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Sample records for formation sacroc unit

  1. Demonstration of a Novel, Integrated, Multi-Scale Procedure for High-Resolution 3D Reservoir Characterization and Improved CO2-EOR/Sequestration Management, SACROC Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Scott R. Reeves

    2007-09-30

    The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate a new and novel approach for high resolution, 3D reservoir characterization that can enable better management of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects and, looking to the future, carbon sequestration projects. The approach adopted has been the subject of previous research by the DOE and others, and relies primarily upon data-mining and advanced pattern recognition approaches. This approach honors all reservoir characterization data collected, but accepts that our understanding of how these measurements relate to the information of most interest, such as how porosity and permeability vary over a reservoir volume, is imperfect. Ideally the data needed for such an approach includes surface seismic to provide the greatest amount of data over the entire reservoir volume of interest, crosswell seismic to fill the resolution gap between surface seismic and wellbore-scale measurements, geophysical well logs to provide the vertical resolution sought, and core data to provide the tie to the information of most interest. These data are combined via a series of one or more relational models to enable, in its most successful application, the prediction of porosity and permeability on a vertical resolution similar to logs at each surface seismic trace location. In this project, the procedure was applied to the giant (and highly complex) SACROC unit of the Permian basin in West Texas, one of the world's largest CO{sub 2}-EOR projects and a potentially world-class geologic sequestration site. Due to operational scheduling considerations on the part of the operator of the field, the crosswell data was not obtained during the period of project performance (it is currently being collected however as part of another DOE project). This compromised the utility of the surface seismic data for the project due to the resolution gap between it and the geophysical well logs. An alternative approach was adopted that utilized a

  2. Shallow groundwater monitoring at the SACROC oilfield, Scurry County, TX: good news for geologic storage of CO2 despite a complex hydrogeologic and geochemical setting (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, R. C.; Romanak, K.; Yang, C.; Hovorka, S.

    2009-12-01

    of carbonate minerals (2% dolomite) in the clastic Dockum aquifer. Concentrations of most analytes in the Dockum aquifer overlying SACROC are not statistically different from regional water quality. Concentrations of chloride and bromide indicate impacts to Dockum aquifer water quality in areas of SACROC. This is probably a result of outdated (pre-1970’s and therefore pre-CO2 injection) oilfield practices, and accidental release of co-produced brine. Complexity of the hydrogeology, aqueous geochemistry, and even the monitoring approach taken at SACROC has prompted numerous additional questions. However, the overall conclusion remains: There are no systematic impacts to shallow freshwater resources overlying, or in the vicinity of SACROC oilfield, resulting from CO2 injection. So for SACROC, we have answered objective (2) above, but are still working on (1). Data interpretation and modeling to aid design of effective monitoring of future CO2 GS sites using the vast amount of data from SACROC continues. This work has been supported by the United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership and Kinder Morgan.

  3. Furthering Chemical and Geophysical Computations: Analysis of SACROC SEM and CT images to obtain pore percentage, size, and connectivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mur, A. J.; Purcell, C. C.; Harbert, W. P.; Soong, Y.; Kutchko, B. G.; Kennedy, S.; McIntryre, D.

    2009-12-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory of the United States Department of Energy, in collaboration with the Bureau of Economic Geology in Austin, Texas has been involved in an extensive study of the many aspects involved in the injection of CO2 into the 2042 meter deep Permian reef structure at the SACROC field. Subsamples of reef limestone cores used for seismic velocity measurements were obtained. XRD determined the sample to be ~99% Calcite and ~1% Dolomite with a small amount of impurities. Preliminary petrographic slides revealed a vuggy porosity. We acquired CT scans of a SACROC limestone core at the Morgantown NETL site. We also acquired a high pixel resolution (112 MB) SEM secondary electron image of the reef limestone at RJ Lee Group. By using ArcMap , we created a tool that groups grayscale ranges into three categories, cleans boundaries between groups, and produces a polygon map of the macropores, micropores, and matrix. The darkest areas in the SEM image were cavern-like pores and were thus called macropores. Micropores, the brightest regions, are textured micrite faces that create many, small pore spaces. Using ImageJ, the CT and Arc pore maps were analyzed to reveal pore shape statistics. Average pore perimeter, average pore area, and pore connectivity is essential for chemistry experiments that will emulate time exposure of CO2 to limestone. Further, ImageJ allows us to obtain pore orientation information. This is important in understanding the anisotropic conditions that may or may not affect seismic data. The image is 10240x11264 pixels which correspond to ~ 8890.00x9780.00 micrometers. Micro- and macropores combined, there were 613744 pores mapped. Differing statistical methods revealed differing results. For example, the average pore perimeter was ~28 microns while the average pore area was <1 square micron. This inconsistency is due to pores sharing boundaries, being contained by one another, or being lighter colored crystals. We used two

  4. Assessing the Leakage Potential of CO2 into Ground Water Resources at SACROC, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, P. H.; Pawar, R. J.; Han, W. S.; McPherson, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we apply CO2-PENS to characterize the long-term CO2 storage performance at SACROC, specifically with respect to potential impacts on ground water resources located above the CO2 injection depth. CO2-PENS is a hybrid process/system model composed of a library of process level modules linked together to allow simulations to span a range of spatial and temporal scales. SACROC is the oldest CO2-EOR operation in the Permian Basin and has been operational for over 35 years. We describe how CO2-PENS is used to couple CO2 migration at three different scales; from a reservoir module, through a borehole leakage module, and into an aquifer impact module. Both the reservoir module and wellbore leakage module are based on abstractions of the underlying physics of multiphase fluid flow, using reductions in complexity to allow fast Monte-Carlo simulation while capturing the behavior of these processes. Finally, we show how results from CO2-PENS can be used to delineate areas that are susceptible to ground water impacts from CO2 leakage and discuss how this information can be used in risk analysis.

