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Sample records for formation fortescue group

  1. REE chemistry and Sm-Nd systematics of late Archean weathering profiles in the Fortescue Group, Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacFarlane, A. W.; Danielson, A.; Holland, H. D.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    1994-01-01

    Two weathering profiles, each consisting of an upper, sericite-rich zone and a lower, chlorite-rich zone, are preserved between flows of the Mt. Roe Basalt in the Fortescue Group, Hamersley Basin, Western Australia. REE concentrations in samples from these two profiles, which originally developed ca 2,760 Ma, show large variations depending on stratigraphic position. LREE abundances and (La/Yb)N are greatest at depths of 3-6 m below the paleosurface of the Mt. Roe #1 profile and are somewhat lower in samples above this level. The LREEs reach concentrations 6-9 times greater than in the underlying basalt, and thus appear to have been mobilized downward in the paleosol and concentrated in its middle part. LREE concentrations in the #2 profile show a similar distribution but with a sharp increase in all REE concentrations within 50 cm of the paleosurface. The distinction between the REE profiles in the two paleosols may be related to the difference in the overlying material. The #1 paleosol is overlain by a few meters of sediments and then by basalt, whereas the #2 paleosol is directly overlain by basalt. The LREEs appear to have been mobilized both during chemical weathering of the parental basalt and during later lower-greenschist-facies metamorphism and metasomatism of the paleosols. Remobilization of the REEs during the regional metamorphism of the Fortescue Group is confirmed by a whole-rock Sm-Nd reference isochron of Mt. Roe #1 samples with an age of 2,151 +/- 360 Ma. Variable initial 143Nd/144Nd values of unweathered basalt samples which may represent the paleosol protolith prevents a confident determination of the magnitude of LREE mobility. Both the initial mobilization of the REEs during weathering and the metasomatic remobilization appear to have taken place under redox conditions where Ce was present dominantly as Ce3+, because Ce anomalies are not developed within the sericite zone samples regardless of concentration. Europium anomalies in the

  2. REE chemistry and Sm-Nd systematics of late Archean weathering profiles in the Fortescue Group, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, A W; Danielson, A; Holland, H D; Jacobsen, S B

    1994-04-01

    Two weathering profiles, each consisting of an upper, sericite-rich zone and a lower, chlorite-rich zone, are preserved between flows of the Mt. Roe Basalt in the Fortescue Group, Hamersley Basin, Western Australia. REE concentrations in samples from these two profiles, which originally developed ca 2,760 Ma, show large variations depending on stratigraphic position. LREE abundances and (La/Yb)N are greatest at depths of 3-6 m below the paleosurface of the Mt. Roe #1 profile and are somewhat lower in samples above this level. The LREEs reach concentrations 6-9 times greater than in the underlying basalt, and thus appear to have been mobilized downward in the paleosol and concentrated in its middle part. LREE concentrations in the #2 profile show a similar distribution but with a sharp increase in all REE concentrations within 50 cm of the paleosurface. The distinction between the REE profiles in the two paleosols may be related to the difference in the overlying material. The #1 paleosol is overlain by a few meters of sediments and then by basalt, whereas the #2 paleosol is directly overlain by basalt. The LREEs appear to have been mobilized both during chemical weathering of the parental basalt and during later lower-greenschist-facies metamorphism and metasomatism of the paleosols. Remobilization of the REEs during the regional metamorphism of the Fortescue Group is confirmed by a whole-rock Sm-Nd reference isochron of Mt. Roe #1 samples with an age of 2,151 +/- 360 Ma. Variable initial 143Nd/144Nd values of unweathered basalt samples which may represent the paleosol protolith prevents a confident determination of the magnitude of LREE mobility. Both the initial mobilization of the REEs during weathering and the metasomatic remobilization appear to have taken place under redox conditions where Ce was present dominantly as Ce3+, because Ce anomalies are not developed within the sericite zone samples regardless of concentration. Europium anomalies in the

  3. Hydrocarbons preserved in a ~2.7 Ga outcrop sample from the Fortescue Group, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Y; Flannery, D T; Walter, M R; George, S C

    2015-03-01

    The hydrocarbons preserved in an Archean rock were extracted, and their composition and distribution in consecutive slices from the outside to the inside of the rock were examined. The 2.7 Ga rock was collected from the Fortescue Group in the Pilbara region, Western Australia. The bitumen I (solvent-extracted rock) and bitumen II (solvent-extracted hydrochloric acid-treated rock) fractions have different hydrocarbon compositions. Bitumen I contains only trace amounts of aliphatic hydrocarbons and virtually no aromatic hydrocarbons. In contrast, bitumen II contains abundant aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The difference seems to reflect the weathering history and preservational environment of the investigated rock. Aliphatic hydrocarbons in bitumen I are considered to be mainly from later hydrocarbon inputs, after initial deposition and burial, and are therefore not indigenous. The lack of aromatic hydrocarbons in bitumen I suggests a severe weathering environment since uplift and exposure of the rock at the Earth's surface in the Cenozoic. On the other hand, the high abundance of aromatic hydrocarbons in bitumen II suggests that bitumen II hydrocarbons have been physically isolated from removal by their encapsulation within carbonate minerals. The richness of aromatic hydrocarbons and the relative scarcity of aliphatic hydrocarbons may reflect the original compositions of organic materials biosynthesised in ancient organisms in the Archean era, or the high thermal maturity of the rock. Cyanobacterial biomarkers were observed in the surficial slices of the rock, which may indicate that endolithic cyanobacteria inhabited the surface outcrop. The distribution of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons implies a high thermal maturity, which is consistent with the lack of any specific biomarkers, such as hopanes and steranes, and the prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphic grade. PMID:25393450

  4. Modern Subsurface Bacteria in Pristine 2.7 Ga-Old Fossil Stromatolite Drillcore Samples from the Fortescue Group, Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Emmanuelle; Moreira, David; Philippot, Pascal; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.; López-García, Purificación

    2009-01-01

    Background Several abiotic processes leading to the formation of life-like signatures or later contamination with actual biogenic traces can blur the interpretation of the earliest fossil record. In recent years, a large body of evidence showing the occurrence of diverse and active microbial communities in the terrestrial subsurface has accumulated. Considering the time elapsed since Archaean sedimentation, the contribution of subsurface microbial communities postdating the rock formation to the fossil biomarker pool and other biogenic remains in Archaean rocks may be far from negligible. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to evaluate the degree of potential contamination of Archean rocks by modern microorganisms, we looked for the presence of living indigenous bacteria in fresh diamond drillcores through 2,724 Myr-old stromatolites (Tumbiana Formation, Fortescue Group, Western Australia) using molecular methods based on the amplification of small subunit ribosomal RNA genes (SSU rDNAs). We analyzed drillcore samples from 4.3 m and 66.2 m depth, showing signs of meteoritic alteration, and also from deeper “fresh” samples showing no apparent evidence for late stage alteration (68 m, 78.8 m, and 99.3 m). We also analyzed control samples from drilling and sawing fluids and a series of laboratory controls to establish a list of potential contaminants introduced during sample manipulation and PCR experiments. We identified in this way the presence of indigenous bacteria belonging to Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria in aseptically-sawed inner parts of drillcores down to at least 78.8 m depth. Conclusions/Significance The presence of modern bacterial communities in subsurface fossil stromatolite layers opens the possibility that a continuous microbial colonization had existed in the past and contributed to the accumulation of biogenic traces over geological timescales. This finding casts shadow on bulk analyses of early life

  5. Group Formation in Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demange, Gabrielle; Wooders, Myrna

    2005-01-01

    Broad and diverse ranges of activities are conducted within and by organized groups of individuals, including political, economic and social activities. These activities have recently become a subject of intense interest in economics and game theory. Some of the topics investigated in this collection are models of networks of power and privilege, trade networks, co-authorship networks, buyer-seller networks with differentiated products, and networks of medical innovation and the adaptation of new information. Other topics are social norms on punctuality, clubs and the provision of club goods and public goods, research and development and collusive alliances among corporations, and international alliances and trading agreements. While relatively recent, the literature on game theoretic studies of group formation in economics is already vast. This volume provides an introduction to this important literature on game-theoretic treatments of situations with networks, clubs, and coalitions, including some applications.

  6. A Fossil Group in Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Eric D.; Rappaport, Saul A.; McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Mark W.; Grant, Catherine E.; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    In the current picture of hierarchical structure formation, galaxy groups play a vital role as the seeds from which large assemblies of matter form. Compact groups are also important environments in which to watch the fueling of star formation and AGN activity, as the conditions are ideal for galaxy-galaxy interactions. We have identified a galaxy system that may represent an intermediate or transition stage in group evolution. Shakhbazyan 1 (or SHK 1) is a remarkably compact collection of about ten massive, red-sequence galaxies within a region 100 kpc across. Several of these galaxies show signs of AGN activity, and new, deep optical observations with the Discovery Channel Telescope reveal an extended stellar envelope surrounding the galaxies. This envelope is much more extended than what would be expected from a superposition of normal galaxy envelopes, and it indicates a large amount of intra-group starlight, evidence that the galaxies in SHK 1 are dynamically interacting.We here present new Chandra spectral imaging observations of this unusual system that confirm the presence of an X-ray-emitting diffuse intra-group medium (IGM), with a temperature of 1.5 keV and X-ray luminosity of 1043 erg/s. Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, the system is about 1/3 as massive as expected from the optical richness. In addition, three of the ten central galaxies exhibit signatures of X-ray AGN. The under-luminous IGM, high density of bright galaxies, and evidence for galaxy-galaxy interaction indicate that this system may be in a transition stage of galaxy merging, similar to that expected in the formation of a fossil group. Alternatively, SHK 1 may consist of multiple poor groups in the final stages of merging along our line of sight. We explore these scenarios and outline paths of future study for this enigmatic system.

  7. Group formation through indirect reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Koji; Shimada, Takashi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2013-03-01

    The emergence of group structure of cooperative relations is studied in an agent-based model. It is proved that specific types of reciprocity norms lead individuals to split into two groups only inside of which they are cooperative. The condition for the evolutionary stability of the norms is also obtained. This result suggests reciprocity norms, which usually promote cooperation, can cause society's separation into multiple groups.

  8. The Dynamics of Group Formation Among Leeches

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, Giacomo; Bianconi, Ginestra; Torre, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Leeches exploring a new environment continuously meet each other and merge in temporary groups. After 2–3 h, leeches become attracted to each other eventually forming a large and stable group. When their number is reduced, leeches remain solitary, behaving independently. Group formation is facilitated by body injection of serotonin (5-HT) and the level of endogenous 5-HT is elevated in leeches forming a large group. In contrast, intravenous injection of 5-HT antagonists prevented injected leeches from joining a large group of conspecifics. When sensilla near the head were ablated or the supraesophageal ganglion disconnected, leeches remained solitary, but explored the environment swimming and crawling. These results suggest that group formation is initiated by a release of 5-HT triggered by sensilla stimulation and its dynamics can be explained by the establishment of a reinforcement dynamics, as observed during human group formation. As 5-HT affects social interactions also in humans, group formation in leeches and humans share a similar dynamics and hormonal control. PMID:22629247

  9. Group formation and the evolution of sociality.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Thomas; De Monte, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    In spite of its intrinsic evolutionary instability, altruistic behavior in social groups is widespread in nature, spanning from organisms endowed with complex cognitive abilities to microbial populations. In this study, we show that if social individuals have an enhanced tendency to form groups and fitness increases with group cohesion, sociality can evolve and be maintained in the absence of actively assortative mechanisms such as kin recognition or nepotism toward other carriers of the social gene. When explicitly taken into account in a game-theoretical framework, the process of group formation qualitatively changes the evolutionary dynamics with respect to games played in groups of constant size and equal grouping tendencies. The evolutionary consequences of the rules underpinning the group size distribution are discussed for a simple model of microbial aggregation by differential attachment, indicating a way to the evolution of sociality bereft of peer recognition. PMID:23289567

  10. Group formation stabilizes predator-prey dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fryxell, John M; Mosser, Anna; Sinclair, Anthony R E; Packer, Craig

    2007-10-25

    Theoretical ecology is largely founded on the principle of mass action, in which uncoordinated populations of predators and prey move in a random and well-mixed fashion across a featureless landscape. The conceptual core of this body of theory is the functional response, predicting the rate of prey consumption by individual predators as a function of predator and/or prey densities. This assumption is seriously violated in many ecosystems in which predators and/or prey form social groups. Here we develop a new set of group-dependent functional responses to consider the ecological implications of sociality and apply the model to the Serengeti ecosystem. All of the prey species typically captured by Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) are gregarious, exhibiting nonlinear relationships between prey-group density and population density. The observed patterns of group formation profoundly reduce food intake rates below the levels expected under random mixing, having as strong an impact on intake rates as the seasonal migratory behaviour of the herbivores. A dynamical system model parameterized for the Serengeti ecosystem (using wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) as a well-studied example) shows that grouping strongly stabilizes interactions between lions and wildebeest. Our results suggest that social groups rather than individuals are the basic building blocks around which predator-prey interactions should be modelled and that group formation may provide the underlying stability of many ecosystems. PMID:17960242

  11. Structuring the Group Experience: A Format for Designing Psychoeducational Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furr, Susan R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents six-step model for moving from a general statement of purpose to a psychoeducational group design that includes didactic content, experiential activities, and processing. By following this model the group facilitator will be able to develop a psychoeducational group that provides a logical sequence of learning activities fostering…

  12. Managed Group Formation: An Approach to Team Formation in Policy Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Reed E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Managed group formation uses student personal value data and sociometric nomination to optimize the influence of work group formation on student learning. Resulting work group formations are used to enhance the effectiveness of traditional course content and to increase students' sensitization to important group process issues in business policy.…

  13. Group-Level Formative Feedback and Metadiscourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resendes, Monica; Scardamalia, Marlene; Bereiter, Carl; Chen, Bodong; Halewood, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    This research explores the ability of grade 2 students to engage in productive discussion about the state of their knowledge building using group-level feedback tools to support their metadiscourse. Two aspects of knowledge work were common to the comparison and experimental classes: "Knowledge Building talk" (KB talk) involving…

  14. Endogenous Group Formation via Unproductive Costs

    PubMed Central

    Aimone, Jason A.; Iannaccone, Laurence R.; Makowsky, Michael D.; Rubin, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Sacrifice is widely believed to enhance cooperation in churches, communes, gangs, clans, military units, and many other groups. We find that sacrifice can also work in the lab, apart from special ideologies, identities, or interactions. Our subjects play a modified VCM game—one in which they can voluntarily join groups that provide reduced rates of return on private investment. This leads to both endogenous sorting (because free-riders tend to reject the reduced-rate option) and substitution (because reduced private productivity favours increased club involvement). Seemingly unproductive costs thus serve to screen out free-riders, attract conditional cooperators, boost club production, and increase member welfare. The sacrifice mechanism is simple and particularly useful where monitoring difficulties impede punishment, exclusion, fees, and other more standard solutions. PMID:24808623

  15. Individuality and group formation: the role of independence and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kampmeier, C; Simon, B

    2001-09-01

    This research examined the interplay of group formation and individualization processes with a particular emphasis on minority and majority groups. First, a 2-component theory of individuality that distinguishes between individuality as independence and as differentiation from other people was presented, tested, and cross-validated in 2 questionnaire studies. Next, a pilot experiment provided first support for the working assumption that the salience of the differentiation or independence components of individuality differentially affect minority and majority group formation. Finally, the main experiment demonstrated that these individuality effects on minority and majority group formation are due largely to a differential orientation toward either intergroup or intragroup comparisons. This experiment also uncovered a unique effect of relative in-group size, but this effect was limited to similarity-based group formation. PMID:11554646

  16. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  17. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

    PubMed Central

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  18. Cyclic diguanylate regulation of Bacillus cereus group biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Fagerlund, Annette; Smith, Veronika; Røhr, Åsmund K; Lindbäck, Toril; Parmer, Marthe P; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Reubsaet, Leon; Økstad, Ole Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Biofilm formation can be considered a bacterial virulence mechanism. In a range of Gram-negatives, increased levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) promotes biofilm formation and reduces motility. Other bacterial processes known to be regulated by c-di-GMP include cell division, differentiation and virulence. Among Gram-positive bacteria, where the function of c-di-GMP signalling is less well characterized, c-di-GMP was reported to regulate swarming motility in Bacillus subtilis while having very limited or no effect on biofilm formation. In contrast, we show that in the Bacillus cereus group c-di-GMP signalling is linked to biofilm formation, and to several other phenotypes important to the lifestyle of these bacteria. The Bacillus thuringiensis 407 genome encodes eleven predicted proteins containing domains (GGDEF/EAL) related to c-di-GMP synthesis or breakdown, ten of which are conserved through the majority of clades of the B. cereus group, including Bacillus anthracis. Several of the genes were shown to affect biofilm formation, motility, enterotoxin synthesis and/or sporulation. Among these, cdgF appeared to encode a master diguanylate cyclase essential for biofilm formation in an oxygenated environment. Only two cdg genes (cdgA, cdgJ) had orthologs in B. subtilis, highlighting differences in c-di-GMP signalling between B. subtilis and B. cereus group bacteria. PMID:27116468

  19. Environmentally driven star formation during a super galaxy group merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, Jonathan; Tran, Kim-Vy; Gonzalez, Anthony H.

    2016-01-01

    We find evidence for outside-in growth of galaxies within a merging super galaxy group at a redshift of z~0.37. We utilize Hubble Space Telescope imaging in rest-frame UV and visual to measure color gradients across the super group and internally within 138 individual galaxies that are spectroscopically confirmed members. The group members show enhanced star formation at intermediate environmental densities. The high resolution imaging shows that the group galaxies have bluer disks, i.e. most of the new stars are forming in the disk which supports outside-in growth. These disk-dominated galaxies will likely fade to become S0 members.

  20. Toward Effective Group Formation in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Hamid; Kardan, Ahmad A.

    2016-01-01

    Group formation task as a starting point for computer-supported collaborative learning plays a key role in achieving pedagogical goals. Various approaches have been reported in the literature to address this problem, but none have offered an optimal solution. In this research, an online learning environment was modeled as a weighted undirected…

  1. A New Group-Formation Method for Student Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Jose; Dias, Teresa Galvao; Cunha, Joao Falcao E.

    2009-01-01

    In BSc/MSc engineering programmes at Faculty of Engineering of the University of Porto (FEUP), the need to provide students with teamwork experiences close to a real world environment was identified as an important issue. A new group-formation method that aims to provide an enriching teamwork experience is proposed. Students are asked to answer a…

  2. Stepfamily Education: Benefits of a Group-Formatted Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogrand, Linda; Torres, Eliza; Higginbotham, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    This program evaluation was conducted by interviewing 40 low-income participants in a relationship education (RE) program for stepfamilies to determine specific benefits of a group-formatted intervention. The benefits that were most often identified were learning from others and having personal stepfamily challenges normalized. Participants also…

  3. Exploring Technology Supported Collaborative and Cooperative Group Formation Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carapina, Mia; Boticki, Ivica

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects on the systematic literature review paper (in progress), which analyzes technology enhanced collaborative and cooperative learning in elementary education worldwide from 2004 to 2015, focusing on the exploration of technology mediated group formation. The review paper reports on only a few cases of technology supported methods…

  4. The star formation histories of Hickson compact group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Del Olmo, A.; Coziol, R.; Torres-Papaqui, J. P.

    2012-10-01

    Aims: We study the star formation fistory (SFH) of 210 galaxy members of 55 Hickson compact groups (HCG) and 309 galaxies from the Catalog of Isolated Galaxies (CIG). The SFH traces the variation of star formation over the lifetime of a galaxy, and consequently yields a snapshot picture of its formation. Comparing the SFHs in these extremes in galaxy density allows us to determine the main effects of compact groups (CG) on the formation of galaxies. Methods: We fit our spectra using the spectral synthesis code STARLIGHT and obtained the stellar population contents and mean stellar ages of HCG and CIG galaxies in three different morphological classes: early-type galaxies (EtG), early-type spirals (EtS), and late-type spirals (LtS). Results: We find that EtG and EtS galaxies in HCG show higher contents of old and intermediate stellar populations as well as an important deficit of the young stellar population, which clearly implies an older average stellar age in early galaxies in HCG. For LtS galaxies we find similar mean values for the stellar content and age in the two samples. However, we note that LtS can be split into two subclasses, namely old and young LtS. In HCG we find a higher fraction of young LtS than in the CIG sample, in addition, most of these galaxies belong to groups in which most of the galaxies are also young and actively forming stars. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) of spiral galaxies in the two samples differ. The EtS in HCG show lower SSFR values, while LtS peak at higher values compared with their counterparts in isolation. We also measured the shorter star formation time scale (SFTS) in HCG galaxies, which indicates that they have a shorter star formation activity than CIG galaxies. We take these observations as evidence that galaxies in CG have evolved more rapidly than galaxies in isolation, regardless of their morphology. Our observations are consistent with the hierarchical galaxy formation model, which states that CGs are

  5. Acritarchs of the Ediacaran Frecheirinha Formation, Ubajara Group, Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chiglino, Leticia; Gaucher, Claudio; Sial, Alcides N; Ferreira, Valderez P

    2015-01-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of organic-walled microfossils in Ediacaran limestones and marls of the Frecheirinha Formation, Ubajara Group, and the first Precambrian acritarchs so far reported for northeastern Brazil. The assemblage of the Frecheirinha Formation represents a low-diversity microflora comprising Leiosphaeridia, Lophosphaeridium and subordinated Bavlinella (=Sphaerocongregus). Their thermal alteration index (TAI) between 4+ and 5, suggests metamorphic temperatures exceeding 200-250°C. Higher temperatures are probably related to intruding granitic plutons (Meruoca, Mucambo). Reported δ13C values of carbonates of -3.5 ‰ VPDB (Vienna-Peedee Belemnite) at the base, passing up section into a positive plateau of up to +3.7 ‰, and corresponding 87Sr/86Sr values between 0.7075 and 0.7080 suggest an Ediacaran age. The acritarch assemblage is comparable to the Late Ediacaran Leiosphere Palynoflora (LELP) or Kotlin-Rovno assemblage, in broad agreement with chemostratigraphic data. Macrofossils belonging to the Ediacara fauna were reported from the overlying Jaibaras Group, which would constrain even further the depositional age of the Frecheirinha Formation to within ca. 575-555 Ma. A more comprehensive palynological study of the Frecheirinha Formation is necessary to confirm this age assignment. PMID:26131630

  6. In vitro apatite formation on polyamide containing carboxyl groups modified with silanol groups.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takahiro; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Hosoya, Kayo; Tanihara, Masao; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Sakaguchi, Yoshimitsu; Konagaya, Shigeji

    2007-06-01

    Modification of organic polymer with silanol groups in combination with calcium salts enables the polymer to show bioactivity, that is, the polymer forms apatite on its surface after exposure to body environment. However, how modification with silanol groups influences ability of apatite formation on the polymer substrate and adhesive strength between polymer and apatite is not yet known. In the present study, polyamide containing carboxyl groups was modified with different amounts of silanol groups, and its apatite-forming ability in 1.5SBF, which contained ion concentrations 1.5 times those of simulated body fluid (SBF), was examined. The rate of apatite formation increased with increasing content of silanol groups in the polyamide films. This may be attributed to enhancement of dipole interactions. A tendency for the adhesive strength of the apatite layer on the polyamide film to be decreased with increasing content of silanol groups was observed. This may be attributed to swelling in 1.5SBF and having a high degree of shrinkage after drying. These findings clearly show that modification of organic polymers with the functional groups induces apatite deposition, and also determines the adhesive strength of the apatite layer to the organic substrates. PMID:17243002

  7. The evolution of star formation activity in galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanianfar, G.; Popesso, P.; Finoguenov, A.; Wuyts, S.; Wilman, D.; Biviano, A.; Ziparo, F.; Salvato, M.; Nandra, K.; Lutz, D.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Tanaka, M.; Mirkazemi, M.; Balogh, M. L.; Altieri, M. B.; Aussel, H.; Bauer, F.; Berta, S.; Bielby, R. M.; Brandt, N.; Cappelluti, N.; Cimatti, A.; Cooper, M.; Fadda, D.; Ilbert, O.; Le Floch, E.; Magnelli, B.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Nordon, R.; Newman, J. A.; Poglitsch, A.; Pozzi, F.

    2014-12-01

    We study the evolution of the total star formation (SF) activity, total stellar mass (ΣM*) and halo occupation distribution (HOD) in massive haloes by using one of the largest X-ray selected sample of galaxy groups with secure spectroscopic identification in the major blank field surveys (ECDFS, CDFN, COSMOS, AEGIS). We provide an accurate measurement of star formation rate (SFR) for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies using very deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel PACS observations. For undetected IR sources, we provide a well-calibrated SFR from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. We observe a clear evolution in the level of SF activity in galaxy groups. The total SF activity in the high-redshift groups (0.5 < z < 1.1) is higher with respect to the low-redshift (0.15 < z < 0.5) sample at any mass by 0.8 ± 0.12 dex. A milder difference (0.35 ± 0.1 dex) is observed between the low-redshift bin and the groups at z ˜ 0. We show that the level of SF activity is declining more rapidly in the more massive haloes than in the more common lower mass haloes. We do not observe any evolution in the HOD and total stellar mass-halo mass relations in groups. The picture emerging from our findings suggests that the galaxy population in the most massive systems is evolving faster than galaxies in lower mass haloes, consistently with a `halo downsizing' scenario.

  8. A model for the formation of the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Peebles, P.J.E.; Melott, A.L.; Holmes, M.R.; Jiang, L.R. Kansas Univ., Lawrence )

    1989-10-01

    Observational tests of a model for the formation of the Local Group are presented and analyzed in which the mass concentration grows by gravitational accretion of local-pressure matter onto two seed masses in an otherwise homogeneous initial mass distribution. The evolution of the mass distribution is studied in an analytic approximation and a numerical computation. The initial seed mass and separation are adjusted to produce the observed present separation and relative velocity of the Andromeda Nebula and the Galaxy. If H(0) is adjusted to about 80 km/s/Mpc with density parameter Omega = 1, then the model gives a good fit to the motions of the outer members of the Local Group. The same model gives particle orbits at radius of about 100 kpc that reasonably approximate the observed distribution of redshifts of the Galactic satellites. 47 refs.

  9. Heats of Formation and Bond Energies in Group III Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Melius, Carl F.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We present heats of formation and bond energies for Group-III compounds obtained from calculations of molecular ground-state I electronic energies. Data for compounds of the form MXn are presented, where M = B, Al, Ga, and In, X = He H, Cl, and CH3, and n = 1-3. Energies for the B, Al, and Ga compounds are obtained from G2 predictions, while those for the In compounds are obtained from CCSD(T)/CBS calculations; these are the most accurate calculations for indium-containing compounds published to date. In most cases, the calculated thermochemistry is in good agreement with published values derived from experiments for those species that have well-established heats of formation. Bond energies obtained from the heats of formation follow the expected trend (Cl much greater than CH3 approx. H). However, the CH3M-(CH3)2 bond energies obtained for trimethylgallium and trimethylindium are considerably stronger (greater than 15 kcal/mol) than currently accepted values.

  10. Reputation drives cooperative behaviour and network formation in human groups.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Jose A; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Ferrer, Alfredo; Moreno, Yamir; Sánchez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Cooperativeness is a defining feature of human nature. Theoreticians have suggested several mechanisms to explain this ubiquitous phenomenon, including reciprocity, reputation, and punishment, but the problem is still unsolved. Here we show, through experiments conducted with groups of people playing an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma on a dynamic network, that it is reputation what really fosters cooperation. While this mechanism has already been observed in unstructured populations, we find that it acts equally when interactions are given by a network that players can reconfigure dynamically. Furthermore, our observations reveal that memory also drives the network formation process, and cooperators assort more, with longer link lifetimes, the longer the past actions record. Our analysis demonstrates, for the first time, that reputation can be very well quantified as a weighted mean of the fractions of past cooperative acts and the last action performed. This finding has potential applications in collaborative systems and e-commerce. PMID:25598347

  11. Reputation drives cooperative behaviour and network formation in human groups

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Jose A.; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Ferrer, Alfredo; Moreno, Yamir; Sánchez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Cooperativeness is a defining feature of human nature. Theoreticians have suggested several mechanisms to explain this ubiquitous phenomenon, including reciprocity, reputation, and punishment, but the problem is still unsolved. Here we show, through experiments conducted with groups of people playing an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma on a dynamic network, that it is reputation what really fosters cooperation. While this mechanism has already been observed in unstructured populations, we find that it acts equally when interactions are given by a network that players can reconfigure dynamically. Furthermore, our observations reveal that memory also drives the network formation process, and cooperators assort more, with longer link lifetimes, the longer the past actions record. Our analysis demonstrates, for the first time, that reputation can be very well quantified as a weighted mean of the fractions of past cooperative acts and the last action performed. This finding has potential applications in collaborative systems and e-commerce. PMID:25598347

  12. Formation of nanostructured Group IIA metal activated sensors: The transformation of Group IIA metal compound sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tune, Travis C.; Baker, Caitlin; Hardy, Neil; Lin, Arthur; Widing, Timothy J.; Gole, James L.

    2015-05-01

    Trends in the Group IIA metal oxides and hydroxides of magnesium, calcium, and barium are unique in the periodic table. In this study we find that they display novel trends as decorating nanostructures for extrinsic semiconductor interfaces. The Group IIA metal ions are strong Lewis acids. We form these M2+ ions in aqueous solution and bring these solutions in contact with a porous silicon interface to form interfaces for conductometric measurements. Observed responses are consistent with the formation of MgO whereas the heavier elements display behaviors which suggest the effect of their more basic nature. Mg(OH)2, when formed, represents a weak base whereas the heavier metal hydroxides of Ca, Sr, and Ba are strong bases. However, the hydroxides tend to give up hydrogen and act as Brönsted acids. For the latter elements, the reversible interaction response of nanostructures deposited to the porous silicon (PS) interface is modified, as the formation of more basic sites appears to compete with M2+ Lewis acidity and hydroxide Brönsted acidity. Mg2+ forms an interface whose response to the analytes NH3 and NO is consistent with MgO and well explained by the recently developing Inverse Hard/Soft Acid/Base model. The behavior of the Ca2+ and Ba2+ decorated interfaces as they interact with the hard base NH3 follows a reversal of the model, indicating a decrease in acidic character as the observed conductometric response suggests the interaction with hydroxyl groups. A change from oxide-like to hydroxide-like constituents is supported by XPS studies. The changes in conductometric response is easily monitored in contrast to changes associated with the Group IIA oxides and hydroxides observed in XPS, EDAX, IR, and NMR measurements.

  13. Dwarf spheroidal satellite formation in a reionized Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies have emerged a powerful probe of small-scale dark matter clustering and of cosmic reionization. They exhibit structural and chemical continuity with dwarf irregular galaxies in the field and with spheroidal galaxies in high-density environments. By combining empirical constraints derived for star formation at low gas column densities and metallicities in the local Universe with a model for dark matter and baryonic mass assembly, we provide an analytical description of how the dwarf spheroidals acquired their stellar content. Their progenitors formed stars until the gas content, initially reduced from the cosmic average by the thermal pressure of the reionized intergalactic medium, was finally ram pressure stripped during the progenitors' accretion on to the host galaxy. Dwarf spheroidal satellites of differing luminosities seem to share very similar most massive progenitor histories that reach thresholds for gas cooling by atomic line emission at epochs at which the Lagrangian volume of the Local Group should have been reionized. We hypothesize that dwarf spheroidals formed the bulk of their stars in partially rotationally supported H I discs in a reionized universe. This model provides an explanation for the `common mass scale' relation and reproduces the empirical luminosity-size and luminosity-metallicity relations. Explosive feedback phenomena, such as outflows driven by the concerted action of supernovae, need not have been significant in the dwarf spheroidals' formation. We further speculate that the true pre-reionization fossils should exhibit a structure distinct from that of the dwarf spheroidals, e.g. in the form of dense isolated or nuclear star clusters.

  14. Asteroid mega-impacts and Precambrian banded iron formations: 2.63 Ga and 2.56 Ga impact ejecta/fallout at the base of BIF/argillite units, Hamersley Basin, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glikson, Andrew; Vickers, John

    2007-02-01

    The temporal association between late Archaean to earliest Proterozoic asteroid impact ejecta/fallout units and overlying banded iron formations suggests that, in some instances, these impacts were closely followed by significant transformation in the nature of source terrains of the sediments. The Jeerinah Impact Layer (JIL) [B.M. Simonson, D. Davies, S.W. Hassler, Discovery of a layer of probable impact melt spherules in the late Archean Jeerinah Formation, Fortescue Group, Western Australia. Aust. J. Earth Sci. 47 (2000) 315-325; B.M. Simonson, S.W. Hassler, Revised correlations in the early Precambrian Hamersley Basin based on a horizon of resedimented impact spherules. Aust. J. Earth Sci. 44 (1997) 37-48; B.M. Simonson, B.P. Glass, Spherule layers - records of ancient impacts. Ann. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 32 (2004) 329-361; A.Y. Glikson, Early Precambrian asteroid impact-triggered tsunami: excavated seabed, debris flows, exotic boulders, and turbulence features associated with 3.47-2.47 Ga-old asteroid impact fallout units, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. Astrobiology 4 (2001) 19-50; S.W. Hassler, B.M. Simonson, D.Y. Sumner, D. Murphy, Neoarchaean impact spherule layers in the Fortescue and Hamersley Groups, Western Australia: stratigraphic and depositional implications of re-correlation. Aust. J. Earth Sci. 52 (2005) 759-772; B. Rasmussen, C. Koeberl, Iridium anomalies and shocked quartz in a late Archean spherule layer from the Pilbara Craton: new evidence for a major asteroid impact at 2.63 Ga. Geology 32 (2004) 1029-1032; B. Rasmussen, T.S. Blake, I.R. Fletcher, U-Pb zircon age constraints on the Hamersley spherule beds: Evidence for a single 2.63 Ga Jeerinah-Carawine impact ejecta layer. Geology, 33 (2005) 725-728.] overlies an argillite-dominated unit (Jeerinah Formation, 2684 ± 6 Ma [A.F. Trendall, W. Compston, D.R. Nelson, J.R. deLaeter, V.C. Bennett, SHRIMP zircon ages constraining the depositional chronology of the Hamersley Group, Western

  15. HIERARCHICAL STRUCTURE FORMATION AND MODES OF STAR FORMATION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUP 31

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, S. C.; Durrell, P. R.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Chandar, R.; English, J.; Charlton, J. C.; Gronwall, C.; Young, J.; Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Johnson, K. E.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Whitmore, B.; Maybhate, Aparna; Zabludoff, Ann

    2010-02-15

    The handful of low-mass, late-type galaxies that comprise Hickson Compact Group 31 (HCG 31) is in the midst of complex, ongoing gravitational interactions, evocative of the process of hierarchical structure formation at higher redshifts. With sensitive, multicolor Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we characterize the large population of < 10 Myr old star clusters (SCs) that suffuse the system. From the colors and luminosities of the young SCs, we find that the galaxies in HCG 31 follow the same universal scaling relations as actively star-forming galaxies in the local universe despite the unusual compact group environment. Furthermore, the specific frequency of the globular cluster system is consistent with the low end of galaxies of comparable masses locally. This, combined with the large mass of neutral hydrogen and tight constraints on the amount of intragroup light, indicate that the group is undergoing its first epoch of interaction-induced star formation. In both the main galaxies and the tidal-dwarf candidate, F, stellar complexes, which are sensitive to the magnitude of disk turbulence, have both sizes and masses more characteristic of z = 1-2 galaxies. After subtracting the light from compact sources, we find no evidence for an underlying old stellar population in F-it appears to be a truly new structure. The low-velocity dispersion of the system components, available reservoir of H I, and current star formation rate of {approx}10 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} indicate that HCG 31 is likely to both exhaust its cold gas supply and merge within {approx}1 Gyr. We conclude that the end product will be an isolated, X-ray-faint, low-mass elliptical.

