea, low cervical and/or chest strain, sometimes vomiting. Not at all infrequently (30%!), we notice the absence of any sign. Alarming manifestations, which indicate the development of complications, are pyrexia, general physical health deterioration, pain (with vertebral/interscapular projection), pulping, subcutaneous cervical emphysema. Diagnosis via various imaging methods (simple radiography, barium swallow, CT, MRI) remains the essential link in identifying the lesion and establishing a therapeutic approach. Endoscopic evaluation (rigid or flexible) is mandatory, also allowing therapeutic gestures. In terms of progression, 80-90% of FB pass into the stomach, being eliminated naturally

  13. [Foreign bodies--uncommon causes of GIT injuries].

    PubMed

    Hasala, P; Hadwiger, J; Gryga, A; Folprecht, M

    2009-09-01

    Injuries to various parts of the digestive tract caused by foreign bodies, frequently deliberately swallowed or inserted using various practics, are less common, however serious injuries. The symptomatology may be vague, credibility is often limited or anamnestic data may be intentionaly missing, which makes the diagnostic process tricky. Undefined, vague signs are related to specificities during the GIT perforation, so called hidden perforation. The recovery is commonly complicated, with a resulting handicap of stool incontinence or of colostomy. This is demonstrated on several subjects, treated in our surgical department. PMID:20052930

  14. Foreign body aspiration – Sometimes a tough nut to crack

    PubMed Central

    Sandhofer, Michael J.; Salzer, Hans; Kulnig, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body aspiration (FBA) is a dangerous and potentially life-threatening event. We report the case of a 24-month old boy, who was initially presented with an episode of obstructive bronchitis to the family pediatrician. Then, while being treated with empiric antibiotics, he aspirated a peanut. Although resulting in a coughing episode, the mother did initially not ascribe any relevancy to it. Since the diagnosis of obstructive bronchitis had already been established, only an in-depth history taking session with the mother could help figure out, why the boy's symptoms got worse instead of better. This article underlines the importance of accurate history taking and clinical examination. PMID:26236592

  15. Foreign body impact event damage formation in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucinell, Ronald B.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses a methodology that can be used to assess the effect of foreign body impacts on composite structural integrity. The described effort focuses on modeling the effect of a central impact on a 5 3/4 inch filament wound test article. The discussion will commence with details of the material modeling that was used to establish the input properties for the analytical model. This discussion is followed by an overview of the impact assessment methodology. The progress on this effort to date is reviewed along with a discussion of tasks that have yet to be completed.

  16. A rare case of bilateral bronchial foreign body

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, ZhiGang; Gao, Qian; Song, PengLong

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 7-year-old male patient with bilateral bronchial cocklebur fruit aspiration, which he sustained while playing. The patient presented with a triad of cough, wheezing, and decreased breath sounds (decreased in the right lung and absent in the left). These symptoms led to a diagnosis of bilateral bronchial foreign body, which was confirmed by computed tomography three-dimensional reconstruction of the bronchial tree. The patient was on the verge of death during operation but was ultimately rescued. Our therapeutic experience in treating this case of bilateral bronchial cocklebur fruit aspiration may provide a good reference for others. PMID:26101515

  17. Foreign Body in the Orbital Floor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ananth Kumar, G B; Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Praveen Kumar, S

    2015-09-01

    An 11 year old girl reported to the department with the complaint of redness and pus discharge from her left eye. History revealed that the patient had a fall from bicycle and injured her left eye one month earlier. CT scan reported an ill defined radiolucency present in the floor of the orbit. On surgical exploration we retrieved a wooden piece along with its disintegrated particles from the orbital floor. The need for clinical suspicion, proper history, diagnostic modalities and management of intra orbital foreign bodies are discussed in this article. PMID:26225084

  18. Urethral foreign body: removal of degraded magnetic spheres using Hartmann ear forceps.

    PubMed

    Chung, Paul H; Traylor, Janelle; Baker, Linda A

    2014-11-01

    Lower urinary tract foreign bodies have been reported in both children and adults. It is helpful for urologists to review foreign body case reports to become familiar with alternative approaches for removal that may prove helpful during challenging cases. To our knowledge, we describe for the first time a degraded rare-earth magnet within the body and use of Hartmann ear forceps to remove a foreign body from the urethra under cystoscopic guidance through a limited urethrotomy. PMID:25443938

  19. Hypoxia during general anesthesia? Unknown foreign body aspiration.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Ozgur; Unal, Demet; Selvi, Onur

    2016-09-01

    An 18-month-old male patient, classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists I, with bilateral inguinal hernia was scheduled for operation. Preanesthetic evaluation revealed history of completed medical treatment of acute bronchitis 10 days ago, and his respiratory examination was recorded as normal. He was successfully operated under general anesthesia with a laryngeal mask. After removal of the laryngeal mask, he displayed signs of hypoxia. Respiratory sounds were undetectable in the left thorax. He was intubated due to failure of adequate ventilation. Positive pressure ventilation and bronchodilators were administered to provide sufficient ventilation. In his chest X-ray, total atelectasis was determined in the left lung. Pleural effusion was ruled out with thoracic ultrasonography. Diagnostic rigid bronchoscopy was performed, and in left bronchial tree, hazelnut fragments were removed. The patient's hemodynamic and respiratory parameters recovered quickly after foreign body removal, and the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. His parents were questioned for persistent respiratory symptoms and they gave information about repeating respiratory tract infections in the last 3 months. We predict that displaced foreign body in lobar bronchus due to mechanical ventilation can cause this condition. PMID:27555159

  20. Button Battery Foreign Bodies in Children: Hazards, Management, and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Thabet, Mohammed Hossam; Basha, Waleed Mohamed; Askar, Sherif

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The demand and usage of button batteries have risen. They are frequently inadvertently placed by children in their ears or noses and occasionally are swallowed and lodged along the upper aerodigestive tract. The purpose of this work is to study the different presentations of button battery foreign bodies and present our experience in the diagnosis and management of this hazardous problem in children. Patients and Methods. This study included 13 patients. The diagnostic protocol was comprised of a thorough history, head and neck physical examination, and appropriate radiographic evaluation. The button batteries were emergently extracted under general anesthesia. Results. The average follow-up period was 4.3 months. Five patients had a nasal button battery. Four patients had an esophageal button battery. Three patients had a button battery in the stomach. One patient had a button battery impacted in the left external ear canal. Apart from a nasal septal perforation and a tympanic membrane perforation, no major complications were detected. Conclusion. Early detection is the key in the management of button battery foreign bodies. They have a distinctive appearance on radiography, and its prompt removal is mandatory, especially for batteries lodged in the esophagus. Physicians must recognize the hazardous potential and serious implications of such an accident. There is a need for more public education about this serious problem. PMID:23936851

  1. Pirfenidone inhibits fibrosis in foreign body reaction after glaucoma drainage device implantation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyoung In; Park, Chan Kee

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the antiscarring effects of pirfenidone on foreign body reaction in a rabbit model of glaucoma drainage implant surgery. Methods Adult New Zealand White rabbits had glaucoma drainage device implantation using Model FP8 Ahmed glaucoma valves. One eye was randomly assigned to receive postoperative intrableb injection of pirfenidone followed by topical treatment. The other eye underwent the same procedure but without the addition of pirfenidone. Histochemical staining and immunohistochemistry for blebs were performed. Results The degree of cellularity was smaller in the pirfenidone group than in the control group at 2 weeks post operation (P=0.005). A few foreign body giant cells were detected in the inner border of the capsule, and their numbers were similar in the control and pirfenidone groups (P>0.05). Using Masson’s trichrome stain, the inner collagen-rich layer was found to be thinner in the pirfenidone group than the control group at 4 weeks (P=0.031) and 8 weeks (P=0.022) post operation. The percentage of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells was lower in the pirfenidone group than in the control group at 2 weeks post operation (total bleb, P=0.022; inner bleb, P=0.036). Pirfenidone treatment decreased the immunoreactivity of connective tissue growth factor at 2 weeks post operation (total bleb, P=0.029; inner bleb, P=0.018). The height and area of α-smooth muscle actin expression were lower in the pirfenidone group than the control group at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks post operation (all P<0.05). Conclusion Postoperative intrableb injection of pirfenidone followed by topical administration reduced fibrosis following glaucoma drainage device implantation. These findings suggest that pirfenidone may function as an antiscarring treatment in foreign body reaction after tube-shunt surgery. PMID:27143855

  2. Bronchoscopic removal of foreign bodies in adults: experience with 62 patients from 1974-1998.

    PubMed

    Debeljak, A; Sorli, J; Music, E; Kecelj, P

    1999-10-01

    The authors reviewed their experience with therapeutic bronchoscopy for removal of tracheobronchial foreign bodies in the adult. Bronchoscopy records and collection of foreign bodies in the endoscopic department were retrospectively examined. Among 37,466 bronchoscopies performed between 1974-1998, 62 (0.2%) were performed for the removal of tracheobronchial foreign bodies. Medical history was suggestive of foreign body aspiration in 33 patients and the chest radiograph was suggestive in 10 patients. The procedure was performed with the flexible bronchoscope in 42 patients (68%), rigid bronchoscope in 4 (6%), and with both in 16 (26%) patients. Foreign bodies were found in the right bronchial tree on 42 occasions, in the left on 20 and in the trachea once. In 39 patients, inflammatory granulations were found around the foreign body. The origins of the foreign bodies included: bone fragments (n=31), vegetable (n=10), broncholith (n=8), a part of dental prosthesis (n=7), endodontic needle (n=2), a metallic (n=2), or plastic (n=1) particle, a tracheostomy tube (n=1) and a match (n=1). In one patient, 2 foreign bodies were found. The foreign bodies were successfully removed in all but 2 patients (3%). The most useful instruments for removal were alligator forceps and the wire basket. Foreign bodies in the tracheobronchial system are rare in adults. They can be successfully removed in the majority of patients under either flexible or rigid bronchoscopy. PMID:10573222

  3. A Rare Presentation of Two Cases of Metallic Intrascleral Foreign Body Entry through Upper Eyelid.

    PubMed

    Shitole, Satish C; Barot, Rakesh K; Shah, Rakesh; Bhagat, Nupur

    2016-04-01

    Ocular injury secondary to foreign body remains an important cause of ocular morbidity with or without blindness in working population. Intraocular foreign body may have varied clinical presentation. Initially it may look an apparently normal eye followed by obvious ocular symptoms depending upon its location and degree of inflammation. It can result in partial or full thickness penetration of sclera with or without involvement of posterior segment. We hereby present two cases of metallic intrascleral foreign body entry through upper lid in young carpenters following hammer and chisel injury. In case 1, Intrascleral location of foreign body was confirmed with X ray orbit and B scan ultrasonography while in case 2 the diagnosis of intrascleral foreign body was missed at the first visit to ophthalmology clinic Both the patients underwent exploratory surgeries where intrascleral metallic foreign bodies were found without ocular penetration. An intrascleral foreign body may be missed due to small penetrating scleral wound covered by a large subconjunctival haemorrhage accompanied by minimal or no signs of inflammation and failure on part of treating ophthalmologist to suspect an intrascleral foreign body. To establish a diagnosis of intraocular particularly intrascleral foreign body, careful history taking and clinical examination along with use of imaging studies are mandatory steps which help in successful management and good visual outcome. These cases highlight the importance of considering a presumptive diagnosis of retained intrascleral foreign body in every patient with a history of penetrating ocular trauma through lid or a visible wound/scar on the lid. PMID:27190855

  4. The prevalence of foreign bodies in jaw bones on panoramic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Omezli, Mehmet Melih; Torul, Damla; Sivrikaya, Efe Can

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Foreign bodies can be deposited in the oral cavity either by traumatic or iatrogenic injury. The most common foreign bodies of iatrogenic origin encountered are restorative materials, like amalgam, and root canal fillings. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of foreign bodies detected with panoramic radiography in the jawbones, as well as to evaluate the etiology and characteristics of these pathologies. Materials and Methods: From March 2012 to January 2014, 11,144 panoramic radiographs were taken and retrospectively reviewed. The number, characteristics, location of the foreign bodies, age, and gender of the patients were recorded. Results: Of the 11,144 patients reviewed, 62 of them have a foreign body with a frequency of 0.6%. The patients who had a foreign body were between 14 and 81 years old. Female patients showed more foreign bodies than male patients. Among the 62 patients, 63 filling materials, one stapler, and five shrapnel were detected. Only 8 patients had symptoms associated with foreign bodies and these foreign bodies excised surgically. Conclusion: If possible, these pathologies must be removed at the time of detection to prevent further complications; however, in asymptomatic cases, according to location and the characteristic of the foreign body, they can be kept under observation without performing any operations. PMID:26752878

  5. A Rare Presentation of Two Cases of Metallic Intrascleral Foreign Body Entry through Upper Eyelid

    PubMed Central

    Barot, Rakesh K; Shah, Rakesh; Bhagat, Nupur

    2016-01-01

    Ocular injury secondary to foreign body remains an important cause of ocular morbidity with or without blindness in working population. Intraocular foreign body may have varied clinical presentation. Initially it may look an apparently normal eye followed by obvious ocular symptoms depending upon its location and degree of inflammation. It can result in partial or full thickness penetration of sclera with or without involvement of posterior segment. We hereby present two cases of metallic intrascleral foreign body entry through upper lid in young carpenters following hammer and chisel injury. In case 1, Intrascleral location of foreign body was confirmed with X ray orbit and B scan ultrasonography while in case 2 the diagnosis of intrascleral foreign body was missed at the first visit to ophthalmology clinic Both the patients underwent exploratory surgeries where intrascleral metallic foreign bodies were found without ocular penetration. An intrascleral foreign body may be missed due to small penetrating scleral wound covered by a large subconjunctival haemorrhage accompanied by minimal or no signs of inflammation and failure on part of treating ophthalmologist to suspect an intrascleral foreign body. To establish a diagnosis of intraocular particularly intrascleral foreign body, careful history taking and clinical examination along with use of imaging studies are mandatory steps which help in successful management and good visual outcome. These cases highlight the importance of considering a presumptive diagnosis of retained intrascleral foreign body in every patient with a history of penetrating ocular trauma through lid or a visible wound/scar on the lid. PMID:27190855

  6. An unusual sharp magnetic foreign body in the oesophagus and its removal: A case report.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Swati; Arora, Sandeep; Sharma, Nishi

    2016-08-01

    Ingestion of foreign bodies is a common pediatric problem. The majority of ingested foreign bodies pass spontaneously. Oesophageal foreign bodies should be urgently removed because of their potential to cause complications. Ingested batteries that lodge in the oesophagus, sharp or pointed foreign bodies in the oesophageal or gastric tract, and ingestion of multiple magnets all require urgent endoscopic removal. A 4-year-old boy ingested a sharp magnetic foreign body, which was removed via rigid oesophagoscopy without complication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only sharp magnetic foreign body ingested by a young child ever reported in the English-language literature. We describe the presentation and therapeutic procedure adopted in this case. PMID:27368455

  7. [Inhaled foreign bodies in 50 patients in South Vietnam, mainly caused by naseberry (Sapodilla)].

    PubMed

    Nguyen Huu, L; Hoang Thi, Q; Nguyen Hong, D; Tran Ngoc, T; Homasson, J-P

    2004-12-01

    Inhalation of foreign bodies is relatively frequent in children, but exceptional in adults. Various kinds of foreign bodies can be inhaled, the type generally depends on eating habits in adults. We reviewed a series of 50 consecutive cases of inhaled foreign bodies and found that naseberry fruits (Sapodilla plum) was the primary cause, followed by bone debris. This series is typical of Eastern Asia, particularly South Vietnam. Most of the foreign bodies were extracted under local anesthesia using fibroscopy with a foreign body forceps. Most of the foreign bodies were on the right side. The naseberry nut is not radio-opaque, so diagnosis was generally established late after infectious complications. The endoscopic aspect was typical and should be recognized by endoscopists working in Vietnam. PMID:15699907

  8. An Asymptomatic Foreign Body in the Nose in an Eighteen-Year-Old Patient: Button Battery

    PubMed Central

    Onal, Merih; Ovet, Gultekin; Alatas, Necat

    2015-01-01

    Foreign bodies lodged in the upper airway are a common occurrence in children. Many unusual foreign bodies in the nose have been reported as foreign bodies like nuts, plastic toy parts, beads, and so forth. Most of these produce minimal morbidity but button batteries due to their early chemical disintegration require early surgical intervention. Here, we report a case of button battery lodged in the nose for several years with a symptom of nasal obstruction and chronic sinusitis. PMID:26664757

  9. Diagnosis and management of an intra-articular foreign body in the foot.

    PubMed

    Mulhall, K J; Sheehan, E; Kearns, S; O'Connor, P; Stephens, M M

    2002-10-01

    We describe a case of a small intra-articular foreign body in the foot presenting 48 hours following injury, which at operation showed early evidence of septic arthritis. It is essential to accurately localise periarticular foreign bodies in the foot and proceed to arthrotomy and debridement in all cases where there is radiological or clinical evidence to suggest intra-articular retention of a foreign body. PMID:12470001

  10. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Radiolucent Foreign Body from an EVAR Device by Combining Different Image Modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Barbiero, Giulio; Cognolato, Diego; Polverosi, Roberta; Guarise, Alessandro

    2009-07-15

    Percutaneous extraction techniques are an established method for removing endovascular foreign bodies. Generally, the foreign body to be removed is radiopaque (i.e., catheter and guidewire fragments, vena cava filters, embolization coils, endovascular stents). We propose an application of these techniques to remove a radiolucent foreign body (i.e., pigtail cover) by means of a combination of different imaging techniques (fluoroscopy, digital subtraction angiography, ultrasound, and computed axial tomography).

