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Sample records for formation confers aluminum

  1. A Formate Dehydrogenase Confers Tolerance to Aluminum and Low pH1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yu Long; Fan, Wei; Xu, Jia Meng; Liu, Yu; Cao, Meng Jie; Wang, Ming-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) is involved in various higher plant abiotic stress responses. Here, we investigated the role of rice bean (Vigna umbellata) VuFDH in Al and low pH (H+) tolerance. Screening of various potential substrates for the VuFDH protein demonstrated that it functions as a formate dehydrogenase. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and histochemical analysis showed that the expression of VuFDH is induced in rice bean root tips by Al or H+ stresses. Fluorescence microscopic observation of VuFDH-GFP in transgenic Arabidopsis plants indicated that VuFDH is localized in the mitochondria. Accumulation of formate is induced by Al and H+ stress in rice bean root tips, and exogenous application of formate increases internal formate content that results in the inhibition of root elongation and induction of VuFDH expression, suggesting that formate accumulation is involved in both H+- and Al-induced root growth inhibition. Over-expression of VuFDH in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) results in decreased sensitivity to Al and H+ stress due to less production of formate in the transgenic tobacco lines under Al and H+ stresses. Moreover, NtMATE and NtALS3 expression showed no changes versus wild type in these over-expression lines, suggesting that herein known Al-resistant mechanisms are not involved. Thus, the increased Al tolerance of VuFDH over-expression lines is likely attributable to their decreased Al-induced formate production. Taken together, our findings advance understanding of higher plant Al toxicity mechanisms, and suggest a possible new route toward the improvement of plant performance in acidic soils, where Al toxicity and H+ stress coexist. PMID:27021188

  2. A Formate Dehydrogenase Confers Tolerance to Aluminum and Low pH.

    PubMed

    Lou, He Qiang; Gong, Yu Long; Fan, Wei; Xu, Jia Meng; Liu, Yu; Cao, Meng Jie; Wang, Ming-Hu; Yang, Jian Li; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2016-05-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) is involved in various higher plant abiotic stress responses. Here, we investigated the role of rice bean (Vigna umbellata) VuFDH in Al and low pH (H(+)) tolerance. Screening of various potential substrates for the VuFDH protein demonstrated that it functions as a formate dehydrogenase. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and histochemical analysis showed that the expression of VuFDH is induced in rice bean root tips by Al or H(+) stresses. Fluorescence microscopic observation of VuFDH-GFP in transgenic Arabidopsis plants indicated that VuFDH is localized in the mitochondria. Accumulation of formate is induced by Al and H(+) stress in rice bean root tips, and exogenous application of formate increases internal formate content that results in the inhibition of root elongation and induction of VuFDH expression, suggesting that formate accumulation is involved in both H(+)- and Al-induced root growth inhibition. Over-expression of VuFDH in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) results in decreased sensitivity to Al and H(+) stress due to less production of formate in the transgenic tobacco lines under Al and H(+) stresses. Moreover, NtMATE and NtALS3 expression showed no changes versus wild type in these over-expression lines, suggesting that herein known Al-resistant mechanisms are not involved. Thus, the increased Al tolerance of VuFDH over-expression lines is likely attributable to their decreased Al-induced formate production. Taken together, our findings advance understanding of higher plant Al toxicity mechanisms, and suggest a possible new route toward the improvement of plant performance in acidic soils, where Al toxicity and H(+) stress coexist. PMID:27021188

  3. Coordination between apoplastic and symplastic detoxification confers plant aluminum resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Lei, Gui Jie; Wang, Zhi Wei; Shi, Yuan Zhi; Braam, Janet; Li, Gui Xin; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2013-08-01

    Whether aluminum toxicity is an apoplastic or symplastic phenomenon is still a matter of debate. Here, we found that three auxin overproducing mutants, yucca, the recessive mutant superroot2, and superroot1 had increased aluminum sensitivity, while a transfer DNA insertion mutant, xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolases15 (xth15), showed enhanced aluminum resistance, accompanied by low endogenous indole-3-acetic acid levels, implying that auxin may be involved in plant responses to aluminum stress. We used yucca and xth15 mutants for further study. The two mutants accumulated similar total aluminum in roots and had significantly reduced cell wall aluminum and increased symplastic aluminum content relative to the wild-type ecotype Columbia, indicating that altered aluminum levels in the symplast or cell wall cannot fully explain the differential aluminum resistance of these two mutants. The expression of Al sensitive1 (ALS1), a gene that functions in aluminum redistribution between the cytoplasm and vacuole and contributes to symplastic aluminum detoxification, was less abundant in yucca and more abundant in xth15 than the wild type, consistent with possible ALS1 function conferring altered aluminum sensitivity in the two mutants. Consistent with the idea that xth15 can tolerate more symplastic aluminum because of possible ALS1 targeting to the vacuole, morin staining of yucca root tip sections showed more aluminum accumulation in the cytosol than in the wild type, and xth15 showed reduced morin staining of cytosolic aluminum, even though yucca and xth15 had similar overall symplastic aluminum content. Exogenous application of an active auxin analog, naphthylacetic acid, to the wild type mimicked the aluminum sensitivity and distribution phenotypes of yucca, verifying that auxin may regulate aluminum distribution in cells. Together, these data demonstrate that auxin negatively regulates aluminum tolerance through altering ALS1 expression and aluminum distribution

  4. Subsurface Aluminum Nitride Formation in Iron-Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, June H.

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels containing higher amounts of aluminum than conventional steels are ideal for structural automotive parts due to their mechanical properties. However, the aluminum tends to react with any processing environment at high temperatures and therefore presents significant challenges during manufacturing. One such challenge occurs during secondary cooling, reheating, and hot-rolling and is caused by a reaction with nitrogen-rich atmospheres wherein subsurface aluminum nitride forms in addition to internal and external oxides. The nitrides are detrimental to mechanical properties and cause surface cracks. It is important to understand how these nitrides and oxides form and their consequences for the quality of steel products. This study looks at model iron-aluminum (up to 8 wt.% aluminum) alloys and uses confocal laser scanning microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy to study the effect of various conditions on the growth and development of these precipitates in a subsurface oxygen-depleted region. By using model alloys and controlling the experimental atmosphere, this study is able to understand some of the more fundamental materials science behind aluminum nitride formation in aluminum-rich iron alloys and the relationship between internal nitride and oxide precipitation and external oxide scale morphology and composition. The iron-aluminum alloys were heated in N2 atmospheres containing oxygen impurities. It was found that nitrides formed when bulk aluminum content was below 8 wt.% when oxygen was sufficiently depleted due to the internal oxidation. In the samples containing 1 wt.% aluminum, the depth of the internal oxide and nitride zones were in agreement with a diffusion-based model. Increasing aluminum content to 3 and 5 wt% had the effects of modifying the surface-oxide scale composition and increasing its continuity

  5. Reliable aluminum contact formation by electrostatic bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kárpáti, T.; Pap, A. E.; Radnóczi, Gy; Beke, B.; Bársony, I.; Fürjes, P.

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents a detailed study of a reliable method developed for aluminum fusion wafer bonding assisted by the electrostatic force evolving during the anodic bonding process. The IC-compatible procedure described allows the parallel formation of electrical and mechanical contacts, facilitating a reliable packaging of electromechanical systems with backside electrical contacts. This fusion bonding method supports the fabrication of complex microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and micro-opto-electromechanical systems (MOEMS) structures with enhanced temperature stability, which is crucial in mechanical sensor applications such as pressure or force sensors. Due to the applied electrical potential of  -1000 V the Al metal layers are compressed by electrostatic force, and at the bonding temperature of 450 °C intermetallic diffusion causes aluminum ions to migrate between metal layers.

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of catalyzed aluminum carbide formation at aluminum-carbon interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabenberg, L.; Maruyama, Benji

    1990-01-01

    Aluminum carbide may form at aluminum-graphite interfaces during the high-temperature processing of graphite fiber-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites. The chemical interactions leading to the formation of the aluminum carbide in the solid state involve the breaking of the carbon-carbon bonds within the graphite, the transport of the carbon atoms across the interface, and the reaction with the aluminum to form Al4C3. The aluminum carbide formation process has been followed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of model, thin-film, reaction couples. The overall reaction is shown to be catalyzed by the presence of water vapor. Water at the interface increases reaction kinetics by apparently weakening the bonds between the surface carbon atoms and their substrate. This result is in general agreement with what is known to occur during the oxidation of graphite in air.

  7. Energetic Insight into the Formation of Solids from Aluminum Polyoxocations.

    PubMed

    Reusser, Dana; Casey, William H; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-01

    The ε-Keggin [AlO4Al12(OH)24(H2O)12](7+) ion (AlAl12(7+)) is a metastable precursor in the formation of aluminum oxyhydroxide solids. It also serves as a useful model for the chemistry of aluminous mineral surfaces. Herein we calculate the enthalpies of formation for this aqueous ion and its heterometal-substituted forms, GaAl12(7+) and GeAl12(8+), using solution calorimetry. Rather than measuring the enthalpies of the MAl12(7/8+) ions directly from solution hydrolysis, we measured the metathesis reaction of the crystallized forms with barium chloride creating an aqueous aluminum solution monospecific in MAl12(7/8+). Then, the contributions to the heat of formation from the crystallized forms were subtracted using referenced states. When comparing the aqueous AlAl12(7+) ion to solid aluminum (oxy)-hydroxide phases, we found that this ion lies closer in energy to solid phases than to aqueous aluminum monomers, thus explaining its role as a precursor to amorphous aluminum hydroxide phases. PMID:26129924

  8. Chromosome-anchored QTL conferring aluminum tolerance in hexaploid oat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major constraint on crop production in acid soils around the world. Hexaploid oat (Avena sativa L.) possesses signi'cant Al tolerance making it a good candidate for production in these environments. Genetic improvement for Al tolerance in oat has traditionally be...

  9. Electrochemical formation of a composite polymer-aluminum oxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge-Marchese, Jude Mary

    1997-10-01

    The formation of polymer films through electrochemical techniques utilizing electrolytes which include conductive polymer is of great interest to the coatings and electronics industries as a means for creating electrically conductive and corrosion resistant finishes. One of these polymers, polyamino-benzene (polyaniline), has been studied for this purpose for over ten years. This material undergoes an insulator-to-metal transition upon doping with protonic acids in an acid/base type reaction. Review of prior studies dealing with polyaniline and working knowledge of aluminum anodization has led to the development of a unique process whereby composite polymer-aluminum oxide films are formed. The basis for the process is a modification of the anodizing electrolyte which results in the codeposition of polyaniline during aluminum anodization. A second process, which incorporates electrochemical sealing of the anodic layer with polyaniline was also developed. The formation of these composite films is documented through experimental processing, and characterized by way of scientific analysis and engineering tests. Analysis results revealed the formation of unique dual phase anodic films with fine microstructures which exhibited full intrusion of the columnar aluminum oxide structure with polyaniline, indicating the polymer was deposited as the metal oxidation proceeded. An aromatic amine derivative of polyaniline with aluminum sulfate was determined to be the reaction product within the aluminum oxide phase of the codeposited films. Scientific characterization determined the codeposition process yields completely chemically and metallurgically bound composite films. Engineering studies determined the films, obtained through a single step, exhibited superior wear and corrosion resistance to conventionally anodized and sealed films processed through two steps, demonstrating the increased manufacturing process efficiency that can be realized with the modification of the

  10. Enthalpy of the formation of natural hydrous aluminum hydroxosulfate (aluminite)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodova, L. P.; Nagornaya, E. V.; Mel'chakova, L. V.; Vigasina, M. F.; Baksheev, I. A.

    2013-12-01

    A thermochemical study of natural aluminum hydroxosulfate Al2[(OH)4SO4] · 7H2O, aluminite (Nakhodka deposit, West Chukotka, Russia) is performed on a Tian-Calvet "Setaram" high-temperature heat-conducting microcalorimeter (France). The enthalpy of aluminite formation from simple compounds is obtained via the melt calorimetry of dissolution, Δf H ○(298.15 K) = -4986 ± 21 kJ/mol.

  11. Formation of Anodic Aluminum Oxide with Branched and Meshed Pores.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeol; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-06-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), with a self-ordered hexagonal array, is important for various applications in nanofabrication including as the fabrication of nanotemplates and other nanostructures. With the consideration, there have been many efforts to control the characteristic parameters of porous anodic alumina by adjustment of the anodizing conditions such as the electrolyte, temperature, applied potential, and Al purity. In particular, impurities in Al are changing the morphology of an alumina film; however, the formation mechanism has not yet been explained. In this work, we anodized a high purity (99.999%, Al(high)) and low purity (99.8%, Al(low)) aluminum foil by a two-step anodization process in an oxalic acid solution or phosphoric acid. It was found that the purity of aluminum foil has influenced the morphology of the alumina film resulting in branched and meshed pores. Also, electrochemical analysis indicated that the branched and meshed pores in the low-purity Al foil formed by the presence of impurities. Impurities act as defects and change the general growth mechanism for pore formation by inducing an electric field imbalance during anodization. This work contributes to the research field of topographical chemistry and applied fields including nanofabrication. PMID:27427755

  12. Bond formation in ultrasonically welded aluminum sheet metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkosz, Daniel Edward

    Ultrasonic welding (USW), a solid state joining technology, has been used to bond aluminum alloys commonly used in the automotive industry. Bonding occurs due to USW's high frequency (˜20 kHz) in-plane vibration of sample interfaces while being held under moderate clamp pressure normal to the plane of vibration. Vibration and clamp pressure are transmitted into bond formation via contact with a weld-tip. To better understand how weld-tip geometry affected bond formation, experiments were conducted to quantify how tip geometry influenced plastic deformation characteristics between fully welded coupons of 0.9mm thick AA6111-T4 aluminum alloy. Weld-interface microstructure features were documented by optical microscopy and features quantified in a 19 point matrix. Correlation between microstructure features, such as rolling-wakes, and resulting weld bond strengths of more than 3.0kN is made. Weld zone microstructure features appear to result from deformation at and severe migration of the original weld interface during USW. To confirm this hypothesis, intrinsic and extrinsic markers were employed to monitor weld interface deformation characteristics. Various physical and analytical techniques were used in conjunction with these markers to show that joining of "like" and "dislike" aluminum samples is achieved through mechanical mixing of mating interfaces and not by elemental diffusion. It is also hypothesized that severe deformation of the original interface would result in areas of high residual strain within a formed weld zone. To investigate this and the influence that tip geometry may have on residual strain, fully welded samples were annealed at 500°C for a controlled period of time and recovery, recrystallization and grain growth characteristics were monitored. In all welds, initial recrystallization and grain growth occurred at the outer ends of weld zones and along weld interfaces where the most turbulent mixing and grain size reduction was observed

  13. Formation of anodic aluminum oxide with serrated nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongdong; Zhao, Liang; Jiang, Chuanhai; Lu, Jia G

    2010-08-11

    We report a simple and robust method to self-assemble porous anodic aluminum oxide membranes with serrated nanochannels by anodizing in phosphoric acid solution. Due to high field conduction and anionic incorporation, an increase of anodizing voltage leads to an increase of the impurity levels and also the field strength across barrier layer. On the basis of both experiment and simulation results, the initiation and formation of serrated channels are attributed to the evolution of oxygen gas bubbles followed by plastic deformation in the oxide film. Alternating anodization in oxalic and phosphoric acids is applied to construct multilayered membranes with smooth and serrated channels, demonstrating a unique way to design and construct a three-dimensional hierarchical system with controllable morphology and composition. PMID:20617804

  14. Bifilm Defect Formation in Hydraulic Jump of Liquid Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Fu-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    In aluminum gravity casting, as liquid aluminum fell through a vertical sprue and impacted on the horizontal flat surface, a phenomenon known as hydraulic jump ( i.e., flow transition from super-critical to sub-critical flows) was observed. As the jump was transformed, a reverse eddy motion on the surface of the jump was created. This motion entrained aluminum oxide film from the surface into aluminum melt. This folded film (so-called "bifilm" defect) was engulfed by the melt and caused its quality to deteriorate. To understand this phenomenon, aluminum casting experiments and computational modeling were conducted. In the casting experiment, a radius ( R j) to the point where the circular hydraulic jump occurred was measured. This is the circular region of `irregular surface feature', a rough oxidized surface texture near the center area of the castings. To quantify contents of the bifilm defects in the outer region of the jump, the samples in this region were sectioned and re-melted for doing re-melted reduced pressure test (re-melt RPT). An "area-normalized" bifilm index map was plotted to analyze bifilms' population in the samples. The flow transition in the hydraulic jump of liquid aluminum depended on three pressure heads: inertial, gravitational, and surface-tension pressures. A new theoretical equation containing surface tension for describing the flow transition of liquid metal was proposed.

  15. Facile formation of superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface and corrosion-resistant behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Libang; Yan, Zhongna; Qiang, Xiaohu; Liu, Yanhua; Wang, Yanping

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic surface with excellent corrosion resistance was prepared on aluminum alloy via boiling water treatment and surface modification with stearic acid. Results suggested that the micro- and nanoscale hierarchical structure along with the hydrophobic chemical composition surface confers the aluminum alloy surface with good superhydrophobicity, and the water contact angle and the water sliding angle can reach 156.6° and 3°, respectively. The corrosion resistance of the superhydrophobic aluminum alloy was first characterized by potentiodynamic polarization, and then the long-term corrosion resistance was investigated by immersing the sample in NaCl solution for 90 days. The surface wettability, morphology, and composition before and after immersion were examined, and results showed that the superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface possessed good corrosion resistance under the experimental conditions, which is favorable for its practical application as an engineering material in seawater corrosion conditions. Finally, the mechanism of the superhydrophobicity and excellent corrosion resistance is deduced.

  16. Polyphenol-Aluminum Complex Formation: Implications for Aluminum Tolerance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Liu, Ruiqiang; Gung, Benjamin W; Tindall, Steven; Gonzalez, Javier M; Halvorson, Jonathan J; Hagerman, Ann E

    2016-04-20

    Natural polyphenols may play an important role in aluminum detoxification in some plants. We examined the interaction between Al(3+) and the purified high molecular weight polyphenols pentagalloyl glucose (940 Da) and oenothein B (1568 Da), and the related compound methyl gallate (184 Da) at pH 4 and 6. We used spectrophotometric titration and chemometric modeling to determine stability constants and stoichiometries for the aluminum-phenol (AlL) complexes. The structures and spectral features of aluminum-methyl gallate complexes were evaluated with quantum chemical calculations. The high molecular weight polyphenols formed Al3L2 complexes with conditional stability constants (β) ∼ 1 × 10(23) at pH 6 and AlL complexes with β ∼ 1 × 10(5) at pH 4. Methyl gallate formed AlL complexes with β = 1 × 10(6) at pH 6 but did not complex aluminum at pH 4. At intermediate metal-to-polyphenol ratios, high molecular weight polyphenols formed insoluble Al complexes but methyl gallate complexes were soluble. The high molecular weight polyphenols have high affinities and solubility features that are favorable for a role in aluminum detoxification in the environment. PMID:27022835

  17. Polyphenol-aluminum complex formation: Implications for aluminum tolerance in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural polyphenols may play an important role in aluminum detoxification in some plants. We examined the interaction between Al3+ and the purified high molecular weight polyphenols pentagalloyl glucose (940 Da) and oenothein B (1568 Da), and the related compound methyl gallate (184 Da) at pH 4 and ...

  18. Aluminum ions accelerated the oxidative stress of copper-mediated melanin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Junwei; Bi, Shuping

    2003-11-01

    A comparison between the effects of aluminum and cupric ions on the dopachrome (DC) conversion and the cooperation effect of the both ions in the DOPA oxidation to melanin pathway has been studied by UV-Vis spectrophotometric method. Both aluminum and cupric ions catalyze the DC conversion reaction, which is an important step in the melanin synthesis pathway. However, cupric ions catalyze the conversion of DC to yield 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA) but the product of DC conversion catalyzed by aluminum is 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI). DOPA oxidation catalyzed by aluminum and cupric ions is studied in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The results from our experiments provide evidence that aluminum can markedly increase the oxidative stress of copper-mediated the melanin formation and influence the properties of the melanin by means of changing the ratio of DHICA/DHI in the acidic environment (pH 5.5).

  19. Aluminum-activated citrate and malate transporters from the MATE and ALMT families function independently to confer Arabidopsis aluminum tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum (Al) activated root malate and citrate exudation plays an important role in Al tolerance in many plant species. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of AtMATE, a homolog of the recently discovered sorghum and barley Al tolerance genes, here shown to encode an Al-activ...

  20. Aluminum-activated citrate and malate transporters from the MATE and ALMT families function independently to confer Arabidopsis aluminum tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum (Al) activated root malate and citrate exudation play an important role in Al tolerance in many plant species. AtALMT1, an Al-activated malate transporter, is a major contributor to Arabidopsis Al tolerance. Here, we demonstrate that a second, unrelated gene, AtMATE, encodes an Arabidopsi...

  1. Formation of Fine Clusters in High-Temperature Oxidation of Molten Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, KeeHyun

    2014-07-01

    High-temperature oxidation of molten aluminum was investigated by high-resolution electron microscopes in order to determine the possibility of heterogeneous nucleation of aluminum grains on oxide for the grain refinement and structural uniformity of intensively melt-sheared aluminum alloys. High-resolution observations detect initial amorphous phase and gamma-alumina phase and show fine clusters with size of about 150 to 200 nm composed of extremely fine aluminum grains and gamma-alumina or amorphous aluminum oxide. Furthermore, high-resolution lattice images and diffraction patterns show no orientation relationship, although there is a specific orientation between gamma-alumina and aluminum along (111)[110] with high potency of heterogeneous nucleation. The volumetric shrinkage by the transformation of gamma- into alpha-alumina causes the surface oxide films to repeatedly rupture and leads to the creation of channels to the base melt surface for further oxidation of fresh metal. Based on the observations, the mechanism of high-temperature oxidation of molten aluminum and formation of the fine clusters as well as the possibility of the heterogeneous nucleation of aluminum grains are discussed.

  2. Evidence of involvement of aluminum in causation of defective formation of eggshells and of impaired breeding in wild passerine birds

    SciTech Connect

    Nyholm, N.E.I.

    1981-12-01

    Aluminum was found in the bone marrow tissue of humeri of wild pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), specifically in birds with impaired breeding. Production of only small cluthes, defective eggshell formation, and intrauterine bleeding were characteristic impairments shown by the aluminum-contaminated birds. These impairments agree with the symptoms of aluminum intoxication of mammals (including man) reported in the literature. A possible route of transport of aluminum to the birds is presented, in which acid precipitation is the proximate link.

  3. Formation of Nanoporous Anodic Alumina by Anodization of Aluminum Films on Glass Substrates.

    PubMed

    Lebyedyeva, Tetyana; Kryvyi, Serhii; Lytvyn, Petro; Skoryk, Mykola; Shpylovyy, Pavlo

    2016-12-01

    Our research was aimed at the study of aluminum films and porous anodic alumina (PAA) films in thin-film РАА/Al structures for optical sensors, based on metal-clad waveguides (MCWG). The results of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of the structure of Al films, deposited by DC magnetron sputtering, and of PAA films, formed on them, are presented in this work.The study showed that the structure of the Al films is defined by the deposition rate of aluminum and the thickness of the film. We saw that under anodization in 0.3 M aqueous oxalic acid solution at a voltage of 40 V, the PAA film with a disordered array of pores was formed on aluminum films 200-600 nm thick, which were deposited on glass substrates with an ultra-thin adhesive Nb layer. The research revealed the formation of two differently sized types of pores. The first type of pores is formed on the grain boundaries of aluminum film, and the pores are directed perpendicularly to the surface of aluminum. The second type of pores is formed directly on the grains of aluminum. They are directed perpendicularly to the grain plains. There is a clear tendency to self-ordering in this type of pores. PMID:27083584

  4. The entropy and Gibbs free energy of formation of the aluminum ion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.; Robie, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    A reevaluation of the entropy and Gibbs free energy of formation of Al3+(aq) yields -308 ?? 15 J/K??mol and 489.4 ?? 1.4kj/mol for S0298 and ??G0f{hook},298 respectively. The standard electrode potential for aluminum is 1.691 ?? 0.005 volts. ?? 1977.

  5. Enthalpies of complex formation of boron and aluminum bromides with organic bases of high donor power

    SciTech Connect

    Grigor-ev, A.A.; Kondrat'ev, Y.V.; Suvorov, A.V.

    1986-11-20

    By the calorimetric method enthalpies of complex formation were determined for boron and aluminum bromides with piperidine and hexamethylphosphoric triamide in benzene solutions and for boron bromide with pyridine in dichloroethane, and also enthalpies of solution were determined for BBr/sub 3/ and the adducts AlBr/sub 3/ x PPy and BBr/sub 2/ x Py in benzene and pyridine.

  6. High-Aluminum-Affinity Silica Is a Nanoparticle That Seeds Secondary Aluminosilicate Formation

    PubMed Central

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Brown, Andy; Dietzel, Martin; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance and abundance of aluminosilicates throughout our natural surroundings, their formation at neutral pH is, surprisingly, a matter of considerable debate. From our experiments in dilute aluminum and silica containing solutions (pH ~ 7) we previously identified a silica polymer with an extraordinarily high affinity for aluminium ions (high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer, HSP). Here, further characterization shows that HSP is a colloid of approximately 2.4 nm in diameter with a mean specific surface area of about 1,000 m2 g-1 and it competes effectively with transferrin for Al(III) binding. Aluminum binding to HSP strongly inhibited its decomposition whilst the reaction rate constant for the formation of the β-silicomolybdic acid complex indicated a diameter between 3.6 and 4.1 nm for these aluminum-containing nanoparticles. Similarly, high resolution microscopic analysis of the air dried aluminum-containing silica colloid solution revealed 3.9 ± 1.3 nm sized crystalline Al-rich silica nanoparticles (ASP) with an estimated Al:Si ratio of between 2 and 3 which is close to the range of secondary aluminosilicates such as imogolite. Thus the high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer is a nanoparticle that seeds early aluminosilicate formation through highly competitive binding of Al(III) ions. In niche environments, especially in vivo, this may serve as an alternative mechanism to polyhydroxy Al(III) species binding monomeric silica to form early phase, non-toxic aluminosilicates. PMID:24349573

  7. Formation of hydrotalcite in mixtures of aluminum hydroxycarbonate and magnesium hydroxide gels.

    PubMed

    Vanderlaan, R K; White, J L; Hem, S L

    1982-07-01

    IR and X-ray analysis demonstrate that hydrotalcite forms during the aging of aluminum hydroxycarbonate gel and magnesium hydroxide gel mixtures. The formation of hydrotalcite produces a change in the pH-stat titrigram and a sharp increase in the pH of the mixture. Hydrotalcite was noted earlier in mixtures having a high molar ratio of magnesium to aluminum, a high total gel concentration, a high initial pH, or in mixtures stored at elevated temperatures. The addition of sorbitol to the mixtures substantially delayed the appearance of hydrotalcite. Nonacid-reactive hydrotalcite formed when mixtures of chloride-containing aluminum hydroxide gel and magnesium hydroxide gel were aged. PMID:7120062

  8. Bubble Formation at a Submerged Orifice for Aluminum Foams Produced by Gas Injection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xueliu; Chen, Xiang; Liu, Xingnan; Zhang, Huiming; Li, Yanxiang

    2013-02-01

    The bubble formation at a submerged orifice in the process of aluminum foams produced by gas injection method is investigated. The experimental results show that the increase of the gas flow rate and the orifice diameter can lead to increasing of the bubble size. The large orifice can make the frequency of bubble formation decrease by slowing down the increase of the gas chamber pressure when the gas flow rate increases. The effect of the gas chamber volume on the bubble size can be ignored in the experiment when it expands from 1 to 125 cm3. A theoretical model of bubble formation, expansion, and detachment under constant flow conditions is established to predict the bubble size. The theoretical predictions for air-aluminum melt systems are consistent with the experimental results.

  9. Suppression of phospholipase D,gammas confers increased aluminum resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is the major stress in acidic soil that comprises about 50% of the world’s arable land. The complex molecular mechanisms of Al toxicity have yet to be fully determined. As a barrier to Al entrance and attack, plant cell membranes play essential roles in Al toxicity, as lipid c...

  10. Modeling of microporosity formation during solidification of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; An, D.; Zhang, Q.; Dai, T.; Zhu, M.

    2015-06-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) multi-phase cellular automaton (MCA) model is adopted to simulate the dendrite and microporosity formation during solidification of aluminium alloys. The model involves three phases of liquid, gas, and solid. The effect of liquid-solid phase transformation on the nucleation and growth of porosity, the redistribution and diffusion of solute and hydrogen, and the effects of surface tension and environmental pressure are taken into account. The growth of both dendrite and porosity is simulated using a CA approach. The diffusion of solute and hydrogen is calculated using the finite difference (FD) method. The simulations can reveal the interactive and competitive growth of dendrites and micropores, and the microsegregationof solute and hydrogen. The porosity nuclei with large size are able to grow preferentially, while the growth of the small porosity nuclei is inhibited. Gas pores grow spherically when it is enveloped by liquid. After touching with dendrites, the shapes of pores become irregular. An increased initial hydrogen concentration reduces the incubation time of porosity nucleation, but increases the final percentage of porosity and the average porosity size at the eutectic temperature. With cooling rate decreasing, the competitive growth between gas pores becomes more evident, leading to non-uniform porosity sizes, and more irregular morphology of the porosities with larger size. The simulation results are compared reasonably well with the experimental data reported in literature.

  11. Formation of Chromate Conversion Coatings on Aluminum and Its Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs,H.; Sasaki, K.; Jeffcoate, C.; Laget, V.; Buchheit, R.

    2005-01-01

    We used in situ X-ray adsorption near-edge structure (XANES) to investigate the formation of chromate conversion coatings on pure Al, commercial Al alloys (AA 1100, AA2024, and AA7075), and a series of binary A1-Cu alloys. The method employed a new electrochemical cell that can determine the ratio of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) to total chromium (Cr(total)) speciation in conversion coatings as a fraction of exposure time to a chromate solution. The spectra showed that the initial Cr(VI)/Cr(total) ratios are greater than later ones for pure Al and AAl 100, but not for AA2024 and AA7075. Measurements with Al-Cu alloys demonstrated that the difference observed in AA2024 and AA7075 may not be due to Cu alloying. The proportion of Cr(VI) in the coatings becomes approximately constant after 180 s of exposure for all the specimens examined even though the coatings continue to grow.

  12. Formation and nitridation of vanadium-aluminum intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Lewalter, H; Bock, W; Kolbesen, B O

    2002-10-01

    V(5)Al(8) and V(3)Al intermetallics have been formed by interdiffusion, by annealing of sputtered V/Al-multilayers at 700 degrees C in vacuo; sapphire (102) was used as substrate. The V/Al intermetallics were nitridated in NH(3) at 900 degrees C for 1 min by RTP (rapid thermal processing). The samples were investigated with XRD (X-ray diffraction), SNMS (secondary neutral mass spectrometry), and AFM (atomic force microscopy). A 5-10 nm thick AlN film (001 textured) was formed by nitridation of V(5)Al(8) (110 textured) and 2-3% nitrogen was incorporated in the V(5)Al(8) bulk. Nitridation of V(3)Al resulted in the formation of VN and AlN. Direct nitridation of V/Al-multilayers showed that near the surface nitridation is faster than intermixing of the V and Al layers. The capability of VN as diffusion barrier for Al could also be shown. PMID:12397502

  13. The formation mechanism of aluminum oxide tunnel barriers.

    SciTech Connect

    Cerezo, A.; Petford-Long, A. K.; Larson, D. J.; Pinitsoontorn, S.; Singleton, E. W.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Oxford; Seagate Tech.

    2006-01-01

    The functional properties of magnetic tunnel junctions are critically dependant on the nanoscale morphology of the insulating barrier (usually only a few atomic layers thick) that separates the two ferromagnetic layers. Three-dimensional atom probe analysis has been used to study the chemistry of a magnetic tunnel junction structure comprising an aluminium oxide barrier formed by in situ oxidation, both in the under-oxidized and fully oxidized states and before and after annealing. Low oxidation times result in discrete oxide islands. Further oxidation leads to a more continuous, but still non-stoichiometric, barrier with evidence that oxidation proceeds along the top of grain boundaries in the underlying CoFe layer. Post-deposition annealing leads to an increase in the barrier area, but only in the case of the fully oxidized and annealed structure is a continuous planar layer formed, which is close to the stoichiometric Al:O ratio of 2:3. These results are surprising, in that the planar layers are usually considered unstable with respect to breaking up into separate islands. Analysis of the various driving forces suggests that the formation of a continuous layer requires a combination of factors, including the strain energy resulting from the expansion of the oxide during internal oxidation on annealing.

  14. Formation of Deposits on the Cathode Surface of Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, François; Soucy, Gervais; Rivoaland, Loig

    2014-12-01

    The efficiency of electrolysis cells for aluminum production is reduced when deposits are formed on the cathode block surface. Overfeeding of alumina or excessive heat loss in industrial cells leads to the formation of highly resistive deposits. In this study, the chemical composition of sludge, ledge toe, and thin deposits was investigated at the bottom of both industrial and experimental electrolysis cells. The formation of deposits in laboratory experiments was demonstrated in acidic, neutral, and basic electrolytic bath. A gradient of chiolite (Na5Al3F14) and α-Al2O3 was observed in the deposits. The bath at the bottom of the experimental electrolysis cell had a higher cryolite ratio implying a higher liquidus temperature. The sludge formed at the bottom of the cell can lift the aluminum metal resulting in an important reduction of the contact surface between the aluminum and the cathode block. Moreover, the deposits disturb the current path and generate horizontal current components in the metal which enhance the motion and lower the current efficiency. A thin film of bath supersaturated in alumina was observed under the metal. This work provides clarification on the formation mechanisms of the various deposits responsible for the deterioration of the cathode surface.

  15. Removal of Vanadium from Molten Aluminum-Part I. Analysis of VB2 Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliq, Abdul; Rhamdhani, Muhammad Akbar; Brooks, Geoffrey A.; Grandfield, John F.

    2014-04-01

    Aluminum has been used as an alternative to copper for electrical conductor applications. However, the presence of certain impurities in aluminum, such as V, Ti, Zr, Cr, and Fe, has detrimental effect on its electrical conductivity. These impurities can be removed by the addition of an Al-B master alloy containing AlB2 or AlB12 phase, known as boron treatment. The detailed mechanism of borides formation, however, is not well understood. In the current study, a systematic investigation of vanadium diborides (VB2) formation in the Al-V-B alloys was carried out. The study comprised thermodynamic assessment and experimental investigation on the Al-V-B system under typical industrial processing conditions. It was predicted from thermodynamic analysis that VB2 are stable borides of V and do not dissolve readily in the temperatures ranging from 948 K to 1173 K (675 °C to 900 °C). The experimental investigation showed that the mechanism of VB2 formation and V removal in an Al-V-B system is complex as it involves a number of steps such as chemical reaction, mass transfers in bulk liquid and inside the VB2 ring, and diffusions of B and V through the VB2 layer. Comparative analysis of thermodynamic and experimental results showed that the aluminum alloys were far from equilibrium and that the overall process was limited by the kinetics of B diffusion through the VB2 ring.

  16. Formation and evolution of tweed structures on high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, P. V.; Vlasov, I. V.; Sklyarova, E. A.; Smekalina, T. V.

    2015-10-27

    Peculiarities of formation and evolution of tweed structures on the surface of high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension were studied using an atom force microscope and a white light interferometer. Tweed structures of micron and submicron sizes were found on the foils at different number of cycles. In the range of 42,000 < N < 95,000 cycles destruction of tweed patterns is observed, which leads to their disappearance from the surface of the foils. Formation of tweed structures of various scales is discussed in terms of the Grinfeld instability.

  17. Formation and emission of brominated dioxins and furans during secondary aluminum smelting processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Liu, Guorui; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Li, Sumei; Liu, Wenbin; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-03-01

    Secondary aluminum smelting (SAl) processes have previously been found to be important sources of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs). It is crucial that the key factors that influence the formation and emission of PBDD/Fs are identified to allow techniques for decreasing PBDD/F emissions during SAl processes to be developed. In this study, stack gas samples were collected from four typical secondary aluminum smelters that used different raw materials, and the samples were analyzed to allow differences between PBDD/F emissions from different SAl plants to be assessed. The composition of the raw materials was found to be one of the key factors influencing the amounts of PBDD/Fs emitted. The PBDD/F emission factors (per tonne of aluminum produced) for the plants using 100% (Plant1), 80% (Plant2), and 50% (Plant3) dirty aluminum scrap in the raw material feed were 180, 86, and 14 μg t(-1), respectively. The amounts of PBDD/Fs emitted at different stages of the smelting process (feeding-fusion, refining, and casting) were compared, and the feeding-fusion stage was found to be the main stage in which PBDD/Fs were formed and emitted. Effective aluminum scrap pretreatments could significantly decrease PBDD/F emissions. Much higher polybrominated dibenzofuran concentrations than polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxin concentrations were found throughout the SAl process. The more-brominated congeners (including octabromodibenzo-p-dioxin, octabromodibenzofuran, heptabromodibenzo-p-dioxins, and heptabromodibenzofurans) were the dominant contributors to the total PBDD/F concentrations. The results could help in the development of techniques and strategies for controlling PBDD/F emissions during metallurgical processes. PMID:26706932

  18. Formation of Brittle Phases During Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Titanium to Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shouzheng; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan; Liu, Kun

    2014-04-01

    Welding of titanium alloy TA15 to aluminum alloy Al 2024 was conducted by pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding using AlSi12 filler metal. Formation process of phases near the Ti/Al interface was discussed. Titanium and aluminum were partially fusion welded in the upper part while brazed together in the middle and bottom parts of the joint. In the upper part of the joint, intermetallics Ti3Al + Ti5Si3, TiAl + Ti5Si3, and TiAl3 were formed as three layers orderly from the titanium side to the weld metal. In the middle and bottom parts of the joint, intermetallics Ti5Si3 and TiAl3 were formed as two layers near the Ti/Al interface.

  19. In vivo stimulation of bone formation by aluminum and oxygen plasma surface-modified magnesium implants.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hoi Man; Zhao, Ying; Tam, Vivian; Wu, Shuilin; Chu, Paul K; Zheng, Yufeng; To, Michael Kai Tsun; Leung, Frankie K L; Luk, Keith D K; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Yeung, Kelvin W K

    2013-12-01

    A newly developed magnesium implant is used to stimulate bone formation in vivo. The magnesium implant after undergoing dual aluminum and oxygen plasma implantation is able to suppress rapid corrosion, leaching of magnesium ions, as well as hydrogen gas release from the biodegradable alloy in simulated body fluid (SBF). No released aluminum is detected from the SBF extract and enhanced corrosion resistance properties are confirmed by electrochemical tests. In vitro studies reveal enhanced growth of GFP mouse osteoblasts on the aluminum oxide coated sample, but not on the untreated sample. In addition to that a small amount (50 ppm) of magnesium ions can enhance osteogenic differentiation as reported previously, our present data show a low concentration of hydrogen can give rise to the same effect. To compare the bone volume change between the plasma-treated magnesium implant and untreated control, micro-computed tomography is performed and the plasma-treated implant is found to induce significant new bone formation adjacent to the implant from day 1 until the end of the animal study. On the contrary, bone loss is observed during the first week post-operation from the untreated magnesium sample. Owing to the protection offered by the Al2O3 layer, the plasma-treated implant degrades more slowly and the small amount of released magnesium ions stimulate new bone formation locally as revealed by histological analyses. Scanning electron microscopy discloses that the Al2O3 layer at the bone-implant interface is still present two months after implantation. In addition, no inflammation or tissue necrosis is observed from both treated and untreated implants. These promising results suggest that the plasma-treated magnesium implant can stimulate bone formation in vivo in a minimal invasive way and without causing post-operative complications. PMID:24060425

  20. Mechanism of Ultrafine Grain Formation During Intense Plastic Straining in an Aluminum Alloy at Intermediate Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kaibyshev, R.; Sitdikov, O.; Mazurina, I,; Lesuer, D. R.

    2000-09-21

    The mechanism of grain formation during equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) in a 2219 Al alloy has been studied at intermediate and high temperatures. It was shown that continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) occurred during intense plastic straining and resulted in the formation of submicrometer grains at temperatures ranging from 250 C to 300 C. Higher temperatures (< 300 C) hindered CDRX. This is caused by the fact that nucleation controls CDRX in the aluminum alloy. Dislocation rearrangements result in the formation of low angle boundary networks at moderate strain. The density of lattice dislocations determines the rate of subgrain formation. In addition, at lower temperatures a low energy dislocation structure (LEDS) forms concurrently with the subgrain structure and stabilizes it. The stability of the subgrain structure is very important for the resulting conversion of low angle boundaries into high angle ones with strain by extensive accumulation of mobile lattice dislocations. Increasing temperature in the range of intermediate temperatures suppresses LEDS formation and decreases the lattice dislocation density. This reduces the rate of the subgrain formation process and CDRX. As a result, at T = 400 C no recrystallized grains were found. At T = 475 C, the new grains form due to geometric dynamic recrystallization (GRX).

  1. Effect of Process Variables on the Formation of Streak Defects on Anodized Aluminum Extrusions: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hanliang; Couper, Malcolm J.; Dahle, Arne K.

    2012-04-01

    Streak defects are often present on anodized extrusions of 6xxx series aluminum alloys, increasing the fabrication cost of these products. Moreover, streaking often only becomes visible after etching and anodizing treatments, rather than in the as-extruded condition, making it difficult to identify the original causes and influencing factors of these defects. In this paper, various process variables that influence the formation of streak defects on anodized aluminium extrusions are reviewed on the basis of a literature review, industrial practice and experimental results. The influencing factors involved in various processing steps such as billet quality, extrusion process, die design and etching process are considered. Effective measures for preventing the formation of streak defects in industrial extrusion products are discussed.

  2. Experimental study of void formation during aluminum solidification in reduced gravity. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis Paul, III

    1993-01-01

    Void formation due to volumetric shrinkage and liquid/vapor reorientation during aluminum solidification was observed in real time by using a radiographic viewing system in normal and reduced gravity. An end-chill directional solidification furnace with water quench was designed and constructed to solidify aluminum samples during the approximately 16 sec of reduced gravity (+/-0.02g) achieved by flying an aircraft through a parabolic trajectory. In the first series of tests the aluminum was contained in a vacuum sealed, pyrolytic boron nitride crucible. An ullage space was present during each test. Void formation was recorded for two cases: a nonwetting system, and a wetting system where wetting occurred between the aluminum and the crucible lid. The void formation in the nonwetting case was similar in normal and reduced gravity, with a single vapor cavity forming at the top of the crucible. In the wetting case during reduced gravity surface tension caused two voids to form in the top corners of the crucible, but during normal gravity only one large void formed across the top. In the second series of tests the aluminum was contained in a pyrolytic boron nitride crucible that was placed in a stainless steel container and sealed in an environment of argon plus 4 percent hydrogen. An ullage space was present during each test. Void formation was recorded for two cases: a nonwetting system, and a wetting system where wetting occurred between the aluminum and one side wall and the lid. The void for nation in the nonwetting case was similar in normal and reduced gravity, with a single vapor cavity forming at the top of the crucible, although the meniscus became more convex in reduced gravity. In the wetting case the aluminum did not climb up the corners in 1g, and one large symmetric void resulted at the top when the aluminum had solidified. In the wetting case during reduced gravity the molten aluminum was drawn up the wetted wall and partially across the lid by a

  3. Nickel-aluminum layered double hydroxides prepared via inverse micelles formation

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Bernal, Maria E.; Ruano-Casero, Ricardo J.; Benito, Fatima; Rives, Vicente

    2009-06-15

    Nickel-aluminum layered double hydroxides have been prepared by conventional coprecipitation and by coprecipitation in the presence of a surfactant. The solids have been characterised by several physicochemical techniques. Calcination leads to formation of homogeneously dispersed mixed oxides, which have been characterised as well. The colour properties (lightness and chromaticity coordinates) of both series of solids (layered precursors and calcined ones) have been measured. It has been found that both the preparation method and the calcination treatment have an important effect on the luminosity (whiteness/darkness) of the solids, although the effect on the precise chromaticity coordinates (green/red and blue/yellow) is less marked. - Graphical abstract: Nickel-aluminum layered double hydroxides have been prepared by conventional coprecipitation and by coprecipitation in the presence of a surfactant. It has been found that both the preparation method and the calcination treatment have an important effect on the luminosity (whiteness/darkness) of the solids, although the effect on the precise chromaticity coordinates (green/red and blue/yellow) is less marked.