  16. Logical implementation of the Automatic Target Recognition Working Group (ATRWG) 9-track tape format image storage format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodzy, P. J.; Baum, J. E.

    1991-04-01

    Over the past two years, the Opto-Radar Systems Group has spearheaded the effort to select and incorporate a standard file format for raw sensor imagery. The goal is to use only one format for the multiple computing facilities and thus eliminate the problem of individual users creating custom software. Such a format must include all the header information that existed on the original data tapes, so all the available sensor information is retained. The format selected, called the NATO format within the Opto-Radar Systems Group, is a subset of the NATO data format developed by the Automatic Target Recognition Working Group (ATRWG). This format is apparently widely used in the ATR community. Thus, an additional benefit to such a format is the ability to transport data to and from other ATR facilities.

  17. A Framework for Semantic Group Formation in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ounnas, Asma; Davis, Hugh C.; Millard, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Collaboration has long been considered an effective approach to learning. However, forming optimal groups can be a time consuming and complex task. Different approaches have been developed to assist teachers allocate students to groups based on a set of constraints. However, existing tools often fail to assign some students to groups creating a…

  18. The formation of compact groups of galaxies. I: Optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaferio, Antonaldo; Geller, Margaret J.; Ramella, Massimo

    1994-01-01

    The small crossing time of compact groups of galaxies (t(sub cr)H(sub 0) approximately less than 0.02) makes it hard to understand why they are observable at all. Our dissipationless N-body simulations show that within a single rich collapsing group compact groups of galaxies continually form. The mean lifetime of a particular compact configuration if approximately 1 Gyr. On this time scale, members may merge and/or other galaxies in the loose group may join the compact configuration. In other words, compact configurations are continually replaced by new systems. The frequency of this process explains the observability of compact groups. Our model produces compact configurations (compact groups (CG's) with optical properties remarkably similar to Hickson's (1982) compact groups (HCG's): (1) CG's have a frequency distribution of members similar to that of HCG's; (2) CG's are approximately equals 10 times as dense as loose groups; (3) CG's have dynamical properties remarkably similar to those of HCG's; (4) most of the galaxy members of CG's are not merger remnants. The crucial aspect of the model is the relationship between CG's and the surrounding rich loose group. Our model predicts the frequency of occurrence of CG's. A preliminary analysis of 18 rich loose groups is consistent with the model prediction. We suggest further observational tests of the model.

  19. [A comparative study of individuals' responses to formative and declining groups].

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, K

    1990-04-01

    Using 40 college students as subjects, this experiment was conducted to investigate differences in the influence exerted by formative groups and declining groups of the same size. No significant differences between formative and declining groups were found at the behavioural level, especially with respect to conformity rates. However, significant differences were found between the two groups at internal levels, especially with respect to the confidence exhibited in subjects' responses and the evaluation of group opinions. In formative groups, the confidence of conformers in the group increased but non-conformers showed no change. In declining groups, the confidence of non-conformers increased but conformers showed no change. Moreover, only the conformers continued to support group opinions after the groups broke down, evaluating the group opinions highly in private. The results suggested in general that individuals are influenced by group changes and that they select their own responses by anticipating changes likely to occur in the group. PMID:2250419

  20. Reformers or Roadblocks: Educational Interest Groups and State Policy Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Joseph; Lemasters, Linda; Howerton, Everett

    2008-01-01

    Given the overt political nature of this topic, an additional theoretical postulate, the Triadic Theory of Power was also presented as another framework to conceptualize the external and internal forces which shape the formation of contemporary education policy. Predicated upon the scholarship of Nobel laureate James Q. Wilson, Andrew McFarland…

  1. Cooperation during cultural group formation promotes trust towards members of out-groups

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaofei Sophia; Houser, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    People often cooperate with members of their own group, and discriminate against members of other groups. Previous research establishes that cultural groups can form endogenously, and that these groups demonstrate in-group favouritism. Given the presence of cultural groups, the previous literature argues that cultural evolution selects for groups that exhibit parochial altruism. The source of initial variation in these traits, however, remains uninformed. We show here that a group's economic production environment may substantially influence parochial tendencies, with groups formed around more cooperative production (CP) displaying less parochialism than groups formed around more independent production (IP) processes. Participants randomized into CP and IP production tasks formed cultural groups, and subsequently played hidden-action trust games with in-group and out-group trustees. We found CP to be associated with significantly greater sharing and exchanging behaviours than IP. In trust games, significant parochial altruism (in-group favouritism combined with out-group discrimination) was displayed by members of IP groups. By contrast, members of CP groups did not engage in either in-group favouritism or out-group discrimination. Further, we found the absence of out-group discrimination in CP to persist even following ‘betrayal’. Finally, belief data suggest that members of CP are not more intrinsically generous than IP members, but rather more likely to believe that out-group trustees will positively reciprocate. Our results have important implications for anyone interested in building cooperative teams, and shed new light on connections between culture and cooperation. PMID:23658200

  2. Lysis and protoplast formation of group B streptococci by mutanolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Calandra, G B; Cole, R M

    1980-01-01

    Group B streptococci, refractory to previously tested muralysins under physiological conditions, were successfully converted to protoplasts by use of a recently describede N-acetyl muramidase, mutanolysin, derived from a streptomycete. Purified enzyme was effective, but crude preparations, although degrading cell walls, simultaneously produced peculiar effects of cytoplasmic coagulation, retention of cell shape, loss of some intracellular enzymes, and a rise in optical density. Addition of purified mutanolysin to the array of muralysins (group C streptococcal phage-associated lysin, lysozyme), previously successful in preparing protoplasts of different streptococci, now makes possible enzymatic preparation of protoplasts of streptococci of groups A, B, C. D. G, and H. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6995317

  3. Influence of Group Formation Choices on Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seethamraju, Ravi; Borman, Mark

    2009-01-01

    With its multidisciplinary and applied foci, team-working skills are seen as especially critical in business courses in general and in business information systems courses in particular, and are specifically incorporated into desired graduate attributes by many universities. Past research has focused on the benefits of group working but little…

  4. Charged group surface accessibility determines micelleplexes formation and cellular interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yang; Sen, Soumyo; Král, Petr; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2015-04-01

    Micelleplexes are a class of nucleic acid carriers that have gained acceptance due to their size, stability, and ability to synergistically carry small molecules. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA gene regulator that is consists of 19-22 nucleotides. Altered expression of miRNAs plays an important role in many human diseases. Using a model 22-nucleotide miRNA sequence, we investigated the interaction between charged groups on the micelle surface and miRNA. The model micelle system was formed from methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide) (mPEG-PLA) mixed with methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide)-b-oligoarginine (mPEG-PLA-Rx, x = 8 or 15). Surface properties of the micelles were varied by controlling the oligoarginine block length and conjugation density. Micelles were observed to have a core-shell conformation in the aqueous environment where the PLA block constituted the hydrophobic core, mPEG and oligoarginine formed a hydrophilic corona. Significantly different thermodynamic behaviors were observed during the interaction of single stranded miRNA with micelles of different surface properties, and the resulting micelleplexes mediated substantial cellular association. Depending upon the oligoarginine length and density, micelles exhibited miRNA loading capacity directly related to the presentation of charged groups on the surface. The effect of charged group accessibility of cationic micelle on micelleplex properties provides guidance on future miRNA delivery system design.Micelleplexes are a class of nucleic acid carriers that have gained acceptance due to their size, stability, and ability to synergistically carry small molecules. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA gene regulator that is consists of 19-22 nucleotides. Altered expression of miRNAs plays an important role in many human diseases. Using a model 22-nucleotide miRNA sequence, we investigated the interaction between charged groups on the micelle surface and miRNA. The

  5. A Process of Identity Formation in Relation to Peers and Peer Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asbridge, Donald J.

    This paper presents a flowsheet model describing the interpersonal process of adolescent identity formation in relation to peers and peer groups within a social-psychological context. The model describes a primary route, a secondary route, and a vicious circle as pathways toward identity formation in relation to peers and peer groups. In the…

  6. Group, One-on-One, or Internet? Preferences for Mindfulness Meditation Delivery Format and their Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Wahbeh, Helané; Svalina, Matthew N.; Oken, Barry S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Group mindfulness meditation interventions have improved symptoms in many health conditions. However, many people are unwilling to receive group treatment, so alternative delivery methods such as individual and internet may be a useful option. The study objective was to examine mindfulness meditation intervention delivery format preferences and their relationship to potential predictors. Design An online survey was conducted of adult English speakers. Data was collected on interest and preference for internet, individual, or group formats of a mindfulness meditation intervention. Age, gender, personality, and posttraumatic stress disorder score and status and depression status were also collected. Results and Conclusions 500 eligible participants completed the survey (mean age 39±15; range 18–70; 68% female). Participants were more interested in the Internet (n=356) and individual formats (n=384) than the group format (n=245). Fifty-five participants (11%) said they would refuse a group format. Internet was the first choice format for most participants (Internet 212 (43%), Individual 187 (38%), Group 97 (20%) and group was the last choice for most participants (Internet 140 (29%), Individual 70 (14%), Group 279 (57%)). Age, extraversion and emotional stability were significant in predicting first choice format. These results support the need for more research and implementation of alternative mindfulness meditation intervention delivery formats. Future research will incorporate additional predictors and include a broader range of participants. PMID:27057260

  7. Multicellular group formation in response to predators in the alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R M; Bell, T; West, S A

    2016-03-01

    A key step in the evolution of multicellular organisms is the formation of cooperative multicellular groups. It has been suggested that predation pressure may promote multicellular group formation in some algae and bacteria, with cells forming groups to lower their chance of being eaten. We use the green alga Chlorella vulgaris and the protist Tetrahymena thermophila to test whether predation pressure can initiate the formation of colonies. We found that: (1) either predators or just predator exoproducts promote colony formation; (2) higher predator densities cause more colonies to form; and (3) colony formation in this system is facultative, with populations returning to being unicellular when the predation pressure is removed. These results provide empirical support for the hypothesis that predation pressure promotes multicellular group formation. The speed of the reversion of populations to unicellularity suggests that this response is due to phenotypic plasticity and not evolutionary change. PMID:26663204

  8. 30-Group Neutron, 12-Group Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B-V in MATSX Format.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1985-12-30

    Version: 00 The library was prepared with a fusion + fission + l/E + thermal Maxwellian weight function and has proved useful for many high energy calculations, including criticals such as GODIVA. It works reasonably well for many shielding problems where resonance selfshielding is not too important. The energy group structures for MATXSSA are listed in Table 1, the materials with neutron scattering data in Table 2, those with photon production data in Table 3,more » and those with photon scattering data In Table 4.« less

  9. 30-Group Neutron, 12-Group Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B-IV in MATXS Format.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1985-12-30

    Version: 00 The library was prepared with a fusion + fission + l/E + thermal Maxwellian weight function and has proved useful for many high energy calculations, including criticals such as GODIVA. It works reasonably well for many shielding problems where resonance selfshielding is not too important. The energy group structures for MATXSl are listed in Table 1, the materials with neutron scattering data in Table 2, those with photon production data in Table 3,more » and those with photon scattering data in Table 4.« less

  10. Effect of phosphate activating group on oligonucleotide formation on montmorillonite: the regioselective formation of 3',5'-linked oligoadenylates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabahar, K. J.; Cole, T. D.; Ferris, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of amine structure on the montmorillonite-catalyzed oligomerization of the 5'-phosphoramidates of adenosine are investigated. 4-Aminopyridine derivatives yielded oligoadenylates as long as dodecamers with a regioselectivity for 3',5'-phosphodiester bond formation averaging 88%. Linear and cyclic oligomers are obtained and no A5'ppA-containing products are detected. Oligomers as long as the hexanucleotide are obtained using 2-aminobenzimidazole as the activating group. A predominance of pA2'pA is detected in the dimer fraction along with cyclic 3',5'-trimer; no A5'ppA-containing oligomers were detected. Little or no oligomer formation was observed when morpholine, piperidine, pyrazole, 1,2,4-triazole, and 2-pyridone are used as phosphate-activating groups. The effects of the structure of the phosphate activating group on the oligomer structure and chain lengths are discussed.

  11. Micromorphologic evidence for paleosol development in the Endicott group, Siksikpuk formation, Kingak(?) shale, and Ipewik formation, western Brooks range, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumoulin, Julie A.; White, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Micromorphologic evidence indicates the presence of paleosols in drill-core samples from four sedimentary units in the Red Dog area, western Brooks Range. Well-developed sepic-plasmic fabrics and siderite spherules occur in claystones of the Upper Devonian through Lower Mississippian(?) Kanayut Conglomerate (Endicott Group), the Pennsylvanian through Permian Siksikpuk Formation (Etivluk Group), the Jurassic through Lower Cretaceous Kingak(?) Shale, and the Lower Cretaceous Ipewik Formation. Although exposure surfaces have been previously recognized in the Endicott Group and Kingak Shale on the basis of outcrop features, our study is the first microscopic analysis of paleosols from these units, and it provides the first evidence of subaerial exposure in the Siksikpuk and Ipewik Formations. Regional stratigraphic relations and geochemical data support our interpretations. Paleosols in the Siksikpuk, Kingak, and Ipewik Formations likely formed in nearshore coastal-plain environments, with pore waters subjected to inundation by the updip migration of slightly brackish ground water, whereas paleosols in the Kanayut Conglomerate probably formed in a more distal setting relative to a marine basin.

  12. Unveiling the Effects of Environment on Star Formation in Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Bai, Lei; Marcillac, Delphine; Momcheva, Ivelina; Mulchaey, John; Rieke, Marcia; Tyler, Krystal; Zabludoff, Ann

    2008-03-01

    As galaxies evolve, they are subject to a menagerie of violent events that can disrupt or entirely subdue ongoing star formation. Nowhere is this more apparent than in high-density environments. Clustering due to hierarchical formation results in interactions between galaxies and the intracluster medium, leading to the demise of star formation and the rise of red sequence galaxies. However, correlations between local density and galaxy properties like morphology, star formation rate, and color exist from the largest clusters down to the poorest groups. It is likely, since the majority of galaxies lie in groups, that global trends in fundamental properties are driven by this environment. That is, the strong observed decline in star formation rate from z ~ 1 is likely to be directly related to processes affecting group galaxies. Despite this, groups are rarely studied, especially compared to the massive amounts of data available for clusters. Indeed, if we wish to study the effect of density on galaxy evolution, we need to focus on all densities. We propose to observe 48 groups of galaxies at intermediate redshifts (0.12 < z < 0.82), the era where strong evolution and transformation are expected for groups, with MIPS at 24-microns. This waveband is ideal for studying obscured star formation in galaxies, which is especially useful for our intermediate redshift range, where other star formation indicators, such as H-alpha and [OII] emission lines, become difficult to acquire and/or correct for obscuration. We will combine our groups with additional data for nearby groups and those at z ~ 1, as well as data for clusters at similar redshifts, to study the effects of a wide variety of densities on galaxy evolution from z ~ 1 to the present.

  13. A Genetic Algorithm Approach for Group Formation in Collaborative Learning Considering Multiple Student Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Julian; Ovalle, Demetrio A.; Vicari, Rosa M.

    2012-01-01

    Considering that group formation is one of the key processes in collaborative learning, the aim of this paper is to propose a method based on a genetic algorithm approach for achieving inter-homogeneous and intra-heterogeneous groups. The main feature of such a method is that it allows for the consideration of as many student characteristics as…

  14. Prevalence, Formation, Maintenance, and Evaluation of Interdisciplinary Student Aging Interest Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Katherine J.; Vandenberg, Edward V.; Bottsford, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe the prevalence, formation, maintenance, and evaluation of student aging interest groups. They conducted a cross-sectional electronic survey of the 46 academic medical centers funded by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. To evaluate their group of approximately 50 students, the authors conducted an electronic pretest and…

  15. Exploring Teacher Beliefs and Use of Acceleration, Ability Grouping, and Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missett, Tracy C.; Brunner, Marguerite M.; Callahan, Carolyn M.; Moon, Tonya R.; Azano, Amy Price

    2014-01-01

    Few academic interventions for gifted students have generated more empirical support than acceleration and ability grouping, and formative assessment is advocated as a tool that educators can use to appropriately integrate accelerative practices and ability grouping into the classroom. However, the empirical support for accelerative practices,…

  16. The Role of Star Formation in Radio-Loud Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Hanna; Wilcots, E.; Hess, K.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray observations have shown that additional non-gravitational processes are required to explain the heating of the intergalactic medium in galaxy groups. The two most likely processes are galactic outflows from starbursts and feedback from AGN. Here, we look at star formation as a possible additional heating mechanism in X-ray luminous groups such as NGC 741, NGC 1052, NGC 524, and NGC 1587. We report on the results of optical imaging of these groups carried out using the WIYN 3.5m telescope with a specific emphasis on measuring the star formation rates of the resident galaxies in each group and estimating the impact of that star formation on the thermodynamics of the intragroup medium.

  17. An iterative evaluation of two shortened systematic review formats for clinicians: a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Perrier, Laure; Kealey, M Ryan; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-01-01

    Objective To conduct a series of focus groups with primary care physicians to determine the optimal format of a shortened, focused systematic review. Materials and methods Prototypes for two formats of a shortened systematic review were developed and presented to participants during focus group sessions. Focus groups were conducted with primary care physicians who were in full- or part-time practice. An iterative process was used so that the information learned from the first set of focus groups (Round 1) influenced the material presented to the second set of focus groups (Round 2). The focus group discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed. Results Each of the two rounds of testing included three focus groups. A total of 32 physicians participated (Round 1:16 participants; Round 2:16 participants). Analysis of the transcripts from Round 1 identified three themes including ease of use, clarity, and implementation. Changes were made to the prototypes based on the results so that the revised prototypes could be presented and discussed in the second round of focus groups. After analysis of transcripts from Round 2, four themes were identified, including ease of use, clarity, brevity, and implementation. Revisions were made to the prototypes based on the results. Conclusions Primary care physicians provided input on the refinement of two prototypes of a shortened systematic review for clinicians. Their feedback guided changes to the format, presentation, and layout of these prototypes in order to increase usability and uptake for end-users. PMID:24786378

  18. Hydrogen Bond Formation between the Carotenoid Canthaxanthin and the Silanol Group on MCM-41 Surface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yunlong; Xu, Dayong; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-08-20

    The formation of one or two hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) between canthaxanthin (CAN), a dye, and the silanol group(s) on the MCM-41 surface has been studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and calorimetric experiments. It was found that the formation of the H-bond(s) stabilized the CAN molecule more than its radical cation (CAN(•+)). The charge distribution, bond lengths, and the HOMO and LUMO energies of CAN are also affected. The formation of the H-bond(s) explains the lower photoinduced electron transfer efficiency of CAN imbedded in Cu-MCM-41 versus that for β-carotene (CAR) imbedded in Cu-MCM-41 where complex formation with Cu(2+) dominates. These calculations show that to achieve high electron transfer efficiency for a dye-sensitized solar cell, H-bonding between the dye and the host should be avoided. PMID:26230844

  19. A FORMATION SCENARIO OF YOUNG STELLAR GROUPS IN THE REGION OF THE SCORPIO CENTAURUS OB ASSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, V. G.; Jilinski, E.; De la Reza, R.; Bazzanella, B.

    2009-04-15

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the role played by Lower Centaurus Crux (LCC) and Upper Centaurus Lupus (UCL), both subcomponents of the Scorpio Centaurus OB association (Sco-Cen), in the formation of the groups {beta} Pictoris, TW Hydrae, and the {eta} Chamaeleontis cluster. The dynamical evolution of all the stellar groups involved and of the bubbles and shells blown by LCC and UCL are calculated, and followed from the past to the present. This leads to a formation scenario in which (1) the groups {beta} Pictoris, TW Hydrae were formed in the wake of the shells created by LCC and UCL, (2) the young cluster {eta} Chamaeleontis was born as a consequence of the collision of the shells of LCC and UCL, and (3) the formation of Upper Scorpius (US), the other main subcomponent of the Sco-Cen association, may have been started by the same process that created {eta} Chamaeleontis.

  20. Scappoose Formation, Columbia County, Oregon: new evidence of age and relation to Columbia River basalt group

    SciTech Connect

    VanAtta, R.O.; Kelty, K.B.

    1985-05-01

    The Scappoose Formation, considered to be late Oligocene to early Miocene in age, was originally believed to be disconformably separated from both the underlying Pittsburg Bluff Formation and the overlying Yakima subgroup of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Recent mapping and petrography show that it lies disconformably on both the Keasey and Pittsburg Bluff Formations, and interfingers with the Yakima Basalt. The Scappoose is composed of fluvial sandstone, conglomerate, and carbonaceous to coal-bearing mud rock, intertongued with shallow neritic to estuarine siltstone, mud rock, and minor sandstone. Chemistry of basalt clasts from fluvial conglomerates reveals that they are derived from the Yakima subgroup. Basalt conglomerate and palagonitic sediments in the upper part of the formation are intercalated with Grande Ronde basalt (Yakima subgroup) flows at many localities. Flows of Yakima Basalt are also invasive into originally wet, unconsolidated Scappoose sediment. Grande Ronde basalt and the Frenchman Springs Member of the Wanapum basalt overlie conglomerate of the Scappoose. In places, the Scappoose Formation is absent, and Yakima Basalt lies directly on the Pittsburg Bluff and Keasey Formations. The thickness of both the Scappoose Formation and the Columbia River Basalt Group varies widely, indicating that both were deposited over a paleotopography with a relief up to 800 ft (245 m). The definition of the boundaries of the Scappoose Formation should be revised, owing to the disconformable relation of the Scappoose to both the underlying Keasey and Pittsburg Bluff Formations and to the Scappoose's intercalation with the overlying Yakima Basalt. Definition of age must also be revised, inasmuch as sedimentation of the formation was coeval with Columbia River Basalt volcanism.

  1. Group Formation Based on Learning Styles: Can It Improve Students' Teamwork?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyprianidou, Maria; Demetriadis, Stavros; Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos; Pombortsis, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This work explores the impact of teacher-led heterogeneous group formation on students' teamwork, based on students' learning styles. Fifty senior university students participated in a project-based course with two key organizational features: first, a web system (PEGASUS) was developed to help students identify their learning styles and…

  2. Effect of Peer Evaluation Format on Student Engagement in a Group Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tessier, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    Active participation in classrooms often involves group work. In order to examine the effect of using peer evaluations as part of that experience, this study measured the influence of four formats of peer evaluation on students' perceptions of fairness of the peer evaluation method, its impact on peer engagement, and peer evaluation scores. The…

  3. Comparing Two Cooperative Small Group Formats Used with Physical Therapy and Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Eon, Marcel; Proctor, Peggy; Reeder, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    This study compared "Structured Controversy" (a semi-formal debate like small group activity) with a traditional open discussion format for medical and physical therapy students. We found that those students who had participated in Structured Controversy changed their personal opinion on the topic more than those who were in the Open Discussion…

  4. Chondrule formation, metamorphism, brecciation, an important new primary chondrule group, and the classification of chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, Derek W. G.; Shaoxiong, Huang; Benoit, Paul H.

    1995-01-01

    The recently proposed compositional classification scheme for meteoritic chondrules divides the chondrules into groups depending on the composition of their two major phases, olivine (or pyroxene) and the mesostasis, both of which are genetically important. The scheme is here applied to discussions of three topics: the petrographic classification of Roosevelt County 075 (the least-metamorphosed H chondrite known), brecciation (an extremely important and ubiquitous process probably experienced by greater than 40% of all unequilibrated ordinary chondrites), and the group A5 chondrules in the least metamorphosed ordinary chondrites which have many similarities to chondrules in the highly metamorphosed 'equilibrated' chondrites. Since composition provides insights into both primary formation properties of the chondruies and the effects of metamorphism on the entire assemblage it is possible to determine the petrographic type of RC075 as 3.1 with unique certainty. Similarly, the near scheme can be applied to individual chondrules without knowledge of the petrographic type of the host chondrite, which makes it especially suitable for studying breccias. Finally, the new scheme has revealed the existence of chondrules not identified by previous techniques and which appear to be extremely important. Like group A1 and A2 chondrules (but unlike group B1 chondrules) the primitive group A5 chondruies did not supercool during formation, but unlike group A1 and A2 chondrules (and like group B1 chondrules) they did not suffer volatile loss and reduction during formation. It is concluded that the compositional classification scheme provides important new insights into the formation and history of chondrules and chondrites which would be overlooked by previous schemes.

  5. Star Formation as a Function of Neutral Hydrogen Gas Density in Local Group Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Erika K.; Madore, Barry F.; Freedman, Wendy L.

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the efficiency and timescales of star formation as a function of local neutral hydrogen gas density in four Local Group galaxies: M33, NGC 6822, the LMC, and the SMC. In this work, we conceptualize the process of star formation as a cycle of two major phases – (1) a gas dynamics phase in which neutral hydrogen gas coalesces into clouds, and (2) a stellar phase in which stars have formed and interrupt further gas coalescence during their active lifetimes. By examining the spatial distribution and number densities of stars on maps of neutral hydrogen, we estimate the timescale of the gas coalescence phase relative to the timescale of the stellar phase and infer an efficiency of star formation as a function of neutral hydrogen gas density. From these timescales and efficiencies, we will calculate star formation rates as a function of neutral hydrogen gas density in these galaxies.

  6. Timing of the Jiufotang Formation (Jehol Group) in Liaoning, northeastern China, and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, H. Y.; Wang, X. L.; Zhou, Z. H.; Wang, F.; Boven, A.; Shi, G. H.; Zhu, R. X.

    2004-06-01

    The timing of the Jiufotang Formation remains speculative despite recent progress in the study of the Jehol Biota. In this paper we contribute to this topic with 40Ar/39Ar dating on K-feldspar (sanidine and orthoclase) from tuffs interbedded within the fossil-bearing shales of the Jiufotang Formation, from the upper part of the Jehol Group in Chaoyang, Liaoning, northeastern China. 40Ar/39Ar step heating analyses of K-feldspar and the SHRIMP U-Pb zircon data indicate that tuffs at the Shangheshou section erupted at 120.3 +/- 0.7 million years ago. This result confirms an Aptian age for the Jiufotang Formation that was mainly based on biostratigraphic evidence. It also places stringent controls on the age of the fossils from the formation, providing a minimum age (120 Ma) for the four-winged dinosaur, Microraptor, and the seed-eating bird, Jeholornis.

  7. F-Formation Detection: Individuating Free-Standing Conversational Groups in Images

    PubMed Central

    Setti, Francesco; Russell, Chris; Bassetti, Chiara; Cristani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Detection of groups of interacting people is a very interesting and useful task in many modern technologies, with application fields spanning from video-surveillance to social robotics. In this paper we first furnish a rigorous definition of group considering the background of the social sciences: this allows us to specify many kinds of group, so far neglected in the Computer Vision literature. On top of this taxonomy we present a detailed state of the art on the group detection algorithms. Then, as a main contribution, we present a brand new method for the automatic detection of groups in still images, which is based on a graph-cuts framework for clustering individuals; in particular, we are able to codify in a computational sense the sociological definition of F-formation, that is very useful to encode a group having only proxemic information: position and orientation of people. We call the proposed method Graph-Cuts for F-formation (GCFF). We show how GCFF definitely outperforms all the state of the art methods in terms of different accuracy measures (some of them are brand new), demonstrating also a strong robustness to noise and versatility in recognizing groups of various cardinality. PMID:25996922

  8. F-formation detection: individuating free-standing conversational groups in images.

    PubMed

    Setti, Francesco; Russell, Chris; Bassetti, Chiara; Cristani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Detection of groups of interacting people is a very interesting and useful task in many modern technologies, with application fields spanning from video-surveillance to social robotics. In this paper we first furnish a rigorous definition of group considering the background of the social sciences: this allows us to specify many kinds of group, so far neglected in the Computer Vision literature. On top of this taxonomy we present a detailed state of the art on the group detection algorithms. Then, as a main contribution, we present a brand new method for the automatic detection of groups in still images, which is based on a graph-cuts framework for clustering individuals; in particular, we are able to codify in a computational sense the sociological definition of F-formation, that is very useful to encode a group having only proxemic information: position and orientation of people. We call the proposed method Graph-Cuts for F-formation (GCFF). We show how GCFF definitely outperforms all the state of the art methods in terms of different accuracy measures (some of them are brand new), demonstrating also a strong robustness to noise and versatility in recognizing groups of various cardinality. PMID:25996922

  9. Formation of carbonyl groups on cellulose during ozone treatment of pulp: consequences for pulp bleaching.

    PubMed

    Pouyet, Frédéric; Chirat, Christine; Potthast, Antje; Lachenal, Dominique

    2014-08-30

    The formation of carbonyl groups during the ozone treatment (Z) of eucalyptus (Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus urophylla hybrid) kraft pulps and their behaviors during subsequent alkaline stages were investigated by the CCOA method with carbazole-9-carboxylic acid [2-(2-aminooxethoxy)-ethoxy] amide (CCOA) as the carbonyl-selective fluorescence label. Several pulp samples with or without lignin and hexenuronic acids (hexA) were used to elucidate the effects of these components when present in unbleached kraft pulp. Both hexA and lignin increased the formation of carbonyl groups on cellulose and hemicellulose during ozonation. It was concluded that radicals are likely formed when ozone reacts with either lignin or hexA. These carbonyl groups were involved in cellulose depolymerization during subsequent alkaline extraction stages with sodium hydroxide (E) and alkaline hydrogen peroxide (P, in ZEP or ZP). Their numbers decreased after E but increased during P when H2O2 was not stabilized enough. Several ways to minimize the occurrence of carbonyl group formation are suggested. PMID:24815405

  10. Star formation properties of Hickson Compact Groups based on deep Hα imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenthaler, Paul; Ploeckinger, Sylvia; Verdugo, Miguel; Ziegler, Bodo

    2015-08-01

    We present deep Hα imaging of seven Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) using the 4.1-m Southern Astrophysics Research (SOAR) Telescope. The high spatial resolution of the observations allows us to study both the integrated star formation properties of the main galaxies as well as the 2D distribution of star-forming knots in the faint tidal arms that form during interactions between the individual galaxies. We derive star formation rates and stellar masses for group members and discuss their position relative to the main sequence of star-forming galaxies. Despite the existence of tidal features within the galaxy groups, we do not find any indication for enhanced star formation in the selected sample of HCGs. We study azimuthally averaged Hα profiles of the galaxy discs and compare them with the g' and r' surface brightness profiles. We do not find any truncated galaxy discs but reveal that more massive galaxies show a higher light concentration in Hα than less massive ones. We also see that galaxies that show a high light concentration in r', show a systematic higher light concentration in Hα. Tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates have been previously detected in R-band images for two groups in our sample but we find that most of them are likely background objects as they do not show any emission in Hα. We present a new TDG candidate at the tip of the tidal tail in HCG 91.

  11. Crystallinity and vinyl groups formation in polyethylene films exposed to UV-B radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Romo, A.; González-Mota, R.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Rosales-Candelas, I.; Muñoz-Campos, E. I.

    2011-10-01

    Polyethylene (PE), is a polymer formed by carbon-carbon single bonds, is a very stable material with a very slow degradation rate. In this paper, polyethylene films bag type were exposed to UV-B radiation (320-280 nm) at different exposure times (2 to 12 days). The UV radiation effects on PE samples were characterized using infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). The vinyl group formation indicates the PE degradation. These chemical groups have IR absorption in 900-1300 cm-1; additionally the degree of crystallinity increase with the increasing of the exposure time. The experiment showed significant changes in PE molecular structure.

  12. Effects of surface functional groups on the formation of nanoparticle-protein corona

    PubMed Central

    Podila, R.; Chen, R.; Ke, P. C.; Brown, J. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we examined the dependence of protein adsorption on the nanoparticle surface in the presence of functional groups. Our UV-visible spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering measurements evidently suggested that the functional groups play an important role in the formation of nanoparticle-protein corona. We found that uncoated and surfactant-free silver nanoparticles derived from a laser ablation process promoted a maximum protein (bovine serum albumin) coating due to increased changes in entropy. On the other hand, bovine serum albumin displayed a relatively lower affinity for electrostatically stabilized nanoparticles due to the constrained entropy changes. PMID:23341687

  13. Upward-migrating methane induced seismic chimney formation in the Nordland Group, Southern Viking Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; Unger, Victoria; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Nordland Group in the Southern Viking Graben hosts seismic chimneys, represented by anomalies in seismic data and determined by residual methane accumulations. These seismic chimneys are generally interpreted as focused fluid flow structures, and thus pose the risk of potential fluid leakage in geological subsurface utilization. The aim of the present study was to assess two popular scientific hypotheses on seismic chimney formation in the Nordland Group. The first one assumes excess pore pressure to result from buoyancy effects caused by upward-migrating methane and the development of a gas column with a thickness of several hundred meters, whereas the second one considers the load of the Fennoscandian ice sheet to be responsible for occurrence of hydraulic fracturing. In this context, we applied coupled hydromechanical simulations to determine the mechanism inducing the formation of these potential leakage pathways. Our simulation results demonstrate that hydraulic fracturing in the Nordland Group already occurs before the maximum methane column heights develop below. Consequently, the load of the Fennoscandian ice sheet is not initiating seismic chimneys formation.

  14. The ultraviolet and infrared star formation rates of compact group galaxies: an expanded sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkić, Laura; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Durrell, Pat R.; Gronwall, Caryl

    2016-07-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended time-scales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by Tzanavaris et al. (2010) and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 μm photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFRUV) using the UVOT uvw2 photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 μm photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFRIR). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-`red'), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-`blue') have redder UV colours, lower specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-poor groups. We find the SFRs to be continuously distributed with a peak at about 1 M⊙ yr-1, indicating this might be the most common value in compact groups. In contrast, the specific SFR distribution is bimodal, and there is a clear distinction between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Overall, our results suggest that the specific SFR is the best tracer of gas depletion and galaxy evolution in compact groups.