  5. Unit Monitors Manchester-Format Data Buses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amador, Jose J.

    1994-01-01

    Circuit card converts data signals into convenient hexadecimal form for troubleshooting. Bus-monitoring unit converts data signals from Manchester II format used on data bus into hexadecimal format. Monitoring circuit causes hexadecimal words to display on video terminal, where test engineer compares them with hexadecimal records for troubleshooting. Circuit monitors one bus or two buses simultaneously.

  6. Analysis of the Wellbore Seal at Well 49-6 in the SACROC CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Field, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. W.; Wigand, M.; Chipera, S.; Woldegabriel, G.; Pawar, R.; Lichtner, P. C.; Wehner, S.; Raines, M.; Guthrie, G. D.

    2005-12-01

    Long-term integrity of wellbore cements is one of the major concerns for geologic sequestration of CO2. This paper presents analyses of cement core recovered from a well used in a long-term CO2 enhanced oil recovery operation. A sidetrack system was used to obtain core from a 55 year-old well with 30 years of CO2 exposure as both an injector and a producer at the SACROC unit (Permian Basin, Texas). The mineralogy, chemistry, and hydrologic properties were evaluated for evidence of degradation by CO2. The recovered samples were located ~ 3 m above the contact with the reservoir. The recovered cement had permeabilities in the milliDarcy range and thus retained its capacity to prevent significant flow of CO2. There was evidence for CO2 migration along the casing-cement and cement-shale interfaces. The casing interface had a 1-2 mm thick rind of calcite-aragonite-halite. The CO2 producing this rind may have traveled up the casing wall or may have infiltrated through the casing threads. The cement in contact with the shale (within 1 cm) was heavily carbonated to an assemblage of calcite, aragonite, vaterite and amorphous alumino-silica residue and was transformed to a distinctive orange color. The heavily carbonated region is separated from less altered cement by a narrow, dense zone of silica and carbonate deposition. The CO2 for this carbonation process migrated from the cement-shale interface where the presence of shale fragments (wall cake) may have provided a fluid pathway. The carbonation reaction was associated with only small changes in the original cement chemistry including an increase in Na2O and decrease in CaO and MgO with a slight enrichment in SiO2. The carbonated zone also has a distinct carbon and oxygen stable isotope signature. Although the observed carbonation was intense, the measured hydrologic properties of the carbonated zone were not significantly different from those of relatively unaltered cement in adjacent parts of the core. Textural

  7. Time-lapse walkaway VSP imaging using reverse-time migration in the angle domain for monitoring CO2 injection at the SACROC EOR field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Huang, H.

    2012-12-01

    Time-lapse walkaway vertical seismic profiling (VSP) surveys can reveal important reservoir changes caused by CO2 injection. We study the capability of time-lapse walkaway VSP imaging using reverse-time migration in the angle-domain for monitoring CO2 injection. During the Phase II project of the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration, one baseline and one repeat walkaway VSP surveys were conducted in 2008 and 2009, respectively, at the SACROC enhanced oil recovery (EOR) field for monitoring CO2 injection. The datasets were acquired by Baker Atlas in collaboration with Kinder Morgan. In this study, we apply reverse-time migration in the angle domain to the time-lapse walkaway VSP datasets from the SACROC EOR field, and conduct detailed analyses of common-image gathers. Our migration results demonstrate that reverse-time migration in the angle domain produces images of time-lapse walkaway VSP data with a better image quality compared to those obtained using conventional reverse-time migration. The time-lapse image difference along the bottom of the reservoir where CO2 is injected is much more significant than that along the top of the reservoir. This is partially because we use the same baseline velocity model for migrations of both datasets. The reservoir velocity decreases during CO2 injection, leading to slightly change in the migration image location along the bottom of the reservoir for the repeat VSP data.

  8. Stratigraphic correlation of the Late Cretaceous Simsima Formation United Arab Emirates and Akveren Formation, northwest Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelghany, O.; Abu Saima, M.; Ramazanoglu, S.; Arman, H.

    2015-11-01

    Latest Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) microfossils are used to correlate the carbonate rocks of the Simsima Formation in the northeastern part of the Arabian Peninsula (Northern Oman Mountains, United Arab Emirates and Oman) with the Akveren Formation in Kandira (northwest Turkey, near Black Sea region). Both formations have characteristically rich planktonic foraminiferal and calcareous nannofossil faunal assemblages that permit the recognition of the Globotruncanella havanensis Zone and Quadrum sissinghii Zone CC22. The palaeontological data is used to build an appropriate palaeoenvironmental model for the latest Cretaceous Aruma Group in the Oman Mountains foreland basin. The study reveals that the Late Cretaceous formations of UAE and Turkey can be divided into an open marine carbonate shelf facies (planktonic foraminifera/calcareous nannofossil biomicrite) and a shallow-marine carbonate facies (rudistids, coralline algal foraminiferal biomicrite).

  9. Soil Formation and Distribution in Missouri. Instructional Unit. Conservation Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillon, David A.