  4. Sister Mary Emil Penet, I.H.M.: Founder of the Sister Formation Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glisky, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Mary Emil Penet, I.H.M., (1916-2001) used her talents and charisma to shape the first national organization of American women religious, the Sister Formation Conference (SFC; 1954-1964), facilitating the integrated intellectual, spiritual, psychological, and professional development of vowed women religious. In the decade preceding Vatican II, her…

  5. 1996 SPE annual technical conference and exhibition: Formation evaluation and reservoir geology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This document contains the Proceedings of the 1996 Society of Petroleum Engineers Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, Formation Evaluation and Reservoir Geology section. Topics covered in this section include the evaluation of reservoir engineering and resource management techniques for oil and natural gas fields, data acquisition methods for reservoir characterization, description of problems and maintenance techniques for fluid flow in oil wells, and technology assessment of well logging instrumentation for formation evaluation and reservoir characterization.

  6. The role of stress in self-ordered porous anodic oxide formation and corrosion of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capraz, Omer Ozgur

    The phenomenon of plastic flow induced by electrochemical reactions near room temperature is significant in porous anodic oxide (PAO) films, charging of lithium batteries and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). As this phenomenon is poorly understood, fundamental insight into flow from our work may provide useful information for these problems. In-situ monitoring of the stress state allows direct correlation between stress and the current or potential, thus providing fundamental insight into technologically important deformation and failure mechanisms induced by electrochemical reactions. A phase-shifting curvature interferometry was designed to investigate the stress generation mechanisms on different systems. Resolution of our curvature interferometry was found to be ten times more powerful than that obtained by state-of-art multiple deflectometry technique and the curvature interferometry helps to resolve the conflicting reports in the literature. During this work, formation of surface patterns during both aqueous corrosion of aluminum and formation of PAO films were investigated. Interestingly, for both cases, stress induced plastic flow controls the formation of surface patterns. Pore formation mechanisms during anodizing of the porous aluminum oxide films was investigated . PAO films are formed by the electrochemical oxidation of metals such as aluminum and titanium in a solution where oxide is moderately soluble. They have been used extensively to design numerous devices for optical, catalytic, and biological and energy related applications, due to their vertically aligned-geometry, high-specific surface area and tunable geometry by adjusting process variables. These structures have developed empirically, in the absence of understanding the process mechanism. Previous experimental studies of anodizing-induced stress have extensively focused on the measurement of average stress, however the measurement of stress evolution during anodizing does not provide

  7. Modeling of porosity formation and feeding flow during casting of steel and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiping

    Porosity is one of the most important defects in metal casting. To quantitatively predict the porosity formation during casting two numerical models are developed for steel and aluminum alloys respectively. For steel, a multi-phase model is developed that predicts melt pressure, feeding flow, porosity (both microscopic and macroscopic), and riser pipe formation during casting. The phases included in the model are solid, liquid, porosity, and air. An energy equation is solved to determine solid fraction. A multi-phase momentum equation, which is valid everywhere in the solution domain, is derived. A pressure equation is then derived from this momentum equation and a mixture continuity equation developed that accounts for all phases. The partial pressure of a gas species dissolved in the melt is determined using the species concentration, which is found by solving a species conservation equation that accounts for convection. Porosity forms once the gas pressure exceeds the sum of the melt pressure and the capillary pressure. The amount of porosity that forms is determined from the mixture continuity equation. The riser pipe is determined from an air continuity equation. A pore size model, which considers the effects of the solidifying steel microstructure on pore size, is incorporated into the multi-phase model. The multi-phase model is applied to one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional simulations. The results clearly illustrate the basic physical phenomena involved and predict microporosity and macroporosity distributions, as well as a riser pipe. For aluminum alloys a gas microsegregation model is developed to quantitatively predict porosity, coupled with the calculations of the pressure field, feeding flow, and distribution of dissolved gas species throughout the casting. The effects of dendritic and eutectic microstructure on the pore shape and size are considered in a pore size model. The model is applied to one-dimensional simulations of A319

  8. Formation of nanocrystalline h-AlN during mechanochemical decomposition of melamine in the presence of metallic aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Rounaghi, S.A.; Kiani Rashid, A.R.; Eshghi, H.; Vahdati Khaki, J.

    2012-06-15

    Decomposition of melamine was studied by solid state reaction of melamine and aluminum powders during high energy ball-milling. The milling procedure performed for both pure melamine and melamine/Al mixed powders as the starting materials for various times up to 48 h under ambient atmosphere. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results revealed that Al causes melamine deammoniation at the first stages of milling and further milling process leads to the s-triazine ring degradation while nano-crystallite hexagonal aluminum nitride (h-AlN) was the main solid product. Comparison to milling process, the possibility of the reaction of melamine with Al was also investigated by thermal treatment method using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA). Melamine decomposition occurred by thermal treatment in the range of 270-370 Degree-Sign C, but no reaction between melamine and aluminum was observed. - Graphical Abstract: Mechanochemical reaction of melamine with Al resulted in the formation of nanocrystalline AlN after 7 h milling time Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High energy ball milling of melamine and aluminum results decomposition of melamine with elimination of ammonia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano-crystalline AlN was synthesized by the mechanochemical route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Milling process has no conspicuous effect on pure melamine degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No reaction takes place by heating melamine and aluminum powder mixture in argon.

  9. Structure and kinetics of formation of interphase layers of synthetic fatty acid aluminum soap at the water/oil interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chalykh, A.E.; Matveev, V.V.; Mityuk, D.Y.; Shal't, S.Y.; Tarasevich, B.N.

    1986-02-01

    The authors investigate the kinetics of formation of interphase layers (IL) at the interface between the phases: a 0.15% solution of aluminum soap of synthetic fatty acids (SFA) (fraction C/sub 17/-C/sub 21/) in n-decane/distilled water. The structure and the morphological properties of IL were investigated by transmission electron spectroscopy. The electron micrographs of the interphase layer of the soap at different stages of its formation show that the formation of a new phase starts with the appearance of small dispersed particles with spherical and fibrillar shapes. The results obtained supplement the authors' concepts about the mechanism of spontaneous microemulsification.

  10. The formation of an ordered microporous aluminum-based material mediated by phthalic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Cai, Jian-Hua; Huang, Pei-Pei; Hu, Lin-Lin; Cao, An-Min; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-06-28

    By using phthalic acid as a soft template, we showed that it was possible to prepare a microporous aluminum-based material when the precipitation of Al(3+) was properly controlled. We also identified that this microporous aluminum-based material could be promising for the removal of fluoride ions in water treatment. PMID:27263661

  11. Prediction of Hot Tear Formation in Vertical DC Casting of Aluminum Billets Using a Granular Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistaninia, M.; Drezet, J.-M.; Phillion, A. B.; Rappaz, M.

    2013-09-01

    A coupled hydromechanical granular model aimed at predicting hot tear formation and stress-strain behavior in metallic alloys during solidification is applied to the semicontinuous direct chill casting of aluminum alloy round billets. This granular model consists of four separate three-dimensional (3D) modules: (I) a solidification module that is used for generating the solid-liquid geometry at a given solid fraction, (II) a fluid flow module that is used to calculate the solidification shrinkage and deformation-induced pressure drop within the intergranular liquid, (III) a semisolid deformation module that is based on a combined finite element/discrete element method and simulates the rheological behavior of the granular structure, and (IV) a failure module that simulates crack initiation and propagation. To investigate hot tearing, the granular model has been applied to a representative volume within the direct chill cast billet that is located at the bottom of the liquid sump, and it reveals that semisolid deformations imposed on the mushy zone open the liquid channels due to localization of the deformation at grains boundaries. At a low casting speed, only individual pores are able to form in the widest channels because liquid feeding remains efficient. However, as the casting speed increases, the flow of liquid required to compensate for solidification shrinkage also increases and as a result the pores propagate and coalesce to form a centerline crack.

  12. On Vertical Drag Defects Formation During Direct Chill (DC) Casting of Aluminum Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Torbjörn; Jarfors, Anders E. W.

    2013-12-01

    During air-slip direct chill casting of aluminum billets, one of the major defects occurring includes traces along the billet called vertical drags (VDs). If the VDs are too deep or too many, then they cause scraping of the billets. As in the subsequent extrusion process, the surface quality is known to impair both the productivity and quality of the profiles. In cast-house practice, many theories circulate about the causes of VD defects and how to avoid them, but in the literature, no thorough treatments have been made to explain this phenomenon. In the current study, the outer appearance, structure around, and compositions at the defects are analyzed. A theory for the formation of the defects, their cause, and how their appearance is coupled to different alloy types is presented. The segregation in the vicinity of the defects is discussed based on deformation of semisolid materials and coupled to Reynolds dilatancy in granular materials. The theory can explain differences between 6063 and 6005 alloys.

  13. Electrospray formation of gelled nano-aluminum microspheres with superior reactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyang; Jian, Guoqiang; Yan, Shi; DeLisio, Jeffery B; Huang, Chuan; Zachariah, Michael R

    2013-08-14

    Nanometallic fuels with high combustion enthalpy, such as aluminum, have been proposed as a potential fuel replacement for conventional metallic fuel to improve propellant performance in a variety of propulsive systems. Nevertheless, nanometallic fuels suffer from the processing challenges in polymer formulations such as increased viscosity and large agglomeration, which hinder their implementation. In this letter, we employ electrospray as a means to create a gel within a droplet, via a rapid, solvent evaporation-induced aggregation of aluminum nanoparticles, containing a small mass fraction of an energetic binder. The gelled aluminum microspheres were characterized and tested for their burning behavior by rapid wire heating ignition experiments. The gelled aluminum microspheres show enhanced combustion behavior compared to nanoaluminum, which possibly benefits from the nitrocellulose coating and the gelled microstructure, and is far superior to the corresponding dense micrometer-sized aluminum. PMID:23875780

  14. Formation and corrosion inhibition mechanisms of chromate conversion coatings on aluminum and AA2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenping

    Chromate conversion coatings (CCCs) are applied to aluminum alloys to enhance their resistance to localized corrosion and to increase paint adhesion. However, chromate is toxic and suspected carcinogen. To develop environmentally friendly alternative coatings, a detailed and accurate understanding of CCC formation and breakdown is needed. Several studies on CCC formation and breakdown were conducted in this regard. A first set of experiments was aimed at studying CCC formation and breakdown on 25-element Al electrode arrays. Results from coating formation experiments show that the coating process occurs in two stages. The first stage is characterized by intense electrochemical activity on the array and last from 20 to 30 seconds. The second stage occurs under electrochemical quiescence and little measurable current flows among elements in the electrode array. Raman spectroscopy shows that the coating continues to adsorb Cr6+. Anodic polarization of conversion coated arrays in chloride solutions led to several important findings. First, it was found that pitting potential increases as coating time increases through both stage one and stage two coating formation. These results also show that changes in coating structure and chemistry occur during the electrochemically quiescent second stage of coating formation. Further analysis showed that pitting potentials were higher on electrode elements that were net cathodes during first stage CCC formation than on electrode elements that were net anodes. Results also showed that the supplemental ingredients, NaF and K3Fe(CN)6, are essential to CCC formation and contribute greatly to increasing the corrosion protection provided by the coating. A second set of experiments was aimed at characterizing the effect of aging on CCC structure and properties. CCCs are dynamic due to the fact that they continue to polymerize after they are removed from the coating bath. Using cathodic polarization experiments carried out in aerated

  15. Polyene Formation Catalyzed by Phosphotungstic Acid and Aluminum Chloride in Thin Films of Poly(Vinyl Alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretinnikov, O. N.; Sushko, N. I.; Maly, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of linear polyenes -(CH=CH) n - during thermal dehydration of thin layers (9-20 μm) of poly(vinyl alcohol) containing phosphotungstic-acid and aluminum-chloride catalysts was investigated. It was found that the concentration of long-chain ( n ≥ 8) polyenes in films containing phosphotungstic acid increased smoothly with increasing annealing time although the kinetics of the dehydration were independent of the film thickness. The polyene ( n ≥ 8) formation rate in films containing aluminum chloride dropped quickly with decreasing film thickness and increasing annealing time. As a result, long-chain polyenes practically did not form regardless of the annealing time for a film thickness of 11 μm.

  16. A model for the formation of fatigue striations and its relationship with small fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth process involves damage accumulation and crack extension. The two sub-processes that lead to fatigue crack extension were quantified separately in a recent model for small fatigue crack growth applicable to engineering alloys. Here, we report the results of an experimental investigation to assess the assumptions of that model. The fatigue striation formation in an aluminum alloy is modeled and it is verified that the number of cycles required for striation formation is related to the cyclic crack tip opening displacement and that the striation spacing is related to the monotonic crack tip displacement. It is demonstrated that extensive cyclic crack tip plasticity in the aluminum alloy causes a reduction in the magnitude of the slope of the fatigue crack propagation curves. The implications of these results on the fatigue crack propagation lifetime calculations are identified.

  17. Factors Leading to the Formation of a Resistive Thin Film at the Bottom of Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulombe, Marc-André; Soucy, Gervais; Rivoaland, Loig; Davies, Lynne

    2016-04-01

    Studies on sludge formation in aluminum electrolysis cells are rare and typically do not distinguish the deposits at the center of the cell from those composing the ledge toe because low voltage lost is expected at the center of the cell. However, high amount of sludge in the center leads to the formation of a thin film in an intermediate zone between the ledge toe and this center thick sludge accumulation. Looking at sludge deposits through composition mapping and microstructure analysis coming from four aluminum cells of two different aluminum reduction technologies, major factors leading to a thin resistive film were identified. This includes the formation of a suspension on the top of the thick deposit at the center of the cell, its displacement through magnetohydrodynamic induced movement by the metal pad, and the growth and thickening of a carbide sublayer making the thin film even more resistive. Correlation between thickening of the thin film and cathode voltage drop increase was observed. The postmortem analysis performed on six laboratory experiments was found useful to support different observations made on the industrial cells at lower cost.

  18. Experimental study of aluminum-oxalate complexing at 80 °C: Implications for the formation of secondary porosity within sedimentary reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Jeremy B.

    1991-10-01

    An experimental study of aluminum-oxalate complexing at 80 °C indicates that the presence of oxalate in sedimentary basin fluids may play an important role in creating secondary porosity in reservoir rocks. The solubility of gibbsite was measured as a function of oxalate concentration. Geologically realistic oxalate concentrations were used in order to simulate the aluminum mobilities that occur in reservoir fluids. Although the stoichiometry of the important aluminum-oxalate species cannot be determined from these data, the results are used to quantify the minimum extent of aluminum-oxalate complexing that occurs in solution. Assuming that Al(Ox)33- is the only important aluminum-oxalate complex, the data limit the log of the dissociation constant of Al(Ox)33- to be ≤-16.5. Thermodynamic modeling of aluminum systems with fluids that contain NaCl, acetate, and oxalate illustrates that aluminum-oxalate complexing is much more important than aluminum-acetate complexing, even at relatively low oxalate concentrations and at very high acetate concentrations. In addition, these calculations show that aluminum-oxalate complexing can greatly increase aluminum mobility in formation waters and, therefore, may increase aluminosilicate mineral dissolution within sedimentary basin fluid-rock systems.

  19. Rule of formation of aluminum electroplating layer on Q235 steel.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhimin; Feng, Qiuyuan; Shen, Changbin; Gao, Hong

    2011-06-01

    Aluminum electroplating layer on Q235 steel in AlCl3-NaCl-KCl molten salt was obtained, and the rule of its nucleation and growth were investigated. The results showed that aluminum electroplating layer formed through nucleating and growing of aluminum particles, and thickened by delaminating growth pattern. At low current density, the morphology of aluminum particles took on flake-like, while at high current density they changed to spherical. The thickness of plating layer increases with increasing current density and electroplating time. The relationship between the plating thickness (δ) and electroplating time (t) or current density (i) can be expressed as δ = 0.28f(137), and δ = 1.1i(1-39). PMID:25084576

  20. The utility of the matrix format for surgical morbidity and mortality conference.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Varun K; Boone, Luke; Lewis, Frank; Gucwa, Angela L; Kruse, E James

    2015-05-01

    With the limitations posed by increasing work hour restrictions, surgical residency programs are focusing more on maximizing the educational benefit of their conferences. The Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) conference serves as a forum to discuss adverse events and patient care improvement using evidence-based medicine. The matrix format (MF) is an enhancement to the traditional format (TF), focusing on the case selection process and a postconference newsletter reiterating the relevant literature review and discussion points. Our institution adopted the MF to evaluate both its short- and long-term educational values. Surveys were distributed to residents and faculty within the Department of General Surgery to assess their interest and satisfaction, perception of educational value, and efficiency with the MF compared with the TF. Responses were obtained from 22/22 (100%) residents for the TF and 11/23 (48%) for the MF. Faculty responses were 19/19 (100%) and 9/16 (56%), respectively. Reasons for an overall decreased response with the MF were not investigated further, as participation was strictly voluntary. Our results confirmed an overall approval of the MF by both residents and faculty. Faculty reported an improved efficiency of the conference (P < 0.039), encompassing improved content and presentation quality. Residents reported an improved overall interest and satisfaction with the MF (P < 0.001) as well as an improvement in the educational value (P < 0.007). Residents spent less time preparing presentations and reported learning greater educational benefit to the conference when preparing their own presentations (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the MF resulted in a greater overall satisfaction for residents and attending surgeons with an increased investment by the audience and overall improvement in perceived educational benefit. PMID:25975336

  1. Formation evaluation and reservoir geology. 1995 SPE annual technical conference and exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains the proceedings of the Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition of the Society of Petroleum Engineers which was held on October 22-25, 1995 in Dallas, Texas. This volume contains the presentations regarding Formation Evaluation and Reservoir Geology. The topics covered in these presentations include: resource management and reservoir engineering of oil, natural gas and gas condensate fields, magnetic, electrical, and seismic surveys of reservoir rock, mathematical models and computerized simulation of fluid flow in reservoir rock, geochemistry of reservoir fluids, and enhanced recovery of oil and natural gas using waterflooding and other secondary recovery methods. Team approaches to reservoir characterization using geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering are also described.

  2. Aluminum-phosphate binder formation in zeolites as probed with X-ray absorption microscopy.

    PubMed

    van der Bij, Hendrik E; Cicmil, Dimitrije; Wang, Jian; Meirer, Florian; de Groot, Frank M F; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2014-12-24

    In this work, three industrially relevant zeolites with framework topologies of MOR, FAU and FER have been explored on their ability to form an AlPO4 phase by reaction of a phosphate precursor with expelled framework aluminum. A detailed study was performed on zeolite H-mordenite, using in situ STXM and soft X-ray absorption tomography, complemented with (27)Al and (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy, XRD, FT-IR spectroscopy, and N2 physisorption. Extraframework aluminum was extracted from steam-dealuminated H-mordenite and shown to dominantly consist of amorphous AlO(OH). It was found that phosphoric acid readily reacts with the AlO(OH) phase in dealuminated H-mordenite and forms an extraframework amorphous AlPO4 phase. It was found that while AlPO4 crystallizes outside of the zeolitic channel system forming AlPO4 islands, AlPO4 that remains inside tends to stay more amorphous. In the case of ultrastable zeolite Y the FAU framework collapsed during phosphatation, due to extraction of framework aluminum from the lattice. However, using milder phosphatation conditions an extraframework AlPO4 α-cristobalite/tridymite phase could also be produced within the FAU framework. Finally, in steamed zeolite ferrierite with FER topology the extraframework aluminum species were trapped and therefore not accessible for phosphoric acid; hence, no AlPO4 phase could be formed within the structure. Therefore, the parameters to be taken into account in AlPO4 synthesis are the framework Si/Al ratio, stability of framework aluminum, pore dimensionality and accessibility of extraframework aluminum species. PMID:25415849

  3. Amorphous and nanocrystalline phase formation in highly-driven aluminum-based binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Yunus Eren

    Remarkable advances have been made since rapid solidification was first introduced to the field of materials science and technology. New types of materials such as amorphous alloys and nanostructure materials have been developed as a result of rapid solidification techniques. While these advances are, in many respects, ground breaking, much remains to be discerned concerning the fundamental relationships that exist between a liquid and a rapidly solidified solid. The scope of the current dissertation involves an extensive set of experimental, analytical, and computational studies designed to increase the overall understanding of morphological selection, phase competition, and structural hierarchy that occurs under far-from equilibrium conditions. High pressure gas atomization and Cu-block melt-spinning are the two different rapid solidification techniques applied in this study. The research is mainly focused on Al-Si and Al-Sm alloy systems. Silicon and samarium produce different, yet favorable, systems for exploration when alloyed with aluminum under far-from equilibrium conditions. One of the main differences comes from the positions of their respective T0 curves, which makes Al-Si a good candidate for solubility extension while the plunging T0 line in Al-Sm promotes glass formation. The rapidly solidified gas-atomized Al-Si powders within a composition range of 15 to 50 wt% Si are examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The non-equilibrium partitioning and morphological selection observed by examining powders at different size classes are described via a microstructure map. The interface velocities and the amount of undercooling present in the powders are estimated from measured eutectic spacings based on Jackson-Hunt (JH) and Trivedi-Magnin-Kurz (TMK) models, which permit a direct comparison of theoretical predictions. For an average particle size of 10 microm with a Peclet number of ~0.2, JH and TMK deviate from each other. This deviation

  4. Effect of geometrical stress concentrators on the band formation and the serrated deformation in aluminum-magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibkov, A. A.; Zolotov, A. E.; Zheltov, M. A.; Denisov, A. A.; Gasanov, M. F.; Kochegarov, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of holes on the band formation and the serrated deformation in planar specimens of aluminum-magnesium alloys AlMg5 and AlMg6 is studied by high-speed video filming of moving deformation bands. It is found that the concentration of an elastic field near a hole causes early nucleation of macrolocalized deformation bands and decreases the critical deformation of the first stress drop. Differences between the spatial-temporal patterns of deformation bands near holes under various deformation conditions are revealed.

  5. Influence of the surface pre-treatment of aluminum on the processes of formation of cerium oxides protective films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, R.; Stoyanova, E.; Tsanev, A.; Stoychev, D.

    2016-03-01

    It is known that there is special interest in the contemporary investigations on conversion treatment of aluminum aimed at promoting its corrosion stability, which is focused on electrolytes on the basis of salts of metals belonging to the group of rare-earth elements. Their application is especially attractive, as it enables a successful substitution of the presently applied highly efficient, but at the same time toxic Cr6+-containing electrolytes. The present paper presents a study on the influence of the preliminary alkaline activation and acidic de-oxidation of the aluminum surface on the processes of immersion formation of protective cerium oxides films on Al 1050. The results obtained show that their deposition from simple electrolytes (containing only salts of Ce3+ ions) on the Al surface, treated only in alkaline solution, occurs at a higher rate, which leads to preparing thicker oxide films having a better protective ability. In the cases when the formation of oxide films is realized in a complex electrolyte (containing salts of Ce3+ and Cu2+ ions), better results are obtained with respect to the morphology and protective action of cerium oxides film on samples that have been consecutively activated in alkaline solution and deoxidized in acidic solution. Electrochemical investigations were carried out in a model corrosion medium (0.1 M NaCl); it was shown that the cerium protective films, deposited by immersion, have a cathodic character with regard to the aluminum support and inhibit the occurrence of the depolarizing corrosion process -- the reaction of oxygen reduction.

  6. Formation of Nanoporous Anodic Alumina by Anodization of Aluminum Films on Glass Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebyedyeva, Tetyana; Kryvyi, Serhii; Lytvyn, Petro; Skoryk, Mykola; Shpylovyy, Pavlo

    2016-04-01

    Our research was aimed at the study of aluminum films and porous anodic alumina (PAA) films in thin-film PAA/Al structures for optical sensors, based on metal-clad waveguides (MCWG). The results of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of the structure of Al films, deposited by DC magnetron sputtering, and of PAA films, formed on them, are presented in this work.

  7. Formation of linear polyenes in poly(vinyl alcohol) films catalyzed by phosphotungstic acid, aluminum chloride, and hydrochloric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretinnikov, O. N.; Sushko, N. I.; Malyi, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Formation of linear polyenes-(CH=CH)n-via acid-catalyzed thermal dehydration of polyvinyl alcohol in 9- to 40-µm-thick films of this polymer containing hydrochloric acid, aluminum chloride, and phosphotungstic acid as dehydration catalysts was studied by electronic absorption spectroscopy. The concentration of long-chain ( n ≥ 8) polyenes in films containing phosphotungstic acid is found to monotonically increase with the duration of thermal treatment of films, although the kinetics of this process is independent of film thickness. In films containing hydrochloric acid and aluminum chloride, the formation rate of polyenes with n ≥ 8 rapidly drops as film thickness decreases and the annealing time increases. As a result, at a film thickness of less than 10-12 µm, long-chain polyenes are not formed at all in these films no matter how long thermal duration is. The reason for this behavior is that hydrochloric acid catalyzing polymer dehydration in these films evaporates from the films during thermal treatment, the evaporation rate inversely depending on film thickness.

  8. Formation of aluminum films on silicon by ion beam deposition: A comparison with ionized cluster beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zuhr, R.A.; Haynes, T.E.; Galloway, M.D. ); Tanaka, S.; Yamada, A.; Yamada, I. . Ion Beam Engineering Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    The direct ion beam deposition (IBD) technique has been used to study the formation of oriented aluminum films on single crystal silicon substrates. In the IBD process, thin film growth is accomplished by decelerating a magnetically-analyzed ion beam to low energies (10--200 eV) for direct deposition onto the substrate under UHV conditions. The energy of the incident ions can be selected to provide the desired growth conditions, and the mass analysis ensures good beam purity. The aluminum on silicon system is one which has been studied extensively by ionized cluster beam (ICB) deposition. In this work, we have studied the formation of such films by IBD with emphasis on the effects of ion energy, substrate temperature, and surface cleanliness. Oriented films have been grown on Si(111) at temperatures from 40{degree} to 300{degree}C and with ion energies from 30 to 120 eV per ion. Completed films were analyzed by ion scattering, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. Results achieved for thin films grown by IBD are compared with results for similar films grown by ICB deposition. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Copper stabilization via spinel formation during the sintering of simulated copper-laden sludge with aluminum-rich ceramic precursors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Chui, Stephen Sin-Yin; Shih, Kaimin; Zhang, Lingru

    2011-04-15

    The feasibility of incorporating copper-laden sludge into low-cost ceramic products, such as construction ceramics, was investigated by sintering simulated copper-laden sludge with four aluminum-rich ceramic precursors. The results indicated that all of these precursors (γ-Al(2)O(3), corundum, kaolinite, mullite) could crystallochemically stabilize the hazardous copper in the more durable copper aluminate spinel (CuAl(2)O(4)) structure. To simulate the process of copper transformation into a spinel structure, CuO was mixed with the four aluminum-rich precursors, and fired at 650-1150 °C for 3 h. The products were examined using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopic techniques. The efficiency of copper transformation among crystalline phases was quantitatively determined through Rietveld refinement analysis of the XRD data. The sintering experiment revealed that the optimal sintering temperature for CuAl(2)O(4) formation was around 1000 °C and that the efficiency of copper incorporation into the crystalline CuAl(2)O(4) structure after 3 h of sintering ranged from 40 to 95%, depending on the type of aluminum precursor used. Prolonged leaching tests were carried out by using acetic acid with an initial pH value of 2.9 to leach CuO and CuAl(2)O(4) samples for 22 d. The sample leachability analysis revealed that the CuAl(2)O(4) spinel structure was more superior to stabilize copper, and suggested a promising and reliable technique for incorporating copper-laden sludge or its incineration ash into usable ceramic products. Such results also demonstrated the potential of a waste-to-resource strategy by using waste materials as part of the raw materials with the attainable temperature range used in the production of ceramics. PMID:21428386

  10. Australian Family Research Conference Proceedings (Canberra, Australia, November 23-25, 1983). Volume I: Family Formation, Structure, Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Family Studies, Melbourne (Australia).

    First in a series of seven volumes containing the proceedings of the 1983 Australian Family Research Conference, this publication deals with the formation, structure, and values of family life in Australia. Papers and authors included are: "Priorities in Family Research and Family Law" (Gareth Evans), "The Baby Boom Generation as Reproducers:…

  11. Educational Research and Policy Formation. CEA/CERA Research Conference (Calgary, Alberta, September 26-7, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Education Association, Toronto (Ontario).

    Canadian educators, researchers, and politicians gathered for a two-day conference in 1977 on the question of how educational research affects the formation of educational policy. The sixteen speakers analyzed the basic question from the points of view of the provincial politician, the school board chairman, the administrator, and the researcher,…

  12. Xyloglucan Endotransglucosylase-Hydrolase17 Interacts with Xyloglucan Endotransglucosylase-Hydrolase31 to Confer Xyloglucan Endotransglucosylase Action and Affect Aluminum Sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Wan, Jiang Xue; Sun, Ying; Shi, Yuan Zhi; Braam, Janet; Li, Gui Xin; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2014-06-19

    Previously, we reported that although the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Xyloglucan Endotransglucosylase-Hydrolase31 (XTH31) has predominately xyloglucan endohydrolase activity in vitro, loss of XTH31 results in remarkably reduced in vivo xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) action and enhanced Al resistance. Here, we report that XTH17, predicted to have XET activity, binds XTH31 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitations assays and that this interaction may be required for XTH17 XET activity in planta. XTH17 and XTH31 may be colocalized in plant cells because tagged XTH17 fusion proteins, like XTH31 fusion proteins, appear to target to the plasma membrane. XTH17 expression, like that of XTH31, was substantially reduced in the presence of aluminum (Al), even at concentrations as low as 10 µm for 24 h or 25 µm for just 30 min. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transfer DNA insertion mutant of XTH17, xth17, showed low XET action and had moderately shorter roots than the wild type but was more Al resistant than the wild type. Similar to xth31, xth17 had low hemicellulose content and retained less Al in the cell wall. These data suggest a model whereby XTH17 and XTH31 may exist as a dimer at the plasma membrane to confer in vivo XET action, which modulates cell wall Al-binding capacity and thereby affects Al sensitivity in Arabidopsis. PMID:24948835

  13. Characterization of Monolayer Formation on Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes,C.; Lappi, S.; Fischer, D.; Sambasivan, S.; Genzer, J.; Franzen, S.

    2008-01-01

    The optical and electronic properties of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films on a glass substrate are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Optical studies with coupling in the Kretschmann configuration reveal an angle-dependent plasma frequency in the mid-IR for p-polarized radiation, suggestive of the detection of a Drude plasma frequency. These studies are complemented by oxygen depletion density functional theory studies for the calculation of the charge carrier concentration and plasma frequency for bulk AZO. In addition, we report on the optical and physical properties of thin film adlayers of n-hexadecanethiol (HDT) and n-octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on AZO surfaces using reflectance FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Our characterization of the SAM deposition onto the AZO thin film reveals a range of possible applications for this conducting metal oxide.

  14. The formation of iron aluminides on aluminum surface by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bidin, Noriah; Al-Wafi, Yusef A.

    2014-03-05

    The formation and growth of Fe based aluminum diffusion layers at the Fe-Al interface have been investigated to improve the surface hardness. The diffusion of Fe into Al has been accomplished by focusing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser on the modified surface. The variety of the layer depth is achieved based on the type of heating and quenching media. Microstructural characterization and mechanical properties of the modified surface were carried out via gas discharge spectrometer GDS, X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Vickers Hardness tester. The results indicate that hardness at the interface of Fe-Al layer is increased. The optimum hardness achieved as 93 HV at corresponding critical energy density of 438 Jcm{sup −2}.

  15. Experimental study to validate a model of hillock{close_quote}s formation in aluminum thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Genin, F.Y.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1996-04-01

    The growth of holes and hillocks in thin films has been reported extensively and for a multitude of film{endash}substrate systems. A recently developed model [F. Y. G{acute e}nin, J. Appl. Phys. {bold 77}, 5130 (1995)] which analyzes the formation of a ridge at a traveling grain boundary due to stress and capillarity driving forces provides a quantitative description of the growth of the hillocks. In order to test the model, the surface morphology of aluminum thin films deposited on oxidized silicon substrates and annealed at 450{degree}C in argon is investigated; the profiles of thermal hillocks are measured by atomic force microscopy. The comparison shows excellent agreement between modeled and experimental profiles. {copyright}{ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Effect of aluminum chloride on formation of a polyconjugated bond system in the initial stage of polyvinyl alcohol thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulak, A. I.; Bondareva, G. V.; Shchurevich, O. A.

    2013-03-01

    Fine-structure bands have been located in electronic absorption spectra of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films decomposed thermally in air at 80-150°C. Doping of the PVA film with aluminum chloride (thermolysis catalyst) was found both to enhance the degree of thermal decomposition and to reduce the starting temperature for formation of poly-π-conjugated chains although it had no effect on the spectral positions of the polyene-unit absorption bands. Values of the band gap of heat-treated PVA films were determined to be in the range 1.65-1.78 eV based on an analysis of the electronic spectra long-wavelength edge.

  17. The formation of iron aluminides on aluminum surface by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidin, Noriah; Al-Wafi, Yusef A.

    2014-03-01

    The formation and growth of Fe based aluminum diffusion layers at the Fe-Al interface have been investigated to improve the surface hardness. The diffusion of Fe into Al has been accomplished by focusing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser on the modified surface. The variety of the layer depth is achieved based on the type of heating and quenching media. Microstructural characterization and mechanical properties of the modified surface were carried out via gas discharge spectrometer GDS, X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Vickers Hardness tester. The results indicate that hardness at the interface of Fe-Al layer is increased. The optimum hardness achieved as 93 HV at corresponding critical energy density of 438 Jcm-2.

  18. The influence of process parameters on porosity formation in hybrid LASER-GMA welding of AA6082 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascari, Alessandro; Fortunato, Alessandro; Orazi, Leonardo; Campana, Giampaolo

    2012-07-01

    This paper deals with an experimental campaign carried out on AA6082 8 mm thick plates in order to investigate the role of process parameters on porosity formation in hybrid LASER-GMA welding. Bead on plate weldments were obtained on the above mentioned aluminum alloy considering the variation of the following process parameters: GMAW current (120 and 180 A for short-arc mode, 90 and 130 A for pulsed-arc mode), arc transfer mode (short-arc and pulsed-arc) and mutual distance between arc and LASER sources (0, 3 and 6 mm). Porosities occurring in the fused zone were observed by means of X-ray inspection and measured exploiting an image analysis software. In order to understand the possible correlation between process parameters and porosity formation an analysis of variance statistical approach was exploited. The obtained results pointed out that GMAW current is significant on porosity formation, while the distance between the sources do not affect this aspect.

  19. The initial release of zinc and aluminum from non-treated Galvalume and the formation of corrosion products in chloride containing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian; Vu, Thanh-Nam; Volovitch, P.; Leygraf, C.; Ogle, K.; Wallinder, I. Odnevall

    2012-03-01

    This study explores the initial release of zinc and aluminum from non-treated Galvalume and the parallel formation of corrosion products when exposed to synthetic seawater and rainwater of different chloride content. Comparisons were made with long-term field exposures at non-sheltered marine conditions. Observed release rates from short-term conditions agree qualitatively with the long-term findings with a selective release of zinc over aluminum. The release and corrosion processes were intertwined through the formation of corrosion products with properties that influence the long-term release process. Prior to exposure, Al2O3 dominated the entire surface, and was subject to local destruction upon interaction with chloride ions. As a consequence Al2O3 was gradually replaced and covered by zinc-rich corrosion products primarily in interdendritic areas during the first year of marine exposure. This was followed by the gradual formation and integration of aluminum-rich corrosion products, reflected by an increased zinc release rate during the first year, followed by a gradually decreased rate during subsequent years. The importance of Al2O3 was also evident in deaerated synthetic rainwater or seawater, where the formation of Al2O3 was presumably hindered. In synthetic rain water this resulted in a higher ratio between released aluminum and zinc compared with non-deaerated conditions.

  20. Rhetoric in Competition: The Formation of Organizational Discourse in Conference on College Composition and Communication Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Brenton

    1996-01-01

    Explores features of conference proposals submitted to the Conference on College Composition in 1989, 1990, and 1992--345 abstracts in total. Results showed that successful abstracts were more likely to follow generic qualities associated with "unsolicited proposals"; foundational discourse remained constant throughout the abstracts but…

  1. The formation of rims on calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions: Step I-Flash heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, David; Boynton, William V.

    2001-08-01

    Wark-Lovering rims of six calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) representing the main CAI types and groups in Allende, Efremovka and Vigarano were microsurgically separated and analysed by neutron activation analysis (NAA). All the rims have similar ~4x enrichments, relative to the interiors, of highly refractory lithophile and siderophile elements. The NAA results are confirmed by ion microprobe and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of rim perovskites and rim metal grains. Less refractory Eu, Yb, V, Sr, Ca and Ni are less enriched in the rims. The refractory element patterns in the rims parallel the patterns in the outer parts of the CAIs. In particular, the rims on type B1 CAIs have the igneously fractionated rare earth element (REE) pattern of the melilite mantle below the rim and not the REE pattern of the bulk CAI, proving that the refractory elements in the rims were derived from the outer mantle and were not condensates onto the CAIs. The refractory elements were enriched in an Al2O3-rich residue <50 um thick after the most volatile ~80% of the outermost 200 um of each CAI had been volatilized, including much Mg, Si and Ca. Some volatilization occurred below the rim, and created refractory partial melts that crystallized hibonite and gehlenitic melilite. The required "flash heating" probably exceeded 2000 degrees C, but for only a few seconds, in order to melt only the outer CAI and to unselectively volatilize slow-diffusing O isotopes which show no mass fractionation in the rim. The volatilization did, however, produce "heavy" mass-fractionated Mg in rims. In some CAIs this was later obscured when "normal" Mg diffused in from accreted olivine grains at relatively high temperature (not the lower temperature meteorite metamorphism) and created the ~50 um set of monomineralic rim layers of pyroxene, melilite and spinel.

  2. Keto-Mycolic Acid-Dependent Pellicle Formation Confers Tolerance to Drug-Sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sambandan, Dhinakaran; Dao, Dee N.; Weinrick, Brian C.; Vilchèze, Catherine; Gurcha, Sudagar S.; Ojha, Anil; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Jacobs, William R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chronic nature of tuberculosis (TB), its requirement of long duration of treatment, its ability to evade immune intervention, and its propensity to relapse after drug treatment is discontinued are reminiscent of other chronic, biofilm-associated bacterial diseases. Historically, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was grown as a pellicle, a biofilm-like structure, at the liquid-air interface in a variety of synthetic media. Notably, the most widely administered human vaccine, BCG, is grown as a pellicle for vaccine production. However, the molecular requirements for this growth remain ill defined. Here, we demonstrate that keto-mycolic acids (keto-MA) are essential for pellicle growth, and mutants lacking in or depleted of this MA species are unable to form a pellicle. We investigated the role of the pellicle biofilm in the reduction of antibiotic sensitivity known as drug tolerance using the pellicle-defective ΔmmaA4 mutant strain. We discovered that the ΔmmaA4 mutant, which is both pellicle defective and highly sensitive to rifampicin (RIF) under planktonic growth, when incorporated within the wild-type pellicle biofilm, was protected from the bactericidal activity of RIF. The observation that growth within the M. tuberculosis pellicle biofilm can confer drug tolerance to a drug-hypersensitive strain suggests that identifying molecular requirements for pellicle growth could lead to development of novel interventions against mycobacterial infections. Our findings also suggest that a class of drugs that can disrupt M. tuberculosis biofilm formation, when used in conjunction with conventional antibiotics, has the potential to overcome drug tolerance. PMID:23653446

  3. Fundamental study of the austenite formation and decomposition in low-silicon, aluminum added TRIP steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Enrique

    2005-11-01

    TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels are under development for automotive applications that require high strength and excellent formability. Conventional TRIP steels consist of a multiphase microstructure comprised of a ferrite matrix with a dispersion of bainite and metastable retained austenite. The high ductility exhibited by these steels results from the transformation of the metastable retained austenite to martensite during straining. In conventional TRIP steel processing, the multiphase microstructure is obtained by controlled cooling from the alpha + gamma region to an isothermal holding temperature. During this holding, bainite forms and carbon is rejected out into the austenite, which lowers the Ms temperature and stabilizes the austenite to room temperature. In this research project, a fundamental study of a low-Si, Mo-Nb added cold rolled TRIP steel with and without Al additions was conducted. In this study, the recrystallization of cold-rolled ferrite, the formation of austenite during intercritical annealing and the characteristics of the decomposition of the intercritically annealed austenite by controlled cooling rates were systematically assessed. Of special interest were: (i) the effect of the initial hot band microstructure, (ii) the formation of epitaxial ferrite during cooling from the intercritical annealing temperature to the isothermal holding temperature, (iii) the influence of the intercritically annealed austenite on the formation of bainite during the isothermal holding temperature, and (iv) the influence of the processing variables on the type, amount, composition and stability of the retained austenite. During this research study, techniques such as OM, SEM, EBSD, TEM, XRD and Magnetometry were used to fully characterize the microstructures. Furthermore, a Gleeble 3500 unit at US Steel Laboratories was used for dilatometry studies and to simulate different CGL processing routes, from which specimens were obtained to evaluate

  4. A thermodynamic prediction for microporosity formation in aluminum-rich Al-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Yeum, K.; Maples, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    A computer model is used to predict the formation and degree of microporosity in a directionally solidified Al-4.5 wt pct Cu alloy, considering the interplay between solidification shrinkage and gas porosity. Macrosegregation theory is used to determine the local pressure within the interdendritic liquid. Results show interdendritic porosity for initial hydrogen contents in the 0.03-1 ppm range, and none below contents of 0.03. An increase in either the thermal gradient or the solidification rate is show to decrease the amount of interdendritic porosity.

  5. Interface Formation During Fusion™ Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Alloy Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Ciano, Massimo; Caron, E. J. F. R.; Weckman, D. C.; Wells, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fusion™ casting is a unique Direct Chill continuous casting process whereby two different alloys can be cast simultaneously, producing a laminated ingot for rolling into clad sheet metal such as AA3003/AA4045 brazing sheet. Better understanding of the wetting and interface formation process during Fusion™ casting is required to further improve process yields and also explore use of other alloy systems for new applications. In this research, AA3003-core/AA4045-clad ingots were cast using a well-instrumented lab-scale Fusion™ casting system. As-cast Fusion™ interfaces were examined metallurgically and by mechanical testing. Computational fluid dynamic analyses of the FusionTM casts were also performed. It was shown that the liquid AA4045-clad alloy was able to successfully wet and create an oxide-free, metallurgical, and mechanically sound interface with the lightly oxidized AA3003-core shell material. Based on the results of this study, it is proposed that the bond formation process at the alloys interface during casting is a result of discrete penetration of AA4045 liquid at defects in the preexisting AA3003 oxide, dissolution of underlying AA3003 by liquid AA4045, and subsequent bridging between penetration sites. Spot exudation on the AA3003 chill cast surface due to remelting and inverse segregation may also improve the wetting and bonding process.

  6. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics in brominated aluminum corroles: Energy relaxation and triplet formation.