  11. An Asymptomatic Foreign Body in the Nose in an Eighteen-Year-Old Patient: Button Battery.

    PubMed

    Onal, Merih; Ovet, Gultekin; Alatas, Necat

    2015-01-01

    Foreign bodies lodged in the upper airway are a common occurrence in children. Many unusual foreign bodies in the nose have been reported as foreign bodies like nuts, plastic toy parts, beads, and so forth. Most of these produce minimal morbidity but button batteries due to their early chemical disintegration require early surgical intervention. Here, we report a case of button battery lodged in the nose for several years with a symptom of nasal obstruction and chronic sinusitis. PMID:26664757

  12. The ocular effects of intralenticular iron foreign bodies in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Virata, S R; Kylstra, J A; Peiffer, R L

    1995-01-01

    Optimal treatment of intralenticular metallic foreign-body injuries remains controversial, especially in patients with clear lenses and good vision. Using 20 rabbit eyes, we examined the cataractogenic potential of intralenticular iron and its effects on the retina. Iron wire implanted into the lenses of 12 rabbit eyes caused cataracts in every eye within 4 weeks. However, after 4 1/2 weeks, none of these eyes showed evidence of retinal siderosis. No cataracts developed in five eyes with intralenticular glass, while three with intravitreal iron showed marked retinal toxicity. These results suggest that as long as the lenses remain clear, conservative management of these injuries carries minimal risk of permanent retinal damage. PMID:7596542

  13. An ingested foreign body: two sides of the same coin?

    PubMed

    Varadharajan, Kiran; Magill, Jennifer; Patel, Kalpesh

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old child presented to the emergency department with an acute onset of dysphagia and stertor. A plain anteroposterior chest X-ray revealed a single circular opacity in the middle third of the oesophagus consistent with an ingested coin. The child was taken to the theatre for rigid pharyngo-oesophagoscopy and removal of the coin. After the first coin was removed subsequent endoscopic examination revealed a second coin at the same location. This extremely rare case of two ingested coins becoming impacted with perfect radiological alignment emphasises the importance of thorough examination on endoscopy and the potential limitations of an X-ray in initial assessment of an ingested foreign body. PMID:24717590

  14. Cerebral foreign body reaction after carotid aneurysm stenting.

    PubMed

    Lorentzen, Anastasia Orlova; Nome, Terje; Bakke, Søren Jacob; Scheie, David; Stenset, Vidar; Aamodt, Anne Hege

    2016-02-01

    Flow diverter stents are new important tools in the treatment of large, giant, or wide-necked aneurysms. Their delivery and positioning may be difficult due to vessel tortuosity. Common adverse events include intracranial hemorrhage and ischemic stroke, which usually occurs within the same day, or the next few days after the procedure. We present a case where we encountered an unusual intracerebral complication several months after endovascular treatment of a large left internal carotid artery aneurysm, and where brain biopsy revealed foreign body reaction to hydrophilic polymer fragments distally to the stent site. Although previously described, embolization of polymer material from intravascular equipment is rare. We could not identify any other biopsy verified case in the literature, with this particular presentation of intracerebral polymer embolization--a multifocal inflammation spread out through the white matter of one hemisphere without hemorrhage or ischemic changes. PMID:26510943

  15. An Organic Intravesical Foreign Body Caused by Penetrating Trauma that was Missed during Initial Management

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hoon Ah; Kang, Sung Gu; Ko, Young Hwii; Kang, Seok Ho; Cheon, Jun; Kim, Je Jong

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of an intravesical foreign body that was incompletely removed endoscopically and that defied diagnosis with current diagnostic tools. A 65-year-old man visited Korea University Anam Hospital complaining of dysuria and a sensation of residual urine. His medical history included an intravesical foreign body caused by penetrating trauma, and he had undergone endoscopic removal of foreign bodies 1 year previously. After additional remnant intravesical foreign bodies were found, he had undergone additional endoscopic removal and his urinary symptoms subsided. After 2 years, however, he again presented to the clinic complaining of dysuria and gross hematuria. Cystoscopy and computed tomography for intravesical foreign bodies were performed, but no evidence of a remnant foreign body was found. Open exploration revealed a remnant foreign body penetrating the bladder. A partial cystectomy including the foreign body was performed. We suggest that cases of penetrating injury with a radiolucent object may warrant primary open exploration and foreign body removal owing to the inherent difficulties in diagnosis and endoscopic treatment of such objects. PMID:23094223

  16. Identification of radiolucent foreign bodies in tissue using optoacoustic spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Leland; Maswadi, Saher; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2011-03-01

    One of the leading causes of medical malpractice claims in emergency medicine is the misdiagnosis of the presence of foreign bodies. Radiolucent foreign bodies are especially difficult to differentiate from surrounding soft tissue, gas, and bone using existing clinical imaging modalities. Because many radiolucent foreign bodies have sufficient contrast for imaging in the optical domain, we are exploring the use of laser-induced optoacoustic imaging for the detection of foreign bodies, especially in orbital and craniofacial injuries, in which the foreign bodies are likely to lie within the penetration depth of visible and near infrared wavelengths. In order to evaluate the performance of optoacoustic imaging for clinical detection and characterization, common foreign bodies have been scanned over a range of visible and near infrared wavelengths to obtain the spectroscopic properties of the materials commonly associated with these foreign bodies. The foreign bodies are also being embedded in realistic ex vivo tissue phantoms to evaluate the changes that may occur in the spectroscopic absorption of the materials due to the interaction with tissue absorbers. Ultimately, we anticipate that spectroscopic characterization will help identify specific wavelengths to be used for imaging foreign bodies that will provide useful diagnostic data about the material properties of the object, thereby enabling the characterization, as well as the location, of the objects. This information will aid the clinician in choosing the optimal treatment course for the patient.

  17. Review of Ingested and Aspirated Foreign Bodies in Children and Their Clinical Significance for Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Pugmire, Brian S; Lim, Ruth; Avery, Laura L

    2015-01-01

    Ingested and aspirated foreign bodies are a common occurrence in children and are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of ingested and aspirated foreign bodies in children and can be crucial to guiding the clinical management of these patients. Prompt identification and localization of ingested foreign bodies is essential to determining the appropriate treatment, as several types of commonly ingested foreign bodies require urgent removal and others can be managed conservatively. In particular, disk batteries impacted in the esophagus carry a high risk of esophageal injury or perforation; multiple ingested magnets can become attracted to each other across bowel walls and cause bowel perforation and fistula formation; and sharp objects commonly cause complications as they pass through the gastrointestinal tract. Accordingly, these ingested foreign bodies warrant aggressive clinical management and therefore radiologists must be familiar with their imaging appearances and clinical implications. Prompt recognition of secondary radiographic signs of foreign-body aspiration is also crucial, as clinical symptoms can sometimes be nonspecific and most aspirated foreign bodies are radiolucent. Overall, radiography is the most important modality in the evaluation of ingested or aspirated foreign bodies; however, fluoroscopy and computed tomography play an ancillary role in complicated cases. It is essential that every radiologist who interprets imaging examinations of children be aware of the imaging appearances of commonly ingested and aspirated foreign bodies and their clinical significance. PMID:26295734

  18. Five years with a rectal foreign body: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ozbilgin, Mücahit; Arslan, Baha; Yakut, Mehmet Can; Aksoy, Süleyman Ozkan; Terzi, Mustafa Cem

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Rectal foreign bodies are rare colorectal emergencies. They are important for the complications that may occur. Delayed response causes a wide range of complications or may even result in death. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 22 years old male patient was seen at our hospital with anal pain, discharge, and complaining of incontinence. The patient stated that a bottle of beverage was placed into his anal canal in an inverted manner for sexual satisfaction 5 years previously. DISCUSSION After clinical and radiological assessment under general anaesthesia in the lithotomy position the object was removed by a laparotomy. He was advised to seek legal help and he received psychiatric treatment in the postoperative period prior to his discharge. CONCLUSION Complications such as abscess, perianal fistula complicated by severe pelvic sepsis and osteomyelitis were expected complications in this case. As in this case, a surgical approach may eliminate dissection planes, increasing morbidity and mortality related to the injuring of surrounding bodies during object extraction. PMID:25553525

  19. Lunelle monthly contraceptive injection (medroxyprogesterone acetate and estradiol cypionate injectable suspension): effects of body weight and injection sites on pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Rahimy, M H; Cromie, M A; Hopkins, N K; Tong, D M

    1999-10-01

    A new contraceptive option, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and estradiol cypionate (E2C) (MPA/E2C, Lunelle Monthly Contraceptive Injection), will soon be available for women in the US. This article reports the results of a US trial that assessed the effects of body weight and injection site on the pharmacokinetics of MPA, the progestin mediating contraceptive efficacy. This assessment was part of a nonrandomized, open-label, multicenter US study in healthy women receiving a monthly injection of MPA/E2C for 60 weeks. A total of 77 women (aged 18-47 years) at four centers participated in the pharmacokinetics assessment during the sixth or the seventh injection. For determination of serum MPA concentration-time profiles, blood samples were collected before the sixth and seventh injections (day 0) and on days 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after the sixth and seventh monthly administrations. For effects of injection site, MPA pharmacokinetics were compared at injection sites of the arm, hip, and leg. The pharmacokinetics of MPA, determined at the sixth and seventh injection, were not significantly affected by injection sites. The mean area under the curve (AUC0-28), however, was different between the arm and the leg injection sites; the difference was < 20%. More important, the average MPA trough concentrations (Cmin) at the fifth and sixth monthly injections were similar (range 0.42-0.51 ng/mL) for the three injection sites and well above the threshold levels of 0.10-0.20 ng/mL required to suppress ovulation. For effects of body mass index (BMI) on pharmacokinetics, women were stratified into three groups: thin/normal (BMI 18-28, n = 48), obese (BMI 29-38, n = 23), and highly obese (BMI > 38, n = 6). There were no significant differences in the pharmacokinetics of MPA among the three BMI categories. The only significant difference (p = 0.0387) was the AUC0-28 between BMI 18-28 and BMI 29-38. Because of the small sample size in the highly obese group, a reanalysis was

  20. Practice perspectives: fat injection in different parts of the body.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, E

    1998-04-01

    Fat injection may be successfully performed in almost all parts of the body, including the face, hands, female breasts, buttocks, calves, and genitals. A review of the steps necessary for obtaining better cosmetic results with this procedure are presented. PMID:9697445

  1. Management of an intrapleural foreign body and empyema with video-assisted thoracoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ekeke, Chigozirim; Noble, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Intrapleural foreign bodies are rare and there are few reports on the occurrence and management of this uncommon clinical presentation. We report a case of a patient with a history of ingesting multiple foreign bodies, which resulted in multiple laparotomy procedures for extraction. The patient recently required surgical removal of innumerable ingested foreign bodies from the stomach and developed a left empyema post-operatively. Subsequent imaging studies revealed evidence of a foreign object in the left pleural space without evidence of an esophageal perforation or diaphragm injury.

  2. Multimodality imaging of foreign bodies in and around the heart.

    PubMed

    Illman, Jeffery E; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Byrne, Suzanne C; Gotway, Michael B; Kligerman, Seth J; Foley, Thomas A; Young, Phillip M; Bois, John P; Malik, Neera; Morris, Jonathan M; Araoz, Philip A

    2016-05-01

    Foreign objects are occasionally seen on computed tomography and could pose a diagnostic challenge to the radiologist and clinicians. It is important to recognize, characterize and localize these objects and determine their clinical significance. Most foreign objects in and around the heart are the result of direct penetrating injury or represent venous embolization to the heart. Foreign objects may cause symptoms and require prompt medical attention or maybe asymptomatic. Clinicians should be familiar with foreign objects that are encountered and understand treatment options. This paper looks at some of foreign objects that can be found and correlates with pathology where possible. PMID:27139781

  3. Effect of treatment with methicillin and gentamicin in a new experimental mouse model of foreign body infection.

    PubMed Central

    Espersen, F; Frimodt-Møller, N; Corneliussen, L; Riber, U; Rosdahl, V T; Skinhøj, P

    1994-01-01

    A new mouse model of foreign body infection has been developed. Intraperitoneal placement of a silicone catheter followed by injection of 10(8) Staphylococcus aureus organisms resulted in a reproducible, localized foreign body infection. The infection persisted as an intra-abdominal abscess surrounding the catheter for at least 30 days. Treatment with up to nine doses of methicillin or gentamicin or both was started 3 days after infection. The treatment showed a significant effect (P < 0.05), measured as reduction of bacteria on the foreign body, for all three regimens with a reduction of up to 2 log units, but no synergism was observed. The result of the treatment was poor, despite the facts that the local concentrations of methicillin were greater than the MIC for at least 72 h and that nine peak concentrations of gentamicin of > 13 micrograms/ml were obtained. The poor result of the treatment was not caused by development of antibiotic resistance or influenced by protein concentration, pH, or local presence in the pus of inhibitors of antibiotics. Both antibiotics showed good effects in time-kill studies in vitro on bacteria on catheters taken out of infected mice and catheters infected in vitro. During treatment, the proportion of intracellular bacteria increased in all treated mice to 60 to 75% compared with 20 to 30% in nontreated mice (P < 0.05). This indicates that intracellular survival of staphylococci may influence the outcome of the treatment in foreign body infections. PMID:7811017

  4. Endoscopic removal of esophageal and ruminal foreign bodies in 5 Holstein calves

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Diego E.; Cribb, Nicola C.; Arroyo, Luis G.; Desrochers, André; Fecteau, Gilles; Nichols, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic removal of esophageal and ruminal foreign bodies was successfully performed in 5 Holstein-Friesian calves under sedation or general anesthesia by using an electrocautery snare or a wire-guided Dormi basket. This report describes the endoscopic manipulations, treatment, and outcomes of esophageal foreign body removal in these calves. PMID:25320385

  5. Do Times until Treatment for Foreign Body Aspiration Relate to Complications?

    PubMed Central

    Tatsanakanjanakorn, Walailak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Foreign body aspiration is an emergency condition and may be fatal. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may be associated with complications. This study evaluated the association between time until treatment and complications due to foreign body aspiration. Methods. This study was a retrospective study conducted at Khon Kaen University Hospital, Thailand. We enrolled patients diagnosed with foreign body aspiration with evidence of foreign body detected using direct laryngobronchoscopy at any area from the larynx to the bronchus. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the association of times of treatment with complications of foreign body aspiration. Results. During the study period, there were 43 patients that met the study criteria. The most common age group was 0–2 years. Plant seeds were the most common foreign bodies (41.9%), and the right main bronchus was the most common site (16 patients, 37.2%). There were 30 patients (69.8%) that experienced complications from foreign body aspiration. Pneumonia was the most common complication (14 patients, 32.6%). The retention time was not significantly associated with the presence of complications (p value: 0.366). Two patients (4.7%) died due to complete airway obstruction and prolonged hypoxia. Conclusion. Times until treatment were not significantly associated with complications from foreign body aspiration.