    This unit is designed to help vocational agriculture teachers incorporate information on soil formation and the soils geography of Missouri into their curriculum. The unit consists of: (1) a topic outline; (2) general unit objectives; (3) discussions of processes and factors of soil formation, the soils geography of Missouri, and some soil…

  10. Standard formatted data units-control authority procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to establish a set of minimum and optional requirements for the implementation of Control Authority (CA) organizations within and among the Agencies participating in the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS). By satisfying these requirements, the resultant cooperating set of CA organizations will produce a global CA service supporting information transfer with digital data under the Standard Formatted Data Unit (SFDU) concept. This service is primarily accomplished through the registration, permanent archiving, and dissemination of metadata in the form of Metadata Objects (MDO) that assist in the interpretation of data objects received in SFDU form. This Recommendation addresses the responsibilities, services, and interface protocols for a hierarchy of CA organizations. The top level, consisting of the CCSDS Secretariat and its operational agent, is unique and primarily provides a global coordination function. The lower levels are Agency CA organizations that have primary responsibility for the registration, archiving, and dissemination of MDOs. As experience is gained and technology evolves, the CA Procedures will be extended to include enhanced services and their supporting protocols. In particular, it is anticipated that eventually CA organizations will be linked via networks on a global basis, and will provide requestors with online automated access to CA services. While this Recommendation does not preclude such operations, it also does not recommend the specific protocols to be used to ensure global compatibility of these services. These recommendations will be generated as experience is gained.

  11. Class Formation, Politics, and Institutions: Schooling in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinson, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Analyzes extent to which Marxist theories of social class influence can explain structure of schooling in the United States. Argues that theoretical and empirical flaws exist in Marxist studies and concludes that effects of class processes have been minimal compared to Europe because of a political system that has limited social class influences…

  12. The Role of Cohabitation in Family Formation: The United States in Comparative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heuveline, Patrick; Timberlake, Jeffrey M.

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of non-marital cohabitation is steadily increasing in the United States. In evaluating the contribution of this new living arrangement to family formation, analysts have relied primarily on comparisons between individuals who cohabit and those who do not. We complement this line of inquiry by comparing the United States and 16…

  13. Weekend Formats in Counsellor Education: A Case Example in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, John; Silliker, S. Alan

    2006-01-01

    Various course and program formats have been developed to better meet the needs of graduate students. One of them is the development of weekend-only courses and programs. This article examines one weekend counsellor education format in the United States, the St. Bonaventure University program offered in the Buffalo (New York) area, in detail. This…

  14. Moving and union formation in the transition to adulthood in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Bohyun Joy; Snyder, Anastasia R.

    2014-01-01

    Although previous research has paid attention to profound changes in union formation among young adults, few studies have incorporated moving events in the estimation of union formation. Moreover, less attention has been given to detailed moving experiences in young adults’ life course. Using panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, we examine the relationship between moving and first union formation of young adults in the United States. Moving events are aggregated by distance moved, economic conditions in origin and destination places (i.e. moving within the same county, moving to new counties with better or the same economic conditions, and moving to new counties with worse economic conditions) and the time since a move. Our findings suggest that moving events, regardless of type, are significantly related to first union formation for females while the time since a move is important to union formation of males. PMID:26047840

  15. Precepts and Practices: Researching Identity Formation among Indian Hindu Adolescents in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Barbara D.

    1995-01-01

    Presents general comments on economic, political and demographic features of Indian Hindu community in the United States. Describes preliminary findings on precepts and practices related to identity formation among Indian Hindu youth. Highlights practices related to dress and hair behaviors and gender differences. Presents questions for further…

  16. Test Format and the Variation of Gender Achievement Gaps within the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean; Fahle, Erin; Kalogrides, Demetra; Podolsky, Anne; Zarate, Rosalia

    2016-01-01

    Prior research demonstrates the existence of gender achievement gaps and the variation in the magnitude of these gaps across states. This paper characterizes the extent to which the variation of gender achievement gaps on standardized tests across the United States can be explained by differing state accountability test formats. A comprehensive…

  17. Unayzah Formation: a new Permian-Carboniferous unit in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Laboun, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The sandstones, shales, and thin beds of argillaceous limestone previously included as the basal part of the Permian Khuff Formation were described as the Unayzah Formation by al-Laboun in 1982 and 1986. The type locality (stratotype.) of this formation is in the town of Unayzah, and a reference section was established in the Qusayba area, al-Qasim district, Saudi Arabia. Fossil flora collected from outcrops and palynomorphs obtained from boreholes support a Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age for these strata. The Unayzah Formation is conformably overlain by the massive carbonates of the Khuff Formation, whereas its basal contact is marked by a regional angular unconformity with various older units. The Unayzah Formation is widespread in the Greater Arabian basin. The formation represents cyclic transgressive and regressive deposits preceding the Permian regional marine transgression, during which the massive carbonates of the Khuff Formation were deposited. This Permian transgression marked a major change in the Sedimentation and evolution of the Greater Arabian basin. The porous sandstones of the Unayzah Formation are important exploration targets because several fields in the eastern and southeastern parts of the Greater Arabian basin produce hydrocarbons from the Unayzah. 11 figures, 1 table.

  18. Geology and hydrocarbon potential of Dawson Bay Formation carbonate unit (Middle Devonian), Williston basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, W.