    PubMed

    Stensitzki, T; Yang, Y; Berg, A; Mahammed, A; Gross, Z; Heyne, K

    2016-07-01

    We combined femtosecond (fs) VIS pump-IR probe spectroscopy with fs VIS pump-supercontinuum probe spectroscopy to characterize the photoreaction of the hexacoordinated Al(tpfc-Br8)(py)2 in a comprehensive way. Upon fs excitation at ∼400 nm in the Soret band, the excitation energy relaxes with a time constant of (250 ± 80) fs to the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. This is evident from the rise time of the stimulated emission signal in the visible spectral range. On the same time scale, narrowing of broad infrared signals in the C=C stretching region around 1500 cm(-1) is observed. Energy redistribution processes are visible in the vibrational and electronic dynamics with time constants between ∼2 ps and ∼20 ps. Triplet formation is detected with a time constant of (95 ± 3) ps. This is tracked by the complete loss of stimulated emission. Electronic transition of the emerging triplet absorption band overlaps considerably with the singlet excited state absorption. In contrast, two well separated vibrational marker bands for triplet formation were identified at 1477 cm(-1) and at 1508 cm(-1). These marker bands allow a precise identification of triplet dynamics in corrole systems. PMID:27226980

  7. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics in brominated aluminum corroles: Energy relaxation and triplet formation

    PubMed Central

    Stensitzki, T.; Yang, Y.; Berg, A.; Mahammed, A.; Gross, Z.; Heyne, K.

    2016-01-01

    We combined femtosecond (fs) VIS pump–IR probe spectroscopy with fs VIS pump–supercontinuum probe spectroscopy to characterize the photoreaction of the hexacoordinated Al(tpfc-Br8)(py)2 in a comprehensive way. Upon fs excitation at ∼400 nm in the Soret band, the excitation energy relaxes with a time constant of (250 ± 80) fs to the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. This is evident from the rise time of the stimulated emission signal in the visible spectral range. On the same time scale, narrowing of broad infrared signals in the C=C stretching region around 1500 cm−1 is observed. Energy redistribution processes are visible in the vibrational and electronic dynamics with time constants between ∼2 ps and ∼20 ps. Triplet formation is detected with a time constant of (95 ± 3) ps. This is tracked by the complete loss of stimulated emission. Electronic transition of the emerging triplet absorption band overlaps considerably with the singlet excited state absorption. In contrast, two well separated vibrational marker bands for triplet formation were identified at 1477 cm−1 and at 1508 cm−1. These marker bands allow a precise identification of triplet dynamics in corrole systems. PMID:27226980

  8. The formation and annealing of dislocation damage from high-dose self-ion implantation of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardiman, R. G.

    1992-06-01

    Quantitative electron channeling and weak-beam transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements of dislocation density have been used to study the formation and annealing of the dislocation network in self-ion-implanted aluminum. The channeling linewidth is found to be proportional to the dislocation density. Several mathematical expressions for the dislocation network growth are examined. One by Igata et al. [in Effects of Radiation on Materials: Proceedings of the 10th International Symposium, edited by D. Kramer, H. R. Brager, and J. S. Perrin, STP 725 (ASTM, Philadelphia, 1980), p. 627] is found to describe the implantation data accurately. This model has a linear growth term and terms for dislocation loss due to surface effects and recovery. The fit is insensitive to the relative importance of the two loss terms. Annealing is found to occur in two stages; roughly one third of the dislocation density is gone by 300 °C, corresponding to typical recovery processes, while the remaining network is stable to about 500 °C.

  9. Microstructure investigations of streak formation in 6063 aluminum extrusions by optical metallographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Vander Voort, George; Suárez-Peña, Beatriz; Asensio-Lozano, Juan

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the solidification strategy for AA 6063 alloy on the surface appearance of anodized extrusions. The microstructure of the samples was analyzed using both light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that if heavy segregation occurs from rapid solidification, coarse Mg2Si particles form, thus reducing the potential for precipitation strengthening by the finer β-Mg2Si developed in the solid state. Differentially-strained regions formed during hot extrusion induce differences in particle size for magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) precipitates. Anodizing generates surface roughness due to Mg2Si particle dissolution and AlFeSi decohesion, which is related to both particle size and deformation. During anodizing, an oxide layer forms on the surface of the extruded products, which can lead to streak formation, usually a subject of rejection due to unacceptable heterogeneous reflectivity. PMID:23481588

  10. Silicon nitride-aluminum oxide solid solution (SiAION) formation and densification by pressure sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Sanders, W. A.; Fiyalko, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Stirred-ball-mill-blended Si3N4 and Al2O3 powders were pressure sintered in order to investigate the mechanism of solid solution formation and densification in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system. Powder blends with Si3N4:Al2O3 mole ratios of 4:1, 3:2, and 2:3 were pressure sintered at 27.6-MN/sq m pressure at temperatures to 17000 C (3090 F). The compaction behavior of the powder blends during pressure sintering was determined by observing the density of the powder compact as a function of temperature and time starting from room temperature. This information, combined with the results of X-ray diffraction and metallographic analyses regarding solutioning and phase transformation phenomena in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system, was used to describe the densification behavior.

  11. Spontaneous formation of complex structures made from elastic membranes in an aluminum-hydroxide-carbonate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehl, Micah; Kaminker, Vitaliy; Pantaleone, James; Nowak, Piotr; Dyonizy, Agnieszka; Maselko, Jerzy

    2015-06-01

    A popular playground for studying chemo-hydrodynamic patterns and instabilities is chemical gardens, also known as silicate gardens. In these systems, complex structures spontaneously form, driven by buoyant forces and either osmotic or mechanical pumps. Here, we report on systems that differ somewhat from classical chemical gardens in that the membranes are much more deformable and soluble. These properties lead to structures that self-construct and evolve in new ways. For example, they exhibit the formation of chemical balloons, a new growth mechanism for tubes, and also the homologous shrinking of these tubes. The stretching mechanism for the membranes is probably different than for other systems by involving membrane "self-healing." Other unusual properties are osmosis that sometimes occurs out of the structure and also small plumes that flow away from the structure, sometimes upwards, and sometimes downwards. Mathematical models are given that explain some of the observed phenomena.

  12. FORMATION OF CHROMATE CONVERSION COATINGS ON ALUMINUM AND ITS ALLOYS: AN IN SITU XANES STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    SASAKI,K.; ISAACS,H.S.; JAFFCOATE,C.S.; BUCHHAIT,R.; LEGAT,V.; LEE,H.; SRINIVASAMURTHI,V.

    2001-09-02

    We used in situ X-ray adsorption near-edge structure (XANES) to investigate the formation of chromate conversion coatings on pure Al, commercial Al alloys (AA 1100, AA2024, and AA7075), and a series of binary Al-Cu alloys. The method employed a new electrochemical cell that can determine the ratio of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) to total chromium (Cr(total)) speciation in conversion coatings as a function of exposure time to a chromate solution. The spectra showed that the initial Cr(VI)/Cr(total) ratios are greater than later ones for pure Al and AA1100, but not for AA2024 and AA7075. Measurements with Al-Cu alloys demonstrated that the difference observed in AA2024 and AA7075 may not be due to Cu alloying. The proportion of Cr(VI) in the coatings becomes approximately constant after 180 s of exposure for all the specimens examined even though the coatings continue to grow.

  13. Role of proteasomes in the formation of neurofilamentous inclusions in spinal motor neurons of aluminum-treated rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Noriyuki; Kumamoto, Toshihide; Ueyama, Hidetsugu; Horinouchi, Hideo; Ohama, Eisaku

    2007-12-01

    We examined the role of the 20S proteasome in pathologic changes, including abnormal aggregation of phosphorylated neurofilaments, of spinal motor nerve cells from aluminum-treated rabbits. Immunohistochemistry for the 20S proteasome revealed that many lumbar spinal motor neurons without intracytoplasmic neurofilamentous inclusions or with small inclusions were more intensely stained in aluminum-treated rabbits than in controls, whereas the immunoreactivity was greatly decreased in some enlarged neurons containing large neurofilamentous inclusions. Proteasome activity in whole spinal cord extracts was significantly increased in aluminum-treated rabbits compared with controls. Furthermore, Western blot analysis indicated that the 20S proteasome degraded non-phosphorylated high molecular weight neurofilament (neurofilament-H) protein in vitro. These results suggest that aluminum does not inhibit 20S proteasome activity, and the 20S proteasome degrades neurofilament-H protein. We propose that abnormal aggregation of phosphorylated neurofilaments is induced directly by aluminum, and is not induced by the proteasome inhibition in the aluminum-treated rabbits. Proteasome activation might be involved in intracellular proteolysis, especially in the earlier stages of motor neuron degeneration in aluminum-treated rabbits. PMID:18021372

  14. The formation and structure of the oxide and hydroxide chemisorbed phases at the aluminum surface, and relevance to hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael; Kelly, Robert; Neurock, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    Aluminum alloys used in aerospace structures are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) induced by hydrogen embrittlement (HE) (Gangloff and Ives 1990). Crack growth experiments have demonstrated a linear relation between the relative humidity of the environment and crack growth rates, indicating the importance of water (Speidel and Hyatt 1972). While the presence of water has been demonstrated to be necessary for EAC of aluminum, crack growth rates have been linked to the diffusivity of hydrogen in aluminum (Gangloff 2003) and hydrogen densities at the crack tip as high as Al2H have been observed (Young and Scully 1998). While the mechanism by which hydrogen embrittles aluminum is yet not well understood, without the entry of hydrogen into the aluminum matrix, embrittlement would not occur. While at the crack tip high hydrogen concentrations exist, the solubility of hydrogen in aluminum is normal near 1 ppm (Wolverton 2004). In this work combined first principles and kinetic Monte Carlo methods will be used to examine the oxide and hydroxide structure resulting from exposure of aluminum to H2O or O2 and relevance to hydrogen entry as well as EAC is discussed.

  15. Effect of Fe- and Si-Enriched Secondary Precipitates and Surface Roughness on Pore Formation on Aluminum Plate Surfaces During Anodizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanzhi; Wang, Shizhi; Yang, Qingda; Zhou, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Two twin roll casts (TRCs) and one hot rolled (HR) AA 1235 aluminum alloy plates with different microstructures are prepared. The plates were electrolyzed in a 1.2 wt% HCl solution with a voltage of 21 V and a current of 1.9 mA. The shape, size, and number of pores formed on the surfaces of these plates were analyzed and correlated with the microstructures of the plates. It is found that pores are easier to form on the alloy plates containing subgrains with a lower dislocation density inside the subgrains, rather than along the grain boundaries. Furthermore, Fe- and Si-enriched particles in the AA1235 aluminum alloys lead to the formation of pores on the surface during electrolyzing; the average precipitate sizes of 4, 3.5, and 2 μm in Alloy 1#, Alloy 2# and Alloy 3# result in the average pore sizes of 3.78, 2.76, and 1.9 μm on the surfaces of the three alloys, respectively; The G.P zone in the alloy also facilitates the surface pore formation. High-surface roughness enhances the possibility of entrapping more lubricants into the plate surface, which eventually blocks the formation of the pores on the surface of the aluminum plates in the following electrolyzing process.

  16. Aluminum colloid formation and its effect on co-precipitation of zinc during acid rock drainage remediation with clinoptilolite in a slurry bubble column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Li, L. Y.; Grace, J. R.

    2012-04-01

    Zinc and other metal ions were adsorbed in a laboratory slurry bubble column (SBC) by natural clinoptilolite sorbent particles. During the remediation process, significant white precipitates were sometimes observed. Both zinc and aluminum were detected in the colloidal mixtures. It is shown that Al leached from clinoptilolite during the agitation, contributing to the precipitate. As a result of the Al leaching and increase of pH during the remediation process, the formation of an Al colloid and zinc adsorption onto it could significantly improve ARD remediation, given the high adsorption capacity of the colloid. Sorption of cations increased with increasing colloid formation. Various conditions were tested to investigate their impact on (a) dealumination of clinoptilolite; (b) Al hydrolysis/colloid formation; and (c) adsorption onto the colloidal mixture. The test results indicate that dealumination contributes to the excess aluminum in the aqueous phase and to precipitates. The excess dealumination varies with pH and agitation time. Al hydrolysis occurs with increasing pH due to the neutralization effect of clinoptilolite. A significant proportion of zinc adsorbed onto the collectible aluminum precipitates.

  17. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-15

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  18. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  19. Formation of nanocrystalline h-AlN during mechanochemical decomposition of melamine in the presence of metallic aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rounaghi, S. A.; Kiani Rashid, A. R.; Eshghi, H.; Vahdati Khaki, J.

    2012-06-01

    Decomposition of melamine was studied by solid state reaction of melamine and aluminum powders during high energy ball-milling. The milling procedure performed for both pure melamine and melamine/Al mixed powders as the starting materials for various times up to 48 h under ambient atmosphere. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results revealed that Al causes melamine deammoniation at the first stages of milling and further milling process leads to the s-triazine ring degradation while nano-crystallite hexagonal aluminum nitride (h-AlN) was the main solid product. Comparison to milling process, the possibility of the reaction of melamine with Al was also investigated by thermal treatment method using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA). Melamine decomposition occurred by thermal treatment in the range of 270-370 °C, but no reaction between melamine and aluminum was observed.

  20. Influence of Gas Composition and Exposure Cycle on the Formation of Surface and Subsurface Oxides in Iron-Aluminum-Based Alloys at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, June H.; Yin, Hogbin; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Auinger, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The slab reheating process of binary iron-aluminum alloys and an industrial TRIP steel grade has been investigated in both dry and wet atmospheres. The presence of water vapor has a significant effect on the overall scale growth and internal corrosion depth. Heating rate greatly influences the porosity of the surface oxide layer with the surface getting more porous at faster heating rates. Nitride formation could be suppressed in the presence of water vapor, leading to a reduction of internal corrosion depth and a better formability of the final material. Experimental results were compared to thermodynamic predictions and critically discussed.

  1. Influence of Gas Composition and Exposure Cycle on the Formation of Surface and Subsurface Oxides in Iron-Aluminum-Based Alloys at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, June H.; Yin, Hogbin; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Auinger, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The slab reheating process of binary iron-aluminum alloys and an industrial TRIP steel grade has been investigated in both dry and wet atmospheres. The presence of water vapor has a significant effect on the overall scale growth and internal corrosion depth. Heating rate greatly influences the porosity of the surface oxide layer with the surface getting more porous at faster heating rates. Nitride formation could be suppressed in the presence of water vapor, leading to a reduction of internal corrosion depth and a better formability of the final material. Experimental results were compared to thermodynamic predictions and critically discussed.

  2. Towards understanding speckle pattern formation in optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Valentin; Meglinski, Igor; Doronin, Alexander; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2016-03-01

    We consider the mechanism of speckle patterns formation in time-domain and swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT), and introduce a Monte Carlo based model for simulating OCT signals and images. The model takes into account polarization and coherent properties of light, mutual interference of the back-scattering light, and its interference with the reference beam. The developed model is employed to generate OCT images, and to analyze the resultant OCT speckle pattern properties. The model simulation results are compared with experimental measurements, and an interpretation of the speckle patterns formation in terms of its underlying physics is provided.

  3. Rigorous simulation of OCT image formation using Maxwell's equations in three dimensions (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Peter R. T.; Curatolo, Andrea; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Existing models of image formation in optical coherence tomography are based upon the extended Huygens-Fresnel formalism. These models all, to varying degrees, rely on scatterer ensemble averages, rather than deterministic scattering distributions. Whilst the former is sometimes preferable, there are a growing number of applications where the ability to predict image formation based upon deterministic refractive index distributions is of great interest, including, for example, image formation in turbid tissue. A rigorous model based upon three-dimensional solutions of Maxwell's equations offers a number of tantalising opportunities. For example, shedding light on features near or below the resolution of an OCT system and on the impact of phenomena usually described as diffraction, interference and scattering, but which more generally result from light scattering satisfying Maxwell's equations. A rigorous model allows inverse scattering methods to be developed not requiring the first-order Born approximation. Finally, a rigorous model can provide gold standard verification of myriad quantitative techniques currently being developed throughout the field. We have developed the first such model of image formation based upon three-dimensional solutions of Maxwell's equations, which has vastly different properties to models based on two-dimensional solutions. Although we present simulated B-scans, this model is equally applicable to C-scans. This has been made possible by advances in computational techniques and in computational resources routinely available. We will present the main features of our model, comparisons of measured and simulated image formation for phantoms and discuss the future of rigorous modelling in optical coherence tomography research and application.

  4. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  5. A first-principles investigation of the effect of relaxation on the alloy formation in the aluminum-3 d-transition-metal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, N. Yu.

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this investigation is to establish the effect of relaxation on the formation of ordered substitutional solid solutions in Al1 - x M x alloys ( M = 3 d metal; x = 1.6 at %). As the main parameters of the process of formation of the aluminum-based solution, thermodynamic quantities such as the energy of dissolution and the cohesive energy have been chosen; for choosing the most appropriate substitutional element, an analysis of the relaxation energy and deviations of empirical atomic radii of the impurity from the radius of the matrix-forming element has been suggested. It has been shown that there is a correlation between these thermodynamic quantities through the behavior of the density of electronic states and the Fermi energy. A regular relation has also been demonstrated to exist between the relaxation and stability of arising solid solutions, which supports the applicability of the analysis of relaxation energy depending on the atomic radius of the matrix-substituting element. The presence of anomalies in the behavior of magnetic properties of some aluminum alloys with transition metals has been shown and their explanation is given.

  6. Teacher Perceptions about Observation Conferences: What Do Teachers Think about Their Formative Supervision in One US School District?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Range, Bret G.; Young, Suzie; Hvidston, David

    2013-01-01

    This study measured teachers' perceptions about the important elements of the pre- and post-observation conferences within one school district in a US state. Overall, respondents valued the post-observation conference more than the pre-observation conference and identified trusting relationships, constructive feedback, reflection and areas of…

  7. Isoniazid-resistance conferring mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis KatG: Catalase, peroxidase, and INH-NADH adduct formation activities

    PubMed Central

    Cade, Christine E; Dlouhy, Adrienne C; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Salas-Castillo, Saida Patricia; Ghiladi, Reza A

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG) is a bifunctional hemoprotein that has been shown to activate isoniazid (INH), a pro-drug that is integral to frontline antituberculosis treatments. The activated species, presumed to be an isonicotinoyl radical, couples to NAD+/NADH forming an isoniazid-NADH adduct that ultimately confers anti-tubercular activity. To better understand the mechanisms of isoniazid activation as well as the origins of KatG-derived INH-resistance, we have compared the catalytic properties (including the ability to form the INH-NADH adduct) of the wild-type enzyme to 23 KatG mutants which have been associated with isoniazid resistance in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. Neither catalase nor peroxidase activities, the two inherent enzymatic functions of KatG, were found to correlate with isoniazid resistance. Furthermore, catalase function was lost in mutants which lacked the Met-Tyr-Trp crosslink, the biogenic cofactor in KatG which has been previously shown to be integral to this activity. The presence or absence of the crosslink itself, however, was also found to not correlate with INH resistance. The KatG resistance-conferring mutants were then assayed for their ability to generate the INH-NADH adduct in the presence of peroxide (t-BuOOH and H2O2), superoxide, and no exogenous oxidant (air-only background control). The results demonstrate that residue location plays a critical role in determining INH-resistance mechanisms associated with INH activation; however, different mutations at the same location can produce vastly different reactivities that are oxidant-specific. Furthermore, the data can be interpreted to suggest the presence of a second mechanism of INH-resistance that is not correlated with the formation of the INH-NADH adduct. PMID:20054829

  8. Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation from rear target ripples in plastic and plastic/aluminum laser targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Velikovich, A. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    We report experimental observations of jets produced from the rear surface of laser targets after a passage of the laser-driven shock wave. As in our previous work, Aglitskiy et al., Phys. Plasmas (2012), the jets are produced via the shaped-charge mechanism, a manifestation of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for a particular case of the Atwood number A =-1. The experiments done on the KrF Nike laser facility with laser wavelength 248 nm, a 4 ns pulse, and low-energy drive regime that used only 1 to 3 overlapping Nike beams and generated ablative pressure below 1 Mbar. Our 50 um thick planar targets were rippled on the rear side with wavelength 45 μm and peak-to-valley amplitude 15 μm. The targets were made either of solid plastic or of aluminum with a 10 μm thick plastic ablator attached to avoid the radiation preheat. The jets were extremely well collimated, which made possible our side-on observations with monochromatic x-ray imaging. We saw a regular set of jets, clearly separated along the 500 μm line of sight. Aluminum jets were found to be slightly better collimated than plastic jets. A quasi-spherical late-time expansion of Al jets starting from the tips has not been previously seen in experiments or simulations. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  9. The detection of tightly closed flaws by nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. [fatigue crack formation in aluminum alloy test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, W. D.; Rathke, R. A.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Mullen, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current and X-radiographic techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens in integrally stiffened panel, and weld panel configurations. Fatigue cracks in integrally stiffened panels, lack-of-fusion in weld panels, and fatigue cracks in weld panels were the flaw types used for evaluation. A 2319 aluminum alloy weld filler rod was used for all welding to produce the test specimens. Forty seven integrally stiffened panels containing a total of 146 fatigue cracks, ninety three lack-of-penetration (LOP) specimens containing a total of 239 LOP flaws, and one-hundred seventeen welded specimens containing a total of 293 fatigue cracks were evaluated. Nondestructive test detection reliability enhancement was evaluated during separate inspection sequences in the specimens in the 'as-machined or as-welded', post etched and post proof loaded conditions. Results of the nondestructive test evaluations were compared to the actual flaw size obtained by measurement of the fracture specimens after completing all inspection sequences. Inspection data were then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determining the flaw detection reliability.

  10. A force sensor using nanowire arrays to understand biofilm formation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Prasana K.; Cavalli, Alessandro; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Murillo, Duber M.; Souza, Alessandra A.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the cellular signaling and function at the nano-bio interface can pave the way towards developing next-generation smart diagnostic tools. From this perspective, limited reports detail so far the cellular and subcellular forces exerted by bacterial cells during the interaction with abiotic materials. Nanowire arrays with high aspect ratio have been used to detect such small forces. In this regard, live force measurements were performed ex-vivo during the interaction of Xylella fastidiosa bacterial cells with InP nanowire arrays. The influence of nanowire array topography and surface chemistry on the response and motion of bacterial cells was studied in detail. The nanowire arrays were also functionalized with different cell adhesive promoters, such as amines and XadA1, an afimbrial protein of X.fastidiosa. By employing the well-defined InP nanowire arrays platform, and single cell confocal imaging system, we were able to trace the bacterial growth pattern, and show that their initial attachment locations are strongly influenced by the surface chemistry and nanoscale surface topography. In addition, we measure the cellular forces down to few nanonewton range using these nanowire arrays. In case of nanowire functionalized with XadA1, the force exerted by vertically and horizontally attached single bacteria on the nanowire is in average 14% and 26% higher than for the pristine array, respectively. These results provide an excellent basis for live-cell force measurements as well as unravel the range of forces involved during the early stages of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation.

  11. Flocculation kinetics mechanism and floc formation prepared by poly aluminum chloride coupled with polyacrylamide for ship ballast water.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhimin; Liu, Sha; Jia, Linan

    2016-01-01

    The performance of flocculants prepared by poly aluminum chloride (PAC) and polyacrylamide (PAM) on treating ballast water collected at the Dalian new port area, the evaluation depending on the values of reaction parameters, and kinetics mechanism of flocculation were investigated in this study. Accordingly, the flocculants of 0.1 g·L(-1), prepared by mixing PAC of 10% with PAM of 2.0‰, enabled the removal rate of zooplankton and phytoplankton to reach 91% in ballast water at 20 °C. Based on flocculation kinetics mechanism analysis, the efficient vortex size during stirring should be larger than the floc particles, and gradient of fluctuating velocity provide the impetus for turbulence flocculation. The results of this study could be relevant to understanding particle-floc interactions during developmental flocculation, and during application of ballast water treatment. PMID:27386983

  12. Peculiarities of the rheological behavior and structure formation of aluminum under deformation at near-solidus temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. S.; Konovalov, A. V.; Belozerov, G. A.; Shveikin, V. P.; Smirnova, E. O.

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with a peculiar rheological behavior of aluminum at near-solidus temperatures. It has been experimentally established that there is an inverse strain rate dependence of strain resistance at temperatures ranging between 560 and 640°C and strain rates ranging from 0.06 to 1.2 s-1. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis has shown that at temperatures ranging between 540 and 640°C and strain rates ranging from 0.06 to 0.1 s-1, the main process of softening is dynamic polygonization, resulting in in situ recrystallization. At higher strain rates, ranging between 0.8 and 1.2 s-1, and temperatures ranging between 560 and 640°C, the recovery is dynamic. This unusual behavior of the mechanism of softening and the presence of the inverse strain rate dependence of strain resistance can be explained by blocking the motion of free dislocations by foreign atoms, which occurs at strain rates ranging between 0.06 and 0.1 s-1. This process results in dislocation pile-up, thereby causing in situ recrystallization. At strain rates exceeding 0.16 s-1, there is no intensive blocking of dislocations, leading to a direct strain rate dependence of strain resistance.

  13. Evidence of [eta]' or ordered zone formation in aluminum alloy 7075 from differential scanning calorimetry. [Aluminium alloy 7075

    SciTech Connect

    Bartges, C.W. )

    1993-05-01

    The development of high strength levels in Al-Mg-Zn-(Cu) alloys is dependent on the decomposition of the supersaturated solid solution ([alpha][sub ss]). The equilibrium phase, [eta], and the transition phase, [eta][prime], have compositions Mg(Zn, Al, Cu)[sub 2] and the GP Zones are solute rich clusters. Several authors have presented evidence that there is another precipitate which forms between the GP Zones and [eta][prime], though there is some controversy whether it is crystallographically distinct from the matrix, [eta][prime], or an ordered GP Zone. Regardless of their structure, these particles are seldom observed and are not usually considered in the decomposition of these alloys. Most of the previous observations of these particles have been the result of involved transmission electron microscopic and X-ray scattering experiments. This report shows they may also be detected using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Also significant is the fact that the particles were observed in AA 7075, an important commercial alloy. Lloyd and Chaturvedi also saw indications of [eta][prime] or ordered zones using DSC, but the results reported herein are different in several important respects. DSC traces of alloys aged for various times at room temperature and 121 C have shown there is at least one phase which can form during the decomposition of aluminum alloy 7075 that is not usually stated in the decomposition reaction. The results of previous studies suggest they may be ordered GP Zones or [eta][prime].

  14. Correlating shaped charge performance with processing conditions and microstructure of an aluminum alloy 1100 liner enabled by a new method to arrest nascent jet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheid, James Eric

    Aluminum-lined shaped charges are used in special applications where jet and / or slug residue in the target is undesired. The three different microstructures of the aluminum liners studied herein resulted from three different manufacturing interpretations of the same design. One interpretation was completely machining the liners from best available annealed round stock. The second was to cold-forge the liners from annealed round-stock in an open-die forge to near-final dimensions, and then machine the liners to the final dimensions. The third variant in this study was to use the above forged liner, but with annealing after the machining. These three manufacturing choices resulted in significant variations in shaped charge performance. The goal of this research was to clarify the relationships between the liner metal microstructure and properties, and the corresponding shaped charge dynamic flow behavior. What began as an investigation into user-reported performance problems associated inherently with liner manufacturing processes and resultant microstructure, resolved into new understandings of the relationships between aluminum liner microstructure and shaped charge collapse kinetics. This understanding was achieved through an extensive literature review and the comprehensive characterization of the material properties of three variants of an 1100 aluminum shaped charge liner with a focus on collapse and nascent jet formation. The machined liner had a microstructure with large millimeter-sized grains and fine particles aligned in bands parallel to the charge axis. The forged liner microstructure consisted of very small one micrometer-sized (1 mum) subgrains and fine particles aligned largely in bands elongated parallel to the liner contour. The annealed liner was characterized by ten micrometer (10 mum) sized equiaxed grains with residual fine particles in the forged alignment. This characterization was enabled by the development, execution and validation of a

  15. Aluminum: Aluminum Scrap Decoater

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, S.

    1999-01-29

    NICE3 and the Philip Services Corporation are cost-sharing a demonstration project to decoat metal using indirect-fired controlled-atmosphere (IDEX) kilns, which can both process solid organics such as rubber and plastics, and minimize dust formation and emission of volatile organic compounds. The publication explains how this cost-effective, two-step system operates.

  16. Determination of boron at sub-ppm levels in uranium oxide and aluminum by hyphenated system of complex formation reaction and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

    PubMed

    Rao, Radhika M; Aggarwal, Suresh K

    2008-04-15

    Boron, at sub-ppm levels, in U3O8 powder and aluminum metal, was determined using complex formation and dynamically modified reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Curcumin was used for complexing boron extracted with 2-ethyl-1,3-hexane diol (EHD). Separation of complex from excess reagent and thereafter its determination using the online diode array detector (DAD) was carried out by HPLC. Calibration curve was found to be linear for boron amounts in the sample ranging from 0.02 microg to 0.5 microg. Precision of about 10% was achieved for B determination in samples containing less than 1 ppmw of boron. The values obtained by HPLC were in good agreement with the data available from other analytical techniques. The precision in the data obtained by HPLC was much better compared to that reported by other techniques. The present hyphenated methodology of HPLC and complex formation reaction is interesting because of cost performance, simplicity, versatility and availability when compared to other spectroscopic techniques like ICP-MS and ICP-AES. PMID:18371924

  17. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  18. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J.

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  19. In-situ Quasi-Instantaneous e-beam Driven Catalyst-Free Formation Of Crystalline Aluminum Borate Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Ignacio G.; Gemming, Thomas; Mendes, Rafael; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Bezugly, Viktor; Kunstmann, Jens; Eckert, Jürgen; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    The catalyst-assisted nucleation and growth mechanisms for many kinds of nanowires and nanotubes are pretty well understood. At times, though, 1D nanostructures form without a catalyst and the argued growth modes have inconsistencies. One such example is the catalyst-free growth of aluminium borate nanowires. Here we develop an in-situ catalyst-free room temperature growth route for aluminium nanowires using the electron beam in a transmission electron microscope. We provide strong experimental evidence that supports a formation process that can be viewed as a phase transition in which the generation of free-volume induced by the electron beam irradiation enhances the atomic mobility within the precursor material. The enhanced atomic mobility and specific features of the crystal structure of Al5BO9 drive the atomic rearrangement that results in the large scale formation of highly crystalline aluminium borate nanowires. The whole formation process can be completed within fractions of a second. Our developed growth mechanism might also be extended to describe the catalyst-free formation of other nanowires. PMID:26934833

  20. In-situ Quasi-Instantaneous e-beam Driven Catalyst-Free Formation Of Crystalline Aluminum Borate Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Ignacio G.; Gemming, Thomas; Mendes, Rafael; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Bezugly, Viktor; Kunstmann, Jens; Eckert, Jürgen; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2016-03-01

    The catalyst-assisted nucleation and growth mechanisms for many kinds of nanowires and nanotubes are pretty well understood. At times, though, 1D nanostructures form without a catalyst and the argued growth modes have inconsistencies. One such example is the catalyst-free growth of aluminium borate nanowires. Here we develop an in-situ catalyst-free room temperature growth route for aluminium nanowires using the electron beam in a transmission electron microscope. We provide strong experimental evidence that supports a formation process that can be viewed as a phase transition in which the generation of free-volume induced by the electron beam irradiation enhances the atomic mobility within the precursor material. The enhanced atomic mobility and specific features of the crystal structure of Al5BO9 drive the atomic rearrangement that results in the large scale formation of highly crystalline aluminium borate nanowires. The whole formation process can be completed within fractions of a second. Our developed growth mechanism might also be extended to describe the catalyst-free formation of other nanowires.

  1. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Jack L.

    2014-06-17

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide gels contain a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous aluminum oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  2. Silico-ferrite of Calcium and Aluminum (SFCA) Iron Ore Sinter Bonding Phases: New Insights into Their Formation During Heating and Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2012-12-01

    The formation of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter phases during heating and cooling of synthetic iron ore sinter mixtures in the range 298 K to 1623 K (25 °C to 1350 °C) and at oxygen partial pressure of 5 × 10-3 atm has been characterized using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. SFCA and SFCA-I are the key bonding phases in iron ore sinter, and an improved understanding of their formation mechanisms may lead to improved efficiency of industrial sintering processes. During heating, SFCA-I formation at 1327 K to 1392 K (1054 °C to 1119 °C) (depending on composition) was associated with the reaction of Fe2O3, 2CaO·Fe2O3, and SiO2. SFCA formation (1380 K to 1437 K [1107 °C to 1164 °C]) was associated with the reaction of CaO·Fe2O3, SiO2, and a phase with average composition 49.60, 9.09, 0.14, 7.93, and 32.15 wt pct Fe, Ca, Si, Al, and O, respectively. Increasing Al2O3 concentration in the starting sinter mixture increased the temperature range over which SFCA-I was stable before the formation of SFCA, and it stabilized SFCA to a higher temperature before it melted to form a Fe3O4 + melt phase assemblage (1486 K to 1581 K [1213 °C to 1308 °C]). During cooling, the first phase to crystallize from the melt (1452 K to 1561 K [1179 °C to 1288 °C]) was an Fe-rich phase, similar in composition to SFCA-I, and it had an average composition 58.88, 6.89, 0.82, 3.00, and 31.68 wt pct Fe, Ca, Si, Al, and O, respectively. At lower temperatures (1418 K to 1543 K [1145 °C to 1270 °C]), this phase reacted with melt to form SFCA. Increasing Al2O3 increased the temperature at which crystallization of the Fe-rich phase occurred, increased the temperature at which crystallization of SFCA occurred, and suppressed the formation of Fe2O3 (1358 K to 1418 K [1085 °C to 1145 °C]) to lower temperatures.

  3. Aluminum Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents three problems based on the price of aluminum designed to encourage students to be cooperative and to use an investigative approach to learning. Students collect and synthesize information, analyze results, and draw conclusions. (AIM)

  4. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    ... penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), products containing iron, tetracycline (Sumycin, Tetracap, and others), ticlopidine (Ticlid), and vitamins.be aware that aluminum hydroxide may interfere with other medicines, making them less effective. Take your other medications 1 ...

  5. The effect of initiation feature and environment on fatigue crack formation and early propagation in aluminum zinc magnesium copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, James T.

    The current research provides insight into fatigue crack formation and progression in the poorly understood size regime that bridges safe-life and damage tolerance approaches; particular attention is given to the influences of corrosion-induced degradation and time-cycle dependent loading environment effects. Quantitative analysis of crack formation life (Ni), microstructurally small crack (<500 microm) propagation kinetics (da/dN), and the effect of cold loading environment provide the means to validate mechanism-based modeling. Both pristine and corroded (L-S surface) 7075-T651 specimens were fatigued at 23°C, -50°C and -90°C under various applied stresses. Microscopy of programmed loading-induced crack surface marks produced an unparalleled Ni and small crack da/dN database. Results show that fatigue crack formation involves a complex interaction of elastic stress concentration, due to a 3-dimensional macro-pit, coupled with local micro-feature (and constituent) induced plastic strain concentration. Such interactions cause high Ni variability, but, from an engineering perspective, a broadly corroded surface should contain an extreme group of features driving Ni to ˜0. At low-applied stresses, Ni consumes a significant portion of total life, which is well predicted by coupling elastic-plastic FEA with empirical low-cycle fatigue life models. All pristine and corroded da/dN were uniquely correlated using complex continuum stress intensity (K) and crack opening solutions which account for the stress concentrating formation feature. Multiple crack growth regimes were observed, typical of environment enhanced fatigue in Al alloys. Such behavior is not captured by prominent mechanics-based small crack models. Furthermore, neither local closure nor slip-based models captured the order of magnitude variability in da/dN attributed to microstructure. Low temperature loading produces an order of magnitude increase in Ni, and even larger reduction in da/dN, due to

  6. Reactively Deposited Aluminum Oxide and Fluoropolymer Filled Aluminum Oxide Protective Coatings for Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Hunt, Jason

    1995-01-01

    Reactive ion beam sputter deposition of aluminum simultaneous with low energy arrival of oxygen ions at the deposition surface enables the formation of highly transparent aluminum oxide films. Thick (12 200 A), adherent, low stress, reactively deposited aluminum oxide films were found to provide some abrasion resistance to polycarbonate substrates. The reactively deposited aluminum oxide films are also slightly more hydrophobic and more transmitting in the UV than aluminum oxide deposited from an aluminum oxide target. Simultaneous reactive sputter deposition of aluminum along with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE Teflon) produces fluoropolymer-filled aluminum oxide films which are lower in stress, about the same in transmittance, but more wetting than reactively deposited aluminum oxide films. Deposition properties, processes and potential applications for these coatings will be discussed.

  7. The formation of nano-size SiO2 thin film on an aluminum plate with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDSA) and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H. K.; Zhao, E.; Yeh, C. L.; Chung, K. M.

    2003-02-01

    This study is using HMDSA (C6H19NSi2) or HMDSO (C6H18OSi2) vapor into C3H8/air premixed flames to form SiO2 thin film on the surface of an aluminum plate. With the addition of HMDSO or HMDSA to premixed flames, an orange secondary flame or a flame brush appeared and was contributed to the formation of SiO2 particles. Based upon the EDS, XPS and FTIR analysis, it is believed that the synthesized products consist of mainly SiO2 and a small amount of SiO. The pure SiO2 crystal structure, was proved by XRD analysis, which may form from the SiO2 amorphous structure after high temperature (1300°C) thermal treatment. The nano-size SiO2 particles, which ranged from 2.5-25 nm, are proved by analysis of the BET and TEM. A 2-D CFD-RC code with 12 reduced chemical reaction mechanism, based upon the SIMPLER procedure, was successfully employed to predict the flame temperature and both of the SiO2 and SiO concentration profiles. Compared with the experimental results, the calculated temperature profiles in the post-flame region are in good agreement with the measured data and observation phenomena.

  8. Formation of ordered films of axially bridged aluminum phthalocyanine [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O via magnetic field-induced reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Basova, Tamara Berezin, Aleksei; Nadolinny, Vladimir; Peisert, Heiko; Chassé, Thomas; Banimuslem, Hikmat; Hassan, Aseel

    2013-11-28

    The μ-(oxo)bis[tetra-tert-butylphthalocyaninato] aluminum(III) [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O films with the crystallites oriented preferably in one direction were obtained via chemical transformation of tetra-tert-butylsubstituted chloroaluminum(III) phthalocyanine (tBu){sub 4}PcAlCl film upon its annealing in magnetic field. A comparative analysis of the influence of post-deposition annealing process without and under applied magnetic field of 1 T, on the orientation and morphology of (tBu){sub 4}PcAlCl and [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O films, has been carried out by the methods of UV-vis, Infrared and Raman spectroscopies, XRD as well as atomic force microscopy. The formation of [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O films with elongated crystallites having preferential orientation was observed upon heating of the films in magnetic field while annealing without magnetic field under the same conditions does not demonstrate any effect on the structure and morphology of these films. The reasons of the sensitivity of this reaction to the presence of such magnetic field is discussed and studied by electronic paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  9. Formation of ordered films of axially bridged aluminum phthalocyanine [(tBu)4PcAl]2O via magnetic field-induced reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basova, Tamara; Berezin, Aleksei; Nadolinny, Vladimir; Peisert, Heiko; Chassé, Thomas; Banimuslem, Hikmat; Hassan, Aseel

    2013-11-01

    The μ-(oxo)bis[tetra-tert-butylphthalocyaninato] aluminum(III) [(tBu)4PcAl]2O films with the crystallites oriented preferably in one direction were obtained via chemical transformation of tetra-tert-butylsubstituted chloroaluminum(III) phthalocyanine (tBu)4PcAlCl film upon its annealing in magnetic field. A comparative analysis of the influence of post-deposition annealing process without and under applied magnetic field of 1 T, on the orientation and morphology of (tBu)4PcAlCl and [(tBu)4PcAl]2O films, has been carried out by the methods of UV-vis, Infrared and Raman spectroscopies, XRD as well as atomic force microscopy. The formation of [(tBu)4PcAl]2O films with elongated crystallites having preferential orientation was observed upon heating of the films in magnetic field while annealing without magnetic field under the same conditions does not demonstrate any effect on the structure and morphology of these films. The reasons of the sensitivity of this reaction to the presence of such magnetic field is discussed and studied by electronic paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  10. Effects of Substrate Roughness on Splat Formation for Ni-Cr Particles Plasma Sprayed onto Aluminum Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossard, S.; Munroe, P. R.; Tran, A. T. T.; Hyland, M. M.

    2010-09-01

    Roughening of the substrate, for instance by grit-blasting or etching, is often used before plasma spraying in order to provide a high degree of roughness that promotes mechanical interlocking of the sprayed coating and consequently improved adhesion. This study investigates the morphology and microstructure of NiCr splats formed on such rough Al substrates, where roughness was generated by a number of methods including grinding and etching. Cross sections of the splats and the splat-substrate interface were examined using a range of electron microscopy techniques. Localized substrate melting and chemical mixing with the splat material was observed, forming very particular structures. The formation of various oxides phases and voids was also noted and found to increase, along with the degree of the substrate melting, with increasing substrate roughness. The structures observed were related to the spray conditions and substrate morphology.

  11. A CRITICAL EXAMINATION OF THE X-WIND MODEL FOR CHONDRULE AND CALCIUM-RICH, ALUMINUM-RICH INCLUSION FORMATION AND RADIONUCLIDE PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, S. J.; Morris, M. A.; Connolly, H. C.; Boss, Alan P.

    2010-12-10

    Meteoritic data, especially regarding chondrules and calcium-rich, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs), and isotopic evidence for short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) in the solar nebula, potentially can constrain how planetary systems form. Interpretation of these data demands an astrophysical model, and the 'X-wind' model of Shu et al. and collaborators has been advanced to explain the origin of chondrules, CAIs, and SLRs. It posits that chondrules and CAIs were thermally processed <0.1 AU from the protostar, then flung by a magnetocentrifugal outflow to the 2-3 AU region to be incorporated into chondrites. Here we critically examine key assumptions and predictions of the X-wind model. We find a number of internal inconsistencies: theory and observation show no solid material exists at 0.1 AU; particles at 0.1 AU cannot escape being accreted into the star; particles at 0.1 AU will collide at speeds high enough to destroy them; thermal sputtering will prevent growth of particles; and launching of particles in magnetocentrifugal outflows is not modeled, and may not be possible. We also identify a number of incorrect predictions of the X-wind model: the oxygen fugacity where CAIs form is orders of magnitude too oxidizing, chondrule cooling rates are orders of magnitude lower than those experienced by barred olivine chondrules, chondrule-matrix complementarity is not predicted, and the SLRs are not produced in their observed proportions. We conclude that the X-wind model is not relevant to chondrule and CAI formation and SLR production. We discuss more plausible models for chondrule and CAI formation and SLR production.

  12. First principles pseudopotential calculations on aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, J.W.; Chetty, N.; Marr, R.B.; Narasimhan, S.; Pasciak, J.E.; Peierls, R.F.; Weinert, M.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in computational techniques have led to the possibility of performing first principles calculations of the energetics of alloy formation on systems involving several hundred atoms. This includes impurity concentrations in the 1% range as well as realistic models of disordered materials (including liquids), vacancies, and grain boundaries. The new techniques involve the use of soft, fully nonlocal pseudopotentials, iterative diagonalization, and parallel computing algorithms. This approach has been pioneered by Car and Parrinello. Here the authors give a review of recent results using parallel and serial algorithms on metallic systems including liquid aluminum and liquid sodium, and also new results on vacancies in aluminum and on aluminum-magnesium alloys.