  6. An Unusual Metallic Foreign Body inside the Knee Medial Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Faria, Carlos Eduardo Nunes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2014-01-01

    Foreign bodies in the knee joint are uncommon, particularly those not related to surgical procedures. In this paper, we present a case of an intraosseous metallic foreign body situated in the medial femoral condyle for one year, causing pain, which was removed with complete resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25506452

  7. Vertebral artery dissection due to an esophageal foreign body migration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Benmansour, Najib; Ouattassi, Naouar; Benmlih, Amine; Elalami, Mohamed Noureddine

    2014-01-01

    Unintentional foreign bodies' swallowing is a fairly common occurrence in ENT consultation especially among children. They usually pass through the gastrointestinal tract without complications. Migration of a foreign body through the esophageal wall is rare. It represents about 1% to 4% of all cases of foreign bodies' ingestion. A 16 year's old female patient has presented to ENT emergency with a painful dysphagia following an accidental ingestion of a metallic pin. Cervical X ray confirmed the presence of the pin while endoscopic investigations have shown no foreign body. Cervical CT scan revealed the migration of the foreign body through the esophageal wall with left vertebral artery dissection. Endoscopic management has been sufficient with an uneventful post operative follow up. Esophageal foreign bodies are very diverse mainly dominated by fish bones (60%) and chicken bones (16%). Metallic pins are rare. The major risks of migration of those foreign bodies are cervical abscess, mediastinitis and oeso-vascular fistulae. Cases of self extrusion through the skin have been reported. Migration of a foreign body through the esophageal wall is rare. Endoscopic management has been sufficient. PMID:25018833

  8. Computed tomography diagnosis of a thoracic and abdominal penetrating foreign body in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Appleby, Ryan; zur Linden, Alex; Singh, Ameet; Finck, Cyrielle; Crawford, Evan

    2015-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old, spayed female, mixed-breed dog was presented for hemoabdomen associated with an abdominal mass. Upon presentation bicavitary effusion was diagnosed. A penetrating intra-abdominal wooden foreign body was identified using computed tomography. This case describes a thoracic penetrating wooden foreign body causing bicavitary effusion following migration into the retroperitoneal space. PMID:26538669

  9. Computed tomography diagnosis of a thoracic and abdominal penetrating foreign body in a dog.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Ryan; Zur Linden, Alex; Singh, Ameet; Finck, Cyrielle; Crawford, Evan

    2015-11-01

    A 1.5-year-old, spayed female, mixed-breed dog was presented for hemoabdomen associated with an abdominal mass. Upon presentation bicavitary effusion was diagnosed. A penetrating intra-abdominal wooden foreign body was identified using computed tomography. This case describes a thoracic penetrating wooden foreign body causing bicavitary effusion following migration into the retroperitoneal space. PMID:26538669

  10. [Significance of topographic diagnosis of foreign bodies situated in the orbit].

    PubMed

    Gundarova, R A; Kataev, M G

    1990-01-01

    Clinical picture of extraocular foreign bodies in the orbit is analyzed in 49 patients, specific features of the diagnosis and treatment of this condition are discussed. Study of the topography of foreign bodies in the orbit has helped distinguish the clinically significant area of fragment localization, areas at a high risk of developing complications, and 'quite' areas. A localizing probe on a space molding was found an effective diagnostic tool. Using this probe, stereotopic localization of a foreign body may be associated with roentgen-negative intraorbital structures, i.e. vessels, nerves, muscles. Topographic location of a foreign body helped explain a considerable vision acuity reduction in relatively transparent media, recurrences of hemorrhages to the fundus oculi, and the type of the pain syndrome. Foreign body removal is indicated in stubborn persistent pain and regressive time course of changes. PMID:2264220

  11. Vertebral artery dissection due to an esophageal foreign body migration: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Benmansour, Najib; Ouattassi, Naouar; Benmlih, Amine; Elalami, Mohamed Noureddine

    2014-01-01

    Unintentional foreign bodies‘ swallowing is a fairly common occurrence in ENT consultation especially among children. They usually pass through the gastrointestinal tract without complications. Migration of a foreign body through the esophageal wall is rare. It represents about 1% to 4% of all cases of foreign bodies‘ ingestion. A 16 year's old female patient has presented to ENT emergency with a painful dysphagia following an accidental ingestion of a metallic pin. Cervical X ray confirmed the presence of the pin while endoscopic investigations have shown no foreign body. Cervical CT scan revealed the migration of the foreign body through the esophageal wall with left vertebral artery dissection. Endoscopic management has been sufficient with an uneventful post operative follow up. Esophageal foreign bodies are very diverse mainly dominated by fish bones (60%) and chicken bones (16%). Metallic pins are rare. The major risks of migration of those foreign bodies are cervical abscess, mediastinitis and oeso-vascular fistulae. Cases of self extrusion through the skin have been reported. Migration of a foreign body through the esophageal wall is rare. Endoscopic management has been sufficient. PMID:25018833

  12. Sonographic detection of a foreign body in the urethra and urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Barzilai, M; Cohen, I; Stein, A

    2000-01-01

    Reported herein is a 41-year-old male who presented for ultrasound due to two episodes of lower urinary tract infections within a period of 5 months. The sonographic examination revealed an elongated foreign body in the urethra extending into the urinary bladder. Self-insertion of foreign bodies into the urethra is usually done for erotic stimulation. However, foreign bodies can be inserted by children due to curiosity and by mentally retarded people, patients with psychiatric disorders as well as by intoxicated patients and in confusional states. Due to embarrassment, the patients seek medical help only when they are symptomatic and hence some of the foreign bodies are removed only several months after insertion. Detection might be either by plain abdominal films when the foreign bodies are radiopaque or by the use of contrast media. In the case presented by us, this was done by sonography. Endoscopic removal of these foreign bodies is considered the treatment of choice. Recurrent or chronic unexplained urinary tract infections should raise a high index of suspicion to the possible existence of a foreign body in the urethra and/or urinary bladder. PMID:10859554

  13. Neglected Foreign Body, the Cause of Navicular Osteomyelitis in A Paediatric Foot: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekara, C.M; George, M.A; Al-Marboi, Bader Said Khamis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Foreign body injuries with date thorns, metal and wooden splinters are common in Middle East region, as most of it is desert. Some of the injuries lead to cellulitis or abscess formation, if neglected or improperly managed results in osteomyelitis or septic arthritis of foot structures. This is the first report of isolated navicular osteomyelitis following neglected foreign body in a paediatric foot. Case Report: A 10 year old male patient presented with discharging sinus in left mid-foot 3 years after penetrating injury with wooden splinter. The diagnosis of navicular osteomelitis is confirmed with plain radio-graphs. The ultrasound of foot was done to localize the foreign bodies. Patient was treated with complete removal of foreign body (wooden splinters), surgical debridement and combination of IV and oral cloxacillin for period of 6 weeks. At 18 months follow up, patient had painless foot with no recurrence or collapse of navicular bone. Conclusion: The neglected foreign body can result in osteomyelitis of small bones of foot in pediatric patient. The ultrasound is more useful tool in localizing foreign bodies; those are not radio-opaque. Early and prompt diagnosis with adequate treatment of established osteomyelitis by complete removal of foreign body, curettage and antibiotics can give good results. PMID:27298914

  14. Anorectal Injuries due to Foreign Bodies: Case Reports and Review of the Management Options

    PubMed Central

    Karateke, Faruk; Das, Koray; Ozyazici, Sefa; Menekse, Ebru; Koseoglu, Zikret; Karcioglu, Ozgur

    2013-01-01

    Anorectal injuries due to autoerotic activity with rectal foreign bodies were identified in four male patients. The objects were bottle in one patient, glasses in two patients, and showerhead in one patient. Foreign bodies were extracted within lithotomy position after anal dilatation, under general anesthesia in 3 patients. One patient presented with peritoneal irritation and had a diagnosis of rectal perforation. He underwent transanal rectal repair with proximal fecal diversion. In this paper we described 4 patients who had anorectal injuries due to autoerotic activity with foreign bodies and reviewed the management options in literature. PMID:23533918

  15. 'Hunt the thimble': a study of the radiology of ingested foreign bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Boothroyd, A E; Carty, H M; Robson, W J

    1987-01-01

    The role of radiology in the management of patients with a history of ingested foreign bodies is reviewed in a retrospective study over a 2-year period in a Children's Hospital. If radiography was confined to those children who have a clinical history suggestive of foreign body impaction in the oesophagus, a foreign body aspiration or having swallowed a button battery, the work load and unnecessary radiation arising from this practice could be halved. This study demonstrates another misuse of radiological services. PMID:3580073

  16. Self harm through foreign bodies ingestion – a rare cause of digestive perforation

    PubMed Central

    Petrea, S; Brezean, I

    2014-01-01

    Self-harm is a rare pathology, often seen in psychiatric patients but more frequently in the penitentiary environment. Of the many possible forms of self-harm, foreign bodies (FB) ingestion is by far the most usual in the Romanian prison environment. Our paper aims to present the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects arising as a consequence of digestive tract perforations consequent upon foreign bodies ingestion; we analyze a number of 45 cases which occurred over a 7-year period (2003-2010) in Rahova Penitentiary Hospital. We also examined the surgical particularities of case resolution. Abbreviations: FB – foreign bodies, EEA – end-to-end anastomosis PMID:24653761

  17. Self harm through foreign bodies ingestion – rare cause of digestive perforation

    PubMed Central

    Petrea, S; Brezean, I

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Self-harm is a rare pathology, often seen in psychiatric patients but more frequently in the penitentiary environment. Of the many possible forms of self-harm, foreign bodies (FB) ingestion is by far the most usual in the Romanian prison environment. The paper aims to present the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects arising as a consequence of the digestive tract perforations consequent upon foreign bodies ingestion; a number of 45 cases which occurred over a 7-year period (2003-2010) in "Rahova" Penitentiary Hospital, were analyzed. We also examined the surgical particularities of case resolution. Abbreviations: FB = foreign bodies, EEA = end-to-end anastomosis PMID:25408734

  18. [Indications for transvitreal removal of foreign bodies from posterior eye segments].

    PubMed

    Volkov, V V; Dal', G A; Tulina, V M; Kulikov, V S; Gavrilova, N K; Nikolaenko, V P

    1999-01-01

    Results of treatment of 40 patients (43 eyes) with foreign bodies in the posterior segment of the eye are discussed. Special attention is paid to correct assessment of the risk and efficacy of removal of a fragment in each case. Only 67.5% of patients presented with obvious indications for removal of a foreign body through the vitreous. Fragments were removed in 83.3% of these patients. Complications occurred in 6.6%. The main causes of failure of sparing removal of a foreign body from the posterior segment of the eye were detachment of the retina and hemophthalmia. PMID:10377863

  19. Unexpected Radiologic Findings for a Casting Type of Radiolucent Colorectal Foreign Body Composed of Polyurethane Foam

    PubMed Central

    Tamamoto, Fumihiko; Ogawa, Shoichi; Sano, Maiko; Yoshimura, Tetsunori; Nozaki, Miwako

    2016-01-01

    Radiologic diagnosis of colorectal foreign bodies is usually not very difficult, because inserted materials are often clearly visible on plain abdominal radiographs. However, when they are radiolucent, a plain abdominal radiograph has been reported to be useless. As radiolucent colorectal foreign bodies appear as radiolucent artificial contours or air-trapped materials in the pelvis, almost always the diagnosis itself can be made by careful evaluation of plain abdominal radiographs. We encountered a case of casting type of radiolucent colorectal foreign body formed from polyurethane foam. It presented us with unexpected radiologic findings and led to diagnostic difficulties. PMID:27213072

  20. Hepatic abscess induced by foreign body: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Sofia A; Alberto, Sara CF; Cruz, Elsa; Pires, Eduardo; Figueira, Tomás; Coimbra, Élia; Estevez, José; Oliveira, Mário; Novais, Luís; Deus, João R

    2007-01-01

    Hepatic abscess due to perforation of the gastrointestinal tract caused by ingested foreign bodies is uncommon. Pre-operative diagnosis is difficult as patients are often unaware of the foreign body ingestion and symptoms and imagiology are usually non-specific. The authors report a case of 62-year-old woman who was admitted with fever and abdominal pain. Further investigation revealed hepatic abscess, without resolution despite antibiotic therapy. A liver abscess resulting from perforation and intra-hepatic migration of a bone coming from the pilorum was diagnosed by surgery. The literature concerning foreign body-induced perforation of the gastrointestinal tract complicated by liver abscess is reviewed. PMID:17457985

  1. A Domino Effect? The Spread of Implantation of Penile Foreign Bodies in the Prison System

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Ryan Malloy; Jain, Samay

    2014-01-01

    Subcutaneous penile insertion of foreign bodies is a practice performed globally but has mostly been reported outside of the United States. An incarcerated 29-year-old Caucasian male in a midwestern prison whittled a domino into a dog bone shape and placed it into his ventral penile subcutaneous tissue. He presented to our facility with erosion of the corners of the foreign body through his skin without evidence of infection. Self-insertion of foreign bodies into penile subcutaneous tissue by incarcerated American men for sexual enhancement is more widespread than previously reported. Erosion is a novel presentation. PMID:26955547

  2. Unexpected Radiologic Findings for a Casting Type of Radiolucent Colorectal Foreign Body Composed of Polyurethane Foam.

    PubMed

    Sanjo, Emi; Tamamoto, Fumihiko; Ogawa, Shoichi; Sano, Maiko; Yoshimura, Tetsunori; Nozaki, Miwako

    2016-01-01

    Radiologic diagnosis of colorectal foreign bodies is usually not very difficult, because inserted materials are often clearly visible on plain abdominal radiographs. However, when they are radiolucent, a plain abdominal radiograph has been reported to be useless. As radiolucent colorectal foreign bodies appear as radiolucent artificial contours or air-trapped materials in the pelvis, almost always the diagnosis itself can be made by careful evaluation of plain abdominal radiographs. We encountered a case of casting type of radiolucent colorectal foreign body formed from polyurethane foam. It presented us with unexpected radiologic findings and led to diagnostic difficulties. PMID:27213072

  3. A light bulb moment: an unusual cause of foreign body aspiration in children.

    PubMed

    Lau, C T; Lan, Lawrence; Wong, Kenneth; Tam, Paul Kwong Hang

    2015-01-01

    A 15-month-old girl developed persistent cough with no associated history of foreign body aspiration. Chest X-ray showed a U-shaped radiopaque foreign body, which was initially thought to be a hairpin, in the right main bronchus. Rigid bronchoscopy was performed and the foreign body turned out to be a light-emitting diode (LED) bulb. In this article, we report our experience of LED bulb aspiration in children, with the view to raise the awareness of clinicians about this potentially life-threatening emergency. PMID:26311014

  4. Thermographic techniques and adapted algorithms for automatic detection of foreign bodies in food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinlschmidt, Peter; Maergner, Volker

    2003-04-01

    At the moment foreign substances in food are detected mainly by using mechanical and optical methods as well as ultrasonic technique and than they are removed from the further process. These techniques detect a large portion of the foreign substances due to their different mass (mechanical sieving), their different colour (optical method) and their different surface density (ultrasonic detection). Despite the numerous different methods a considerable portion of the foreign substances remain undetected. In order to recognise materials still undetected, a complementary detection method would be desirable removing the foreign substances not registered by the a.m. methods from the production process. In a project with 13 partner from the food industry, the Fraunhofer - Institut für Holzforschung (WKI) and the Technische Unsiversität are trying to adapt thermography for the detection of foreign bodies in the food industry. After the initial tests turned out to be very promising for the differentiation of food stuffs and foreign substances, more and detailed investigation were carried out to develop suitable algorithms for automatic detection of foreign bodies. In order to achieve -besides the mere visual detection of foreign substances- also an automatic detection under production conditions, numerous experiences in image processing and pattern recognition are exploited. Results for the detection of foreign bodies will be presented at the conference showing the different advantages and disadvantages of using grey - level, statistical and morphological image processing techniques.