    1988-07-01

    The Middle Devonian Dawson Bay Formation carbonate unit is present in the subsurface of North Dakota except where truncated by postdepositional erosion. The carbonate unit thickens from the erosional limit to a maximum thickness of 47.5 m (156 ft) in Renville County and reaches a maximum depth of 3798 m (12,460 ft) below the surface in McKenzie County. In North Dakota, a submarine hardground separates the carbonate unit from the underlying second red bed member of the Dawson Bay Formation. The upper contact with the Souris River Formation is conformable except in those areas where the Dawson Bay Formation was exposed to subaerial erosion prior to deposition of the Souris River sediments. The Dawson Bay carbonate unit is predominantly dolomitic and fossiliferous limestone or fossiliferous dolostone. The carbonate unit can be subdivided into five lithofacies on the basis of characteristic fossil fauna, flora, and other lithologic features. Lithofacies analysis of the Dawson Bay carbonates suggests a shallowing-upward succession of depositional environments and associated energy zones as follows: shallow epeiric sea (very low energy), stromatoporoid biostrome/bioherm (low energy), very shallow epeiric sea (very low energy), restricted shallow epeiric sea (extremely low energy), and shallow epeiric sea shoreline (variable energy). Eogenetic diagenesis includes color-mottling, dolomitization of micrite to microcrystalline dolomite with penecontemporaneous anhydrite replacement of cryptalgal mudstones and boundstones, cementation by sparry calcite, and vuggy porosity development. Mesogenetic diagenesis includes formation of mosaic dolomites, cementation by blocky equant calcite, neomorphism, pressure-solution, fracturing, halite cementation, and hydrocarbon emplacement.

  19. Timing of union formation and partner choice in immigrant societies: The United States and Germany

    PubMed Central

    Soehl, Thomas; Yahirun, Jenjira

    2015-01-01

    As Gordon noted in his 1964 treatise on assimilation, marriage across ethnic boundaries and in particular, marriage into the mainstream is a key indicator as well as a mechanism of immigrant assimilation. Since then research has investigated numerous micro- and macro level correlates of exogamy. In this paper we focus on a topic that has received less attention thus far – how the timing of marriage is associated with partner choice. We compare the United States and Germany as two countries with significant immigrant and second-generation populations but where mainstream patterns of union formation differ. In both contexts we show that unions that cross ethnic boundaries happen later in life than those that stay within. Comparing across countries we argue that in Germany differences in the timing of union formation between the second generation and the mainstream, may pose additional barriers to intermarriage that do not exist in the United States. PMID:26681932

  20. Depositional model for the San Andres Formation, Roberts unit, Wasson field, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ginger, E.P. )

    1992-04-01

    The Permian San Andres reservoir at Roberts unit produces from approximately 250 ft of anhydritic dolostones. The reservoir interval, which is more than 500 ft below the top of the San Andres Formation, consists of fossiliferous and pelletal/peloidal dolowackestones and dolopackstones. They were deposited in a shallow-marine environment with local shoaling conditions. Toward the top of the reservoir, intertidal and supratidal deposits interfinger with the subtidal units and form the lateral and overlying seals. A sponge-bryozoan bank lithofacies is recognized within the subtidal deposits at Roberts unit. The banks consist of dolomitized mud-rich boundstones dominated by bryozoans, sponges, and crinoids. Interbedded fossiliferous dolowackestones, dolopackstones, and dolograinstones are common. The restricted nature of the San Andres in the western part of Roberts unit (i.e., shoreward of the banks) indicates that the banks baffled wave energy and inhibited current circulation on the platform, resulting in a mud-dominated, restricted lagoonal facies with very low faunal diversity. The sponge-bryozoan banks occur within a narrow belt across the central part of Roberts unit and continue into the adjacent Willard unit. Their distribution has a distinct northeast-soutwest trend that parallels the subjacent Abo shelf margin reef trend, suggesting that the Abo reef trend influenced subsequent bank development.

  1. Formation mechanism of the secondary building unit in a chromium terephthalate metal-organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu Cantu, David; McGrail, B. Peter; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra

    2014-09-18

    Based on density functional theory calculations and simulation, a detailed mechanism is presented on the formation of the secondary building unit (SBU) of MIL-101, a chromium terephthalate metal-organic framework (MOF). SBU formation is key to MOF nucleation, the rate-limiting step in the formation process of many MOFs. A series of reactions that lead to the formation of the SBU of MIL-101 is proposed in this work. Initial rate-limiting reactions form the metal cluster with three chromium (III) atoms linked to a central bridging oxygen. Terephthalate linkers play a key role as chromium (III) atoms are joined to linker carboxylate groups prior to the placement of the central bridging oxygen. Multiple linker addition reactions, which follow in different paths due to structural isomers, are limited by the removal of water molecules in the first chromium coordination shell. The least energy path is identified were all linkers on one face of the metal center plane are added first. A simple kinetic model based on transition state theory shows the rate of secondary building unit formation similar to the rate metal-organic framework nucleation. The authors are thankful to Dr. R. Rousseau for a critical reading of the manuscript. This research would not have been possible without the support of the Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and the PNNL Institutional Computing (PIC) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  2. The role of diagenetic studies in flow-unit modeling: San Andres formation, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, S. )

    1994-03-01

    The Permian San Andres Formation represents one of the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing intervals of the Permian basin. Dolostone lithofacies intercalated with thin evaporites accommodate highly compartmentalized reservoirs resulting from complex depositional and diagenetic histories. This compartmentalization often facilitates the use of these reservoirs in flow-unit studies. Perhaps more important than the relationship of productive intervals to depositional facies is the degree to which diagenetic processes have influenced reservoir properties. Detailed petrographic evaluation of the reservoir in question, though often overlooked, should be an integral part of flow-unit studies. Once a diagenetic sequence is established, the information may be incorporated in to the facies model to better understand how to subdivide the reservoir. Such an investigation has been conducted on the San Andres Formation in Reeves field of southeastern Yoakum County, Texas. Here, multistage diagenetic overprints are superimposed on depositional facies that vary in degree of lateral extent, thereby complicating the geometries of individual productive zones within the reservoir. Analysis of the reservoir reveals that Reeves San Andres sediments were subjected to dominant diagenetic processes, including dolomitization and sulfate implacement, both of which are major factors in porosity preservation, and a variety of minor processes that have had little effect on reservoir quality. The recognition of diagenetic facies, and understanding of the processes that have created them, and identification of the implications of these processes on reservoir properties is a vital part of any flow-unit study.