  13. Formation Mechanism of SiO2-Type Inclusions in Si-Mn-Killed Steel Wires Containing Limited Aluminum Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kunpeng; Jiang, Min; Wang, Xinhua; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Haoqian; Cao, Zhanmin

    2015-10-01

    The origin, formation mechanism, and evolution of SiO2-type inclusions in Si-Mn-killed steel wires were studied by pilot trials with systematical samplings at the refining ladle, casting tundish, as-cast bloom, reheated bloom, and hot-rolled rods. It was found that the inclusions in tundish were well controlled in the low melting point region. By contrast, MnO-SiO2-Al2O3 inclusions in the as-cast bloom were with compositions located in the primary region of SiO2, and most CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MnO inclusions lied in primary phase region of anorthite. Therefore, precipitation of SiO2 particles in MnO-SiO2-Al2O3 inclusions can be easier than in CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MnO inclusions to form dual-phase inclusions in the as-cast bloom. Thermodynamic calculation by the software FactSage 6.4 (CRCT-ThermFact Inc., Montréal, Canada) showed that mass transfer between liquid steel and inclusions resulted in the rise of SiO2 content in inclusions from tundish to as-cast bloom and accelerated the precipitation of pure SiO2 phase in the formed MnO-SiO2-Al2O3 inclusions. As a result, the inclusions characterized by dual-phase structure of pure SiO2 in MnO-SiO2-Al2O3 matrix were observed in both as-cast and reheated blooms. Moreover, the ratio of such dual-phase SiO2-type inclusions witnessed an obvious increase from 0 to 25.4 pct before and after casting, whereas it changed little during the reheating and rolling. Therefore, it can be reasonably concluded that they were mainly formed during casting. Comparing the evolution of the inclusions composition and morphology in as-cast bloom and rolled products, a formation mechanism of the SiO2-type inclusions in wire rods was proposed, which included (1) precipitation of SiO2 in the formed MnO-SiO2-Al2O3 inclusion during casting and (2) solid-phase separation of the undeformed SiO2 precipitation from its softer MnO-SiO2-Al2O3 matrix during multipass rolling.

  14. Refractory Boride Formation and Microstructure Evolution during Solidification of Titanium-Boron and Titanium Aluminum-Boron Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, Mark Edward

    1990-01-01

    gamma-TiAl alloys targeted for use as a structural material in advanced aerospace applications lack adequate creep strength at high temperatures. Incorporation of hard refractory second phase particles (e.g. TiB _2) exhibiting large aspect ratios (i.e. needles) can increase creep strength by constraining the plastic flow of the matrix during high temperature service. Matrix microstructure evolution and refractory boride formation in binary Ti-B and Ti-(25-52) at% Al and <= ~ 6 at% B alloys during conventional solidification is examined. The effects of rapid solidification processing (RSP) on microstructure evolution and boride morphology in ternary alloys is examined in electromagnetically levitated droplets processed via gas and splat quenching. A liquidus projection near the Ti-Al edge binary is deduced from a combination of computer modelling efforts and experimental evidence. The primary fields of crystallization sequentially traversed with increasing Al content starting from the Ti-B edge binary are: TiB to Ti_3B_4 to TiB_2 and beta to alpha to gamma for B-rich (i.e. ~5 at% B) and dilute alloys, respectively. A monovariant line of the type, L to M + TiB_2 (where M = beta, alpha , and gamma) was found to run slightly below the ~1 at% B isoconcentration line near the equiatomic TiAl composition. Matrix microstructure evolution and boride formation in these ternary alloys can be explained using the proposed liquidus projection for the Ti-Al-B system. TiB_2 forms in Ti-Al-B alloys (i.e. >= 35 at% Al) with various morphologies--blocky, plate/needle and flakes--and are extensively characterized by TEM and SEM. Their growth mechanisms leading to their various morphologies is discussed. Aside from the boride phases formed, the solidification microstructures of the Ti-Al -B alloys of interest showed essentially the same constituent phases as those of binary Ti-Al alloys of similar composition. Characterization of supercooled ternary droplets dilute in B (i.e. <=1 at% B

  15. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  16. Aluminum phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Aluminum phosphide ; CASRN 20859 - 73 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  17. Electron Diffraction Evidence for the Ordering of Excess Nickel Atoms by Relation to Stoichiometry in Nickel-Rich Beta'-Nial Formation of a Nickel-Aluminum (Ni2al) Superlattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynaud, F.

    1988-01-01

    In electron diffraction patterns of nickel-rich beta-NiAl alloys, many anomalies are observed. One of these is the appearance of diffuse intensity maxima between the reflexions of the B2 structure. This is explained by the short-range ordering of the excess nickel atoms on the simple cubic sublattice occupied only by aluminum atoms in the stoichiometric, perfectly ordered NiAl alloy. After annealing Ni 37.5 atomic percent Al and Ni 37.75 atomic percent Al for 1 week at 300 and 400 C, the diffuse intensity maxima transformed into sharp superstructure reflexions. These reflexions are explained by the formation of the four possible variants of an ordered hexagonal superstructure corresponding to the Ni2Al composition. This structure is closely related to the Ni2Al3 structure (same space group) formed by the ordering of vacancies on the nickel sublattice in aluminum-rich beta-NiAl alloys.

  18. Beta4 integrin-dependent formation of polarized three-dimensionalarchitecture confers resistance to apoptosis in normal and malignantmammary epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Valerie M.; Lelievre, Sophie; Lakins, Johnathon N.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Jones, Jonathan C.R.; Giancotti, Filippo; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-08-27

    Tumor cells can evade chemotherapy by acquiring resistanceto apoptosis. We investigated the molecular mechanism whereby malignantand nonmalignant mammary epithelial cells become insensitive toapoptosis. We show that regardless of growth status formation ofpolarized, three-dimensional structures driven by basement membraneconfers protection to apoptosis in both nonmalignant and malignantmammary epithelial cells. By contrast, irrespective of their malignantstatus, nonpolarized structures are sensitive to induction of apoptosis.Resistance to apoptosis requires ligation of beta4 integrins, whichregulates tissue polarity, hemidesmosome formation and NFkB activation.Expression of beta4 integrin that lacks the hemidesmosome targetingdomain interferes with tissue polarity and NFkB activation and permitsapoptosis. These results indicate that integrin-induced polarity maydrive tumor cell resistance to apoptosis-inducing agents via effects onNFkB.

  19. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S. Glazkova, Elena A. Svarovskaya, Natalia V. Bakina, Olga V. Kazantsev, Sergey O. Lerner, Marat I.

    2015-10-27

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  20. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Glazkova, Elena A.; Svarovskaya, Natalia V.; Bakina, Olga V.; Kazantsev, Sergey O.; Lerner, Marat I.

    2015-10-01

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  1. A Pseudomonas strain isolated from date-palm rhizospheres improves root growth and promotes root formation in maize exposed to salt and aluminum stress.

    PubMed

    Zerrouk, Izzeddine Zakarya; Benchabane, Messaoud; Khelifi, Lakhdar; Yokawa, Ken; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Baluska, Frantisek

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Pseudomonas fluorescens 002 (P.f.002.), isolated from the rhizosphere of date palms from the Ghardaia region in the Algerian Sahara, to promote root growth of two varieties of maize under conditions of salt and aluminum stress. Primary roots of 5-day-old seedlings were inoculated with P.f.002., and seedlings were then grown under both control and stressed conditions. Primary, lateral, and seminal root lengths and numbers, as well as root dry mass, were evaluated. P.f.002 increased all parameters measured under both salt and aluminum stress. Hence, the use of P.f.002 may represent an important biotechnological approach to decrease the impact of salinity and acidity in crops. PMID:26759938

  2. XRD and NMR investigation of Ti-compound formation in solution-doping of sodium aluminum hydrides: Solubility of Ti in NaAlH4 crystals grown in THF

    SciTech Connect

    Majzoub, E H; Herberg, J L; Stumpf, R; Spangler, S; Maxwell, R S

    2004-08-26

    Sodium aluminum hydrides have gained attention due to their high hydrogen weight percent (5.5% ideal) compared to interstitial hydrides, and as a model for hydrides with even higher hydrogen weight fraction. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Ti-compounds that are formed under solution-doping techniques, such as wet doping in solvents such as tetrahydrofuran (THF). Compound formation in Ti-doped sodium aluminum hydrides is investigated using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We present lattice parameter measurements of crushed single crystals, which were exposed to Ti during growth. Rietveld refinements indicate no lattice parameter change and thus no solubility for Ti in NaAlH{sub 4} by this method of exposure. In addition, x-ray diffraction data indicate that no Ti substitutes in NaH, the final decomposition product for the alanate. Reaction products of completely reacted (33.3 at. %-doped) samples that were solvent-mixed or mechanically milled are investigated. Formation of TiAl{sub 3} is observed in mechanically milled materials, but not solution mixed samples, where bonding to THF likely stabilizes Ti-based nano-clusters. The Ti in these clusters is activated by mechanical milling.

  3. First principles pseudopotential calculations on aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, J.W.; Chetty, N.; Marr, R.B.; Narasimhan, S.; Pasciak, J.E.; Peierls, R.F.; Weinert, M.; Rahman, T.S.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in computational techniques have led to the possibility of performing first principles calculations of the energetics of alloy formation on systems involving several hundred atoms. This includes impurity concentrations in the 1% range as well as realistic models of disordered materials (including liquids), vacancies, and grain boundaries. The new techniques involve the use of soft, fully nonlocal pseudopotentials, iterative diagonalization, and parallel computing algorithms. This approach has been pioneered by Car and Parrinello. Here the authors give a review of recent results using parallel and serial algorithms by their group on metallic systems including liquid aluminum and liquid sodium, and also new results on vacancies in aluminum and on aluminum-magnesium alloys.

  4. Design for aluminum recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This article describes the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles and the need to recycle to benefit further growth of aluminum applications by assuring an economical, high-quality source of metal. The article emphasizes that coordination of material specifications among designers can raise aluminum scrap value and facilitate recycling. Applications of aluminum in automobile construction are discussed.

  5. Constraints on formation processes of two coarse-grained calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions: a study of mantles, islands and cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeker, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    Many coarse-grained calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) contain features that are inconsistent with equilibrium liquid crystallization models of origin. Spinel-free islands (SFIs) in spinel-rich cores of Type B CAIs are examples of such features. One model previously proposed for the origin of Allende 5241, a Type B1 CAI containing SFIs, involves the capture and assimilation of xenoliths by a liquid droplet in the solar nebula (El Goresy et al, 1985; MacPherson et al 1989). This study reports new textural and chemical zoning data from 5241 and identifies previously unrecognized chemical zoning patterns in the melilite mantle and in a SFI. -from Author

  6. Occupational exposure to aluminum and its biomonitoring in perspective.

    PubMed

    Riihimäki, Vesa; Aitio, Antero

    2012-11-01

    Exposure to aluminum at work is widespread, and people are exposed to several species of aluminum, which differ markedly as to the kinetics and toxicity. Especially welding of aluminum is widely applied and continuously expanding. Inhalation of fine particles of sparsely soluble aluminum results in the retention of deposited particles in the lungs. From the lungs, aluminum is released to the blood and distributed to bones and the brain, and excreted to urine. Soluble aluminum compounds are not accumulated in the lungs. Neurotoxicity is the critical effect of exposure to sparsely soluble aluminum compounds. Studies on workers exposed to aluminum welding fumes have revealed disturbances of cognitive processes, memory and concentration, and changes in mood and EEG. Early pulmonary effects have been observed among aluminum powder-production workers using high-resolution computed tomography. The primary objective of aluminum biomonitoring (BM) is to help prevent the formation of aluminum burden in the lungs and thereby to prevent harmful accumulation of aluminum in target organs. BM of aluminum can be effectively used for this purpose in the production/use of aluminum powders, aluminum welding, as well as plasma cutting, grinding, polishing and thermal spraying of aluminum. BM of aluminum may also be similarly useful in the smelting of aluminum and probably in the production of corundum. BM can help identify exposed individuals and roughly quantitate transient exposure but cannot predict health effects in the production/use of soluble aluminum salts. For urinary aluminum (U-Al) we propose an action limit of 3 µmol/L, corrected to a relative density of 1.021, in a sample collected preshift after two days without occupational exposure, and without use of aluminum-containing drugs. This value corresponds roughly to 2.3 µmol/g creatinine. Compliance with this limit is expected to protect the worker against the critical effect of aluminum in exposure to sparsely soluble

  7. Formation of biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexins in the transition zones of fire blight-infected stems of Malus domestica cv. 'Holsteiner Cox' and Pyrus communis cv. 'Conference'.

    PubMed

    Chizzali, Cornelia; Khalil, Mohammed N A; Beuerle, Till; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Richter, Klaus; Flachowsky, Henryk; Peil, Andreas; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-05-01

    In the rosaceous subtribe Pyrinae (formerly subfamily Maloideae), pathogen attack leads to formation of biphenyls and dibenzofurans. Accumulation of these phytoalexins was studied in greenhouse-grown grafted shoots of Malus domestica cv. 'Holsteiner Cox' and Pyrus communis cv. 'Conference' after inoculation with the fire blight bacterium, Erwinia amylovora. No phytoalexins were found in leaves. However, both classes of defence compounds were detected in the transition zone of stems. The flanking stem segments above and below this zone, which were necrotic and healthy, respectively, were devoid of detectable phytoalexins. The transition zone of apple stems contained the biphenyls 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyaucuparin, aucuparin, noraucuparin and 2'-hydroxyaucuparin and the dibenzofurans eriobofuran and noreriobofuran. In pear, aucuparin, 2'-hydroxyaucuparin, noreriobofuran and in addition 3,4,5-trimethoxybiphenyl were detected. The total phytoalexin content in the transition zone of pear was 25 times lower than that in apple. Leaves and stems of mock-inoculated apple and pear shoots lacked phytoalexins. A number of biphenyls and dibenzofurans were tested for their in vitro antibacterial activity against some Erwinia amylovora strains. The most efficient compound was 3,5-dihydroxybiphenyl (MIC=115 μg/ml), the immediate product of biphenyl synthase which initiates phytoalexin biosynthesis. PMID:22377689

  8. Aluminum-based metal-air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A.; Martinez, Jose Antonio Bautista

    2016-01-12

    Provided in one embodiment is an electrochemical cell, comprising: (i) a plurality of electrodes, comprising a fuel electrode that comprises aluminum and an air electrode that absorbs gaseous oxygen, the electrodes being operable in a discharge mode wherein the aluminum is oxidized at the fuel electrode and oxygen is reduced at the air electrode, and (ii) an ionically conductive medium, comprising an organic solvent; wherein during non-use of the cell, the organic solvent promotes formation of a protective interface between the aluminum of the fuel electrode and the ionically conductive medium, and wherein at an onset of the discharge mode, at least some of the protective interface is removed from the aluminum to thereafter permit oxidation of the aluminum during the discharge mode.

  9. Effects of Ca(OH)2 assisted aluminum sulfate coagulation on the removal of humic acid and the formation potentials of tri-halomethanes and haloacetic acids in chlorination.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinming; Cao, Xiaoting; Chen, Cheng; Shi, Dongrui; Li, Genmao; Mulcahy, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The effects of addition of calcium hydroxide on aluminum sulphate (or alum) coagulation for removal of natural organic matter (NOM) and its subsequent effect on the formation potentials of two major types of regulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs), have been examined. The results revealed several noteworthy phenomena. At the optimal coagulation pH (i.e. 6), the coagulation behavior of NOM water solutions versus alum dose, showed large variation and a consequent great change in the formation potentials of the DBPs at certain coagulant doses. However, with addition of a relatively small amount of Ca(OH)2, although the zeta potential of coagulated flocs remained almost the same, NOM removal became more consistent with alum dose. Importantly, also the detrimental effect of charge reversal on NOM removal at the low coagulant dose disappeared. This resulted in a steady decrease in the formation potentials of DBPs as a function of the coagulant dose. Moreover, the addition of Ca(OH)2 broadened the pH range of alum coagulation and promoted further reduction of the formation potentials of the DBPs. The enhancement effects of Ca(OH)2 assisted alum coagulation are especially pronounced at pH 7 and 8. Finally, synchronous fluorescence spectra showed that the reduction in DBPs formation potential by Ca(OH)2-assisted alum coagulation was connected to an enhanced removal of small hydrophobic and hydrophilic HA molecules. Ca(OH)2-assistance of alum coagulation appeared to increase substantially the removal of the hydrophilic HA fraction responsible for HAAs formation, prompting further reduction of HAA formation potentials. PMID:23520868

  10. Nanostructured lithium-aluminum alloy electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Hudak, Nicholas S.; Huber, Dale L.

    2010-12-01

    Electrodeposited aluminum films and template-synthesized aluminum nanorods are examined as negative electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. The lithium-aluminum alloying reaction is observed electrochemically with cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic cycling in lithium half-cells. The electrodeposition reaction is shown to have high faradaic efficiency, and electrodeposited aluminum films reach theoretical capacity for the formation of LiAl (1 Ah/g). The performance of electrodeposited aluminum films is dependent on film thickness, with thicker films exhibiting better cycling behavior. The same trend is shown for electron-beam deposited aluminum films, suggesting that aluminum film thickness is the major determinant in electrochemical performance regardless of deposition technique. Synthesis of aluminum nanorod arrays on stainless steel substrates is demonstrated using electrodeposition into anodic aluminum oxide templates followed by template dissolution. Unlike nanostructures of other lithium-alloying materials, the electrochemical performance of these aluminum nanorod arrays is worse than that of bulk aluminum.

  11. The Cleaning of Aluminum Frame Assembly Units

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T H

    2001-05-16

    The Brulin immersion and the precision cleaning experiments have shown that neither the Brulin solution nor the precision cleaning in AstroPak causes the smut formation on aluminum surfaces. The acid-bath cleaning in GTC is the primary source of the smut formation. The current GTC acid formulation etches the aluminum matrix quite aggressively, but does not appear to appreciably attack the Si particles. Therefore, this acid-bath cleaning will leave the cast-aluminum part surfaces with many protruded Si particles, which could potentially cause smut problems in the cleaning process down-stream. To ensure the removal of all loose Si particles from the cast-aluminum parts, it is necessary to physically hand-wipe and vigorously wash the acid-bath cleaned surfaces. Furthermore, the casting porosity in alloy A356 could be another source in causing high swipe readings in the FAU parts.

  12. Conference Connections: Rewiring the Circuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siemens, George; Tittenberger, Peter; Anderson, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Increased openness, two-way dialogue, and blurred distinctions between experts and amateurs have combined with numerous technology tools for dialogue, personal expression, networking, and community formation to "remake" conferences, influencing not only how attendees participate in but also how organizers host conferences today. (Contains 31…

  13. Aluminum and Young Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Thomas

    1980-01-01

    The author suggests a variety of ways in which aluminum and aluminum foil can be used in elementary and junior high art classes: relief drawing and rubbing; printing; repousse; sculpture; mobiles; foil sculpture; and three dimensional design. Sources of aluminum supplies are suggested. (SJL)

  14. Making Conferences Human Places of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Open Space Technology is a cumbersome name for a participative conference model that enables dynamic inclusive engagement and challenges traditional, highly structured hierarchical conference formats. Based on self-organising systems, (Wenger, 1998) Open Space Technology conferences have an open process, start with no agenda and empower the most…

  15. Issues for conversion coating of aluminum alloys with hydrotalcite

    SciTech Connect

    Drewien, C.A.; Buchheit, R.G.

    1993-12-01

    Hydrotalcite coatings on aluminum alloys are being developed for corrosion protection of aluminum in aggressive saline environments. Coating bath composition, surface pretreatment, and alloying elements in aluminum all influence the performance of these coatings during salt spray testing. The coating bath, comprised of lithium carbonate, requires aging by dissolution of aluminum into the bath in order to grow corrosion resistant coatings. Coatings formed in non- aged baths do not perform well in salt spray testing. The alloying elements in aluminum alloys, especially copper, influence the coating growth and formation leading to thin coatings. The effect of the alloy elements is to limit the supply of aluminum to the coating/electrolyte interface and hinder growth of hydrotalcite upon aluminum alloys.

  16. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  17. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  18. Closing the loop: an interactive action-research conference format for delivering updated medical information while eliciting Latina patient/family experiences and psychosocial needs post-genetic cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Deborah J; Deri, Julia; Ricker, Charité; Perez, Martin A; Ogaz, Raquel; Feldman, Nancy; Viveros, Lori A; Paz, Benjamin; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Blazer, Kathleen R

    2012-09-01

    A patient/family-centered conference was conducted at an underserved community hospital to address Latinas' post-genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) medical information and psychosocial support needs, and determine the utility of the action research format. Latinas seen for GCRA were recruited to a half-day conference conducted in Spanish. Content was partly determined from follow-up survey feedback. Written surveys, interactive discussions, and Audience Response System (ARS) queries facilitated the participant-healthcare professional action research process. Analyses included descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. The 71 attendees (41 patients and 27 relatives/friends) were primarily non-US born Spanish-speaking females, mean age 43 years. Among patients, 73 % had a breast cancer history; 85 % had BRCA testing (49 % BRCA+). Nearly all (96 %) attendees completed the conference surveys and ARS queries; ≥48 % participated in interactive discussions. Most (95 %) agreed that the format met their personal interests and expectations and provided useful information and resources. Gaps/challenges identified in the GCRA process included pre-consult anxiety, uncertainty about reason for referral and expected outcomes, and psychosocial needs post-GCRA, such as absorbing and disseminating risk information to relatives and concurrently coping with a recent cancer diagnosis. The combined action research and educational conference format was innovative and effective for responding to continued patient information needs and addressing an important data gap about support needs of Latina patients and family members following genetic cancer risk assessment. Findings informed GCRA process improvements and provide a basis for theory-driven cancer control research. PMID:22678665

  19. Superhydrophobic coating deposited directly on aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, Ana M.; Llorca-Isern, Nuria

    2014-06-01

    This study develops an alternative method for enhancing superhydrophobicity on aluminum surfaces with an amphiphilic reagent such as the dodecanoic acid. The goal is to induce superhydrophobicity directly through a simple process on pure (99.9 wt%) commercial aluminum. The initial surface activation leading to the formation of the superhydrophobic coating is studied using confocal microscopy. Superhydrophobic behavior is analyzed by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The highest contact angle (approaching 153°) was obtained after forming hierarchical structures with a particular roughness obtained by grinding and polishing microgrooves on the aluminum surface together with the simultaneous action of HCl and dodecanoic acid. The results also showed that after immersion in the ethanol-acidic-fatty acid solutions, they reacted chemically through the action of the fatty acid, on the aluminum surface. The mechanism is analyzed by TOF-SIMS and XPS in order to determine the molecules involved in the reaction. The TOF-SIMS analysis revealed that the metal and its oxides seem to be necessary, and that free-aluminum is anchored to the fatty acid molecules and to the alumina molecules present in the medium. Consequently, both metallic aluminum and aluminum oxides are necessary in order to form the compound responsible for superhydrophobicity.

  20. Explosive Welding of Aluminum to Aluminum: Analysis, Computations and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grignon, F.; Benson, D.; Vecchio, K. S.; Meyers, M. A.

    2004-07-01

    6061 T0 aluminum alloy was joined to 6061 T0 aluminum alloy by explosive welding. This is a process in which the controlled energy of a detonating explosive is used to create a metallic bond between two similar or dissimilar materials. The welding conditions were tailored to produce both wavy and straight interfaces. A three-pronged study was used to establish the conditions for straight weld formation: (a) analytical calculation of the domain of weldability; (b) characterization of the explosive welding experiments carried out under different conditions, and (c) 2D finite differences simulation of these tests using the explicit Eulerian hydrocode Raven with a Johnson-Cook constitutive equation for the Al alloy. The numerical simulation and the analytical calculations confirm the experimental results and explain the difficulties met for obtaining a continuous straight interface along the entire weld.

  1. The formation of tungsten doped Al2O3/ZnO coatings on aluminum by plasma electrolytic oxidation and their application in photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojadinović, Stevan; Vasilić, Rastko; Radić, Nenad; Tadić, Nenad; Stefanov, Plamen; Grbić, Boško

    2016-07-01

    Tungsten doped Al2O3/ZnO coatings are formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation of aluminum substrate in supporting electrolyte (0.1 M boric acid + 0.05 M borax + 2 g/L ZnO) with addition of different concentrations of Na2WO4·2H2O. The morphology, crystal structure, chemical composition, and light absorption characteristics of formed surface coatings are investigated. The X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate that formed surface coatings consist of alpha and gamma phase of Al2O3, ZnO, metallic tungsten and WO3. Obtained results showed that incorporated tungsten does not have any influence on the absorption spectra of Al2O3/ZnO coatings, which showed invariable band edge at about 385 nm. The photocatalytic activity of undoped and tungsten doped Al2O3/ZnO coatings is estimated by the photodegradation of methyl orange. The photocatalytic activity of tungsten doped Al2O3/ZnO coatings is higher thanof undoped Al2O3/ZnO coatings; the best photocatalytic activity is ascribed to coatings formed in supporting electrolyte with addition of 0.3 g/L Na2WO4·2H2O. Tungsten in Al2O3/ZnO coatings acts as a charge trap, thus reducing the recombination rate of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. The results of PL measurements are in agreement with photocatalytic activity. Declining PL intensity corresponds to increasing photocatalytic activity of the coatings, indicating slower recombination of electron-hole pairs.

  2. Aluminum: Recycling of Aluminum Dross/Saltcake

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, S.

    1999-01-29

    As this NICE3 publication details, the objective of this project is to commercialize the process technology to eliminate all landfill waste associated with black dross and saltcake generated from aluminum recycling in the United States.

  3. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flumerfelt, Joel Fredrick

    In recent years, the aluminum powder industry has expanded into non-aerospace applications. However, the alumina and aluminum hydroxide in the surface oxide film on aluminum powder require high cost powder processing routes. A driving force for this research is to broaden the knowledge base about aluminum powder metallurgy to provide ideas for fabricating low cost aluminum powder components. The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization commercial inert gas atomization and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). The commercial atomization methods are bench marks of current aluminum powder technology. The GARS process is a laboratory scale inert gas atomization facility. A benefit of using pure aluminum powders is an unambiguous interpretation of the results without considering the effects of alloy elements. A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a

  4. The viability of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haopeng; Jae Ko, Yeon; Zhang, Xinxing; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu; Schnoeckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Jena, Puru; Kiran, Boggavarapu E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu; Kandalam, Anil K. E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu

    2014-03-28

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have investigated the extent to which the aluminum moieties within selected magnesium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Magnesium-aluminum cluster anions were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, photoelectron spectra of Mg{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup −} (m, n = 1,6; 2,5; 2,12; and 3,11) were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on these four stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for the cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra). Calculations revealed that, unlike the cases of recently reported sodium-aluminum clusters, the formation of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters was limited in most cases by weak charge transfer between the magnesium atoms and their aluminum cluster moieties. Only in cases of high magnesium content, e.g., in Mg{sub 3}Al{sub 11} and Mg{sub 2}Al{sub 12}{sup −}, did the aluminum moieties exhibit Zintl anion-like characteristics.

  5. The viability of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haopeng; Ko, Yeon Jae; Zhang, Xinxing; Gantefoer, Gerd; Schnoeckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W; Jena, Puru; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Kandalam, Anil K; Bowen, Kit H

    2014-03-28

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have investigated the extent to which the aluminum moieties within selected magnesium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Magnesium-aluminum cluster anions were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, photoelectron spectra of MgmAln (-) (m, n = 1,6; 2,5; 2,12; and 3,11) were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on these four stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for the cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra). Calculations revealed that, unlike the cases of recently reported sodium-aluminum clusters, the formation of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters was limited in most cases by weak charge transfer between the magnesium atoms and their aluminum cluster moieties. Only in cases of high magnesium content, e.g., in Mg3Al11 and Mg2Al12 (-), did the aluminum moieties exhibit Zintl anion-like characteristics. PMID:24697443

  6. The viability of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haopeng; Jae Ko, Yeon; Zhang, Xinxing; Gantefoer, Gerd; Schnoeckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Jena, Puru; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Kandalam, Anil K.; Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-03-01

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have investigated the extent to which the aluminum moieties within selected magnesium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Magnesium-aluminum cluster anions were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, photoelectron spectra of MgmAln- (m, n = 1,6; 2,5; 2,12; and 3,11) were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on these four stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for the cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra). Calculations revealed that, unlike the cases of recently reported sodium-aluminum clusters, the formation of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters was limited in most cases by weak charge transfer between the magnesium atoms and their aluminum cluster moieties. Only in cases of high magnesium content, e.g., in Mg3Al11 and Mg2Al12-, did the aluminum moieties exhibit Zintl anion-like characteristics.

  7. Biomedical Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    As a result of Biomedical Conferences, Vivo Metric Systems Co. has produced cardiac electrodes based on NASA technology. Frequently in science, one highly specialized discipline is unaware of relevant advances made in other areas. In an attempt to familiarize researchers in a variety of disciplines with medical problems and needs, NASA has sponsored conferences that bring together university scientists, practicing physicians and manufacturers of medical instruments.

  8. Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement Conference: Using a Revised Morbidity and Mortality Format to Focus on Systems-Based Patient Safety Issues in a VA Hospital: Design and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Wendy H; Ledford, Judith; Cooper, Jacqueline; Lloyd, Melissa G; Moore, Timothy; Harji, Farzana; Twitty, Vivian; Brooks, Annette; Oliver, Rosalinda C; Goff, James M

    2016-03-01

    The Veterans Healthcare Administration (VA) has embraced patient safety and quality improvement in the quest to improve care for veterans. The New Mexico VA Health Care System introduced a new morbidity and mortality conference, called the Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement Conference (IQIC), using patient case presentations to focus on underlying systems in the clinical care environment. The revised conference design also effectively teaches the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core requirements for resident education. A formal process was established for case selection, presentation, systems issue identification, tracking, and follow-up. The IQIC has enabled the identification of more than 20 system issues at the study institution. Outcome data show lasting improvement in system issues that were addressed by this mechanism. The VA IQIC is an effective method to both identify and correct systems issues that affect patient care and is an effective method for teaching residents the 6 ACGME requirements for residency education. PMID:25332453

  9. Aspects of aluminum toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, C.D.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. The widespread occurrence of aluminum, both in the environment and in foodstuffs, makes it virtually impossible for man to avoid exposure to this metal ion. Attention was first drawn to the potential role of aluminum as a toxic metal over 50 years ago, but was dismissed as a toxic agent as recently as 15 years ago. The accumulation of aluminum, in some patients with chronic renal failure, is associated with the development of toxic phenomena; dialysis encephalopathy, osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy, and an anemia. Aluminum accumulation also occurs in patients who are not on dialysis, predominantly infants and children with immature or impaired renal function. Aluminum has also been implicated as a toxic agent in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, Guamiam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and parkinsonism-dementia. 119 references.

  10. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  11. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  12. Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant

    DOEpatents

    LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-11-05

    A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

  13. Deposition behavior of residual aluminum in drinking water distribution system: Effect of aluminum speciation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Shi, Baoyou; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yan, Mingquan; Lytle, Darren A; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Finished drinking water usually contains some residual aluminum. The deposition of residual aluminum in distribution systems and potential release back to the drinking water could significantly influence the water quality at consumer taps. A preliminary analysis of aluminum content in cast iron pipe corrosion scales and loose deposits demonstrated that aluminum deposition on distribution pipe surfaces could be excessive for water treated by aluminum coagulants including polyaluminum chloride (PACl). In this work, the deposition features of different aluminum species in PACl were investigated by simulated coil-pipe test, batch reactor test and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The deposition amount of non-polymeric aluminum species was the least, and its deposition layer was soft and hydrated, which indicated the possible formation of amorphous Al(OH)3. Al13 had the highest deposition tendency, and the deposition layer was rigid and much less hydrated, which indicated that the deposited aluminum might possess regular structure and self-aggregation of Al13 could be the main deposition mechanism. While for Al30, its deposition was relatively slower and deposited aluminum amount was relatively less compared with Al13. However, the total deposited mass of Al30 was much higher than that of Al13, which was attributed to the deposition of particulate aluminum matters with much higher hydration state. Compared with stationary condition, stirring could significantly enhance the deposition process, while the effect of pH on deposition was relatively weak in the near neutral range of 6.7 to 8.7. PMID:27090705

  14. MTBE OXIDATION BY BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum, prepared by sulfating zero-valent aluminum with sulfuric acid, has a dual functionality of simultaneously decomposing both reductively- and oxidatively-degradable contaminants. In this work, the use of bifunctional aluminum for the degradation of methyl te...

  15. Studies on aluminum neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S.

    1988-01-01

    This work reports the inhibitory effects of aluminum on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) from yeast and brains. The aluminum contents and several enzyme activities in aluminum-fed rat brain homogenates were compared with those in age-matched control groups. The concentration of aluminum in the homogenates of the aluminum-fed groups were twice of that of the controls. Acetylcholinesterase activities were the same as in both groups but hexokinase and G6PD activities in the aluminum-fed group were about 73% and 70% of the control, respectively. Further studies on the inhibitory effects of aluminum on G6PD were performed with the enzymes purified from human and pig brains. Two forms of G6PD isozymes were purified from human and pig brain by ammonium sulfate fractionation, hydroxylapatite chromatography, affinity chromatography with NADP-agarose and Blue-Sepharose CL-6B, and gel filtration with Sephadex S-300. The two forms of isozymes (isozyme I and II), purified to be homogeneous, had a molecular weight of 220,000, and composed of 4 subunits of molecular weight of 57,000. HPLC peptide maps of tryptic digests and amino acid analyses of the isozymes showed extensive homologies between the isozymes. Interestingly, only the isozyme II in human and pig brain were active with 6-phosphogluconate as a substrate. No such an activity was found in isozyme I. Aluminum inactivated G6PD activity of the human and pig brain isozyme I and isozyme II without affecting the 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity of the isozyme II. Circular dichroism studies showed that the binding of aluminum to G6PD induced a decrease in {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet and a increase in random coil. Therefore it is suggested that inactivation of G6PD by aluminum is due to the conformational change induced by aluminum binding.

  16. Microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Yang, S S; Chen, C Y; Wei, C B; Lin, Y T

    1996-11-01

    Several microbes were isolated from the contaminated fuel-oil in Taiwan and the microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy A356-T6 was tested by MIL-STD-810E test method. Penicillium sp. AM-F5 and Cladosporium resinac ATCC 22712 had significant adsorption and pitting on the surface of aluminum alloy, Pseudomonas acruginosa AM-B5 had weak adsorption and some precipitation in the bottom, and Candida sp. AM-Y1 had the less adsorption and few cavities formation on the surface. pH of the aqueous phase decreased 0.3 to 0.7 unit for 4 months of incubation. The corrosion of aluminum alloy was very significant in the cultures of Penicillium sp. AM-F2, Penicillium sp. AM-F5 and C. resinac ATCC 22712. The major metabolites in the aqueous phase with the inoculation of C. resinac were citric acid and oxalic acid, while succinic acid and fumaric acid were the minors. PMID:10592801

  17. Aluminum: Reducing chloride emissions from aluminum production

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, P.

    1999-09-29

    Reynolds Metals Company (RMC), with assistance from a NICE{sup 3} grant, is developing for commercialization a closed-loop control process that greatly reduces chlorine emissions and increases plant efficiency while maintaining metal quality. The process still utilizes chlorine to remove impurities during aluminum processing, but is more effective than current methods. With the new technology chlorine in the stack is monitored and input chlorine is adjusted continuously. This optimization of chlorine use results in substantially less waste because less chlorine has to be bought or produced by aluminum manufacturers. This innovation is a significant improvement over conventional aluminum treatments, in which chlorine is injected in a more costly and wasteful manner. By the year 2010, the new technology has the potential to reduce the energy it takes to create chlorine by 8.4 billion Btu per year and to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 1,377 tons per year.

  18. Aluminum space frame technology

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, S.

    1994-01-01

    This article examines the increased application of aluminum to the construction of automobile frames. The topics of the article include a joint venture between Audi and Alcoa, forms in which aluminum is used, new alloys and construction methods, meeting rigidity and safety levels, manufacturing techniques, the use of extrusions, die casting, joining techniques, and pollution control during manufacturing.

  19. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are also…

  20. Cast aluminum denture base.

    PubMed

    Barco, M T; Dembert, M L

    1987-08-01

    The laboratory procedures for a cast aluminum base denture have been presented. If an induction casting machine is not available, the "two-oven technique" works well, provided the casting arm is kept spinning manually for 4 minutes after casting. If laboratory procedures are executed precisely and with care, the aluminum base denture can be cast with good results. PMID:3305884

  1. Managing aluminum phosphide poisonings

    PubMed Central

    Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K; Azim, Afzal; Sharma, Kalpana

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a cheap, effective and commonly used pesticide. However, unfortunately, it is now one of the most common causes of poisoning among agricultural pesticides. It liberates lethal phosphine gas when it comes in contact either with atmospheric moisture or with hydrochloric acid in the stomach. The mechanism of toxicity includes cellular hypoxia due to the effect on mitochondria, inhibition of cytochrome C oxidase and formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. The signs and symptoms are nonspecific and instantaneous. The toxicity of AlP particularly affects the cardiac and vascular tissues, which manifest as profound and refractory hypotension, congestive heart failure and electrocardiographic abnormalities. The diagnosis of AlP usually depends on clinical suspicion or history, but can be made easily by the simple silver nitrate test on gastric content or on breath. Due to no known specific antidote, management remains primarily supportive care. Early arrival, resuscitation, diagnosis, decrease the exposure of poison (by gastric lavage with KMnO4, coconut oil), intensive monitoring and supportive therapy may result in good outcome. Prompt and adequate cardiovascular support is important and core in the management to attain adequate tissue perfusion, oxygenation and physiologic metabolic milieu compatible with life until the tissue poison levels are reduced and spontaneous circulation is restored. In most of the studies, poor prognostic factors were presence of acidosis and shock. The overall outcome improved in the last decade due to better and advanced intensive care management. PMID:21887030

  2. Managing aluminum phosphide poisonings.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K; Azim, Afzal; Sharma, Kalpana

    2011-07-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a cheap, effective and commonly used pesticide. However, unfortunately, it is now one of the most common causes of poisoning among agricultural pesticides. It liberates lethal phosphine gas when it comes in contact either with atmospheric moisture or with hydrochloric acid in the stomach. The mechanism of toxicity includes cellular hypoxia due to the effect on mitochondria, inhibition of cytochrome C oxidase and formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. The signs and symptoms are nonspecific and instantaneous. The toxicity of AlP particularly affects the cardiac and vascular tissues, which manifest as profound and refractory hypotension, congestive heart failure and electrocardiographic abnormalities. The diagnosis of AlP usually depends on clinical suspicion or history, but can be made easily by the simple silver nitrate test on gastric content or on breath. Due to no known specific antidote, management remains primarily supportive care. Early arrival, resuscitation, diagnosis, decrease the exposure of poison (by gastric lavage with KMnO(4), coconut oil), intensive monitoring and supportive therapy may result in good outcome. Prompt and adequate cardiovascular support is important and core in the management to attain adequate tissue perfusion, oxygenation and physiologic metabolic milieu compatible with life until the tissue poison levels are reduced and spontaneous circulation is restored. In most of the studies, poor prognostic factors were presence of acidosis and shock. The overall outcome improved in the last decade due to better and advanced intensive care management. PMID:21887030

  3. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  4. The aluminum smelting process.

    PubMed

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  5. Aluminum structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, G.

    1996-05-01

    Extensive research by aluminum producers and automakers in the 1980s resulted in the development of technologies that enable building of aluminum cars that meet and exceed all the expectations of today`s drivers and passengers, yet weigh several hundred pounds less than their steel counterparts. The Acura NSX sports car, the Audi A8, and the Jaguar XJ220 have all been introduced. Ford has built 40 aluminum-intensive automobiles based on the Taurus/Sable for test purposes, and General Motors recently announced an aluminum-structured electric vehicle. The design flexibility that aluminum allows is shown by these examples. Each uses a somewhat different technology that is particularly suited to the vehicle and its market.

  6. The Aluminum Smelting Process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  7. Paint-Bonding Improvement for 2219 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daech, Alfred F.; Cibula, Audrey Y.

    1987-01-01

    Bonding of adhesives and primers to 2219 aluminum alloy improved by delaying rinse step in surface-treatment process. Delaying rinse allows formation of rougher surface for stronger bonding and greater oxide buildup.

  8. Conference Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Cait

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes an original conference, organised by the Child Care Research Forum (http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/ccrf/), which brought together experts from all over Northern Ireland to showcase some of the wealth of research with children and young people that is going on in the country today. Developed around the six high-level outcomes of…

  9. Effect of trace elements vanadium and nickel on iron intermetallic phases formation and distribution in DC cast 5xxx series aluminum ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaofeng

    AA5657 alloy is one of the important members of 5xxx-series alloys. It has application in many fields as packing, electricity, architectural, and printing. These applications require high quality surface finishing, and the alloy ingots require homogeneous microstructure. In the industry of DC (direct-chill) casting of 1xxx and 5xxx-series aluminium ingots, there exist different cooling rates from the casting surface to the ingot center. Thus, different Fe intermetallic phases such as AlmFe, Al6Fe, alpha-AlFeSi and Al3Fe can form preferentially in different positions of the ingot. The Fe intermetallic phase transition in DC casting ingot may cause microstructure inhomogeneities, which in turn cause the so called fir-tree zones (FTZs) in the ingots as well as streaks and bands on the Al sheets. Nowadays, with the increase of impurity in aluminium smelting raw materials (coke, alumina, etc.), the levels of trace elements present in the primary metal is gradually increasing. The impact of this increase on the aluminium transformation process and the final products is uncertain. Thus, there is a clear need to better understand these impacts, which will allow identifying ways to mitigate the negative impacts. The study presented in this thesis was performed on AA5657 alloys to study the effect of trace elements V and Ni on Fe intermetallic phases formation and distribution. A slice of AA1050 alloy ingot with visible FTZs was also studied to characterize the Fe intermetallic phases transition across the FTZs. A DC simulator was built in the lab, which can reproduce the solidification conditions in the sub-surface regions of industry ingots. The methods for the characterization of Fe intermetallic particles were developed in this research. AlmFe, Al6Fe, alpha-AlFeSi and alpha-Al3Fe intermetallic phases were successfully identified by using Deep-etching method, EDS and EBSD technique in combination. Quantitative analysis of the Fe intermetallic particles was carried out by

  10. Aluminum inhibits neurofilament assembly, cytoskeletal incorporation, and axonal transport. Dynamic nature of aluminum-induced perikaryal neurofilament accumulations as revealed by subunit turnover.

    PubMed

    Shea, T B; Wheeler, E; Jung, C

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism by which aluminum induces formation of perikaryal neurofilament (NF) inclusions remains unclear. Aluminum treatment inhibits: 1. The incorporation of newly synthesized NF subunits into Triton-insoluble cytoskeleton of axonal neurites; 2. Their degradation and dephosphorylation; 3. Their translocation into axonal neurites. It also fosters the accumulation of phosphorylated NFs within perikarya. In the present study, we addressed the relationship among these effects. Aluminum reduced the assembly of newly synthesized NF subunits into NFs. During examination of those subunits that did assemble in the presence of aluminum, it was revealed that aluminum also interfered with transport of newly assembled NFs into axonal neurites. Similarly, a delay in axonal transport of microinjected biotinylated NF-H was observed in aluminum-treated cells. Aluminum also inhibited the incorporation of newly synthesized and microinjected subunits into the Triton-insoluble cytoskeleton within both perikarya and neurites. Once incorporated into Triton-insoluble cytoskeletons, however, biotinylated subunits were retained within perikarya of aluminum-treated cells to a greater extent than within untreated cells. Notably, these subunits were depleted in the presence and absence of aluminum within 48 h, despite the persistence of the aluminum-induced perikaryal accumulation itself, suggesting that individual NF subunits undergo turnover even within aluminum-induced perikaryal accumulations. These findings demonstrate that aluminum interferes with multiple aspects of neurofilament dynamics and furthermore leaves open the possibility that aluminum-induced perikaryal NF whorls may not represent permanent structures, but rather may require continued recruitment of cytoskeletal constituents. PMID:9437656

  11. Gelling Mechanism of Aluminum Di-Soaps in Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaorong; Rackaitis, Mindaugas

    2009-03-01

    This work demonstrates that aluminum di-soaps form nano-sized spherical micelles in the oils and that the aggregation of these micelles forms a network that gives rise to a gel formation -- thereby refuting a long-held belief that the gel formation was the result of linear polymeric chains of aluminum association. The discovery of such aluminum nano-particles could expand application of these materials to new technologies because these materials are chemically inert, odorless and nontoxic, and have been widely used in greases, paints, gels, cosmetics, drugs and foods.