  15. Star Formation, Structure and Evolution of Galaxies in Loose Groups: The Environmental Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcum, Pamela Marie

    1994-01-01

    Galaxies seldom live in isolation. Rather, they reside in multi-galaxy systems (clusters, loose groups, compact groups) spanning a large range in kinematical properties. This thesis investigates the relationship between environment and properties of galaxies belonging to loose groups. The galactic properties which we consider are morphology, near infrared colors, Ha surface brightness (proportional to star formation rate), Ha emission equivalent width (sensitive to the star formation history), color gradients light distribution profiles, and luminosity functions. Recent N-body simulations predict that transitory compact configurations, each typically consisting of approx. 2 to 5 galaxies, are created continuously during collapse of a loose group. Given this model, a loose group is expected to acquire an increasing number of merger remnants and peculiar galaxies as that group evolves dynamically. This thesis investigates the possible observational consequences of group evolution by comparing two samples of galaxy groups: (1) groups that contain galaxies listed in the 'Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies', which either have obvious disturbed morphologies and/or are likely to be involved in an interaction with a close neighboring group member(s), and (2) a control sample containing members having 'normal' galaxy properties. The thesis consists of 3 papers: the first paper describes observations and data analysis for the near infrared (JHK) imaging, taken with the Kitt Peak SQIID detector at the 1.3 meter telescope. Near infrared contours, aperture photometry, and results based on the near infrared colors are presented. The second paper provides a description of the data analysis for the R and H(alpha) CCD images, taken with the Case Western Reserve University Burrell Schmidt telescope at Kitt Peak. The morphology of the star forming regions are shown by displaying H(alpha) maps overlaid with R band contours. Near infrared H(alpha) band and optical R band surface brightness

  16. A backbone amide protecting group for overcoming difficult sequences and suppressing aspartimide formation.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, Abu-Baker M; Papageorgiou, George; Raz, Richard; Quibell, Martin; Burlina, Fabienne; Offer, John

    2016-05-01

    A backbone amide bond protecting group, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-5-nitrobenzyl (Hmnb), improved the synthesis of aggregation and aspartimide-prone peptides. Introduction of Hmnb is automated and carried out during peptide assembly by addition of 4-methoxy-5-nitrosalicylaldehyde to the peptidyl-resin and on-resin reduction to the secondary amine. Acylation of the hindered secondary amine is aided by the formation of an internal nitrophenol ester that undergoes a favourable O,N intramolecular acyl transfer. This activated ester participates in the coupling and generally gives complete reaction with standard coupling conditions. Hmnb is easily available in a single preparative step from commercially available material. Different methods for removing the amide protecting group were explored. The protecting group is labile to acidolysis, following reduction of the nitro group to the aniline. The two main uses of backbone protection of preventing aspartimide formation and of overcoming difficult sequences are demonstrated, first with the synthesis of a challenging aspartimide-prone test sequence and then with the classic difficult sequence ACP (65-74) and a 23-mer homopolymer of polyalanine. PMID:27086749

  17. The enhancement of biofilm formation in Group B streptococcal isolates at vaginal pH.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yueh-Ren; Li, Chien-Ming; Yu, Chen-Hsiang; Lin, Yuh-Jyh; Wu, Ching-Ming; Harn, I-Chen; Tang, Ming-Jer; Chen, Yi-Ting; Shen, Fang-Chi; Lu, Chien-Yi; Tsai, Tai-Chun; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2013-04-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a common asymptomatic colonizer in acidic vagina of pregnant women and can transmit to newborns, causing neonatal pneumonia and meningitis. Biofilm formation is often associated with bacterial colonization and pathogenesis. Little is known about GBS biofilm and the effect of environmental stimuli on their growth along with biofilm formation. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival and biofilm formation of GBS, isolated from pregnant women, in nutrient-limited medium under various pH conditions. Growth and survival experiments were determined by optical density and viable counts. Crystal violet staining, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to analyze the capacity of biofilm production. Our results showed that GBS isolates proliferated with increasing pH with highest maximum specific growth rate (μmax) at pH 6.5, but survived at pH 4.5 for longer than 48 h. Biofilm formation of the 80 GBS isolates at pH 4.5 was significantly higher than at pH 7.0. This difference was confirmed by two other methods. The low elastic modulus obtained from samples at pH 4.5 by AFM revealed the softness of biofilm; in contrast, little or no biofilm was measured at pH 7.0. Under acidic pH, the capability of biofilm formation of serotypes III and V showed statistically significant difference from serotypes Ia and Ib. Our finding suggested that survival and enhanced biofilm formation at vaginal pH are potentially advantageous for GBS in colonizing vagina and increase the risk of vaginosis and neonatal infection. PMID:22797522

  18. Inhibition of positronium formation by polar groups in polymers-relation with TSL experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantarovich, V. P.; Suzuki, T.; He, C.; Gustov, V. W.

    2003-05-01

    Positronium (Ps) formation in polymers is affected by polar groups, contained in polymer chains and having dipole distribution of electric charge. Oxygen, double-bonded to carbon (-CO), is one of the examples of the group with dipole moment. Inhibition of Ps formation can be partly explained in this case by the trapping of positrons (e+) into negatively charged part of the dipole -C+O-. A proof of this explanation is based on the results of coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) and obtained in this paper for the copolymer of ethylene (E) and methylmethacrylate (MMA). The same trapping was demonstrated also for polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and for one of polyimides (Kapton). However, part of the inhibition can be due to trapping of the spur electrons. A role of this process can be found from a comparison of the effects of Ps inhibition and suppression of thermostimulated luminescence (TSL). In some of the described cases, inhibition is very effective but limited: it starts at very low concentrations of inhibitors, but saturates at a certain level. This fact is interpreted as a result of incomplete slowing down of positrons inside of the spur in the moment of Ps formation.

  19. Effect of estradiol on planktonic growth, coaggregation, and biofilm formation of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fteita, Dareen; Könönen, Eija; Söderling, Eva; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quantity and quality of biofilms at gingival margin are considered to play a role in the initiation and development of pregnancy-related gingivitis. Prevotella intermedia sensu lato is able to consume estradiol, the major sex hormone secreted during pregnancy, in the absence of vitamin K. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of estradiol on the planktonic growth, coaggregation, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation of the P. intermedia group bacteria, namely P. intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella pallens. In all experiments, the type strain (ATCC) and a clinical strain (AHN) of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and P. pallens were incubated with the concentrations of 0, 30, 90, and 120 nmol/L of estradiol. Planktonic growth was assessed by means of the colony forming unit method, while coaggregation and biofilm formation were assessed by spectrophotometric methods. In the determination of protein and polysaccharide levels, the Bradford and phenol-sulfuric acid methods were used, respectively. P. pallens AHN 9283 and P. nigrescens ATCC 33563 increased their numbers at planktonic stage with increasing estradiol concentrations. In 48-h biofilm tests, elevated protein levels were found for both strains of P. intermedia, and the strains P. nigrescens ATCC 33563 and P. pallens AHN 9283 in the presence of estradiol. The P. intermedia strains also increased the levels of polysaccharide formation in the biofilm. Coaggregation of the P. intermedia group organisms with Fusobacterium nucleatum was enhanced only in P. intermedia AHN 8290. In conclusion, our in vitro experiments indicate that estradiol regulates planktonic growth, coaggregation, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation characteristics of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and P. pallens differently. These results may, at least partly, explain the differences seen in their contribution to the pathogenesis of pregnancy-related gingivitis. PMID

  20. Star formation and environmental quenching of GEEC2 group galaxies at z ˜ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Angus; Balogh, Michael L.; McGee, Sean L.; Wilman, David J.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Tanaka, Masayuki; Bower, Richard G.; Hou, Annie; Mulchaey, John S.; Parker, Laura C.

    2014-03-01

    We present new analysis from the Group Environment Evolution Collaboration 2 (GEEC2) spectroscopic survey of galaxy groups at 0.8 < z < 1. Our previous work revealed an intermediate population between the star-forming and quiescent sequences and a strong environmental dependence in the fraction of quiescent galaxies. Only ˜5 per cent of star-forming galaxies in both the group and field sample show a significant enhancement in star formation, which suggests that quenching is the primary process in the transition from the star-forming to the quiescent state. To model the environmental quenching scenario, we have tested the use of different exponential quenching time-scales and delays between satellite accretion and the onset of quenching. We find that with no delay, the quenching time-scale needs to be long in order to match the observed quiescent fraction, but then this model produces too many intermediate galaxies. Fixing a delay time of 3 Gyr, as suggested from the local Universe, produces too few quiescent galaxies. The observed fractions are best matched with a model that includes a delay that is proportional to the dynamical time and a rapid quenching time-scale (˜0.25 Gyr), but this model also predicts intermediate galaxies Hδ strength higher than that observed. Using stellar synthesis models, we have tested other scenarios, such as the rejuvenation of star formation in early-type galaxies and a portion of quenched galaxies possessing residual star formation. If environment quenching plays a role in the GEEC2 sample, then our work suggests that only a fraction of intermediate galaxies may be undergoing this transition and that quenching occurs quite rapidly in satellite galaxies (≲0.25 Gyr).

  1. The Local Group Dwarf Irregular Galaxy NGC 6822: new insight on its star formation history .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, F.; Buonanno, R.; Bono, G.; Cassisi, S.; Monelli, M.; Pietrinferni, A.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Aparicio, A.

    We present a new photometric analysis of the Local Group Dwarf Irregular Galaxy NGC 6822 based on archival Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys images. The data correspond to three fields covering the south-east region of the galaxy; for each field F475W and F814W HST bands are available. For each field an accurate color magnitude diagram (F814W, F475W-F814W) has been obtained. Preliminary hints on the galaxy star formation history are presented based on the comparison with isochrones from "A Bag of Stellar Tracks and Isochrones" (BaSTI) database.

  2. Increased efficiency of evolved group I intron spliceozymes by decreased side product formation

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Zhaleh N.; Müller, Ulrich F.

    2015-01-01

    The group I intron ribozyme from Tetrahymena was recently reengineered into a trans-splicing variant that is able to remove 100-nt introns from pre-mRNA, analogous to the spliceosome. These spliceozymes were improved in this study by 10 rounds of evolution in Escherichia coli cells. One clone with increased activity in E. coli cells was analyzed in detail. Three of its 10 necessary mutations extended the substrate binding duplexes, which led to increased product formation and reduced cleavage at the 5′-splice site. One mutation in the conserved core of the spliceozyme led to a further reduction of cleavage at the 5′-splice site but an increase in cleavage side products at the 3′-splice site. The latter was partially reduced by six additional mutations. Together, the mutations increased product formation while reducing activity at the 5′-splice site and increasing activity at the 3′-splice site. These results show the adaptation of a ribozyme that evolved in nature for cis-splicing to trans-splicing, and they highlight the interdependent function of nucleotides within group I intron ribozymes. Implications for the possible use of spliceozymes as tools in research and therapy, and as a model for the evolution of the spliceosome, are discussed. PMID:26106216

  3. QUENCHING OF STAR FORMATION IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY GROUPS: CENTRALS, SATELLITES, AND GALACTIC CONFORMITY

    SciTech Connect

    Knobel, Christian; Lilly, Simon J.; Woo, Joanna; Kovač, Katarina

    2015-02-10

    We re-examine the fraction of low-redshift Sloan Digital Sky Survey satellites and centrals in which star formation has been quenched, using the environment quenching efficiency formalism that separates out the dependence of stellar mass. We show that the centrals of the groups containing the satellites are responding to the environment in the same way as their satellites (at least for stellar masses above 10{sup 10.3} M {sub ☉}), and that the well-known differences between satellites and the general set of centrals arise because the latter are overwhelmingly dominated by isolated galaxies. The widespread concept of ''satellite quenching'' as the cause of environmental effects in the galaxy population can therefore be generalized to ''group quenching''. We then explore the dependence of the quenching efficiency of satellites on overdensity, group-centric distance, halo mass, the stellar mass of the satellite, and the stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR) of its central, trying to isolate the effect of these often interdependent variables. We emphasize the importance of the central sSFR in the quenching efficiency of the associated satellites, and develop the meaning of this ''galactic conformity'' effect in a probabilistic description of the quenching of galaxies. We show that conformity is strong, and that it varies strongly across parameter space. Several arguments then suggest that environmental quenching and mass quenching may be different manifestations of the same underlying process. The marked difference in the apparent mass dependencies of environment quenching and mass quenching which produces distinctive signatures in the mass functions of centrals and satellites will arise naturally, since, for satellites at least, the distributions of the environmental variables that we investigate in this work are essentially independent of the stellar mass of the satellite.

  4. The formation of in-group favoritism and out-group prejudice in young children: are they distinct attitudes?

    PubMed

    Aboud, Frances E

    2003-01-01

    Although standardized measures of prejudice reveal high levels of ethnocentric bias in the preschool years, it may reflect in-group favoritism or out-group prejudice. A measure that partially decouples the two attitudes was given to White children between 4 and 7 years of age to examine the reciprocal relation between and the acquisition and correlates of in-group and out-group attitudes. The two attitudes were reciprocally correlated in 1 sample from a racially homogeneous school but not in a 2nd sample from a mixed-race school. In-group favoritism did not appear until 5 years of age but then reached significant levels; it was strongly related to developing social cognitions. Out-group prejudice was weaker, but its targets suffer from comparison with the high favoritism accorded in-group members. PMID:12518808

  5. Star formation history and evolution of gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Disney, M. J.; Pritzl, B. J.; Knezek, P. M.; Gallagher, J. S.; Minchin, R. F.; Freeman, K. C.

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the properties of three unusual dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group discovered with the HIPASS survey. From their optical morphology, they appear to be low surface brightness dwarf spheroidals, yet they are gas rich (MHI/LB > 1) with gas-mass-to-stellar light ratios larger than typical dwarf irregular galaxies. Therefore these systems appear different from any dwarfs of the Local Group. They should be favoured hosts for starburst, whereas we find a faint star formation region in only one object. We have obtained 21-cm data and Hubble Space Telescope photometry in V and I bands, and have constructed colour magnitude diagrams (CMDs) to investigate their stellar populations and to set a constraint on their age. From the comparison of the observed and model CMDs, we infer that all three galaxies are at least older than 2 Gyr (possibly even as old as 10 Gyr) and remain gas rich because their star formation rates have been very low (<~10-3Msolaryr-1) throughout. In such systems, star formation appears to have been sporadic and local, though one object (HIPASS J1321-31) has a peculiar red plume in its CMD suggesting that many of its stars were formed in a `miniburst' 300-500 Myr ago. The question of why there are no similar dwarf galaxies in the Local Group remains open. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Associations of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555; the Australia Telescope Compact Array which is part of the Australia Telescope, funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operation as a National Facility managed by CSIRO. E-mail: marco.grossi@roma 1.infn.it ‡ Visiting Astronomer, Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatories, which is operated by the Association of Unicersities for for Reasearch in Astronomy. Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National

  6. Report of the IAU Commission Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides and File Format Specification: Update September 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, J.; Acton, C.; Arlot, J.-E.; Bell, S.; Capitaine, N.; Fienga, A.; Folkner, W.; Gastineau, M.; Pavlov, D.; Pitjeva, E.; Skripnichenko, V.; Wallace, P.

    2015-08-01

    The IAU Commission 4 Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides recommends the use of the Spacecraft and Planet Kernel (SPK) file format to provide a uniform format for the position ephemerides of planets and other natural solar system bodies. The Working Group also recommends the use of the binary Planetary Constants Kernel (PCK) format ephemeris file for the orientation of a body. It further recommends supporting data be stored in a text PCK. Since the previous report: - Some minor changes have been made to the formats for the coordinate time ephemeris, data types 20: Chebyshev Polynomials (Velocity Only) and 120: Chebyshev Polynomials (TCB:Velocity Only). - the working group's final report is currently undergoing review by the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to assure it correctly describes these file formats.

  7. Quantifying Functional Group Interactions that Determine Urea Effects on Nucleic Acid Helix Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Emily J.; Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Cha, Hyo Keun; McDevitt, Joseph L.; Merker, Wolf E.; Ritzer, Ryan; Muth, Gregory W.; Engelsgjerd, Samuel W.; Mangold, Kathryn E.; Thompson, Perry J.; Kerins, Michael J.; Record, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Urea destabilizes helical and folded conformations of nucleic acids and proteins, as well as protein-nucleic acid complexes. To understand these effects, extend previous characterizations of interactions of urea with protein functional groups, and thereby develop urea as a probe of conformational changes in protein and nucleic acid processes, we obtain chemical potential derivatives (μ23 = dμ2/dm3) quantifying interactions of urea (component 3) with nucleic acid bases, base analogs, nucleosides and nucleotide monophosphates (component 2) using osmometry and hexanol-water distribution assays. Dissection of these μ23 yields interaction potentials quantifying interactions of urea with unit surface areas of nucleic acid functional groups (heterocyclic aromatic ring, ring methyl, carbonyl and phosphate O, amino N, sugar (C,O)); urea interacts favorably with all these groups, relative to interactions with water. Interactions of urea with heterocyclic aromatic rings and attached methyl groups (as on thymine) are particularly favorable, as previously observed for urea-homocyclic aromatic ring interactions. Urea m-values determined for double helix formation by DNA dodecamers near 25°C are in the range 0.72 to 0.85 kcal mol−1 m−1 and exhibit little systematic dependence on nucleobase composition (17–42% GC). Interpretation of these results using the urea interaction potentials indicates that extensive (60–90%) stacking of nucleobases in the separated strands in the transition region is required to explain the m-value. Results for RNA and DNA dodecamers obtained at higher temperatures, and literature data, are consistent with this conclusion. This demonstrates the utility of urea as a quantitative probe of changes in surface area (ΔASA) in nucleic acid processes. PMID:23510511

  8. Characterization of Biofilm Formation by Clinically Relevant Serotypes of Group A Streptococci†

    PubMed Central

    Lembke, Cordula; Podbielski, Andreas; Hidalgo-Grass, Carlos; Jonas, Ludwig; Hanski, Emanuel; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) is a frequent cause of purulent infections in humans. As potentially important aspects of its pathogenicity, GAS was recently shown to aggregate, form intratissue microcolonies, and potentially participate in multispecies biofilms. In this study, we show that GAS in fact forms monospecies biofilms in vitro, and we analyze the basic parameters of S. pyogenes in vitro biofilm formation, using Streptococcus epidermidis as a biofilm-positive control. Of nine clinically important serotype strains, M2, M6, M14, and M18 were found to significantly adhere to coated and uncoated polystyrene surfaces. Fibronectin and collagen types I and IV best supported primary adherence of serotype M2 and M18 strains, respectively, whereas serotype M6 and M14 strains strongly bound to uncoated polystyrene surfaces. Absorption measurements of safranin staining, as well as electron scanning and confocal laser scanning microscopy, documented that primary adherence led to subsequent formation of three-dimensional biofilm structures consisting of up to 46 bacterial layers. Of note, GAS isolates belonging to the same serotype were found to be very heterogeneous in their biofilm-forming behavior. Biofilm formation was equally efficient under static and continuous flow conditions and consisted of the classical three steps, including partial disintegration after long-term incubation. Activity of the SilC signaling peptide as a component of a putative quorum-sensing system was found to influence the biofilm structure and density of serotype M14 and M18 strains. Based on the presented methods and results, standardized analyses of GAS biofilms and their impact on GAS pathogenicity are now feasible. PMID:16597993

  9. Episodic star formation in a group of LAEs at z = 5.07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; González-Martín, O.; Castro Rodríguez, N.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Cava, A.; Cardiel, N.; Cabrera Lavers, A.; Gallego, J.; Hernán Caballero, A.; Herrera Ruiz, N.; Ramírez Olivencia, N.

    2014-10-01

    We are undertaking a search for high-redshift low-luminosity Lyman Alpha sources in the SHARDS (Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources) survey. Among the pre-selected Lyman Alpha sources two candidates were spotted, located 3.19 arcsec apart, and tentatively at the same redshift. Here, we report on the spectroscopic confirmation with Gran Telescopio Canarias of the Lyman Alpha emission from this pair of galaxies at a confirmed spectroscopic redshifts of z=5.07. Furthermore, one of the sources is interacting/merging with another close companion that looks distorted. Based on the analysis of the spectroscopy and additional photometric data, we infer that most of the stellar mass of these objects was assembled in a burst of star formation 100 Myr ago. A more recent burst (2 Myr old) is necessary to account for the measured Lyman Alpha flux. We claim that these two galaxies are good examples of Lyman Alpha sources undergoing episodic star formation. Besides, these sources very likely constitute a group of interacting Lyman Alpha emitters (LAEs).

  10. Possible Microfossils (Warrawoona Group, Towers Formation, Australia, approximately 3.3 - 3.5 Ga)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, P. A.; Wentworth, S. J.; Allen, C. C.; McKay, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    Early in the twentieth century there were reports of Archean stromatolite-like structures that were similar to organic rich stromatolites from the base of the Cambrian (600 m.y.). It was not until the latter half of this century that fossilized Archean-age (3.9-2.5 Ga) life forms were found in the Fig Tree Formation of South Africa and the Towers Formation of Australia. Some of the ancient stromatolites contained streaks and clots of kerogen, pyrite grains, remnants of microbial cells, and filaments that represented various stages of preservation, while others appeared to lack fossils. A set of physical criteria was established for evaluating the biogenicity of these Archean discoveries: (1) rocks of unquestionable Archean age; (2) microfossils indigenous to Archean sediments; and (3) microfossils occurring in clasts that are syngenetic with deposition of the sedimentary unit. In the case of bedded cherts, the fossils should predate the cherts; (4) the microfossils are biogenic; and (5) replicate sampling of the fossil-iferous outcrop firmly demonstrates the provenance of these microfossils. Sample 002 from the Precambrian Paleobiology Research Group (PPRG) was examined. This stromatolitic carbonaceous chert contains microbial remains that meet the established criteria [10]. Using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), we have analyzed the morphologies and chemistry of these possible microbial remains.

  11. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. II. Searching for signatures of reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-07-10

    We search for signatures of reionization in the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies (10{sup 4} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}). The SFHs are derived from color-magnitude diagrams using archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. Only five quenched galaxies (And V, And VI, And XIII, Leo IV, and Hercules) are consistent with forming the bulk of their stars before reionization, when full uncertainties are considered. Observations of 13 of the predicted 'true fossils' identified by Bovill and Ricotti show that only two (Hercules and Leo IV) indicate star formation quenched by reionization. However, both are within the virial radius of the Milky Way and evidence of tidal disturbance complicates this interpretation. We argue that the late-time gas capture scenario posited by Ricotti for the low mass, gas-rich, and star-forming fossil candidate Leo T is observationally indistinguishable from simple gas retention. Given the ambiguity between environmental effects and reionization, the best reionization fossil candidates are quenched low mass field galaxies (e.g., KKR 25).

  12. Jesse Ewing Canyon Formation, an interpreted alluvial fan deposit in the basal Uinta Mountain Group (Middle Proterozoic), Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, I.D.; Wiley, M.T.

    1986-07-01

    The Jesse Ewing Canyon Formation, a member of the Middle Proterozic Uinta Mountain Group, is here proposed as a formal lithostratigraphic unit. It consists of interbedded dark reddish-brown to dark gray conglomerate with predominant white, pale green, gray, or pink metaquartzite clasts, light to dark brown or reddish-brown quartz arenite, and reddish-brown, red, or maroon shale. This represents the first proposal of a formation in the Uinta Mountain Group in the eastern part of the range and follows by only a few years beginning efforts to establish formations in the group in the western part. The Jesse Ewing Canyon Formation locally constitutes the basal member of the Uinta Mountain Group and is here reaffirmed as an alluvial fan deposit, based on a detailed comparison of observed features to those of modern alluvial fans. This interpretation supports the hypothesis that the Uinta Trough is an aulacogen.

  13. Aperiodic dynamics in a deterministic adaptive network model of attitude formation in social groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jonathan A.; Grindrod, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Adaptive network models, in which node states and network topology coevolve, arise naturally in models of social dynamics that incorporate homophily and social influence. Homophily relates the similarity between pairs of nodes' states to their network coupling strength, whilst social influence causes coupled nodes' states to convergence. In this paper we propose a deterministic adaptive network model of attitude formation in social groups that includes these effects, and in which the attitudinal dynamics are represented by an activato-inhibitor process. We illustrate that consensus, corresponding to all nodes adopting the same attitudinal state and being fully connected, may destabilise via Turing instability, giving rise to aperiodic dynamics with sensitive dependence on initial conditions. These aperiodic dynamics correspond to the formation and dissolution of sub-groups that adopt contrasting attitudes. We discuss our findings in the context of cultural polarisation phenomena. Social influence. This reflects the fact that people tend to modify their behaviour and attitudes in response to the opinions of others [22-26]. We model social influence via diffusion: agents adjust their state according to a weighted sum (dictated by the evolving network) of the differences between their state and the states of their neighbours. Homophily. This relates the similarity of individuals' states to their frequency and strength of interaction [27]. Thus in our model, homophily drives the evolution of the weighted ‘social' network. A precise formulation of our model is given in Section 2. Social influence and homophily underpin models of social dynamics [21], which cover a wide range of sociological phenomena, including the diffusion of innovations [28-32], complex contagions [33-36], collective action [37-39], opinion dynamics [19,20,40,10,11,13,15,41,16], the emergence of social norms [42-44], group stability [45], social differentiation [46] and, of particular relevance

  14. Role of methyl group number on SOA formation from monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons photooxidation under low-NOx conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Tang, P.; Nakao, S.; Chen, C.-L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2016-02-01

    Substitution of methyl groups onto the aromatic ring determines the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon precursor (SOA yield and chemical composition). This study links the number of methyl groups on the aromatic ring to SOA formation from monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons photooxidation under low-NOx conditions (HC/NO > 10 ppbC : ppb). Monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with increasing numbers of methyl groups are systematically studied. SOA formation from pentamethylbenzene and hexamethylbenzene are reported for the first time. A decreasing SOA yield with increasing number of methyl groups is observed. Linear trends are found in both f44 vs. f43 and O / C vs. H / C for SOA from monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with zero to six methyl groups. An SOA oxidation state predictive method based on benzene is used to examine the effect of added methyl groups on aromatic oxidation under low-NOx conditions. Further, the impact of methyl group number on density and volatility of SOA from monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is explored. Finally, a mechanism for methyl group impact on SOA formation is suggested. Overall, this work suggests that, as more methyl groups are attached on the aromatic ring, SOA products from these monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons become less oxidized per mass/carbon on the basis of SOA yield or chemical composition.

  15. Stages of rootless cone formation observed within the Raudhólar cone group, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, E. P.; Hamilton, C.; Fagents, S. A.; Thordarson, T.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary (rootless) cones form when lava interacts explosively with water contained in the substrate, and represent a largely degassed, end-member system that can elucidate mechanisms of magma-water interactions in the absence of primary degassing-induced fragmentation. Rootless cones are well documented in Iceland. The Raudhólar rootless cone group, located within the ~5200-year-old Ellidaá lava flow on the south-eastern outskirts of Reykjavík, was extensively quarried during the Second World War and now provides excellent cross-sections through the tephra sequences. Taking advantage of this exposure, we performed detailed stratigraphic, grain-size, and componentry analyses, which suggest that the energetics of rootless explosions vary substantially during cone formation. The lower unit contains the most substrate sediment and is characterized by dilute pyroclastic density current deposits. The middle unit is dominated by a succession of bed-pairs, each containing a finer-grained lower layer and coarser-grained upper layer. In the upper unit, the succession grades into a welded section that caps the cone. The abundance of substrate sediment generally decreases upwards within the cone, which suggests that the efficiency of lava-substrate mixing decreased with time. In addition, clast size generally increases upwards within the cone, implying that the fragmentation energy also decreased as the rootless eruption progressed. Both lines of evidence suggest that the explosions decreased in intensity with time, likely due to the depletion of available groundwater. However, alternating fine- and coarse-grained beds imply cycles of increased and decreased fragmentation efficiency, which we attribute to groundwater recharge and depletion during the event. Therefore, this study presents a detailed look at rootless cone formation and provides the foundation for future work on this important, yet understudied, system.

  16. ULTRAVIOLET+INFRARED STAR FORMATION RATES: HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS WITH SWIFT AND SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Immler, S.; Johnson, K. E.; Reines, A. E.; Gronwall, C.; Hoversten, E.; Charlton, J. C.

    2010-06-10

    We present Swift UVOT ultraviolet (UV; 1600-3000 A) data with complete three-band UV photometry for a sample of 41 galaxies in 11 nearby (<4500 km s{sup -1}) Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) of galaxies. We use UVOT uvw2-band (2000 A) photometry to estimate the dust-unobscured component, SFR{sub UV}, of the total star formation rate, SFR{sub TOTAL}. We use Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m photometry to estimate SFR{sub IR}, the component of SFR{sub TOTAL} that suffers dust extinction in the UV and is re-emitted in the IR. By combining the two components, we obtain SFR{sub TOTAL} estimates for all HCG galaxies. We obtain total stellar mass, M {sub *}, estimates by means of Two Micron All Sky Survey K{sub s} -band luminosities, and use them to calculate specific star formation rates, SSFR {identical_to} SFR{sub TOTAL}/M {sub *}. SSFR values show a clear and significant bimodality, with a gap between low ({approx}<3.2 x 10{sup -11} yr{sup -1}) and high-SSFR ({approx_gt}1.2 x 10{sup -10} yr{sup -1}) systems. We compare this bimodality to the previously discovered bimodality in {alpha}{sub IRAC}, the MIR activity index from a power-law fit to the Spitzer IRAC 4.5-8 {mu}m data for these galaxies. We find that all galaxies with {alpha}{sub IRAC} {<=} 0 ( >0) are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, as expected if high levels of star-forming activity power MIR emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and a hot dust continuum. Consistent with this finding, all elliptical/S0 galaxies are in the low-SSFR locus, while 22 out of 24 spirals/irregulars are in the high-SSFR locus, with two borderline cases. We further divide our sample into three subsamples (I, II, and III) according to decreasing H I richness of the parent galaxy group to which a galaxy belongs. Consistent with the SSFR and {alpha}{sub IRAC} bimodality, 12 out of 15 type I (11 out of 12 type III) galaxies are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, while type II galaxies span almost the full range of SSFR values. We use the

  17. Ultraviolet+Infrared Star Formation Rates: Hickson Compact Groups with Swift and SPitzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S. C.; Johnson, K. E.; Gronwall, C.; Immler, S.; Reines, A. E.; Hoversten, E.; Charlton, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present Swift UVOT ultraviolet (UV; 1600-3000 A) data with complete three-band UV photometry for a sample of 41 galaxies in 11 nearby (<4500 km/s) Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) of galaxies. We use UVOT uvw2-band (2000A) photometry to estimate the dust-unobscured component, SFR(sub uv), of the total star formation rate, SFR(sub TOTAL). We use Spitzer MIPS 24 micron photometry to estimate SFR(sub IR), the component of SFR(sub TOTAL) that suffers dust extinction in the UV and is re-emitted in the IR. By combining the two components, we obtain SFR(sub TOTAL) estimates for all HCG galaxies. We obtain total stellar mass, M(sub *) estimates by means of Two Micron All Sky Survey K(sub s)-band luminosities, and use them to calculate specific star formation rates, SSFR is identical with SFR(sub TOTAL)/ M (sub *). SSFR values show a clear and significant bimodality, with a gap between low (approximately <3.2 x 10(exp -11) / yr) and high-SSFR (approximately > 1.2 x lO)exp -10)/yr) systems. We compare this bimodality to the previously discovered bimodality in alpha-IRAC, the MIR activity index from a power-law fit to the Spitzer IRAC 4.5-8 micron data for these galaxies. We find that all galaxies with alpha-IRAC <= 0 (> 0) are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, as expected if high levels of star-forming activity power MIR emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and a hot dust continuum. Consistent with this finding, all elliptical/SO galaxies are in the low-SSFR locus, while 22 out of 24 spirals / irregulars are in the high-SSFR locus, with two borderline cases. We further divide our sample into three subsamples (I, II, and III) according to decreasing H I richness of the parent galaxy group to which a galaxy belongs. Consistent with the SSFR and alpha-IRAC bimodality, 12 out of 15 type I (11 out of 12 type III) galaxies are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, while type II galaxies span almost the full range of SSFR values. We use the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy

  18. Going out with a bang or a whimper? Star formation and quenching in the Local Group's satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    HST observations of the Milky Way and M31's satellite galaxies show that those galaxies have an incredible diversity of star-formation histories, yet with the exception of the Magellanic Clouds, NGC205, and NGC185, none have active star formation or cold gas at the present. What accounts for the variation in star-formation histories, and what turns off star formation? We propose to use the publicly available Galacticus semi-analytic modeling code to explore the mechanisms for star formation and quenching of Local Group dwarf galaxies, comparing the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way and M31 with the star-forming "field" galaxies of the Local Group. We will create new modules for Galacticus to incorporate physical processes necessary to follow star formation and quenching {e.g., ram- pressure and tidal stripping and compression of gas}, and perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the HST-derived star-formation histories to determine the best-fit physical model and degeneracies of parameters for star formation in the Local Group. These new modules and the Markov chains will be publicly released via the Galacticus web server. With this study, we can determine to what extent the star-formation histories and quenching of Local Group dwarfs are governed by physical processes that depend on properties of the Milky Way and M31's dark and gas halos versus other "external" {e.g., reionization-induced photoionization} or "internal" {e.g., supernova feedback} processes. This study will be a window into the broader question of star formation in dwarf galaxies.

  19. Brightest group galaxies: stellar mass and star formation rate (paper I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozaliasl, Ghassem; Finoguenov, Alexis; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Mirkazemi, Mohammad; Erfanianfar, Ghazaleh; Tanaka, Masayuki

    2016-05-01

    We study the distribution and evolution of the stellar mass and the star formation rate (SFR) of the brightest group galaxies (BGGs) over 0.04 < z < 1.3 using a large sample of 407 X-ray galaxy groups selected from the COSMOS, AEGIS, and XMM-LSS fields. We compare our results with predictions from the semi-analytic models based on the Millennium simulation. In contrast to model predictions, we find that, as the Universe evolves, the stellar mass distribution evolves towards a normal distribution. This distribution tends to skew to low-mass BGGs at all redshifts implying the presence of a star-forming population of the BGGs with MS ˜ 1010.5 M⊙ which results in the shape of the stellar mass distribution deviating from a normal distribution. In agreement with the models and previous studies, we find that the mean stellar mass of BGGs grows with time by a factor of ˜2 between z = 1.3 and z = 0.1, however, the significant growth occurs above z = 0.4. The BGGs are not entirely a dormant population of galaxies, as low-mass BGGs in low-mass haloes are more active in forming stars than the BGGs in more massive haloes, over the same redshift range. We find that the average SFR of the BGGs evolves steeply with redshift and fraction of the passive BGGs increases as a function of increasing stellar mass and halo mass. Finally, we show that the specific SFR of the BGGs within haloes with M200 ≤ 1013.4 M⊙ decreases with increasing halo mass at z < 0.4.

  20. Sequential palynostratigraphy of the Queen City and Weches formations (Middle Eocene Claiborne Group), southeast central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Elsik, W.C. )

    1993-02-01

    Palynomorph sequences of several orders of magnitude were found in the Queen City and Weches formations respectively at Six Mile and Burleson bluffs on the Brazos River, Milam and Burleson counties, Texas. The long term development of the subtropical to tropical Claibornian palynoflora included Engelhardtia spp., Friedrichipollis claibornensis, Nudopollis terminalis, Pollenites laesius and Symplocoipollenites spp. Shorter term fluctuations in sea level were reflected by common herbaceous pollen in the Queen City, and common mangrove pollen in the Weches. Paleoenvironments were marginally to fully marine; dinocysts occurred throughout. The Wetzeliella group of dinocysts were present only in the Queen City at Six Mile Bluff. Late Paleocene to Early Eocene pollen, and Early Middle Eocene pollen with last effective occurrences near the Queen City and Weches boundary included Aesculiidites circumstriatus, Annona foveoreticulata and a new species of Platycarya. Five short term warmer-cooler couplet events were represented by successive abundance peaks of Juglandaceae followed by Ulmus; Alnus supports the three upper Ulmus peaks. One deep water event was recorded by an abundance of fresh water Pediastrum at the Queen City and Weches boundary. That boundary event was bracketed by two of the Alnus and Ulmus peaks.

  1. Ion implantation induced defect formation and amorphization in the Group IV semiconductors: Diamond, silicon and germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Diane P.