  5. Misery of neurosurgeon: Gauzoma causing foreign body granuloma-role of radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravi; Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Kumar, Atin; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Materials used in neurosurgery to achieve hemostasis may be of resorbable or nonresorbable substance and may cause foreign body granuloma if left at the operative site. Foreign body granuloma depending on clinical history may be indistinguishable from an abscess, resolving infarction, and hematoma. Here we present two cases, who had decompressive craniectomy following road traffic accident. Follow-up computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed hyperdense lobulated lesion with peripheral rim enhancement. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), lesions were predominantly hypointense on T1-weighted images, and hyperintense on T2-weighted images and showed a lack of restricted diffusion. In view of recent craniectomy and imaging findings diagnosis of foreign body granuloma was made. Both patients underwent surgery, intraoperatively gauze pieces were retrieved from lesions which confirmed preoperative diagnosis. The combination of CT and MRI can diagnose foreign body granuloma, especially in trauma settings. Thus, we can help the surgeon by providing the probable diagnosis for proper management. PMID:26889295

  6. Misery of neurosurgeon: Gauzoma causing foreign body granuloma-role of radiologist.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravi; Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Kumar, Atin; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Materials used in neurosurgery to achieve hemostasis may be of resorbable or nonresorbable substance and may cause foreign body granuloma if left at the operative site. Foreign body granuloma depending on clinical history may be indistinguishable from an abscess, resolving infarction, and hematoma. Here we present two cases, who had decompressive craniectomy following road traffic accident. Follow-up computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed hyperdense lobulated lesion with peripheral rim enhancement. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), lesions were predominantly hypointense on T1-weighted images, and hyperintense on T2-weighted images and showed a lack of restricted diffusion. In view of recent craniectomy and imaging findings diagnosis of foreign body granuloma was made. Both patients underwent surgery, intraoperatively gauze pieces were retrieved from lesions which confirmed preoperative diagnosis. The combination of CT and MRI can diagnose foreign body granuloma, especially in trauma settings. Thus, we can help the surgeon by providing the probable diagnosis for proper management. PMID:26889295

  7. Foreign Bodies in Lower Urinary Tract: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Pandey, Praveen; Goel, Amit; Kumar Pal, Dilip; Kumar Kundu, Anup

    2013-01-01

    Foreign bodies in lower urinary tract may present in a different number of ways. We report four cases of such unusual presentation. Physical examination and plain radiograph was sufficient enough to confirm our diagnosis in all cases. The cases belonged to different age groups and three out of four cases were managed by open surgical approach. One foreign body was removed using cystoscope. Prompt surgical management prevented urinary tract infections and long term complications in these patients. PMID:24396584

  8. Pencil in the pharynx: Case report of a penetrating foreign body.

    PubMed

    Kara, İrfan; Ulutabanca, Halil; Kökoğlu, Kerem; Güneş, Murat Salih; Çağlı, Sedat

    2016-07-01

    Pharyngeal foreign bodies are commonly encountered in otolaryngological practice. However, in certain instances, particularly in cases of penetrating injuries, major vascular damage leads to severe morbidity and mortality. Management of these cases includes airway protection, bleeding control, imaging of major vascular injury, and prophylactic antibiotics. The case of a 2-year-old patient with penetrating pharyngeal foreign body is described in the present report. PMID:27598617

  9. Removal of a large foreign body in the rectosigmoid colon by colonoscopy using gastrolith forceps

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiao-Dong; Wu, Guang-Yao; Li, Song-Hu; Wen, Zong-Quan; Zhang, Fu; Yu, Shao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Rectal foreign bodies are man-made injury that occurs occasionally. The management depends on its depth and the consequence it caused. We here report a case of rectal foreign body (a glass bottle measuring about 38 mm × 75 mm) which was located 13-15 cm from the anus. The patient had no sign of perforation, and we managed to remove it using endoscopy with gastrolith forceps. PMID:27182529

  10. [The prevention of the entry of foreign bodies into the stomach and intestines].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, N M; Belyĭ, I S; Gaponov, V V

    1993-01-01

    On the basis of the results of treatment of 320 patients, the organization and sanitary-instructive measures aimed at prevention of getting, or development of the foreign bodies in the stomach and intestine are suggested. The primary prophylaxis (prevention of penetration of the substances which are alien to the organism into its cavities and tissues) and the secondary one (removal of the foreign bodies from the organism of a patient before their penetration into the intestine) are distinguished. PMID:10912057

  11. Removal of Rectal Foreign Bodies Using Tenaculum Forceps Under Endoscopic Assistance

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Keun Joon; Kim, Boo Gyoung; Park, Sung Min; Ji, Jeong-Seon; Kim, Byung-Wook; Choi, Hwang

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of rectal foreign bodies is increasing by the day, though not as common as that of upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies. Various methods for removal of foreign bodies have been reported. Removal during endoscopy using endoscopic devices is simple and safe, but if the foreign body is too large to be removed by this method, other methods are required. We report two cases of rectal foreign body removal by a relatively simple and inexpensive technique. A 42-year-old man with a vibrator in the rectum was admitted due to inability to remove it by himself and various endoscopic methods failed. Finally, the vibrator was removed successfully by using tenaculum forceps under endoscopic assistance. Similarly, a 59-year-old man with a carrot in the rectum was admitted. The carrot was removed easily by using the same method as that in the previous case. The use of tenaculum forceps under endoscopic guidance may be a useful method for removal of rectal foreign bodies. PMID:26576143

  12. Seasonal Variation of Rectal Foreign Bodies: Data from Nationwide Inpatient Sample

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ranjan; Karmacharya, Paras; Alweis, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Seasonality is noted in various aspects of human behavior and functioning which have led to an increasing interest in their seasonality in the recent years. Aims: We aimed to examine the seasonal variation in the incidence of rectal foreign bodies in the US using a large inpatient database. Methods: We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database to identify patients aged ≥18 years admitted with a primary diagnosis of the rectal foreign body from 2009 to 2011. We used the Edward's recognition and estimation of cyclic trend method to study the seasonal variation of the incidence of rectal foreign body and Z-test to compare the seasonal incidences. Results: A total of 3359 hospitalizations with primary diagnosis of the rectal foreign body were reported from 2009 to 2011. The peak incidence of rectal foreign bodies was seen in October (peak/low ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10–1.32). Conclusion: Data on seasonal variation of rectal foreign bodies are extremely limited. Further studies would be required to verify whether our findings of a higher incidence in the fall season are reflective of acute changes in the length of the days, climate, sleep-wake cycle, or decreased sexual intercourse at this time of the year. High suspicion at this time of the year may help promptly diagnose and avoid unnecessary investigations. PMID:27213144

  13. A method for detection of foreign body in cotton based on threshold segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Tao; Xie, Tingting; Wang, Mengxue; Yang, Chaoyu

    2013-10-01

    In order to extract foreign body from the complex channel background and cotton layers, a detection method which combined improved Otsu threshold with background estimation threshold is presented. Firstly, the original image which containing multiple foreign fibers is divided into two new images which containing only two substances by Otsu threshold. And then using the estimated value of the means and the standard deviations of the two new images a background estimation threshold was determined. The foreign fibers are extracted by the estimation threshold. Simulation results show that this method can overcome the effect which caused by the channel background interference and diversity of the foreign fibers in the actual working environment and can extract foreign bodies quickly and effectively.

  14. Two remarkable events in the field of intraocular foreign body: (1) The reversal of siderosis bulbi. (2) The spontaneous extrusion of an intraocular copper foreign body.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, R B

    1975-01-01

    Two unusual events concerning intraocular foreign bodies are presented. The first patient had an occult or unsuspected intraocular foreign body. He showed iridoplegia with mydriasis, siderosis iridis, and an intraocular piece of iron lying posteriorly near the retina. The foreign body was removed and the patient regained normal iris color and pupillary activity. His vision remains 20/15 six years postoperatively dispite ensuing retinal detachment one year after removal of the foreign body. The second patient was a young boy injured by a blasting cap explosion. He lost one eye from the injury and had a piece of intraocular brass in his left eye. In spite of the development of chalcosis and a mature cataract the lens gradually shrank in the pupillary space permitting a clear aphakic area and 20/25 vision. The brass fragment migrated forward and inferiorly and was finally extruded under the conjunctiva five years later, where it was removed and chemically analyzed by x-ray diffraction. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:1108372

  15. Metallic foreign body in the sphenoid sinus after ballistic injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Akhaddar, A; Abouchadi, A; Jidal, M; Gazzaz, M; Elmostarchid, B; Naama, O; Rzin, A; Boucetta, M

    2008-05-01

    Paranasal sinus injuries by foreign bodies have a lower incidence compared with facial injuries. Among them, penetrating maxillofacial injuries to the sphenoid sinus and skull base remain rare. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who presented with, after a missile-related maxillofacial injury, a metallic foreign body enclosed within the sphenoid sinus with carotid-canal fracture. Angiographic evaluation showed a mass in the right internal carotid artery. The foreign object was successfully extracted through a transmaxillary sublabial approach with a good outcome. We discuss the extensive preoperative evaluation and interdisciplinary management of this unusual injury. PMID:17628677

  16. Urethral foreign body insertion for secondary gain in the incarcerated population.

    PubMed

    Mastromichalis, Michael; Sackman, Daniel; Tycast, James F; Chehval, Micheal J

    2011-10-01

    Not uncommonly, hostile prison environments can lead desperate prisoners to place foreign materials into natural orifices in an effort to gain transfer to an outside healthcare facility. In this article, we present a case series of urethral foreign body insertion of varying burdens and durations requiring transfer to our facility for surgical management. Endoscopic retrieval was the initial management in each case; one case required conversion to open cystotomy for complete removal due the orientation, amount of inserted foreign body, and erosion into the proximal urethral and bladder urothelium. PMID:22018157

  17. Body in Mind: How Gestures Empower Foreign Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macedonia, Manuela; Knosche, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that enactment (i.e., performing representative gestures during encoding) enhances memory for concrete words, in particular action words. Here, we investigate the impact of enactment on abstract word learning in a foreign language. We further ask if learning novel words with gestures facilitates sentence…

  18. Comparison between Computed Tomography and Ultrasonography in Detecting Foreign Bodies Regarding Their Composition and Depth: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Abdolaziz; Shakibafard, Alireza; Khosravifard, Negar

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Impaction of foreign bodies in the soft tissues is a sequela of traumatic and penetrating injuries. Such foreign bodies should be removed due to the complications they cause. Patient’s history, clinical evaluation and imaging examinations aid in the proper detection and localization of the foreign bodies.   Purpose The aim of the present study was to compare the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography for detecting foreign bodies in in-vitro models simulating facial soft tissues. Materials and Method Fifty foreign particles with five different compositions including wood, glass, metal, plastic, and stone were embedded in five calf tongues at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 cm depths. CT and ultrasonography were compared regarding their capability of detecting and localizing the foreign bodies. Results Wood and plastic foreign bodies were demonstrated more clearly on ultrasonography images. High density materials such as metal, stone, and glass were detected with almost the same accuracy on CT and ultrasonography examinations. Visibility of the foreign bodies deteriorated on ultrasonography images as their depth increased; however, CT appearances of the foreign particles were not influenced by their depths. Conclusion Ultrasonography is an appropriate technique for detection of foreign bodies especially the ones with low density. Therefore, it seems logical to perform ultrasonography in combination with CT in cases with the suspicion of foreign body impaction. PMID:27602392

  19. Non-fatal asphyxiation and foreign body ingestion in children 0-14 years.

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, A. E.; Ozanne-Smith, J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the frequency and nature of non-fatal asphyxiation and foreign body ingestion injuries among children in the state of Victoria, Australia, and to identify possible areas for prevention. METHODS: For children under 15 years, all Victorian public hospital admissions, July 1987 to June 1995, due to asphyxiation or 'foreign body entering through other orifice' (which includes ingestions), were reviewed. Emergency department presentations due to asphyxiation and foreign body ingestion provided information on circumstances of, and the type of foreign bodies involved in the injuries. RESULTS: The childhood average annual admission rate for asphyxiation was 15.1 per 100,000. Food related asphyxiation peaked in infants under 1 year, and declined to low levels by 3 years. The main foods involved were nuts, carrot, apple, and candy. The rate of non-food related asphyxiation was relatively constant to 3 years of age and then declined by 6 years. Mechanical suffocation was less common. The annual admission rate for 'foreign body entering through other orifice' was 31.7 per 100,000. These injuries peaked in 2-3 year olds then gradually declined. About 80% of these foreign body admissions were ingestions, with coins being the major object ingested. Admission rates for these causes remained constant over the eight years. Asphyxiation resulted in a higher proportion admitted and longer hospital stays. CONCLUSIONS: Prevention of suffocation and strangulation needs to focus on a safe sleeping environment and avoidance of ropes and cords, while foreign body asphyxiation and ingestion needs a focus on education of parents and child carers regarding age, appropriate food, risk of play with coins, and other small items. Legislation for toy small parts could be extended to those used by children up to the age of 5 years, and to other products marketed for children. Design changes and warning labels also have a place in prevention. PMID:9338828

  20. Maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma with concurrent prolonged foreign body impaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ha; Cho, Jin Hee; Cho, Kwang Jae; Kim, Joohwan

    2012-03-01

    Several elements in the maxillary sinus are reported to be carcinogenic. Also, foreign body reaction can cause cancer in any part of the body. We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma at the site in the maxillary sinus where a bullet splinter, analyzed as iron afterward, was inserted during the Korean War, approximately 60 years earlier. PMID:22446444

  1. A Ferromagnetic Foreign Body at the Lateral Aspect of the Mandibular Ramus in a Medically Compromised Patient.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Nakayama, Y; Yamamoto, I; Matsusue, Y; Shimotsuji, H; Kirita, T

    2016-01-01

    A case of a ferromagnetic foreign body in a medically compromised patient was reported. The patient was a 45-year-old male who consulted our department complaining of a foreign body accidentally impacted in the right cheek. X-ray examination revealed a foreign body at the lateral aspect of the right mandibular ramus. The removal of the foreign body was scheduled, but the patient did not return for the procedure. After 8 years he revisited our department for the removal of the foreign body, because it had been found to be ferromagnetic and a barrier to MRI examination. X-ray examination confirmed the foreign body was located at the same site as 8 years prior. Although the patient was suffering from liver cirrhosis with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia, the foreign body was successfully removed under general anesthesia. The foreign body was 12 × 5 × 1 mm, weighed 0.48 g, and was ferromagnetic. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. X-ray examination confirmed the removal of the foreign body. Since the surgery, the patient has been in generally stable condition with no complications. This case was a rare example of a foreign body that needed to be removed for medical examination. PMID:27583049

  2. A Ferromagnetic Foreign Body at the Lateral Aspect of the Mandibular Ramus in a Medically Compromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Nakayama, Y; Yamamoto, I; Matsusue, Y; Shimotsuji, H; Kirita, T

    2016-01-01

    A case of a ferromagnetic foreign body in a medically compromised patient was reported. The patient was a 45-year-old male who consulted our department complaining of a foreign body accidentally impacted in the right cheek. X-ray examination revealed a foreign body at the lateral aspect of the right mandibular ramus. The removal of the foreign body was scheduled, but the patient did not return for the procedure. After 8 years he revisited our department for the removal of the foreign body, because it had been found to be ferromagnetic and a barrier to MRI examination. X-ray examination confirmed the foreign body was located at the same site as 8 years prior. Although the patient was suffering from liver cirrhosis with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia, the foreign body was successfully removed under general anesthesia. The foreign body was 12 × 5 × 1 mm, weighed 0.48 g, and was ferromagnetic. The patient’s postoperative course was uneventful. X-ray examination confirmed the removal of the foreign body. Since the surgery, the patient has been in generally stable condition with no complications. This case was a rare example of a foreign body that needed to be removed for medical examination. PMID:27583049

  3. Inflammasome components ASC and AIM2 modulate the acute phase of biomaterial implant-induced foreign body responses

    PubMed Central

    Christo, Susan N.; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Manavis, Jim; Grimbaldeston, Michele A.; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir; Hayball, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Detailing the inflammatory mechanisms of biomaterial-implant induced foreign body responses (FBR) has implications for revealing targetable pathways that may reduce leukocyte activation and fibrotic encapsulation of the implant. We have adapted a model of poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) bead injection to perform an assessment of the mechanistic role of the ASC-dependent inflammasome in this process. We first demonstrate that ASC−/− mice subjected to PMMA bead injections had reduced cell infiltration and altered collagen deposition, suggesting a role for the inflammasome in the FBR. We next investigated the NLRP3 and AIM2 sensors because of their known contributions in recognising damaged and apoptotic cells. We found that NLRP3 was dispensable for the fibrotic encapsulation; however AIM2 expression influenced leukocyte infiltration and controlled collagen deposition, suggesting a previously unexplored link between AIM2 and biomaterial-induced FBR. PMID:26860464