  12. A Study on Formation and Thermal Stability of Nano-sized Oxide Clusters in Mechanically Alloyed Nickel Aluminum for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Deog

    the thermal stability during an extensive matrix of long-term thermal annealing. In particular, the size, number density and composition of nano-clusters were assessed. While improvements in strength were obtained in the advanced NiAl ODS alloys, and the higher strength persisted through thermal annealing for 100 hrs at 1723K, characterization revealed the presence of Al in the oxide precipitate phases. The Al incorporation is believed detrimental to the formation of a high density of thermally stable Y-Ti-O nanoscale precipitates.

  13. Sorptive fractionation of organic matter and formation of organo-hydroxy-aluminum complexes during litter biodegradation in the presence of gibbsite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, K.; Grandy, A. S.; Gao, X.; Keiluweit, M.; Wickings, K.; Carpenter, K.; Chorover, J.; Rasmussen, C.

    2013-11-01

    Solid and aqueous phase Al species are recognized to affect organic matter (OM) stabilization in forest soils. However, little is known about the dynamics of formation, composition and dissolution of organo-Al hydroxide complexes in microbially-active soil systems, where plant litter is subject to microbial decomposition in close proximity to mineral weathering reactions. We incubated gibbsite-quartz mineral mixtures in the presence of forest floor material inoculated with a native microbial consortium for periods of 5, 60 and 154 days. At each time step, samples were density separated into light (<1.6 g cm-3), intermediate (1.6-2.0 g cm-3), and heavy (>2.0 g cm-3) fractions. The light fraction was mainly comprised of particulate organic matter, while the intermediate and heavy density fractions contained moderate and large amounts of Al-minerals, respectively. Multi-method interrogation of the fractions indicated the intermediate and heavy fractions differed both in mineral structure and organic compound composition. X-ray diffraction analysis and SEM/EDS of the mineral component of the intermediate fractions indicated some alteration of the original gibbsite structure into less crystalline Al hydroxide and possibly proto-imogolite species, whereas alteration of the gibbsite structure was not evident in the heavy fraction. DRIFT, Py-GC/MS and STXM/NEXAFS results all showed that intermediate fractions were composed mostly of lignin-derived compounds, phenolics, and polysaccharides. Heavy fraction organics were dominated by polysaccharides, and were enriched in proteins, N-bearing compounds, and lipids. The source of organics appeared to differ between the intermediate and heavy fractions. Heavy fractions were enriched in 13C with lower C/N ratios relative to intermediate fractions, suggesting a microbial origin. The observed differential fractionation of organics among hydroxy-Al mineral types suggests that microbial activity superimposed with abiotic mineral

  14. Clinical biochemistry of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.W.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Aluminum toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure on long-term intermittent hemodialysis treatment. The predominant disorders have been those involving either bone (osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy) or brain (dialysis encephalopathy). In nonuremic patients, an increased brain aluminum concentration has been implicated as a neurotoxic agent in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and was associated with experimental neurofibrillary degeneration in animals. The brain aluminum concentrations of patients dying with the syndrome of dialysis encephalopathy (dialysis dementia) are significantly higher than in dialyzed patients without the syndrome and in nondialyzed patients. Two potential sources for the increased tissue content of aluminum in patients on hemodialysis have been proposed: (1) intestinal absorption from aluminum containing phosphate-binding gels, and (2) transfer across the dialysis membrane from aluminum in the water used to prepare the dialysate. These findings, coupled with our everyday exposure to the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum in nature, have created concerns over the potential toxicity of this metal.

  15. Proceedings of the Seventh Applied Diamond Conference/Third Frontier Carbon Technology Joint Conference (ADC/FCT 2003). Supplement 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakawa, M. (Editor); Miyoshi, K. (Editor); Koga, Y. (Editor); Schaefer, L. (Editor); Tzeng, Y. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This document contains 2 reports which were presented at the Seventh Applied Diamond Conference/Third Frontier Carbon Technology Joint Conference. The topics discuss the formation of C-N nanofibers as well as the characterization of diamond thin films.

  16. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  17. Advances in aluminum anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dale, K. H.

    1969-01-01

    White anodize is applied to aluminum alloy surfaces by specific surface preparation, anodizing, pigmentation, and sealing techniques. The development techniques resulted in alloys, which are used in space vehicles, with good reflectance values and excellent corrosive resistance.

  18. Walnut Hulls Clean Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colberg, W. R.; Gordon, G. H.; Jackson, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Hulls inflict minimal substrate damage. Walnut hulls found to be best abrasive for cleaning aluminum surfaces prior to painting. Samples blasted with walnut hulls showed no compressive stress of surface.

  19. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  20. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  1. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  2. Light weight aluminum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catura, R. C.; Vieira, J. R.

    1985-09-01

    Light weight mirror blanks were fabricated by dip-brazing a core of low mass aluminum foam material to thin face sheets of solid aluminum. The blanks weigh 40% of an equivalent size solid mirror and were diamond turned to provide reflective surfaces. Optical interferometry was used to assess their dimensional stability over 7 months. No changes in flatness are observed (to the sensitivity of the measurements of a half wavelength of red light).

  3. Next conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Toney, Michael F.

    2010-11-01

    After the successful conference on Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science (SRPS) in Rolduc Abbey (the Netherlands), we are now looking forward to the next meeting in this topical series started in 1995 by H G Zachmann, one of the pioneers of the use of synchrotron radiation techniques in polymer science. Earlier meetings were held in Hamburg (1995), Sheffield (2002), Kyoto (2006), and Rolduc (2009). In September of 2012 the Synchrotron Radiation and Polymer Science V conferences will be organized in a joint effort by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Advanced Light Source at LBL Advanced Light Source at LBL The conference will be organised in the heart of beautiful San Francisco. The program will consist of invited and contributed lectures divided in sessions on the use of synchrotron SAXS/WAXD, imaging and tomography, soft x-rays, x-ray spectroscopy, GISAXS and reflectivity, micro-beams and hyphenated techniques in polymer science. Poster contributions are more than welcome and will be highlighted during the poster sessions. Visits to both SLAC as well as LBL will be organised. San Francisco can easily be reached. It is served by two major international airports San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport. Both are being served by most major airlines with easy connections to Europe and Asia as well as national destinations. Both also boast excellent connections to San Francisco city centre. We are looking forward to seeing you in the vibrant city by the Bay in September 2012. Golden gate bridge Alexander Hexemer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Michael F Toney Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Pk, CA 94025, USA E-mail: ahexemer@lbl.gov, mftoney@slac.stanford.edu

  4. Conferences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Way back in the mid-1990s, as a young PhD student, I wrote a Lateral Thoughts article about my first experience of an academic conference (Physics World 1994 October p80). It was a peach of a trip - most of the lab decamped to Grenoble for a week of great weather, beautiful scenery and, of course, the physics. A whole new community was there for me to see in action, and the internationality of it all helped us to forget about England's non-appearance in the 1994 World Cup finals.

  5. Conference Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, James, Jr.; Thomas, Valerie

    2000-01-01

    The MU-SPIN conference focused on showcasing successful experiences with information technology to enhance faculty and student development in areas of scientific and technical research and education. And it provided a forum for discussing increased participation of MU-SPIN schools in NASA Flight Missions and NASA Educational and Public Outreach activities. Opportunities for Involvement sessions focused on Space Science, Earth Science, Education, and Aeronautics. These sessions provided insight into the missions of NASA's enterprises and NASA's Education program. Presentations by NASA scientists, university Principal Investigators, and other affiliates addressed key issues for increased minority involvement.

  6. Conference Simulation in an English Composition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Gail

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the use of a conference format in teaching a required English composition course. The focus of the course is student research and presentation; thus, simulating a conference was a natural fit for the course's overall goals. Students worked in one of four committees: the Call for Proposals Committee, the Proposal Evaluation…

  7. Aluminum, parathyroid hormone, and osteomalacia

    SciTech Connect

    Burnatowska-Hledin, M.A.; Kaiser, L.; Mayor, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum exposure in man is unavoidable. The occurrence of dialysis dementia, vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, and hypochromic microcytic anemia in dialysis patients underscores the potential for aluminum toxicity. Although exposure via dialysate and hyperalimentation leads to significant tissue aluminum accumulation, the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum and the severe pathology associated with large aluminum burdens suggest that smaller exposures via the gastrointestinal tract and lungs could represent an important, though largely unrecognized, public health problem. It is clear that some aluminum absorption occurs with the ingestion of small amounts of aluminum in the diet and medicines, and even greater aluminum absorption is seen in individuals consuming large amounts of aluminum present in antacids. Aluminum absorption is enhanced in the presence of elevated circulating parathyroid hormone. In addition, elevated PTH leads to the preferential deposition of aluminum in brain and bone. Consequently, PTH is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of toxicities in those organs. PTH excess also seems to lead to the deposition of aluminum in the parathyroid gland. The in vitro demonstration that aluminum inhibits parathyroid hormone release is consistent with the findings of a euparathyroid state in dialysis patients with aluminum related vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia. Nevertheless, it seems likely that hyperparathyroidism is at least initially involved in the pathogenesis of aluminum neurotoxicity and osteomalacia; the increases in tissue aluminum stores are followed by suppression of parathyroid hormone release, which is required for the evolution of osteomalacia. Impaired renal function is not a prerequisite for increased tissue aluminum burdens, nor for aluminum-related organ toxicity. Consequently, it is likely that these diseases will be observed in populations other than those with chronic renal disease.

  8. The Conference Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolls, Blanche; Hartman, Linda; Corey, Linda; Marcoux, Betty; Jay, M. Ellen; England, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Includes five articles on conference experiences: preplanning for a library conference; top ten reasons to attend an AASL (American Association of School Librarians) national conference; why should you bother to fill out a conference evaluation form; a case for conferences; and AASL tours. (LRW)

  9. ALUMINUM RECLAMATION BY ACIDIC EXTRACTION OF ALUMINUM-ANODIZING SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extraction of aluminum-anodizing sludges with sulfuric acid was examined to determine the potential for production of commercial-strength solutions of aluminum sulfate, that is liquid alum. The research established kinetic and stoichiometric relationships and evaluates product qu...

  10. Aluminum for plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Knight, Mark W; King, Nicholas S; Liu, Lifei; Everitt, Henry O; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2014-01-28

    Unlike silver and gold, aluminum has material properties that enable strong plasmon resonances spanning much of the visible region of the spectrum and into the ultraviolet. This extended response, combined with its natural abundance, low cost, and amenability to manufacturing processes, makes aluminum a highly promising material for commercial applications. Fabricating Al-based nanostructures whose optical properties correspond with theoretical predictions, however, can be a challenge. In this work, the Al plasmon resonance is observed to be remarkably sensitive to the presence of oxide within the metal. For Al nanodisks, we observe that the energy of the plasmon resonance is determined by, and serves as an optical reporter of, the percentage of oxide present within the Al. This understanding paves the way toward the use of aluminum as a low-cost plasmonic material with properties and potential applications similar to those of the coinage metals. PMID:24274662

  11. New Process for Grain Refinement of Aluminum. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Joseph A. Megy

    2000-09-22

    A new method of grain refining aluminum involving in-situ formation of boride nuclei in molten aluminum just prior to casting has been developed in the subject DOE program over the last thirty months by a team consisting of JDC, Inc., Alcoa Technical Center, GRAS, Inc., Touchstone Labs, and GKS Engineering Services. The Manufacturing process to make boron trichloride for grain refining is much simpler than preparing conventional grain refiners, with attendant environmental, capital, and energy savings. The manufacture of boride grain refining nuclei using the fy-Gem process avoids clusters, salt and oxide inclusions that cause quality problems in aluminum today.

  12. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, Peter (Inventor); Lederich, Richard J. (Inventor); O'Neal, James E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Three aluminum-lithium alloys are provided for high performance aircraft structures and engines. All three alloys contain 3 wt % copper, 2 wt % lithium, 1 wt % magnesium, and 0.2 wt % zirconium. Alloy 1 has no further alloying elements. Alloy 2 has the addition of 1 wt % iron and 1 wt % nickel. Alloy 3 has the addition of 1.6 wt % chromium to the shared alloy composition of the three alloys. The balance of the three alloys, except for incidentql impurities, is aluminum. These alloys have low densities and improved strengths at temperatures up to 260.degree. C. for long periods of time.

  13. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They ... They combine with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription. ...

  14. Process for anodizing aluminum foil

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.A.; Scott, J.W.

    1984-11-06

    In an integrated process for the anodization of aluminum foil for electrolytic capacitors including the formation of a hydrous oxide layer on the foil prior to anodization and stabilization of the foil in alkaline borax baths during anodization, the foil is electrochemically anodized in an aqueous solution of boric acid and 2 to 50 ppm phosphate having a pH of 4.0 to 6.0. The anodization is interrupted for stabilization by passing the foil through a bath containing the borax solution having a pH of 8.5 to 9.5 and a temperature above 80/sup 0/ C. and then reanodizing the foil. The process is useful in anodizing foil to a voltage of up to 760 V.

  15. PROCESS FOR REMOVING ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Flox, J.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for removing aluminum jackets or cans from uranium slugs. This is accomplished by immersing the aluminum coated uranium slugs in an aqueous solution of 9 to 20% sodium hydroxide and 35 to 12% sodium nitrate to selectively dissolve the aluminum coating, the amount of solution being such as to obtain a molar ratio of sodium hydroxide to aluminum of at least

  16. Filamentation and spatiotemporal distribution of extracellular polymeric substances: role on X.fastidiosa single cell adhesion and biofilm formation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M.; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K.; Monteiro, Moniellen P.; César, Carlos L.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms can be defined as a community of microorganisms attached to a surface, living embedded in a self- produced matrix of hydrated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which comprises most of the biofilm mass. We have recently used an extensive pool of microscopy techniques (confocal fluorescence, electron and scanning probe microscopies) at the micro and nanoscales in order to create a detailed temporal observation of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation, using both wild type strain and Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-modified cells of this citrus phytopathogen. We have identified three different EPS compositions, as well as their spatial and temporal distribution from single cell to mature biofilm formation stages. In the initial adhesion stage, soluble-EPS (S-EPS) accumulates at cell polar regions and forms a surface layer which facilitates irreversible cell attachment and cell cluster formation. These small clusters are subsequently connected by filamentous cells; further S-EPS surface coverage facilitates cell attachment and form filaments, leading to a floating framework of mature biofilms. The important role of EPS in X.fastidiosa biology was further investigated by imunolabelling experiments to detect the distribution of XadA1 adhesin, which is expressed in early stages of biofilm formation and released in outer membrane vesicles. This protein is located mainly in S-EPS covered areas, as well as on the filaments, indicating a molecular pathway to the enhanced cell attachment previously observed. These results suggest that S-EPS may thus represent an important target for disease control, slow plant colonization by the bacteria, keeping the plant more productive in the field.

  17. RECLAMATION OF ALUMINUM FINISHING SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research study of the reclamation of aluminum-anodizing sludges was conducted in two sequential phases focused on enhanced dewatering of aluminum-anodizing sludges to produce commercial-strength solutions of aluminum sulfate, i.e., liquid alum. The use of high-pressure (14 to...

  18. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  19. Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, J.

    2004-07-01

    The competition between CDM and MOND to account for the `missing mass' phenomenon is asymmetric. MOND has clearly demonstrated that a characteristic acceleration a_0 underlies the data and understanding what gives rise to a_0 is an important task. The reason for MOND's success may lie in either the details of galaxy formation, or an advance in fundamental physics that reduces to MOND in a suitable limit. CDM has enjoyed great success on large scales. The theory cannot be definitively tested on small scales until galaxy formation has been understood because baryons either are, or possibly have been, dominant in all small-scale objects. MOND's predictive power is seriously undermined by its isolation from the rest of physics. In view of this isolation, the way forward is probably to treat CDM as an established theory to be used alongside relativity and electromagnetism in efforts to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies.

  20. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-25

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  1. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  2. Mechanisms of aluminum tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity limits agricultural productivity over much of the world’s arable land by inhibiting root growth and development. Affected plants have difficulty in acquiring adequate water and nutrition from their soil environments and thus have stunted shoot development and diminished yield....

  3. Maize aluminum tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is one of the most economically important food crops grown on acid soils, where aluminum (Al) toxicity greatly limits crop yields. Considerable variation for Al tolerance exists in maize, and this variation has been exploited for many years by plant breeders to enhance maize Al tolerance. Curr...

  4. Aluminum-ferricyanide battery

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, C.; Licht, S.L.

    1993-11-29

    A battery capable of producing high current densities with high charge capacity is described which includes an aluminum anode, a ferricyanide electrolyte and a second electrode capable of reducing ferricyanide electrolyte which is either dissolved in an alkaline solution or alkaline seawater solution. The performance of the battery is enhanced by high temperature and high electrolyte flow rates.

  5. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  6. Fluxless aluminum brazing

    DOEpatents

    Werner, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    This invention relates to a fluxless brazing alloy for use in forming brazed composites made from members of aluminum and its alloys. The brazing alloy consists of 35-55% Al, 10--20% Si, 25-60% Ge; 65-88% Al, 2-20% Si, 2--18% In; 65--80% Al, 15-- 25% Si, 5- 15% Y. (0fficial Gazette)

  7. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  8. REMOVAL OF ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, J.H.

    1959-08-25

    A process is presented for dissolving aluminum jackets from uranium fuel elements without attack of the uranium in a boiling nitric acid-mercuric nitrate solution containing up to 50% by weight of nitrtc acid and mercuric nitrate in a concentration of between 0.05 and 1% by weight.

  9. Building an aluminum car

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1994-05-01

    This article examines the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles to decrease weight and consequently increase fuel economy. The topics of the article include federal fuel economy goals, the development of optimum body structure and manufacturing techniques, comparison with steel, cost of materials, weight reduction and recycling of materials.

  10. Mesoporous aluminum phosphite

    SciTech Connect

    El Haskouri, Jamal; Perez-Cabero, Monica; Guillem, Carmen; Latorre, Julio; Beltran, Aurelio; Beltran, Daniel; Amoros, Pedro

    2009-08-15

    High surface area pure mesoporous aluminum-phosphorus oxide-based derivatives have been synthesized through an S{sup +}I{sup -} surfactant-assisted cooperative mechanism by means of a one-pot preparative procedure from aqueous solution and starting from aluminum atrane complexes and phosphoric and/or phosphorous acids. A soft chemical extraction procedure allows opening the pore system of the parent as-prepared materials by exchanging the surfactant without mesostructure collapse. The nature of the pore wall can be modulated from mesoporous aluminum phosphate (ALPO) up to total incorporation of phosphite entities (mesoporous aluminum phosphite), which results in a gradual evolution of the acidic properties of the final materials. While phosphate groups in ALPO act as network building blocks (bridging Al atoms), the phosphite entities become basically attached to the pore surface, what gives practically empty channels. The mesoporous nature of the final materials is confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms. The materials present regular unimodal pore systems whose order decreases as the phosphite content increases. NMR spectroscopic results confirm the incorporation of oxo-phosphorus entities to the framework of these materials and also provide us useful information concerning the mechanism through which they are formed. - Abstract: TEM image of the mesoporous aluminum phosphite showing the hexagonal disordered pore array that is generated by using surfactant micelles as template. Also a scheme emphasizing the presence of an alumina-rich core and an ALPO-like pore surface is presented.

  11. Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, David B.

    2014-07-01

    This conference on ``Multi-wavelength AGN Surveys and Studies'' has provided a detailed look at the explosive growth over the past decade, of available astronomical data from a growing list of large scale sky surveys, from radio-to-gamma rays. We are entering an era were multi-epoch (months to weeks) surveys of the entire sky, and near-instantaneous follow-up observations of variable sources, are elevating time-domain astronomy to where it is becoming a major contributor to our understanding of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). While we can marvel at the range of extragalactic phenomena dispayed by sources discovered in the original ``Markarian Survey'' - the first large-scale objective prism survey of the Northern Sky carried out at the Byurakan Astronomical Observtory almost a half-century ago - it is clear from the talks and posters presented at this meeting that the data to be be obtained over the next decade will be needed if we are to finally understand which phase of galaxy evolution each Markarian Galaxy represents.

  12. SOLDERING OF ALUMINUM BASE METALS

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1958-02-25

    This patent deals with the soldering of aluminum to metals of different types, such as copper, brass, and iron. This is accomplished by heating the aluminum metal to be soldered to slightly above 30 deg C, rubbing a small amount of metallic gallium into the part of the surface to be soldered, whereby an aluminum--gallium alloy forms on the surface, and then heating the aluminum piece to the melting point of lead--tin soft solder, applying lead--tin soft solder to this alloyed surface, and combining the aluminum with the other metal to which it is to be soldered.

  13. Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbs, Daniel M.; Ramachandran, Usha; Lu, Sang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Li Q.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2005-12-06

    Citric acid has been shown to act as an agent for increasing the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in aqueous solutions of high (>2.47 mol/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous suspensions of aluminum-containing particles. Solutions of aluminum chloride, with and without citric acid added, were titrated with NaO(aq). The presence and size of particles were determined using quasi-elastic light scattering. In solutions that contained no citric acid, particles formed instantaneously when NaOH(aq) was added but these were observed to rapidly diminish in size, disappearing at OH/Al ratios below 2.5 mol/mol. When the OH/Al ratio was raised beyond 2.5 by addingmoreNaOH(aq), suspensions of colloidally stable particles formed. Large polycations containing 13 aluminum atoms were detected by 27Al solution NMR in citric-acid-free solutions with OH/Al ratios slightly lower than 2.5. In comparison, adding citric acid to solutions of aluminum chloride inhibited the formation of large aluminum-containing polycations. The absence of the polycations prevents or retards the subsequent formation of particles, indicating that the polycations, when present, act as seeds to the formation of new particles. Particles did not form in solutions with a citric acid/aluminum ratio of 0.8 until sufficient NaOH(aq) was added to raise the OH/Al ratio to 3.29. By comparison, lower amounts of citric acid did not prevent particles from forming but did retard the rate of growth.

  14. Stx1 prophage excision in Escherichia coli strain PA20 confers strong curli and biofilm formation by restoring native mlrA.

    PubMed

    Uhlich, Gaylen A; Chen, Chin-Yi; Cottrell, Bryan J; Hofmann, Christopher S; Yan, Xianghe; Nguyen, Ly

    2016-07-01

    Prophage insertions in Escherichia coli O157:H7 mlrA contribute to the low expression of curli fimbriae and biofilm observed in many clinical isolates. Varying levels of CsgD-dependent curli/biofilm expression are restored to strains bearing prophage insertions in mlrA by mutation of regulatory genes affecting csgD Our previous study identified strong biofilm- and curli-producing variants in O157:H7 cultures that had lost the mlrA-imbedded prophage characteristic of the parent population, suggesting prophage excision as a mechanism for restoring biofilm properties. In this study, we compared genomic, transcriptomic and phenotypic properties of parent strain PA20 (stx1, stx2) and its prophage-cured variant, 20R2R (stx2), and confirmed the mechanism underlying the differences in biofilm formation. PMID:27190164

  15. Conference Scene

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, J Steven; Lantos, John; Spielberg, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for clinicians, pharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies is to better understand the relative contributions of ontogeny and genetic variation to observed variability in drug disposition and response across the pediatric age spectrum from preterm and term newborns, to infants, children and adolescents. Extrapolation of adult experience with pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine to pediatric patients of different ages and developmental stages, is fraught with many challenges. Compared with adults, pediatric pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics involves an added measure of complexity as variability owing to developmental processes, or ontogeny, is superimposed upon genetic variation. Furthermore, some pediatric diseases have no adult correlate or are more prevalent in children compared with adults, and several adverse drug reactions are unique to children, or occur at a higher frequency in children. The primary objective of this conference was to initiate an ongoing series of annual meetings on ‘Pediatric Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine’ organized by the Center for Personalized Medicine and Therapeutic Innovation and Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Medical Therapeutics at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics in Kansas City, MO, USA. The primary goals of the inaugural meeting were: to bring together clinicians, basic and translational scientists and allied healthcare practitioners, and engage in a multi- and cross-disciplinary dialog aimed at implementing personalized medicine in pediatric settings; to provide a forum for the presentation and the dissemination of research related to the application of pharmacogenomic strategies to investigations of variability of drug disposition and response in children; to explore the ethical, legal and societal implications of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine that are unique to children; and finally, to create networking opportunities for stimulating discussion

  16. Aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires: Growth methods, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainey, Mel F.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2016-12-01

    Metal-mediated vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth is a promising approach for the fabrication of silicon nanowires, although residual metal incorporation into the nanowires during growth can adversely impact electronic properties particularly when metals such as gold and copper are utilized. Aluminum, which acts as a shallow acceptor in silicon, is therefore of significant interest for the growth of p-type silicon nanowires but has presented challenges due to its propensity for oxidation. This paper summarizes the key aspects of aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth along with wire properties and device results. In the first section, aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth is discussed with a specific emphasis on methods to mitigate aluminum oxide formation. Next, the influence of growth parameters such as growth temperature, precursor partial pressure, and hydrogen partial pressure on nanowire morphology is discussed, followed by a brief review of the growth of templated and patterned arrays of nanowires. Aluminum incorporation into the nanowires is then discussed in detail, including measurements of the aluminum concentration within wires using atom probe tomography and assessment of electrical properties by four point resistance measurements. Finally, the use of aluminum-catalyzed VLS growth for device fabrication is reviewed including results on single-wire radial p-n junction solar cells and planar solar cells fabricated with nanowire/nanopyramid texturing.

  17. Aluminum electroplating on steel from a fused bromide electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhat K. Tripathy; Laura A. Wurth; Eric J. Dufek; Toni Y. Gutknecht; Natalie J. Gese; Paula Hahn; Steven M. Frank; Guy L. Frederickson; J. Stephen Herring

    2014-08-01

    A quaternary bromide bath (LiBr–KBr–CsBr–AlBr3) was used to electro-coat aluminum on steel substrates. The electrolytewas prepared by the addition of AlBr3 into the eutectic LiBr–KBr–CsBr melt. A smooth, thick, adherent and shiny aluminum coating could be obtained with 80 wt.% AlBr3 in the ternary melt. The SEM photographs of the coated surfaces suggest the formation of thick and dense coatings with good aluminum coverage. Both salt immersion and open circuit potential measurement suggested that the coatings did display a good corrosionresistance behavior. Annealing of the coated surfaces, prior to corrosion tests, suggested the robustness of the metallic aluminum coating in preventing the corrosion of the steel surfaces. Studies also indicated that the quaternary bromide plating bath can potentially provide a better aluminumcoating on both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, including complex surfaces/geometries.

  18. Aluminum permanganate battery

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, C.; Licht, S.L.

    1993-11-30

    A battery is provided comprising an aluminum anode, an aqueous solution of permanganate as the cathodic species and a second electrode capable of reducing permanganate. Such a battery system is characterized by its high energy density and low polarization losses when operating at high temperatures in a strong caustic electrolyte, i.e., high concentration of hydroxyl ions. A variety of anode and electrocatalyst materials are suitable for the efficient oxidation-reduction process and are elucidated.

  19. Aluminum microstructures on anodic alumina for aluminum wiring boards.

    PubMed

    Jha, Himendra; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Sakairi, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Hideaki

    2010-03-01

    The paper demonstrates simple methods for the fabrication of aluminum microstructures on the anodic oxide film of aluminum. The aluminum sheets were first engraved (patterned) either by laser beam or by embossing to form deep grooves on the surface. One side of the sheet was then anodized, blocking the other side by using polymer mask to form the anodic alumina. Because of the lower thickness at the bottom part of the grooves, the part was completely anodized before the complete oxidation of the other parts. Such selectively complete anodizing resulted in the patterns of metallic aluminum on anodic alumina. Using the technique, we fabricated microstructures such as line patterns and a simple wiring circuit-board-like structure on the anodic alumina. The aluminum microstructures fabricated by the techniques were embedded in anodic alumina/aluminum sheet, and this technique is promising for applications in electronic packaging and devices. PMID:20356280

  20. Degradation Mechanisms in Aluminum Matrix Composites: Alumina/Aluminum and Boron/Aluminum. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ. at Raleigh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of fabrication and long term thermal exposure (up to 10,000 hours at 590 K) on two types of aluminum matrix composites were examined. An alumina/aluminum composite, was made of continuous alpha Al2O3 fibers in a matrix of commercially pure aluminum alloyed with 2.8% lithium. The mechanical properties of the material, the effect of isothermal exposure, cyclic thermal exposure, and fatigue are presented. Two degradation mechanisms are identified. One was caused by formation of a nonstoichiometric alumina during fabrication, the other by a loss of lithium to a surface reaction during long term thermal exposure. The other composite, boron/aluminum, made of boron fibers in an aluminum matrix, was investigated using five different aluminum alloys for the matrices. The mechanical properties of each material and the effect of isothermal and cyclic thermal exposure are presented. The effects of each alloy constituent on the degradation mechanisms are discussed. The effects of several reactions between alloy constituents and boron fibers on the composite properties are discussed.

  1. Silicon diffusion in aluminum for rear passivated solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Urrejola, Elias; Peter, Kristian; Plagwitz, Heiko; Schubert, Gunnar

    2011-04-11

    We show that the lateral spread of silicon in a screen-printed aluminum layer increases by (1.50{+-}0.06) {mu}m/ deg. C, when increasing the peak firing temperature within an industrially applicable range. In this way, the maximum spread limit of diffused silicon in aluminum is predictable and does not depend on the contact area size but on the firing temperature. Therefore, the geometry of the rear side pattern can influence not only series resistance losses within the solar cell but the process of contact formation itself. In addition, too fast cooling lead to Kirkendall void formations instead of an eutectic layer.

  2. Effects of various additives on sintering of aluminum nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komeya, K.; Inoue, H.; Tsuge, A.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of thirty additives on sintering A/N were investigated. The addition of alkali earth oxides and rare earth oxides gave fully densified aluminum nitride. This is due to the formation of nitrogen-containing aluminate liquid in the system aluminum nitride-alkali earth oxides or rare earth oxides. Microstructural studies of the sintered specimens with the above two types of additives suggested that the densification was due to the liquid phase sintering. Additions of silicon compounds resulted in poor densification by the formation of highly refractory compounds such as A/N polytypes.

  3. Nanovoid Cavitation by Dislocation Emission in Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, Jaime; Knap, Jaroslaw; Ortiz, Michael

    2004-10-01

    This Letter is concerned with the determination of the transition paths attendant to nanovoid growth in aluminum under hydrostatic tension. The analysis is, therefore, based on energy minimization at 0K. Aluminum is modeled by the Ercolessi-Adams embedded-atom method, and spurious boundary artifacts are mitigated by the use of the quasicontinuum method. Our analysis reveals several stages of pressure buildup separated by yield points. The first yield point corresponds to the formation of highly stable tetrahedral dislocation junctions around the surfaces of the void. The second yield point is caused by the dissolution of the tetrahedral structures and the emission of conventional 1/2<110>{111} and anomalous 1/2<110>{001} dislocation loops.

  4. Avoidance of aluminum by rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Exley, C.

    2000-04-01

    Aluminum is the principal toxicant in fish in acid waters. The ability to avoid Al, particularly at low concentrations, would confer a considerable ecological advantage, but previous research into avoidance of Al has produced mixed results. The author used a cylindrical perspex tank, 150 cm in length, to study avoidance of Al by rainbow trout fry. The fish avoided Al, and their response was dependent on pH. Avoidance that was demonstrated at pHs of 5.00, 5.50, 5.50, and 5.75 was abolished at a pH of 6.00. Fry avoided very low Al concentrations being sensitive to [Al] > 1.00 {micro}mol L{sup {minus}1} at a pH of 5.00. This unequivocal demonstration of avoidance by rainbow trout fry of Al may have important implications for the ecology of indigenous fish populations in surface waters impacted by acidic deposition.

  5. Aluminum Carbothermic Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Marshall J.

    2005-03-31

    This report documents the non-proprietary research and development conducted on the Aluminum Carbothermic Technology (ACT) project from contract inception on July 01, 2000 to termination on December 31, 2004. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new carbothermic process for producing commercial grade aluminum, designated as the ''Advanced Reactor Process'' (ARP). The scope of the program ranged from fundamental research through small scale laboratory experiments (65 kW power input) to larger scale test modules at up to 1600 kW power input. The tasks included work on four components of the process, Stages 1 and 2 of the reactor, vapor recovery and metal alloy decarbonization; development of computer models; and economic analyses of capital and operating costs. Justification for developing a new, carbothermic route to aluminum production is defined by the potential benefits in reduced energy, lower costs and more favorable environmental characteristics than the conventional Hall-Heroult process presently used by the industry. The estimated metrics for these advantages include energy rates at approximately 10 kWh/kg Al (versus over 13 kWh/kg Al for Hall-Heroult), capital costs as low as $1250 per MTY (versus 4,000 per MTY for Hall-Heroult), operating cost reductions of over 10%, and up to 37% reduction in CO2 emissions for fossil-fuel power plants. Realization of these benefits would be critical to sustaining the US aluminum industries position as a global leader in primary aluminum production. One very attractive incentive for ARP is its perceived ability to cost effectively produce metal over a range of smelter sizes, not feasible for Hall-Heroult plants which must be large, 240,000 TPY or more, to be economical. Lower capacity stand alone carbothermic smelters could be utilized to supply molten metal at fabrication facilities similar to the mini-mill concept employed by the steel industry. Major

  6. Conference summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Martin

    To do justice to so many interesting contributions, both in the form of papers presented as talks and posters represented only by titles in these proceedings, will be difficult. Rather than attempting to list contributions from the individual areas in a representative fashion, I will attempt to see how a few of the striking contributions fit into, or alter, our views on major questions we have been trying to answer during the past few decades — questions dealing with the structure and evolution of the universe, the formation of galaxies and stars, and the origins of the solar system, in short everything from Comets to Cosmology — though I will reverse the order, starting here with cosmological questions and ending up with comets, or rather with zodiacal dust.

  7. Fifth international fungus spore conference

    SciTech Connect

    Timberlake, W.E.

    1993-04-01

    This folio contains the proceedings of the Fifth International Fungal Spore Conference held August 17-21, 1991 at the Unicoi State Park at Helen, Georgia. The volume contains abstracts of each oral presentation as well as a collection of abstracts describing the poster sessions. Presentations were organized around the themes (1) Induction of Sporulation, (2) Nuclear Division, (3) Spore Formation, (4) Spore Release and Dispersal, and (4) Spore Germination.

  8. Extracting aluminum from dross tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, A. M.

    2002-11-01

    Aluminum dross tailings, an industrial waste, from the Egyptian Aluminium Company (Egyptalum) was used to produce two types of alums: aluminum-sulfate alum [itAl2(SO4)3.12H2O] and ammonium-aluminum alum [ (NH 4)2SO4AL2(SO4)3.24H2O]. This was carried out in two processes. The first process is leaching the impurities using diluted H2SO4 with different solid/liquid ratios at different temperatures to dissolve the impurities present in the starting material in the form of solute sulfates. The second process is the extraction of aluminum (as aluminum sulfate) from the purifi ed aluminum dross tailings thus produced. The effects of temperature, time of reaction, and acid concentration on leaching and extraction processes were studied. The product alums were analyzed using x-ray diffraction and thermal analysis techniques.

  9. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  10. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  11. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  12. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  13. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  14. Quasicrystalline particulate reinforced aluminum composite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.E.; Biner, S.B.; Sordelet, D.J.; Unal, O.

    1997-07-01

    Particulate reinforced aluminum and aluminum alloy composites are rapidly emerging as new commercial materials for aerospace, automotive, electronic packaging and other high performance applications. However, their low processing ductility and difficulty in recyclability have been the key concern. In this study, two composite systems having the same aluminum alloy matrix, one reinforced with quasicrystals and the other reinforced with the conventional SiC reinforcements were produced with identical processing routes. Their processing characteristics and tensile mechanical properties were compared.

  15. Cathodic phenomena in aluminum electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouteillon, J.; Poignet, J. C.; Rameau, J. J.

    1993-02-01

    Although aluminum is one of the world's highest production-volume primary metals, it is particularly costly to produce for a variety of factors, not the least of which are the expenses associated with electrolytic reduction. Based on the scale of global aluminum processing, even minor improvements in the electrowinning technology can result in significant savings of resources. Thus, from this perspective, the following reviews recent studies of cathodic phenomena in aluminum electrowinning.

  16. Effects of organic solutes on chemical reactions of aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lind, Carol J.; Hem, John David

    1975-01-01

    Concentrations of organic matter in the general range of 1-10 milligrams per litre organic carbon are common in natural water, and many naturally occurrin7 organic compounds form aluminum complexes. The aluminum concentrations in near-neutral pH solutions may be 10-100 times higher than the values predicted from solubility data if formation of such organic complexes is ignored. The processes of polymerization of aluminum hydroxide and precipitation of gibbsite are inhibited by the presence of the organic flavone compound quercetin in concentrations as low as 10 x -5.3 mole per litre. Quercetin forms a complex, with a probable molar ratio of 1:2 aluminum to quercetin, that has a formation constant (f12) of about 10 12. A complex with a higher aluminum-quercetin ratio also was observed, but this material tends to evolve into a compound of low solubility that removes aluminum from solution. In the presence of both dissolved aluminum and aqueous silica, low concentrations of quercetin improved the yield of crystallized kaolinite and halloysite. Small amounts of well-shaped kaolinite and halloysite crystals were identified by electron microscopy in solutions with pH's in the range 6.5-8.5 after 155 days aging in one experimer t and 481 days aging in a repeated experiment. The bulk of the precipitated material was amorphous to X-rays, and crystalline material was too small a proportion of the total to give identifiable X-ray diffraction peaks. The precipitates had aluminum-silicon ratios near 1, and their solubility corresponded to that found by Hem, Roberson, Lind, and Polzer (1973) for similar aluminosilicate precipitated in the absence of organic solutes. The improved yield of crystalline material obtained in the presence of quercetin probably is the result of the influence of the organic compound on the aluminum hydroxide polymerization process. Natural water containing color imparted by organic material tends to be higher in aluminum than would be predicted by p

  17. Laser welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Sabo, K.R.; Sanders, P.G.; Spawr, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recent interest in reducing the weight of automobiles to increase fuel mileage has focused attention on the use of aluminum and associated joining technologies. Laser beam welding is one of the more promising methods for high speed welding of aluminum. Consequently, substantial effort has been expended in attempting to develop a robust laser beam welding process. Early results have not been very consistent in the process requirements but more definitive data has been produced recently. This paper reviews the process parameters needed to obtain consistent laser welds on 5,000 series aluminum alloys and discusses the research necessary to make laser processing of aluminum a reality for automotive applications.

  18. Mineral of the month: aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plunkert, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum is the second most abundant metallic element in Earth’s crust after silicon. Even so, it is a comparatively new industrial metal that has been produced in commercial quantities for little more than 100 years. Aluminum is lightweight, ductile, malleable and corrosion resistant, and is a good conductor of heat and electricity. Weighing about one-third as much as steel or copper per unit of volume, aluminum is used more than any other metal except iron. Aluminum can be fabricated into desired forms and shapes by every major metalworking technique to add to its versatility.

  19. SIAM conference on applications of dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A conference (Oct.15--19, 1992, Snowbird, Utah; sponsored by SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) Activity Group on Dynamical Systems) was held that highlighted recent developments in applied dynamical systems. The main lectures and minisymposia covered theory about chaotic motion, applications in high energy physics and heart fibrillations, turbulent motion, Henon map and attractor, integrable problems in classical physics, pattern formation in chemical reactions, etc. The conference fostered an exchange between mathematicians working on theoretical issues of modern dynamical systems and applied scientists. This two-part document contains abstracts, conference program, and an author index.

  20. Plant adaptation to acid soils: the molecular basis for crop aluminum resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity on acid soils is a significant limitation to crop production worldwide, as approximately 50% of the world’s potentially arable soils are acidic. Because acid soils are such an important constraint to agriculture, understanding the mechanisms and genes conferring resistance to ...

  1. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  2. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  3. Critical properties of aluminum.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Divesh; Jasper, Ahren W; Schultz, Nathan E; Siepmann, J Ilja; Truhlar, Donald G

    2006-04-01

    Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo calculations are performed using a validated embedded-atom potential to obtain the vapor-liquid coexistence curve for elemental aluminum in good agreement with available experimental data up to the boiling point. These calculations are then extended to make a reliable prediction of the critical temperature, pressure, and density of Al, which have previously been known only with very large uncertainties. This demonstrates the ability of modern simulations to predict fundamental physical properties that are extremely difficult to measure directly. PMID:16568986

  4. Effect of grain orientation on aluminum relocation at incipient melt conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yilmaz, Nadir; Vigil, Francisco M.; Vigil, Miquela S.; Branam, Robert; Tolendino, Greg; Gill, Walt; Burl Donaldson, A.

    2015-09-01

    Aluminum is commonly used for structural applications in the aerospace industry because of its high strength in relation to its weight. It is necessary to understand the mechanical response of aluminum structures at elevated temperatures such as those experienced in a fire. Additionally, aluminum alloys exhibit many complicated behaviors that require further research and understanding, such as aluminum combustion, oxide skin formation and creep behavior. This paper discusses the effect of grain orientation on aluminum deformation subjected to heating at incipient melt conditions. Experiments were conducted by applying a vertical compressive force to aluminum alloy 7075 block test specimens. Furthermore,more » compression testing was done on test specimens with the applied load on the long transverse and short transverse orientations. Our results showed that the grain orientation significantly influences aluminum’s strength and mode of failure.« less

  5. Effect of grain orientation on aluminum relocation at incipient melt conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Nadir; Vigil, Francisco M.; Vigil, Miquela S.; Branam, Robert; Tolendino, Greg; Gill, Walt; Burl Donaldson, A.

    2015-09-01

    Aluminum is commonly used for structural applications in the aerospace industry because of its high strength in relation to its weight. It is necessary to understand the mechanical response of aluminum structures at elevated temperatures such as those experienced in a fire. Additionally, aluminum alloys exhibit many complicated behaviors that require further research and understanding, such as aluminum combustion, oxide skin formation and creep behavior. This paper discusses the effect of grain orientation on aluminum deformation subjected to heating at incipient melt conditions. Experiments were conducted by applying a vertical compressive force to aluminum alloy 7075 block test specimens. Furthermore, compression testing was done on test specimens with the applied load on the long transverse and short transverse orientations. Our results showed that the grain orientation significantly influences aluminum’s strength and mode of failure.

  6. Bronchopulmonary Cellular Response to Aluminum and Zirconium Salts

    PubMed Central

    Stankus, Richard P.; Schuyler, Mark R.; D'Amato, Robert A.; Salvaggio, John E.