  3. [Microflora formation in the newborn in maternity hospitals and neonatal abnormality units].

    PubMed

    Shilova, V P; Rozanova, S M; Kyrf, M V; Beĭkin, Ia B; Kuznetsova, L S; Turintseva, E G; Usova, O P; Chernykh, N G; Iagafarova, I S

    2007-10-01

    The basic sources of pyoseptic infection pathogens are infected and colonized neonatal infants in maternity hospitals. Microbiological monitoring revealed the specific features of biocenosis formation in the newborn in the "Mother and Baby" units, resuscitative departments (RD), intensive care units, and neonatal abnormality departments (NAD). Irrespective of the conditions of hospital stay, methicillin-resistant S. epidermis (MRSE) and Enterococcus faecium were prevalent in the neonatal microbial landscape. Colonization with the normal flora in the newborn actively treated with antibiotics is difficult in RD, at the same time there is a significant infection with the mycotic flora. Broad-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiela pneumonia strains have received wide acceptance in NAD. PMID:18154133

  4. Racial Formation in Theory and Practice: The Case of Mexicans in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms of social stratification require the categorical definition of an out-group to that can be excluded and exploited. Historically, in the United States, African Americans have been the subject of a systematic process of racial formation to define socially in this fashion. Beginning in the 1970s, however, and accelerating in the 1980s and 1990s, Mexicans were increasingly subject to processes of racialization that have rendered them more exploitable and excludable than ever before. Over the past decade, Mexican Americans moved steadily away from their middle position in the socioeconomic hierarchy and gravitated toward the bottom. This paper describes the basic mechanisms of stratification in the United States and how Mexicans have steadily been racialized to label them socially as a dehumanized and vulnerable out-group. PMID:20814590

  5. Effects of anthropogenic emissions on aerosol formation from isoprene and monoterpenes in the southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lu; Guo, Hongyu; Boyd, Christopher M.; Klein, Mitchel; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Cerully, Kate M.; Hite, James R.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Knote, Christoph; Olson, Kevin; Koss, Abigail; Goldstein, Allen H.; Hering, Susanne V.; de Gouw, Joost; Baumann, Karsten; Lee, Shan-Hu; Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney J.; Ng, Nga Lee

    2015-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) constitutes a substantial fraction of fine particulate matter and has important impacts on climate and human health. The extent to which human activities alter SOA formation from biogenic emissions in the atmosphere is largely undetermined. Here, we present direct observational evidence on the magnitude of anthropogenic influence on biogenic SOA formation based on comprehensive ambient measurements in the southeastern United States (US). Multiple high-time-resolution mass spectrometry organic aerosol measurements were made during different seasons at various locations, including urban and rural sites in the greater Atlanta area and Centreville in rural Alabama. Our results provide a quantitative understanding of the roles of anthropogenic SO2 and NOx in ambient SOA formation. We show that isoprene-derived SOA is directly mediated by the abundance of sulfate, instead of the particle water content and/or particle acidity as suggested by prior laboratory studies. Anthropogenic NOx is shown to enhance nighttime SOA formation via nitrate radical oxidation of monoterpenes, resulting in the formation of condensable organic nitrates. Together, anthropogenic sulfate and NOx can mediate 43–70% of total measured organic aerosol (29–49% of submicron particulate matter, PM1) in the southeastern US during summer. These measurements imply that future reduction in SO2 and NOx emissions can considerably reduce the SOA burden in the southeastern US. Updating current modeling frameworks with these observational constraints will also lead to more accurate treatment of aerosol formation for regions with substantial anthropogenic−biogenic interactions and consequently improve air quality and climate simulations. PMID:25535345

  6. Fuel Efficient Strategies for Reducing Contrail Formations in United States Air Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, Banavar; Chen, Neil Y.; Ng, Hok K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a class of strategies for reducing persistent contrail formation in the United States airspace. The primary objective is to minimize potential contrail formation regions by altering the aircraft's cruising altitude in a fuel-efficient way. The results show that the contrail formations can be reduced significantly without extra fuel consumption and without adversely affecting congestion in the airspace. The contrail formations can be further reduced by using extra fuel. For the day tested, the maximal reduction strategy has a 53% contrail reduction rate. The most fuel-efficient strategy has an 8% reduction rate with 2.86% less fuel-burnt compared to the maximal reduction strategy. Using a cost function which penalizes extra fuel consumed while maximizing the amount of contrail reduction provides a flexible way to trade off between contrail reduction and fuel consumption. It can achieve a 35% contrail reduction rate with only 0.23% extra fuel consumption. The proposed fuel-efficient contrail reduction strategy provides a solution to reduce aviation-induced environmental impact on a daily basis.

  7. Sandstone units of the Lee Formation and related strata in eastern Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Charles L.