  4. Epidemiology and Management of Foreign Bodies in the Hand: Pakistani Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Saaiq, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Penetrating and impalement injuries of the hand and fingers are one of the commonest presentations at the hospital’s emergency rooms. This study assessed the characteristics of patients who suffered foreign body injuries to the hands and documented the pattern of diagnosis and management at a specialist plastic surgical facility. METHODS The study was conducted at the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad over a period of six years (i.e. from September 1, 2007 to July 31, 2013). All adult patients (37 subjects) of either gender who were managed for hand foreign bodies during the study period were included by convenience sampling technique. The demographic profile of the patients, cause of injury, type of foreign body, occupation of the patient, diagnostic yield of plain x-rays, type of procedure undertaken for retrieval of foreign body, and complications were all recorded on a form. A follow-up of three months was done. RESULTS Eighteen (48.64%) were males while 51.35% (n=19) were female. The mean age was 26.78±9.94 years. The commonest sufferers were housewives 29.72% (n=11). Majority of patients (n=16; 43.24%) presented on day 3 (i.e. >48-72 hours), among the injury causing mechanisms, the commonest were accidents with sewing machines 45.94% (n=17) and sewing machine needles 45.94% (n=17) were the commonest foreign bodies observed. The plain x-ray hands reveled the diagnosis in all patients except those with wooden foreign bodies (n=3; 8.10%). All patients had successful surgical exploration and retrieval of the foreign bodies under local anesthesia and tourniquet control. In two cases, image intensifier was employed to locate the foreign bodies per-operatively. Wound infection was found in 0.8% (n=4) patients, all of whom were managed successfully with oral antibiotics. None of patients had hospitalization. All patients were fine at 3 months follow up. CONCLUSIONS Surgical

  5. Cervical esophagotomy for foreign body extraction – Case report and comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Heger, Patrick; Weber, Tim F.; Rehm, Johannes; Pathil, Anita; Decker, Frank; Schemmer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal foreign bodies are an important and serious cause of morbidity and mortality in both children and adults. Due to the possibility of serious complications, i.e. perforation, necrosis, mediastinitis, and fistulation, rapid and accurate diagnostic measures with subsequent therapy are necessary. Case report We are reporting a case of a 55-year-old, mentally impaired patient that has swallowed a foreign body, which subsequently became lodged in his esophagus. Due to the fact that endoscopic removal was not possible and there was a high risk of complications such as esophageal perforation or mediastinitis in this case, we performed cervical esophagotomy and successfully extracted the foreign body. The patient showed an uneventful postoperative process and could be discharged on Day 11 after the operation. Comprehensive review Furthermore, we performed a systematic review of the literature to identify all studies that described a surgical approach through esophagotomy in cases of foreign body ingestion and found 11 publications describing the cases of 29 patients. These studies reported an overall complication rate of 17.2% and a mortality rate of 0%. Conclusion Our findings suggest that esophagotomy could be a viable approach for the extraction of foreign bodies especially in some cases when endoscopic removal was not successful and the risk of esophageal perforation is high. PMID:27144004

  6. CT detection and location of intraorbital foreign bodies. Experiments with wood and glass.

    PubMed

    Myllylä, V; Pyhtinen, J; Päivänsalo, M; Tervonen, O; Koskela, P

    1987-06-01

    The series comprises 27 patients examined by CT to detect, locate or exclude a foreign body. 22 of them actually had an orbital foreign body. In three cases CT was the primary method and showed the foreign body correctly, while in 18 it was first detected in plain films and CT was performed to locate it. 20 metallic foreign bodies were hyperdense in appearance. Two cases had wooden foreign bodies, one with a density of +10 HU and the other hypodense with a value of about -434 to -446 HU. The latter piece of wood was first interpreted falsely as a bubble of gas. The results proved that the detection of metal is easy, but differentiation between wood and gas is problematical. Experiments conducted to determine the CT densities of different pieces of wood gave results varying from -618 HU to +23 HU. The highest densities obtained for glass varied from +522 HU to +2000 HU. The density of a plastic lens was -105 HU. PMID:3037632

  7. Surgical Removal of Neglected Soft Tissue Foreign Bodies by Needle-Guided Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Radmanesh, Mohammad; Rabiei, Sohrab; kavoussi, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The phenomenon of neglected foreign bodies is a significant cause of morbidity in soft tissue injuries and may present to dermatologists as delayed wound healing, localized cellulitis and inflammation, abscess formation, or foreign body sensation. Localization and removal of neglected soft tissue foreign bodies (STFBs) is complex due to possible inflammation, indurations, granulated tissue, and fibrotic scar. This paper describes a simple method for the quick localization and (surgical) removal of neglected STFBs using two 23-gauge needles without ultrasonographic or fluoroscopic guidance. Materials and Methods: A technique based on the use of two 23-gauge needles was used in 41 neglected STFBs in order to achieve proper localization and fixation of foreign bodies during surgery. Results: Surgical removal was successful in 38 of 41 neglected STFBs (ranging from 2–13mm in diameter). Conclusion: The cross-needle-guided technique is an office-based procedure that allows the successful surgical removal of STFBs using minimal soft tissue exploration and dissection via proper localization, fixation, and propulsion of the foreign body toward the surface of the skin. PMID:24303416

  8. Foreign bodies in the tracheobronchial tree. Special references to experience in 97 children.

    PubMed

    Svensson, G

    1985-03-01

    The case records of 110 patients (97 children and 13 grown-ups) with foreign bodies in the tracheobronchial tree during a period of 14 years (1970-1983) are reviewed. Atypical histories, misleading clinical and radiological findings and delayed diagnoses due to misinterpretations by the patients or their physicians were seen from time to time. Other findings in this survey were that organic material prevailed, with the majority of the objects in the right bronchial tree; there was a male predominance and the most common age for inhalation of a foreign body was about two years. Bronchoscopic extraction was the routine and only in one boy had the object to be removed by the transthoracic route. The venturi technique with oxygenation through the bronchoscope was applied at the extraction procedures. This principle for ventilation during general anaesthesia creates excellent working conditions for the endoscopist. The hazard at the removal of a foreign body is thereby reduced. PMID:3997379

  9. Foreign body granuloma of the penis caused by occupational glass fibre exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Hinnen, U; Elsner, P; Barraud, M; Burg, G

    1997-01-01

    We report a patient who presented with the suspected diagnosis of syphilis. Clinical findings included a penile ulcer, positive history of syphilis more than 20 years ago, and positive syphilis serology (TPHA, FTA-Abs). A biopsy showed a plasma-cell rich inflammation with granuloma formation. Since a birefractory structure was observed in the biopsy possibly corresponding to a foreign body, the patient's occupational exposure was investigated. Working in the fiber reinforced plastics industry, he was heavily exposed to glass fibre that was even detected on the inside of his underwear. Taking the serological pattern into account that was not consistent with active syphilis, a penile ulcer following a foreign body reaction was diagnosed. This case report demonstrates the difficulties of differentiating foreign body granuloma of the genital region from venereal diseases with granuloma formation. Images PMID:9582491

  10. Combinatorial hydrogel library enables identification of materials that mitigate the foreign body response in primates

    PubMed Central

    Vegas, Arturo J; Veiseh, Omid; Doloff, Joshua C; Ma, Minglin; Tam, Hok Hei; Bratlie, Kaitlin; Li, Jie; Bader, Andrew R; Langan, Erin; Olejnik, Karsten; Fenton, Patrick; Kang, Jeon Woong; Hollister-Locke, Jennifer; Bochenek, Matthew A; Chiu, Alan; Siebert, Sean; Tang, Katherine; Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Aresta-Dasilva, Stephanie; Dholakia, Nimit; Thakrar, Raj; Vietti, Thema; Chen, Michael; Cohen, Josh; Siniakowicz, Karolina; Qi, Meirigeng; McGarrigle, James; Graham, Adam C; Lyle, Stephen; Harlan, David M; Greiner, Dale L; Oberholzer, Jose; Weir, Gordon C; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2016-01-01

    The foreign body response is an immune-mediated reaction that can lead to the failure of implanted medical devices and discomfort for the recipient1–6. There is a critical need for biomaterials that overcome this key challenge in the development of medical devices. Here we use a combinatorial approach for covalent chemical modification to generate a large library of variants of one of the most widely used hydrogel biomaterials, alginate. We evaluated the materials in vivo and identified three triazole-containing analogs that substantially reduce foreign body reactions in both rodents and, for at least 6 months, in non-human primates. The distribution of the triazole modification creates a unique hydrogel surface that inhibits recognition by macrophages and fibrous deposition. In addition to the utility of the compounds reported here, our approach may enable the discovery of other materials that mitigate the foreign body response. PMID:26807527

  11. Silicone impression material foreign body in the middle ear: Two case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuyoshi; Okamura, Koji; Yano, Takuya; Moteki, Hideaki; Kitoh, Ryosuke; Takumi, Yutaka; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2015-10-01

    We report two cases of impression material foreign body in the middle ear. The first case had been affected with chronic otitis media. The silicone flowed into the middle ear through a tympanic membrane perforation during the process of making an ear mold. About 4 years and 8 months after, the patient had severe vertigo and deafness. We found bone erosion of the prominence of the lateral semicircular canal and diagnosed labyrinthitis caused by silicone impression material. In the second case silicone flowed into the canal wall down mastoid cavity. Both cases required surgery to remove the foreign body. The clinical courses in such cases are variable and timing of surgery is sometimes difficult. In addition to reporting these two cases, we present here a review of the literature regarding impression material foreign bodies. PMID:25956272

  12. Local Foreign-Body Reaction to Commercial Biodegradable Implants: An In Vivo Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Amy S.; Koshy, John C.; Weathers, William M.; Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Kaufman, Yoav; Sharabi, Safa E.; Brown, Rodger H.; Hicks, M. John; Hollier, Larry H.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable plates have been used extensively in fracture fixation since the 1960s. They rarely cause stress-protection atrophy or problems requiring secondary plate removal, common complications seen with metallic plates. However, aseptic foreign-body reactions have been reported, sometimes years after the original implantation. Both inadequate polymer degradation and debris accumulation have been implicated as causes. The current generation of commercial biodegradable plates is formulated to minimize this complication by altering the ratio of polylactic and polyglycolic acids. This in vivo study compares the degree of local foreign-body reaction of two commercially available resorbable plates in rabbits. Two types of biodegradable plates were examined: poly(D/L)lactide acid (PDLLA) and polylactide-co-glycolide acid (PLGA). Each plate was placed into a periosteal pericalvarial pocket created beneath the anterior or posterior scalp of a rabbit. Humane killing occurred at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Foreign-body reaction was evaluated histologically. The PDLLA plates demonstrated marked local foreign-body reactions within the implant capsule as early as 3 months after implantation, with presence of inflammatory cells and granulomatous giant cells in close association with the implant material. All local foreign-body reactions were subclinical with no corresponding tissue swelling requiring drainage. PLGA plates did not demonstrate any signs of inflammatory reactions. In addition, the PLGA plates did not appear to resorb or integrate at 12 months. Neither PDLLA nor PLGA plates demonstrated inflammation of the soft tissue or adjacent bone outside the implant capsule. In our study, the PDLLA plates demonstrated histological evidence of foreign-body reaction that is confined within the implant capsule, which was not seen with the PLGA plates. This finding may be attributable to the lack of significant resorption seen in the PLGA plates. Both PDLLA and PLGA

  13. Retrobulbar lymphoma associated with a ballistic foreign body in a cat.

    PubMed

    Robat, C; Bemelmans, I; Marescaux, L

    2016-04-01

    A seven-year-old domestic shorthair cat, adopted 5 years previously with a corneal perforation of the left eye, was presented for investigation of a left orbital mass. Computed tomography revealed a metallic foreign body within a contrast-enhancing, heterogeneous orbital mass. Large cell lymphoma was diagnosed from a fine needle aspirate. The cat staged negatively and was treated with L-asparaginase, prednisolone and three fractions of radiation therapy. A rapid clinical remission was obtained and the cat remained in remission for 3 years after therapy. This is the first report of large cell lymphoma likely occurring secondary to a foreign body. PMID:26290463

  14. Vocal cord palsy anatomical changes and a foreign body mimicking malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Helen; Qureishi, Ali; Silva, Priy

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman presented with a history of prolonged dysphonia, a red flag symptom for laryngeal cancer. Flexible nasal endoscopy revealed a lesion which looked suspicious for malignancy and therefore she went onto have a microlaryngoscopy and an attempt at biopsy. It was during this procedure that a foreign body was removed whole from a dilated laryngeal ventricle. We believe that some subtle anatomical changes caused by a pre-existing unilateral vocal cord palsy contributed to the impaction of this foreign body. PMID:25073526

  15. Corpus alienum on hard palate - An unusual "misdiagnosis" of foreign body: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Nitesh; Singh, Neerja; Singh, Subash; Agarwal, Naina; Gupta, Narendra Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Corpus alienum or foreign body on hard palate is a rare presentation and often associated with a scare secondary to misdiagnosis. The potential dangers of respiratory obstruction, mucosal tear, nasopharyngeal inflammation and gastro-intestinal bleeding make these non-invasive foreign bodies, life threatening. A case report of a three year old girl with a 2.5cm×2cm plastic sticker lodged on hard palate for four months and misdiagnosed as salivary gland tumor has been reported along with a literature review. PMID:26545792

  16. Incidental intraoperative diagnosis of retained foreign body lung misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ramchandani, Radhakrishna; Dewan, Ravindra Kumar; Ramchandani, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial foreign body aspiration (FBA) is a very common and lethal problem among children. It can easily be diagnosed with a typical history of choking crisis. Clinical examination and radiology play a secondary role in diagnosis. Acute choking episode may lead to death or else to serious sequels such as bronchiectasis, atelectasis, and recurrent pneumonia. Here, we report an interesting case of bronchiectasis in a young female initially thought to be a consequence of pulmonary tuberculosis, who was subsequently found to have retained foreign body in the left lower lobe lung which was the actual cause of her symptoms. PMID:27578942

  17. Incidental intraoperative diagnosis of retained foreign body lung misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandani, Radhakrishna; Dewan, Ravindra Kumar; Ramchandani, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial foreign body aspiration (FBA) is a very common and lethal problem among children. It can easily be diagnosed with a typical history of choking crisis. Clinical examination and radiology play a secondary role in diagnosis. Acute choking episode may lead to death or else to serious sequels such as bronchiectasis, atelectasis, and recurrent pneumonia. Here, we report an interesting case of bronchiectasis in a young female initially thought to be a consequence of pulmonary tuberculosis, who was subsequently found to have retained foreign body in the left lower lobe lung which was the actual cause of her symptoms.

  18. A strategy for removal of foreign body in mandible with navigation system.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Li, Z; Tian, W; Tang, W

    2015-07-01

    Navigation surgery in the mandible has rarely been reported because of the complexities of navigating a mobile structure. In this article, we present a simple and novel strategy for removal of a foreign body in the mandible using a navigation system. A female diagnosed with a foreign body in the left mandible underwent navigation surgery using a BrainLAB system. We used a special open splint fabricated with acrylic resin to successfully perform the mandibular navigation. This strategy may be appropriate for many types of mandibular navigation surgery. PMID:25744644

  19. Impacted Sharp Oesophageal Foreign Bodies--A Novel Technique of Removal with the Paediatric Bronchoscope.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Aparajita; Bajpai, Minu

    2016-04-01

    Sharp foreign bodies in the oesophagus may present as an entirely asymptomatic child with only radiological evidence but require emergent surgical management. Safety pins, razor blades and needles are a few of the commonly ingested sharp objects in developing countries. The open safety pin is a particularly interesting clinical problem, as the management depends on its location and orientation. Many methods and instruments have been used over the years to remove them from the upper digestive tract. We present a novel method using the rigid paediatric bronchoscope and alligator forceps for the extraction of this unusual foreign body from the oesophagus of a 6 year old girl. PMID:26851436

  20. Wire grill brush bristle as an unusual foreign body: report of two pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Arganbright, Jill M; Bruegger, Daniel E; Sykes, Kevin J; Wei, Julie L

    2012-03-01

    Wire grill brushes are commonly used for cleaning grill grates. Accidental ingestion of a wire bristle from a grill-cleaning brush is a rarely reported foreign body, with only three prior case reports. Although scarce in the literature, we encountered two pediatric cases at the regional children's hospital within 1 year. By presenting these two cases, our goal was to raise awareness of this potentially hazardous foreign body. Additionally, we raise a consumer safety issue associated with the use of wire grill-cleaning brushes as there are currently no ingestion hazard warnings on these products. Laryngoscope,, 2011. PMID:22231656

  1. [Endoscopic removal of a dental foreign body from maxillary sinus via anterior prelacrimal recess approach: a case report].