    1978-01-01

    The bronchopulmonary cellular immunological response to repeated intratracheal inoculation of aluminum chlorhydrate, sodium zirconium lactate, and zirconium aluminum glycine was examined in rabbits. Results of a dose-response experiment using 0.1, 1.0, and 10.0-mg intratracheal inoculations of each metallic salt demonstrated significant bronchopulmonary histopathology in the 10.0-mg dose-response groups only. Acute lesions were histologically characterized by an inflammatory response centered around respiratory bronchioles. Although epithelioid cell formation was evident in 10.0 mg of aluminum salt (aluminum chlorhydrate and zirconium aluminum glycine) -injected animals, no well-defined granulomas characterized by an orderly arrangement of epithelioid cells, lymphocytes, and giant cells were evident in any of the experimental groups employed. All three metallic salts induced “activated” bronchopulmonary macrophages as determined by an in vitro phagocytic assay. This activation was likely nonimmunological since no measurable differences were observed in metallic salt-induced delayed skin reactivity or migration inhibition factor production between inoculated and uninoculated rabbits. The above observations suggest that aluminum and zirconium salts administered in comparatively high dosage via the respiratory tract route can induce respiratory bronchiolitis and activation of alveolar macrophages in the absence of demonstrable delayed hypersensitivity. Images PMID:352963

  7. Aluminum citrate prevents renal injury from calcium oxalate crystal deposition.

    PubMed

    Besenhofer, Lauren M; Cain, Marie C; Dunning, Cody; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2012-12-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are responsible for the kidney injury associated with exposure to ethylene glycol or severe hyperoxaluria. Current treatment strategies target the formation of calcium oxalate but not its interaction with kidney tissue. Because aluminum citrate blocks calcium oxalate binding and toxicity in human kidney cells, it may provide a different therapeutic approach to calcium oxalate-induced injury. Here, we tested the effects of aluminum citrate and sodium citrate in a Wistar rat model of acute high-dose ethylene glycol exposure. Aluminum citrate, but not sodium citrate, attenuated increases in urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the ratio of kidney to body weight in ethylene glycol-treated rats. Compared with ethylene glycol alone, the addition of aluminum citrate significantly increased the urinary excretion of both crystalline calcium and crystalline oxalate and decreased the deposition of crystals in renal tissue. In vitro, aluminum citrate interacted directly with oxalate crystals to inhibit their uptake by proximal tubule cells. These results suggest that treating with aluminum citrate attenuates renal injury in rats with severe ethylene glycol toxicity, apparently by inhibiting calcium oxalate's interaction with, and retention by, the kidney epithelium. PMID:23138489

  8. Aluminum Citrate Prevents Renal Injury from Calcium Oxalate Crystal Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Besenhofer, Lauren M.; Cain, Marie C.; Dunning, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are responsible for the kidney injury associated with exposure to ethylene glycol or severe hyperoxaluria. Current treatment strategies target the formation of calcium oxalate but not its interaction with kidney tissue. Because aluminum citrate blocks calcium oxalate binding and toxicity in human kidney cells, it may provide a different therapeutic approach to calcium oxalate-induced injury. Here, we tested the effects of aluminum citrate and sodium citrate in a Wistar rat model of acute high-dose ethylene glycol exposure. Aluminum citrate, but not sodium citrate, attenuated increases in urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the ratio of kidney to body weight in ethylene glycol–treated rats. Compared with ethylene glycol alone, the addition of aluminum citrate significantly increased the urinary excretion of both crystalline calcium and crystalline oxalate and decreased the deposition of crystals in renal tissue. In vitro, aluminum citrate interacted directly with oxalate crystals to inhibit their uptake by proximal tubule cells. These results suggest that treating with aluminum citrate attenuates renal injury in rats with severe ethylene glycol toxicity, apparently by inhibiting calcium oxalate’s interaction with, and retention by, the kidney epithelium. PMID:23138489

  9. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  10. Characterization of phosphate films on aluminum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, B.; Ramamurthy, S.; McIntyre, N.S.

    1997-08-01

    A thin layer of phosphate conversion coating was formed on pure aluminum in a commercial zinc-manganese phosphating bath. A number of surface analytical techniques were used to characterize the phosphate thin films formed after immersion times ranging from 30 s to 10 min. The coating contained mainly a crystalline structure with dispersed micrometer-scale cavities. The major constituents of the phosphate film were zinc, phosphorus, and oxygen; a small amount of manganese was also detected. Based on these results, a three-stage mechanism was proposed for the formation and the growth of phosphate conversion coatings on aluminum. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to evaluate the corrosion performance of phosphated and uncoated aluminum samples in 0.50 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.10 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions. Both types of samples exhibited a passive state in the neutral solution and general corrosion behavior in the acid solution.

  11. The General Conference Mennonites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    General Conference Mennonites and Old Order Amish are compared and contrasted in the areas of physical appearance, religious beliefs, formal education, methods of farming, and home settings. General Conference Mennonites and Amish differ in physical appearance and especially in dress. The General Conference Mennonite men and women dress the same…

  12. Parent Conferences. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents six workshop sessions on parent conferences: (1) "Parents' Perspectives on Conferencing" (R. Duffy); (2) "Three Way Conferences" (G. Zeller); (3) "Conferencing with Parents of Infants" (K. Albrecht); (4) "Conferencing with Parents of School-Agers" (L. G. Miller); (5) "Cross Cultural Conferences" (J. Gonzalez-Mena); and (6) "Working with…

  13. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation--which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports--the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs. PMID:26184330

  14. The Benefits of Aluminum Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyal, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses benefits of aluminum windows for college construction and renovation projects, including that aluminum is the most successfully recycled material, that it meets architectural glass deflection standards, that it has positive thermal energy performance, and that it is a preferred exterior surface. (EV)

  15. Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide - 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    The 1990 U.S. Bureau of Mines publication, Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide, has been updated and is now available. The 1998 USGS edition of Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide is published in two parts. Part I—Detail contains information on individual primary smelter capacity, location, ownership, sources of energy, and other miscellaneous information. Part II—Summary summarizes the capacity data by country

  16. Lost-Soap Aluminum Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Lost-wax casting in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum casting process is described. (Author/KC)

  17. Boron carbide-aluminum cermets

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, D.C.

    1986-09-03

    We have developed boron carbide-aluminum cermets by means of thermodynamic, kinetic, and processing studies. Our research indicates that boron carbide-aluminum cermets offer ''tailorable'' microstructures with designable properties through process control. This new class of cermets has the potential to become a very important material with wide industrial applications.

  18. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation—which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports—the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs. PMID:26184330

  19. Aluminum Nanowire Arrays via Directed Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesbitt, Nathan T.; Merlo, Juan M.; Rose, Aaron H.; Calm, Yitzi M.; D'Imperio, Luke A.; Courtney, Dave T.; Shepard, Steve; Kempa, Krzysztof; Burns, Michael J.; Naughton, Michael J.

    Vertically-oriented metal nanowire arrays are rare. Here, freestanding, vertically-oriented, and lithographically-ordered Al nanowire arrays have been fabricated via directed assembly. The fabrication technique is a variation on the preparation of anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, using nanoimprint lithography (NIL) to direct the formation of pores on an Al film and produce Al nanowires. Near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and conventional optical microscope data of a single nanowire lying on glass and illuminated by a laser spot show evidence of surface plasmons propagating along the nanowire. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. (DGE-1258923).

  20. Channeling of aluminum in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.G.; Hopkins, C.G.

    1985-05-15

    A systematic study of channeling of aluminum in the silicon crystal is reported. Depth distributions measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry are reported for 40-, 75-, and 150-keV aluminum channeled in the <100> and <110> directions of silicon. The profile dependence on alignment angle is shown for 150-keV aluminum in the <110> of silicon. Aluminum has low electronic stopping in silicon and corresponding deep channeled profiles are observed for aligned implants and deep channeling tails are observed on random implants. The maximum channeling range for 150-keV Al in <100> silicon is about 2.8 ..mu..m and is about 6.4 ..mu..m in <110> silicon. Some ions will reach the maximum channeling range even for 2/sup 0/ misalignment. Many of the deep channeling tails and ''supertails'' reported in earlier literature can be explained by the normal channeling of aluminum in silicon.

  1. Surface-catalyzed chlorine and nitrogen activation: mechanisms for the heterogeneous formation of ClNO, NO, NO2, HONO, and N2O from HNO3 and HCl on aluminum oxide particle surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubasinghege, Gayan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2012-05-31

    It is well-known that chlorine active species (e.g., Cl(2), ClONO(2), ClONO) can form from heterogeneous reactions between nitrogen oxides and hydrogen chloride on aerosol particle surfaces in the stratosphere. However, less is known about these reactions in the troposphere. In this study, a potential new heterogeneous pathway involving reaction of gaseous HCl and HNO(3) on aluminum oxide particle surfaces, a proxy for mineral dust in the troposphere, is proposed. We combine transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate changes in the composition of both gas-phase and surface-bound species during the reaction under different environmental conditions of relative humidity and simulated solar radiation. Exposure of surface nitrate-coated aluminum oxide particles, from prereaction with nitric acid, to gaseous HCl yields several gas-phase products, including ClNO, NO(2), and HNO(3), under dry (RH < 1%) conditions. Under humid more conditions (RH > 20%), NO and N(2)O are the only gas products observed. The experimental data suggest that, in the presence of adsorbed water, ClNO is hydrolyzed on the particle surface to yield NO and NO(2), potentially via a HONO intermediate. NO(2) undergoes further hydrolysis via a surface-mediated process, resulting in N(2)O as an additional nitrogen-containing product. In the presence of broad-band irradiation (λ > 300 nm) gas-phase products can undergo photochemistry, e.g., ClNO photodissociates to NO and chlorine atoms. The gas-phase product distribution also depends on particle mineralogy (Al(2)O(3) vs CaCO(3)) and the presence of other coadsorbed gases (e.g., NH(3)). These newly identified reaction pathways discussed here involve continuous production of active ozone-depleting chlorine and nitrogen species from stable sinks such as gas-phase HCl and HNO(3) as a result of heterogeneous surface reactions. Given that aluminosilicates represent a major fraction of mineral dust

  2. Aluminum Induces Rigor within the Actin Network of Soybean Cells.

    PubMed Central

    Grabski, S.; Schindler, M.

    1995-01-01

    Aluminum is toxic to both plants and animals. Root growth and pollen-tube extension are inhibited after aluminum stress in acidic environments. Incubation of cultured neurons with aluminum results in the formation of neurofibrillar tangles reminiscent of the neural pathology observed in Alzheimer's disease. The present communication demonstrates that aluminum induces a rapid and dramatic increase in the rigidity of the actin network in soybean (Glycine max) root cells. This rigidity can be prevented by either co-incubation with sodium fluoride or magnesium, or pretreatment with cytochalasin D. It is proposed that the growth-inhibitory activity and cytotoxicity of aluminum in plants may be a consequence of a global rigor that is induced within the actin network. This rigor may result from the formation of nonhydrolyzable [Al3+-ADP] or [Al3+-ATP] complexes whose binding to actin/myosin can modify contraction. Additionally, Al3+-mediated interference with the normal kinetics of F-actin filament assembly/disassembly could precipitate subsequent disorganization of associated cytoskeletal structures and promote altered expression of cytoskeletal proteins. PMID:12228515

  3. Mutations in the fusion protein cleavage site of avian paramyxovirus serotype 4 confer increased replication and syncytium formation in vitro but not increased replication and pathogenicity in chickens and ducks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Xiao, Sa; Shive, Heather; Collins, Peter L; Samal, Siba K

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the F protein cleavage site in the replication and pathogenicity of avian paramyxoviruses (APMVs), we constructed a reverse genetics system for recovery of infectious recombinant APMV-4 from cloned cDNA. The recovered recombinant APMV-4 resembled the biological virus in growth characteristics in vitro and in pathogenicity in vivo. The F cleavage site sequence of APMV-4 (DIQPR↓F) contains a single basic amino acid, at the -1 position. Six mutant APMV-4 viruses were recovered in which the F protein cleavage site was mutated to contain increased numbers of basic amino acids or to mimic the naturally occurring cleavage sites of several paramyxoviruses, including neurovirulent and avirulent strains of NDV. The presence of a glutamine residue at the -3 position was found to be important for mutant virus recovery. In addition, cleavage sites containing the furin protease motif conferred increased replication and syncytium formation in vitro. However, analysis of viral pathogenicity in 9-day-old embryonated chicken eggs, 1-day-old and 2-week-old chickens, and 3-week-old ducks showed that none the F protein cleavage site mutations altered the replication, tropism, and pathogenicity of APMV-4, and no significant differences were observed among the parental and mutant APMV-4 viruses in vivo. Although parental and mutant viruses replicated somewhat better in ducks than in chickens, they all were highly restricted and avirulent in both species. These results suggested that the cleavage site sequence of the F protein is not a limiting determinant of APMV-4 pathogenicity in chickens and ducks. PMID:23341874

  4. Mutations in the Fusion Protein Cleavage Site of Avian Paramyxovirus Serotype 4 Confer Increased Replication and Syncytium Formation In Vitro but Not Increased Replication and Pathogenicity in Chickens and Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Xiao, Sa; Shive, Heather; Collins, Peter L.; Samal, Siba K.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the F protein cleavage site in the replication and pathogenicity of avian paramyxoviruses (APMVs), we constructed a reverse genetics system for recovery of infectious recombinant APMV-4 from cloned cDNA. The recovered recombinant APMV-4 resembled the biological virus in growth characteristics in vitro and in pathogenicity in vivo. The F cleavage site sequence of APMV-4 (DIQPR↓F) contains a single basic amino acid, at the -1 position. Six mutant APMV-4 viruses were recovered in which the F protein cleavage site was mutated to contain increased numbers of basic amino acids or to mimic the naturally occurring cleavage sites of several paramyxoviruses, including neurovirulent and avirulent strains of NDV. The presence of a glutamine residue at the -3 position was found to be important for mutant virus recovery. In addition, cleavage sites containing the furin protease motif conferred increased replication and syncytium formation in vitro. However, analysis of viral pathogenicity in 9-day-old embryonated chicken eggs, 1-day-old and 2-week-old chickens, and 3-week-old ducks showed that none the F protein cleavage site mutations altered the replication, tropism, and pathogenicity of APMV-4, and no significant differences were observed among the parental and mutant APMV-4 viruses in vivo. Although parental and mutant viruses replicated somewhat better in ducks than in chickens, they all were highly restricted and avirulent in both species. These results suggested that the cleavage site sequence of the F protein is not a limiting determinant of APMV-4 pathogenicity in chickens and ducks. PMID:23341874

  5. Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres formed through a self-templating solid-gas interface reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Jie Song Xubo; Zhang Yaohua; Li Yan; Li Xingguo; Pu Yikang

    2007-01-15

    Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres were synthesized by simply heating aluminum nanoparticles in ammonia at 1000 deg. C. The as-synthesized sphere shells are polycrystalline with cavity diameters ranging from 15 to 100 nm and shell thickness from 5 to 15 nm. The formation mechanism can be explained by the nanoscale Kirkendall effect, which results from the difference in diffusion rates between aluminum and nitrogen. The Al nanoparticles served as both reactant and templates for the hollow sphere formation. The effects of precursor particle size and temperature were also investigated in terms of product morphology. Room temperature cathode luminescence spectrum of the nanosized hollow spheres showed a broad emission band centered at 415 nm, which is originated from oxygen related luminescence centers. The hollow structure survived a 4-h heat treatment at 1200 deg. C, exhibiting excellent thermal stability. - Graphical abstract: Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres were synthesized by nitridation of aluminum nanoparticles at 1000 deg. C using ammonia.

  6. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P.; Kandalam, Anil K. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Kiran, Boggavarapu E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu

    2014-02-07

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium–aluminum cluster anions, Na{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

  7. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P.; Kandalam, Anil K.; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-02-01

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium-aluminum cluster anions, NamAln-, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

  8. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W; Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P; Kandalam, Anil K; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Bowen, Kit H

    2014-02-01

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium-aluminum cluster anions, Na(m)Al(n)(-), were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams. PMID:24511934

  9. Dry machinability of aluminum alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Shareef, I.; Natarajan, M.; Ajayi, O. O.; Energy Technology; Department of IMET

    2005-01-01

    Adverse effects of the use of cutting fluids and environmental concerns with regard to cutting fluid disposability is compelling industry to adopt Dry or near Dry Machining, with the aim of eliminating or significantly reducing the use of metal working fluids. Pending EPA regulations on metal cutting, dry machining is becoming a hot topic of research and investigation both in industry and federal research labs. Although the need for dry machining may be apparent, most of the manufacturers still consider dry machining to be impractical and even if possible, very expensive. This perception is mainly due to lack of appropriate cutting tools that can withstand intense heat and Built-up-Edge (BUE) formation during dry machining. The challenge of heat dissipation without coolant requires a completely different approach to tooling. Special tooling utilizing high-performance multi-layer, multi-component, heat resisting, low friction coatings could be a plausible answer to the challenge of dry machining. In pursuit of this goal Argonne National Labs has introduced Nano-crystalline near frictionless carbon (NFC) diamond like coatings (DLC), while industrial efforts have led to the introduction of composite coatings such as titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN), tungsten carbide/carbon (WC/C) and others. Although, these coatings are considered to be very promising, they have not been tested either from tribological or from dry machining applications point of view. As such a research program in partnership with federal labs and industrial sponsors has started with the goal of exploring the feasibility of dry machining using the newly developed coatings such as Near Frictionless Carbon Coatings (NFC), Titanium Aluminum Nitride (TiAlN), and multi-layer multicomponent nano coatings such as TiAlCrYN and TiAlN/YN. Although various coatings are under investigation as part of the overall dry machinability program, this extended abstract deals with a systematic investigation of dry

  10. Histomorphometric evidence of deleterious effect of aluminum on osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    de Vernejoul, M C; Belenguer, R; Halkidou, H; Buisine, A; Bielakoff, J; Miravet, L

    1985-01-01

    Bone histomorphometry was performed in 26 hemodialyzed patients to study the relation between the dynamic parameters of bone formation and aluminum deposition. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether bone formation rate at tissue level (Svft) was above or below normal: 0.089 mu 3/mu 2 per day. The 12 patients who constituted group II, defined by a Svft less than 0.089 mu 3/mu 2 per day, had markedly decreased extent of double-labeled surfaces (m = 1.3 +/- 6.5%), and these were absent in 8 of 12 patients. Osteomalacia, defined by decreased formation with increased mean osteoid thickness (greater than 15 micron), was present in only 3 of 12 patients in group II. The 14 patients who constituted group I, defined by a Svft greater than 0.089 mu 3/mu 2 per day, had both increased total labeled surfaces and mineralization rate. Osteomalacia was present in none of the group I patients. In trabecular bone, group II patients had increased stainable aluminum deposition, compared to group I patients, whether estimated as total stainable aluminum (2.16 +/- 1.34 vs 0.17 +/- 0.28 mm/mm2) or stainable percent of trabecular surfaces (42 +/- 19 vs 4 +/- 5%). This last parameter was inversely related to osteoblastic surfaces (r = -0.49, n = 26, P less than 0.01) and total labeled surfaces (r = -0.72, n = 26, P less than 0.01). Therefore, massive aluminum deposition was not invariably associated with impaired mineralization but with decreased formation due to decreased extent of active formation surfaces. In the group I patients, moderate aluminum deposition was not associated with the mineralization arrest observed in these patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2581595

  11. In-situ processing of aluminum nitride particle reinforced aluminum alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qingjun

    Discontinuously reinforced aluminum alloy composites (DRACs) have potential applications in automotive, electronic packaging, and recreation industries. Conventional processing of DRACs is by incorporation of ceramic particles/whiskers/fibers into matrix alloys. Because of the high cost of ceramic particles, DRACs are expensive. The goal of this work was to develop a low-cost route of AlN-Al DRACs processing through bubbling and reacting nitrogen and ammonia gases with aluminum alloy melt in the temperature range of 1373--1523 K. Thermodynamic analysis of AlN-Al alloy system was performed based on Gibbs energy minimization theory. AlN is stable in aluminum, Al-Mg, Al-Si, Al-Zn, and Al-Li alloys over the whole temperature range for application and processing of DRACs. Experiments were carried out to form AlN by bubbling nitrogen and ammonia gases through aluminum, Al-Mg, and Al-Si alloy melts. Products were characterized with XRD, SEM, and EDX. The results showed that in-situ processing of AlN reinforced DRACs is technically feasible. Significant AlN was synthesized by bubbling deoxidized nitrogen and ammonia gases. When nitrogen gas was used as the nitrogen precursor, the AlN particles formed in-situ are small in size, (<10 mum). The formation of AlN is strongly affected by the trace oxygen impurities in the nitrogen gas. The deleterious effect of oxygen impurities is due to their inhibition to the chemisorption of nitrogen gas at the interface. In comparison with nitrogen gas, bubbling ammonia led to formation of AlN particles in smaller size (about 2 mum or less) at a significantly higher rate. Ammonia is not stable and dissociated into nitrogen and hydrogen at reaction temperatures. The hydrogen functions as oxygen-getter at the interface and benefits chemisorption of nitrogen, thereby promoting the formation of AlN. The overall process of AlN formation was modeled using two-film model. For nitrogen bubbling gas, the whole process is controlled by chemisorption

  12. Aluminum plasmonic photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qi; Wang, Chenxi; Huang, Hao; Li, Wan; Du, Deyang; Han, Di; Qiu, Teng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of photocatalytic processes is dictated largely by plasmonic materials with the capability to enhance light absorption as well as the energy conversion efficiency. Herein, we demonstrate how to improve the plasmonic photocatalytic properties of TiO2/Al nano-void arrays by overlapping the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes with the TiO2 band gap. The plasmonic TiO2/Al arrays exhibit superior photocatalytic activity boasting an enhancement of 7.2 folds. The underlying mechanisms concerning the radiative energy transfer and interface energy transfer processes are discussed. Both processes occur at the TiO2/Al interface and their contributions to photocatalysis are evaluated. The results are important to the optimization of aluminum plasmonic materials in photocatalytic applications. PMID:26497411

  13. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  14. Aluminum toxicity. Hematological effects.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; del Carmen Contini, M; Gonzalez, M; Millen, N; Elias, M M

    2000-01-01

    Sequential effects of intoxication with aluminum hydroxide (Al) (80 mg/Kg body weight, i.p., three times a week), were studied on rats from weaning and up to 28 weeks. The study was carried out on hematological and iron metabolism-related parameters on peripheral blood, at the end of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th months of exposure. As it was described that hematotoxic effects of Al are mainly seen together with high levels of uremia, renal function was measured at the same periods. The animals treated developed a microcytosis and was accompanied by a decrease in mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH). Significantly lower red blood cell counts (RBC million/microl) were found in rats treated during the 1st month. These values matched those obtained for control rats during the 2nd month. From the 3rd month onwards, a significant increase was observed as compared to control groups, and the following values were obtained by the 6th month: (T) 10.0 +/- 0.3 versus (C) 8.7 +/- 0.2 (million/microl). Both MCH and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were found to be significantly lower in groups treated from the 2nd month. At the end of the 6th month the following values were found: MCH (T) 13.3 +/- 0.1 versus (C) 16.9 +/- 0.3 (pg); MCV (T) 42.1 +/- 0.7 versus (C) 51.8 +/- 0.9 (fl). Al was found responsible for lower serum iron concentration levels and in the percentage of transferrin saturation. Thus, although microcytic anemia constitutes an evidence of chronic aluminum exposure, prolonged exposure could lead to a recovery of hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration values with an increase in red cell number. Nevertheless, both microcytosis and the decrease of MCH would persist. These modifications took place without changes being observed in the renal function during the observation period. PMID:10643868

  15. Aluminum: Industry of the future

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    For over a century, the US aluminum industry has led the global market with advances in technology, product development, and marketing. Industry leaders recognize both the opportunities and challenges they face as they head into the 21st century, and that cooperative R and D is key to their success. In a unique partnership, aluminum industry leaders have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to focus on innovative technologies that will help to strengthen the competitive position of the US aluminum industry and, at the same time, further important national goals. This industry-led partnership, the Aluminum Industry of the Future, promotes technologies that optimize the use of energy and materials in operations and reduce wastes and energy-related emissions. Led by The Aluminum Association, industry leaders began by developing a unified vision of future market, business, energy, and environmental goals. Their vision document, Partnerships for the Future, articulates a compelling vision for the next 20 years: to maintain and grow the aluminum industry through the manufacture and sale of competitively priced, socially desirable, and ecologically sustainable products. Continued global leadership in materials markets will require the combined resources of industry, universities, and government laboratories. By developing a unified vision, the aluminum industry has provided a framework for the next step in the Industries of the Future process, the development of a technology roadmap designed to facilitate cooperative R and D.

  16. Simulating weld-fusion boundary microstructures in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrivas, Anastasios D.; Lippold, John C.

    2004-02-01

    A fundamental study of weld-fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys was conducted in an effort to understand equiaxed grain zone formation and fusion boundary nucleation and growth phenomena. In addition to commercial aluminum alloys, experimental Mg-bearing alloys with Zr and Sc additions were studied along with the widely used Cu- and Licontaining alloy 2195-T8. This article describes work conducted to clarify the interrelation among composition, base metal substrate, and temperature as they relate to nucleation and growth phenomena at the fusion boundary.

  17. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples. PMID:18669265

  18. Plasma Source Ion Implantation of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Kevin Carl

    Three plasma source ion implantation (PSII) schemes applied to three aluminum systems have been studied. Pure aluminum, and aluminum alloys 7075 (Al-Cu-Mg-Zn) and A390 (Al-17Si-Cu-Fe) were (1) argon ion sputter-cleaned and nitrogen-implanted, (2) nitrogen-implanted without sputter -cleaning, and (3) argon-implanted. Nitrogen implantation was performed with the goal of modifying the surface properties by transformation of the surface to aluminum-nitride. Argon implantation was performed with the goal of modifying the surface properties by inducing radiation damage. All implantation schemes were accomplished using a glow discharge mode of the PSII process. Implanted surfaces were investigated using Auger depth profiling and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The profiles indicated a stoichiometric layer, ~ 0.15 μm thick, of AlN on the nitrogen-implanted samples. Electron microscopy confirmed the complete conversion of the aluminum surface to AlN. Knoop microhardness tests showed an increase in surface hardness, especially at low loads. The improvements were independent of prior sputter-cleaning and were approximately equal for the studied aluminum systems. Pin-on-disk wear tests were conducted using a ruby stylus and isopropanol lubrication. Argon implantation decreased the wear resistance of pure aluminum and 7075. Nitrogen implantation improved the wear rates by a factor of ~10 for pure aluminum and 7075. These improvements were independent of prior sputter-cleaning. The coefficient of friction was not significantly influenced by the implantation schemes. Due to a coarse microstructure, tribological tests of ion-implanted A390 were inconclusive. Corrosion studies performed in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution (seawater) indicated nitrogen implantation gave pure aluminum improved corrosion resistance. The improvement is due to the complete conversion of the aluminum surface to AlN. Because of pre-existing precipitates, the corrosion properties of 7075 and A390 were not

  19. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  20. Fundamental studies on electrochemical production of dendrite-free aluminum and titanium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Debabrata

    A novel dendrite-free electrorefining of aluminum scrap was investigated by using AlCl3-1-Ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquid electrolyte. Electrodeposition of aluminum were conducted on copper/aluminum cathodes at voltage of 1.5 V, temperatures (50-110°C), stirring rate (0-120 rpm), molar ratio (MR) of AlCl3:EMIC (1.25-2.0) and electrode surface modification (modified/unmodified). The study was focused to investigate the effect of process variables on deposit morphology, cathode current density and their role in production of dendrite-free aluminum. The deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Modified electrodes and stirring rate (60 rpm) eliminate dendritic deposition by reducing cathode overpotential below critical overpotential (etacrt≈ -0.54 V) for dendrite formation. Pure aluminum (>99%) was deposited with current efficiency of 84-99%. Chronoamperometry study was conducted using AlCl3-EMIC and AlCl3-1-Butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (BMIC) (MR = 1.65:1) at 90°C to understand the mechanism of aluminum electrodeposition and find out diffusion parameter of electroactive species Al2C 7-. It was concluded that electrodeposition of aluminum is a diffusion controlled instantaneous nucleation process and diffusion coefficient of Al2C7- was found to be 5.2-6.9 x 10-11 m2/s and 2.2 x 10-11 m2/s for AlCl3-EMIC and AlCl3-BMIC, respectively. A novel production route of Ti-Al alloys was investigated using AlCl 3-BMIC-TiCl4 (MR = 2:1:0.019) and AlCl3-BMIC (MR = 2:1) electrolytes at constant voltages of 1.5-3.0 V and temperatures (70-125°C). Ti sheet was used as anode and cathode. Characterization of electrodeposited Ti-Al alloys was carried out using SEM, EDS, XRD and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Effect of voltage and temperature on cathode current density, current efficiency, composition and morphology of Ti

  1. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  2. Writing Conferences and Some Applications for the EFL Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    A teacher of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) to adults in a non-English-speaking country describes use of classroom writing conferences to improve student language use and introduce writing into the communicative syllabus. The approach is based on a conference format and focuses on self-directed inquiry. Students are provided with monolingual…

  3. Guide for Planning a High School Environmental Action Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanless, Angie, Comp.; And Others

    The purpose of this manual is to provide guidelines and suggestions for people organizing an environmental action conference for high school students. The format and planning suggestions are based on the methods used for a conference organized by the Wisconsin Center for Environmental Education in 1991. The bulk of the manual provides structure…

  4. A case of recurrent renal aluminum hydroxide stone.

    PubMed

    Cakıroglu, Basri; Dogan, Akif Nuri; Tas, Tuncay; Gozukucuk, Ramazan; Uyanik, Bekir Sami

    2014-01-01

    Renal stone disease is characterized by the differences depending on the age, gender, and the geographic location of the patients. Seventy-five percent of the renal stone components is the calcium (Ca). The most common type of the stones is the Ca oxalate stones, while Ca phosphate, uric acid, struvite, and sistine stones are more rarely reported. Other than these types, triamterene, adenosine, silica, indinavir, and ephedrine stones are also reported in the literature as case reports. However, to the best of our knowledge, aluminum hydroxide stones was not reported reported before. Herein we will report a 38-years-old woman with the history of recurrent renal colic disease whose renal stone was determined as aluminum hydroxide stone in type. Aluminum mineral may be considered in the formation of kidney stones as it is widely used in the field of healthcare and cosmetics. PMID:25013740

  5. Structure and properties of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levkov, R.; Kulkov, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the study of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide with gibbsite modification is presented. The dependence of porosity and mechanical characteristics of the material sintered at different temperatures was studied. It was shown that compressive strength of alumina ceramics increases by 40 times with decreasing the pore volume from 65 to 15%. It was shown that aluminum hydroxide may be used for pore formation and pore volume in the sintered ceramics can be controlled by varying the aluminum hydroxide concentration and sintering temperature. Based on these results one can conclude that the obtained structure is very close to inorganic bone matrix and can be used as promising material for bone implants production.

  6. Heliocentric zoning of the asteroid belt by aluminum-26 heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, R. E.; McSween, H. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The dependence of asteroid spectral class (and inferred composition and thermal history) on heliocentric radius has been held to be the result of heating by a solar energy source, most likely electrical induction, during the formation of the planetary system. Such variations in thermal history can be more simply explained by the presence of different amounts of the radionuclide aluminum-26, whose decay products are observed in meteorites, in planetesimals. These differences occurred naturally as a function of the increasing amount of time required to accrete objects farther from the sun, during which aluminum-26 decayed from its initial concentration in the solar nebula. Both theory and isotopic evidence suggest that increases in accretion time across the asteroid belt are of order several half-lives of aluminum-26, which is sufficient to produce the inferred differences in thermal history.

  7. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The study of protective-coupling layers of refractory metal carbides on the graphite fibers prior to their incorporation into composites is presented. Such layers should be directly wettable by liquid aluminum and should act as diffusion barriers to prevent the formation of aluminum carbide. Chemical vapor deposition was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of ZrC on the carbon fibers of tows derived from both rayon and polyacrylonitrile. A wet chemical coating of the fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was used, and showed promise as an alternative coating method. Experiments were performed to demonstrate the ability of aluminum alloys to wet carbide surfaces. Titanium carbide, zirconium carbide and carbide-coated graphite surfaces were successfully wetted. Results indicate that initial attempts to wet surfaces of ZrC-coated carbon fibers appear successful.

  8. Solubility of Aluminum in Cryolite-Based Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielik, V.; Fellner, P.; Sýkorová, A.; Thonstad, J.

    2010-04-01

    The solubility of aluminum in NaF-AlF3-Al2O3 melts was investigated between 800 °C and 960 °C. The amount of dissolved metal in rapidly cooled samples was analyzed by the reaction with hydrochloric acid under the formation of hydrogen—the volume of which then was determined. Four thermodynamic models that describe the high-temperature equilibrium of aluminum reactions with the NaF-AlF3 melt were proposed. The best fit for the experimental data was obtained by assuming the existence of a monovalent aluminum species, AlF and {text{AlF}}_{ 2}^{ - } , as well as elemental sodium.

  9. Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-01-01

    A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

  10. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  11. Aluminum laser welding optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelíčková, Hana; Halenka, Viktor; Lapšanská, Hana; Havelková, Martina

    2007-04-01

    Pulsed Nd:YAG laser with maximal power 150 W is used in our laboratory to cut, drill and weld metal and non-metal thin materials to thickness 2 mm. Welding is realized by fixed processing head or movable fiber one with beam diameter 0,6 mm in focus plane. Welding of stainless and low-carbon steel was tested before and results are publicized and used in practice. Now the goal of our experiment was optimization of process parameters for aluminum that has other physical properties than steels, lower density, higher heat conductivity and surface reflexivity. Pure alumina specimen 0,8 mm and Al-Mg-Si alloy 0,5 mm prepared for butt welds. Problem with surface layer of Al IIO 3 was overcome by sanding and chemical cleaning with grinding paste. Critical parameters for good weld shape are specimen position from beam focus plane, pulse length and energy, pulse frequency and the motion velocity that determines percentage of pulse overlap. Argon as protective gas was used with speed 6 liters per second. Thermal distribution in material can be modeled by numerical simulation. Software tool SYSWELD makes possible to fit laser as surface heat source, define weld geometry, and make meshing of specimen to finite elements and compute heat conduction during process. Color isotherms, vectors, mechanical deformations and others results can be study in post-processing.

  12. Anodized aluminum on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of reported analyses and results obtained for anodized aluminum flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was prepared. Chromic acid, sulfuric acid, and dyed sulfuric acid anodized surfaces were exposed to the space environment. The vast majority of the anodized surface on LDEF was chromic acid anodize because of its selection as a thermal control coating for use on the spacecraft primary structure, trays, tray clamps, and space end thermal covers. Reports indicate that the chromic acid anodize was stable in solar absorptance and thermal emittance, but that contamination effects caused increases in absorptance on surfaces exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. There were some discrepancies, however, in that some chromic acid anodized specimens exhibited significant increases in absorptance. Sulfuric acid anodized surfaces also appeared stable, although very little surface area was available for evaluation. One type of dyed sulfuric acid anodize was assessed as an optical baffle coating and was observed to have improved infrared absorptance characteristics with exposure on LDEF.

  13. Reduction of Oxidative Melt Loss of Aluminum and Its Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Subodh K. Das; Shridas Ningileri

    2006-03-17

    This project led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms of dross formation. The microstructural evolution in industrial dross samples was determined. Results suggested that dross that forms in layers with structure and composition determined by the local magnesium concentration alone. This finding is supported by fundamental studies of molten metal surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data revealed that only magnesium segregates to the molten aluminum alloy surface and reacts to form a growing oxide layer. X-ray diffraction techniques that were using to investigate an oxidizing molten aluminum alloy surface confirmed for the first time that magnesium oxide is the initial crystalline phase that forms during metal oxidation. The analytical techniques developed in this project are now available to investigate other molten metal surfaces. Based on the improved understanding of dross initiation, formation and growth, technology was developed to minimize melt loss. The concept is based on covering the molten metal surface with a reusable physical barrier. Tests in a laboratory-scale reverberatory furnace confirmed the results of bench-scale tests. The main highlights of the work done include: A clear understanding of the kinetics of dross formation and the effect of different alloying elements on dross formation was obtained. It was determined that the dross evolves in similar ways regardless of the aluminum alloy being melted and the results showed that amorphous aluminum nitride forms first, followed by amorphous magnesium oxide and crystalline magnesium oxide in all alloys that contain magnesium. Evaluation of the molten aluminum alloy surface during melting and holding indicated that magnesium oxide is the first crystalline phase to form during oxidation of a clean aluminum alloy surface. Based on dross evaluation and melt tests it became clear that the major contributing factor to aluminum alloy dross was in the alloys with Mg content. Mg was

  14. Hydrogen partitioning in pure cast aluminum as determined by dynamic evolution rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Peterson, D. T.; Schmidt, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen in pure aluminum can be found in two different states. One is related to a presence in gas-filled pores, while the other state involves the formation of a solid solution between hydrogen and aluminum. The considered investigation is concerned with the distribution of the hydrogen between various states. A dynamic technique is employed to measure the evolution of hydrogen from commercially available samples of polycrystalline pure aluminum under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The obtained data are compared with the results of a statistical analysis concerning the porosity in the cast aluminum. It was found that more than 99 pct of the hydrogen in the aluminum is located in large pores. Less than 1 pct of the hydrogen is partitioned between the solid solution and the small pores.

  15. Effect of aluminum (III) on the conversion of dopachrome in the melanin synthesis pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Junwei; Bi, Shuping

    2003-06-01

    The effect of aluminum ions on the kinetics and mode of the conversion of dopachrome (DC) in acidic environment has been studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometric and cyclic voltammetric methods. The DC conversion step is an important reaction in melanogenesis. Aluminum ions catalyze greatly the decarboxylative transformation of DC to give 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) rather than 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA) at pH 5.5, which enhance the ratio of formation DHI/DHICA in melanin synthesis pathway. The kinetics of DC conversion catalyzed by aluminum ions is dependent on the concentration of DC and aluminum ions. These results provide evidence that aluminum ions could play a role in the synthesis of melanin pathway in acidic condition through catalyzing the DC decarboxylative transformation to yield DHI and influence the melanin structure and properties.

  16. From Conference to Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Robert; Tenenberg, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Revising and extending conference articles for journal publication benefits both authors and readers. The new articles are more complete, and benefit from peer review, feedback from conference presentation, and greater editorial consistency. For those articles that are appropriate, we encourage authors to do this, and present two examples of such…

  17. The Effective Clinical Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wink, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the common problems with clinical conferences and suggests approaches to maximize student learning. Suggests that an effective clinical conference has three characteristics: (1) it is a group event; (2) it contributes to the achievement of course and clinical objectives; and (3) it provides a setting for students to explore personal…

  18. The Learning Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates--and to introduce an alternative, the "learning conference", that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes. Design/methodology/approach: A…

  19. Conference Planning Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Library Association, Burlington.

    Intended as a useful aid for organizing its annual spring meeting, this general conference planning manual developed by the Vermont Library Association provides a blueprint for planners on the responsibilities of the planning committee, the conference chair, and others; site selection and local arrangements; program and sessions planning;…

  20. Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketroser, Heidi

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the fifth annual Dr. Curtis C. Melnick Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference sponsored by the Greater Chicago (Illinois) Regional Office of the Anti-Defamation League of the B'nai B'rith. The day-long conference addressed issues of prejudice and allowed students and staff from various high schools to explore their concerns with…

  1. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  2. ASE Annual Conference 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the ASE Annual Conference 2010 which was held at Nottingham after a gap of 22 years. As always, the main conference was preceded by International Day, an important event for science educators from across the world. There were two strands to the programme: (1) "What works for me?"--sharing new ideas and tried…

  3. District Leadership Conference Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Coordinating Council for Occupational Education, Olympia.

    This manual provides usable guidelines and planning forms and materials for planning district leadership conferences, which were designed and initiated in Washington State to meet the problems in student enrollment and, consequently, Distributive Education Clubs of America membership. The conferences have become a useful means to increase…

  4. Low-aluminum content iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    The low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum program deals with the development of a Fe-Al alloy with aluminum content such as a produce the minimum environmental effect at room temperature. The FAPY is an Fe-16 at. % Al-based alloy developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as the highest aluminum-containing alloy with essentially no environmental effect. The chemical composition for FAPY in weight percent is: aluminum = 8.46, chromium = 5.50, zirconium = 0.20, carbon = 0.03, molybdenum = 2.00, yttrium = 0.10 and iron = 83.71. The ignots of the alloy can be hot worked by extrusion, forging, and rolling processes. The hot-worked cast structure can be cold worked with intermediate anneals at 800{degrees}C. Typical room-temperature ductility of the fine-grained wrought structure is 20 to 25% for this alloy. In contrast to the wrought structure, the cast ductility at room temperature is approximately 1% with a transition temperature of approximately 100 to 150{degrees}C, above which ductility values exceed 20%. The alloy has been melted and processed into bar, sheet, and foil. The alloy has also been cast into slabs, step-blocks of varying thicknesses, and shapes. The purpose of this section is to describe the welding response of cast slabs of three different thicknesses of FAPY alloy. Tensile, creep, and Charpy-impact data of the welded plates are also presented.

  5. Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide Energy Assessments at Two Aluminum Sheet Production Operations;

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-04-01

    DOE Industrial Technologies Program case study describes the savings possible if Commonwealth Aluminum (now Aleris Rolled Products) makes improvements noted in energy assessments at two aluminum mills.

  6. Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide Energy Assessments at Two Aluminum Sheet Production Operations

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    DOE Industrial Technologies Program case study describes the savings possible if Commonwealth Aluminum (now Aleris Rolled Products) makes improvements noted in energy assessments at two aluminum mills.

  7. ICCK Conference Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, William H.

    2013-05-28

    The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT's Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase kinetics

  8. Terbium photoluminescence in yttrium aluminum garnet xerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Maliarevich, G. K.; Gaponenko, N. V. Mudryi, A. V.; Drozdov, Yu. N.; Stepikhova, M. V.; Stepanova, E. A.

    2009-02-15

    Based on a colloidal solution containing terbium, yttrium, and aluminum metal ions, a powder was synthesized and films of terbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet Tb{sub 0.15}Y{sub 2.85}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} were grown on single-crystal silicon and porous anodic alumina. Annealing of the sample in a temperature range from 200-1100 deg. C results in an increase in the photoluminescence intensity in the wavelength range from 480-640 nm, which is caused by Tb{sup 3+} ion intra-atomic transitions {sup 5}D{sub 4}{sup {yields}}{sup 7}F{sub j} (j = 3, 4, 5, 6). Annealing at 900 deg. C and higher temperatures gives rise to low-intensity photoluminescence bands in the region of 667 and 681 nm, which correspond to transitions {sup 5}D{sub 4}{sup {yields}}{sup 7}F{sub 0}, {sup 5}D{sub 4}{sup {yields}}{sup 7}F{sub 1}, and room-temperature Stark term splitting, which suggests the existence of a crystalline environment of Tb{sup 3+} ions. The FWHM of spectral lines in the region of 543 nm decreases from {approx}10 to {approx}(2-3) nm as the xerogel annealing temperature is increased from 700 to 900 deg. C and higher. Three bands with maxima at 280, 330, and 376 nm, which correspond to Tb{sup 3+} ion transitions {sup 7}F{sub 6}{sup {yields}}{sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}L{sub 6}, {sup 5}G{sub 6}, {sup 5}D{sub 3}, are observed in the photoluminescence excitation spectra of the studied structures for the emission wavelength at 543 nm. X-ray diffraction detected the formation of a crystalline phase for a terbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet powder after annealing at 1100 deg. C.

  9. Production of aluminum orthophosphate and basic aluminum polyphosphate under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkhamov, A. A.; Iaroslavskii, I. M.; Popolitov, V. I.; Umarov, B. S.; Iliaev, A. B.

    Berlinite (AlPO4) crystals, which are used in piezoelectronic devices, have been produced by hydrothermal synthesis using the methods proposed by Stanley (1954) and Kolb and Laudise (1978). Also, the possibility of AlPO4 crystallization from metastable aluminophosphate glass has been investigated. It is found that berlinite can be crystallized by slowly raising the temperature in the retrograde solubility region; the crystal growth temperature can be reduced by using metastable aluminophosphate glass. Basic aluminum polyphosphate crystals, which decompose with the formation of Al(PO3)3, have been produced and investigated.

  10. Computer simulation of resistance spot welding in aluminum: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, D.J.; Chandler, H.W.; Evans, J.T.; Wen, J.