    1984-01-01

    Most of the Cumberland Plateau region of southeastern Kentucky is underlain by thick sequences of quartzose sandstone which are assigned for the most part to the Lee Formation. Much new information has been gathered about the Lee and related strata as a result of the cooperative mapping program of the U. S. Geological Survey and the Kentucky Geological Survey between 1960 and 1978. This report summarizes the age, lithology, distribution, sedimentary structures, and stratigraphic relations of the sandstone units of the Lee within and between each of three major outcrop belts in Kentucky: Cumberland Mountain, Pine Mountain, and the Pottsville Escarpment area. The Lee Formation generally has been regarded as Early Pennsylvanian in age and separated from Mississippian strata in Kentucky by an unconformity. However, lithostratigraphic units included in the formation as presently defined are broadly time-transgressive and range in age from Late Mississippian in parts of the Cumberland Mountain outcrop belt to Middle Pennsylvanian in the Pottsville Escarpment area. Members of the Lee intertongue with and grade into the underlying Pennington Formation and overlying Breathitt Formation. Sandstone and conglomeratic sandstone members of the Lee of Mississippian age found only in parts of the Cumberland overthrust sheet are closely associated with marine rocks; Pennsylvanian members are mostly associated with continental coal-bearing strata. Sandstone members of the Lee are mostly quartz rich and range from more than 90 percent to more than 99 percent quartz. They are relatively coarse grained, commonly pebbly, and in places conglomeratic. The units are southwest-trending linear or broadly lobate bodies. The Lee Formation is as much as 1,500 ft thick in the type area in Cumberland Mountain where it has been divided into eight members. The Pinnacle Overlook, Chadwell, White Rocks Sandstone, Middlesboro, Bee Rock Sandstone, and Naese Sandstone Members are mostly quartzose

  8. Accountable Care Organizations in the United States: Market and Demographic Factors Associated with Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Valerie A; Colla, Carrie H; Carluzzo, Kathleen L; Kler, Sarah E; Fisher, Elliott S

    2013-01-01

    Background. The Accountable Care Organization (ACO) model is rapidly being implemented by Medicare, private payers, and states, but little is known about the scope of ACO implementation. Objective. To determine the number of accountable care organizations in the United States, where they are located, and characteristics associated with ACO formation. Study Design, Methods, and Data. Cross-sectional study of all ACOs in the United States as of August 2012. We identified ACOs from multiple sources; documented service locations (practices, clinics, hospitals); and linked service locations to local areas, defined as Dartmouth Atlas hospital service areas. We used multivariate analysis to assess what characteristics were associated with local ACO presence. We examined demographic characteristics (2010 American Community Survey) and health care system characteristics (2010 Medicare fee-for-service claims data). Principal Findings. We identified 227 ACOs located in 27 percent of local areas. Fifty-five percent of the US population resides in these areas. HSA-level characteristics associated with ACO presence include higher performance on quality, higher Medicare per capita spending, fewer primary care physician groups, greater managed care penetration, lower poverty rates, and urban location. Conclusions. Much of the US population resides in areas where ACOs have been established. ACO formation has taken place where it may be easier to meet quality and cost targets. Wider adoption of the ACO model may require tailoring to local context. PMID:24117222

  9. The Monterey Formation of the Santa Ynez Unit, Part II: Fractures, borehole images, and production

    SciTech Connect

    Lockman, D.F.; Schwalbach, J.R. )

    1996-01-01

    The Santa Ynez Unit (SYU), operated by Exxon, USA, comprises sixteen Federal OCS leases in the western portion of the Santa Barbara Channel, offshore California. The three accumulations, Hondo, Pescado, and Sacate Fields, are trapped in a large complex of east-west trending anticlines. The Hondo and Harmony platforms produce from the Hondo structure, and the Heritage platform produces from the Pescado structure. Hondo platform production began in 1981, and approximately 130 MBO and 200 BCF have been produced. Drilling began from Harmony and Heritage platforms in 1993. The primary reservoir is the Miocene Monterey Formation, consisting of very thin interbeds of fine-grained siliceous mudstones, charts, porcelanites, and carbonate rocks. The majority of the recoverable reserves are contained in and produced from the extensive, high-permeability fracture network. Part of our formation evaluation program emphasizes fracture characterization and quantification by integrating a number of new technologies. We have calibrated borehole images to approximately 1000 feet of continuous cores from the main producing zones. This enables us to quantify levels of fracturing in wells without core, and to develop strategies for selective perforation of the most highly-productive intervals. Production logs and wireline formation tests provide valuable information about the relation between fluid entry to the well bore and fracture distribution. Borehole images also provide valuable information about fracture orientations, bed orientations, locally-developed chert folds, and lithofacies.

  10. The Monterey Formation of the Santa Ynez Unit, Part II: Fractures, borehole images, and production

    SciTech Connect

    Lockman, D.F.; Schwalbach, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Ynez Unit (SYU), operated by Exxon, USA, comprises sixteen Federal OCS leases in the western portion of the Santa Barbara Channel, offshore California. The three accumulations, Hondo, Pescado, and Sacate Fields, are trapped in a large complex of east-west trending anticlines. The Hondo and Harmony platforms produce from the Hondo structure, and the Heritage platform produces from the Pescado structure. Hondo platform production began in 1981, and approximately 130 MBO and 200 BCF have been produced. Drilling began from Harmony and Heritage platforms in 1993. The primary reservoir is the Miocene Monterey Formation, consisting of very thin interbeds of fine-grained siliceous mudstones, charts, porcelanites, and carbonate rocks. The majority of the recoverable reserves are contained in and produced from the extensive, high-permeability fracture network. Part of our formation evaluation program emphasizes fracture characterization and quantification by integrating a number of new technologies. We have calibrated borehole images to approximately 1000 feet of continuous cores from the main producing zones. This enables us to quantify levels of fracturing in wells without core, and to develop strategies for selective perforation of the most highly-productive intervals. Production logs and wireline formation tests provide valuable information about the relation between fluid entry to the well bore and fracture distribution. Borehole images also provide valuable information about fracture orientations, bed orientations, locally-developed chert folds, and lithofacies.