    PubMed

    Song, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yongjin; Zhao, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    We present a rare case of dental foreign body from maxillary sinus in a 21-year woman who was hospitalized because of oral cavity and nasal sinus leak for 3 months when doing cheek-bulging action. Admission diagnosis :dental maxillary sinus"foreign body" (left); chronic maxillary sinusitis (left). Computed tomographic scan showed irregular high density shadow in the left maxillary sinus. The "foreign body" was removed via anteri- or prelacrimal recess approach, which was supposed to be the iatrogenic foreign body - alveolar bone. PMID:27382694

  2. A unique case of foreign-body associated orbital myositis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seongmu; Shetlar, Debra J; Yen, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman presented with a 2-week history of diplopia and right-sided orbital pain with eye movement. Examination revealed an edematous, ptotic right upper eyelid with conjunctival hyperemia, proptosis, and significant limitation to upward and downward ductions on the right. MRI was significant for a homogeneously enhancing lesion within the superior rectus muscle. A laboratory evaluation seeking an infectious, inflammatory, or autoimmune process was nonrevealing. A diagnosis of orbital myositis was made, and the patient experienced significant improvement with oral corticosteroids. The patient's symptoms, however, recurred after attempts at a slow taper of the corticosteroids. An orbital biopsy of the lesion revealed fibroadipose tissue containing irregularly shaped yellow-white deposits birefringent under polarized light, suggestive of silica crystals. The patient denied any history of trauma or prior surgery. An intraorbital triamcinolone injection to the superior orbit allowed resolution of symptoms and a successful taper off systemic corticosteroids. PMID:22082591

  3. Magnetised Intragastric Foreign Body Collection and Autism: An Advice for Carers and Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rashid, Farhan; Davies, Laura; Iftikhar, S. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The pica phenomenon, where non-edible substances are repeatedly consumed, has been linked with developmental and behavioural disorders, particularly autism. The clinical presentation of foreign body ingestion in patients with autism is discussed, and recommendations for caregivers are provided based on the available literature. An 18-year-old man…

  4. Double esophageal perforation by ingested foreign body: Endoscopic and surgical approach. A case report.

    PubMed Central

    Ugenti, I.; Digennaro, R.; Martines, G.; Caputi Iambrenghi, O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal perforation in adults is most frequently caused by ingested foreign bodies. They can migrate through the esophageal wall, damaging the nearby organs such as the aorta or the trachea, with fatal outcome. After the diagnosis, the viable treatments for extracting the foreign body and repairing the perforation are several. The appropriate treatment, may be endoscopic, surgical or combined, depending on the level of the perforation, on the co-morbidities of the patient and on the available resources. Presentation of case This paper describes a case of a 68 years old patient with a double EP caused by a meat-bone that perforated the thoracic esophageal wall, approaching the aorta on the left side and the azygos vein on the right side. Discussion Because of the double transfixion and the position near the aorta and the azygos, it was not possible to remove safely the bone during the endoscopy. The management required a combined endoscopic and surgical approach. This way it was possible to detect easily the location of the perforation, to remove safely the foreign body, to repair the perforation both from the outside and from the inside, and to place the nasogastric tube under direct vision. Conclusion Even when the type of esophageal perforation requires surgical treatment, the simultaneous use of endoscopy proved to be an advantage in order to extract the foreign body safely, to perform a double repair of the perforation and to place the nasogastric tube under direct vision. PMID:26551553

  5. Impacted foreign bodies in the maxillofacial region-diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Santos, Thiago de Santana; Melo, Auremir Rocha; de Moraes, Hécio Henrique Araújo; Avelar, Rafael Linard; Becker, Otávio Emmel; Haas, Orion Luiz; de Oliveira, Rogério Belle

    2011-07-01

    Foreign bodies are often encountered by oral and maxillofacial surgeons and may present a diagnostic challenge to the trauma surgeon due to many factors such as the size of the object, the difficult access, and a close anatomic relationship of the foreign body to vital structures. They are usually a result of injuries or operations. Fragments of broken instruments can be left behind and entire teeth or their fragments can be displaced during extraction. The approach to this kind of injury should be sequential and multidisciplinary, beginning with the trauma unit that will provide maintenance of the airways, hemodynamic stabilization, and, but only if necessary, neurologic, ophthalmologic, and vascular evaluation. With a view to illustrating and discussing the diagnosis and treatment of this kind of injury, this study reports impacted foreign bodies in oral and maxillofacial region. The following data were collected: age, sex, race, etiology, occurrence of fracture, anatomic location of the fracture, daytime of the traumatic event, type of the object, signal and symptoms, type of imaging examination used, type of anesthesia, approach, transoperative complication, period between surgery and hospital liberation, and the occurrence of death. Foreign body injuries in the maxillofacial region can place the patient's life at risk, so a correct initial treatment performed by a multidisciplinary team increases the survival of this kind of patient. PMID:21772164

  6. Unusual foreign body in the vesico-urethral; 195 cm liquid pipe.

    PubMed

    Sökmen, Doğukan; Törer, Buğra Doğukan; Kargı, Taner; Yavuzsan, Abdullah Hızır; Şahin, Selçuk; Tuğcu, Volkan

    2014-12-01

    Insertion of foreign bodies into the genitourinary system is a pathological action believed to increase sexual gratification usually for psychiatric patients and mentally retarded cases especially during masturbation. In this report, we represented a male case who is inserted a 195 cm cannula by himself into the bladder through the urethra because of his psychiatric disorder. PMID:26328187

  7. A case of presumed acute retinal necrosis after intraocular foreign body injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Who; Byon, Ik Soo; Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Ji Eun; Oum, Boo Sup

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report a case of acute retinal necrosis (ARN) after intraocular foreign body removal. A 32-year-old male presented with visual loss in the left eye. He was hit by an iron fragment while he was hammering. An intraocular foreign body was found with corneal laceration and traumatic cataract. On the day he was injured, primary closure of the laceration, lensectomy, and vitrectomy were performed, and the foreign body was removed. The day after the operation, there was no sign of retinal detachment or retinitis. Two days after the operation, retinal necrosis and accompanying vitreous inflammation were noted in the far periphery. On day 3, the necrosis spread circumferentially and inflammation became more distinct. ARN was presumed and intravenous acyclovir was administered. The necrotic areas were reduced 2 days later, and were resolved in 1 month. The final visual acuity in his left eye was 20/20 after implantation of an intraocular lens. This case is the first report of ARN after penetrating injury and an intraocular foreign body. ARN may develop after open-globe injury. PMID:23658473

  8. A case of retained graphite anterior chamber foreign body masquerading as stromal keratitis.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Ryung; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Jin Hak; Hyon, Joon Young

    2011-04-01

    We report a case of a retained graphite anterior chamber foreign body that was masquerading as stromal keratitis. A 28-year-old male visited with complaints of visual disturbance and hyperemia in his right eye for four weeks. On initial examination, he presented with a stromal edema involving the inferior half of the cornea, epithelial microcysts, and moderate chamber inflammation. Suspecting herpetic stromal keratitis, he was treated with anti-viral and anti-inflammatory agents. One month after the initial visit, anterior chamber inflammation was improved and his visual acuity recovered to 20/20, but subtle corneal edema still remained. On tapering the medication, after three months, a foreign body was incidentally identified in the inferior chamber angle and was surgically removed resulting in complete resolution of corneal edema. The removed foreign body was a fragment of graphite and he subsequently disclosed a trauma with mechanical pencil 12 years earlier. This case showed that the presence of an anterior chamber foreign body should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic localized corneal edema. PMID:21461226

  9. Foreign body lodged in distal phalanx of left index finger-taser dart.

    PubMed

    Dearing, Mark; Lewis, Terrence J

    2005-11-01

    We report a case of a Taser dart presenting as a radio opaque foreign body to familiarize the Emergency Radiology community with the appearance of this non-lethal weapon which is being deployed in large numbers by police and security forces world wide. PMID:16155754

  10. Computer vision for foreign body detection and removal in the food industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computer vision inspection systems are often used for quality control, product grading, defect detection and other product evaluation issues. This chapter focuses on the use of computer vision inspection systems that detect foreign bodies and remove them from the product stream. Specifically, we wi...

  11. Management of dogs and cats with endotracheal tube tracheal foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Nutt, Laura K; Webb, Jinelle A; Prosser, Kirsten J; Defarges, Alice

    2014-06-01

    Two cats and 3 dogs were treated for an endotracheal tube tracheal foreign body (ETFB) during recovery from general anesthesia. Bronchoscopy was used to remove the ETFB. Animals were clinically normal at discharge. While rare, ETFB can occur upon recovery from anesthesia. Bronchoscopy is an effective way to remove ETFB. PMID:24891640

  12. Foreign Bodies Ingestion in Children: Experience of 61 Cases in a Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit from Romania

    PubMed Central

    Diaconescu, Smaranda; Gimiga, Nicoleta; Sarbu, Ioan; Stefanescu, Gabriela; Olaru, Claudia; Ioniuc, Ileana; Ciongradi, Iulia; Burlea, Marin

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of foreign bodies is a worldwide pediatric pathology. We assessed the clinical, endoscopic, and therapeutic aspects of this condition in a pediatric gastroenterology unit. We reviewed 61 patients (median age of 3.25 ± 4.7 years). The most frequently ingested objects were coins (26.23%), unidentified metal objects (13.11%), bones (8.19%), batteries, and buttons (6.55%). The clinical features we encountered included abdominal pain (55.73%), vomiting (34.42%), and asymptomatic children (29.5%). Routine X-ray examination enabled finding the foreign body in 42 of the cases. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed within 24–72 hours. 25 cases resulted in a negative endoscopy (40.98%), 19 objects (31.14%) were removed using a polypectomy snare, and extraction failure occurred in 17 patients (27.86%). 28 foreign bodies were passed without incidents; in 14 cases, the swallowed objects were never found. In one case, a battery was stuck in the esophageal folds and led to tracheal-esophageal fistula and bronchopneumonia and later to esophageal stenosis. We report a large proportion of foreign bodies that could not be identified or removed due to lack of early endoscopy and poor technical settings. Batteries and sharp objects lead to severe complications and preschool-age children are at high risk for such events. PMID:26949384

  13. [Foreign body retention after soft tissue laceration. A case of insufficient inspection and documentation].

    PubMed

    Kempf, L; Braun, K F; Neu, J

    2014-02-01

    A 52-year-old man sustained a laceration to his left eyebrow after a fall in his bathroom. His plastic glasses shattered upon impact. The patient was referred to a local emergency department. After a quick exploration by the physician on call, the wound was closed by a nurse using the Steri-Strip Wound Closure system. No further exploration or imaging was performed. Four weeks after the incident the patient presented to a dermatologist with a "foreign body sensation" at the site of the laceration. Assuming a foreign body granuloma, he was referred to a maxillofacial surgeon who removed plastic debris (parts of the glasses worn by the patient). The wound subsequently healed without further complications.The patient filed a complaint for inadequate treatment in the emergency department. No detailed patient and accident history had been obtained, the wound exploration performed by the physician was superficial, and the wound closure was performed by a nurse. The expert opinion of the arbitration board ascertained a medical malpractice in terms of insufficient history, examination, and a lack of documentation. Specific questioning of the accident history would have led to the suspicion of possible foreign bodies, thus, leading to a more thorough exploration and likely further imaging. The arbitration board concluded that obtaining a detailed accident history and an accurate examination would have revealed the foreign bodies and/or led to further imaging. Complying with this, the patient could have been spared further harm and secondary surgery would have been unnecessary. PMID:24474417

  14. [Removal of a Foreign Body in the Urinary Bladder in a Patient Four Times in the Past Thirty Years].

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Sohei; Tsutahara, Koichi; Yamamichi, Gaku; Okusa, Takuya; Taniguchi, Ayumu; Kishimoto, Nozomu; Tanigawa, Go; Takao, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of recurring foreign bodies in the urinary bladder. A 67-year-old male inserted a foreign body into the urinary bladder during masturbation. Eight months later, he experienced a fever and went to a hospital where ultrasonography revealed a foreign body in his urinary bladder. Then, he was referred to our hospital for surgical treatment. The patient's surgical record indicated that he had undergone the same operation 3 times in the past thirty years. The inserted foreign body was successfully removed by suprapubic cystotomy, and he was discharged 13 days after the operation. He was also evaluated by psychiatrists, but they diagnosed that he had no mental disorder. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the removal of a foreign body in the urinary bladder four times in the same patient. PMID:27133888

  15. Foreign body granulomatous reaction to silica, silicone, and hyaluronic acid in a patient with interferon-induced sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Novoa, R; Barnadas, M A; Torras, X; Curell, R; Alomar, A

    2013-12-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed sarcoid granulomas 11 months after starting treatment with pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. The sites of the lesions were related to 3 different foreign bodies: silica in old scars on the skin, hyaluronic acid that had been injected into facial tissues, and silicone in an axillary lymph node draining the area of a breast implant. Systemic sarcoidosis was diagnosed on the basis of a history of dry cough and fever and blood tests that revealed elevated angiotensin converting enzyme and liver enzymes. Interruption of the antiviral therapy led to normalization of liver function tests and disappearance of the skin lesions and lymphadenopathies. Dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons should be aware of the risk of sarcoid lesions related to cosmetic implants in patients who may require treatment with interferon in the future. PMID:22995946

  16. An unusual and fatal case of upper gastrointestinal perforation and bleeding secondary to foreign body ingestion.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Rosario; Tacchella, Tiziana; Lo Pinto, Sara; Bonsignore, Alessandro; Ventura, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    We report a fatal case of gastrointestinal perforation and hemorrhage secondary to the ingestion of a foreign body. While engaged in an amateur futsal competition, an apparently healthy young man suddenly collapsed and his respiration ceased. Autopsy revealed a 3-mm circular perforation on the gastric wall fundus with a significant amount of clotted blood within the gastric lumen. On inspection, a foreign body consisting of a bristle-like hair, later identified via electron microscopy to be a cat vibrissa, i.e. a whisker, was found along the perforation margin. Thus, the inadvertent ingestion of fine, sharp objects (even a cat whisker) can lead to gastric perforation and bleeding, which might prove fatal under given circumstances. PMID:27183326

  17. ‘Crohn'z meanz Heinz’: foreign body inflammatory mass mimicking Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Visagan, R; Grossman, R; Dimitriadis, P A; Desai, A

    2013-01-01

    The authors present a patient with a presumed diagnosis of Crohn's disease for 6 years turning out to be an unusual inflammatory mass caused by ileal perforation due to a foreign body. When surgical intervention became necessary for admissions with recurrent obstruction, laparoscopy revealed an inflammatory mass in the terminal ileum, exposing two pieces of plastic bearing the word ‘Heinz’. Resection of the inflammatory mass led to the complete resolution of symptoms. Histology from the operative specimen showed no features of Crohn's disease. There were no granulomas and no fissuring ulcers. This case highlights that an inflammatory mass in the small intestine caused by the perforation of ingested foreign body can mimic Crohn's disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a synthetic plastic packaging causing ileo-caecal junctional perforation mimicking Crohn’s disease. PMID:23749825

  18. A Bronchopleurocutaneous Fistula Caused by Unexpected Foreign Body Aspiration: False Barley (Hordeum murinum).

    PubMed

    Kanbur, Serda; Evman, Serdar; Dogruyol, Talha; Yalcinkaya, Irfan

    2015-12-01

    A 13-year-old boy with no previous history of foreign body aspiration, presenting with side pain, was referred to our clinic with a pneumonia diagnosis by an external medical facility where he had been started on antibiotic treatment. Consolidation in the right inferior lobe and minimal pleural effusion were found on the lung radiograph and computed tomography scan. Skin hyperemia and abscess formation in the right chest were observed subsequently. A drain was placed; bronchoscopy, sampling for cultures, and a biopsy were performed. Four months after this first episode ended with inconclusive results, the patient returned, reporting that a spike of grass was protruding from the continued abscess drainage. The skin lesion closed after emptying of the abscess cavity; a check-up bronchoscopy was unremarkable. The extrusion from the skin of the foreign body, a rare event in the published literature, was our first such case. PMID:26652568

  19. Electrical wire as a foreign body in a male urethra: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Self-inflicted foreign bodies in the male urethra and urinary bladder are an emergency that urologists may rarely have to face. A case of an electrical wire inserted in the male urethra and coiled in the bladder is presented. Case presentation A 53-year-old male presented with the inability to void and bloody urethral discharge after having introduced an electrical wire in his urethra for masturbation 3 hours earlier. He had made several unsuccessful attempts to remove it. Conclusion The variety of these objects may be impressive and removal of the foreign body may be quite challenging requiring imagination and high-level surgical skills., In this case an electrical wire was used and the diagnostic as well as the therapeutic steps for its removal are presented. PMID:19192284

  20. Management of a patient with autism following ingestion of a foreign body

    PubMed Central

    McCain, Stephen; Tan, Samantha; Mark, David

    2014-01-01

    Patients with autism often find admission to hospital an anxious time. Awareness of the condition, a speedy diagnosis and flexibility in adapting treatment plans will facilitate early discharge and return to their familiar environment. We describe a patient with severe autism who presented with an acute abdomen secondary to ingestion of a foreign body which required laparotomy. Communication directly to medical staff was greatly limited due to severe autism and close liaison with family members was essential in interpreting scant clinical signs. At the time of surgery a rubber bottle teat was found causing transection of small bowel due to erosion of the foreign body. The postoperative course was fraught with challenges and ensuring side room nursing care with family members present throughout his admission minimised postoperative stress and confusion. We recommend awareness of management strategies for patients with autism to ensure rapid recovery and early discharge home. PMID:24966264

  1. Foreign Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... safety pins, buttons, crayon pieces, erasers, paper wads, rocks, and beads are also risks. Small batteries are ... is not sold, leased, or given to any third party be they reliable or not. The information ...