    1995-10-01

    A computer-based model of resistance spot welding with hemispherical electrode tips has been developed to include simulation of elastic-plastic mechanical deformation as well as ohmic heating and thermal conduction. The primary effect of the mechanical deformation is in its influence on the contact read and current density developed at the faying surface. The model was used to simulate spot welding in aluminum alloys. Preliminary results show the effects of variations in input current, contact resistance, applied force and position of the cooling water with respect to the electrode tip. It is shown that the value of the contact resistance has a large effect on nugget formation in the spot welding of aluminum alloys and that the applied force has a significant effect arising from its effect on the area of contact at the faying surface. The formation of a resistance spot weld in aluminum is also sensitive to the position of the cooling water-electrode interface because of the high thermal conductivity of aluminum alloys.

  11. Aluminum-dependent regulation of intracellular silicon in the aquatic invertebrate Lymnaea stagnalis

    PubMed Central

    Desouky, Mahmoud; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; McCrohan, Catherine R.; White, Keith N.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon is essential for some plants, diatoms, and sponges but, in higher animals, its endogenous regulation has not been demonstrated. Silicate ions may be natural ligands for aluminum and here we show that, in the freshwater snail (Lymnaea stagnalis), intracellular silicon seems specifically up-regulated in response to sublethal aluminum exposure. X-ray microanalysis showed that exposure of snails to low levels of aluminum led to its accumulation in lysosomal granules, accompanied by marked up-regulation of silicon. Increased lysosomal levels of silicon were a specific response to aluminum because cadmium and zinc had no such effect. Furthermore, intra-lysosomal sulfur from metallothionein and other sulfur-containing ligands was increased after exposure to cadmium and zinc but not aluminum. To ensure that these findings indicated a specific in vivo response, and not ex vivo formation of hydroxy-aluminosilicates (HAS) from added aluminum (555 μg/liter) and water-borne silicon (43 μg/liter), two further studies were undertaken. In a ligand competition assay the lability of aluminum (527 μg/liter) was completely unaffected by the presence of silicon (46 μg/liter), suggesting the absence of HAS. In addition, exogenous silicon (6.5 mg/liter), added to the water column to promote formation of HAS, caused a decrease in lysosomal aluminum accumulation, showing that uptake of HAS would not explain the loading of aluminum into lysosomal granules. These findings, and arguments on the stability, lability, and kinetics of aluminum–silicate interactions, suggest that a silicon-specific mechanism exists for the in vivo detoxification of aluminum, which provides regulatory evidence of silicon in a multicellular organism. PMID:11891333

  12. Parent-led conferences as sites of medical work.

    PubMed

    Dimond, Rebecca

    2014-11-01

    Conferences are novel sites for understanding medical work. Through describing styles of presentation that take place at conferences attended by patients and parents, this article highlights how clinicians on stage present ordinary and extraordinary aspects of medicine. Attention is drawn to the reaction of the parents in the audience. The power of the presenter to direct proceedings highlights the potential vulnerability of the audience. The relationship between clinician on stage and parents in the audience reflects the clinical relationship between doctor and patient. But through identifying insiders and outsiders, the conference setting also enables new relationships and collective identities to be formed. Drawing on an ethnographic study of rare disease conferences, this article extends understanding of medical work by identifying how conferences offer new ways of witnessing the clinical gaze, the doctor-patient relationship and the formation and enactment of a conference community. PMID:24677337

  13. Aluminum-activated citrate and malate transporters encoded by distinct Al tolerance genes function independently in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum (Al) -activated malate and citrate exudation from roots plays an important role in conferring Al tolerance to many plant species. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of AtMATE, the gene encoding an Al-activated root citrate efflux transporter that functions in Arabid...

  14. Association mapping provides insights into the origin and the fine structure of the sorghum aluminum tolerance locus, AltSB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root damage caused by aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major cause of grain yield reduction on acid soils, which are prevalent in tropical and subtropical regions of the world where food security is most tenuous. In sorghum, Al tolerance is conferred by SbMATE, an Al-activated root citrate efflux transpo...

  15. Weld Repair of Thin Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld repairing of thin aluminum sheets now possible, using niobium shield and copper heat sinks. Refractory niobium shield protects aluminum adjacent to hole, while copper heat sinks help conduct heat away from repair site. Technique limits tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding bombardment zone to melt area, leaving surrounding areas around weld unaffected. Used successfully to repair aluminum cold plates on Space Shuttle, Commercial applications, especially in sealing fractures, dents, and holes in thin aluminum face sheets or clad brazing sheet in cold plates, heat exchangers, coolers, and Solar panels. While particularly suited to thin aluminum sheet, this process also used in thicker aluminum material to prevent surface damage near weld area.

  16. CONFERENCE NOTE: Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-01-01

    The next Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements (CPEM), will be held from 9 to 12 June 1992 at the Centre des Nouvelles Industries et Technologies (CNIT), La Défense, Paris, France. This conference, which is held every two years and whose importance and high level, confirmed by thirty years' experience, are recognized throughout the world, can be considered as a forum in which scientists, metrologists and professionals will have the opportunity to present and compare their research results on fundamental constants, standards and new techniques of precision measurement in the electromagnetic domain. Topics The following topics are regarded as the most appropriate for this conference: realization of units and fundamental constants d.c. a.c. and high voltage time and frequency radio-frequency and microwaves dielectrics, antennas, fields lasers, fibre optics advanced instrumentation, cryoelectronics. There will also be a session on international cooperation. Conference Language The conference language will be English. No translation will be provided. Organizers Société des Electriciens et des Electroniciens (SEE). Bureau National de Métrologie (BNM) Sponsors Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Instrumentation & Measurement Society Union Radio Scientifique Internationale United States National Institute of Standards and Technology Centre National d'Etudes des Télécommunications Mouvement Français pour la Qualité, Section Métrologie Comité National Français de Radioélectricité Scientifique Contact Jean Zara, CPEM 92 publicity, Bureau National de Métrologie, 22, rue Monge, 75005 Paris Tel.: (33) 1 46 34 48 16, Fax: (33) 1 46 34 48 63

  17. Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Das, S.K.

    2008-02-15

    The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

  18. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  19. Regeneration of Aluminum Hydride Using Trimethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    D Lacina; J Reilly; Y Celebi; J Wegrzyn; J Johnson; J Graetz

    2011-12-31

    Aluminum hydride is an attractive reducing agent and energy storage compound possessing a low decomposition temperature and a high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen density. However, it is thermodynamically unstable at room temperature and requires extremely high pressures to form the hydride from aluminum and hydrogen gas. Here, we describe an alternate method of synthesizing AlH{sub 3} using Ti-catalyzed Al powder, H{sub 2}, and trimethylamine (TMA) to form an alane adduct. The formation of trimethylamine alane occurs at modest hydrogen pressures ({approx}100 bar), forming the 2:1 bis complex (2 trimethylamine/AlH{sub 3}). Along with the hydrogenation product, mono (1:1) and bis (2:1) standards of TMA-AlH{sub 3} were prepared and characterized using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the reaction products showed that the Ti catalyst remains with the unreacted Al powder after hydrogenation and is not present in the alane adduct. We also demonstrate that TMA can be transaminated with triethylamine to form triethylamine alane, which can easily be separated to recover AlH{sub 3}.

  20. Formation Mechanism of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-(MgO) Inclusions in Si-Mn-Killed Steel with Limited Aluminum Content During the Low Basicity Slag Refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kunpeng; Jiang, Min; Wang, Xinhua; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Haoqian; Cao, Zhanmin

    2016-02-01

    Pilot trails were carried out to study the formation mechanism of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-(MgO) inclusions in tire cord steel. 48 samples were taken from 8 heats of liquid steel during secondary refining, which were subsequently examined by an automatic scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). Characteristics of thousands of oxide inclusions at different refining stages were obtained, including their compositions, sizes, morphologies, etc. Based on the obtained information of inclusions, details during formation of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-(MgO) inclusions were revealed and a new mechanism was proposed, including their origin, formation, and evolution during the refining process. It was found that CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-(MgO) inclusions were initially originated from the CaO-SiO2-MnO-(MgO) inclusions, which were formed during BOF tapping by the coalescence between MnO-SiO2 deoxidation products and the emulsified slag particles because of violent flow of steel. This can be well confirmed by the evaluation of the formation thermodynamics of CaO-SiO2-MnO-(MgO) inclusions, which was proved very difficult to be produced by intrinsic reactions inside liquid steel. Because of chemical reactions between CaO-SiO2-MnO-(MgO) inclusions and molten steel, they were mainly changed into CaO-SiO2-MnO-Al2O3-(MgO) and partially into CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-(MgO), which may be detrimental to the cold drawing ability of coils. Based on this finding, improvements were made in industrial production during BOF tapping and secondary refining. The results indicated that such (CaO-SiO2)-based inclusions existed in conventional process were effectively decreased after the improvements.

  1. The investigation on the stratification phenomenon of aluminum rear alloyed layer in silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Xi; Chen, Xiaojing; Zhang, Song; Shi, Zhengrong; Li, Guohua

    2015-06-01

    A stratification phenomenon of aluminum rear alloyed layer was found in the study of aluminum rear emitter N-type solar cells. It is related to the composition of the paste. The outer aluminum alloyed layer can be called as aluminum doped emitter, and it gives the contribution to the junction formation. The inner layer is only the Al/Si mixed layer. The aluminum atoms in this layer are not bonded with silicon atoms. This inner layer will ruin the quality of the rear junction. The shunt resistance, reverse current density and the junction electric leakage value are getting worse when the thickness of the inner layer increases. The thickness of the inner Al/Si mixed layer increases with the increasing of firing temperature, while the depth of the aluminum doped emitter almost does not change. From the analyses, the inner Al/Si mixed layer is redundant and deleterious. Only a single deep aluminum doped rear emitter is needed for N-type solar cells. The highest power conversion efficiency of 19.93% for aluminum rear emitter N-type cells without the stratification phenomenon has been obtained.

  2. Role of Exogenous Melatonin on Cell Proliferation and Oxidant/Antioxidant System in Aluminum-Induced Renal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Karabulut-Bulan, Omur; Bayrak, Bertan Boran; Arda-Pirincci, Pelin; Sarikaya-Unal, Guner; Us, Huseyin; Yanardag, Refiye

    2015-11-01

    Aluminum has toxic potential on humans and animals when it accumulates in various tissues. It was shown in a number of studies that aluminum causes oxidative stress by free radical formation and lipid peroxidation in tissues and thus may cause damage in target organs. Although there are numerous studies investigating aluminum toxicity, biochemical mechanisms of the damage caused by aluminum have yet to be explained. Melatonin produced by pineal gland was shown to be an effective antioxidant. Since kidneys are target organs for aluminum accumulation and toxicity, we have studied the role of melatonin against aluminum-induced renal toxicity in rats. Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups. Group I served as control, and received only physiological saline; group II served as positive control for melatonin, and received ethanol and physiological saline; group III received melatonin (10 mg/kg); group IV received aluminum sulfate (5 mg/kg) and group V received aluminum sulfate and melatonin (in the same dose), injected three times a week for 1 month. Administration of aluminum caused degenerative changes in renal tissues, such as increase in metallothionein immunoreactivity and decrease in cell proliferation. Moreover, uric acid and lipid peroxidation levels and xanthine oxidase activity increased, while glutathione, catalase, superoxide dismutase, paraoxonase 1, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and sodium potassium ATPase activities decreased. Administration of melatonin mostly prevented these symptoms. Results showed that melatonin is a potential beneficial agent for reducing damage in aluminum-induced renal toxicity. PMID:25855374

  3. PREPARATION OF DIBASIC ALUMINUM NITRATE

    DOEpatents

    Gresky, A.T.; Nurmi, E.O.; Foster, D.L.; Wischow, R.P.; Savolainen, J.E.

    1960-04-01

    A method is given for the preparation and recovery of basic aluminum nltrates having an OH: Al ratio of at least two, comprising two steps. First, metallic aluminum is dissolved in aqueous Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, in the presence of a small quantity of elemental or ionic mercury, to increase its Al: NO/sub 3/ ratio into the range 1 to 1.2. The resulting aqueous solution is then added to an excess of a special organic solvent, typically a mixture of five parts methanol and six parts diethyl ether, whereupon the basic aluminum nitrate, e.g. Al/sub 6/(OH)/sub 13/-(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/, recoverably precipitates.

  4. Rechargeable Aluminum-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Liu, Hansan; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng; Brown, Gilbert M

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reports on the development of rechargeable aluminum-ion batteries. A possible concept of rechargeable aluminum/aluminum-ion battery based on low-cost, earth-abundant Al anode, ionic liquid EMImCl:AlCl3 (1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloroaluminate) electrolytes and MnO2 cathode has been proposed. Al anode has been reported to show good reversibility in acid melts. However, due to the problems in demonstrating the reversibility in cathodes, alternate battery cathodes and battery concepts have also been presented. New ionic liquid electrolytes for reversible Al dissolution and deposition are needed in the future for replacing corrosive EMImCl:AlCl3 electrolytes.

  5. [Effect of aluminum on the non-enzymatic oxidation of dopamine].

    PubMed

    Marinho, C R; Manso, C F

    1994-11-01

    The effect of different concentrations of aluminum sulphate on the nonenzymatic oxidation of dopamine was studied in order to evaluate the action of this metal on neuromelanin synthesis. Data shows that under the studied conditions, aluminum partially inhibits dopamine self-oxidation, decreasing the formation of some intermediate compounds, namely dopaminequinone and dopaminochrome. If neuromelanins have a cytoprotective function in the central nervous system, possibly acting as intracellular scavengers of free radicals and redox metal ions, their decrease due to aluminum could be responsible for serious damage to neuronal tissues. PMID:7717100

  6. Explosion bonding: aluminum-magnesium alloys bonded to austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The explosion bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys to 300 series stainless steel alloys is summarized. The process technique involves a parallel gap arrangement with copper or aluminum bonding aids. Successful bonds have been achieved using either a single shot process for joining the trilayer clad or a sequential shot technique for each metal component. Bond success is monitored through a combined metallographic and tensile strength evaluation. Tensile properties are shown to be strongly dependent upon process parameters and the amount of intermetallic formation at the aluminum bond interface. Empirical data has been compared with experimental and destructive test results to determine the optimum procedures.

  7. Recycling of aluminum salt cake

    SciTech Connect

    Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Karvelas, D.E.

    1991-12-01

    The secondary aluminum industry generates more than 110 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of salt-cake waste every year. This waste stream contains about 3--5% aluminum, 15--30% aluminum oxide, 30--40% sodium chloride, and 20--30% potassium chloride. As much as 50% of the content of this waste is combined salt (sodium and potassium chlorides). Salt-cake waste is currently disposed of in conventional landfills. In addition, over 50 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of black dross that is not economical to reprocess a rotary furnace for aluminum recovery ends up in landfills. The composition of the dross is similar to that of salt cake, except that it contains higher concentrations of aluminum (up to 20%) and correspondingly lower amounts of salts. Because of the high solubility of the salts in water, these residues, when put in landfills, represent a potential source of pollution to surface-water and groundwater supplies. The increasing number of environmental regulations on the generation and disposal of industrial wastes are likely to restrict the disposal of these salt-containing wastes in conventional landfills. Processes exist that employ the dissolution and recovery of the salts from the waste stream. These wet-processing methods are economical only when the aluminum concentration in that waste exceeds about 10%. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a study in which existing technologies were reviewed and new concepts that are potentially more cost-effective than existing processes were developed and evaluated. These include freeze crystallization, solvent/antisolvent extraction, common-ion effect, high-pressure/high-temperature process, and capillary-effect systems. This paper presents some of the technical and economic results of the aforementioned ANL study.

  8. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1.248 Section 1.248 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR...

  9. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1.248 Section 1.248 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. (a)...

  10. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice... reliability of the Bulk-Power System. The conference will explore the progress made on the priorities for addressing risks to reliability that were identified in earlier Commission technical conferences....

  11. 10 CFR 501.32 - Conferences (other than prepetition conferences).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SANCTIONS Written Comments, Public Hearings and Conferences During Administrative Proceedings § 501.32 Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). (a) At any time following commencement of a proceeding... proceeding. Conferences held after the commencement of an administrative proceeding before OFE shall...

  12. Catalytic carbide formation at aluminium-carbon interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maruyama, B.; Rabenberg, L.; Ohuchi, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of the reaction of several monolayer-thick films of aluminum with glassy carbon substrates are presented. The influence of molecular oxygen and water vapor on the rate of reaction is examined. It is concluded that water vapor catalyzed the formation of aluminum carbide from aluminum and carbon by forming active sites which weakened carbon-carbon bonds at the glassy carbon surface, thus assisting their cleavage. The rate of carbide formation for undosed and molecular oxygen-dosed examples was less as neither metallic aluminum nor oxygen-formed alumina could bond to the carbon atom with sufficient strength to dissociate it quickly.

  13. The effects of fumed silica and barite on the aluminum resistance of alumina castables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, Saied; Gaubert, Christophe; Allaire, Claude

    2003-11-01

    A study of the effects of microsilica and barium sulfate as additives in high-tabular alumina castables on cold and hot modulus of rupture, porosity, thermal shock, and corrosion resistance to aluminum attack is reported in this article. This investigation underlined the importance of the quality of fumed silica on the physical and mechanical properties of refractory castables, and also confirmed the importance of celsian formation during firing in the protection of refractory against aluminum attack.

  14. Aluminum-air battery crystallizer

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1987-01-23

    A prototype crystallizer system for the aluminum-air battery operated reliably through simulated startup and shutdown cycles and met its design objectives. The crystallizer system allows for crystallization and removal of the aluminium hydroxide reaction product; it is required to allow steady-state and long-term operation of the aluminum-air battery. The system has to minimize volume and maintain low turbulence and shear to minimize secondary nucleation and energy consumption while enhancing agglomeration. A lamella crystallizer satisfies system constraints.

  15. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg. 3 figs.

  16. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C. Joseph; Dispennette, John M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

  17. Hermetically sealed aluminum electrolytic capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S.; Liu, Yanming; Elias, William

    1995-01-01

    Aluminum electrolytic capacitors are presently not allowed on NASA missions because they outgas water and organic vapors, as well as H2. As a consequence, much larger and heavier packages of tantalum capacitors are used. A hermetically sealed aluminum capacitor has been developed under NASA-MSFC SBIR contracts. This capacitor contains a nongassing electrolyte that was developed for this application so internal pressure would remain low. Capacitors rated at 250 to 540 V have been operated under full load for thousands of hours at 85 and 105 C with good electrical performance and low internal pressure. Electrolyte chemistry and seal engineering concepts will be discussed.

  18. Advances in aluminum casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tiryakioglu, M.; Campbell, J.

    1998-01-01

    This symposium focuses on the improvements of aluminum casting quality and reliability through a better understanding of processes and process variables, and explores the latest innovations in casting-process design that allow increasing use of the castings to replace complex assemblies and heavy steel and cast-iron components in aerospace and automotive applications. Presented are 35 papers by international experts in the various aspects of the subject. The contents include: Semisolid casting; Computer-aided designing of molds and castings; Casting-process modeling; Aluminum-matrix composite castings; HIPing of castings; Progress in the US car project; Die casting and die design; and Solidification and properties.

  19. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H.

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as amore » function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.« less

  20. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H.

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  1. Nitriding of large-sized aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Shigeru; Yoshida, Kazuharu; Sato, Shin-ichi

    1996-06-01

    Aluminum chips with 2mm in size have been successfully nitrided with 99.3% of conversion, using yttrium oxide as a promoter. The product consisted of hollow spheres with 2mm in dia. and fine particles of aluminum nitride. This nitriding is divided into two steps. In the first step, nitriding begins from the surface of aluminum chip. Because the surface is activated by the addition of yttrium oxide, the reaction heat raises the temperature of aluminum enough to generate the aluminum vapor, followed by the second step; exothermic reaction of aluminum vapor and nitrogen gas. In addition, to accelerate the first step without additive, electrolytic etching was applied to aluminum wires with 2mm in dia. In this case, aluminum wires were also completely nitrided.

  2. Aluminum: World market prospects for troubled times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djukanovic, Goran

    2009-02-01

    Aluminum and alumina prices and production volumes dropped significantly in 2008 due to the worldwide economic recession. This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the current state of the aluminum industry and its outlook for the future.

  3. Aluminum nitride insulating films for MOSFET devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Maserjian, J.

    1972-01-01

    Application of aluminum nitrides as electrical insulator for electric capacitors is discussed. Electrical properties of aluminum nitrides are analyzed and specific use with field effect transistors is defined. Operational limits of field effect transistors are developed.

  4. Alkaline oxide conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    Three related conversion coating methods are described that are based on film formation which occurs when aluminum alloys are exposed to alkaline Li salt solutions. Representative examples of the processing methods, resulting coating structure, composition and morphology are presented. The corrosion resistance of these coatings to aerated 0.5 M NaCl solution has been evaluated as a function of total processing time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). This evaluation shows that excellent corrosion resistance can be uniformly achieved using no more than 20 minutes of process time for 6061-T6. Using current methods a minimum of 80 minutes of process time is required to get marginally acceptable corrosion resistance for 2024-T3. Longer processing times are required to achieve uniformly good corrosion resistance.

  5. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-04

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  6. 75 FR 70689 - Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division; Currently...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... in the Federal Register on November 17, 2009 (74 FR 59254). At the request of the State agency and a... Employment and Training Administration Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum- Greenwood... Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC, Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division, including on- site...

  7. The effect of zinc on the aluminum anode of the aluminum-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yougen; Lu, Lingbin; Roesky, Herbert W.; Wang, Laiwen; Huang, Baiyun

    Aluminum is an ideal material for batteries, due to its excellent electrochemical performance. Herein, the effect of zinc on the aluminum anode of the aluminum-air battery, as an additive for aluminum alloy and electrolytes, has been studied. The results show that zinc can decrease the anodic polarization, restrain the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate.

  8. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  9. Insider conference tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Attending an educator conference and its associated exhibit hall can be a rewarding experience for your brain. But if you keep in mind these insider's tips, your feet, arms, stomach, and wallet will also thank you.

  10. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  11. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  12. RECOVERY OF ALUMINUM FROM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.; Higgins, I.R.

    1962-11-20

    A method is given for recovertng aluminum values from aqueous solutions containing said values together with fission products. A mixture of Fe/sub 2/O/ sub 3/ and MnO/sub 2/ is added to a solution containing aluminum and fission products. The resulting aluminum-containing supernatant is then separated from the fission product-bearing metal oxide precipitate and is contacted with a cation exchange resin. The aluminum sorbed on the resin is then eluted and recovered. (AEC)

  13. Mineral resource of the month: aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E. Lee

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on aluminum, a mineral resource which is described as the third-most abundant element in Earth's crust. According to the article, aluminum is the second-most used metal. Hans Christian Oersted, a Danish chemist, was the first to isolate aluminum in the laboratory. Aluminum is described as lightweight, corrosion-resistant and an excellent conductor of electricity and heat.

  14. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  15. Blood aluminum levels as a function of aluminum intake from drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Turnquest, E.M.; Hallenbeck, W.H. )

    1991-04-01

    Questions regarding the health effects of aluminum are still unanswered. The speciation, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity of aluminum are not well understood. Furthermore, no animal or human studies of aluminum absorption have been reported using drinking water as the source of aluminum. The following experiment attempted to reach a better understanding of the bioavailability of aluminum from drinking water. Its objective was to determine whether or not increased aluminum ingestion from drinking water would be reflected in increased serum and whole blood aluminum levels in the baboon experimental model.

  16. Novel aqueous aluminum/sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, S.; Peramunage, D. )

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum sulfur batteries based on concentrated polysulfide catholytes and an alkaline aluminum anode are introduced and investigated. The new battery is expressed by aluminum oxidation and aqueous sulfur reduction for an overall battery discharge consisting of 2Al + S[sub 4][sup 2[minus

  17. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  18. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  20. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  1. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  4. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be safely used as a source of niacin...

  5. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  9. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  10. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  12. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  13. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  14. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  15. 75 FR 80527 - Aluminum Extrusions From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determination, 75 FR 54302, September 7, 2010, and Aluminum Extrusions From... Antidumping Duty Determination, 75 FR 57441, September 21, 2010. \\3\\ See Aluminum Extrusions From the People's... Determination of Targeted Dumping, 75 FR 69403, November 12, 2010, and Aluminum Extrusions From the...

  16. [Current researches on biological effect of aluminum].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin

    2002-08-01

    Aluminum content is generally not high (less that 10 mg/kg) in most foods with the exception of a few such as tea, spinach, and so on, that contain more amounts of it. However, aluminum content is much high in foods in those aluminum-containing food additives are used. After drinking water is treated with aluminum-containing coagulant agent, it's aluminum concentration increases. The aluminum intake of residents from cookware in our country is 4 mg/(capit.d). The aluminum intake in adults is usually 10 mg/(capit.d), but it will rise up to tens to hundreds mg/(capit.d) when residents consume foods with a high aluminum concentration or aluminum-containing drugs. Aluminum is absorbed mainly via a duodenum, and this can be influenced by multiple factors. Absorbed aluminum is discharged primarily by renal excretion. Aluminum accumulation in human body might harm central nervous system, bone lesions, and hemopoietic system, and is a suspected causal factor to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:12600050

  17. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  18. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  19. Recovering aluminum from aluminum dross in a DC electric-arc rotary furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzonev, Tz.; Lucheva, B.

    2007-11-01

    The recycling of aluminum scrap and dross yields significant economic and energy savings, as well environmental benefits. The recovery of aluminum depends on many factors. The aim of this work is to experimentally investigate aluminum recovery under different conditions. In this study, aluminum dross was processed in a direct-current electric-arc rotary furnace. The presence of crushing refractory bodies during processing was found to increase the degree of aluminum recovery by about ten percent.

  20. Inert anodes for aluminum smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, J.D.; Ray, S.P.; Baker, F.W.; DeYoung, D.H.; Tarcy, G.P.

    1986-02-01

    The use of nonconsumable or inert anodes for replacement of consumable carbon anodes in Hall electrolysis cells for the production of aluminum has been a technical and commercial goal of the aluminum industry for many decades. This report summarizes the technical success realized in the development of an inert anode that can be used to produce aluminum of acceptable metal purity in small scale Hall electrolysis cells. The inert anode material developed consists of a cermet composition containing the phases: copper, nickel ferrite and nickel oxide. This anode material has an electrical conductivity comparable to anode carbon used in Hall cells, i.e., 150 ohm {sup {minus}1}cm{sup {minus}1}. Metal purity of 99.5 percent aluminum has been produced using this material. The copper metal alloy present in the anode is not removed by anodic dissolution as does occur with cermet anodes containing a metallic nickel alloy. Solubility of the oxide phases in the cryolite electrolyte is reduced by: (1) saturated concentration of alumina, (2) high nickel oxide content in the NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} composition, (3) lowest possible cell operating temperature, (4) additions of alkaline or alkaline earth fluorides to the bath to reduce solubilities of the anode components, and (5) avoiding bath contaminants such as silica. Dissolution rate measurements indicate first-order kinetics and that the rate limiting step for dissolution is mass transport controlled. 105 refs., 234 figs., 73 tabs.

  1. Directly polished lightweight aluminum mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Horst, Rik; Tromp, Niels; de Haan, Menno; Navarro, Ramon; Venema, Lars; Pragt, Johan

    2008-07-01

    During the last ten years, Astron has been a major contractor for the design and manufacturing of astronomical instruments for Space- and Earth based observatories, such as VISIR, MIDI, SPIFFI, X-Shooter and MIRI. The collaboration between optical- and mechanical designers at Astron led to new design philosophies and strategies. Driven by the need to reduce the weight of optically ultra-stiff structures, two promising techniques have been developed in the last years: ASTRON Extreme Lightweighting for mechanical structures and an improved Polishing Technique for Aluminum Mirrors. Using one single material for both optical components and mechanical structure simplifies the design of a cryogenic instrument significantly, it is very beneficial during instrument test and verification, and makes the instrument insensitive to temperature changes. Aluminum has been the main material used for cryogenic optical instruments, and optical aluminum mirrors are generally diamond turned. The application of a polishable hard top coating like nickel removes excess stray light caused by the groove pattern, but limits the degree of lightweighting of the mirrors due to the bi-metal effect. By directly polishing the aluminum mirror surface, the recent developments at Astron allow for using a non-exotic material for light weighted yet accurate optical mirrors, with a lower surface roughness (~1nm RMS), higher surface accuracy and reduced light scattering. This paper presents the techniques, obtained results and a global comparison with alternative lightweight mirror solutions.

  2. Aluminum: The Next Twenty Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, M. Desmond; Pollio, Gerald

    1982-12-01

    This report concludes that the outlook for the world aluminum industry is quite favorable. Demand is expected to expand at a more rapid rate than for other basic metals, but not sufficiently to put undue strain on productive capacity. Capital requirements of the world aluminum industry are projected at 95.5 billion in 1980 prices — more than 200 billion in current prices—over the balance of the century. Given the aluminum industry's past success in generating internal funds, this level of capital expanditure should not cause undue financing problems. Finally, we expect changes to occur in the structure of the industry over the forecast period, with virtually all new alumina capacity being installed in proximity to bauxite production, and—with the exception of Australia—a major shift in smelting capacity away from other industrialized economies. While the large multinational companies will still play a dominant role in the world aluminum market, their share of production and ownership is likely to decline progressively during the period.

  3. Characterizatin of ultrafine aluminum nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, M. M.; Jorgensen, B. S.; Mang, J. T.; Smith, B. L.; Son, S. F.

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum nanopowders with particle sizes ranging from {approx}25 nm to 80 nm were characterized by a variety of methods. We present and compare the results from common powder characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), BET gas adsorption surface area analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), and low angle laser light scattering (LALLS). Aluminum nanoparticles consist of an aluminum core with an aluminum oxide coating. HRTEM measurements of both the particle diameter and oxide layer thickness tend to be larger than those obtained from BET and TGA. LALLS measurements show a large degree of particle agglomeration in solution; therefore, primary particle sizes could not be determined. Furthermore, results from small-angle scattering techniques (SAS), including small-angle neutron (SANS) and x-ray (SAXS) scattering are presented and show excellent agreement with the BET, TGA, and HRTEM. The suite of analytical techniques presented in this paper can be used as a powerful tool in the characterization of many types of nanosized powders.

  4. Aluminum and its light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merica, Paul D

    1920-01-01

    Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.

  5. Thermodynamics and kinetics of pack aluminide coating formation on IN-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Caves, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of pack variables on the formation of aluminide coatings on nickel-base superalloy IN-100 was conducted. Also, the thermodynamics and kinetics of coating formation were analyzed. Observed coating weights were in good agreement with predictions made from the analysis. Pack temperature rather than pack aluminum activity controls the principal coating phase formed. In 1 weight percent aluminum packs, aluminum weight gains were related to the halide pack activator. Solid-state nickel diffusion controlled coating formation from sodium fluoride and chloride and ammonium fluoride activated packs. In other ammonium and sodium halide activated 1 weight percent aluminum packs, gaseous diffusion controlled coating formation.

  6. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  7. Effects of Organic Chelation on the Behavior of Aluminum Relative to Gallium During Pedogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, M. M.; Derry, L. A.

    2003-12-01

    bulk soil shows an increase in Ga/Al despite an overall loss of both metals, indicating a relative enrichment of gallium in the secondary minerals. The results of preliminary laboratory syntheses of allophane minerals show that there is no significant fractionation of aluminum and gallium during secondary mineral formation in the absence of organic chelators.

  8. Decarbonization process for carbothermically produced aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Bruno, Marshall J.; Carkin, Gerald E.; DeYoung, David H.; Dunlap, Sr., Ronald M.

    2015-06-30

    A method of recovering aluminum is provided. An alloy melt having Al.sub.4C.sub.3 and aluminum is provided. This mixture is cooled and then a sufficient amount of a finely dispersed gas is added to the alloy melt at a temperature of about 700.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. The aluminum recovered is a decarbonized carbothermically produced aluminum where the step of adding a sufficient amount of the finely dispersed gas effects separation of the aluminum from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates by flotation, resulting in two phases with the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates being the upper layer and the decarbonized aluminum being the lower layer. The aluminum is then recovered from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates through decanting.

  9. The Surface Tension of Pure Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, Ian Frank; Taylor, John Andrew

    2013-08-01

    The surface tension of high purity and commercial purity aluminum in vacuo was determined using the sessile drop method and the results were found to compare favorably with published data. The effects of holding atmosphere, substrate, and "surface fracture" of the sessile drop on the measured surface tension values were investigated together with the effects of different solute elements commonly present in commercial aluminum alloys. The results obtained suggest that the nature of the surface oxide film formed on the droplets (affected by alloy composition and atmosphere) and the rupture of this film are the dominant factors influencing the surface tension values obtained. Changes in surface tension values of up to 60 pct were observed. The possible effect of this variable surface tension on practical casting processes, such as direct chill casting, is suggested.

  10. Complex foamed aluminum parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings

    SciTech Connect

    Simancik, F.; Schoerghuber, F.

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility of complex shaped aluminum foam parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings has been investigated. The foamed samples were prepared by injection of the foam into sand molds. It turned out that sound castings can be produced if the foam core is properly preheated and/or surface treated before casting. The effect of the foam core on the performance of the casting was evaluated by in compression testing and by measuring structural damping. The gain in the related properties turned out to be much higher than the weight increase of the casting due to the presence of the core. The weight increase may be partially offset through a reduction of the wall-thickness of the shell.

  11. Formation in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennon, Fred; Jacobsen, Douglas; Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt; Thatamanil, John J.; Porterfield, Amanda; Moore, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    What is the relationship between the academic knowledge of the guild and the formation of students in the classroom? This Forum gathers four essays originally presented at a Special Topics Session at the 2009 conference of the American Academy of Religion (Atlanta, Georgia), with a brief introductory essay by Fred Glennon explaining the genesis of…

  12. Tenth AMS Conference on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, R.; Colton, M.; Deblonde, G.; Jedlovec, G.; Lee, T.

    2000-01-01

    The American Meteorological Society held its Tenth Conference on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography in conjunction with the 80th Annual Meeting in Long Beach, California. For the second consecutive conference, a format that consisted of primarily posters, complemented by invited theme oriented oral presentations, and panel discussions on various aspects on satellite remote sensing were utilized. Joint sessions were held with the Second Conference on Artificial Intelligence, the Eleventh Conference on Middle Atmosphere, and the Eleventh symposium on Global Change Studies. In total, there were 23 oral presentations, 170 poster presentations, and four panel discussions. Over 450 people representing a wide spectrum of the society attended one or more of the sessions in the five-day meeting. The program for the Tenth Conference on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography can viewed in the October 1999 issue of the Bulletin.

  13. Low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Baldwin, R.H.; Howell, C.R.

    1993-07-01

    The low room-temperature ductility Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys is associated with their environmental embrittlement. Reducing the aluminum level from 29 to 16 at % has been found to be an effective method in essentially eliminating the environmental-embrittlement effect and increasing the room-temperature ductility value to over 25%. This paper will present data on alloy compositions, melting, casting and processing methods, and mechanical properties. Plans for future work on these alloys will also be described.

  14. [Atmospheric emission of PCDD/Fs from secondary aluminum metallurgy industry in the southwest area, China].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Guo, Zhi-Shun; Jian, Chuan; Zhu, Ming-Ji; Deng, Li; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Five secondary aluminum metallurgy enterprises in the southwest area of China were measured for emissions of PCDD/Fs. The results indicated that the emission levels of PCDD/Fs (as TEQ) were 0.015-0.16 ng x m(-3), and the average was 0.093 ng x m(-3) from secondary aluminum metallurgy enterprises. Emission factors of PCDD/Fs (as TEQ) from the five secondary aluminum metallurgy enterprises varied between 0.041 and 4.68 microg x t(-1) aluminum, and the average was 2.01 microg x t(-1) aluminum; among them, PCDD/Fs emission factors from the crucible smelting furnace was the highest. Congener distribution of PCDD/F in stack gas from the five secondary aluminum metallurgies was very different from each other. Moreover, the R(PCDF/PCDD) was the lowest in the enterprise which was installed only with bag filters; the R(PCDF/PCDD) were 3.8-12.6 (the average, 7.7) in the others which were installed with water scrubbers. The results above indicated that the mechanism of PCDD/Fs formation was related to the types of exhaust gas treatment device. The results of this study can provide technical support for the formulation of PCDD/Fs emission standards and the best available techniques in the secondary aluminum metallurgy industry. PMID:24720181

  15. Aluminum Leaching of ''Archived'' Sludge from Tanks 8F, 11H, and 12H

    SciTech Connect

    FONDEUR, FERNANDOF.

    2004-03-12

    Aluminum can promote formation or dissolution of networks in hydroxide solid solutions. When present in large amounts it will act as a network former increasing both the viscosity and the surface tension of melts. This translates into poor free flow properties that affect pour rate of glass production in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). To mitigate this situation, DWPF operations limit the amount of aluminum contained in sludge. This study investigated the leaching of aluminum compounds from archived sludge samples. The conclusions found boehmite present as the predominant aluminum compound in sludge from two tanks. We did not identify an aluminum compound in sludge from the third tank. We did not detect any amorphous aluminum hydroxide in the samples. The amount of goethite measured 4.2 percentage weight while hematite measured 3.7 percentage weight in Tank 11H sludge. The recommended recipe for removing gibbsite in sludge proved inefficient for digesting boehmite, removing less than 50 per cent of the compound within 48 hours. The recipe did remove boehmite when the test ran for 10 days (i.e., 7 more days than the recommended baseline leaching period). Additions of fluoride and phosphate to Tank 12H archived sludge did not improve the aluminum leaching efficiency of the baseline recipe.

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AA1235 Aluminum Foil Stocks Produced Directly from Electrolytic Aluminum Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Yu, Kun; Wen, Li; Yao, Sujuan; Dai, Yilong; Wang, Zhifeng

    2016-02-01

    A new process is developed to obtain high-quality AA1235 aluminum foil stocks and to replace the traditional manufacture process. During the new manufacture process, AA1235 aluminum sheets are twin-roll casted directly through electrolytic aluminum melt (EAM), and subsequently the sheets are processed into aluminum foil stocks by cold rolling and annealing. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the AA1235 aluminum sheets produced through such new process are investigated in each state by optimal microscope, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, orientation imaging microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, etc. The results show that compared with the traditional AA1235 aluminum foil stocks produced through re-melted aluminum melt (RAM), the amount of impurities is decreased in the EAM aluminum foil stocks. The EAM aluminum foil stock obtains less β-FeSiAl5 phases, but more α-Fe2SiAl8 phases. The elongation of EAM aluminum foil stocks is improved significantly owing to more cubic orientation. Especially, the elongation value of the EAM aluminum foil stocks is approximately 25 pct higher than that of the RAM aluminum foil stocks. As a result, the EAM aluminum foil stocks are at an advantage in increasing the processing performance for the aluminum foils during subsequent processes.

  17. Conference -- summary and comment.

    PubMed

    Fairweather, D

    1974-01-01

    500 delegates met at the IPPF twenty-first Anniversary Conference which was held in Brighton on October 22-27, 1973. The theme of the conference was Planning for the Future. In his welcoming speech Dr. Fernando Tamayo, IPPF President, noted that the quality of life is everybody's business. Mr. Rafael Salas, UNFPA Executive Director, gave the keynote speech pointing out the need for a comprehensive approach to the problem of rapid population growth. The motto of the World Population Year 1974, "1 world for all," should be the goal. "A Survey of Unmet Needs in Family Planning," which was the result of family planning studies in 209 countries, was the background document of the conference. Other important papers of the conference were Dr. Thorsten Sjovall's paper "Human Rights and Welfare Aspects," Dr. Bernard Berelson's paper "Contribution of Family Planning to Demographic, Economic and Social Goals"; Rodney Shearman's "New Possibilities for Fertility Control"; Dr. Alexander Kessler's report "Barriers between Contraceptive Services and the Consumer"; papers on social and economic change and planned parenthood; a discussion by Professor Francis Okediji on "Social and Cultural Values affecting Fertility and the Adoption of Family Planning in Africa," following a speech by Mrs. Nani Soewondo on the influence of legislation and policy in improving the status of women; and the final paper by Mrs. Wendy Marson entitled "A View for the Future." At the final session of the conference Professor Brian Abel-Smith presented a summary of the proceedings. The writer believes that energy was generated by the exchange of views at the conference and that energy must be harnessed and driven forward by the IPPF Governing Body and Management Planning Committee. A major degree of flexibility in outlook and action must be maintained. PMID:12178347

  18. Studying electromigration of melted inclusions in aluminum-silicon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsov, A. A.; Muradov, V. E.; Kashtanova, E. A.

    2011-06-01

    The formation and electromigration of melted aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) inclusions in single-crystalline silicon and polycrystalline aluminum has been studied. It is established that, in a temperature interval of T = 850-920 K, the contact melting in the Al-Si system is accompanied by the formation of melted zones (inclusions) with dimensions within 50-800 μm. These inclusions exhibit electrostimulated migration ( j ≤ 4 × 106 A/m2) along the lines of an applied electric field. The dependence of the specific velocity of melted zones on their sizes has been measured for the electromigration of Al-Si inclusions in silicon and aluminum crystals. It is suggested that the mechanism of melted zone migration consists in the melting and crystallization due to thermoelectric phenomena at interphase boundaries and electromigration in the volume of inclusion. Effective charges on Al and Si atoms in Al-Si melts and the Peltier coefficients in the corresponding crystal-melt systems have been experimentally determined

  19. Paired and interacting galaxies: Conference summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A.

    1990-01-01

    The author gives a summary of the conference proceedings. The conference began with the presentation of the basic data sets on pairs, groups, and interacting galaxies with the latter being further discussed with respect to both global properties and properties of the galactic nuclei. Then followed the theory, modelling and interpretation using analytic techniques, simulations and general modelling for spirals and ellipticals, starbursts and active galactic nuclei. Before the conference the author wrote down the three questions concerning pairs, groups and interacting galaxies that he hoped would be answered at the meeting: (1) How do they form, including the role of initial conditions, the importance of subclustering, the evolution of groups to compact groups, and the fate of compact groups; (2) How do they evolve, including issues such as relevant timescales, the role of halos and the problem of overmerging, the triggering and enhancement of star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei, and the relative importance of dwarf versus giant encounters; and (3) Are they important, including the frequency of pairs and interactions, whether merging and interactions are very important aspects of the life of a normal galaxy at formation, during its evolution, in forming bars, shells, rings, bulges, etc., and in the formation and evolution of active galaxies? Where possible he focuses on these three central issues in the summary.

  20. EPRI electric vehicle conference

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleeger, D.

    1999-10-01

    Lower operating and maintenance costs, quiet and clean operation appear the main factors in choosing electric over the typical internal combustion powered equipment. The Conference was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). EPRI is a cooperative effort by major electric companies across the USA, founded in 1973 and headquartered in Palo Alto, CA. Featured at the Conference were presentations on regulatory issues, lift truck technologies, automotive advances and other industrial applications to include automated guided vehicles, personnel carriers and electric bicycles. Approximately 25 exhibitors displayed components, subassemblies and complete vehicles.

  1. Hermetically Sealed Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S.; Liu, Yanming; Elias, William

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum electrolytic capacitors are presently not allowed on NASA missions because they outgas water and organic vapors, as well as H2. As a consequence, for some applications, much larger and heavier packages of tantalum capacitors must be used. A hermetically sealed aluminum capacitor has been developed. This contains a nongassing electrolyte that was developed for this application so internal pressure would remain low. Capacitors rated from 250 V to 540 V have been operated under full load for thousands of hours at 85 and 105 C with good electrical performance and absence of gas generation. Electrolyte chemistry and seal engineering will be discussed, as well as the extension of this design concept to lower voltage ratings.

  2. Implants of aluminum into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvagno, G.; Scandurra, A.; Raineri, V.; Rimini, E.; La Ferla, A.; Sciascia, V.; Frisina, F.; Raspagliesi, M.; Ferla, G.