  11. Microfluidic device for the formation of optically excitable, three-dimensional, compartmentalized motor units.

    PubMed

    Uzel, Sebastien G M; Platt, Randall J; Subramanian, Vidya; Pearl, Taylor M; Rowlands, Christopher J; Chan, Vincent; Boyer, Laurie A; So, Peter T C; Kamm, Roger D

    2016-08-01

    Motor units are the fundamental elements responsible for muscle movement. They are formed by lower motor neurons and their muscle targets, synapsed via neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The loss of NMJs in neurodegenerative disorders (such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or spinal muscle atrophy) or as a result of traumatic injuries affects millions of lives each year. Developing in vitro assays that closely recapitulate the physiology of neuromuscular tissues is crucial to understand the formation and maturation of NMJs, as well as to help unravel the mechanisms leading to their degeneration and repair. We present a microfluidic platform designed to coculture myoblast-derived muscle strips and motor neurons differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) within a three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel. The device geometry mimics the spinal cord-limb physical separation by compartmentalizing the two cell types, which also facilitates the observation of 3D neurite outgrowth and remote muscle innervation. Moreover, the use of compliant pillars as anchors for muscle strips provides a quantitative functional readout of force generation. Finally, photosensitizing the ESC provides a pool of source cells that can be differentiated into optically excitable motor neurons, allowing for spatiodynamic, versatile, and noninvasive in vitro control of the motor units. PMID:27493991

  12. White Thrombus Formation in Blood Tubing Lines in a Chronic Hemodialysis Unit

    PubMed Central

    Watnick, Suzanne; Stooksbury, Michael; Winter, Rolf; Riscoe, Michael; Cohen, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Previous reports have described white particulate matter in banked blood components, but no prior public reports describe such matter in blood tubing during the course of routine in-center hemodialysis. This report describes the events, investigations, and preliminary conclusions associated with the spontaneous formation of adherent white thrombus in the venous and arterial blood lines during routine in-center hemodialysis treatments. Design setting, participants, & measurements: This investigation occurred at the Portland Veterans Administration Medical Center (PVAMC) Hemodialysis Unit from October 2006 through April 2007. Sixty-eight variables regarding demographics, medical history and dialysis treatments were collected on our 34 chronic hemodialysis outpatients. Results: Over a 5-wk interval, 62% (21 of 34) of the chronic hemodialysis patients unexpectedly developed a white precipitate adhering to the lumenal surface of their dialysis blood tubing, with 73 of 580 chronic dialysis treatments exhibiting the phenomenon. Microscopic and biochemical analyses were consistent with white thrombus, formed by an aggregation of platelets and fibrin. An alert was issued and other in-center hemodialysis units noted similar findings. This was remedied by the removal of specific tubing. Conclusions: Both patient-specific and tubing-specific factors may have been operative. Although patient safety was not adversely affected, assessment of clinical and manufacturing variables potentially affecting platelet activation is warranted. PMID:18184880

  13. Microfluidic device for the formation of optically excitable, three-dimensional, compartmentalized motor units

    PubMed Central

    Uzel, Sebastien G. M.; Platt, Randall J.; Subramanian, Vidya; Pearl, Taylor M.; Rowlands, Christopher J.; Chan, Vincent; Boyer, Laurie A.; So, Peter T. C.; Kamm, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Motor units are the fundamental elements responsible for muscle movement. They are formed by lower motor neurons and their muscle targets, synapsed via neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The loss of NMJs in neurodegenerative disorders (such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or spinal muscle atrophy) or as a result of traumatic injuries affects millions of lives each year. Developing in vitro assays that closely recapitulate the physiology of neuromuscular tissues is crucial to understand the formation and maturation of NMJs, as well as to help unravel the mechanisms leading to their degeneration and repair. We present a microfluidic platform designed to coculture myoblast-derived muscle strips and motor neurons differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) within a three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel. The device geometry mimics the spinal cord–limb physical separation by compartmentalizing the two cell types, which also facilitates the observation of 3D neurite outgrowth and remote muscle innervation. Moreover, the use of compliant pillars as anchors for muscle strips provides a quantitative functional readout of force generation. Finally, photosensitizing the ESC provides a pool of source cells that can be differentiated into optically excitable motor neurons, allowing for spatiodynamic, versatile, and noninvasive in vitro control of the motor units. PMID:27493991

  14. Standard format data units - Tools for automatic exchange of space mission data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    A set of standard formatting rules for the data sets, and a standard computer-readable language with which to describe the data, are two tools which are used to create the Standard Format Data Unit (SFDU). The NASA/JPL proposal for creation and utilization of SFDUs is presented, and its relationship to recommendations from the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) is discussed. Several current and planned implementations of the SFDU concept among major space flight projects are identified. The purpose of creating the concept of an SFDU is to allow members of the science community to share national and global resource data independently of project or program. The feedback from SFDU implementation efforts is considered an essential part of the CCSDS activity. Even though the CCSDS specifically deals with space data systems, the SFDU concept can be applied to practically every data system on an open network. The SFDU is in the early phase of CCSDS standard definition work, and must go through several other phases before being formally recommended as an international standard.