  2. Differential expression of chemokines, chemokine receptors and proteinases by foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman A; Hashimi, Saeed M; Khan, Shershah; Quan, Jingjing; Bakr, Mahmoud M; Forwood, Mark R; Morrison, Nigel M

    2014-07-01

    Osteoclasts and foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) are both derived from the fusion of macropahges. These cells are seen in close proximity during foreign body reactions, therefore it was assumed that they might interact with each other. The aim was to identify important genes that are expressed by osteoclasts and FBGCs which can be used to understand peri-implantitis and predict the relationship of these cells during foreign body reactions. Bone marrow macrophages (BMM) were treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) to produce osteoclasts. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to identify the genes that were expressed by osteoclasts and FBGCs compared to macrophage controls. TRAP staining was used to visualise the cells while gelatine zymography and western blots were used for protein expression. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), matrix metallo proteinase 9 (MMP9), nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1), cathepsin K (CTSK) and RANK were significantly lower in FBGCs compared to osteoclasts. Inflammation specific chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP1 also called CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP1α), MIP1β and MIP1γ, and their receptors CCR1, CCR3 and CCR5, were highly expressed by FBGCs. FBGCs were negative for osteoclast specific markers (RANK, NFATc1, CTSK). FBGCs expressed chemokines such as CCL2, 3, 5 and 9 while osteoclasts expressed the receptors for these chemokines i.e. CCR1, 2 and 3. Our findings show that osteoclast specific genes are not expressed by FBGCs and that FBGCs interact with osteoclasts during foreign body reaction through chemokines. PMID:24500983

  3. A 20-gauge intraocular electromagnetic tip for simplified intraocular foreign-body extraction.

    PubMed

    May, D R; Noll, F G; Munoz, R

    1989-02-01

    A modified tip for the Bronson intraocular electromagnet has been developed. The tip was machined to a 20-gauge cylinder that can be inserted readily into the eye either through an entrance wound or through a pars plana incision. Placement of the tip of the magnet inside the eye allows the foreign body to impact the tip of the magnet rather than the wall of the eye. PMID:2916983

  4. Foreign body detection in food materials using compton scattered x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Nigel James Bruce

    This thesis investigated the application of X-ray Compton scattering to the problem of foreign body detection in food. The methods used were analytical modelling, simulation and experiment. A criterion was defined for detectability, and a model was developed for predicting the minimum time required for detection. The model was used to predict the smallest detectable cubes of air, glass, plastic and steel. Simulations and experiments were performed on voids and glass in polystyrene phantoms, water, coffee and muesli. Backscatter was used to detect bones in chicken meat. The effects of geometry and multiple scatter on contrast, signal-to-noise, and detection time were simulated. Compton scatter was compared with transmission, and the effect of inhomogeneity was modelled. Spectral shape was investigated as a means of foreign body detection. A signal-to-noise ratio of 7.4 was required for foreign body detection in food. A 0.46 cm cube of glass or a 1.19 cm cube of polystyrene were detectable in a 10 cm cube of water in one second. The minimum time to scan a whole sample varied as the 7th power of the foreign body size, and the 5th power of the sample size. Compton scatter inspection produced higher contrasts than transmission, but required longer measurement times because of the low number of photon counts. Compton scatter inspection of whole samples was very slow compared to production line speeds in the food industry. There was potential for Compton scatter in applications which did not require whole-sample scanning, such as surface inspection. There was also potential in the inspection of inhomogeneous samples. The multiple scatter fraction varied from 25% to 55% for 2 to 10 cm cubes of water, but did not have a large effect on the detection time. The spectral shape gave good contrasts and signal-to-noise ratios in the detection of chicken bones.

  5. Aerodigestive Foreign Bodies in Adult Ethiopian Patients: A Prospective Study at Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Abebe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Foreign bodies (FBs) in the aerodigestive tract are important causes of morbidity and mortality and pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The best method of removal of an esophageal and tracheobronchial FB is endoscopic guided extraction. Objective. To present our experience of the removal of aerodigestive FBs in adult Ethiopian patients using rigid endoscopes. Methods. A hospital-based prospective study, at Tikur Anbessa Referral and Teaching Hospital, from January 2011 to December 2012 (over two years). Results. A total of 32 patients (18 males and 14 females) with a mean age of 28.0 ± 12.74 years were treated for FB ingestion and aspiration at Tikur Anbessa Hospital. The FBs were impacted at the esophagus in 18 (56.2%) patients, at the pharynx in 7 (21.8%), and at the air way in 7 (21.8%) patients. Pieces of bones were the commonest objects found in the esophagus (17/18 of the cases) and the pharynx (4/7), while fractured tracheostomy tubes and needles were frequently seen in the air way (3/7 cases each). The foreign bodies were visible in plain radiographs of 26 (81.2%) patients. Successful extraction of FBs was achieved by using Mc gill forceps in 11 cases, rigid esophagoscopes in 9 patients, and bronchoscopes in 4 cases. Four cases required open surgery to remove the foreign bodies. Two complications (one pneumothorax and one esophageal perforation) occurred. All patients were discharged cured. Discussion and Recommendations. Aerodigestive FBs are not so rare in the hospital and timely diagnosis and removal of accidentally ingested and aspirated foreign body should be performed so as to avoid the potentially lethal complications associated. Rigid esophagoscopy requires general anesthesia and is associated with its own complications, but our experience and outcome of its use are encouraging. PMID:24834074

  6. [A case report of a bronchial foreign body removal by direct laryngoscopy with fiber bronchoscope].

    PubMed

    Sun, Le; Fang, Ning; Zhang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    An 11 year old girl presented with dyspnea and a rough cough, after having mistakenly swallowed a steel ball and unable to relieve the symptoms. Chest X-ray showed an image consistent with a 10 mm diameter circular object, embedded in the right mainstem bronchi near the fifth thoracic level and the medicastinal moving to the right. A clinical diagnosis based on these findings: foreign body of the right bronchial. PMID:27101687

  7. Gas Turbine Engine Staged Fuel Injection Using Adjacent Bluff Body and Swirler Fuel Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A fuel injection array for a gas turbine engine includes a plurality of bluff body injectors and a plurality of swirler injectors. A control operates the plurality of bluff body injectors and swirler injectors such that bluff body injectors are utilized without all of the swirler injectors at least at low power operation. The swirler injectors are utilized at higher power operation.

  8. Comparison of Two Foreign Body Retrieval Devices with Adjustable Loops in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Konya, Andras

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to compare two similar foreign body retrieval devices, the Texan{sup TM} (TX) and the Texan LONGhorn{sup TM} (TX-LG), in a swine model. Both devices feature a {<=}30-mm adjustable loop. Capture times and total procedure times for retrieving foreign bodies from the infrarenal aorta, inferior vena cava, and stomach were compared. All attempts with both devices (TX, n = 15; TX-LG, n = 14) were successful. Foreign bodies in the vasculature were captured quickly using both devices (mean {+-} SD, 88 {+-} 106 sec for TX vs 67 {+-} 42 sec for TX-LG) with no significant difference between them. The TX-LG, however, allowed significantly better capture times than the TX in the stomach (p = 0.022), Overall, capture times for the TX-LG were significantly better than for the TX (p = 0.029). There was no significant difference between the total procedure times in any anatomic region. TX-LG performed significantly better than the TX in the stomach and therefore overall. The better torque control and maneuverability of TX-LG resulted in better performance in large anatomic spaces.

  9. Escherichia vulneris osteomyelitis of the tibia caused by a wooden foreign body.

    PubMed

    Levine, W N; Goldberg, M J

    1994-03-01

    A new species in the family Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia vulneris, was characterized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1982. It has been shown to have a predilection for human wounds, and several case reports have described superficial wound infections with this rare organism. Until now, however, there have been no reports of osteomyelitis occurring secondary to E vulneris infection. The authors present the case of a 13-year-old boy who fell on a stick and sustained a penetrating injury to his right knee. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lytic lesion with a foreign body in the tibial epiphysis. On culture, only E vulneris was found, and histologic examination showed the foreign body to be surrounded by acute and chronic inflammation, abscess formation, and foreign-body giant-cell reaction. Although a recent study questioned the pathogenicity of this organism after reviewing the cases of 12 patients in whom there was concurrent heavy growth of Staphylococcus aureus, the present case supports the finding that E vulneris is a human pathogen that should be treated when obtained from human wound cultures. PMID:8022648

  10. Delayed Foreign Body Reaction Caused by Bioabsorbable Plates Used for Maxillofacial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hong Bae; Gu, Ja Hea; Oh, Sang Ah

    2016-01-01

    Background Bioabsorbable plates and screws are commonly used to reduce maxillofacial bones, particularly in pediatric patients because they degrade completely without complications after bone healing. In this study, we encountered eight cases of a delayed foreign body reaction after surgical fixation with bioabsorbable plates and screws. Methods A total of 234 patients with a maxillofacial fracture underwent surgical treatment from March 2006 to October 2013, in which rigid fixation was achieved with the Inion CPS (Inion, Tampere, Finland) plating system in 173 patients and Rapidsorb (Synthes, West Chester, PA, USA) in 61 patients. Their mean age was 35.2 years (range, 15-84 years). Most patients were stabilized with two- or three-point fixation at the frontozygomatic suture, infraorbital rim, and anterior wall of the maxilla. Results Complications occurred in eight (3.4%) of 234 patients, including palpable, fixed masses in six patients and focal swelling in two patients. The period from surgical fixation to the onset of symptoms was 9-23 months. Six patients with a mass underwent secondary surgery for mass removal. The masses contained fibrous tissue with a yellow, grainy, cloudy fluid and remnants of an incompletely degraded bioabsorbable plate and screws. Their histological findings demonstrated a foreign body reaction. Conclusions Inadequate degradation of bioabsorbable plates caused a delayed inflammatory foreign body reaction requiring secondary surgery. Therefore, it is prudent to consider the possibility of delayed complications when using bioabsorbable plates and surgeons must conduct longer and closer follow-up observations. PMID:26848444

  11. An intraorbital wooden foreign body: description of a case and a variety of CT appearances.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Koji; Noguchi, Tomoyuki; Mihara, Futoshi; Yoshiura, Takashi; Togao, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2007-04-01

    We present a case report in which a 4-year-old girl was involved in a fall that resulted in an injury of the right orbita. The girl kept a chopstick in her right hand that got into the right orbita due to this accident. Only a fraction remained in the orbita; the residual chopstick got lost. Hence, the substance of the chopstick was unknown. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a foreign body in the right orbita, but ophthalmologists had initially no indication of intervention. Further course according to the follow-up CT showed an increase of Hounsfield units (HU). These findings led to the assumption that the foreign body was made of wood. Through this, the ophthalmologists performed an evacuation. Motivated by these clinical results, we created an experimental setup that could demonstrate changes of HU in different coated chopsticks. It is concluded that wooden foreign bodies can display a variety of CT appearances depending on materials, types, coating, and time-course. PMID:17347767

  12. Demographic and Clinical Findings in Children Undergoing Bronchoscopy for Foreign Body Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Mojgan; Manesh, Mohammad Reza Hashemi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Foreign body aspiration (FBA) is a significant cause of airway distress, mortality, and morbidity in children. Diagnosis of FBA can be challenging and is sometimes delayed for weeks or even months. If not diagnosed and treated promptly, FBA can result in serious consequences. Methods: For this retrospective study, we investigated the medical records of 89 children who underwent bronchoscopy for suspected FBA and recorded relevant demographic, clinical, and treatment data. Results: Of the 89 patients identified for this study, 51 had a definitive diagnosis of FBA. Among these patients, choking, chronic cough and wheezing, cyanosis, and dyspnea were the most frequent symptoms of FBA. The foreign bodies were located in the left bronchus (45.1%), the right bronchus (35.3%), the trachea (15.7%), and in both the right and left bronchi (3.9%). Seeds were the most prevalent foreign body, found in 39.2% of the patients. Conclusion: Lack of complete medical history in patients with suspected FBA is one of the main causes of delayed FBA diagnosis. Bronchoscopy is considered the definitive diagnostic method for FBA and should be conducted in all patients with suspected FBA because of the low risk of complications and reduced probability that FBA diagnosis and treatment will be delayed. PMID:27303219

  13. Microfrabricated instrument tag for the radiographic detection of retained foreign bodies during surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Anurag; Marentis, Theodore C.; Chronis, Nikos

    2012-03-01

    Gossypibomas are foreign objects, usually surgical sponges or towels, accidentally retained in the human body during an operation. They are associated with significant postsurgical complications, morbidity and mortality. Postsurgical radiographs are considered the standard of care for a retained foreign body, but their detection sensitivity typically ranges between 60% and 80%. To address this we have microfabricated x-ray visible microtags that can be attached to foreign bodies and allow them to be easily recognized by a trained radiologist or a computer aided detection (CAD) algorithm. Key element of the microtag design is the use of three radiopaque beads placed in a precise, triangular configuration. We demonstrated that those microtags are visible in standard radiographs over different backgrounds (soft tissue, bone) and at different spatial orientations. We envision that these microtags attached to surgical sponges and towels will greatly increase the detection sensitivity and specificity of gossypibomas at an infinitesimal cost and will be used in the operating room to provide point of care information to the surgeons.

  14. A Review of the Biocompatibility of Implantable Devices: Current Challenges to Overcome Foreign Body Response

    PubMed Central

    Onuki, Yoshinori; Bhardwaj, Upkar; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Burgess, Diane J.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, a variety of devices (drug-eluting stents, artificial organs, biosensors, catheters, scaffolds for tissue engineering, heart valves, etc.) have been developed for implantation into patients. However, when such devices are implanted into the body, the body can react to these in a number of different ways. These reactions can result in an unexpected risk for patients. Therefore, it is important to assess and optimize the biocompatibility of implantable devices. To date, numerous strategies have been investigated to overcome body reactions induced by the implantation of devices. This review focuses on the foreign body response and the approaches that have been taken to overcome this. The biological response following device implantation and the methods for biocompatibility evaluation are summarized. Then the risks of implantable devices and the challenges to overcome these problems are introduced. Specifically, the challenges used to overcome the functional loss of glucose sensors, restenosis after stent implantation, and calcification induced by implantable devices are discussed. PMID:19885290

  15. Measurements of Skin Friction of the Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Cone with Foreign Gas Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, Constantine C.; Ukuno, Arthur F.

    1960-01-01

    Measurements of average skin friction of the turbulent boundary layer have been made on a 15deg total included angle cone with foreign gas injection. Measurements of total skin-friction drag were obtained at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.7, 3.5, and 4.7 and within a Reynolds number range from 0.9 x 10(exp 6) to 5.9 x 10(exp 6) with injection of helium, air, and Freon-12 (CCl2F2) through the porous wall. Substantial reductions in skin friction are realized with gas injection within the range of Mach numbers of this test. The relative reduction in skin friction is in accordance with theory-that is, the light gases are most effective when compared on a mass flow basis. There is a marked effect of Mach number on the reduction of average skin friction; this effect is not shown by the available theories. Limited transition location measurements indicate that the boundary layer does not fully trip with gas injection but that the transition point approaches a forward limit with increasing injection. The variation of the skin-friction coefficient, for the lower injection rates with natural transition, is dependent on the flow Reynolds number and type of injected gas; and at the high injection rates the skin friction is in fair agreement with the turbulent boundary layer results.