    1993-04-01

    The electrical behaviour of ion implanted aluminum into silicon was investigated by varying the beam energy in the 80 keV-6 MeV range, the dose in the 1 × 10 13-1 × 10 14/cm 2 range and the annealing procedure. Aluminum atoms precipitate into exten defects at the end of range damage and where the concentration exceeds the solid solubility value (about 2 × 10 19/cm 3 at 1200°C Escape of Al atoms occurs very easily as soon as they reach the external surface during the thermal diffusion. Using high energy implants, 6 MeV, it was possible to follow in detail the broadening of the diffused profiles. The measured trends between the retained dose and the junction depth and between the outdiffused dose and the annealing time are quite well predicted by the solution of the diffusion equation with the surface acting as a perfect sink for the dopant.

  3. Automated and aluminum welding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Clyde S.

    1994-10-01

    Automated welding technology and techniques for welding advanced aluminum alloys with potential for industrial and commercial applications have been developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Marshall Space Flight Center. These technologies are being offered to private companies for commercial development, and include: Variable polarity plasma arc welding, a welding process that produces high-quality aluminum welds for fabrication of the space shuttle external tank and space station common module structures. This process uses reverse polarity pulses to produce welds virtually free of internal defects. Advanced weld sensor technology, comprised of machine vision-based weld seam tracking that uses both structured and global laser illumination for finding weld joints, even those difficult to discern by the human eye. Weld pool feedback is accomplished with a vision system to measure arc symmetry and molten weld pool geometry. A weld bead profiler trails the welding torch. It provides feedback to the process control system, which records quality control data.

  4. MHD technology in aluminum casting

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinichenko, I.

    1984-08-01

    The use of MHD technology in aluminum casting is discussed. Associates of the Latvian Academy of Sciences Institute of Physics developed magnetohydrodynamic units for the Siberian plant. A MHD unit made it possible to free five persons from heavy work at the plant. Labor productivity doubled in this section. With the aid of the magnetic field, the alloy silumin is obtained in only three hours. Specialists of the Irkutsk affiliate of the All-Union Scientific Research and Design Institute of the Aluminum, Magnesium and Electrode Industry are convinced that MHD technology has a bright future. However, this will necessitate the development of new MHD technology for different types of casting facilities, with their specific features taken into account.

  5. Laser Overlap Welding of Zinc-coated Steel on Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, Hamed Tasalloti; Kah, Paul; Martikainen, Jukka

    Local reinforcement of aluminum with laser welded patches of zinc-coated steel can effectively contribute to crashworthiness, durability and weight reduction of car body. However, the weld between Zn-coated steel and aluminum is commonly susceptible to defects such as spatter, cavity and crack. The vaporization of Zn is commonly known as the main source of instability in the weld pool and cavity formation, especially in a lap joint configuration. Cracks are mainly due to the brittle intermetallic compounds growing at the weld interface of aluminum and steel. This study provides a review on the main metallurgical and mechanical concerns regarding laser overlap welding of Zn-coated steel on Al-alloy and the methods used by researchers to avoid the weld defects related to the vaporization of Zn and the poor metallurgical compatibility between steel and aluminum.

  6. Electrically Conductive Anodized Aluminum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Trung Hung

    2006-01-01

    Anodized aluminum components can be treated to make them sufficiently electrically conductive to suppress discharges of static electricity. The treatment was conceived as a means of preventing static electric discharges on exterior satin-anodized aluminum (SAA) surfaces of spacecraft without adversely affecting the thermal-control/optical properties of the SAA and without need to apply electrically conductive paints, which eventually peel off in the harsh environment of outer space. The treatment can also be used to impart electrical conductivity to anodized housings of computers, medical electronic instruments, telephoneexchange equipment, and other terrestrial electronic equipment vulnerable to electrostatic discharge. The electrical resistivity of a typical anodized aluminum surface layer lies between 10(exp 11) and 10(exp 13) Omega-cm. To suppress electrostatic discharge, it is necessary to reduce the electrical resistivity significantly - preferably to < or = 10(exp 9) Omega-cm. The present treatment does this. The treatment is a direct electrodeposition process in which the outer anodized surface becomes covered and the pores in the surface filled with a transparent, electrically conductive metal oxide nanocomposite. Filling the pores with the nanocomposite reduces the transverse electrical resistivity and, in the original intended outer-space application, the exterior covering portion of the nanocomposite would afford the requisite electrical contact with the outer-space plasma. The electrical resistivity of the nanocomposite can be tailored to a value between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 12) Omega-cm. Unlike electrically conductive paint, the nanocomposite becomes an integral part of the anodized aluminum substrate, without need for adhesive bonding material and without risk of subsequent peeling. The electrodeposition process is compatible with commercial anodizing production lines. At present, the electronics industry uses expensive, exotic

  7. Final report on the Copper Mountain conference on multigrid methods

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods was held on April 6-11, 1997. It took the same format used in the previous Copper Mountain Conferences on Multigrid Method conferences. Over 87 mathematicians from all over the world attended the meeting. 56 half-hour talks on current research topics were presented. Talks with similar content were organized into sessions. Session topics included: fluids; domain decomposition; iterative methods; basics; adaptive methods; non-linear filtering; CFD; applications; transport; algebraic solvers; supercomputing; and student paper winners.

  8. Aluminum-lithium target behavior

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W.R.

    1989-10-01

    Information on physical properties and irradiation behavior of aluminum-lithium target alloys employed for the production of tritium in Savannah River reactors has been reviewed to support development of technology for the New Production Reactor (NPR). Phase compositions and microstructures, thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, and constituent diffusion phenomena of the alloys, established in prior site studies, are presented. Irradiation behavior, including distributions of product tritium and helium and related exposure limits due to swelling and cracking of the target alloys is discussed, along with gas release processes occurring during subsequent product recovery operations. The property review supports designation of the aluminum-lithium alloys as ideally well-suited target materials for low-temperature, tritium-producing reactors, demonstrated over 35 years of Savannah River reactor operation. Low temperature irradiation and reaction with lithium in the alloy promotes tritium retention during reactor exposure, and the aluminum provides a matrix from which the product is readily recovered on heating following irradiation. 33 refs., 26 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Enhancing mechanical toughness of aluminum surfaces by nano-boron implantation: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhen; Kwon, Dae-Gyeon; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Tománek, David

    2015-01-01

    Searching for ways to enhance surface hardness of aluminum, we study the equilibrium structure, stability, elastic properties and formation dynamics of a boron-enriched surface using ab initio density functional calculations. We used molecular dynamics simulations to model the implantation of energetic boron nanoparticles in Al and identify structural arrangements that optimize the formation of strong covalent Bsbnd Al bonds. Nano-indentation simulations based on constrained optimization suggest that presence of boron nanostructures in the subsurface region enhances significantly the mechanical hardness of aluminum surfaces.

  10. Hydrogen embrittlement of aluminum: the crucial role of vacancies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2005-04-22

    We report first-principles calculations which demonstrate that vacancies can combine with hydrogen impurities in bulk aluminum and play a crucial role in the embrittlement of this prototypical ductile solid. Our studies of hydrogen-induced vacancy superabundant formation and vacancy clusterization in aluminum lead to the conclusion that a large number of H atoms (up to 12) can be trapped at a single vacancy, which overcompensates the energy cost to form the defect. In the presence of trapped H atoms, three nearest-neighbor single vacancies which normally would repel each other, aggregate to form a trivacancy on the slip plane of Al, acting as embryos for microvoids and cracks and resulting in ductile rupture along these planes. PMID:15904157

  11. 78 FR 27963 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, July 9, 2013 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m....

  12. Tonoplast- and Plasma Membrane-Localized Aquaporin-Family Transporters in Blue Hydrangea Sepals of Aluminum Hyperaccumulating Plant

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Takashi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kanai, Masatake; Mano, Shoji; Nishimura, Mikio; Yoshida, Kumi

    2012-01-01

    Hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla) is tolerant of acidic soils in which toxicity generally arises from the presence of the soluble aluminum (Al) ion. When hydrangea is cultivated in acidic soil, its resulting blue sepal color is caused by the Al complex formation of anthocyanin. The concentration of vacuolar Al in blue sepal cells can reach levels in excess of approximately 15 mM, suggesting the existence of an Al-transport and/or storage system. However, until now, no Al transporter has been identified in Al hyperaccumulating plants, animals or microorganisms. To identify the transporter being responsible for Al hyperaccumulation, we prepared a cDNA library from blue sepals according to the sepal maturation stage, and then selected candidate genes using a microarray analysis and an in silico study. Here, we identified the vacuolar and plasma membrane-localized Al transporters genes vacuolar Al transporter (VALT) and plasma membrane Al transporter 1 (PALT1), respectively, which are both members of the aquaporin family. The localization of each protein was confirmed by the transient co-expression of the genes. Reverse transcription-PCR and immunoblotting results indicated that VALT and PALT1 are highly expressed in sepal tissue. The overexpression of VALT and PALT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana conferred Al-tolerance and Al-sensitivity, respectively. PMID:22952644

  13. Declining Enrollment Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    This report summarizes the results of a conference on declining enrollment sponsored by the Arizona State Department of Education. Topics covered include school closing, budget implications of declining enrollment, staffing problems and reduction in force, board of education and community support, problems of small school districts, and…

  14. A Conference of Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, KY. Dept. of Educational Research.

    Presented are the proceedings of the First Historic Helen Keller World Conference on Services to Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults, held in New York City in September, 1977 on the theme "The Deaf-Blind Person in the Community." Reports have the following titles and authors: "Definition, Demography, Causes and Prevention of Deaf-Blindness; Finding and…

  15. Open Mind Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Alexander H.

    1995-01-01

    Open Mind, The Association for the achievement of diversity in higher education, met in conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, between October 16 and 18, 1992. A number of workgroups met to discuss the goals, structure, and generally evaluate the Association and its achievements. A summary of the workgroup sessions and their minutes are included.

  16. APPA 2011 Conference Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facilities Manager, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents highlights of APPA conference that was held on July 16-18, 2011. The highlights feature photos of 2011-2012 board of directors, outgoing senior regional representatives to the board, meritorious service award, APPA fellow, president's recognition and gavel exchange, and diamond business partner award.

  17. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  18. Grammar! A Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lid, Ed.; Boaks, Peter, Ed.

    Papers from a conference on the teaching of grammar, particularly in second language instruction, include: "Grammar: Acquisition and Use" (Richard Johnstone); "Grammar and Communication" (Brian Page); "Linguistic Progression and Increasing Independence" (Bernardette Holmes); "La grammaire? C'est du bricolage!" ("Grammar? That's Hardware!") (Barry…

  19. Microbicides 2006 conference

    PubMed Central

    Ramjee, Gita; Shattock, Robin; Delany, Sinead; McGowan, Ian; Morar, Neetha; Gottemoeller, Megan

    2006-01-01

    Current HIV/AIDS statistics show that women account for almost 60% of HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV prevention tools such as male and female condoms, abstinence and monogamy are not always feasible options for women due to various socio-economic and cultural factors. Microbicides are products designed to be inserted in the vagina or rectum prior to sex to prevent HIV acquisition. The biannual Microbicides conference took place in Cape Town, South Africa from 23–26 April 2006. The conference was held for the first time on the African continent, the region worst affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The conference brought together a record number of 1,300 scientists, researchers, policy makers, healthcare workers, communities and advocates. The conference provided an opportunity for an update on microbicide research and development as well as discussions around key issues such as ethics, acceptability, access and community involvement. This report discusses the current status of microbicide research and development, encompassing basic and clinical science, social and behavioural science, and community mobilisation and advocacy activities. PMID:17038196

  20. Knowledge Sharing at Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vries, Bregje; Pieters, Jules

    2007-01-01

    To improve the quality in teaching and learning, opportunities need to be provided where practitioners and researchers meet and share visions, disseminate findings, co-construct ideas, and set research agendas together. Visiting a conference is one well-known and established way to do this. But are they effective? A survey was conducted among the…

  1. Government Quality Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Government Quality Conference was an attempt to bring together executive organizations and senior individuals in the Federal Government that have a desire to improve productivity. It was designed to provide an exchange of ideas based on experience, and to encourage individual management initiatives to tap the capabilities of Federal employees.

  2. International waste management conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the international waste management conference. Topics covered include: Quality assurance in the OCR WM program; Leading the spirit of quality; Dept. of Energy hazardous waste remedial actions program; management of hazardous waste projects; and System management and quality assurance.

  3. REGIONAL CONFERENCE SUMMARIES, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    AN AVERAGE OF 200 TEACHER EDUCATORS, STATE DIRECTORS, LAYMEN, AND REPRESENTATIVES OF VARIOUS AGENCIES ATTENDED EACH OF NINE REGIONAL CONFERENCES CONDUCTED THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES TO DISCUSS THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGES AND PROBLEMS IN PLANNING AND CONDUCTING VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. MAJOR SPEECHES PRESENTED…

  4. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  5. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  6. IATUL Conference 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Services and Use, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes presentations at conference on theme "The future of information resources for science and technology and role of libraries": industrial and commercial use of national, regional, and university resources; balance between public- and private-sector resources; local access in national and regional context; access to information in…

  7. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, Evan

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  8. The interparliamentary conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of information on environmental problems with global origins and consequences. The areas of major concern included the following: global climate change; deforestation and desertification; preservation of biological diversity; safeguarding oceans and water resources; population growth; destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer; and sustainable development.

  9. Conference summary - Personal views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lub, J.

    2016-05-01

    This is a collection of remarks on the three and a half days of the RR Lyrae 2015 Conference, limited only by my own lack of attention and understanding. I end with some personal recollections on my complete failure, even though doing the necessary calculations, to spot the importance and the possible application of Fourier amplitudes and phases of the RR Lyrae light curves.

  10. Deletion of the Escherichia coli pseudouridine synthase gene truB blocks formation of pseudouridine 55 in tRNA in vivo, does not affect exponential growth, but confers a strong selective disadvantage in competition with wild-type cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gutgsell, N; Englund, N; Niu, L; Kaya, Y; Lane, B G; Ofengand, J

    2000-01-01

    Previous work from this laboratory (Nurse et al., RNA, 1995, 1:102-112) established that TruB, a pseudouridine (psi) synthase from Escherichia coli, was able to make psi55 in tRNA transcripts but not in transcripts of full-length or fragmented 16S or 23S ribosomal RNAs. By deletion of the truB gene, we now show that TruB is the only protein in E. coli able to make psi55 in vivo. Lack of TruB and psi55 did not affect the exponential growth rate but did confer a strong selective disadvantage on the mutant when it was competed against wild-type. The negative selection did not appear to be acting at either the exponential or stationary phase. Transformation with a plasmid vector conferring carbenicillin resistance and growth in carbenicillin markedly increased the selective disadvantage, as did growth at 42 degrees C, and both together were approximately additive such that three cycles of competitive growth sufficed to reduce the mutant strain to approximately 0.2% of its original value. The most striking finding was that all growth effects could be reversed by transformation with a plasmid carrying a truB gene coding for a D48C mutation in TruB. Direct analysis showed that this mutant did not make psi55 under the conditions of the competition experiment. Therefore, the growth defect due to the lack of TruB must be due to the lack of some other function of the protein, possibly an RNA chaperone activity, but not to the absence of psi55. PMID:11142385

  11. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOEpatents

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  12. Fourth National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings contain the papers given and digests of group topics discussed at the 1949 National Conference on Citizenship held in New York. An introduction by the chairman of the conference committee identified the conference theme as "Responsible American Citizens" and noted that discussion would center on citizens in politics, in the world,…

  13. PRACTICAL GUIDE TO CONFERENCE LEADERSHIP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MORGAN, JOHN S.

    THIS GUIDE TO CONFERENCE LEADERSHIP BEGINS WITH A CHAPTER ON LEADERSHIP PSYCHOLOGY AND GOES ON TO PRESENT OUTLINES FOR RUNNING CONFERENCES. THE LEADER PREPARES FOR THE MEETING BY COLLECTING FACTS ON THE SUBJECT, PREPARING AN OUTLINE, KNOWING THE PARTICIPANTS, MAKING PHYSICAL ARRANGEMENTS, AND WRITING THE TENTATIVE SUMMARY. IN THE CONFERENCE HE…

  14. ALA Conference 2009: Chicago Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    There is joy among those who have the funds to go to Chicago for the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference, July 9-15. Every librarian knows there is nothing better than a Chicago gathering, with the city's wonderful haunts, museums, restaurants, and fine memories of past conferences. The conference program covers nearly every…

  15. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  16. Reducing corrosion in aluminum-steel joints

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This article examines how galvanic corrosion in aluminum-intensive steel structures can be controlled, without losing performance, by using transition materials. The topics of the article include the transition material concept, corrosion resistance, experimental conditions, and the results of the experiment including mass loss of lap joints, strength retention, joining methods. The results show how use of steel-clad aluminum transition material in joining aluminum and steel deals successfully addresses the problems of joining and durability associated with increasing use of aluminum on automobiles.

  17. Aluminum-stabilized NB3SN superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Scanlan, Ronald M.

    1988-01-01

    An aluminum-stabilized Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials.

  18. Gut: An underestimated target organ for Aluminum.

    PubMed

    Vignal, C; Desreumaux, P; Body-Malapel, M

    2016-06-01

    Since World War II, several factors such as an impressive industrial growth, an enhanced environmental bioavailability and intensified food consumption have contributed to a significant amplification of human exposure to aluminum. Aluminum is particularly present in food, beverages, some drugs and airbone dust. In our food, aluminum is superimposed via additives and cooking utensils. Therefore, the tolerable intake of aluminum is exceeded for a significant part of the world population, especially in children who are more vulnerable to toxic effects of pollutants than adults. Faced with this oral aluminum influx, intestinal tract is an essential barrier, especially as 38% of ingested aluminum accumulates at the intestinal mucosa. Although still poorly documented to date, the impact of oral exposure to aluminum in conditions relevant to real human exposure appears to be deleterious for gut homeostasis. Aluminum ingestion affects the regulation of the permeability, the microflora and the immune function of intestine. Nowadays, several arguments are consistent with an involvement of aluminum as an environmental risk factor for inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26970682

  19. Fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrivas, Anastasios Dimitrios

    2000-10-01

    A melting technique was developed to simulate the fusion boundary of aluminum alloys using the GleebleRTM thermal simulator. Using a steel sleeve to contain the aluminum, samples were heated to incremental temperatures above the solidus temperature of a number of alloys. In alloy 2195, a 4wt%Cu-1wt%Li alloy, an equiaxed non-dendritic zone (EQZ) could be formed by heating in the temperature range from approximately 630 to 640°C. At temperatures above 640°C, solidification occurred by the normal epitaxial nucleation and growth mechanism. Fusion boundary behavior was also studied in alloys 5454-H34, 6061-T6, and 2219-T8. Additionally, experimental alloy compositions were produced by making bead on plate welds using an alloy 5454-H32 base metal and 5025 or 5087 filler metals. These filler metals contain zirconium and scandium additions, respectively, and were expected to influence nucleation and growth behavior. Both as-welded and welded/heat treated (540°C and 300°C) substrates were tested by melting simulation, resulting in dendritic and EQZ structures depending on composition and substrate condition. Orientation imaging microscopy (OIM(TM)) was employed to study the crystallographic character of the microstructures produced and to verify the mechanism responsible for EQZ formation. OIM(TM) proved that grains within the EQZ have random orientation. In all other cases, where the simulated microstructures were dendritic in nature, it was shown that epitaxy was the dominant mode of nucleation. The lack of any preferred crystallographic orientation relationship in the EQZ supports a theory proposed by Lippold et al that the EQZ is the result of heterogeneous nucleation within the weld unmixed zone. EDS analysis of the 2195 on STEM revealed particles with ternary composition consisted of Zr, Cu and Al and a tetragonal type crystallographic lattice. Microdiffraction line scans on EQZ grains in the alloy 2195 showed very good agreement between the measured Cu

  20. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  1. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  2. 40 CFR 63.5753 - How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? 63.5753...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum... aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? (a) Use equation 1 of...

  3. 40 CFR 63.5753 - How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? 63.5753...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum... aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? (a) Use equation 1 of...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  5. 40 CFR 180.1091 - Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1091 Aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum secondary butoxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Aluminum isopropoxide (CAS Reg. No....

  6. 40 CFR 63.5753 - How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? 63.5753...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Standards for Aluminum... aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings? (a) Use equation 1 of...

  7. [The corrosion resistance of aluminum and aluminum-based alloys studied in artificial model media].

    PubMed

    Zhakhangirov, A Zh; Doĭnikov, A I; Aboev, V G; Iankovskaia, T A; Karamnova, V S; Sharipov, S M

    1991-01-01

    Samples of aluminum and its alloys, designed for orthodontic employment, were exposed to 4 media simulating the properties of biologic media. The corrosion resistance of the tested alloys was assessed from the degree of aluminum migration to simulation media solutions, which was measured by the neutron activation technique. Aluminum alloy with magnesium and titanium has shown the best corrosion resistance. PMID:1799002

  8. Aluminum reclamation from dross. (Latest citations from the Aluminum Industry Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning aluminum reclamation from dross. Topics include dross treatment technology, the environmental benefits of aluminum recovery from dross, and the economics of aluminum reclamation in dross processing systems. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  9. European Conference on Health Economics.

    PubMed

    Malmivaara, Antti

    2010-12-01

    The biennial European Conference on Health Economics was held in Finland this year, at the Finlandia Hall in the centre of Helsinki. The European conferences rotate among European countries and fall between the biennial world congresses organized by the International Health Economics Association (iHEA). A record attendance of approximately 800 delegates from 50 countries around the world were present at the Helsinki conference. The theme of the conference was 'Connecting Health and Economics'. All major topics of health economics were covered in the sessions. For the first time, social care economics was included in the agenda of the European Conference as a session of its own. PMID:21155696

  10. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy AA2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S.; Sankar, V. S.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Venkitakrishnan, P. V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is a relatively recent development, which can provide a superior alternative to resistance spot welding and riveting for fabrication of aluminum sheet metal structures. In the current work, FSSW experiments were conducted in 3-mm thick sheets of aluminum alloy 2014 in T4 and T6 conditions, with and without Alclad layers. The effects of tool geometry and welding process parameters on joint formation were investigated. A good correlation between process parameters, bond width, hook height, joint strength, and fracture mode was observed. The presence of Alclad layers and the base metal temper condition were found to have no major effect on joint formation and joint strength. Friction stir spot welds produced under optimum conditions were found to be superior to riveted joints in lap-shear and cross-tension tests. The prospects of FSSW in aluminum sheet metal fabrication are discussed.

  11. Potassium alum and aluminum sulfate micro-inclusions in polar ice from Dome Fuji, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Hiroshi; Iizuka, Yoshinori; Horikawa, Shinichiro; Sakurai, Toshimitsu; Hondoh, Takeo; Motoyama, Hideaki

    2014-03-01

    Water-soluble trace constituents affect the physicochemical properties of polar ice. Their structural distribution provides important insights into the formation history of ice and inclusions. We report the first finding of KAl(SO4)2·12H2O (potassium alum) and Al2(SO4)3·nH2O (aluminum sulfate) micro-inclusions in the Dome Fuji ice core, East Antartica, using a micro-Raman technique. Eutectic temperatures of these water-soluble species determined using thermal analysis were -0.4 °C for potassium alum and -8.0 °C for aluminum sulfate. Although the formation process of the aluminum-bearing sulfates remains unclear, the occurrence of these salts largely depends on ice depth.

  12. The effect of mechanical surface and heat treatments on the erosion resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D.; Brainard, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of both mechanical surface treatments and heat treatments on the erosion resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy were studied in order to gain a better understanding of material properties which affect erosion behavior. It was found that mechanical surface treatments have little or no effect on the erosion resistance. This is due to the formation by particle impact of a work-hardened surface layer, independent of the initial surface condition. The erosion resistance of aluminum single crystals was found to be independent of orientation, which is due to destruction of the surface microstructure and formation of a polycrystalline surface layer by the particle impact as observed by X-ray diffraction. Although on solution treatment of annealed aluminum 6061 the increase in hardness is accompanied by an increase in erosion resistance, precipitation treatment (which causes a further increase in hardness) results in a slightly lower erosion resistance.

  13. Aluminum silicide microparticles transformed from aluminum thin films by hypoeutectic interdiffusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum silicide microparticles with oxidized rough surfaces were formed on Si substrates through a spontaneous granulation process of Al films. This microparticle formation was caused by interdiffusion of Al and Si atoms at hypoeutectic temperatures of Al-Si systems, which was driven by compressive stress stored in Al films. The size, density, and the composition of the microparticles could be controlled by adjusting the annealing temperature, time, and the film thickness. High-density microparticles of a size around 10 μm and with an atomic ratio of Si/Al of approximately 0.8 were obtained when a 90-nm-thick Al film on Si substrate was annealed for 9 h at 550°C. The microparticle formation resulted in a rapid increase of the sheet resistance, which is a consequence of substantial consumption of Al film. This simple route to size- and composition-controllable microparticle formation may lay a foundation stone for the thermoelectric study on Al-Si alloy-based heterogeneous systems. PMID:24994964

  14. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  15. NSI conference support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, Susan

    1991-01-01

    One of the many services NSI provides as an extension of customer/user support is to attend major scientific conferences. The conference effort provides NASA/OSSA scientists with many benefits: (1) scientist get to see NSI in action; they utilize the network to read email, and have recently begun to demonstrate their scientific research to their colleagues; (2) scientist get an opportunity to meet and interact with NSI Staff, which gives scientists a chance to get status on their requirements, ask about network status, get acquainted with our procedures, and learn about services; and (3) scientists are exposed to networking in a larger sense; particularly by knowing about other NASA groups who provide valuable scientific resources over the Internet.

  16. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  17. IEEE conference record -- Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This conference covers the following areas: computational plasma physics; vacuum electronic; basic phenomena in fully ionized plasmas; plasma, electron, and ion sources; environmental/energy issues in plasma science; space plasmas; plasma processing; ball lightning/spherical plasma configurations; plasma processing; fast wave devices; magnetic fusion; basic phenomena in partially ionized plasma; dense plasma focus; plasma diagnostics; basic phenomena in weakly ionized gases; fast opening switches; MHD; fast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; intense ion and electron beams; laser-produced plasmas; microwave plasma interactions; EM and ETH launchers; solid state plasmas and switches; intense beam microwaves; and plasmas for lighting. Separate abstracts were prepared for 416 papers in this conference.

  18. Aluminum core structures brazed without use of flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Aluminum alloy face sheets are brazed to aluminum alloy honeycomb cores without using corrosive flux by means of one or three methods. The completed brazed structure has the high-strength characteristics of heat treated aluminum alloys.

  19. Hair as an indicator of excessive aluminum exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Yokel, R.A.

    1982-04-01

    To determine if excessive systemic exposure to aluminum would be reflected in increased aluminum concentration in hair, rabbits were given a series of aluminum lactate injections. Hair was collected before the aluminum lactate administration from the site of injections and twice after the injections from this site as well as from an area adjoining the injection site. Aluminum was determined by flameless atomic absorption analysis of acid-digested samples. The concentration of aluminum in the hair increased after the injections in samples taken at both times from both sites. Considerable variability in hair aluminum was found before excessive exposure, as has been reported in humans, and in response to the exposure. The increase in hair aluminum did not correlate with the amount of hair produced. Nevertheless, because some subjects exposed to excessive aluminum showed a very large increase in hair aluminum, hair may be a useful indicator of aluminum body burden in such aluminum-induced conditions as dialysis encephalopathy.

  20. Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

  1. Investigations of Aluminum-Doped Self-Healing Zircaloy Surfaces in Context of Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, James; Vasudevamurthy, Gokul; Snead, Lance; Hinderliter, Brian; Massey, Caleb

    2016-05-01

    We present here some important results investigating aluminum as an effective surface dopant for increased oxidation resistance of zircaloy nuclear fuel cladding. At first, the transport behavior of aluminum into reactor grade zircaloy was studied using simple diffusion couples at temperatures greater than 770 K. The experiments revealed the formation of tens of microns thick graded Zr-Al layers. The activation energy of aluminum in zircaloy was found to be ~175 kJ/mol (~1.8 eV), indicating the high mobility of aluminum in zircaloy. Subsequently, aluminum sputter-coated zircaloy coupons were heat-treated to achieve surface doping and form compositionally graded layers. These coupons were then tested in steam environments at 1073 and 1273 K. The microstructure of the as-fabricated and steam-corroded specimens was compared to those of pure zircaloy control specimens. Analysis of data revealed that aluminum effectively competed with zircaloy for oxygen up until 1073 K blocking oxygen penetration, with no traces of large scale spalling, indicating mechanically stable interfaces and surfaces. At the highest steam test temperatures, aluminum was observed to segregate from the Zr-Al alloy under layers and migrate to the surface forming discrete clusters. Although this is perceived as an extremely desirable phenomenon, in the current experiments, oxygen was observed to penetrate into the zirconium-rich under layers, which could be attributed to formation of surface defects such as cracks in the surface alumina layers.

  2. Investigations of Aluminum-Doped Self-Healing Zircaloy Surfaces in Context of Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, James; Vasudevamurthy, Gokul; Snead, Lance; Hinderliter, Brian; Massey, Caleb

    2016-06-01

    We present here some important results investigating aluminum as an effective surface dopant for increased oxidation resistance of zircaloy nuclear fuel cladding. At first, the transport behavior of aluminum into reactor grade zircaloy was studied using simple diffusion couples at temperatures greater than 770 K. The experiments revealed the formation of tens of microns thick graded Zr-Al layers. The activation energy of aluminum in zircaloy was found to be ~175 kJ/mol (~1.8 eV), indicating the high mobility of aluminum in zircaloy. Subsequently, aluminum sputter-coated zircaloy coupons were heat-treated to achieve surface doping and form compositionally graded layers. These coupons were then tested in steam environments at 1073 and 1273 K. The microstructure of the as-fabricated and steam-corroded specimens was compared to those of pure zircaloy control specimens. Analysis of data revealed that aluminum effectively competed with zircaloy for oxygen up until 1073 K blocking oxygen penetration, with no traces of large scale spalling, indicating mechanically stable interfaces and surfaces. At the highest steam test temperatures, aluminum was observed to segregate from the Zr-Al alloy under layers and migrate to the surface forming discrete clusters. Although this is perceived as an extremely desirable phenomenon, in the current experiments, oxygen was observed to penetrate into the zirconium-rich under layers, which could be attributed to formation of surface defects such as cracks in the surface alumina layers.

  3. SAARC Conference on Children.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    In September 1992, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, ministry representatives attended the 2nd South Asian Ministerial Conference on Children to discuss child survival and safe motherhood, maternal and child nutrition, basic education, safe water, sanitation, the environment, child rights, and sociopolitical strategy to reach goals and to reduce poverty. To achieve the 7 major goals and essential supportive goals for the region, each country must define tasks in manageable terms based on country-specific and community-specific needs and importance while at the same time countries should cooperate to strengthen prospects of achieving goals emerging as priorities. The Conference called for countries to reinforce their National Plans of Action with a regional perspective and to consider representative goals in primary education, diarrhea control, iodine deficiency disorders, reducing gender disparity, family size, child labor, drinking water, guinea worm disease, immunization, maternal mortality, and nutrition. The Conference emphasized that the strategy for reaching child-centered goals should be integrated with the total development strategy and be a holistic approach. For example, governments need to expand social safety programs for children and women because of structural adjustments in the economy. The resolution also called on governments to allow community-led local planning. A working group at the conference made recommendations for supporting/sectoral goals on water supply, sanitation, and environment. For example, it called for universal access to potable water and sanitary means of excreta disposal by 2000 and for adequate shelter and services to improve the living environment of children in South Asia. Some recommended strategies to achieve these goals were community participation; decentralization; promotion of self-reliance, cost-sharing, and sustainability; and special training for women. Other areas they addressed were home gardens for vegetables and fruits

  4. Moldova. Historic regional conference.

    PubMed

    Moshin, V

    1995-05-01

    The Directorate of Maternal and Child Health and the Family Planning Association of Moldova organized a regional conference, which was held October 18-19, 1994, in Kishinev, Moldova, with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). The conference,"Problems of Family Planning in Eastern Europe," was attended by approximately 400 Moldovan delegates of governmental and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and by 25 delegates from Romania, Russia, Belarus, the Ukraine, and Georgia. The President of Moldova and the Ministry of Public Health of Moldova gave their approval. The main objectives of the conference were to inform the public about the recommendations of the ICPD, to analyze the status of women's reproductive health and family planning in Eastern Europe, and to find ways of implementing the ICPD Plan of Action. Major problems identified during the conference were: 1) the social and economic problems facing most families; 2) the high rate of morbidity and mortality; 3) the decrease in birth rate; 4) the increase in abortions; 5) the rising incidence of venereal disease; and 6) the absence of an effective family planning system. It was agreed that cooperation between governments and NGOs is essential in designing population programs for each country. The following goals were set: 1) to provide populations with sufficient contraceptives; 2) to actively promote family planning concepts through the mass media; 3) to train specialists and to open family planning offices and centers; 4) to introduce sex education in the curricula of Pedagogical Institutes; and 5) to create national and regional statistical and sociological databases on population issues. PMID:12222268

  5. 1999 IEEE radar conference

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    This conference addresses the stringent radar technology demands facing the next century: target detection, tracking and identification; changing target environment; increased clutter mitigation techniques; air traffic control; transportation; drug smuggling; remote sensing, and other consumer oriented applications. A timely discussion covers how to minimize costs for these emerging areas. Advanced radar technology theory and applications are also presented. Topics covered include: signal processing; space time adaptive processing/antennas; surveillance technology; radar systems; dual use; and phenomenology.

  6. SALT Science Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David; Schroeder, Anja

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has seen great changes in the last years following the beginning of full time science operations in 2011. The three first generation instruments, namely the SALTICAM imager, the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) and its multiple modes and finally in 2014, the new High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS), have commissioned it. The SALT community now eagerly anticipate the installation and commissioning of the near-infrared arm of RSS, likely to commence in 2016. The the third "Science with SALT" conference was held at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study from 1-5 June 2015. The goals of this conference were to: -Present and discuss recent results from SALT observations; -Anticipate scientific programs that will be carried out with new SALT instrumentation such as RSS-NIR; -Provide a scientific environment in which to foster inter-institutional and inter-facility collaborations between scientists at the different SALT partners; -Provide an opportunity for students and postdocs to become more engaged in SALT science and operations; -Encourage the scientific strategic planning that will be necessary to insure an important role for SALT in an era of large astronomical facilities in the southern hemisphere such as MeerKAT, the SKA, LSST, and ALMA; -Consider options for future instrumentation and technical development of SALT; and, -Present, discuss, and engage in the SALT Collateral Benefits program led by SAAO. Conference proceedings editors: David Buckley and Anja Schroeder

  7. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  8. Effect of heat treatment on the structure and properties of steel-aluminum composite with a diffusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, V. I.; Lysak, V. I.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Kharlamov, V. O.

    2015-11-01

    Results of a study of the effect of the conditions of heat treatment on the structure and properties of explosion-welded steel-aluminum composite with different diffusion barriers are reported. The creation of diffusion barrier from either nitrated steel layer or chromium sublayer between aluminum and steel was shown to increase the temperature stability of steel-aluminum composite at the expense of deceleration of diffusion processes and shift of the temperature range of the onset of the formation of intermetallics to the high-temperature range.

  9. Enhancement of oxidation resistance of silicon carbide by high-dose and multi-energy aluminum implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.; Du, H.; Libera, M.; Withrow, S.P.; Casas, L.M.; Lareau, R.T.

    1993-12-31

    High-dose and multi-energy aluminum implantation of {alpha}-SiC (0001) was carried out to achieve a broad aluminum distribution extending from the sample surface to a depth of approximately 350 nm. Oxidation resistance of the implanted crystals was studied in 1 atm flowing oxygen at 1300C. Aluminum implantation resulted in a 45% improvement in the oxidation resistance of {alpha}-SiC as compared with unimplanted crystals due to the formation of structurally dense mullite (3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.2SiO{sub 2}) in the oxidation scale.

  10. Aluminum cars: fast track to coal-haul savings

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, M.G.

    1983-08-01

    While aluminum railroad cars are not new, South Carolina's Public Service Authority, called Santee Cooper, created a transportation milestone when it ordered 300 lightweight aluminum cars for coal-train service. Sizable cost savings are expected with the two car types: composite aluminum/steel body hopper and all-aluminum gondola. The authors detail the cars' specifications, manufacture, and maintenance; describe other recent aluminum-car productions; and analyze the economics of an aluminum-car unit train. 4 figures, 1 table.

  11. The conference on reproductive behavior: a history.

    PubMed

    Dewsbury, Donald A

    2003-04-01

    The Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology was, in part, an outgrowth of the Conference on Reproductive Behavior, which was, in turn, an outgrowth of the West Coast Sex Meetings. In this article I trace the history of these organizations. The West Coast meetings provided an opportunity for free and informal exchange among west coast researchers studying sexual behavior. The 29 meetings of the Conference on Reproductive Behavior began with a similar format that evolved as success and growth forced numerous changes. With time, the meetings became more structured and more dependent on time limits, and added invited addresses, symposia, workshops, roundtables, posters, tours, and papers presented by abstract only. The administrative structure was kept as simple as possible. With changing times, these informal meetings eventually were superseded by the Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology. PMID:12788292

  12. Corrosion Mechanisms of Steel and Cast Iron by Molten Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balloy, David; Tissier, Jean-Charles; Giorgi, Marie-Laurence; Briant, Marc

    2010-09-01

    The corrosion mechanisms by liquid aluminum of three industrial materials have been studied: unalloyed steel (UAS), and ferritic and modified pearlitic cast irons (FCI and PCI, respectively). The behavior of these materials when in contact with liquid aluminum is different. Aluminum diffuses deep into the UAS and forms intermetallic compounds with iron at the surface and in the steel matrix. At the surface, only Fe2Al5 and FeAl3 are found. In the matrix, FeAl2 also is formed in agreement with the equilibrium Fe-Al diagram. From the matrix to FeAl2, the Al content in the ferrite increases progressively until Al saturation is reached. At this step, black elongated precipitates (Al4C3 and/or graphite) appear. Graphite lamellas present in both FCI and PCI constitute an efficient barrier to the Al diffusion. The high silicon content of the FCI leads to the formation of a phase free from Al and saturated in Si. For the PCI, a thin layer rich in Al and Si, which is formed between the matrix and Fe2Al5, limits the diffusion of atoms. The effects of Cr and P added in the PCI also are discussed.

  13. Environmental effects on aluminum fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, F. R.; Shepic, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The sustained load stress corrosion cracking (SCC) threshold for aluminum alloy 214 was determined using smooth (sigma sub TH) and precracked (K sub ISCC) specimens, and cyclic load growth behavior in 3.5% NaCl salt solution was studied. The relationship between K sub ISCC and sigma sub TH was also studied. The work showed that 2124-T851 aluminum alloy in plate gage has a moderately high resistance to stress corrosion attack. Experimental results showed that no SCC occurred in the longitudinal and long transverse directions in any of the tests. Some SCC was found by smooth tests in the short transverse direction, and the data were confirmed by two test methods-sigma sub TH = 275 MN/sq m (40 ksi). No SCC was found from compact specimen tests in any direction: surface flaw and center notch specimens evaluated in the short transverse direction exhibited SCC. The data indicate that stress corrosion behavior is defect, size, and stress dependent, but not entirely in accordance with a stress intensity controlled mechanism.

  14. Mathematical model and numerical simulation of aluminum casting and solidification in magnetic fields with allowance for free surface dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, A. V.; Pervukhin, M. V.; Platonov, D. V.; Khatsayuk, M. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A complex mathematical model of aluminum casting and solidification in a variable electromagnetic field is constructed. The model is based on the solution of magnetohydrodynamic equations and the VOF method. Test results are presented for the model and the numerical algorithm proposed. The numerical results are compared with experimental data and computations of other authors and are found to be in good agreement. The model is used to simulate aluminum solidification under an electromagnetic field. The physical processes influencing ingot formation are analyzed.

  15. Improved dual flow aluminum hydrogen peroxide battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Catherine; Licht, Stuart L.; Matthews, Donna

    1993-11-01

    A novel dual flow battery configuration is provided comprising an aqueous hydrogen peroxide catholyte, an aqueous anolyte, a porous solid electrocatalyst capable of reducing said hydrogen peroxide and separating said anolyte, and an aluminum anode positioned within said anolyte. Separation of catholyte and anolyte chambers prevents hydrogen peroxide poisoning of the aluminum anode.

  16. RECOVERY OF METAL USING ALUMINUM DISPLACEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of typical metals (Cu, Pb, Sn, Ni) from printed circuit and metal finishing waste streams was evaluated using displacement with aluminum. he metal is recovered as non-hazardous metal particles and can be recycled by smelting. n acceptable aluminum metal configuration ...

  17. Virus inactivation in aluminum and polyaluminum coagulation.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Sakuma, Satoru; Gojo, Takahito; Mamiya, Teppei; Suzuoki, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takanobu

    2003-11-15

    Inorganic aluminum salts, such as aluminum sulfate, are coagulants that cause small particles, such as bacteria and viruses as well as inorganic particles, to destabilize and combine into larger aggregates. In this investigation, batch coagulation treatments of water samples spiked with Qbeta, MS2, T4, and P1 viruses were conducted with four different aluminum coagulants. The total infectious virus concentration in the suspension of floc particles that eventually formed by dosing with coagulant was measured after the floc particles were dissolved by raising the pH with an alkaline beef extract solution. The virus concentrations were extremely reduced after the water samples were dosed with aluminum coagulants. Viruses mixed with and adsorbed onto preformed aluminum hydroxide floc were, however, completely recovered after the floc dissolution. These results indicated that the aluminum coagulation process inactivates viruses. Virucidal activity was most prominent with the prehydrolyzed aluminum salt coagulant, polyaluminum chloride (PACl). Virucidal activity was lower in river water than in ultrapure water--natural organic matter in the river water depressed the virucidal activity. Mechanisms and kinetics of the virus inactivation were discussed. Our results suggest that intermediate polymers formed during hydrolysis of the aluminum coagulants sorbed strongly to viruses, either rendering them inactive or preventing infectivity. PMID:14655704

  18. RECOVERY OF METALS USING ALUMINUM DISPLACEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of typical metals (Cu, Pb, Sn, Ni) from printed circuit and metal finishing waste streams was evaluated using displacement with aluminum. he metal is recovered as non-hazardous metal particles and can be recycled by smelting. n acceptable aluminum metal configuration ...

  19. Aluminum low temperature smelting cell metal collection

    DOEpatents

    Beck, Theodore R.; Brown, Craig W.

    2002-07-16

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten salt electrolyte in an electrolytic cell having an anodic liner for containing the electrolyte, the liner having an anodic bottom and walls including at least one end wall extending upwardly from the anodic bottom, the anodic liner being substantially inert with respect to the molten electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes is provided and disposed vertically in the electrolyte. A plurality of cathodes is disposed vertically in the electrolyte in alternating relationship with the anodes. The anodes are electrically connected to the anodic liner. An electric current is passed through the anodic liner to the anodes, through the electrolyte to the cathodes, and aluminum is deposited on said cathodes. Oxygen bubbles are generated at the anodes and the anodic liner, the bubbles stirring the electrolyte. Molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes into a tubular member positioned underneath the cathodes. The tubular member is in liquid communication with each cathode to collect the molten aluminum therefrom while excluding electrolyte. Molten aluminum is delivered through the tubular member to a molten aluminum reservoir located substantially opposite the anodes and cathodes. The molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes and delivered to the reservoir while avoiding contact of the molten aluminum with the anodic bottom.

  20. SOLID STATE BONDING OF THORIUM WITH ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Storchhelm, S.

    1959-12-01

    A method is described for bonding thorium and aluminum by placing clean surfaces of thorium and aluminum in contact with each other and hot pressing the metals together in a protective atmosphere at a temperature of about 375 to 575 deg C and at a pressure of at least 10 tsi to effect a bond.