    Silicon, which has been the workhorse of the semiconductor industry for the past several decades, is now being enhanced with other Group IV elements, such as carbon (silicon carbide) and germanium (silicon-germanium strained channels in transistors), to accentuate properties of silicon for various nanoelectronic devices. However, there is little understanding of the relationship between ion implantation and defect evolution in two of the three corners of the Group IV phase diagram. In particular, the rod-like {311} defect is theorized to be unique to the diamond crystal structure elements. Due to its ability to affect dopant diffusion, the {311} defect is well studied in silicon. However, few studies of germanium and none of diamond have analyzed extended defect formation and evolution using transmission electron spectroscopy. Using ion implantation to induce amorphization is a technological process step in Si devices and potentially for diamond nano-electronics. Defects associated with crystal regrowth in Ge and diamond are not well known. My research studies the formation conditions of extended defects and amorphization in carbon and germanium after ion implantation. Ion implantation damage in diamond-cubic single-crystal silicon, germanium and diamond was produced by Si+ implantation at 1 MeV to a dose of 1 x 1014 cm-2 and 1 x 10 15 cm-2. Damage in Si and Ge was produced by Si + implantation at 40 keV to a dose of 1 x 1014 cm-2 and 1 x 1015 cm-2, and amorphizing damage in diamond was produced by Si+ implantation at 1 MeV to a dose of 3 and 7 x 1015 cm-2. All implants were carried out at room temperature. For non-amorphizing implants (1014 Si+ cm-2) into Ge, dot-like defects formed immediately upon implantation and were stable up to temperatures of 650°C. The activation energy of these defects was determined to be approximately 0.2 +/- 0.1 eV. For amorphizing implants (1015 Si+ cm-2) into Ge and upon solid-phase epitaxial regrowth, the same types of defects seen

  2. A "Fossil Vadose Zone" from the Triassic Cooper Canyon Formation (Dockum Group) of West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, R. M.; Hughes, E.; Hubbell, J. M.; Grisak, G.; Cook, S.; Pickens, J.; Griffith, B. C.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrogeologic investigations at a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Andrews County, Texas, have revealed evidence of a "fossil vadose zone" present within the redbeds of the Cooper Canyon Formation. The Cooper Canyon Formation is the uppermost stratigraphic unit in the Triassic Dockum Group in the study area and consists of very low permeability claystone and mudstone with several areally extensive siltstone/sandstone interbeds. Piezometers installed within two of the siltstone/sandstone zones show that water levels can rise up to about 20 m above the top of the zones and that uppermost of these zones is locally unsaturated. Waters in these zones have radiometric age dates of about 16,000 years. Recently twelve boreholes were drilled into the Cooper Canyon, cored, and sampled for in situ water potential (the sum of the matric and osmotic potential) and other hydraulic properties including moisture content, porosity, electrical conductivity of a saturated paste (EC), and chloride content. Water potential and saturation data show that Cooper Canyon mudstones are unsaturated to depths greater than 110 m with water potentials typically ranging from -2 MPa to -5 MPa. Very low water potentials (less than -1 MPa) occur within 0.1 m to 1 m of the upper and lower contacts of the siltstone/sandstone zones. Hydraulic gradients are outward from the siltstone/sandstone zones, and water potential values in the mudstones show one or more minima. These conditions preclude vertical flow between the land surface and underlying units and between siltstone/sandstone zones. The average air-entry pressure for Cooper Canyon rocks is about -1 MPa, and water saturation averages 83%. Chloride concentration profiles show a strong bulge in the sediments and rocks above the Cooper Canyon suggesting that very little Holocene recharge has reached the redbeds. Chloride concentrations within the siltstone/sandstone zones are higher than the surrounding mudstones, indicating

  3. Final Update of the IAU Commission 4 Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides and File Format Specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, James L.

    2015-08-01

    The IAU Commission 4 Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides recommends the use of the Spacecraft and Planet Kernel (SPK) format to provide a uniform format for the position ephemerides of planets and other natural solar system bodies, and the use of the Planetary Constants Kernel (PCK) for the orientation of these bodies. These formats are used by the SPICE system, developed by the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The working group's final report is currently undergoing final preparations for publication. A long version of this report will be available at the IAU Commission 4 - Ephemerides (or its successor) web site. This long version will contain a full description of that portion of the SPK and PCK formats required to duplicate these file types for this application.

  4. Use of Improved Orbitals for CCSD(T) Calculations for Predicting Heats of Formation of Group IV and Group VI Metal Oxide Monomers and Dimers and UCl6.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zongtang; Lee, Zachary; Peterson, Kirk A; Dixon, David A

    2016-08-01

    The prediction of the heats of formation of group IV and group VI metal oxide monomers and dimers with the coupled cluster CCSD(T) method has been improved by using Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) and Brueckner orbitals for the initial wave function. The valence and core-valence contributions to the total atomization energies for the CrO3 monomer and dimer are predicted to be significantly larger than when using the Hartree-Fock (HF) orbitals. The predicted heat of formation of CrO3 with CCSD(T)/PW91 is consistent with previous calculations including high-order corrections beyond CCSD(T) and agrees well with the experiment. The improved heats of formation with the DFT and Brueckner orbitals are due to these orbitals being closer to the actual orbitals. Pure DFT functionals perform slightly better than the hybrid B3LYP functional due to the presence of exact exchange in the hybrid functional. Comparable heats of formation for TiO2 and the second- and the third-row group IV and group VI metal oxides are predicted well using either the DFT PW91 orbitals, Brueckner orbitals, or HF orbitals. The normalized clustering energies for the dimers are consistent with our previous work except for a larger value predicted for Cr2O6. The prediction of the reaction energy for UF6 + 3Cl2 → UCl6 + 3F2 was significantly improved with the use of DFT or Brueckner orbitals as compared to HF orbitals. PMID:27398941

  5. SOCIOMETRIC FORMATION AND EFFECTIVENESS OF GROUPS IN A FARM MANAGEMENT PROGRAM. EXTENSION STUDY, NUMBER 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LONGEST, JAMES W.; AND OTHERS

    THE EXTENSION AGENT CONDUCTING THE FARM AND HOME MANAGEMENT PROGRAM FOR FARMERS AND THEIR WIVES IN A NEW YORK COUNTY BEGAN USING SMALL EXPERIMENTAL STUDY GROUPS IN THE SECOND YEAR OF THE PROGRAM. USE OF SOCIOMETRIC TECHNIQUES FOR FORMING THESE GROUPS RESULTED IN REDISTRIBUTION OF THE 15 MEMBERS OF TWO ORIGINAL GROUPS TO FIVE DIFFERENT GROUPS AND…

  6. Stable isotopic chemostratigraphy of the Middle Devonian Cedar Valley Group: Initial data from the uppermost Givetian Lithograph City Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, R.A.; Gonzalez, L.A. . Dept of Geology); Ludvigson, G.A.; Witzke, B.J. . Geological Survey Bureau); Day, J.E. . Dept. of Geography-Geology)

    1994-04-01

    Nonluminescent brachiopods (Hadrorhynchia solon) from pelletal wackestones/packstones of the State Quarry Member of the Lithograph City Formation (norrisi Zone; Metzger, 1993, GSA Abst. w/Prog., 25(6):53) yield a marine calcite value of [delta][sup 18]O = [minus]5.5 [per thousand] and [delta][sup 13]C = 1.5 [per thousand]. This value represents a 1.5 per mil decrease in marine calcite [delta][sup 18]O in relation to the underlying coralville Formation, limiting the range of a Givetian (380--374 Ma) secular increase in marine [delta][sup 18]O from [minus]6.5 [per thousand] to [minus]4.0 [per thousand] that had been detected in the two underlying formations of the Cedar Valley Group of eastern Iowa. Earlier studies of carbonate diagenesis in the Cedar Valley Group have shown that the shallowing-upward depositional history of successive T-R formations is encoded in the carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of all rock components. Specifically, episodes of subaerial exposure and consequent meteoric diagenesis resulted in pervasive diagenetic overprinting of the upper portions of each T-R cycle. For example, in the Coralville Formation, nonluminescent brachiopods in the upper part of the formation are depleted by up to 3.5 per mil in [delta][sup 18]O and 4.5 per mil in [delta][sup 13]C relative to their counterparts at the base. Accordingly, the basal portions of the T-R formations, which were chemically stabilized in rock-dominated diagenetic systems, best preserve the original marine compositions of Cedar Valley Group carbonates. A meteoric calcite line of [delta][sup 18]O = 7.0 [per thousand] is suggested from preliminary data on calcite cements from the Lithograph City Formation.

  7. Molecular Structures, Acid-Base Properties, and Formation of Group 6 Transition Metal Hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shenggang; Guenther, Courtney L.; Kelley, Matthew S.; Dixon, David A.

    2011-04-28

    Density functional theory (DFT) and coupled cluster theory (CCSD(T)) were used to study the group 6 metal (M = Cr, Mo, W) hydroxides: MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3), M2O6-m(OH)2m (m = 1-5), M3O9-m(OH)2m (m = 1, 2), and M4O11(OH)2. The calculations were done up to the complete basis set (CBS) limit for the CCSD(T) method. Molecular structures of many low-energy conformers/isomers were located. Brønsted acidities in the gas phase and pKa values in aqueous solution were predicted for MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3) and MnO3n-1(OH)2 (n = 2-4). In addition, Brønsted basicities and Lewis acidities (fluoride affinities) were predicted for MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3) as well as the metal oxide clusters MnO3n (n = 1-3). The metal hydroxides were predicted to be strong Brønsted acids and weak to modest Brønsted bases and Lewis acids. The pKa values can have values as negative as -31. Potential energy surfaces for the hydrolysis of the MnO3n (n = 1-4) clusters were calculated. Heats of formation of the metal hydroxides were predicted from the calculated reaction energies, and the agreement with the limited available experimental data is good. The first hydrolysis step leading to the formation of MnO3n-1(OH)2 was predicted to be exothermic, with the exothermicity becoming less negative as n increases and essentially converged at n = 3. Reaction rate constants for the hydrogen transfer steps were calculated using transition state theory and RRKM theory. Further hydrolysis of MnO3n-1(OH)2 tends to be endothermic especially for M = Cr. Fifty-five DFT exchange-correlation functionals were benchmarked for the calculations of the reaction energies, complexation energies, and reaction barriers by comparing to our CCSD(T) results. Overall, the DFT results for the potential energy surfaces are semiquantitatively correct, but no single functional works for all processes and all three metals. Among the functionals benchmarked, the wB97, wB97X, B1B95, B97-1, mPW1LYP, and X3LYP functionals have the best

  8. Image encryption schemes for joint photographic experts group and graphics interchange format formats based on three-dimensional baker with compound chaotic sequence generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shiyu; Tong, Xiaojun; Zhang, Miao

    2013-01-01

    We propose several methods to transplant the compound chaotic image encryption scheme with permutation based on three-dimensional (3-D) baker onto image formats such as the joint photographic experts group (JPEG) and graphics interchange format (GIF). The new methods avert the discrete cosine transform and quantization, which result in floating point precision loss, and succeed to encrypt and decrypt JPEG images lossless. The ciphered JPEG images generated by our solution own much better randomness than most other existing schemes. Our proposed method for GIF keeps the property of animation successfully. The security test results indicate the proposed methods have high security, and the speed of our algorithm is faster than classical solutions. Since JPEG and GIF image formats are popular contemporarily, we show that the prospect of chaotic image encryption is promising.

  9. Formation of sunspot groups: Do we see manifestations of the rising-tube mechanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getling, Alexander; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Buchnev, Aleksei

    A comparison is made between the expected manifestations of two mechanisms suggested to account for the formation of local photospheric magnetic fields, viz., the rising of an Omega-shaped flux tube of a strong magnetic field and the emph{in situ} amplification and structuring of magnetic field by convection. The ultimate aim of the study is to elaborate observational criteria to find out which mechanism controls the process in any given case. To this end, the full velocity and magnetic-field vectors in growing active regions and sunspot groups at a photospheric level were recorded nearly simultaneously. Observations of a young bipolar subregion developing within AR 11313 were carried out on 9-10 October 2011, with the Solar Optical Telescope on the emph{Hinode} satellite, which yielded 5576-Å filtergrams and Dopplergrams and also spectropolarimetric records of the magnetic-field vector. To determine the tangential-velocity field, a technique similar to but more reliable than local correlation tracking (LCT) was applied to the series of filtergrams, and the trajectories of corks were computed. According to our preliminary findings, the velocity pattern in the growing active region cannot be described as a spreading flow on the scale of the entire bipolar region, which could be expected if a tube of strong magnetic field emerged. Instead, normal mesogranular and supergranular flows are observed in agreement with Bumba’s inference that the development of an active region does not entail the destruction of the existing convective-velocity field. Between the magnetic polarities, curves can be found to which the surface flows converge rather than diverging from them under the action of a rising tube. The convective mechanism appears to be better compatible with observations than the rising-tube mechanism. In the umbras of the well-developed sunspots, flows converging to the umbra centres are revealed. Spreading streams are present around these spots. Hinode is a

  10. Star Formation Suppression in Compact Group Galaxies: A New Path to Quenching?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.; Bitsakis, T.; Lanz, L.; Lacy, M.; Charmandaris, V.; Cluver, M.; Dopita, M. A.; Guillard, P.; Jarrett, T.; Kewley, L. J.; Nyland, K.; Ogle, P. M.; Rasmussen, J.; Rich, J. A.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Xu, C. K.; Yun, M.

    2015-10-01

    We present CO(1-0) maps of 12 warm H2-selected Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs), covering 14 individually imaged warm H2 bright galaxies, with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy. We found a variety of molecular gas distributions within the HCGs, including regularly rotating disks, bars, rings, tidal tails, and possibly nuclear outflows, though the molecular gas morphologies are more consistent with spirals and early-type galaxies than mergers and interacting systems. Our CO-imaged HCG galaxies, when plotted on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, shows star formation (SF) suppression of < {S} > =10+/- 5, distributed bimodally, with five objects exhibiting suppressions of {S} ≳ 10 and depletion timescales ≳10 Gyr. This SF inefficiency is also seen in the efficiency per freefall time of Krumholz et al. We investigate the gas-to-dust ratios of these galaxies to determine if an incorrect LCO-M(H2) conversion caused the apparent suppression and find that HCGs have normal gas-to-dust ratios. It is likely that the cause of the apparent suppression in these objects is associated with shocks injecting turbulence into the molecular gas, supported by the fact that the required turbulent injection luminosity is consistent with the bright H2 luminosity reported by Cluver et al. Galaxies with high SF suppression ({S} ≳ 10) also appear to be those in the most advanced stages of transition across both optical and infrared color space. This supports the idea that at least some galaxies in HCGs are transitioning objects, where a disruption of the existing molecular gas in the system suppresses SF by inhibiting the molecular gas from collapsing and forming stars efficiently. These observations, combined with recent work on poststarburst galaxies with molecular reservoirs, indicates that galaxies do not need to expel their molecular reservoirs prior to quenching SF and transitioning from blue spirals to red early-type galaxies. This may imply that SF quenching can

  11. The Formation of Group Ethos Among Student Teachers for Inner City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Colvin; Swick, Kevin

    1971-01-01

    The study attempted to verify a group ethos among student teachers. When the teachers involved sensed a groupness, a family ethos, they become a special core of teachers, and they performed accordingly. (Author)

  12. The Emergence of Embedded Relations and Group Formation in Networks of Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thye, Shane R.; Lawler, Edward J.; Yoon, Jeongkoo

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how and when small networks of self-interested agents generate a group tie or affiliation at the network level. A group affiliation is formed when actors (a) perceive themselves as members of a group and (b) share resources with each other despite an underlying competitive structure. We apply a concept of structural cohesion to…

  13. Report of the IAU Commission 4 Working Group on standardizing access to ephemerides and File format specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, J.; Acton, A.; Arlot, J.-E.; Bell, , S. A.; Capitaine, N.; Fienga, A.; Folkner, W. M.; Gastineau, M.; Pavlov, D.; Pitjeva, E. V.; Skripnichenko, V. I.; Wallace, P. T.

    2014-12-01

    The IAU Commission 4 Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides recommends the use of the Spacecraft and Planet Kernel (SPK) file format to provide a uniform format for the position ephemerides of planets and other natural solar system bodies, and the use of the binary Planetary Constants Kernel (PCK) format for the orientation of a body. It further recommends supporting data be stored in a text PCK. These formats are used by the SPICE system developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A new data type, Type 20: Chebyshev (Velocity Only) has been added. Other changes to the specification are new object identification numbers for coordinate time ephemerides, and a set of three new data types that uses the TCB rather than the TDB timescale.

  14. An Agent-Based Simulation for Investigating the Impact of Stereotypes on Task-Oriented Group Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghami, Mahsa; Sukthankar, Gita

    In this paper, we introduce an agent-based simulation for investigating the impact of social factors on the formation and evolution of task-oriented groups. Task-oriented groups are created explicitly to perform a task, and all members derive benefits from task completion. However, even in cases when all group members act in a way that is locally optimal for task completion, social forces that have mild effects on choice of associates can have a measurable impact on task completion performance. In this paper, we show how our simulation can be used to model the impact of stereotypes on group formation. In our simulation, stereotypes are based on observable features, learned from prior experience, and only affect an agent's link formation preferences. Even without assuming stereotypes affect the agents' willingness or ability to complete tasks, the long-term modifications that stereotypes have on the agents' social network impair the agents' ability to form groups with sufficient diversity of skills, as compared to agents who form links randomly. An interesting finding is that this effect holds even in cases where stereotype preference and skill existence are completely uncorrelated.

  15. Factors affecting treatment efficacy in social phobia: the use of video feedback and individual vs. group formats.

    PubMed

    Aderka, Idan M

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis assessed two potential moderators of treatment efficacy in social phobia: video feedback, and treatment format (i.e., individual vs. group). Eighteen recent (2000-2006) trials including a total of 511 participants were sampled. Effect sizes (Cohen's d's) were calculated for each trial while correcting for measurement error. The Q statistic was used to test (a) heterogeneity across trials and (b) potential moderators. Results indicated that use of video feedback was not a moderator of treatment efficacy and did not significantly affect effect sizes. In contrast, treatment format was a moderator of treatment efficacy such that individual treatments reported larger effect sizes and lower attrition rates compared with group treatments. The results suggest that individual treatments in social phobia may be superior to group treatments irrespective of treatment type. PMID:18599263

  16. On the formation of polar ring galaxies and tidal dwarf galaxies in gas-rich galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilborn, Virginia; Sweet, Sarah; Meurer, Gerhardt; Drinkwater, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We are conducting a study of the properties of galaxies and dwarfs in 16 gas-rich galaxy groups identified in the Survey for Ionization in Neutral Gas Galaxies (SINGG; Meurer et al. 2006). We have found a young gas-rich coalescing galaxy group, J1051-17. Key features of this system are gas-rich tidal tails, studded with dwarf galaxies extending 200 kpc which merge in to a low surface brightness polar disk orbiting a very red edge-on host hosting a central AGN. Accretion from the polar disk may be feeding the AGN and powering a galactic wind. The example of this system suggests that tidal interactions with gas rich satellites may be a key process that aligns satellites in to polar planes while fuelling accretion down to the very centres of the host. We discuss the formation scenario of this polar ring galaxy, and investigate the formation of tidal dwarf galaxies in the wider group sample.

  17. Divergent Mechanistic Routes for the Formation of gem-Dimethyl Groups in the Biosynthesis of Complex Polyketides

    SciTech Connect

    Poust, S; Phelan, RM; Deng, K; Katz, L; Petzold, CJ; Keasling, JD

    2015-01-07

    The gem-dimethyl groups in polyketide-derived natural products add steric bulk and, accordingly, lend increased stability to medicinal compounds, however, our ability to rationally incorporate this functional group in modified natural products is limited. In order to characterize the mechanism of gem-dimethyl group formation, with a goal toward engineering of novel compounds containing this moiety, the gem-dimethyl group producing polyketide synthase (PKS) modules of yersiniabactin and epothilone were characterized using mass spectrometry. The work demonstrated, contrary to the canonical understanding of reaction order in PKSs, that methylation can precede condensation in gem-dimethyl group producing PKS modules. Experiments showed that both PKSs are able to use dimethylmalonyl acyl carrier protein (ACP) as an extender unit. Interestingly, for epothilone module8, use of dimethylmalonyl-ACP appeared to be the sole route to form a gem-dimethylated product, while the yersiniabactin PKS could methylate before or after ketosynthase condensation.

  18. THE ORIENTATIONS OF GALAXY GROUPS AND FORMATION OF THE LOCAL SUPERCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Godlowski, Wlodzimierz; Flin, Piotr E-mail: sfflin@cyf-kr.edu.p

    2010-01-10

    We analyzed the orientation of galaxy groups in the Local Supercluster (LSC). It is strongly correlated with the distribution of neighboring groups in the scale up to about 20 Mpc. The group major axis is in alignment with both the line joining the two brightest galaxies and the direction toward the center of the LSC, i.e., Virgo cluster. These correlations suggest that two brightest galaxies were formed in filaments of matter directed toward the protosupercluster center. Afterward, the hierarchical clustering leads to aggregation of galaxies around these two galaxies. The groups are formed on the same or similarly oriented filaments. This picture is in agreement with the predictions of numerical simulations.

  19. Fractured-aquifer hydrogeology from geophysical logs: Brunswick group and Lockatong Formation, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.; Senior, L.A.; Decker, E.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Brunswick Group and the underlying Lockatong Formation are composed of lithified Mesozoic sediments that constitute part of the Newark Basin in southeastern Pennsylvania. These fractured rocks form an important regional aquifer that consists of gradational sequences of shale, siltstone, and sandstone, with fluid transport occurring primarily in fractures. An extensive suite of geophysical logs was obtained in seven wells located at the borough of Lansdale, Pennsylvania, in order to better characterize the areal hydrogeologic system and provide guidelines for the refinement of numerical ground water models. Six of the seven wells are approximately 120 m deep and the seventh extends to a depth of 335 m. Temperature, fluid conductivity, and flowmeter logs are used to locate zones of fluid exchange and to quantify transmissivities. Electrical resistivity and natural gamma logs together yield detailed stratigraphic information, and digital acoustic televiewer data provide magnetically oriented images of the borehole wall from which almost 900 fractures are identified. Analyses of the geophysical data indicate that the aquifer penetrated by the deep well can be separated into two distinct structural domains, which may, in turn, reflect different mechanical responses to basin extension by different sedimentary units: 1. In the shallow zone (above 125 m), the dominant fracture population consists of gently dipping bedding plane partings that strike N46??E and dip to the northwest at about 11 degrees. Fluid flow is concentrated in the upper 80 m along these subhorizontal fractures, with transmissivities rapidly diminishing in magnitude with depth. 2. The zone below 125 m marks the appearance of numerous high-angle fractures that are orthogonal to the bedding planes, striking parallel but dipping steeply southeast at 77 degrees. This secondary set of fractures is associated with a fairly thick (approximately 60 m) high-resistivity, low-transmissivity sandstone unit that

  20. Non-parametric star formation histories for four dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, X.; Gilmore, Gerard; Valls-Gabaud, David

    2000-10-01

    We use recent Hubble Space Telescope colour-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stellar populations of a sample of local dSph galaxies (Carina, Leo I, Leo II and Ursa Minor) to infer the star formation histories of these systems, SFR(t). Applying a new variational calculus maximum likelihood method, which includes a full Bayesian analysis and allows a non-parametric estimate of the function one is solving for, we infer the star formation histories of the systems studied. This method has the advantage of yielding an objective answer, as one need not assume a priori the form of the function one is trying to recover. The results are checked independently using Saha's W statistic. The total luminosities of the systems are used to normalize the results into physical units and derive SN type II rates. We derive the luminosity-weighted mean star formation history of this sample of galaxies.

  1. Unconformities in the mid-Late Proterozoic Pahrump Group: Stratigraphic evidence from the upper member Crystal Spring Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mbuyi, K.; Prave, A.R. . Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Deposition of the Pahrump Group rocks (Crystal Spring-Beck Spring-Kingston Peak Formations) in the Death Valley region of California post-dates 1.7 to 1.4 Ga gneissic basement rocks (Wright et al., 1976) and mostly predates the inferred 0.75 Ga glacial deposits of the Kingston Peak Formation. The 1.08 Ga age of the diabase sills in the middle Crystal Spring Formation provides an additional time constraint. Event though this time span is excessive when compared to better dated Phanerozoic successions, the Pahrump Group, nonetheless, has been assumed to be internally conformable. Results from the authors recent work invalidates that assumption. They have carefully measured 15 sections of upper member Crystal Spring Formation rocks and have mapped in detail the belt of exposures in the Saratoga, Saddle Peak, and Ibex Hills, and northern Kingston Range. Their data indicates that an unconformity of significant but unknown duration occurs within the upper member. Evidence for this unconformity includes: (1) local angular discordance of up to 20[degree]; (2) presence of an erosive-based breccia unit (0.10--30 m thick) that consists mostly of hornfelsic clasts derived from immediately subjacent rocks; and (3) erosional beveling and truncation of underlying rocks. In addition, the upward transition to Beck Spring deposition is marked by a disconformity (sequence boundary) that cuts down across and erosionally truncates strata of the upper member Crystal Spring Formation.

  2. Presence of the dinosaur Scelidosaurus indicates Jurassic age for the Kayenta Formation (Glen Canyon Group, northern Arizona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padian, Kevin

    1989-05-01

    The Glen Canyon Group (Moenave, Wingate, Kayenta and Navajo Formations) of northern Arizona represents an extensive outcrop of early Mesozoic age terrestrial sediments. The age of these formations has long been disputed because independent stratigraphic data from marine tie-ins, paleobotanical and palynological evidence, and radiometric calibrations have been scanty or absent. The fauna of the Kayenta Formation in particular has been problematic because it has appeared to contain both typical Late Triassic and Early Jurassic taxa Here I report that the principal evidence for Late Triassic taxa, dermal scutes previously assigned to an aetosaur, in fact belongs to the thyreophoran ornithischian dinosaur Scelidosaurus, previously known only as a washed-in form found in marine sediments in the Early Jurassic of England. The presence of this dinosaur represents the first vertebrate biostratigraphic tie-in of the Glen Canyon Group horizons with reliably dated marine deposits in Europe. Together with revised systematic assessments of other vertebrates and independent evidence from fossil pollen, it supports an Early Jurassic age for the Kayenta Formation and most or all of the Glen Canyon Group.

  3. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of Kincaid Formation, Midway Group (Paleocene), Upper Rio Grande Embayment, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, E.C. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    Sedimentary rocks of the Kincaid Formation crop out along the northern and western edges of the Rio Grande Embayment. Siltstones are exposed at the type locality of the Kincaid Formation along the Frio River in Uvalde County, Texas. On the east and south, the Kincaid Formation changes facies to richly fossiliferous carbonate rocks; however, basinward, it grades into a shale facies that contains interbedded units of fine-grained sandstone. At the type locality of the Kincaid Formation, approximately 30 ft (9 m) of massive siltstone grades upward into a very silty limestone unit. Bedding is poorly defined throughout the section, largely the result of intensive bioturbation. The grain size of the siltstone increases upward, ranging from medium to coarse. Clay content in the siltstone decreases upward as the amount of calcareous material increases. The upper 4-6 ft (1.2-1.8 m) may actually be considered a silty limestone. A dramatic facies change is present along the outcrop both east and south of the type section. To the east, the Kincaid Formation is composed of glauconitic and highly fossiliferous limestone. The siltstone present at the type locality thins eastward and is absent less than 20 mi (32 km) away. Eighty miles (130 km) to the south, along the Rio Grande River, approximately 45 ft (14 m) of limestone and shale comprise the Kincaid Formation. These early Paleocene sediments are interpreted to be shallow marine in origin. The siltstone represents a shallow sublittoral shoreface environment whereas the limestones on the east and south were deposited in shallow nearshore environments beyond the reach of clastic deposition.

  4. Alcohol and group formation: a multimodal investigation of the effects of alcohol on emotion and social bonding.

    PubMed

    Sayette, Michael A; Creswell, Kasey G; Dimoff, John D; Fairbairn, Catharine E; Cohn, Jeffrey F; Heckman, Bryan W; Kirchner, Thomas R; Levine, John M; Moreland, Richard L

    2012-08-01

    We integrated research on emotion and on small groups to address a fundamental and enduring question facing alcohol researchers: What are the specific mechanisms that underlie the reinforcing effects of drinking? In one of the largest alcohol-administration studies yet conducted, we employed a novel group-formation paradigm to evaluate the socioemotional effects of alcohol. Seven hundred twenty social drinkers (360 male, 360 female) were assembled into groups of 3 unacquainted persons each and given a moderate dose of an alcoholic, placebo, or control beverage, which they consumed over 36 min. These groups' social interactions were video recorded, and the duration and sequence of interaction partners' facial and speech behaviors were systematically coded (e.g., using the facial action coding system). Alcohol consumption enhanced individual- and group-level behaviors associated with positive affect, reduced individual-level behaviors associated with negative affect, and elevated self-reported bonding. Our results indicate that alcohol facilitates bonding during group formation. Assessing nonverbal responses in social contexts offers new directions for evaluating the effects of alcohol. PMID:22760882

  5. No Effect of Social Group Composition or Size on Hippocampal Formation Morphology and Neurogenesis in Mountain Chickadees (Poecile gambeli)

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Rebecca A.; Roth, Timothy C.; LaDage, Lara D.; Pravosudov, Vladimir V.

    2010-01-01

    Brain plasticity and adult neurogenesis may play a role in many ecologically-important processes including mate recognition, song learning and production, and spatial memory processing. In a number of species, both physical and social environments appear to influence attributes (e.g., volume, neuron number, and neurogenesis) of particular brain regions. The hippocampus in particular is well known to be especially sensitive to such changes. Although social grouping in many taxa includes the formation of male and female pairs, most studies of the relationship between social environment and the hippocampus have typically considered only solitary animals and those living in same-sex groups. Thus, the aim of the present study was to compare the volume of the hippocampal formation, the total number of hippocampal neurons, and the number of immature neurons in the hippocampus (as determined by doublecortin expression) in mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli) housed in groups of males and females, male-female pairs, same-sex pairs of either males or females, and as solitary individuals. The different groups were visually and physically, but not acoustically, isolated from each other. We found no significant differences between any of our groups in hippocampal volume, the total number of hippocampal neurons, or the number of immature neurons. Our results thus provided no support to the hypothesis that social group composition and/or size have an effect on hippocampal morphology and neurogenesis. PMID:20336697

  6. Using Focus Groups to Investigate the Presence of Formative Feedback in CAA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, Stephen; Hernandez-Martinez, Paul; Robinson, Carol L.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this project was to examine the effectiveness of feedback offered by computer-aided assessment (CAA). CAA provides practice tests for undergraduates, and feedback to help them improve their scores and mathematical understanding. However, there is a lack of evidence-based literature on the effect of formative feedback in mathematics…

  7. Formation and Uses of Lay Advisory Groups for the Humanities. Project Report No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckwith, Miriam M.

    Based on the experiences of several community colleges, this report examines successful and unsuccessful strategies utilized in the formation of lay advisory committees for the humanities. The report first presents brief descriptions of successful committee organization efforts at five institutions: Clark College (Vancouver, WA), Brevard Community…

  8. Lithostratigraphy of the Calico Hills Formation and Prow Pass Tuff (Crater Flat Group) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, T.C.; Geslin, J.K.

    1995-07-01

    Lithostratigraphic relations within the Calico Hills Formation and Prow Pass Tuff (Crater Flat Group) were reconstructed from analysis of core samples and observation of outcrop exposures. The Calico Hills Formation is composed of five nonwelded pyroclastic units (each formed of one or more pyroclastic-flow deposits) that overlie an interval of bedded tuff and a basal volcaniclastic sandstone unit. The Prow Pass Tuff is divided into four pyroclastic units and an underlying interval of bedded tuff. The pyroclastic units of the Prow Pass Tuff are distinguished by the sizes and amounts of their pumice and lithic clasts and their degree of welding. Pyroclastic units of the Prow Pass Tuff are distinguished from those of the Calico Hills Formation by their phenocryst assemblage, chemical composition, and ubiquitous siltstone lithic clasts. Downhole resistivity tends to mirror the content of authigenic minerals, primarily zeolites, in both for-mations and may be useful for recognizing the vitric-zeolite boundary in the study area. Maps of zeolite distribution illustrate that the bedded tuff and basal sandstone units of the Calico Hills Formation are altered over a wider area than the pyroclastic units of both the Calico Hills Formation and the upper Prow Pass Tuff.

  9. Formation of the lamellar structure in Group IA and IIID iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalik, J. A.; Williams, D. B.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical EM, light microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis are used to study the lamellar plessite structure of Group IA and IIID iron meteorites. The alpha lamellae in IIID structures contained a compositional gradient from 6.1 + or - 0.7 wt pct Ni at the center of the alpha lamellae to 3.6 + or - 0.5 wt pct at the alpha/gamma interface. For the Group IA irons, compositions of 4 wt pct Ni in alpha and about 48 wt pct Ni in gamma are found. Convergent beam electron diffraction was used to characterize the orientation relations at the alpha/gamma interface in the lamellar regions of both Group IA and IIID. The phase transformations responsible for the observed lamellar structure in the IA and IIID chemical groups were also investigated.

  10. End Group Effects on the Hydrogel Formation of PEO-PPO-PEO Triblock Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Aaron; Ryu, Chang Y.; Jung, Gyoo Y.; Hwang, Hee Sung

    2012-02-01

    Pluronic F108, a triblock copolymer consisting of outer polyethylene oxide (PEO) chains and an inner polypropylene oxide (PPO) chains, has been shown to be an effective hydrogel matrix for DNA separation by capillary electrophoresis using single-stranded conformation polymorphism. This presentation will discuss a new pathway to potentially enhance the separation abilities of F108 by altering the chain end groups of the block copolymers. F108 is believed to form a micelle in aqueous solutions with the hydrophobic group in the interior, thus we expect considerable interaction between the DNA sample and the end groups found at the hydrophilic brush layers of the micelle. The rheological properties of end group derivatives of F108, in combination of small angle x-ray scattering, can reveal structural differences in the micelles. In particular, gelation temperature of the end group derivatives can be linked to differences in the micelle structure. Dynamic light scattering can also be used to determine the effects of chain end groups on the hydrodynamic size of the block copolymer micelles in dilute solution.

  11. INTERGALACTIC GAS IN GROUPS OF GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL FORMATION AND THE MISSING BARYONS PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    Freeland, E.; Wilcots, E. E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu

    2011-09-10

    Radio galaxies with bent jets are predominantly located in groups and clusters of galaxies. We use bent-double radio sources, under the assumption that their jets are bent by ram pressure, to probe intragroup medium (IGM) gas densities in galaxy groups. This method provides a direct measurement of the intergalactic gas density and allows us to probe intergalactic gas at large radii and in systems whose IGM is too cool to be detected by the current generation of X-ray telescopes. We find gas with densities of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} at group radii from 15 to 700 kpc. A rough estimate of the total baryonic mass in intergalactic gas is consistent with the missing baryons being located in the IGM of galaxy groups. The neutral gas will be easily stripped from dwarf galaxies with total masses of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M{sub sun} in the groups studied here. Indications are that intragroup gas densities in less-massive systems like the Local Group should be high enough to strip gas from dwarfs like Leo T and, in combination with tides, produce dwarf spheroidals.

  12. Toxic tau oligomer formation blocked by capping of cysteine residues with 1,2-dihydroxybenzene groups

    PubMed Central

    Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Misato; Almeida, Osborne F. X.; Sumioka, Akio; Maeda, Sumihiro; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Saito, Akiko; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Masaaki; Koyama, Hiroko; Yoshiike, Yuji; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Ihara, Yasuo; Takashima, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles, composed of hyperphosphorylated tau fibrils, are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; the neurofibrillary tangle load correlates strongly with clinical progression of the disease. A growing body of evidence indicates that tau oligomer formation precedes the appearance of neurofibrillary tangles and contributes to neuronal loss. Here we show that tau oligomer formation can be inhibited by compounds whose chemical backbone includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Specifically, we demonstrate that 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-containing compounds bind to and cap cysteine residues of tau and prevent its aggregation by hindering interactions between tau molecules. Further, we show that orally administered DL-isoproterenol, an adrenergic receptor agonist whose skeleton includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene and which penetrates the brain, reduces the levels of detergent-insoluble tau, neuronal loss and reverses neurofibrillary tangle-associated brain dysfunction. Thus, compounds that target the cysteine residues of tau may prove useful in halting the progression of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. PMID:26671725

  13. Toxic tau oligomer formation blocked by capping of cysteine residues with 1,2-dihydroxybenzene groups.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Misato; Almeida, Osborne F X; Sumioka, Akio; Maeda, Sumihiro; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Saito, Akiko; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Masaaki; Koyama, Hiroko; Yoshiike, Yuji; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Ihara, Yasuo; Takashima, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles, composed of hyperphosphorylated tau fibrils, are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; the neurofibrillary tangle load correlates strongly with clinical progression of the disease. A growing body of evidence indicates that tau oligomer formation precedes the appearance of neurofibrillary tangles and contributes to neuronal loss. Here we show that tau oligomer formation can be inhibited by compounds whose chemical backbone includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Specifically, we demonstrate that 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-containing compounds bind to and cap cysteine residues of tau and prevent its aggregation by hindering interactions between tau molecules. Further, we show that orally administered DL-isoproterenol, an adrenergic receptor agonist whose skeleton includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene and which penetrates the brain, reduces the levels of detergent-insoluble tau, neuronal loss and reverses neurofibrillary tangle-associated brain dysfunction. Thus, compounds that target the cysteine residues of tau may prove useful in halting the progression of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. PMID:26671725

  14. [Study on virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and phylogenetic groupings in Escherichia coli strains isolated from patients with cystitis].