  16. Surgical Removal of a Ventricular Foreign Body in a Captive African Black-footed Penguin ( Spheniscus demersus ).

    PubMed

    Castaño-Jiménez, Paula A; Trent, Ava M; Bueno, Irene

    2016-03-01

    Anterior gastrointestinal tract obstruction by a foreign body has been reported in several avian species, most commonly in captive birds. It is often associated with behavioral issues that lead to compulsive consumption of bedding materials or bright moving objects. In penguins, foreign bodies are most commonly identified at necropsy and often are found in the ventriculus because of anatomic characteristics of the species. A captive African black-footed penguin ( Spheniscus demersus ) was diagnosed with a ventricular foreign body. The anatomic and physiologic differences that should be taken into account when surgically removing a ventricular foreign body in a penguin are described. These differences include the caudal location in the coelom and the large size of the ventriculus in proportion to the penguin's body size; the presence of a simple stomach, uniform in thickness and lacking muscular development; a simple gastrointestinal cycle (gastric contraction); and variability in pH of stomach contents. No complications were observed after surgery, and the bird recovered completely. Management of foreign bodies in birds should be based on the clinical signs of the individual bird, the species affected and its anatomic characteristics, the nature and location of the foreign body, available tools, and the preference and experience of the surgeon. This particular case demonstrates that the most indicated and preferred method is not always possible and that knowledge of biologic, anatomic, and physiologic differences of the species may allow the use of an alternative and more invasive approach with favorable outcomes. PMID:27088744

  17. Intelligent Foreign Particle Inspection Machine for Injection Liquid Examination Based on Modified Pulse-Coupled Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Ji; Wang, YaoNan; Zhou, BoWen; Zhang, Hui

    2009-01-01

    A biologically inspired spiking neural network model, called pulse-coupled neural networks (PCNN), has been applied in an automatic inspection machine to detect visible foreign particles intermingled in glucose or sodium chloride injection liquids. Proper mechanisms and improved spin/stop techniques are proposed to avoid the appearance of air bubbles, which increases the algorithms' complexity. Modified PCNN is adopted to segment the difference images, judging the existence of foreign particles according to the continuity and smoothness properties of their moving traces. Preliminarily experimental results indicate that the inspection machine can detect the visible foreign particles effectively and the detection speed, accuracy and correct detection rate also satisfying the needs of medicine preparation. PMID:22412318

  18. Is differentiation of frequently encountered foreign bodies in corpses possible by Hounsfield density measurement?

    PubMed

    Bolliger, Stephan A; Oesterhelweg, Lars; Spendlove, Danny; Ross, Steffen; Thali, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    The radiological determination of foreign objects in corpses can be difficult if they are fragmented or deformed. With multislice computed tomography, radiodensities--referred to as Hounsfield units (HU)--can be measured. We examined the possibility of differentiating 21 frequently occurring foreign bodies, such as metals, rocks, and different manmade materials by virtue of their HU values. Gold, steel, and brass showed mean HU values of 30671-30710 (upper measurable limit), mean HU values for steel, silver, copper, and limestone were 20346, 16949, 14033, and 2765, respectively. The group consisting of objects, such as aluminum, tarmac, car front-window glass, and other rocks, displayed mean HU values of 2329-2131 HU. The mean HU value of bottle glass and car side-window glass was 2088, whereas windowpane glass was 493. HU value determination may therefore help in preautopsy differentiation between case-relevant and irrelevant foreign bodies and thus be useful for autopsy planning and extraction of the objects in question. PMID:19627414

  19. Combination management by C-arm fluoroscopy and extraocular muscle severance for penetrating ocular trauma with a retrobulbar foreign body.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Makoto; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Nomi, Norimasa; Teranishi, Shinichiro; Orita, Tomoko; Fujitsu, Youichiro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2016-06-01

    We report here the successful removal of a retrobulbar metallic foreign body in a patient with penetrating ocular trauma by a transconjunctival approach and combination management with C-arm fluoroscopy and extraocular muscle severance. A 37-year-old man sustained a penetrating injury to the right eye while using an iron hammer. Initial slitlamp examination revealed a corneoscleral laceration, iridocele, anterior chamber collapse, and a traumatic cataract. Visual acuity in the right eye was limited to the perception of hand motion. Computed tomography revealed an orbital foreign body in the retrobulbar area. The patient underwent corneoscleral suturing, severance of extraocular muscles, removal of the foreign body with guidance by C-arm fluoroscopy, pars plana lensectomy, and pars plana vitrectomy. Combination management with C-arm fluoroscopy and extraocular muscle severance may thus be a suitable approach to the removal of a retrobulbar metallic foreign body. PMID:27070785

  20. Dermatitis artefacta: keloids and foreign body granuloma due to overvalued ideation of acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Sanjiv V; Khairkar, Praveen; Singh, Adarshlata; Gupta, Sumit

    2009-01-01

    Skin is well recognized as an important somatic mirror of one's emotion and a site for the discharge of one's anxieties. We present a case of a 42-year-old female patient presenting with a vague history of generalized body pain and skin lesions in the form of cotton threads buried under the skin, crusted plaque, multiple keloids and rusted pin buried through the skin mostly in the easily accessible areas of the body. Histopathology from the crusted plaque revealed foreign body granuloma. To satisfy her psychological or emotional need, it is the deliberate and conscious production of self-inflicted skin lesions through overvalued ideation of acupuncture on her part. PMID:19915244

  1. Transcriptional switching in macrophages associated with the peritoneal foreign body response.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Jane E; Summers, Kim M; Gongora, Milena; Grimmond, Sean M; Campbell, Julie H; Hume, David A; Rolfe, Barbara E

    2014-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that myeloid cells are the source of fibrotic tissue induced by foreign material implanted in the peritoneal cavity. This study utilised the MacGreen mouse, in which the Csf1r promoter directs myeloid-specific enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression, to determine the temporal gene expression profile of myeloid subpopulations recruited to the peritoneal cavity to encapsulate implanted foreign material (cubes of boiled egg white). Cells with high EGFP expression (EGFP(hi)) were purified from exudate and encapsulating tissue at different times during the foreign body response, gene expression profiles determined using cDNA microarrays, and data clustered using the network analysis tool, Biolayout Express(3D). EGFP(hi) cells from all time points expressed high levels of Csf1r, Emr1 (encoding F4/80), Cd14 and Itgam (encoding Mac-1) providing internal validation of their myeloid nature. Exudate macrophages (days 4-7) expressed a large cluster of cell cycle genes; these were switched off in capsule cells. Early in capsule formation, Csf1r-EGFP(hi) cells expressed genes associated with tissue turnover, but later expressed both pro- and anti-inflammatory genes alongside a subset of mesenchyme-associated genes, a pattern of gene expression that adds weight to the concept of a continuum of macrophage phenotypes rather than distinct M1/M2 subsets. Moreover, rather than transdifferentiating to myofibroblasts, macrophages contributing to later stages of the peritoneal foreign body response warrant their own classification as 'fibroblastoid' macrophages. PMID:24638066

  2. The electricidal effect is active in an experimental model of Staphylococcus epidermidis chronic foreign body osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Del Pozo, Jose L; Rouse, Mark S; Euba, Gorane; Kang, Cheol-In; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Steckelberg, James M; Patel, Robin

    2009-10-01

    Treatment with low-amperage (200 microA) electrical current was compared to intravenous doxycycline treatment or no treatment in a rabbit model of Staphylococcus epidermidis chronic foreign body osteomyelitis to determine if the electricidal effect is active in vivo. A stainless steel implant and 10(4) CFU of planktonic S. epidermidis were placed into the medullary cavity of the tibia. Four weeks later, rabbits were assigned to one of three groups with treatment administered for 21 days. The groups included those receiving no treatment (n = 10), intravenous doxycycline (n = 14; 8 mg/kg of body weight three times per day), and electrical current (n = 15; 200 microA continuous delivery). Following treatment, rabbits were sacrificed and the tibias quantitatively cultured. Bacterial load was significantly reduced in the doxycycline (median, 2.55 [range, 0.50 to 6.13] log10 CFU/g of bone) and electrical-current (median, 1.09 [range, 0.50 to 2.99] log10 CFU/g of bone) groups, compared to the level for the control group (median, 4.16 [range, 3.70 to 5.66] log10 CFU/g of bone) (P < 0.0001). Moreover, treatment with electrical current was statistically significantly more efficacious (P = 0.035) than doxycycline treatment. The electricidal effect (the bactericidal activity of low-amperage electrical current against bacterial biofilms) is active in vivo in the treatment of experimental S. epidermidis chronic foreign body osteomyelitis. PMID:19651912

  3. Rigid Bronchoscopy in Airway Foreign Bodies: Value of the Clinical and Radiological Signs

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Kunjan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Foreign body in airway is a common emergency in ENT practice. As we know, Rigid Bronchoscopy is the method of choice for removing it, although at times it leads to specialists performing unnecessary bronchoscopy, exposing patients to hazards of general anesthesia. Objective  The objective of my study is to calculate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, odds ratio from the clinical and radiological signs, comparing with the gold standard, the rigid bronchoscope procedure. Method  This is a prospective analytical study designed at University Teaching Hospital and conducted over a period of 18 months, from March 2011 to August 2012. Data collection was broadly classified into three different categories: (1) Symptomatology, such as presence or absence of choking, cyanosis, and difficulty in breathing; (2) Clinical signs, such as the presence or absence of air entry, crackles, and rhonchi 3. Chest X-ray findings were suggestive of a foreign body. Results  There were a total of 40 rigid bronchoscopies performed under general anesthesia for the diagnosis and therapeutic reasons. Among 40 patients who underwent rigid bronchoscopy, 32 (80%) were found to have varieties of foreign bodies in their airway while 8 patients (20%) had negative bronchoscopy. The history of choking is the only clinical symptoms which came out to be statistically Significant (p = 0.043) with odds ratio of 5. Conclusion  Rigid bronchoscopy is the gold standard technique for diagnosis and procedure of choice to remove FB from airway. Regardless, it still presents a small chance of negative result, especially when there is no history of aspiration. PMID:27413398

  4. Management of ingested foreign bodies in children: a clinical report of the NASPGHAN Endoscopy Committee.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Robert E; Lerner, Diana G; Lin, Tom; Manfredi, Michael; Shah, Manoj; Stephen, Thomas C; Gibbons, Troy E; Pall, Harpreet; Sahn, Ben; McOmber, Mark; Zacur, George; Friedlander, Joel; Quiros, Antonio J; Fishman, Douglas S; Mamula, Petar

    2015-04-01

    Foreign body ingestions in children are some of the most challenging clinical scenarios facing pediatric gastroenterologists. Determining the indications and timing for intervention requires assessment of patient size, type of object ingested, location, clinical symptoms, time since ingestion, and myriad other factors. Often the easiest and least anxiety-producing decision is the one to proceed to endoscopic removal, instead of observation alone. Because of variability in pediatric patient size, there are less firm guidelines available to determine which type of object will safely pass, as opposed to the clearer guidelines in the adult population. In addition, the imprecise nature of the histories often leaves the clinician to question the timing and nature of the ingestion. Furthermore, changes in the types of ingestions encountered, specifically button batteries and high-powered magnet ingestions, create an even greater potential for severe morbidity and mortality among children. As a result, clinical guidelines regarding management of these ingestions in children remain varied and sporadic, with little in the way of prospective data to guide their development. An expert panel of pediatric endoscopists was convened and produced the present article that outlines practical clinical approaches to the pediatric patient with a variety of foreign body ingestions. This guideline is intended as an educational tool that may help inform pediatric endoscopists in managing foreign body ingestions in children. Medical decision making, however, remains a complex process requiring integration of clinical data beyond the scope of these guidelines. These guidelines should therefore not be considered to be a rule or to be establishing a legal standard of care. Caregivers may well choose a course of action outside of those represented in these guidelines because of specific patient circumstances. Furthermore, additional clinical studies may be necessary to clarify aspects based on

  5. The influence of foreign body surface area on the outcome of chronic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Coman, Cristin; Barbuceanu, Florica; Turcu, Danut; Bercaru, Nicolae; Badulescu, Marius

    2016-09-01

    Reproducible animal models of osteomyelitis close to the clinical scenario are difficult to obtain as the animals either die shortly after inoculation of bacteria or the bone cures itself of infection. Additional materials used as foreign bodies offer increased chances for localized infection due to bacterial attachment and are closer to clinical pathology. Through in vivo experimentation we investigated here the influence of surface area of a series of foreign bodies on the final outcome of the animal model, in terms of reproducibility, survival rate and time necessary for onset of chronic disease. Stainless steel Kirschner wire segments, stainless steel balls and cotton meshes were employed for this purpose. The clinical, microbiological, radiological and histological results obtained were compared with the simple case where no foreign body was used. The follow-up period was 57days. The cotton meshes, which had the highest surface area, were observed to provide the best outcome, with the lowest disease onset time interval (of 1week earlier than the others), the highest survival (of 90%) and disease reproduction rate (90%). The only clinical pattern of the mesh group rabbits was short lived inflammation while the other rabbits presented also some other clinical signs such as rhinorrheas, abscesses, rush and/or dyspnea. Moreover, this model is the most suitable for further treatment studies, as the cotton meshes could be easily removed after disease onset, without any intervention on the bone. This is important, as the treatment would address the bacteria present within the bone parts (marrow, cortex, periosteum etc.) not those forming the biofilm. PMID:27264239

  6. [Fortuitous discovery of intracerebral foreign body leads to the diagnosis of Munchausen syndrome by proxy].

    PubMed

    Bouaziz Abed, A; Mustapha, R; Chiha, M

    2011-11-01

    An intracerebral foreign body is a rare situation in childhood. It often occurs accidentally with transorbital or more rarely transnasal penetration. We report the case of a child who had been followed since the age of 2.5 months for chronic vomiting without failure to thrive. The fortuitous discovery at 22 months of age of a 4.5-cm-long sewing needle in his brain probably introduced via the fontanel led us to the diagnosis of Munchausen syndrome by proxy. PMID:21920715

  7. Foreign body retrieval in children with respiratory symptoms and no history of aspiration.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, A L; Mroueh, S M; Bitar, F F; Farhat, F T

    2000-10-01

    To asses the role of bronchoscopy and its yield in children with respiratory symptoms and no typical history of radiological evidence of foreign body aspiration (FBA), we reviewed the records of all patients who underwent bronchoscopy at our institution between 1985 and 1995 and had no history of choking, witnessed FBA or clear radiological evidence of FBA (N = 54, age range 4 months to 16 years). These were subdivided into two subgroups, those with positive bronchoscopy, and those with negative bronchoscopy. Respiratory symptoms and their duration, signs and radiological findings did not differ in both subgroups. PMID:11330222

  8. Foreign body giant cells selectively covering haptics of intraocular lens implants: indicators of poor toleration?

    PubMed

    Wolter, J R

    1983-10-01

    A Sputnik lens implant removed after five years because of bullous keratopathy exhibits a dense covering of its Supramid anterior staves with large foreign body giant cells, while its Prolene loops and Polymethylmethacrylate optics have attracted only few of these cell units. The glass-membrane-like component of the reactive membrane also shows significant differences on the different parts of this implant. The use of observation of the components of reactive membranes on lens implants as indicators of toleration in the eye is suggested. PMID:6364004

  9. Missed diagnosis of anterior urethral valve complicated with a foreign body: a cause for concern.

    PubMed

    Nayyar, Rishi; Chavda, Sundeep; Singh, Prabhjot; Gupta, Narmada P

    2011-01-01

    Anterior urethral valve (AUV) is a long known but rare anomaly, which is occasionally encountered in boys with obstructive uropathy. We present a case of AUV with a diverticulum which was misdiagnosed at other center as neurogenic bladder resulting in chronic renal failure. The case was further complicated by breakage of tip of the catheter used for clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) in the diverticulum presenting as a foreign body in the urethra. This article highlights the frequently missed diagnosis of AUV by most practitioners wrongly labeling it as neurogenic bladder, leading to improper management and renal failure in young boys. PMID:21478596

  10. Colonic Foreign Body Retrieval Using a Modified TAMIS Technique with Standard Instruments and Trocars

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O.; Mohammed, Fawwaz; Spence, Richard; Albert, Matthew; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Background. Reports of retained colorectal foreign bodies (CFBs) are no longer considered uncommon. We present a case where a retained CFB was retrieved using a modified TAMIS technique using standard instruments and trocars. Case Report. A 52-year-old man presented with a CFB. We report our technique of extraction with standard laparoscopic instruments without specialized access platforms. Conclusions. This modified TAMIS technique is well suited for resource poor environments because it requires no specialized equipment, platforms, or additional skill sets compared to conventional laparoscopy. PMID:25945267