    PubMed

    Tiba, Monique Ribeiro; Nogueira, Gustavo Prado; Leite, Domingos da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli samples isolated from female patients with cystitis were characterized with regard to the presence of virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and phylogenetic groupings. Polymerase chain reaction results demonstrated that all the samples were positive for the gene fimH (type 1 fimbriae), 91 for fliC (flagellins), 50 for papC (P fimbriae), 44 for kpsMTII (capsules) and 36 for flu (antigen 43). The results from assays to quantify the biofilm formation demonstrated that 44 samples produced biofilm on polystyrene microplates and 56 samples produced weak or no biofilm. We also confirmed that Escherichia coli samples were present in phylogenetic groups B2 and D. PMID:19287937

  15. On the Formation of Amide Polymers via Carbonyl-Amino Group Linkages in Energetically Processed Ices of Astrophysical Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förstel, Marko; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Jones, Brant M.; Sun, Bing J.; Lee, Huan C.; Chang, Agnes H. H.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the formation of organic amide polymers via carbonyl-amino group linkages in carbon monoxide and ammonia bearing energetically processed ices of astrophysical relevance. The first group comprises molecules with one carboxyl group and an increasing number of amine moieties starting with formamide (45 u), urea (60 u), and hydrazine carboxamide (75 u). The second group consists of species with two carboxyl (58 u) and up to three amine groups (73 u, 88 u, and 103 u). The formation and polymerization of these linkages from simple inorganic molecules via formamide und urea toward amide polymers is discussed in an astrophysical and astrobiological context. Our results show that long chain molecules, which are closely related to polypeptides, easily form by energetically processing simple, inorganic ices at very low temperatures and can be released into the gas phase by sublimation of the ices in star-forming regions. Our experimental results were obtained by employing reflectron time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, coupled with soft, single photon vacuum ultraviolet photoionization; they are complemented by theoretical calculations.

  16. THE SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION AND THE EFFECT OF THE GALAXY ENVIRONMENT IN LOW-REDSHIFT GALAXY GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Mulchaey, John S.; Bai, Lei; Ponman, Trevor J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Dariush, Ali

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the interaction between galaxies and their surroundings is central to building a coherent picture of galaxy evolution. Here we use Galaxy Evolution Explorer imaging of a statistically representative sample of 23 galaxy groups at z Almost-Equal-To 0.06 to explore how local and global group environments affect the UV properties and dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs) of their member galaxies. The data provide SFRs out to beyond 2R{sub 200} in all groups, down to a completeness limit and limiting galaxy stellar mass of 0.06 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, respectively. At fixed galaxy stellar mass, we find that the fraction of star-forming group members is suppressed relative to the field out to an average radius of R Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Mpc Almost-Equal-To 2R{sub 200}, mirroring results for massive clusters. For the first time, we also report a similar suppression of the specific SFR within such galaxies, on average by 40% relative to the field, thus directly revealing the impact of the group environment in quenching star formation within infalling galaxies. At fixed galaxy density and stellar mass, this suppression is stronger in more massive groups, implying that both local and global group environments play a role in quenching. The results favor an average quenching timescale of {approx}> 2 Gyr and strongly suggest that a combination of tidal interactions and starvation is responsible. Despite their past and ongoing quenching, galaxy groups with more than four members still account for at least {approx}25% of the total UV output in the nearby universe.

  17. Altitude of the top of the Matawan Group-Magothy Formation, Suffolk County, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krulikas, Richard K.; Koszalka, E.J.; Doriski, Thomas P.

    1983-01-01

    The Magothy aquifer, with its irregular surface and deeply eroded buried valleys, has become the major source of fresh water in most of Suffolk Country. With the availability of recent data from deep wells and test holes, refinement of the surface-altitude contours has been possible and resulted in substantial revision in some areas. This 1-sheet map delineates the surface altitude of the Magothy aquifer (Matawan Group-Magothy Formation) and includes a brief text and bibliography. (USGS).

  18. Environmental interactions in Space Exploration: Announcement of the formation of an Environmental Interactions Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph C.; Hillard, G. Barry

    1991-01-01

    With the advent of the Space Exploration Initiative, the possibility of designing and using systems on scales not heretofore attempted presents exciting new challenges in systems design and space science. The environments addressed by the Space Exploration Initiative include the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, as well as the varied plasma and field environments which will be encountered by humans and cargo enroute to these destinations. Systems designers will need to understand environmental interactions and be able to model these mechanisms from the earliest conceptual design stages through design completion. To the end of understanding environmental interactions and establishing robotic precursor mission requirements, an Environmental Interactions Working Group has been established as part of the Robotic Missions Working Group. The current paper describes the working group and gives an update of its current activities. Working group charter and operation are reviewed, background information on the environmental interactions and their characteristics is offered, and the current status of the group's activities is presented along with anticipations for the future.

  19. Use of formative research and social network theory to develop a group walking intervention: Sumter County on the Move!

    PubMed

    Forthofer, Melinda; Burroughs-Girardi, Ericka; Stoisor-Olsson, Liliana; Wilcox, Sara; Sharpe, Patricia A; Pekuri, Linda M

    2016-10-01

    Although social support is a frequently cited enabler of physical activity, few studies have examined how to harness social support in interventions. This paper describes community-based formative research to design a walking program for mobilizing naturally occurring social networks to support increases in walking behavior. Focus group methods were used to engage community members in discussions about desired walking program features. The research was conducted with underserved communities in Sumter County, South Carolina. The majority of focus group participants were women (76%) and African American (92%). Several important themes emerged from the focus group results regarding attitudes toward walking, facilitators of and barriers to walking, ideal walking program characteristics, and strategies for encouraging community members to walk. Most noteably, the role of existing social networks as a supportive influence on physical activity was a recurring theme in our formative research and a gap in the existing evidence base. The resulting walking program focused on strategies for mobilizing, supporting and reinforcing existing social networks as mechanisms for increasing walking. Our approach to linking theory, empirical evidence and community-based formative research for the development of a walking intervention offers an example for practitioners developing intervention strategies for a wide range of behaviors. PMID:27268867

  20. Human group formation in online guilds and offline gangs driven by a common team dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Yee, Nicholas; Tita, George; Hui, Pak Ming

    2009-06-01

    Quantifying human group dynamics represents a unique challenge. Unlike animals and other biological systems, humans form groups in both real (offline) and virtual (online) spaces—from potentially dangerous street gangs populated mostly by disaffected male youths to the massive global guilds in online role-playing games for which membership currently exceeds tens of millions of people from all possible backgrounds, age groups, and genders. We have compiled and analyzed data for these two seemingly unrelated offline and online human activities and have uncovered an unexpected quantitative link between them. Although their overall dynamics differ visibly, we find that a common team-based model can accurately reproduce the quantitative features of each simply by adjusting the average tolerance level and attribute range for each population. By contrast, we find no evidence to support a version of the model based on like-seeking-like (i.e., kinship or “homophily”).

  1. Doing Violence, Making Race: Southern Lynching and White Racial Group Formation.

    PubMed

    Smångs, Mattias

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a theoretical framework of how intergroup violence may figure into the activation and maintenance of group categories, boundaries, and identities, as well as the mediating role played by organizations in such processes. The framework's analytical advantages are demonstrated in an application to southern lynchings. Findings from event- and community-level analyses suggest that "public" lynchings, carried out by larger mobs with ceremonial violence, but not "private" ones, perpetrated by smaller bands without public or ceremonial violence, fed off and into the racial group boundaries, categories, and identities promoted by the southern Democratic Party at the turn of the 20th century and on which the emerging Jim Crow system rested. Highlighting that racialized inequalities cannot be properly understood apart from collective processes of racial group boundary and identity making, the article offers clues to the mechanisms by which past racial domination influences contemporary race relations. PMID:27092388

  2. Collegial decision making based on social amplification leads to optimal group formation

    PubMed Central

    Amé, Jean-Marc; Halloy, José; Rivault, Colette; Detrain, Claire; Deneubourg, Jean Louis

    2006-01-01

    Group-living animals are often faced with choosing between one or more alternative resource sites. A central question in such collective decision making includes determining which individuals induce the decision and when. This experimental and theoretical study of shelter selection by cockroach groups demonstrates that choices can emerge through nonlinear interaction dynamics between equal individuals without perfect knowledge or leadership. We identify a simple mechanism whereby a decision is taken on the move with limited information and signaling and without comparison of available opportunities. This mechanism leads to optimal mean benefit for group individuals. Our model points to a generic self-organized collective decision-making process independent of animal species. PMID:16581903

  3. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group: formation of patient-centered outcome measures in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W; Abernethy, April; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Bhushan, Reva; Garg, Amit; Merola, Joseph F; Maccarone, Mara; Christensen, Robin

    2015-02-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis, the group aims to create a tool considerate of patients and providers using the input of all relevant stakeholders in assessment of disease severity and response to treatment. Herein, we delineate the procedures through which consensus is being reached and the future directions of the project. PMID:25486914

  4. Personalized Education; Solving a Group Formation and Scheduling Problem for Educational Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahargam, Sanaz; Erdos, Dóra; Bestavros, Azer; Terzi, Evimaria

    2015-01-01

    Whether teaching in a classroom or a Massive Online Open Course it is crucial to present the material in a way that benefits the audience as a whole. We identify two important tasks to solve towards this objective; (1) group students so that they can maximally benefit from peer interaction and (2) find an optimal schedule of the educational…

  5. Oxo-group-14-element bond formation in binuclear uranium(V) Pacman complexes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Guy M; Arnold, Polly L; Love, Jason B

    2013-07-29

    Simple and versatile routes to the functionalization of uranyl-derived U(V)-oxo groups are presented. The oxo-lithiated, binuclear uranium(V)-oxo complexes [{(py)3LiOUO}2(L)] and [{(py)3LiOUO}(OUOSiMe3)(L)] were prepared by the direct combination of the uranyl(VI) silylamide "ate" complex [Li(py)2][(OUO)(N")3] (N" = N(SiMe3)2) with the polypyrrolic macrocycle H4L or the mononuclear uranyl (VI) Pacman complex [UO2(py)(H2L)], respectively. These oxo-metalated complexes display distinct U-O single and multiple bonding patterns and an axial/equatorial arrangement of oxo ligands. Their ready availability allows the direct functionalization of the uranyl oxo group leading to the binuclear uranium(V) oxo-stannylated complexes [{(R3Sn)OUO}2(L)] (R = nBu, Ph), which represent rare examples of mixed uranium/tin complexes. Also, uranium-oxo-group exchange occurred in reactions with [TiCl(OiPr)3] to form U-O-C bonds [{(py)3LiOUO}(OUOiPr)(L)] and [(iPrOUO)2(L)]. Overall, these represent the first family of uranium(V) complexes that are oxo-functionalised by Group 14 elements. PMID:23794441

  6. Facilitated Networking and Group Formation in an Online Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasso, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    In 2008 and 2009, a series of online professional development communities for groups of teacher-leaders in digital pedagogy was run. In each of the first two iterations, there was an early dropout of individuals who felt they "did not belong". Contributing to this sense of isolation was the immediate emergence of online networks in the…

  7. Integration of Structured Expressive Activities within a Humanistic Group Play Therapy Format for Preadolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratton, Sue C.; Ceballos, Peggy L.; Ferebee, Kelly Webb

    2009-01-01

    The integration of expressive activities in play groups with preadolescents encourages them to reach more deeply into their own resources, enabling them to handle future challenges more effectively. Developmental and therapeutic rationale, along with research support, is given for the integration of creative activities into a humanistic play group…

  8. Designing Project-Based Courses with a Focus on Group Formation and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    The value and the pitfalls of project and group work are well recognized. The principles and elements which apply to projects in general, apply to project-based courses. Thoughtful and detailed planning, understanding of the stakeholders and their needs, a good design, appropriate testing, monitoring and quality control and continual management…

  9. Group Formation in Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Contexts: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amara, Sofiane; Macedo, Joaquim; Bendella, Fatima; Santos, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Learners are becoming increasingly divers. They may have much personal, social, cultural, psychological, and cognitive diversity. Forming suitable learning groups represents, therefore, a hard and time-consuming task. In Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (MCSCL) environments, this task is more difficult. Instructors need to consider…

  10. Modeling the Formation Process of Grouping Stimuli Sets through Cortical Columns and Microcircuits to Feature Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Adam

    2013-01-01

    A computational model of a self-structuring neuronal net is presented in which repetitively applied pattern sets induce the formation of cortical columns and microcircuits which decode distinct patterns after a learning phase. In a case study, it is demonstrated how specific neurons in a feature classifier layer become orientation selective if they receive bar patterns of different slopes from an input layer. The input layer is mapped and intertwined by self-evolving neuronal microcircuits to the feature classifier layer. In this topical overview, several models are discussed which indicate that the net formation converges in its functionality to a mathematical transform which maps the input pattern space to a feature representing output space. The self-learning of the mathematical transform is discussed and its implications are interpreted. Model assumptions are deduced which serve as a guide to apply model derived repetitive stimuli pattern sets to in vitro cultures of neuron ensembles to condition them to learn and execute a mathematical transform. PMID:24369455

  11. The geological significance of the boundary between the Fort Sill and Signal Mountain Formations in the lower Arbuckle Group (Cambrian)

    SciTech Connect

    Hosey, R.; Donovan, R.N. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    During the upper Cambrian, a transgression inundated the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen enveloping a landscape that consisted of hills of Cambrian-aged rhyolite up to 350 m in height. Initial deposits on this topography--the Reagan Formation--consist of siliciclastics that were deposited as alluvium and succeeding tidally-influenced marine sandstones and shales. The siliciclastics grains are made up of local rhyolite, quartz and authigenic glauconite. The overlying Honeycreek Formation is defined by the addition of carbonated detritus in the form of tidally-influenced pelmatozoan grainstones. The passage from the Honeycreek to the overlying Fort Sill Formation of the Arbuckle Group is marked by the incoming of beds of lime mudstone and the gradual disappearance of grainstones and siliciclastics. The contact between the Fort Sill and the overlying thinly-bedded dark grey bioclastic limestones of the Signal Mountain Formation is one of the most distinctive horizons in the Arbuckle Group. The contact evidently marks a substantial change in depositional environment. In detail the contact is sharp and shows evidence of minor erosion, although no karsting has been detected. The authors suggest that the contact surface records a regression, perhaps associated with dolomitization and followed by some erosion. A regression is also indicated by the local occurrence of a laminated tidal flat unit with traces of evaporites that outcrops in the far west of the Slick Hills immediately below the formation contact. They suggest that the Signal Mountains as a transgressive unit, incorporating siliciclastics transported into the area during the regression. It has been suggested that the unconformity reflects localized tectonism associated with the evolution of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. On the other hand the surface may correlate with a craton--wide Sauxian' hiatus.

  12. Hierarchical Formation in Action: Characterizing Accelerated Galaxy Evolution in Compact Groups Using Whole-sky WISE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, Catherine; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey; Gallagher, Sarah; Alatalo, Katherine; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2016-04-01

    Compact groups provide an environment to study the growth of galaxies amid multiple prolonged interactions. With their dense galaxy concentrations and relatively low velocity dispersions, compact groups mimic the conditions of hierarchical galaxy assembly. Compact group galaxies are known to show a bimodality in Spitzer IRAC infrared color space: galaxies are preferentially either quiescent with low specific star formation rates (SSFRs) or prolifically forming stars—galaxies with moderate levels of specific star formation are rare. Previous Spitzer IRAC studies identifying this “canyon” have been limited by small number statistics. We utilize whole-sky Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data to study 163 compact groups, thereby tripling our previous sample and including more galaxies with intermediate mid-IR colors indicative of moderate SSFRs. We define a distinct WISE mid-IR color space ≤ft({log}≤ft[\\tfrac{{f}12}{{f}4.6}\\right]\\right) versus ≤ft({log}≤ft[\\tfrac{{f}22}{{f}3.4}\\right]\\right) that we use to identify canyon galaxies from the larger sample. We confirm that compact group galaxies show a bimodal distribution in the mid-infrared and identify 37 canyon galaxies with reliable photometry and intermediate mid-IR colors. Morphologically, we find that the canyon harbors a large population of both Sa–Sbc and E/S0 type galaxies, and that they fall on the optical red sequence rather than the green valley. Finally, we provide a catalog of WISE photometry for 567 of 652 galaxies selected from the sample of 163 compact groups.

  13. Inhibition of nitrobenzene adsorption by water cluster formation at acidic oxygen functional groups on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuichi; Machida, Motoi; Tatsumoto, Hideki

    2008-06-15

    The inhibition effect of nitrobenzene adsorption by water clusters formed at the acidic groups on activated carbon was examined in aqueous and n-hexane solution. The activated carbon was oxidized with nitric acid to introduce CO complexes and then outgassed in helium flow at 1273 K to remove them completely without changing the structural properties of the carbon as a reference adsorbent. The amounts of acidic functional groups were determined by applying Boehm titration. A relative humidity of 95% was used to adsorb water onto the carbon surface. Strong adsorption of water onto the oxidized carbon can be observed by thermogravimetric analysis. The adsorption kinetic rate was estimated to be controlled by diffusion from the kinetic analysis. Significant decline in both capacity and kinetic rate for nitrobenzene adsorption onto the oxidized carbon was also observed in n-hexane solution by preadsorption of water to the carbon surface, whereas it was not detected for the outgassed carbons. These results might reveal that water molecules forming clusters at the CO complexes inhibited the entrance of nitrobenzene into the interparticles of the carbon. PMID:18440013

  14. Chemically mediated group formation in soil-dwelling larvae and pupae of the beetle Trypoxylus dichotomus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Wataru; Ishikawa, Yukio; Takanashi, Takuma

    2014-09-01

    Many insects form groups through interactions among individuals, and these are often mediated by chemical, acoustic, or visual cues and signals. In spite of the diversity of soil-dwelling insects, their aggregation behaviour has not been examined as extensively as that of aboveground species. We investigated the aggregation mechanisms of larvae of the Japanese rhinoceros beetle Trypoxylus dichotomus, which live in groups in humus soil. In two-choice laboratory tests, 2nd- and 3rd-instar larvae gathered at conspecific larvae irrespective of the kinship. The ablation of maxillae, which bear chemosensilla, abolished aggregation behaviour. Intact larvae also exhibited aggregation behaviour towards a larval homogenate. These results suggest that larval aggregation is mediated by chemical cues. We also demonstrated that the mature larvae of T. dichotomus built their pupal cells close to a mesh bag containing a conspecific pupal cell, which indicated that larvae utilize chemical cues emanating from these cells to select the pupation site. Thus, the larvae of T. dichotomus may use chemical cues from the conspecifics in two different contexts, i.e. larval aggregation and pupation site selection. Using conspecific cues, larvae may be able to choose suitable locations for foraging or building pupal cells. The results of the present study highlight the importance of chemical information in belowground ecology.

  15. Fish in a ring: spatio-temporal pattern formation in one-dimensional animal groups

    PubMed Central

    Abaid, Nicole; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we study the collective behaviour of fish shoals in annular domains. Shoal mates are modelled as self-propelled particles moving on a discrete lattice. Collective decision-making is determined by information exchange among neighbours. Neighbourhoods are specified using the perceptual limit and numerosity of fish. Fish self-propulsion and obedience to group decisions are described through random variables. Spatio-temporal schooling patterns are measured using coarse observables adapted from the literature on coupled oscillator networks and features of the time-varying network describing the fish-to-fish information exchange. Experiments on zebrafish schooling in an annular tank are used to validate the model. Effects of group size and obedience parameter on coarse observables and network features are explored to understand the implications of perceptual numerosity and spatial density on fish schooling. The proposed model is also compared with a more traditional metric model, in which the numerosity constraint is released and fish interactions depend only on physical configurations. Comparison shows that the topological regime on which the proposed model is constructed allows for interpreting characteristic behaviours observed in the experimental study that are not captured by the metric model. PMID:20413559

  16. The STE group kinase SepA controls cleavage furrow formation in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Ishikawa-Ankerhold, Hellen C; Kastner, Peter M; Burghardt, Emmanuel; Gerisch, Günther

    2009-11-01

    During a REMI screen for proteins regulating cytokinesis in Dictyostelium discoideum we isolated a mutant forming multinucleate cells. The gene affected in this mutant encoded a kinase, SepA, which is an ortholog of Cdc7, a serine-threonine kinase essential for septum formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Localization of SepA-GFP in live cells and its presence in isolated centrosomes indicated that SepA, like its upstream regulator Spg1, is associated with centrosomes. Knockout mutants of SepA showed a severe cytokinesis defect and a delay in development. In multinucleate SepA-null cells nuclear division proceeded normally and synchronously. However, often cleavage furrows were either missing or atypical: they were extremely asymmetric and constriction was impaired. Cortexillin-I, a marker localizing strictly to the furrow in wild-type cells, demonstrated that large, crescent-shaped furrows expanded and persisted long after the spindle regressed and nuclei returned to the interphase state. Outside the furrow the filamentous actin system of the cell cortex showed strong ruffling activity. These data suggest that SepA is involved in the spatial and temporal control system organizing cortical activities in mitotic and postmitotic cells. PMID:19479821

  17. Intermolecular charge flux as the origin of infrared intensity enhancement upon halogen-bond formation of the peptide group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Hajime

    2010-07-01

    The changes in the vibrational properties of the peptide group upon formation of O⋯X and N⋯X halogen bonds are studied theoretically. Calculations are carried out for complexes of N-methylacetamide (NMA), a well known model molecule of the peptide group, with halogen-containing molecules. For comparison, calculations are also carried out for some NMA-water hydrogen-bonding complexes. It is shown that the infrared (IR) intensity of the amide I mode of the peptide group is enhanced significantly (up to about 520 km mol-1 or 2.6 times) upon CO⋯X halogen-bond formation, in spite of rather modest magnitudes of the intermolecular electric field and of the changes in the CO bond length and in the amide I vibrational frequency as compared with the cases of the CO⋯H(D) hydrogen bonding. From the analysis of the changes in the dipole derivative and in the electronic structure, it is shown that this IR intensity enhancement arises from the intermolecular charge flux. For the N⋯X halogen bonding complexes, some characteristic changes in the vibrational properties are seen, among which the IR intensity enhancement of the ND out-of-plane wagging mode is most notable. The reason why such large IR intensity enhancements are seen for these particular vibrational modes is examined.

  18. Sedimentological cross section of Cambro-Ordovician carbonate shelf (Knox group, Conassauga Formation) in central Alabama: facies, diagenesis, potential reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Sternbach, L.R.

    1984-04-01

    Cambro-Ordovician thrust-imbricated carbonates in central Alabama are the focus of renewed exploration interest. Samples from east-west-trending core holes within the surface-most thrust plates reconstruct the carbonate shelf and shelf-edge facies before deformation. The Upper Cambrian shelf margin now is in the subsurface of Talledega County; coeval dolostones in the western part of the state represent the former shelf interior. Rock analogs to former environments include the following. (1) Barrier shoals (Conasauga Formation) - dark colored, partially dolomitized ooid and skeletal grainstones. (2) Submerged back-barrier and offshelf dolomitized sediments (lower Knox Group) - western belt: finely crystalline algal thrombolites, fenestral dolopelmicrites, rippled beds; eastern belt: finely laminated dolostones, slope-derived pebbles and graded beds. (3) Tidal flats (upper Knox Group) - light-colored, crystalline dolostones, dolomitized pellet grainstones, algal laminites, pseudomorphs after sulfates and early diagenetic chertification. (4) Former emergent shelf -(Knox unconformity)-pelmicrite, skeletal wackestones, erosional chert pebble conglomerate. Multiple possibilities for hydrocarbon reservoirs appear throughout the sequence. Vuggy and intercrystalline dolostone porosity is primarily in the lower Knox formations. Primary interparticle pores are retained in lower Knox algal buildups. Breccia porosity occurs in the strata below the Knox unconformity through solution of the underlying Knox Group. Fractures in the subsurface are believed to enhance permeability in all porosity types.

  19. Sedimentological cross section of Cambro-Ordovician carbonate shelf (Knox group, Conasauga Formation) in central Alabama: facies, diagenesis, potential reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Sternbach, L.R.

    1984-04-01

    Cambro-Ordovician thrust-imbricated carbonates in central Alabama are the focus of renewed exploration interest. Samples from east-west-trending core holes within the surface-most thrust plates reconstruct the carbonate shelf and shelf-edge facies before deformation. The Upper Cambrian shelf margin now is in the subsurface of Talledega County; coeval dolostones in the western part of the state represent the former shelf interior. Rock analogs to former environments include the following. (1) Barrier shoals (Conasauga Formation) - dark colored, partially dolomitized ooid and skeletal grainstones. (2) Submerged back-barrier and offshelf dolomitized sediments (lower Knox Group) - western belt: finely crystalline algal thrombolites, fenestral dolopelmicrites, rippled beds; eastern belt: finely laminated dolostones, slope-derived pebbles and graded beds. (3) Tidal flats (upper Knox Group) - light-colored, crystalline dolostones, dolomitized pellet grainstones, algal laminites, pseudomorphs after sulfates and early diagenetic chertification. (4) Former emergent shelf -(Knox unconformity)-pelmicrite, skeletal wackestones, erosional chert pebble conglomerate. Multiple possibilities for hydrocarbon reservoirs appear throughout the sequence. Vuggy and intercrystalline dolostone porosity is primarily in the lower Knox formations. Primary interparticle pores are retained in lower Knox algal buildups. Breccia porosity occurs in the strata below the Knox unconformity through solution of the underlying Knox Group. Fractures in the subsurface are believed to enhance permeability in all porosity types.

  20. On the Formation of Elliptical Galaxies via Mergers in Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranu, Dan; Dubinski, John; Yee, Howard K. C.

    2015-08-01

    Giant elliptical galaxies have long been thought to form through gas-rich "major" mergers of two roughly equal-mass spiral galaxies. However, ellipticals are often found at the centers of groups and are likely to have undergone several significant mergers since z=2. We test the hypothesis that ellipticals form through multiple, mainly minor and dry mergers in groups, using hundreds of N-body simulations of mergers in groups of three to twenty-five spirals (Taranu et al. 2013).Realistic mock observations of the central merger remnants show that they have similar surface brightness profiles to local ellipticals. The size-luminosity and velocity dispersion-luminosity relations have modest (~0.1 dex) scatter, with similar slopes; however, most remnants are too large and have too low dispersions for their luminosities. Some remnants show substantial (v/σ > 0.1) rotational support, but most are slow rotators with v/σ << 0.5.Ellipticals also follow a tight "fundamental plane" scaling relation between size R, mean surface brightness μ and velocity dispersion σ: R ∝ σ^a μ^b. This relation has small (<0.06 dex) scatter and significantly different coefficients from the expected scaling (a "tilt"). The remnants lie on a similar fundamental plane, with even smaller scatter (0.02 dex) and a tilt in the correct sense - albeit weaker than observed. This tilt is caused by variable dark matter fractions within the effective radius, such that massive merger remnants have larger central dark matter fractions than their lower-mass counterparts (Taranu et al. 2015).These results suggest that massive ellipticals can originate from multiple, mainly minor and dry mergers of spirals at z<2, producing tight scaling relations in the process. However, significant gas dissipation and/or more compact progenitor spirals may be needed to produce lower-mass, rapidly-rotating ellipticals. I will also show preliminary results from simulations with more realistic progenitor galaxies (including

  1. Studies on cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances: functional groups, calcite biomineralization and formation of capsular polymeric substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, M.; Sibler, S.; Matsko, N.

    2006-12-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of microbial origin are an important class of polymeric materials which have been involved in different processes such as biofilm development or mineral precipitation. Cyanobacteria have been known as potential EPS producers for a long time. Despite their ubiquitous distribution, there is still a great lack of knowledge concerning the diversity of EPS binding sites of different picocyanobacterial strains on the one hand and the specific components of EPS which are responsible for calcite precipitation and crystal morphology on the other hand. It is generally accepted that capsular extracellular polymeric substances are the main components of biofilm matrixes. In this context, it is important to understand under which conditions cyanobacteria produce surface polysaccharides. In a recent study, we characterized the binding sites of EPS of three unicellular autotrophic picocyanobacterial strains of the Synechococcus-type. Potentiometric titrations were conducted to determine different types of functional groups present at the various sites. Precipitation experiments with EPS of different strains allowed for estimating the potential of EPS to precipitate calcium carbonate and the impact of functional groups composition on crystal morphology. In order to clarify the conditions under which cyanobacteria formed capsular EPS, we performed growth experiments in nutrients medium with different phosphorus concentrations (0.4, 4.1, 8.2 and 41 mgP/l). Cyanobacterial cells produced capsular EPS under phosphorus concentrations of 0.4, 4.1 and 8.2 mgP/l, while no capsular EPS were observed for the highest P concentration (41 mgP/l). At this concentration, however, calcium rich storage products were detected in the cells. The results thus suggest that both extracellular and intracellular products are regulated through phosphorus concentrations in growth solutions. Titrations reveal five or six distinct sites on surfaces of picocyanobacterial

  2. ABO (histo) blood group phenotype development and human reproduction as they relate to ancestral IgM formation: A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Arend, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a histo (blood) group) ABO phenotype and the exclusion of an autoreactive IgM or isoagglutinin activity arise apparently in identical glycosylation of complementary domains on cell surfaces and plasma proteins. The fundamental O-glycan emptiness of the circulating IgM, which during the neonatal amino acid sequencing of the variable regions is exerting germline-specific O-GalNAc glycan-reactive serine/threonine residues that in the plasma of the adult human blood group O individuals apparently remain associated with the open glycosidic sites on the ABOH convertible red cell surface, must raise suggestions on a transient expression of developmental glycans, which have been "lost" over the course of maturation. In fact, while the mammalian non-somatic, embryogenic stem cell (ESC)- germ cell (GC) transformation is characterized by a transient and genetically as-yet-undefined trans-species-functional O-GalNAc glycan expression, in the C57BL/10 mouse such expression was potentially identified in growth-dependent, blood group A-like GalNAc glycan-bearing, ovarian glycolipids complementary with the syngeneic anti-A reactive IgM, which does not appear in early ovariectomized animals. This non-somatically encoded, polyreactive, ancestral IgM molecule has not undergone clonal selection and does primarily not differentiate between self and non-self and might, due to amino acid hydroxyl groups, highly suggest substrate competition with subsequent O-glycosylations in ongoing ESC-GC transformations and affecting GC maturation. However, the membrane-bound somatic N/O-glycotransferases, which initiate, after formation of the zygote, the complex construction of the human ABO phenotypes in the trans cisternae of the Golgi apparatus, are associated and/or completed with soluble enzyme versions exerting identical specificities in plasma and likely competing vice versa by glycosylation of neonatal IgM amino acids, where they suggest to accomplish the clearance of anti

  3. Group additive values for the gas-phase standard enthalpy of formation, entropy and heat capacity of oxygenates.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Paschalis D; Sabbe, Maarten K; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Papayannakos, Nikos; Marin, Guy B

    2013-11-25

    A complete and consistent set of 60 Benson group additive values (GAVs) for oxygenate molecules and 97 GAVs for oxygenate radicals is provided, which allow to describe their standard enthalpies of formation, entropies and heat capacities. Approximately half of the GAVs for oxygenate molecules and the majority of the GAVs for oxygenate radicals have not been reported before. The values are derived from an extensive and accurate database of thermochemical data obtained by ab initio calculations at the CBS-QB3 level of theory for 202 molecules and 248 radicals. These compounds include saturated and unsaturated, α- and β-branched, mono- and bifunctional oxygenates. Internal rotations were accounted for by using one-dimensional hindered rotor corrections. The accuracy of the database was further improved by adding bond additive corrections to the CBS-QB3 standard enthalpies of formation. Furthermore, 14 corrections for non-nearest-neighbor interactions (NNI) were introduced for molecules and 12 for radicals. The validity of the constructed group additive model was established by comparing the predicted values with both ab initio calculated values and experimental data for oxygenates and oxygenate radicals. The group additive method predicts standard enthalpies of formation, entropies, and heat capacities with chemical accuracy, respectively, within 4 kJ mol(-1) and 4 J mol(-1) K(-1) for both ab initio calculated and experimental values. As an alternative, the hydrogen bond increment (HBI) method developed by Lay et al. (T. H. Lay, J. W. Bozzelli, A. M. Dean, E. R. Ritter, J. Phys. Chem.- 1995, 99, 14514) was used to introduce 77 new HBI structures and to calculate their thermodynamic parameters (Δ(f)H°, S°, C(p)°). The GAVs reported in this work can be reliably used for the prediction of thermochemical data for large oxygenate compounds, combining rapid prediction with wide-ranging application. PMID:24123572

  4. Mesoarchean oceanic sedimentary sequences: Dixon Island-Cleaverville formations of Pilbara vs Komati section of Fig Tree Group in Barberton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokawa, S.; Ito, T.; Ikehara, M.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Horie, K.; Sakamoto, R.; Takehara, M.; Teraji, S.

    2011-12-01

    During the Neoarchean to Paleoproterozoic, atmospheric conditions varied from lower levels of oxygen contents to oxic conditions in atmosphere, with the Great Oxidation Event occurring at 2.5 Ga (e.g. Canfield, 2005, Farquhar et al., 2007). However, many iron formations and oxic iron rich sediments occur in the Mesoarchean. We evaluate the sedimentation history of some well-preserved Mesoarchean iron rich sequences by focusing on their stratigraphic pattern and geochemical characteristics. Our study focuses on three iron formation bearing deeper facies sedimentary sequences in Mesoarchean - 1) Dixon Island (Pilbara), 2) Cleaverville (Pilbara) and 3) Mapepe (Barberton) formations. The Dixon Island-Cleaverville formations include volcano-sedimentary sequences as indicated by drill core samples (DXCL) (Kiyokawa et al., 2006, Yamaguchi et al., 2009). It shows coarsening and thickening upward black shale-BIF sequences which indicate oceanic caldera environment. Estimated sedimentation rate from Dixon Island Formation (3195+15 Ma) to Cleaverville Formation (3108+13 Ma) is 2-4 cm/1000year. The Komati section of the Mappepe Formation in the Fig Tree Group consists of a more than 300m thick bedded black shale-chert-iron formation sequence. Based on mapping at 1/100 and 1/1000 scales, we reconstructed 150m thick stratigraphic section. This sequence conformably overlies volcanic rocks, which are in turn overlain by iron rich red bed sequences. Organic rich sequences of three different thickness were identified; 1) less than 1mm thick thin laminated black and white chert and pyrite lamination sequence, 2) 3-5 cm thick black shale-chert-iron rich sequence, and 3) 20 cm thick black chert with fine grained volcanic rocks to banded iron formation sequence. Each sequence contains cycles of organic matter rich shale at the bottom, with chert, pyrite or iron rich bed to the top. Total organic carbon of DXCL core reaches maximum values over 3.0 wt%. (ave 1.2 wt%). Total organic carbon

  5. Revision of the Western Australian pebble-mimic dragon species-group (Tympanocryptis cephalus: Reptilia: Agamidae).

    PubMed

    Doughty, Paul; Kealley, Luke; Shoo, Luke P; Melville, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Recent work on species complexes of the pebble-mimic dragons of the Australian genus Tympanocryptis has greatly clarified evolutionary relationships among taxa and also indicated that species diversity has been severely underestimated. Here we provide a morphological and molecular appraisal of variation in the T. cephalus species-group and find evidence for recognizing five species-level lineages from Western Australia. Four species-level lineages are strongly supported with a combined mitochondrial and nuclear DNA Bayesian analysis (a fifth population from the Gascoyne region lacked tissue samples). Morphologically, we found subtle, yet consistent, differences among the populations in scalation, color and pattern. True T. cephalus Günther is restricted to the coastal Pilbara region and characterized by five dark blotches on the dorsum, keeled ventrals, and other characters. Two other lineages within the Pilbara, from the Hamersley range and Fortescue/northern Pilbara region, differed from T. cephalus senso stricto by possessing a more elongate body and a plain dorsum. Furthermore, the Hamersley lineage differed from the Fortescue lineage by possessing slightly more reddish coloration and feeble keeling on the snout. Although there are few specimens and no tissue samples available for the Gascoyne population, these individuals are larger, have rugose scales on the snout, and possess scattered enlarged tubercles with three large blotches on the dorsum. The name T. cephalus gigas Mitchell is available for this population. The most widespread lineage, and the one best represented in collections and in field guides, occurs throughout central Western Australia. These Goldfield populations are characterized by a protruding snout, narrow rostral, and uniform reddish-brown coloration, often with a dark wash. Based on the genetic and morphological differences, we redescribe T. cephalus, resurrect and elevate T. gigas to a full species and designate a neotype for this taxon

  6. [Prognostic assessment for formation of a group of cardiovascular high risk among personnel participating in atomic submarines utilization].

    PubMed

    Sosiukin, A E; Vasiliuk, V B; Ivanchenko, A V; Saenko, S A; Semenchuk, O A; Dokhov, M A; Verveda, A B

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound scanning of main vessels (common carotid, internal carotid, common and superficial femoral, posterior tibial arteries) in staffers of shipyard "Nerpa"--branch of JSC "Shipbuilding center Zvezdochka" (Snezhnogorsk city Murmansk region)--engaged into atomic submarines utilization. Findings are atherosclerotic changes in common carotid and common femoral arteries--increased thickness of intima-media complex over the reference values or atherosclerotic plaque formation. The changes were maximal in a group of males aged over 50 with length of service over 25 years. Discriminant analysis helped to suggest a mathematic model to forecast cardiovascular diseases in personnel of "Nerpa" shipyard. PMID:25845142

  7. Archean Age Fossils from Northwestern Australia (Approximately 3.3 to 3.5 GA, Warrawoona Group, Towers Formation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Penny A. Morris

    1999-01-01

    Archean aged rocks from the Pilbara Block area of western Australia (Warrawoona Group, Towers Formation, -3.3-3.5 Ga) contain microfossils that are composed of various sizes of spheres and filaments. The first descriptions of these microfossils were published in the late 1970's (Dunlop, 1978; Dunlop, et. al., 1978). The authenticity of the microfossils is well established. The small size of the microfossils prevents isotope dating, at least with the present technology. Microbiologists, however, have established guidelines to determine the authenticity of the Archean aged organic remains (Schopf, Walter, 1992).

  8. The first Pan-Podocnemididae turtle egg from the Presidente Prudente Formation (Late Cretaceous, Bauru Group), Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marsola, Júlio C De A; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Montefeltro, Felipe C; Langer, Max C

    2014-01-01

    Pan-Podocnemididae turtles are ubiquitous in Late Cretaceous rocks of the Bauru Group in southeastern Brazil. This group of side-necked turtles is particularly abundant in a turtle-bearing site of the Presidente Prudente Formation known as Tartaruguito. Here, we describe the first turtle egg (LPRP-USP 0052) from the Tartaruguito site. LPRP-USP 0052 is nearly complete but misses a pole and measures 5,1 and 2,9-2,2 centimeters due to its flattened minor axis. The egg morphology and microstructure were analyzed by observations performed with CT, Optic Microscopy, Scanning Electronic Microscopy and Wave Dispersion Energy analyses. The eggshell ranges from 145 to160 micrometers thick. Considering the matching morphology of the new specimen and its provenance from the stratigraphic horizon that yielded only the podocnemidids Bauruemys and Roxochelys, it is most likely that LPRP-USP 0052 was produced by a podocnemidid turtle.  PMID:25544080

  9. Personality, Parasites, Political Attitudes, and Cooperation: A Model of How Infection Prevalence Influences Openness and Social Group Formation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gordon D A; Fincher, Corey L; Walasek, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    What is the origin of individual differences in ideology and personality? According to the parasite stress hypothesis, the structure of a society and the values of individuals within it are both influenced by the prevalence of infectious disease within the society's geographical region. High levels of infection threat are associated with more ethnocentric and collectivist social structures and greater adherence to social norms, as well as with socially conservative political ideology and less open but more conscientious personalities. Here we use an agent-based model to explore a specific opportunities-parasites trade-off (OPTO) hypothesis, according to which utility-maximizing agents place themselves at an optimal point on a trade-off between (a) the gains that may be achieved through accessing the resources of geographically or socially distant out-group members through openness to out-group interaction, and (b) the losses arising due to consequently increased risks of exotic infection to which immunity has not been developed. We examine the evolution of cooperation and the formation of social groups within social networks, and we show that the groups that spontaneously form exhibit greater local rather than global cooperative networks when levels of infection are high. It is suggested that the OPTO model offers a first step toward understanding the specific mechanisms through which environmental conditions may influence cognition, ideology, personality, and social organization. PMID:26612490

  10. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Drosophila Ash2, a Member of the Trithorax Group Required for Imaginal Disc Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, A. L.; Shearn, A.

    1996-01-01

    The ash2 gene is a member of the trithorax group of genes whose products function to maintain active transcription of homeotic selector genes. Mutations in ash2 cause the homeotic transformations expected for a gene in this group but, in addition, cause a variety of pattern formation defects that are not necessarily expected. The ash2 gene is located in cytogenetic region 96A17-19 flanked by slowpoke and tolloid and is included in a cosmid that contains part of slowpoke. The ash2 transcript is 2.0 kb and is present throughout development. The ASH2 protein predicted from the nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame has a putative double zinc-finger domain, called a PHD finger, that is present not only in the products of other trithorax group genes such as TRX and ASH1, but also in the product of a Polycomb group gene, PCL. Polyclonal antibodies directed against ASH2 detect the protein in imaginal discs and in the nuclei of salivary gland and fat body cells. On immunoblots these affinity-purified antibodies detect a 70-kDa protein in larvae and a 53-kDa protein in pupae. PMID:8889525

  11. Geologic and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Ogallala Formation and White River Group, Belvoir Ranch near Cheyenne, Laramie County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartos, Timothy T.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Hallberg, Laura L.; Webster, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    The geologic and hydrogeologic characteristics of Tertiary lithostratigraphic units (Ogallala Formation and White River Group) that typically compose or underlie the High Plains aquifer system in southeastern Wyoming were described physically and chemically, and evaluated at a location on the Belvoir Ranch in Laramie County, Wyoming. On the basis of this characterization and evaluation, three Tertiary lithostratigraphic units were identified using physical and chemical characteristics determined during this study and previous studies, and these three units were determined to be correlative with three identified hydrogeologic units composing the groundwater system at the study site—a high-yielding aquifer composed of the entire saturated thickness of the heterogeneous and coarse-grained fluvial sediments assigned to the Ogallala Formation (Ogallala aquifer); an underlying confining unit composed primarily of very fine-grained volcaniclastic sediments and mudrocks assigned to the Brule Formation of the White River Group and some additional underlying sediments that belong to either the Brule or Chadron Formation, or both (Brule confining unit); and an underlying low-yielding aquifer composed primarily of poorly sorted fluvial sediments assigned to the Chadron Formation of the White River Group (Chadron aquifer). Despite widely varying sediment heterogeneity and consolidation, some limited hydraulic connection throughout the full vertical extent of the Ogallala aquifer was indicated but not conclusively proven by interpretation of similar chemical and isotopic characteristics, modern apparent groundwater ages, and similar hydraulic-head responses measured continuously in two Ogallala aquifer monitoring wells installed for this study at two different widely separated (83 feet) depth intervals. Additional work beyond the scope of this study, such as aquifer tests, would be required to conclusively determine hydraulic connection within the Ogallala aquifer. Groundwater

  12. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. I. Hubble space telescope/wide field planetary camera 2 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-07-10

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with τ ∼ 5 Gyr; (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs, and dwarf ellipticals can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH (τ ∼ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages >10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z = 2 ranges considerably (80% for galaxies with M < 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉} to 30% for galaxies with M > 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}) and is largely explained by environment; (5) the distinction between 'ultra-faint' and 'classical' dSphs is arbitrary; (6) LG dIrrs formed a significantly higher fraction of stellar mass prior to z = 2 than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies from Leitner and the SFHs from the abundance matching models of Behroozi et al. This may indicate higher than expected star formation efficiencies at early times in low mass galaxies. Finally, we provide all the SFHs in tabulated electronic format for use by the community.

  13. Siderophile element systematics of IAB complex iron meteorites: New insights into the formation of an enigmatic group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsham, Emily A.; Bermingham, Katherine R.; Walker, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    Siderophile trace element abundances and the 187Re-187Os isotopic systematics of the metal phases of 58 IAB complex iron meteorites were determined in order to investigate formation processes and how meteorites within chemical subgroups may be related. Close adherence of 187Re-187Os isotopic data of most IAB iron meteorites to a primordial isochron indicates that the siderophile elements of most members of the complex remained closed to elemental disturbance soon after formation. Minor, presumably late-stage open-system behavior, however, is observed in some members of the sLM, sLH, sHL, and sHH subgroups. The new siderophile element abundance data are consistent with the findings of prior studies suggesting that the IAB subgroups cannot be related to one another by any known crystallization process. Equilibrium crystallization, coupled with crystal segregation, solid-liquid mixing, and subsequent fractional crystallization can account for the siderophile element variations among meteorites within the IAB main group (MG). The data for the sLM subgroup are consistent with equilibrium crystallization, combined with crystal segregation and mixing. By contrast, the limited fractionation of siderophile elements within the sLL subgroup is consistent with metal extraction from a chondritic source with little subsequent processing. The limited data for the other subgroups were insufficient to draw robust conclusions about crystallization processes involved in their formation. Collectively, multiple formational processes are represented in the IAB complex, and modeling results suggest that fractional crystallization within the MG may have been a more significant process than has been previously recognized.

  14. Anionic group 6B metal carbonyls as homogeneous catalysts for carbon dioxide/hydrogen activation: the production of alkyl formates

    SciTech Connect

    Darensbourg, D.J.; Ovalles, C.

    1984-06-27

    The production of alkyl formates from the hydrocondensation of carbon dioxide in alcohols utilizing anionic group 6B carbonyl hydrides as catalysts is herein reported. HM(CO)/sub 5//sup -/ (M = Cr, W; derived from ..mu..-H(M/sub 2/(CO)/sub 10/)/sup -/) and their products of carbon dioxide insertion, HCO/sub 2/M(CO)/sub 5//sup -/, have been found to be effective catalysts for the hydrogenation of CO/sub 2/ in alcohols under rather mild conditions (loading pressures of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/, 250 psi each, and 125/sup 0/C) to provide alkyl formates. The only metal carbonyl species detected in solution via spectroscopy, both at the end of a catalytic period and during catalysis, were M(CO)/sub 6/ and HCO/sub 2/M(CO)/sub 5//sup -/. The metal hexacarbonyls were independently shown to be catalytically inactive. A catalytic cycle is proposed which initially involves release of formic acid from the metal center, either by reductive elimination of the hydrido formato ligands or ligand-assisted heterolytic splitting of dihydrogen with loss of formic acid. In a rapid subsequent process HCOOH reacts with alcohols to yield HCOOR. The addition of carbon monoxide retards alkyl formate production, strongly implying CO/sub 2/ to be the primary source of the carboxylic carbon atom in HCOOR. This was verified by carrying out reactions in the presence of HCO/sub 2/W(/sup 13/CO)/sub 5//sup -/ which provided only H/sup 12/COOR after short reaction periods. However, in the absence of hydrogen and carbon dioxide ..mu..-H(M/sub 2/(CO)/sub 10/)/sup -/ species were observed to be effective catalyst precursors for converting CO and methanol into methyl formate. 36 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  15. A new squamate lizard from the Upper Cretaceous Adamantina Formation (Bauru Group), São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nava, William R; Martinelli, Agustín G

    2011-03-01

    The record of non-mosasaur squamates (Reptilia, Squamata) is sparse in the Cretaceus fossil record of Brazil and include six putative reports, three from the Aptian-Albian of the Araripe Basin (Tijubina pontei Bonfim-Júnior and Marques, Olindalacerta brasiliensis Evans and Yabumoto, and a lizard indet.) and three from the Upper Cretaceous of the Bauru Group (Pristiguana brasiliensis Estes and Price, Anilioidae gen. et sp. indet., and Squamata gen. et sp. indet.). In this contribution, a new genus and species of lizard, Brasiliguana prudentis gen. et sp. nov., is described based on an isolated left maxilla with teeth. The material was discovered in an outcrop of the Upper Cretaceous Adamantina Formation (Bauru Group) located in the proximity of Presidente Prudente Municipality, São Paulo State, Brazil. The new taxon is considered a basal non-Priscagamidae+Acrodonta iguanian based on the presence of a weakly inclined anterior margin of the maxillary nasal process and maxillary tooth shape and tooth implantation similar to that of iguanians rather than of other lizard groups (e.g. teiids). This finding significantly increases the squamate lizard diversity of South America, which is still poorly understood and sparsely represented in the fossil record. PMID:21437386

  16. The IL-8 protease SpyCEP is detrimental for Group A Streptococcus host-cells interaction and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Andreoni, Federica; Ogawa, Taiji; Ogawa, Mariko; Madon, Jerzy; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Schuepbach, Reto A.; Zinkernagel, Annelies S.

    2014-01-01

    SpyCEP-mediated chemokine degradation translates into more efficient spreading and increased severity of invasive Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections, due to impaired neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection. SpyCEP is markedly up-regulated in invasive as compared to colonizing GAS isolates raising the question whether SpyCEP expression hinders bacterial attachment and thus colonization of the host. To address this question we used a molecular approach involving the use of homologous GAS strains either expressing or not SpyCEP or expressing an enzymatically inactive variant of SpyCEP. We found that expression of enzymatically functional SpyCEP lowered GAS adherence and invasion potential toward various epithelial and endothelial cells. SpyCEP also blunted biofilm formation capacity. Our data indicate that expression of SpyCEP decreases colonization and thus might be detrimental for the spreading of GAS. PMID:25071751

  17. In(Ga)As quantum dot formation on group-III assisted catalyst-free InGaAs nanowires.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Martin; Ketterer, Bernt; Uccelli, Emanuele; Morante, Joan Ramon; Arbiol, Jordi; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna

    2011-05-13

    Growth of GaAs and In(x)Ga(1-x)As nanowires by the group-III assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth method on (001)GaAs/SiO(2) substrates is studied in dependence on growth temperature, with the objective of maximizing the indium incorporation. Nanowire growth was achieved for growth temperatures as low as 550 °C. The incorporation of indium was studied by low temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The results show that the incorporation of indium achieved by lowering the growth temperature does not have the effect of increasing the indium concentration in the bulk of the nanowire, which is limited to 3-5%. For growth temperatures below 575 °C, indium rich regions form at the surface of the nanowires as a consequence of the radial growth. This results in the formation of quantum dots, which exhibit spectrally narrow luminescence. PMID:21430322

  18. Origin of iron oxide spherules in the banded iron formation of the Bababudan Group, Dharwar Craton, Southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orberger, Beate; Wagner, Christiane; Wirth, Richard; Quirico, Eric; Gallien, Jean Paul; Derré, Colette; Montagnac, Gilles; Noret, Aurélie; Jayananda, Mudlappa; Massault, Marc; Rouchon, Virgile

    2012-06-01

    The banded iron formation of the Bababudan Group (Western Dharwar Craton, India) is composed of millimetric to centimetric alternating quartz and grey to red Fe-oxide bands. Major phases are quartz and martite (hematized magnetite) with minor Fe-sulfides and Ca-Mg-Fe-carbonates. Micrometric Fe-oxide spherules fill cavities in discontinuous micrometric layers of Fe-oxides that occur in the massive quartz layers and at the interface of massive Fe-oxide and quartz layers. The spherules are composed of micrometric radial plates of hematite intergrown with nanometric magnetite. These spherules contain carbonaceous matter (CM) with nanometric Fe-particles and have low N contents (˜900 ppm; CM1). The spherule formation is attributed to a low temperature hydrothermal process (150-200 °C) at around 2.52 Ga, possibly favored by the presence of CM. These hydrothermal fluids dissolved diagenetic interstitial sulfides or carbonates creating cavities which, provided space for the spherule precipitation. Carbonaceous matter of semi-anthracite maturity is encapsulated in quartz grains adjacent to the Fe-oxide spherules (CM2) and it is thus concluded that CM1 and CM2 are most likely contemporaneous and of the same origin, either incorporated at the time of BIF formation or during the hydrothermal event at 2.52 Ga from the underlying phyllitised black shales. Carbonaceous matter (CM3) was also found around the Fe-oxide spherules and the martite grains. CM3 has much higher N contents (>5000 ppm), is of a lower maturity than CM1 and CM2, and is related to weathering, which is also indicated by the presence of goethite and kaolinite. The δ13C of all CMs varies from -19.4 to -24.7‰, similar to values measured in the underlying phyllitised black shales and likely reflect denitrifying microbial activity.

  19. Chemostratigraphy of predominantly siliciclastic Neoproterozoic successions: a case study of the Pocatello Formation and Lower Brigham Group, Idaho, USA

    PubMed

    Smith, L H; Kaufman, A J; Knoll, A H; Link, P K

    1994-05-01

    Isotopic chemostratigraphy has proven successful in the correlation of carbonate-rich Neoproterozoic successions. In successions dominated by siliciclastic rocks, chemostratigraphy can be problematic, but if thin carbonates punctuate siliciclastic strata, useful isotopic data may be obtained. The upper Pocatello Formation and lower Brigham Group of southeastern Idaho provide an opportunity to assess the potential and limitations of isotopic chemostratigraphy in overwhelmingly siliciclastic successions. The 5000 m thick succession consists predominantly of siliciclastic lithologies, with only three intervals that contain thin intercalated carbonates. Its depositional age is only broadly constrained by existing biostratigraphic, sequence stratigraphic and geochronometric data. The lowermost carbonates include a cap dolomite atop diamictites and volcanic rocks of the Pocatello Formation. The delta 13C values of these carbonates are distintly negative (-5 to -3), similar to carbonates that overlie Neoproterozoic glaciogenic rocks worldwide. Stratigraphically higher carbonates record a major positive delta 13C excursion to values as high as +8.8 within the carbonate member of the Caddy Canyon Quartzite. The magnitude of this excusion is consistent with post-Sturtian secular variation recorded elsewhere in the North American Cordillera, Australia, Svalbard, Brazil and Nambia, and exceeds the magnitude of any post-Varanger delta 13C excursion documented to date. In most samples, Sr-isotopic abundances have been altered by diagenesis and greenschist facies metamorphism, but a least-altered value of approximately 0.7076 supports a post-Sturtian and pre-Marinoan/Varanger age for upper Pocatello and lower Brigham rocks that lie above the Pocatello diamictite. Thus, even though available chemostratigraphic data are limited, they corroborate correlations of Pocatello Formation diamictites and overlying units with Sturtian glaciogenic rocks and immediately post

  20. Low Temperature Magnetic Properties of the Late Archean Boolgeeda Iron Formation (Hamersley Group, Western Australia): Environmental Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlut, Julie; Isambert, Aude; Bouquerel, Hélène; Pecoits, Ernesto; Philippot, Pascal; Vennin, Emmanuelle; Ader, Magali; Thomazo, Christophe; Buoncristiani, Jean-François; Baton, Franck; Muller, Elodie; Deldicque, Damien

    2015-05-01

    The origin of the iron oxides in Archean and Paleoproterozoic Banded Iron Formations is still a debated question. We report low and high temperature magnetic properties, susceptibility and saturation magnetization results joined with scanning microscope observations within a 35 meters section of the Late Archean Boolgeeda Iron Formation of the Hamersley Group, Western Australia. With the exception of two volcanoclastic intervals characterized by low susceptibility and magnetization, nearly pure magnetite is identified as the main magnetic carrier in all iron-rich layers including hematite-rich jasper beds. Two populations of magnetically distinct magnetites are reported from a 2 meter-thick interval within the section. Each population shows a specific Verwey transition temperature: one around 120-124 K and the other in the range of 105-110 K. This temperature difference is interpreted to reflect two distinct stoichiometry and likely two episodes of crystallization. The 120-124K transition is attributed to nearly pure stoichiometric magnetite, SEM and microprobe observations suggest that the lower temperature transition is related to chemically impure silician magnetite. Microbial-induced partial substitution of iron by silicon is suggested here. This is supported by an increase in Total Organic Carbon (TOC) in the same interval.

  1. Characteristics of Escherichia coli causing persistence or relapse of urinary tract infections: phylogenetic groups, virulence factors and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Ejrnæs, Karen; Stegger, Marc; Reisner, Andreas; Ferry, Sven; Monsen, Tor; Holm, Stig E; Lundgren, Bettina; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs) pose a major problem but little is known about characteristics of Escherichia coli associated with RUTI. This study includes E. coli from 155 women with community-acquired lower urinary tract infections (UTIs) randomized to one of three dosing regiments of pivmecillinam and aimed to identify associations between the presence of 29 virulence factor genes (VFGs), phylogenetic groups and biofilm formation and the course of infection during follow-up visits at 8-10 and 35-49 days post-inclusion, respectively. E. coli causing persistence or relapse were more often of phylogenetic group B2 and had a significantly higher aggregate VFG score than E. coli that were not detectable at follow-up. Specifically, these E. coli causing persistence or relapse were characterized by a higher prevalence of hemolysis and 12 VFGs (sfa/focDE, papAH, agn43, chuA, fyuA, iroN, kpsM II, kpsM II K2, cnf1, hlyD, malX and usp). KpsM II K2 and agn43a(CFT073) were independently associated with persistence or relapse. No specific combination of presence/absence of VFGs could serve as a marker to predict RUTI. Stratifying for VFGs, seven days of pivmecillinam treatment reduced the prevalence of persistence or relapse of UTI compared with three days. In vitro biofilm formation was not higher among E. coli causing persistence or relapse. The presence of agn43a(CFT073) or agn43b(CFT073) was associated with biofilm forming capacity. In conclusion, our results show potential targets for prevention and treatment of persistence/relapse of UTI and potential markers for selecting treatment lengths and warrant studies of these and new VFGs. PMID:22030858

  2. Selected data for wells and test holes used in structure-contour maps of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents selected data on wells and test holes that were used in the construction of structure-contour maps of selected formations that contain major aquifers in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota. Altitudes of the top of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation are presented for the wells and test holes presented in this report.

  3. Social conflict and the formation of emergent groups in a technological disaster: The Exxon Valdez oil spill and the response of residents in the area of Homer, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Button, G.V.

    1993-01-01

    To date there has been a paucity of research on the formation of emergent groups in the wake of technological disasters. A majority of researchers have contended that whereas natural disasters engender social cohesion and stimulate the formation of emergent groups, technological disasters have the tendency to constrain such formation because of the social conflict which follows in the wake of a technological disaster. This thesis challenges that assumption and examines both the nature of the social conflict and the formation of emergent groups that occurred in the aftermath of this country's largest environmental disaster: the Exxon Valdez oil spill. An anthropological perspective is employed. The investigator examines the formation of such groups in the area of Homer, Alaska. The differential response to the disaster and the ensuing social conflict is examined by a combination of participant-observation methods, formal and informal, in-depth interviews, and archival records. This investigation reveals that although there was considerable social conflict, there was also sufficient social cohesion to promote the formation of emergent group responses to the oil spill and the cleanup that followed. Moreover, it finds that the resultant conflict and the formation of such groups was attributable in part to a widely reported sense of a loss of control' and considerable uncertainty about many of the facts' surrounding the spill. This included uncertainty about who was ultimately in control of the cleanup and which clean-up technologies and remediation efforts were most urgent and useful. This thesis concludes that, contrary to the expectations of most social scientists, emergent groups can form in the wake of a technological disaster. Moreover, given the sense of urgency and the common perception of disaster victims that authorities are both unable and unwilling to respond to disasters, the formation of such groups is inevitable.

  4. Ultrasonic spectrometry of aqueous solutions of alkyl maltosides: kinetics of micelle formation and head-group isomerization.

    PubMed

    Haller, Julian; Kaatze, Udo

    2009-10-19

    At frequencies between 100 kHz and 400 MHz, ultrasonic attenuation spectra are measured at 25 degrees C for aqueous solutions of hexyl-, heptyl-, octyl-, nonyl-, and decyl-beta-D-maltopyranoside as well as of decyl-alpha-D-maltopyranoside. The spectra with surfactant concentration c above the relevant critical micelle concentration (cmc) display three relaxation terms with discrete relaxation times. That with a relaxation time between 0.1 and 1.2 micros is due to exchange of monomers between micelles and the suspending phase. It is discussed in the light of the Teubner-Kahlweit-Aniansson-Wall model of the formation/decay kinetics of systems with Gaussian size distribution of micelles. The relaxation parameters are compared to those for solutions of other non-ionic surfactants, such as alkyl monoglycosides and poly(ethylene glycol) monoalkyl ethers. At c < cmc this low-frequency relaxation term is missing and at c approximately = cmc it is broadened, as is characteristic of solutions of oligomeric molecular structures rather than proper micelles. The relaxation terms with relaxation times between 6 and 15 ns and 0.7 and 2.3 ns reveal head-group rotations around glycosidic angles and isomerization of the exocyclic hydroxymethyl group, respectively. These unimolecular reactions are also examined with a view to solutions of alkyl monoglycosides as well as of glucose and maltose. PMID:19760695

  5. THE M81 GROUP DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY DDO 165. II. CONNECTING RECENT STAR FORMATION WITH INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM STRUCTURES AND KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, John M.; Most, Hans P.; Skillman, Evan D.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Warren, Steven R. E-mail: hmost@macalester.edu E-mail: dweisz@astro.umn.edu

    2011-07-01

    We compare the stellar populations and complex neutral gas dynamics of the M81 group dIrr galaxy DDO 165 using data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Very Large Array. Cannon et al. in Paper I of this series identified two kinematically distinct H I components, multiple localized high velocity gas features, and eight H I holes and shells (the largest of which spans {approx}2.2 x 1.1 kpc). Using the spatial and temporal information from the stellar populations in DDO 165, we compare the patterns of star formation (SF) over the past 500 Myr with the H I dynamics. We extract localized star formation histories within 6 of the 8 H I holes identified in Paper I, as well as 23 other regions that sample a range of stellar densities and neutral gas properties. From population synthesis modeling, we derive the energy outputs (from stellar winds and supernovae) of the stellar populations within these regions over the last 100 Myr, and compare with refined estimates of the energies required to create the H I holes. In all cases, we find that 'feedback' is energetically capable of creating the observed structures in the interstellar medium (ISM). Numerous regions with significant energy inputs from feedback lack coherent H I structures but show prominent localized high velocity gas features; this feedback signature is a natural product of temporally and spatially distributed SF. In DDO 165, the extended period of heightened SF activity (lasting more than 1 Gyr) is energetically capable of creating the observed holes and high velocity gas features in the neutral ISM.

  6. Strong far-infrared cooling lines, peculiar CO kinematics, and possible star-formation suppression in Hickson compact group 57

    SciTech Connect

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Ogle, P. M.; Rich, J. A.; Xu, C. K.; Lisenfeld, U.; Bitsakis, T.; Guillard, P.; Charmandaris, V.; Cluver, M.; Jarrett, T.; Dopita, M. A.; Kewley, L. J.; Freeland, E.; Rasmussen, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.

    2014-11-10

    We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson compact group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm molecular hydrogen consistent with shock or turbulent heating. Our observations show that HCG 57d has strong [C II] emission compared to L {sub FIR} and weak CO(1-0), while in HCG 57a, both the [C II] and CO(1-0) are strong. HCG 57a lies at the upper end of the normal distribution of the [C II]/CO and [C II]/FIR ratios, and its far-infrared (FIR) cooling supports a low-density, warm, diffuse gas that falls close to the boundary of acceptable models of a photon-dominated region. However, the power radiated in the [C II] and warm H{sub 2} emissions have similar magnitudes, as seen in other shock-dominated systems and predicted by recent models. We suggest that shock heating of the [C II] is a viable alternative to photoelectric heating in violently disturbed, diffuse gas. The existence of shocks is also consistent with the peculiar CO kinematics in the galaxy, indicating that highly noncircular motions are present. These kinematically disturbed CO regions also show evidence of suppressed star formation, falling a factor of 10-30 below normal galaxies on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We suggest that the peculiar properties of both galaxies are consistent with a highly dissipative, off-center collisional encounter between HCG 57d and 57a, creating ring-like morphologies in both systems. Highly dissipative gas-on-gas collisions may be more common in dense groups because of the likelihood of repeated multiple encounters. The possibility of shock-induced star-formation suppression may explain why a subset of these HCG galaxies has been found previously to fall in the mid-infrared green valley.

  7. Strong Far-infrared Cooling Lines, Peculiar CO Kinematics, and Possible Star-formation Suppression in Hickson Compact Group 57

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.; Bitsakis, T.; Guillard, P.; Charmandaris, V.; Cluver, M.; Dopita, M. A.; Freeland, E.; Jarrett, T.; Kewley, L. J.; Ogle, P. M.; Rasmussen, J.; Rich, J. A.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Xu, C. K.; Yun, M.

    2014-11-01

    We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson compact group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm molecular hydrogen consistent with shock or turbulent heating. Our observations show that HCG 57d has strong [C II] emission compared to L FIR and weak CO(1-0), while in HCG 57a, both the [C II] and CO(1-0) are strong. HCG 57a lies at the upper end of the normal distribution of the [C II]/CO and [C II]/FIR ratios, and its far-infrared (FIR) cooling supports a low-density, warm, diffuse gas that falls close to the boundary of acceptable models of a photon-dominated region. However, the power radiated in the [C II] and warm H2 emissions have similar magnitudes, as seen in other shock-dominated systems and predicted by recent models. We suggest that shock heating of the [C II] is a viable alternative to photoelectric heating in violently disturbed, diffuse gas. The existence of shocks is also consistent with the peculiar CO kinematics in the galaxy, indicating that highly noncircular motions are present. These kinematically disturbed CO regions also show evidence of suppressed star formation, falling a factor of 10-30 below normal galaxies on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We suggest that the peculiar properties of both galaxies are consistent with a highly dissipative, off-center collisional encounter between HCG 57d and 57a, creating ring-like morphologies in both systems. Highly dissipative gas-on-gas collisions may be more common in dense groups because of the likelihood of repeated multiple encounters. The possibility of shock-induced star-formation suppression may explain why a subset of these HCG galaxies has been found previously to fall in the mid-infrared green valley.

  8. The prenyl group contributes to activities of phytoestrogen 8-prenynaringenin in enhancing bone formation and inhibiting bone resorption in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ming, Lei-Guo; Lv, Xiang; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Ge, Bao-Feng; Zhen, Ping; Song, Peng; Zhou, Jian; Ma, Hui-Ping; Xian, Cory J; Chen, Ke-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have found that 8-prenylflavonoids have a higher osteogenic activity than do flavonoids, which suggested that the 8-prenyl group may play an active role in bone-protective properties. To address this hypothesis, activities of 8-prenylnaringenin (PNG) and naringenin (NG) in osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function were compared in vitro. PNG was found to have a stronger ability than NG to improve osteoblast differentiation and osteogenic function in cultured rat calvarial osteoblasts, as demonstrated by levels of alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin, calcium deposition, and the number and area of mineralized bone nodules, as well as mRNA expression of osteogenesis-related genes Bmp-2, OSX, and Runx-2. In addition, although expression of osteoclastogenic inducer receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) was not affected, that of osteoclastogenesis inhibitor osteoprotegerin (OPG) and consequently the OPG/RANKL ratio were increased, more potently by PNG than NG. PNG was also found to have a higher potency than NG in inhibiting the osteoclast formation in rabbit bone marrow cells and their resorptive activity, as revealed by lower numbers of osteoclasts formed, lower numbers and areas of bone resorption pits, and lower mRNA expression levels of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin K. Furthermore, PNG induced apoptosis of mature osteoclasts at a higher degree and at an earlier time than did NG. These results indicate that the 8-prenyl group plays an important role and contributes to the higher bone-protective activity of PNG in comparison with NG. PMID:23389955

  9. Sexual and Apomictic Seed Formation in Hieracium Requires the Plant Polycomb-Group Gene FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM[W

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Julio C.M.; Tucker, Matthew R.; Johnson, Susan D.; Hrmova, Maria; Koltunow, Anna M.G.

    2008-01-01

    A Polycomb-Group (PcG) complex, FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED (FIS), represses endosperm development in Arabidopsis thaliana until fertilization occurs. The Hieracium genus contains apomictic species that form viable seeds asexually. To investigate FIS function during apomictic seed formation, FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE), encoding a WD-repeat member of the FIS complex, was isolated and downregulated in sexual and apomictic Hieracium species. General downregulation led to defects in leaf and seed development, consistent with a role in developmental transitions and cell fate. PcG-like activity of Hieracium FIE was also supported by its interaction in vitro with the Arabidopsis CURLY LEAF PcG protein. By contrast, specific downregulation of FIE in developing seeds of sexual Hieracium did not result in autonomous endosperm proliferation but led to seed abortion after cross-pollination. Furthermore, in apomictic Hieracium, specific FIE downregulation inhibited autonomous embryo and endosperm initiation, and most autonomous seeds displayed defective embryo and endosperm growth. Therefore, FIE is required for both apomictic and fertilization-induced seed initiation in Hieracium. Since Hieracium FIE failed to interact with FIS class proteins in vitro, its partner proteins might differ from those in the FIS complex of Arabidopsis. These differences in protein interaction were attributed to structural modifications predicted from comparisons of Arabidopsis and Hieracium FIE molecular models. PMID:18812497

  10. Influence of the linkage type between the polymer backbone and side groups on the surface segregation of methyl groups during film formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yizhi; Fan, Hao; Wang, Yuping; Zuo, Biao; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Shunli; Wang, Xinping

    2015-12-21

    Although poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) differs from poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) only in the reversed position of the ester group, a large difference in the concentration dependence of the casting solution on the corresponding surface structure of the cast films of PVAc, PMA and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was observed. The hydrophobicity of both PMA and PMMA films increased with increasing concentration of the corresponding polymer solution, whereas cast PVAc films showed the reverse trend. The surface structure of the cast films prepared with different concentrations of the casting solution, characterized by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectra, showed that the order of the methylene groups increased while that of the acetyl methyl group decreased on the surface of cast PVAc film with increasing concentration of casting solution. However, the order of the ester methyl group increased and that of methylene groups did not change for cast PMA films with increasing concentration of casting solution. The cast PMMA film showed a reverse trend compared with the corresponding PMA film. It is apparent that well-ordered ester or acetyl methyl groups on the surface, which are oriented away from the polymer film, rather than methylene groups, play an important role in determining surface hydrophobicity, as the latter shield the OC[double bond, length as m-dash]O groups of PVAc, PMA and PMMA film surfaces from being exposed, resulting in low surface free energy. The reason for this difference is attributed to the relatively low energy for ester methyl group reorientation, an ester group structure nearer to the trans state and more regular local configuration of segments in concentrated solutions of PMA and PMMA compared to that of PVAc. PMID:26415634

  11. Appendix: Final Update of the IAU Division A Commission 4 Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides and File Format Specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, James L.; Acton, Charles; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Bell, Steven A.; Capitaine, Nicole; Fienga, Agnès; Folkner, William M.; Gastineau, Mickaël; Pavlov, Dmitry; Pitjeva, Elena V.; Skripnichenko, Vladimir I.; Wallace, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The IAU Commission 4 Working Group on Standardizing Access to Ephemerides recommends the use of the Spacecraft and Planet Kernel (SPK) format to provide a uniform format for the position ephemerides of planets and other natural solar system bodies, and the use of the Planetary Constants Kernel (PCK) for the orientation of these bodies. These formats are used by the SPICE system, developed by the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The working group's final report is currently undergoing final preparations for publication. A long version of this report will be available at the IAU Commission 4: Ephemerides (or its successor) web site. This long version will contain a full description of that portion of the SPK and PCK formats required to duplicate these file types for this application.

  12. Doubts about the crucial role of the rising-tube mechanism in the formation of sunspot groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getling, A. V.; Ishikawa, R.; Buchnev, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    Some preliminary processing results are presented for a dataset obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope on the Hinode satellite. The idea of the project is to record, nearly simultaneously, the full velocity and magnetic-field vectors in growing active regions and sunspot groups at a photospheric level. Our ultimate aim is to elaborate observational criteria to distinguish between the manifestations of two mechanisms of sunspot-group formation - the rising of an Ω -shaped flux tube of a strong magnetic field and the in situ amplification and structuring of magnetic field by convection (the convective mechanism is briefly described). Observations of a young bipolar subregion developing within AR 11313 were carried out on 9-10 October 2011. During each 2-h observational session, 5576-Å filtergrams and Dopplergrams were obtained at a time cadence of 2 min, and one or two 32-min-long spectropolarimetric fast-mode scans were done. Based on the series of filtergrams, the trajectories of corks are computed, using a technique similar to but more reliable than local correlation tracking (LCT), and compared with the magnetic maps. At this stage of the investigation, only the vertical magnetic field and the horizontal flows are used for a qualitative analysis. According to our preliminary findings, the velocity pattern in the growing active region has nothing to do with a spreading flow on the scale of the entire bipolar region, which could be expected if a tube of strong magnetic field emerged. No violent spreading flows on the scale of the entire growing magnetic region can be identified. Instead, normal mesogranular and supergranular flows are preserved. Signs of small-scale structuring of the magnetic field can be detected in the area where new spots develop, and signs of the presence of separatrices between the magnetic polarities can be found, such that the surface flows converge to but not diverge from these separatrix curves. The observed scenario of evolution

  13. In vitro effect of antibiotics on biofilm formation by Bacteroides fragilis group strains isolated from intestinal microbiota of dogs and their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Silva, Janice Oliveira; Martins Reis, Ana Catarina; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; Pinheiro, Adriana Queiroz; Freire, Rosemary Souza; Oriá, Reinaldo Barreto; de Carvalho, Cibele Barreto Mano

    2014-08-01

    The Bacteroides fragilis group strains colonize the intestinal tract of dogs as commensal bacteria. Nevertheless, they can be opportunistic pathogens responsible for significant morbidity and mortality rates in dogs, like in oral infections, abscesses and wound infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility in B. fragilis strains isolated from dogs intestinal microbiota and to evaluate the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of some antimicrobials on biofilm formation. A total of 30 B. fragilis group strains were tested for susceptibility to ten antimicrobial agents by broth microdilution method. Thirteen B. fragilis strains were tested for biofilm formation and the biofilm producer strains were chosen to evaluate the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of six antimicrobials on biofilm formation. The isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, metronidazole, imipenem and chloramphenicol. Tetracycline and clindamycin were active against 50% and 33% of the strains, respectively. When biofilm-forming strains were grown in the presence of sub-MICs of imipenem and metronidazole, the inhibition of biofilm formation was observed. In contrast, enrofloxacin at ½ MIC caused a significant increase in biofilm formation in two of four strains examined. In conclusion, the B. fragilis group strains isolated were susceptible to most of the antimicrobials tested and the sub-MIC concentrations of imipenem, metronidazole and clindamycin were able to inhibit the biofilm formation. PMID:24799339

  14. Remagnetization of the Tonoloway Formation and the Helderberg Group in the Central Appalachians: testing the origin of syntilting magnetizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas Elmore, R.; Lee-Egger Foucher, Jamie; Evans, Mark; Lewchuk, Michael; Cox, Eric

    2006-09-01

    Palaeomagnetic, rock magnetic, geochemical and strain studies of the Helderberg Group and the Tonoloway Formation in the Valley and Ridge province of West Virginia were performed to test the origin of syntilting magnetizations and to test the mechanisms of chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) acquisition. The test for a connection between strain and remagnetization was performed by comparing the types and levels of strain with the magnetic properties between the generally coarse-grained, thickly bedded Helderberg and the thinly bedded and finer-grained Tonoloway. Standard tilt tests as well as optimal differential untilting from two transects on the Wills Mountain anticline indicate that the Helderberg contains a pervasive late syntilting (~30 per cent untilting) characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) whereas the Tonoloway contains a well defined early syntilting ChRM-1 (~76 per cent untilting) as well as a ChRM-2, which is similar to the ChRM in the Helderberg. The ChRMs reside in magnetite. The rock magnetic results from the two units are similar although the Helderberg samples have a finer apparent grain size, perhaps as a result of magnetic hardening. Strain data reveal an apparent correlation between the syntilting magnetizations and types/degrees of pressure solution strain. Pressure solution strain is higher in the Helderberg and lower in the Tonoloway. Strain may have caused rotation of magnetic minerals, but it not clear that the differences in strain between the units were high enough to cause the rotations that are needed to explain the tilt test results. Several other viable hypotheses were also investigated. One hypothesis is a strain-enhanced chemical process that caused dissolution and precipitation of new magnetite in solution structures during folding. A preliminary test of this hypothesis produced inconclusive results. Another hypothesis, consistent with some of the characteristics of the magnetizations in the Helderberg and Tonoloway units

  15. The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies. III. Characterizing Quenching in Low-mass Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the quenching of low-mass galaxies (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 108 {{M}⊙ }) as a function of lookback time using the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies. The SFHs were derived by analyzing color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations in archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. We find: (1) lower-mass galaxies quench earlier than higher-mass galaxies; (2) inside of Rvirial there is no correlation between a satellite’s current proximity to a massive host and its quenching epoch; and (3) there are hints of systematic differences in the quenching times of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites, although the sample size and uncertainties in the SFHs of M31 dwarfs prohibit definitive conclusions. Combined with results from the literature, we qualitatively consider the redshift evolution (z = 0-1) of the quenched galaxy fraction over ˜7 dex in stellar mass (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 1011.5 {{M}⊙ }). The quenched fraction of all galaxies generally increases toward the present, with both the lowest and highest-mass systems exhibiting the largest quenched fractions at all redshifts. In contrast, galaxies between {{M}\\star } ˜ 108-1010 {{M}⊙ } have the lowest quenched fractions. We suggest that such intermediate-mass galaxies are the least efficient at quenching. Finally, we compare our quenching times with predictions for infall times for low-mass galaxies associated with the MW. We find that some of the lowest-mass satellites (e.g., CVn II, Leo IV) may have been quenched before infall, while higher-mass satellites (e.g., Leo I, Fornax) typically quench ˜1-4 Gyr after infall. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA constract NAS 5-26555.

  16. A Code for the Generation of Group Constants for Reactor Calculations from Neutron Nuclear Data in KEDAK Format.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1988-09-15

    Version 00 Group averaged neutron cross sections, energy resonance self shielding factors, elastic transfer elements up to P5 approximation, the inelastic, (n,2n) and (n,3n) transfer elements, fission spectra, etc., for coarse groups (26 groups in the standard case) in the fast neutron energy range are calculated.

  17. Studying the evolution of galaxies in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr - II. The importance of environment in the suppression of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsakis, T.; Dultzin, D.; Ciesla, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Appleton, P. N.; Charmandaris, V.; Krongold, Y.; Guillard, P.; Alatalo, K.; Zezas, A.; González, J.; Lanz, L.

    2016-06-01

    We present an in depth study on the evolution of galaxy properties in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr. We are using the largest multiwavelength sample to-date, comprised 1770 groups (containing 7417 galaxies), in the redshift range of 0.01 < z < 0.23. To derive the physical properties of the galaxies, we rely on ultraviolet (UV)-to-infrared spectral energy distribution modelling, using CIGALE. Our results suggest that during the 3 Gyr period covered by our sample, the star formation activity of galaxies in our groups has been substantially reduced (3 to 10 times). Moreover, their star formation histories as well as their UV-optical and mid-infrared colours are significantly different from those of field and cluster galaxies, indicating that compact group galaxies spend more time transitioning through the green valley. The morphological transformation from late-type spirals to early-type galaxies occurs in the mid-infrared transition zone rather than in the UV-optical green valley. We find evidence of shocks in the emission line ratios and gas velocity dispersions of the late-type galaxies located below the star forming main sequence. Our results suggest that in addition to gas stripping, turbulence and shocks might play an important role in suppressing the star formation in compact group galaxies.

  18. Domino Fragmentations in Traceless Directing Groups of Radical Cascades: Evidence for the Formation of Alkoxy Radicals via C-O Scission.

    PubMed

    Harris, Trevor; Gomes, Gabriel Dos Passos; Clark, Ronald J; Alabugin, Igor V

    2016-07-15

    Direct evidence for the formation of alkoxy radicals is reported in radical cascades using traceless directing groups. Despite the possibility of hydrogen abstraction in the fragmenting step, followed by loss of R-OH, β-scission is preferred for the formation of alkoxy radicals. For the first time, the C-O radical was intermolecularly trapped using a silyl enol ether. Various C-X fragmenting groups were explored as possible traceless directing groups for the preparation of extended polyaromatics. Computational evidence shows that a combination of aromatization, steric and stereoelectronic effects assists the fragmentation to alkoxy radicals. Additionally, a new through-space interaction was discovered between O and Sn in the fragmentation as a specific transition state stabilizing effect. PMID:27304982

  19. Directing Group in Decarboxylative Cross-Coupling: Copper-Catalyzed Site-Selective C-N Bond Formation from Nonactivated Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-Jing; Lu, Xi; Wang, Guan; Li, Lei; Jiang, Wei-Tao; Wang, Yu-Dong; Xiao, Bin; Fu, Yao

    2016-08-01

    Copper-catalyzed directed decarboxylative amination of nonactivated aliphatic carboxylic acids is described. This intramolecular C-N bond formation reaction provides efficient access to the synthesis of pyrrolidine and piperidine derivatives as well as the modification of complex natural products. Moreover, this reaction presents excellent site-selectivity in the C-N bond formation step through the use of directing group. Our work can be considered as a big step toward controllable radical decarboxylative carbon-heteroatom cross-coupling. PMID:27439145

  20. The Importance of the Prenyl Group in the Activities of Osthole in Enhancing Bone Formation and Inhibiting Bone Resorption In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yuan-Kun; Pan, Ya-Lei; Niu, Yin-Bo; Li, Chen-Rui; Wu, Xiang-Long; Fan, Wu-Tu; Lu, Ting-Li; Mei, Qi-Bing; Xian, Cory J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis treatment always aimed at keeping the balance of bone formation and bone resorption. Recently, prenyl group in natural products has been proposed as an active group to enhance the osteogenesis process. Osthole has both the prenyl group and bone-protective activities, but the relationship is still unknown. In this study we found that osthole exerted a potent ability to promote proliferation and osteogenic function of rat bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts, including improved cell viability, alkaline phosphatase activity, enhanced secretion of collagen-I, bone morphogenetic protein-2, osteocalcin and osteopontin, stimulated mRNA expression of insulin-like growth factor-1, runt-related transcription factor-2, osterix, OPG (osteoprotegerin), RANKL (receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand), and the ratio of OPG/RANKL, as well as increasing the formation of mineralized nodules. However, 7-methoxycoumarin had no obvious effects. Osthole also inhibited osteoclastic bone resorption to a greater extent than 7-methoxycoumarin, as shown by a lower tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity and lower number and smaller area of resorption pits. Our findings demonstrate that osthole could be a potential agent to stimulate bone formation and inhibit bone resorption, and the prenyl group plays an important role in these bone-protective effects. PMID:25147567

  1. Formative Assessment: Using Concept Cartoon, Pupils' Drawings, and Group Discussions to Tackle Children's Ideas about Biological Inheritance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Christine; Teou, Lay-Yen

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out in the context of formative assessment where assessment and learning were integrated to enhance both teaching and learning. The purpose of the study was to: (a) identify pupils' ideas about biological inheritance through the use of a concept cartoon, pupils' drawings and talk, and (b) devise scaffolding structures that…

  2. Evidence for inter- and intraspecies biofilm formation variability among a small group of coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Fernando; Lima, Cláudia Afonso; Brás, Susana; França, Ângela; Cerca, Nuno

    2015-10-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are common bacterial colonizers of the human skin. They are often involved in nosocomial infections due to biofilm formation in indwelling medical devices. While biofilm formation has been extensively studied in Staphylococcus epidermidis, little is known regarding other CoNS species. Here, biofilms from six different CoNS species were characterized in terms of biofilm composition and architecture. Interestingly, the ability to form a thick biofilm was not associated with any particular species, and high variability on biofilm accumulation was found within the same species. Cell viability assays also revealed different proportions of live and dead cells within biofilms formed by different species, although this parameter was particularly similar at the intraspecies level. On the other hand, biofilm disruption assays demonstrated important inter- and intraspecies differences regarding extracellular matrix composition. Lastly, confocal laser scanning microscopy experiments confirmed this variability, highlighting important differences and common features of CoNS biofilms. We hypothesized that the biofilm formation heterogeneity observed was rather associated with biofilm matrix composition than with cells themselves. Additionally, our results indicate that polysaccharides, DNA and proteins are fundamental pieces in the process of CoNS biofilm formation. PMID:26403430

  3. Data Collection Design for Equivalent Groups Equating: Using a Matrix Stratification Framework for Mixed-Format Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbella, Kinge Keka

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-format assessments are increasingly being used in large scale standardized assessments to measure a continuum of skills ranging from basic recall to higher order thinking skills. These assessments are usually comprised of a combination of (a) multiple-choice items which can be efficiently scored, have stable psychometric properties, and…

  4. 69-Group Thermal-Reactor Neutron Cross Section Data from ENDF/B-V in MATXS Format.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1985-12-30

    Version: 00 The library contains 80 materials (no photon production) and includes self-shielded cross sections for the important actinides. Thermal scattering data are given for all materials, with bound scattering for the important moderators. The group structure contains 42 thermal groups extending to 4 eV. The data were generated with PSR-171/NJOY-II [2]. The energy group structure for MATXS7A is listed in Table 1, the materials with neutron scattering data in Table 2, and those withmore » thermal scattering data in Table 3.« less

  5. The group A3 chondrules of Krymka: Further evidence for major evaporative loss during the formation of chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.; Benoit, P. H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1993-01-01

    Like Semarkona (type 3.0), Krymka (type 3.1) contains two distinct types of chondrule (namely groups A and B) which differ in their bulk compositions, phase compositions, and CL properties. The group A chondrules in both meteorites show evidence for major loss of material by evaporation(i.e. elemental abundance patterns, size, redox state, olivine-pyroxene abundances). Group A and B chondrules probably formed from common or very similar precursors by the same processes acting with different intensities, group A suffering greater mass-loss by evaporation and reduction of FeO and SiO2. While Krymka chondrules share many primary mineralogical and compositional properties with Semarkona chondrules, the minimal metamorphism it has suffered has also had a significant effect on its chondrules.

  6. Lithologic mapping of the Arbuckle Group Formation in the Slick Hills of southwestern Oklahoma, utilizing geographic information systems/remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Collerain, M.D.; Morgan, K.; Donovan, N.; Busbey, A. )

    1993-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the presence of dolomite within lithologic sequences of the Arbuckle Group in the Slick Hills, using Landsat TM data. Samples from six formations of the Arbuckle Group were collected and spectral curves made using a spectral radiometer in labs. These spectral curves were then compared with each band of Landsat TM in search of dolomite spectral patterns. Using ERDAS, GRASS and MultiSpec image processing and GIS software, multiband combinations, ratios and principle components computer processing was performed and analyzed. The result was a Landsat derived image that differentiates dolomite from limestone in the Slick Hills.

  7. Petrologic and isotopic data from the Cretaceous (Campanian) Blackhawk Formation and Star Point Sandstone (Mesaverde Group), Wasatch Plateau, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Neil S.; Turner, Christine E.; Peterson, Fred

    2013-01-01

    The presence of discrete minerals associated with coal—whether (1) detrital or authigenic constituents of the coals or in thin mudstone or siltstone units interbedded with coals, or (2) authigenic phases that formed along cleats—might influence its utilization as an energy resource. The build-up of sintered ash deposits on the surfaces of heat exchangers in coal-fired power plants, due to the alteration of minerals during combustion of the coal, can seriously affect the functioning of the boiler and enhance corrosion of combustion equipment. In particular, the presence of sodium in coals has been considered a key factor in the fouling of boilers; however, other elements (such as calcium or magnesium) and the amount of discrete minerals burned with coal can also play a significant role in the inefficiency of and damage to boilers. Previous studies of the quality of coals in the Cretaceous (Campanian) Blackhawk Formation of the Wasatch Plateau, Utah, revealed that the sodium content of the coals varied across the region. To better understand the origin and distribution of sodium in these coals, petrologic studies were undertaken within a sedimentological framework to evaluate the timing and geochemical constraints on the emplacement of sodium-bearing minerals, particularly analcime, which previously had been identified in coals in the Blackhawk Formation. Further, the study was broadened to include not just coals in the Blackhawk Formation from various localities across the Wasatch Plateau, but also sandstones interbedded with the coals as well as sandstones in the underlying Star Point Sandstone. The alteration history of the sandstones in both formations was considered a key component of this study because it records the nature and timing of fluids passing through them and the associated precipitation of sodium-bearing minerals; thus, the alteration history could place constraints on the distribution and timing of sodium mineralization in the interbedded or

  8. Some Like It Hot: Linking Diffuse X-ray Luminosity, Baryonic Mass, and Star Formation Rate in Compact Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, S.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Walker, L.; Brandt, W. N.; Charlton, J. C.; Johnson, K. E.; Tzanavaris, P.

    2014-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies (CGs) are ideal laboratories in which to study the effects of environmentally-driven galaxy evolution due to their high galaxy number densities and low velocity dispersions, which cause frequent and prolonged galaxy-galaxy interactions. In our study to better understand the origin and properties of hot gas in poor systems of galaxies, we present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in a sample of 19 CGs observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Our analysis shows that the hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations, even in CGs where the hot gas is clearly associated with the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and combine them with HI masses from the literature to find that high-baryonic-mass CGs are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint X-ray emission attributed to star formation. We also use a new physically motivated definition of fossil groups (evolved galaxy groups where most of the mass is concentrated within a single galaxy) to investigate the hot gas properties of three compact fossil systems in our sample. In addition, we find that the most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because the cold gas has been exhausted in star formation, heated to X-ray temperatures, or removed from the galaxies by ram-pressure stripping. Finally, the optical colors that trace the recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is not dependent on the recent assembly of stellar mass in the most massive galaxies. This work has been supported by the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Ontario Early Researcher Award Program, and NASA.

  9. Knowing what to think by knowing who you are: self-categorization and the nature of norm formation, conformity and group polarization.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D; Wetherell, M; Cochrane, S; Hogg, M A; Turner, J C

    1990-06-01

    We contrast two theoretical approaches to social influence, one stressing interpersonal dependence, conceptualized as normative and informational influence (Deutsch & Gerard, 1955), and the other stressing group membership, conceptualized as self-categorization and referent informational influence (Turner, Hogg, Oakes, Reicher & Wetherell, 1987). We argue that both social comparisons to reduce uncertainty and the existence of normative pressure to comply depend on perceiving the source of influence as belonging to one's own category. This study tested these two approaches using three influence paradigms. First we demonstrate that, in Sherif's (1936) autokinetic effect paradigm, the impact of confederates on the formation of a norm decreases as their membership of a different category is made more salient to subjects. Second, in the Asch (1956) conformity paradigm, surveillance effectively exerts normative pressure if done by an in-group but not by an out-group. In-group influence decreases and out-group influence increases when subjects respond privately. Self-report data indicate that in-group confederates create more subjective uncertainty than out-group confederates and public responding seems to increase cohesiveness with in-group - but decrease it with out-group - sources of influence. In our third experiment we use the group polarization paradigm (e.g. Burnstein & Vinokur, 1973) to demonstrate that, when categorical differences between two subgroups within a discussion group are made salient, convergence of opinion between the subgroups is inhibited. Taken together the experiments show that self-categorization can be a crucial determining factor in social influence. PMID:2372667

  10. Do not aim too high nor too low: Moderate expectation-based group formation promotes public cooperation on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2014-09-01

    We propose a public goods game model wherein individuals can adaptively adjust their social ties. Individuals have expectation towards the groups they are involved in. They drop out of these groups which do not satisfy their expectation and explore some new ones in the evolutionary process. The time scale ratio of natural selection to interaction determines how fast interaction happens relatively to selection. The results show that cooperation is greatly enhanced when interaction happens quickly. Furthermore, we find that there exists an optimal interval of intermediate expectation level most favoring cooperation. Robustness of the results has been checked by means of an extended model, where individuals' expectation is subject to evolution as well.

  11. Existence of two groups of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis based on biofilm formation, intracellular survival, capsular profile and agr-typing.

    PubMed

    Bardiau, Marjorie; Caplin, Jonathan; Detilleux, Johann; Graber, Hans; Moroni, Paolo; Taminiau, Bernard; Mainil, Jacques G

    2016-03-15

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is recognised worldwide as an important pathogen causing contagious acute and chronic bovine mastitis. Chronic mastitis account for a significant part of all bovine cases and represent an important economic problem for dairy producers. Several properties (biofilm formation, intracellular survival, capsular expression and group agr) are thought to be associated with this chronic status. In a previous study, we found the existence of two groups of strains based on the association of these features. The aim of the present work was to confirm on a large international and non-related collection of strains the existence of these clusters and to associate them with case history records. In addition, the genomes of eight strains were sequenced to study the genomic differences between strains of each cluster. The results confirmed the existence of both groups based on capsular typing, intracellular survival and agr-typing: strains cap8-positive, belonging to agr group II, showing a low invasion rate and strains cap5-positive, belonging to agr group I, showing a high invasion rate. None of the two clusters were associated with the chronic status of the cow. When comparing the genomes of strains belonging to both clusters, the genes specific to the group "cap5-agrI" would suggest that these strains are better adapted to live in hostile environment. The existence of these two groups is highly important as they may represent two clusters that are adapted differently to the host and/or the surrounding environment. PMID:26931384

  12. Identifying priorities to improve maternal and child nutrition among the Khmu ethnic group, Laos: a formative study

    PubMed Central

    de Sa, Joia; Bouttasing, Namthipkesone; Sampson, Louise; Perks, Carol; Osrin, David; Prost, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Chronic malnutrition in children remains highly prevalent in Laos, particularly among ethnic minority groups. There is limited knowledge of specific nutrition practices among these groups. We explored nutritional status, cultural beliefs and practices of Laos' Khmu ethnic group to inform interventions for undernutrition as part of a Primary Health Care (PHC) project. Mixed methods were used. For background, we disaggregated anthropometric and behavioural indicators from Laos' Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey. We then conducted eight focus group discussions and 33 semi-structured interviews with Khmu villagers and health care workers, exploring beliefs and practices related to nutrition. The setting was two rural districts in Luang Prabang province, in one of which the PHC project had been established for 3 years. There was a higher prevalence of stunting in the Khmu than in other groups. Disaggregation showed nutrition behaviours were associated with ethnicity, including exclusive breastfeeding. Villagers described strong adherence to post-partum food restrictions for women, while little change was described in intake during pregnancy. Most children were breastfed, although early introduction of pre-lacteal foods was noted in the non-PHC district. There was widespread variation in introduction and diversity of complementary foods. Guidance came predominantly from the community, with some input from health care workers. Interventions to address undernutrition in Khmu communities should deliver clear, consistent messages on optimum nutrition behaviours. Emphasis should be placed on dietary diversity for pregnant and post-partum mothers, encouraging exclusive breastfeeding and timely, appropriate complementary feeding. The impact of wider governmental policies on food security needs to be further assessed. PMID:22515273

  13. Identifying priorities to improve maternal and child nutrition among the Khmu ethnic group, Laos: a formative study.

    PubMed

    de Sa, Joia; Bouttasing, Namthipkesone; Sampson, Louise; Perks, Carol; Osrin, David; Prost, Audrey

    2013-10-01

    Chronic malnutrition in children remains highly prevalent in Laos, particularly among ethnic minority groups. There is limited knowledge of specific nutrition practices among these groups. We explored nutritional status, cultural beliefs and practices of Laos' Khmu ethnic group to inform interventions for undernutrition as part of a Primary Health Care (PHC) project. Mixed methods were used. For background, we disaggregated anthropometric and behavioural indicators from Laos' Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey. We then conducted eight focus group discussions and 33 semi-structured interviews with Khmu villagers and health care workers, exploring beliefs and practices related to nutrition. The setting was two rural districts in Luang Prabang province, in one of which the PHC project had been established for 3 years. There was a higher prevalence of stunting in the Khmu than in other groups. Disaggregation showed nutrition behaviours were associated with ethnicity, including exclusive breastfeeding. Villagers described strong adherence to post-partum food restrictions for women, while little change was described in intake during pregnancy. Most children were breastfed, although early introduction of pre-lacteal foods was noted in the non-PHC district. There was widespread variation in introduction and diversity of complementary foods. Guidance came predominantly from the community, with some input from health care workers. Interventions to address undernutrition in Khmu communities should deliver clear, consistent messages on optimum nutrition behaviours. Emphasis should be placed on dietary diversity for pregnant and post-partum mothers, encouraging exclusive breastfeeding and timely, appropriate complementary feeding. The impact of wider governmental policies on food security needs to be further assessed. PMID:22515273

  14. Diverse microbially induced sedimentary structures from 1 Ga lakes of the Diabaig Formation, Torridon Group, northwest Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callow, Richard H. T.; Battison, Leila; Brasier, Martin D.

    2011-08-01

    The siliciclastic lacustrine rocks of the ~ 1000 Ma Diabaig Formation, northwest Scotland, contain a remarkable diversity of macroscopic structures on bedding planes that can be compared with various kinds of microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS). Field sedimentological investigations, combined with laboratory analysis of bedding planes and petrographic study of thin sections have allowed us to characterise a range of depositional environments and document the spectrum of biological structures. MISS are reported from frequently subaerial environments, through commonly submerged facies, and down to permanently sub-wavebase settings. Palaeoenvironmental conditions (water depth, exposure, hydrodynamic energy) control the distribution of MISS within these facies. This demonstrates that mat-forming microbial communities were arguably well adapted to low light levels or periodic exposure. Some MISS from the Diabaig Formation are typical of Precambrian microbial mats, including reticulate fabrics and 'old elephant skin' textures. In addition to these, a number of new and unusual fabrics of putative microbial origin are described, including linear arrays of ridges and grooves (cf. 'Arumberia') and discoidal structures that are comparable with younger Ediacaran fossils such as Beltanelliformis. These observations indicate that benthic microbial ecosystems were thriving in freshwater lake systems ~ 1000 Ma, and indicate how microbially induced sedimentary structures may be applied as facies indicators for Proterozoic lacustrine environments. The discovery of structures closely resembling Ediacaran fossils (cf. Beltanelliformis) also serves to highlight the difficulty of interpreting simple discoidal bedding plane structures as metazoan fossils.

  15. Rapid detection of rRNA group I pseudomonads in contaminated metalworking fluids and biofilm formation by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratul; Donofrio, Robert S; Goeres, Darla M; Bagley, Susan T

    2012-05-01

    Metalworking fluids (MWFs), used in different machining operations, are highly prone to microbial degradation. Microbial communities present in MWFs lead to biofilm formation in the MWF systems, which act as a continuous source of contamination. Species of rRNA group I Pseudomonas dominate in contaminated MWFs. However, their actual distribution is typically underestimated when using standard culturing techniques as most fail to grow on the commonly used Pseudomonas Isolation Agar. To overcome this, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to study their abundance along with biofilm formation by two species recovered from MWFs, Pseudomonas fluorescens MWF-1 and the newly described Pseudomonas oleovorans subsp. lubricantis. Based on 16S rRNA sequences, a unique fluorescent molecular probe (Pseudo120) was designed targeting a conserved signature sequence common to all rRNA group I Pseudomonas. The specificity of the probe was evaluated using hybridization experiments with whole cells of different Pseudomonas species. The probe's sensitivity was determined to be 10(3) cells/ml. It successfully detected and enumerated the abundance and distribution of Pseudomonas indicating levels between 3.2 (± 1.1) × 10(6) and 5.0 (± 2.3) × 10(6) cells/ml in four different industrial MWF samples collected from three different locations. Biofilm formation was visualized under stagnant conditions using high and low concentrations of cells for both P. fluorescens MWF-1 and P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis stained with methylene blue and Pseudo120. On the basis of these observations, this molecular probe can be successfully be used in the management of MWF systems to monitor the levels and biofilm formation of rRNA group I pseudomonads. PMID:22042232

  16. Some Like it Hot: Linking Diffuse X-Ray Luminosity, Baryonic Mass, and Star Formation Rate in Compact Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mulchaey, John S.; Walker, Lisa May; Brandt, Willian N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L(x-T) and (L(x-sigma), even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and Hi masses are great than or equal to 10(sup (11.3) solar mass are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 micron star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due togas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  17. Some like it hot: Linking diffuse X-ray luminosity, baryonic mass, and star formation rate in compact groups of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2014-08-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L{sub X} -T and L{sub X} -σ, even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and H I masses ≳ 10{sup 11.3} M{sub ☉} are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 μm star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due to gas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  18. Virgilian (Upper Pennsylvanian) paleosols in the upper Lawrence Formation (Douglas Group) and in the Snyderville Shale member (Oread Formation, Shawnee Group) of the northern Midcontinent, USA: Pedologic contrasts in a cyclothem sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Joeckel, R.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-10-03

    Paleosols in the upper Lawrence Formation and in the Snyderville Shale Member (Virgilian) extend over an estimated area of over 14,000 km[sup 2] in Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, and Kansas. These paleosols, both within cyclothems, are: (1) critical indicators of nearly basin wide emergence (peak regression of the Midcontinent seaway) and geomorphic stability, and (2) useful stratigraphic markers. Both paleosols appear to be analogous to modern Vertisols: they have nested, synformal-antiformal sets ([approximately]4--10 m wide) of very large, intersecting slickensides. The upper Lawrence shows a single paleosol across the study area. The paleosol is thickest and best-developed shelfward (northward) and shows topohydrosequence variation at two basinward localities in northeastern Kansas. Stratigraphic trends suggest an appreciable time differential in the south-to-north migration of the toronto transgression. The Snyderville shows two welded paleosols in southeastern Nebraska and a single one elsewhere in the study area. Elsewhere in the Snyderville, there is local evidence for lowstand incision of streams and small lows that underwent little or no subaerial exposure. Snyderville paleogeography and pedogenesis, however, were markedly different from upper Lawrence paleogeography and pedogenesis. Contrasts between the two paleosols are likely to be related to intercycle changes in geomorphic conditions (driven by patterns of sedimentation, eustasy, and tectonics) and climate.

  19. Addition of surfactants in ozonated water cleaning for the suppression of functional group formation and particle adhesion on the SiO2 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jahyun; Im, Kyungtaek; Lim, Sangwoo

    2011-04-01

    Various kinds of surfactants were added to a cleaning solution and deionized (DI) water, and their effect on the suppression of organic function group formation and particle adhesion to a SiO2 surface was analyzed using multi-internal reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results implied that attached organic functional groups are affected by the chemical structure of a surfactant in DI water. Furthermore, the addition of anionic glycolic acid ethoxylate 4-tert-butylphenyl ether (GAE4E) is the most effective in terms of preventing organic group attachment and particle adhesion to the SiO2 surface, whether it was added to the cleaning solution or post-cleaning rinse water, with or without polystyrene latex particles. Moreover, it was possible to completely prevent particle adhesion to the SiO2 surface with the proper addition of GAE4E in DIO3 solution.

  20. Formation and geochemical significance of micrometallic aggregates including fissiogenic platinum group elements in the Oklo natural reactor, Gabon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Makiko; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Gauthier-Lafaye, François

    2010-08-01

    Metallic aggregates with a size of a few tens μm and consisting mainly of Ru, Rh, Pd, Te, Pb, As, Sb, S and Bi were found in the acid residue of SD37-S2/CD uraninite taken from Oklo natural reactor zone (RZ) 13. Quantitative analyses of major elements using an electron probe microanalyzer and in situ isotopic analyses of Zr, Mo, Ru, Pb and U using a sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe were performed on the metallic aggregates to determine the geochemical behaviors of fission products and actinides and to ascertain the processes of formation of the aggregates in the RZs. The chemical compositions of the aggregates investigated in this study are significantly different from those reported previously, showing lower Pb content and no correlation between the contents of Pb and S in the individual grains. The 235U/ 238U ratios in metallic aggregates vary significantly from 0.00478 to 0.01466, indicating chemical fractionation between U and Pu during the formation of the aggregates. The Pb isotopic data indicate that most of the Pb in the aggregates decayed from 2.05 Ga-old uraninite that existed in the RZ originally and that there was chemical fractionation between U and Pb in some aggregates. The Zr and Mo isotopic ratios, 90Zr/ 91Zr and 95Mo/ 97Mo, for most of the aggregates had small variations, which can be simply explained by constant separate mixing of fissiogenic and nonfissiogenic components. On the other hand, a large variation in the 99Ru/ 101Ru ratio (0.324-1.73) cannot be explained only by a two component mixing theory; thus, chemical fractionation between Tc and Ru during the reactor criticality is suggested. The large variations in the 235U/ 238U and 99Ru/ 101Ru isotopic ratios suggest that the aggregates formed under various redox conditions owing to the radiolysis of water.

  1. A re-evaluation of the stratigraphy and sedimentology of the Day Point Formation (Chazy Group): A new look at old reefs

    SciTech Connect

    Falkenberg, J.; Mehrtens, C.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Day Point Formation (Chazy Group, Middle Ordovician) outcrops in the Champlain Valley of New York and Vermont. The stratigraphy of the Day Point Formation is complex, containing lithologic sequences that are unique at different localities around the Champlain Valley. The formation exhibits complex lateral interfingering of seven lithofacies: (1) Highly bioturbated sandstone with symmetrical and bifurcating ripples. (2) Bioturbated, brachiopod rich, wackestone facies. (3) Planar cross-bedded, interlayered sand and sandy packstone. (4) Interlayered sand and shale grading into sand and limestone layers. (5) Grainstone which, at some localities, contains mound-shaped bryozoan reefs, at other localities thin non-reefal sheet-like layers are present. The grainstone also has planar laminated and cross stratified beds. (6) Fine-grained, calcareous sandstone with planar and herringbone cross bedding, which in places contains small bryozoan reefs and thin sheet-reefs. (7) Planar cross bedded packstone containing bryozoan reefs and thin sheet-like non-reefal layers. The thin reefal layers are found where the mound-shaped reefs are absent. The sand units are found only in the lower portion of the Day Point Formation. The bryozoan reefs and non-reefal layers are associated with the sand beds in the lower portion of the Day Point Formation, and either live within the sand or on top of it. The bryozoans that form the non-reefal layers, found in the limestones, are contained within thin layers of sand. In contrast, no sand is found in the upper section of the Day Point Formation, yet the bryozoan reefs flourish.

  2. The crucial role of higher order multiplicity in wide binary formation: a case study using the β-Pictoris moving group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, P.; Bayo, A.

    2016-07-01

    The `in situ' formation of very wide binaries is hard to explain as their physical separations are beyond the typical size of a collapsing cloud core (≈5000-10 000 au). Here we investigate the formation process of such systems. We compute population statistics such as the multiplicity fraction, companion-star fraction and physical separation distribution of companions in the β-Pictoris moving group. We compare previous multiplicity studies in younger and older regions and show that the dynamic evolution of a young population with a high degree of primordial multiplicity can lead to a processed separation distribution, similar to the field population. The evolution of outer components is attributed to the dynamical unfolding of higher order (triple) systems; a natural consequence of which is the formation of wide binaries. We find a strong preference for wide systems to contain three or more components (>1000 au: 11/14, 10 000 au: 6 / 7). We argue that the majority of wide binaries identified in young moving groups are primordial. Under the assumption that stellar populations, within our galaxy, have statistically similar primordial multiplicity, we can infer that the paucity of wide binaries in the field is the result of dynamical evolution.

  3. The crucial role of higher-order multiplicity in wide binary formation: A case study using the β-Pictoris moving group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, P.; Bayo, A.

    2016-04-01

    The "in-situ" formation of very wide binaries is hard to explain as their physical separations are beyond the typical size of a collapsing cloud core (≈5000-10,000 au). Here we investigate the formation process of such systems. We compute population statistics such as the multiplicity fraction ( MF ), companion-star fraction ( CSF ) and physical separation distribution of companions in the β-Pictoris moving group (BPMG). We compare previous multiplicity studies in younger and older regions and show that the dynamic evolution of a young population with a high degree of primordial multiplicity can lead to a processed separation distribution, similar to the field population. The evolution of outer components is attributed to the dynamical unfolding of higher-order (triple) systems; a natural consequence of which is the formation of wide binaries. We find a strong preference for wide systems to contain three or more components (>1000 au: 11 / 14, 10,000 au: 6 / 7). We argue that the majority of wide binaries identified in young moving groups are primordial. Under the assumption that stellar populations, within our galaxy, have statistically similar primordial multiplicity, we can infer that the paucity of wide binaries in the field is the result of dynamical evolution.

  4. Geochronology and geochemistry of tuff beds from the Shicaohe Formation of Shennongjia Group and tectonic evolution in the northern Yangtze Block, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qiuding; Wang, Zhengjiang; Wang, Jian; Deng, Qi; Yang, Fei

    2016-03-01

    Meso- to Neoproterozoic magmatic events are widespread in the Yangtze Block. The geochronology and tectonic significance of the Shennongjia Group in the Yangtze Block are still highly controversial. An integrated geochronology and geochemistry approach provides new insights into the geochronological framework, tectonic setting, magmatic events, and basin evolution of the northern Yangtze Block. Our new precise sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe U-Pb data indicate a deposition age of 1180 ± 15 Ma for the Shicaohe Formation subalkaline basaltic tuff that is geochemically similar to modern intracontinental rift volcanic rocks. The integration of available geochemical data together with our new U-Pb ages indicates the Shicaohe Formation subalkaline basaltic tuff formed ca. 1180 in a continental rift-related setting on a passive continental margin. The Shennongjia Group is topped by the Zhengjiaya Formation volcanic sequence, indicating arc-related igneous events at 1103 Ma. The transition of the late Mesoproterozoic tectonic regime from intracontinental extension to convergence occurred between ca. 1180 and 1103 Ma in the northern Yangtze Block. Tectonic evolution in the Neoproterozoic led to accretion along the northern margin of the Yangtze Block. These results provide geochronological evidence, which is of utmost importance for reconfiguration of the chronostratigraphic framework and for promoting research on Mesoproterozoic strata in China, thereby increasing understanding of magmatic events and basin evolutionary history in the northern Yangtze Block.

  5. An active site rearrangement within the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme releases nonproductive interactions and allows formation of catalytic interactions.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Raghuvir N; Van Schie, Sabine N S; Giambaşu, George; Dai, Qing; Yesselman, Joseph D; York, Darrin; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Biological catalysis hinges on the precise structural integrity of an active site that binds and transforms its substrates and meeting this requirement presents a unique challenge for RNA enzymes. Functional RNAs, including ribozymes, fold into their active conformations within rugged energy landscapes that often contain misfolded conformers. Here we uncover and characterize one such "off-pathway" species within an active site after overall folding of the ribozyme is complete. The Tetrahymena group I ribozyme (E) catalyzes cleavage of an oligonucleotide substrate (S) by an exogenous guanosine (G) cofactor. We tested whether specific catalytic interactions with G are present in the preceding E•S•G and E•G ground-state complexes. We monitored interactions with G via the effects of 2'- and 3'-deoxy (-H) and -amino (-NH(2)) substitutions on G binding. These and prior results reveal that G is bound in an inactive configuration within E•G, with the nucleophilic 3'-OH making a nonproductive interaction with an active site metal ion termed MA and with the adjacent 2'-OH making no interaction. Upon S binding, a rearrangement occurs that allows both -OH groups to contact a different active site metal ion, termed M(C), to make what are likely to be their catalytic interactions. The reactive phosphoryl group on S promotes this change, presumably by repositioning the metal ions with respect to G. This conformational transition demonstrates local rearrangements within an otherwise folded RNA, underscoring RNA's difficulty in specifying a unique conformation and highlighting Nature's potential to use local transitions of RNA in complex function. PMID:26567314

  6. THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON THE FORMATION OF H{alpha} FILAMENTS AND COOL CORES IN GALAXY GROUPS AND CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2011-04-10

    We present the results of a combined X-ray and H{alpha} study of 10 galaxy groups and 17 galaxy clusters using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Maryland Magellan Tunable Filter. We find no difference in the morphology or detection frequency of H{alpha} filaments in groups versus clusters over the mass range 10{sup 13} < M{sub 500} < 10{sup 15} M{sub sun}. The detection frequency of H{alpha} emission is shown to be only weakly dependent on the total mass of the system at the 52% confidence level. In contrast, we find that the presence of H{alpha} filaments is strongly correlated with both the global (89% confidence level) and core (84%) intracluster medium (ICM) entropy, as well as the X-ray cooling rate (72%). The H{alpha} filaments are therefore an excellent proxy for the cooling ICM. The H{alpha} filaments are more strongly correlated with the cooling properties of the ICM than with the radio properties of the brightest cluster galaxy; this further supports the scenario where these filaments are directly associated with a thermally unstable, rapidly cooling ICM, rather than radio bubbles. The ICM cooling efficiency, defined as the X-ray cooling rate per unit gas mass, is shown to correlate with the total system mass, indicating that groups are more efficient at cooling than clusters. This result implies that, in systems with cool cores, active galactic nucleus feedback scales with the total mass of the system, in agreement with earlier suggestions.

  7. Unexpected formation of π-expanded isoquinoline from anthracene possessing four electron-donating groups via the Duff reaction.

    PubMed

    Węcławski, Marek K; Deperasińska, Irena; Leniak, Arkadiusz; Banasiewicz, Marzena; Kozankiewicz, Bolesław; Gryko, Daniel T

    2016-08-01

    New synthetic methods leading towards π-expanded heterocycles are sought after mainly due to their promising opto-electronic properties. Subjecting 1,5,9,10-tetramethoxyanthracene to the modern Duff reaction conditions led to the formation of a compound possessing the 2-azabenzoanthrone (dibenzo[de,h]isoquinolin-7-on) skeleton instead of the expected dialdehyde. This non-typical course of reaction can be rationalized by the double electrophilic aromatic substitution at two neighboring electron-rich positions of anthracene followed by oxidation of the resulting intermediate to form a pyridine ring. Optical studies supported by the quantum chemistry calculations indicated the lack of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT); for energy reasons, only one tautomeric form, with a hydrogen atom bonded to one of the two nearby oxygen atoms, was populated in the electronic ground S0 and in the excited S1 states. Nonradiative depopulation of the S1 state proceeded via internal conversion stimulated by the presence of the low frequency vibrational modes. Our serendipitous discovery represents the most complex case of rearrangement of aromatic compounds under Duff reaction conditions and could help to design analogous processes. At the same time this is the simplest method for the synthesis of derivatives of 2-azabenzoanthrone. PMID:27367169

  8. Millimeter-scale variations of stable isotope abundances in carbonates from banded iron-formations in the Hamersley Group of Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Baur, M E; Hayes, J M; Studley, S A; Walter, M R

    1985-01-01

    Several diamond drill cores from formations within the Hamersley Group of Western Australia have been studied for evidence of short-range variations in the isotopic compositions of the carbonates. For a set of 32 adjacent microbands analyzed in a specimen from the Marra Mamba Iron Formation, carbon isotope compositions of individual microbands ranged from -2.8 to -19.8 per mil compared to PDB and oxygen isotope compositions ranged from 10.2 to 20.8 per mil compared to SMOW. A pattern of alternating abundances was present, with the average isotopic contrasts between adjacent microbands being 3.0 per mil for carbon and 3.1 per mil for oxygen. Similar results were obtained for a suite of 34 microbands (in four groups) from the Bruno's Band unit of the Mount Sylvia Formation. Difficulties were experienced in preparing samples of single microbands from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, but overall isotopic compositions were in good agreement with values reported by previous authors. Chemical analyses showed that isotopically light carbon and oxygen were correlated with increased concentrations of iron. The preservation of these millimeter-scale variations in isotopic abundances is interpreted as inconsistent with a metamorphic origin for the isotopically light carbon in the BIF carbonates. A biological origin is favored for the correlated variations in 13C and Fe, and it is suggested that the 13C-depleted carbonates may derive either from fermentative metabolism or from anaerobic respiration. A model is presented in which these processes occur near the sediment-water interface and are coupled with an initial oxidative precipitation of the iron. PMID:11539027

  9. Millimeter-scale variations of stable isotope abundances in carbonates from banded iron-formations in the Hamersley Group of Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baur, M. E.; Hayes, J. M.; Studley, S. A.; Walter, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Several diamond drill cores from formations within the Hamersley Group of Western Australia have been studied for evidence of short-range variations in the isotopic compositions of the carbonates. For a set of 32 adjacent microbands analyzed in a specimen from the Marra Mamba Iron Formation, carbon isotope compositions of individual microbands ranged from -2.8 to -19.8 per mil compared to PDB and oxygen isotope compositions ranged from 10.2 to 20.8 per mil compared to SMOW. A pattern of alternating abundances was present, with the average isotopic contrasts between adjacent microbands being 3.0 per mil for carbon and 3.1 per mil for oxygen. Similar results were obtained for a suite of 34 microbands (in four groups) from the Bruno's Band unit of the Mount Sylvia Formation. Difficulties were experienced in preparing samples of single microbands from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, but overall isotopic compositions were in good agreement with values reported by previous authors. Chemical analyses showed that isotopically light carbon and oxygen were correlated with increased concentrations of iron. The preservation of these millimeter-scale variations in isotopic abundances is interpreted as inconsistent with a metamorphic origin for the isotopically light carbon in the BIF carbonates. A biological origin is favored for the correlated variations in 13C and Fe, and it is suggested that the 13C-depleted carbonates may derive either from fermentative metabolism or from anaerobic respiration. A model is presented in which these processes occur near the sediment-water interface and are coupled with an initial oxidative precipitation of the iron.

  10. Usefulness of postoperative hip irradiation in the prevention of heterotopic bone formation in a high risk group of patients

    SciTech Connect

    MacLennan, I.; Keys, H.M.; Evarts, C.M.; Rubin, P.

    1984-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification is a complication of total hip arthroplasty in 14 to 30% of patients. Significant functional impairment will occur in up to 28% of patients with ectopic bone. The high risk group includes those with preexisting heterotopic bone in either hip, those suffering from hypertrophic osteoarthritis or ankylosing spondylitis and patients who have had multiple procedures on the hip. Fifty-eight patients (67 hips) were irradiated after surgical removal of ectopic bone (53 hips) or received radiation prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification (14 hips). Ninety-five percent of patients had either no bone visible or insignificant amounts of ectopic bone visible on postoperative hip X-rays. Only 5% of patients showed significant persistence of ectopic bone. Postoperative hip function was dramatically improved compared to preoperative function in all patients treated. The importance of early commencement of irradiation is emphasized.

  11. Studying with the cloud: the use of online Web-based resources to augment a traditional study group format.

    PubMed

    Chan, Teresa; Sennik, Serena; Zaki, Amna; Trotter, Brendon

    2015-03-01

    Cloud-based applications such as Google Docs, Skype, Dropbox, and SugarSync are revolutionizing the way that we interact with the world. Members of the millennial generation (those born after 1980) are now becoming senior residents and junior attending physicians. We describe a novel technique combining Internet- and cloud-based methods to digitally augment the classic study group used by final-year residents studying for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada examination. This material was developed by residents and improved over the course of 18 months. This is an innovation report about a process for enhanced communication and collaboration as there has been little research to date regarding the augmentation of learner-driven initiatives with virtual resources. PMID:25927263

  12. The 9/11 attacks inside and outside the US: testing four models of flashbulb memory formation across groups and the specific effects of social identity.

    PubMed

    Luminet, Olivier; Curci, Antonietta

    2009-10-01

    Flashbulb memories (FBMs) are consistent recollections of specific details of the reception context of events. Four theoretical models accounting for FBM formation (Brown & Kulik, 1977; Conway et al., 1994; Er, 2003; Finkenauer et al., 1998) were tested on average 21 and 524 days after the 9/11 attacks in the US in 2001 in two groups of participants (US, N=112; non-US, N=727). Structural equation modelling revealed that (1) a revision of Finkenauer et al.'s (1998) model provided the best fit indices in both the US and non-US groups, (2) several relations among latent variables that were predicted by the three other models (Brown & Kulik, 1977; Conway et al., 1994; Er, 2003) were not significant, (3) with respect to Finkenauer et al's model, the "direct path" (from novelty/surprise to FBMs) was found to be significant only for the US group, while the "indirect path" (from emotional states, rehearsal and event-memory to FBMs) was only significant for the non-US group. It is suggested that the specific activation of social identity in the US group can explain these differences. PMID:19711222

  13. First-principles electronic structure and formation energies of group V and VII impurities in the α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Congxin; Jia, Yu; Zhang, Qiming

    2014-09-21

    Based on density functional theory, the electronic structures, formation energy, and transition level of the selected group V and VII impurities in α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} are investigated by means of first-principles methods. Numerical results show that the group V and VII atoms-doped α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be energetically favorable under the Fe-rich condition. Group V atom substituting O atom can induce the acceptor impurity level, while the deep donor impurity states are formed inside the band gap when group VII atom substitute O atom in the α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Moreover, our results show that halogen atom F substituting O atom should be very easy in the α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, our results also show that for both group V and VII atom-doped α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the upper sides of valence band are modified obviously, while the conduction band edge does not change.

  14. Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

    1994-08-01

    The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

  15. Comparative palynology of clastics and lignites from the Manning Formation, Jackson Group, Upper Eocene, Grimes County, TX

    SciTech Connect

    Gennett, J.A.

    1996-09-01

    The 3500 lignite seam at the Gibbons Creek Mine in Grimes County, TX was sampled for pollen and spores at 10 cm intervals. The majority of samples are dominated (to 60%) by Momipites from the Juglandaceae (walnut family), as is typical of Jackson Group sediments. Other palynomorph taxa vary systematically, with a peak of pollen of the freshwater tree Nyssa (blackgum) and associated Rboipites angustus (to 17%) occurring at the base. Higher in the seam, increase (to 55%) of Cupuliferoipollenites (a chestnut-like grain) and Cyrillaceae-pollenites? ventosus (to 7%) percentages may indicate a higher salinity environment. A Chrysophyllum (satin leaf) peak (to 25%) near the top of the seam suggests relatively shallow fresh-water conditions. Core samples from an interval above the lignites represent a transgressive-regressive cycle in inner shelf clastics. These samples were taken at 40 cm or greater intervals and reveal the regional pollen flora. Although minor changes occur, palynomorph spectra are for the most part homogenous. The dominant grain is again Momipites coryloides, but in general percentages are lower (to 35%). Cupuliferoipollenites (to 17%), Chrysophyllum (to 5%), and Rhoipites angustus (to 3%) are not less important, but do not peak as they do in the lignite spectra. Palm leaf megafossils; in one sample suggest a clastic wetland; in this sample palm pollen (mostly Arecipites, representing the modern saw palmetto) reaches 73%. Another sample contains high (26%) percentages of the fern spore Lygodiumsporites adriennis. High percentages of these two taxa do not occur in the lignite samples.

  16. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed formation of hydrogels from chitosan and poly(vinyl alcohol) derivatives both possessing phenolic hydroxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Khanmohammadi, Mehdi; Khoshfetrat, Ali Baradar; Taya, Masahito

    2014-10-13

    Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed cross-linking was applied to prepare hydrogels from aqueous solutions containing chitosan and poly(vinyl alcohol) derivatives both possessing phenolic hydroxyl groups (denoted as Ph-chitosan and Ph-PVA, respectively). Comparing the hydrogels prepared from the solution of 1.0% (w/v) Ph-chitosan and 3.0% (w/v) Ph-PVA and that of 3.0% (w/v) Ph-chitosan and 1.0% (w/v) Ph-PVA, the gelation time of the former hydrogel was 47 s, while was 10s longer than that of the latter one. The breaking point for the former hydrogel under stretching (114% strain) was approximately twice larger than that for the latter one. The swelling ratio of the former hydrogel in saline was about half of the latter one. Fibroblastic cells did not adhere on the former hydrogel but adhered and spread on the latter one. The growth of Escherichia coli cells was fully suppressed on the latter hydrogel during 48 h cultivation. PMID:25037368

  17. RESOLVING THE GALAXIES WITHIN A GIANT Ly{alpha} NEBULA: WITNESSING THE FORMATION OF A GALAXY GROUP?

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Brodwin, Mark; Chaffee, Frederic H.; Desai, Vandana; Soifer, B. T.; Eisenhardt, Peter; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2012-06-20

    Detailed analysis of the substructure of Ly{alpha} nebulae can put important constraints on the physical mechanisms at work and the properties of galaxies forming within them. Using high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of a Ly{alpha} nebula at z Almost-Equal-To 2.656, we have taken a census of the compact galaxies in the vicinity, used optical/near-infrared colors to select system members, and put constraints on the morphology of the spatially extended emission. The system is characterized by (1) a population of compact, low-luminosity ({approx}0.1 L*) sources-17 primarily young, small (R{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 1-2 kpc), disky galaxies including an obscured active galactic nucleus-that are all substantially offset ({approx}>20 kpc) from the line-emitting nebula; (2) the lack of a central galaxy at or near the peak of the Ly{alpha} emission; and (3) several nearly coincident, spatially extended emission components-Ly{alpha}, He II, and UV continuum-that are extremely smooth. These morphological findings are difficult to reconcile with theoretical models that invoke outflows, cold flows, or resonant scattering, suggesting that while all of these physical phenomena may be occurring, they are not sufficient to explain the powering and large extent of Ly{alpha} nebulae. In addition, although the compact galaxies within the system are irrelevant as power sources, the region is significantly overdense relative to the field galaxy population (by at least a factor of four). These observations provide the first estimate of the luminosity function of galaxies within an individual Ly{alpha} nebula system and suggest that large Ly{alpha} nebulae may be the seeds of galaxy groups or low-mass clusters.

  18. Formation of the Treysa quintet and the main-group pallasites by impact-generated processes in the IIIAB asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.

    2016-04-01

    Treysa and Delegate have compositions closely similar to those of IIIAB irons but plot above the IIIAB field on Ir-Au diagrams; for this reason they are designated anomalous members of IIIAB. All refractory siderophiles share this anomaly. Wasson () interpreted the large spread on IIIAB Ir-Au diagrams to result from melt-trapping and generated solid and liquid fractional crystallization tracks; almost all IIIAB irons fall between the tracks. In contrast, Treysa, Delegate, and three other irons (the Treysa quintet) plot beyond the liquid track. Ideal fractional crystallization cannot account for compositions that plot outside the region between the tracks. Possible explanations for the anomalous compositions of the Treysa quintet are that (1) these meteorites did not form in the IIIAB magma or (2) they formed by the mixing of early crystallized solids with a late liquid. The weight of the evidence including cosmic-ray ages favor the second explanation. Although this explanation can account for positions plotting above the liquid track, it requires special circumstances. The infalling blocks must be assimilated and the resulting melt must crystallize quickly into pockets small enough (<1 m) to allow igneous gradients to be leveled by subsequent diffusion. The Treysa quintet shares the region beyond the liquid track with most main-group pallasites (PMG), which may have also originated in the IIIAB body. It appears that Treysa, its relatives, and the PMG were formed in one or more impact events that mixed olivine and solid metal formed near the core-mantle boundary with nearby magma. It is then necessary to cool the melt rapidly; the best way to achieve rapid cooling is by heat exchange with cooler solids. That the Treysa quintet and the PMG can be explained by the same processes operating on late IIIAB magma supports the conclusion that PMG formed on the IIIAB parent asteroid.

  19. Fission track ages of detrital zircons from sandstones of the Umpqua Group and Tyee Formation, Oregon coast range

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, J.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Brandon, M.T. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    Detrital zircons from Paleogene sandstones of the Umpqua Group (UG) and the Tyee Fm (TF) yield contrasting FT age patterns which distinguish these two units and cast new light on their regional extent, correlation and provenance. In the Roseburg (Rg) area of the southern Oregon Coast Range, where most widely exposed, the UG consists of continental and marine clastic beds which overlie submarine lavas of the Coast Range Basalt. K-Ar And Ar-Ar dating of the basement basalts shows a younging trend from about 62 Ma at Rg at the south to 56 Ma at Siletz River and 53 Ma at Tillamook to the north. Detrital zircons from the Rg area are characterized by old FT ages. Of 192 grains dated, 90% are older than 90 Ma; the median age is 129 Ma. A diorite cobble from an UG conglomerate gave a zircon FT age of 105 Ma. These ages point to a source in the Jurassic plutons in the Klamath Mountains nearby to the south. The authors have determined FT cooling ages of 110 and 120 Ma for zircons from the Mt. Ashland and Grants Pass plutons. Continental and shallow marine clastic strata of the TF overly the UG beds west of Rg. The UG is not widely exposed north of Rg where it thins and pinches out above the Coast Range Basalt and is overlain by a northern turbidite facies of the TF. Three TF sandstones from the latitude of Rg and three others from west and south of Corvallis yielded distinctive and identical zircon FT age patterns characterized by young ages. Of 335 zircons dated, 80% are younger than 90 Ma; the median age is 61 Ma. This maximum age is very close to that of the overlying Tillamook and Fisher Fms. The flood of detrital zircons with young FT ages in the TF marks the abrupt change from a nearby Klamath source for the UG beds to a distant, easterly TF source in a recently uplifted plutonic-metamorphic terrane.

  20. A new turtle from the Upper Cretaceous Bauru Group of Brazil, updated phylogeny and implications for age of the Santo Anastácio Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegazzo, Mirian Costa; Bertini, Reinaldo José; Manzini, Flávio Fernando

    2015-03-01

    A new Podocnemidinura specimen from the Upper Cretaceous Bauru Group (Paraná Basin) of southeastern Brazil was described. The Bauru Group provided an important portrait of the Brazilian Mesozoic terrestrial biota, which boasts a vertebrate fauna formed from fishes, frogs, lacertilians, crocodyliforms, dinosaurs and mammals; records of palynomorphs; and invertebrate fauna consisted of gastropods, bivalves, ostracods and conchostracans. Nevertheless, the age of these continental deposits is not precisely estimated, which prevents global correlations, and its fauna is argued to be endemic. The new specimen described is the first turtle from the Santo Anastácio Formation, and its morphological comparison with other South American forms provided a significant advancement in the understanding of the age of this unit (Late Cretaceous). This study permitted a revision of the turtle taxa of the Bauru Group. As a result, some taxa were considered synonym, including the new Santo Anastácio form. The specimen is still unnamed due to the absence of skull characters that preclude its accurate positioning within the Bauru Group skull-based taxa. In addition, the phylogenetic affinities of this taxon were analyzed into Podocnemidinura clade.

  1. Subsurface study of Lower Ordovician Prairie du Chien group and underlying Cambrian formations and their relation to pre-Glenwood unconformity in southern peninsula of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, C.T. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    Prior to discovery of commercial gas in Lower Ordovician Prairie du Chien sandstones at Falmouth field, Missaukee County, in April 1981, only 119 wells had reached underlying Cambrian rocks in Michigan's Southern Peninsula. The resulting deep basin drilling activity to January 1, 1987, has resulted in 17 Prairie du Chien gas discoveries in the north-central part of the Michigan basin and an additional 46 Cambrian penetrations. This study also utilized 235 Prairie du Chien partial penetrations. It is now possible to correlate with relative certainty the standard Cambrian formations of the subsurface of southern Michigan to wells within and on the other margins of the basin. These, in ascending order, are Mount Simon, Eau Claire, Dresbach, Franconia, and Trempealeau. Because of the previous lack of control, these units were commonly misidentified in northern wells in previous studies. The present study largely corroborates previous recent work. Four ascending formations of the Prairie du Chien Group were also correlated throughout the basin: Umlor, Foster, Bruggers, and Goodwell (newly proposed). Two type wells demonstrate the character of the Goodwell Formation. The Bruggers Sandstones has been further divided into four informal zones, based on extending correlations of thin, silty dolomite marker beds on gamma-ray logs from the Goodwell and Woodville fields area, Newaygo County. Gas is produced from these Brugger zones. Twelve detailed stratigraphic cross sections (using 183 wells) and a pre-Glenwood paleogeologic map demonstrate marked basin-wide pre-Middle Ordovician erosional truncation.

  2. The group A streptococcal collagen-like protein 1, Scl1, mediates biofilm formation by targeting the EDA-containing variant of cellular fibronectin expressed in wounded tissue

    PubMed Central

    Oliver-Kozup, Heaven; Martin, Karen H.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Green, Brett J.; Betts, Courtney; Shinde, Arti V.; Van De Water, Livingston; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2012-01-01

    Summary Wounds are known to serve as portals of entry for group A Streptococcus (GAS). Subsequent tissue colonization is mediated by interactions between GAS surface proteins and host extracellular matrix components. We recently reported that the streptococcal collagen-like protein-1, Scl1, selectively binds the cellular form of fibronectin (cFn) and also contributes to GAS biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. One structural feature of cFn, which is predominantly expressed in response to tissue injury, is the presence of a spliced variant containing extra domain A (EDA/EIIIA). We now report that GAS biofilm formation is mediated by the Scl1 interaction with EDA-containing cFn. Recombinant Scl1 proteins that bound cFn also bound recombinant EDA within the C-C′ loop region recognized by the α9β1 integrin. The extracellular 2-D matrix derived from human dermal fibroblasts supports GAS adherence and biofilm formation. Altogether, this work identifies and characterizes a novel molecular mechanism by which GAS utilizes Scl1 to specifically target an extracellular matrix component that is predominantly expressed at the site of injury in order to secure host tissue colonization. PMID:23217101

  3. Unique Footprint in the scl1.3 Locus Affects Adhesion and Biofilm Formation of the Invasive M3-Type Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Bachert, Beth A.; Choi, Soo J.; LaSala, Paul R.; Harper, Tiffany I.; McNitt, Dudley H.; Boehm, Dylan T.; Caswell, Clayton C.; Ciborowski, Pawel; Keene, Douglas R.; Flores, Anthony R.; Musser, James M.; Squeglia, Flavia; Marasco, Daniela; Berisio, Rita; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    The streptococcal collagen-like proteins 1 and 2 (Scl1 and Scl2) are major surface adhesins that are ubiquitous among group A Streptococcus (GAS). Invasive M3-type strains, however, have evolved two unique conserved features in the scl1 locus: (i) an IS1548 element insertion in the scl1 promoter region and (ii) a nonsense mutation within the scl1 coding sequence. The scl1 transcript is drastically reduced in M3-type GAS, contrasting with a high transcription level of scl1 allele in invasive M1-type GAS. This leads to a lack of Scl1 expression in M3 strains. In contrast, while scl2 transcription and Scl2 production are elevated in M3 strains, M1 GAS lack Scl2 surface expression. M3-type strains were shown to have reduced biofilm formation on inanimate surfaces coated with cellular fibronectin and laminin, and in human skin equivalents. Repair of the nonsense mutation and restoration of Scl1 expression on M3-GAS cells, restores biofilm formation on cellular fibronectin and laminin coatings. Inactivation of scl1 in biofilm-capable M28 and M41 strains results in larger skin lesions in a mouse model, indicating that lack of Scl1 adhesin promotes bacterial spread over localized infection. These studies suggest the uniquely evolved scl1 locus in the M3-type strains, which prevents surface expression of the major Scl1 adhesin, contributed to the emergence of the invasive M3-type strains. Furthermore these studies provide insight into the molecular mechanisms mediating colonization, biofilm formation, and pathogenesis of group A streptococci.

  4. Synthesis of an Open-Cage Structure POSS Containing Various Functional Groups and Their Effect on the Formation and Properties of Langmuir Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał; Karasiewicz, Joanna; Rojewska, Monika; Skrzypiec, Marta; Dopierała, Katarzyna; Prochaska, Krystyna; Maciejewski, Hieronim

    2016-09-01

    Recently, silsesquioxanes have been recognized as a new group of film-forming materials. This study has been aimed at determining the effect of the kind of functional groups present in two different open-cage structure POSS molecules on the possibility of the formation of Langmuir monolayers and their properties. To achieve this goal, two new POSS derivatives (of open-cage structures) containing polyether and fluoroalkyl functional groups have been synthesized on the basis of a hydrosilylation process. An optimization of the process was performed, which makes it possible to obtain the above-mentioned derivatives with high yields. In the next step, the Langmuir technique was applied to measurements of the surface pressure (π) - the mean molecular area (A) isotherms during the compression of monolayers formed by molecules of the two POSS derivatives considered. Subsequently, the monolayers were transferred onto quartz plates according to the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Both derivatives are able to form insoluble Langmuir films at the air-water interface, which can be transferred onto a solid substrate and effectively change its wetting properties. PMID:27483454

  5. An unusual Middle Permian flora from the Blaine Formation (Pease River Group: Leonardian-Guadalupian Series) of King County, West Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiMichele, W.A.; Hook, R.W.; Nelson, W.J.; Chaney, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    A new Middle Permian plant assemblage from South Ash Pasture in King County, Texas, may be the youngest and is certainly the most unusual flora known from the Permian of either West Texas or adjoining north-central Texas. Found serendipitously in the evaporite-rich upper Blaine Formation (Pease River Group, Guadalupian Series), the flora is of very low diversity despite intensive collecting efforts, and the affinities of nearly all taxa are enigmatic. The most common elements are parallel-veined leaves that resemble cordaites but that could be isolated pinnules of a pinnate leaf. Gigantopterid foliage is present but not assignable to any known taxon. A single foliar conifer specimen is too incomplete for assignment. Numerous reproductive organs, however, and an abundance of axes may represent conifers. Conchostracans, palaeoniscoid fish scales, and small heteropolar coprolites also occur in the deposit, which originated as a small, claystone-dominated channel fill in a coastal plain setting.

  6. Formative evaluation of a participatory women's group intervention to improve reproductive and women's health outcomes in rural Bangladesh: a controlled before and after study

    PubMed Central

    Harris-Fry, Helen A; Azad, Kishwar; Younes, Leila; Kuddus, Abdul; Shaha, Sanjit; Nahar, Tasmin; Hossen, Munir; Costello, Anthony; Fottrell, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background Women's groups using participatory methods reduced newborn mortality in rural areas of low income countries. Our study assessed a participatory women's group intervention that focused on women's health, nutrition and family planning. Methods The study was conducted in three districts in Bangladesh between October 2011 and March 2013, covering a population of around 230 000. On the basis of allocation for the preceding cluster randomised trials, three unions per district were randomly allocated to receive a women's group intervention and three per district were control clusters. Outcomes included unmet need for family planning, morbidity, dietary diversity, night blindness, healthcare decision-making and knowledge of sexual and reproductive health, nutrition and anaemia. A difference-in-difference analysis was used to adjust for secular trends and baseline differences between women taking part in the intervention and a random sample from control clusters. Results We interviewed 5355 (91% response rate) women before the intervention and 5128 after (96% response rate). There were significant improvements in women's dietary diversity score (increase of 0.2 (95% CI 0.1 to 0.3)) and participation in healthcare decision-making (proportion increase (95% CI) 14.0% (10.6% to 17.4%)). There were also increases in knowledge about: contraception (4.2% (2.0% to 6.3%)), ways to treat (55.4% (52.2% to 58.5%)) and prevent (71.0% (68.0% to 74.1%)) sexually transmitted infections, nutrition (46.6% (43.6% to 49.6%)) and anaemia prevention (62.8% (60.9% to 64.6%)). There were no significant differences in unmet need for family planning, morbidity or night blindness. Conclusions Participatory women's groups have considerable potential to improve women's health knowledge, but evidence of impact on certain outcomes is lacking. Further formative work and intervention development is needed to optimise the impact of this approach for women's health. PMID:26739272

  7. Conversion of membrane lipid acyl groups to triacylglycerol and formation of lipid bodies upon nitrogen starvation in biofuel green algae Chlorella UTEX29.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Elton C; Johnson, Jodie V; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2013-11-01

    Algal lipids are ideal biofuel sources. Our objective was to determine the contributors to triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation and lipid body formation in Chlorella UTEX29 under nitrogen (N) deprivation. A fivefold increase in intracellular lipids following N starvation for 24 h confirmed the oleaginous characteristics of UTEX29. Ultrastructural studies revealed increased number of lipid bodies and decreased starch granules in N-starved cells compared to N-replete cells. Lipid bodies were observed as early as 3 h after N removal and plastids collapsed after 48 h of stress. Moreover, the identification of intracellular pyrenoids and differences in the expected nutritional requirements for Chlorella protothecoides (as UTEX29 is currently classified) led us to conduct a phylogenetic study using 18S and actin cDNA sequences. This indicated UTEX29 to be more phylogenetically related to Chlorella vulgaris. To investigate the fate of different lipids after N starvation, radiolabeling using ¹⁴C-acetate was used. A significant decrease in ¹⁴C-galactolipids and phospholipids matched the increase in ¹⁴C-TAG starting at 3 h of N starvation, consistent with acyl groups from structural lipids as sources for TAG under N starvation. These results have important implications for the identification of key steps controlling oil accumulation in N-starved biofuel algae and demonstrate membrane recycling during lipid body formation. PMID:23928654

  8. Composition, diagenesis, and morphology of chlorite and illite/smectite mixed-layer clays in the Cherry Canyon Formation, Delaware Mountain Group, Screwbean field, Reeves County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Thomerson, M.D.; Henderson, S.K. )

    1993-09-01

    Oil and gas production in the Screwbean field of Reeves County, Texas, is predominantly from the subarkosic Bell Canyon (Ramsey sand member) and upper Cherry Canyon sandstones of the Permian (Guadalupian) Delaware Mountain Group. Authigenic clays compromise up to 10% of the bulk rock and can seriously degrade the production potential and performance of reservoir rock. The chlorite and illite/smectite mixed-layer clays can have several effects on the reservoir: loss of permeability as a result of swelling, formation damage because of acid sensitivity, and high irreducible water saturations (bound water) caused by microporosity. Twenty-five powdered samples from whole core taken in the Cherry Canyon Formation from a well in Reeves County were analyzed by x-ray diffraction. The actual x-ray diffraction patterns from the powdered samples were compared to simulated x-ray diffraction patterns generated by a microcomputer. Once matched, the computer models give the fractional clay composition of that particular sample. The prominent morphology of the authigenic clays is also very important. Photomicrographs taken with a scanning electron microscope were employed to delineate the clay morphologies and illustrate the intergranular habits of these clay minerals. The failure to recognize the aforementioned problems can lead to prematurely abandoning and bypassing possible productive zones. The data generated by this study will allow us to better use these reservoirs and more effectively explore future zones.

  9. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  10. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.