  15. Modeling of in situ ultrafine atmospheric particle formation in the eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaydos, Timothy M.; Stanier, Charles O.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2005-04-01

    The creation of new atmospheric particles from in situ nucleation influences climate through cloud-aerosol interactions and may negatively impact human health. Although recent observations show that nucleation is widespread in the eastern United States, the corresponding pathways remain uncertain. Combining extensive field measurements in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with an aerosol dynamics and chemistry model assuming ternary NH3-H2SO4-H2O nuclei formation, we show excellent model-measurement agreement and predictive capability. The ternary NH3-H2SO4-H2O nucleation model is successful in predicting the presence or lack of nucleation on 19 out of 19 days with complete data sets in July 2001 and on 25 out of 29 days in January 2002. Reductions of ammonia emissions are predicted to decrease the frequency of nucleation events during both summer and winter, with a more dramatic effect during the summer. The response to changes in emissions of sulfur dioxide during the summer is counterintuitive. Reductions of sulfur dioxide and the resulting sulfate by up to 40% actually increase the frequency of the summer nucleation events. Modeling predicts the opposite effect in winter, with reductions of sulfur dioxide leading to fewer nucleation events.

  16. 43 CFR 3280.3 - What is BLM's general policy regarding the formation of unit agreements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES UNIT AGREEMENTS Geothermal Resources Unit Agreements-General § 3280.3 What is BLM's... natural resources of any geothermal reservoir, field, or like area, or any part thereof, lessees and...

  17. 43 CFR 3280.3 - What is BLM's general policy regarding the formation of unit agreements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... natural resources of any geothermal reservoir, field, or like area, or any part thereof, lessees and their... operating under a unit agreement for the reservoir, field, or like area, or any part thereof,...

  18. Super viscous oil reservoir formations of Ufa unit of Republic of Tatarstan and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipova, D.; Vafin, R.; Surmashev, R.; Bondareva, O.

    2012-04-01

    Over 450 concentrations of super viscous oils (SVO) were discovered in Tatarstan for the time being. All of them are related to productive deposits of Permian period occurred at depths up to 300-400 metres consisting of terrigenous and carbonate deposits. Described are reservoir formations of the fields where recoverable reserves of SVO are confined by argillo-arenaceous thickness of Ufa terrigenous unit. Studying reservoir properties was based on laboratory analysis of core samples in terms of: Macro- and microscopic description, grain-size analysis, determination of effective porosity, permeability, volumetric and weight oil saturation, carbonate content, mineralogical density. According to macro-analysis data, thickness cross-section presents sandstones with rare interlayer and lenticle of siltstones and clays. The colour of calcareous sandstones varies from grey to black. Incoherent rocks prevail while closely consolidated types are rarely observed. The grain-size analysis revealed that 0.25-0.1 mm size grains are dominated in the sandstone composition, their concentration in rocks amounts to 69% that enables belonging oil rocks to fine-grained sandstones. Reservoir properties of rocks widely vary as follows: Effective porosity varies from 2.4 to 44.5% (average 31.5%), carbonate content from 0.6 to 30.1% (average 6.7%), mineralogical density from 2.3 to 3.3% (average 2.7%), and oil saturation from 0.1 to 14.9 rock weight % (average 7.8%). Reservoir porosities of reservoirs correlate to each other. Correlations between porosities are set in logarithmic values. Good direct correlation dependence (coefficient of correlation 0.5352) was identified between porosity and permeability as well as clear inverse relation between carbonate content and porosity (coefficient of correlation = - 0.7659). More tight positive correlation is observed for Porosity - Mass oil saturation (coefficient of correlation 0. 75087). This correlation indicates that super viscous oils are

  19. Upper Cretaceous to Lower Miocene of the Subsilesian Unit (Western Carpathians, Czech Republic): stratotypes of formations revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubík, Miroslav; Franců, Juraj; Gilíková, Helena; Otava, Jiří; Švábenická, Lilian

    2016-06-01

    Type sections/areas for all four formations distinguished in the sedimentary succession of the Subsilesian Unit on Czech territory were revisited and described. New data on lithology, sedimentology, fossil record, biostratigraphy, heavy-minerals and geochemical proxies are based on observations and analysis of these sections. The historical type section of the Frýdek Formation was destroyed during railway construction in 19th century. Outcrops of Campanian to Maastrichtian marls and sandstones on the southwestern slope of "Castle hill" at Frýdek, are proposed as a new type section. The Ostravice riverbed in Frýdlant nad Ostravicí was originally designated as the type area, not mentioning the particular section. This area, even when supplemented with Sibudov Creek, does not show all typical facies of the formation. The outcrops range from lowermost Eocene to Eocene-Oligocene transition. In the original description of the Menilite Formation Glocker mentioned several localities in the area covering the Ždanice, Subsilesian and Silesian units, not mentioning the principal one. The single sections, each not exceeding a thickness of 2 m, are not sufficient to be a type section. Instead of that, we propose the area between Paršovice and Bystřice pod Hostýnem, covering the historical localities, as the type area. The type locality of the Ženklava Formation is an outcrop in an unnamed creek in Ženklava according to the original definition. It seems to be reasonable to extend the type section to the whole 500 m long section of the creek with the outcrops that better illustrate the lithological variability of the formation. New biostratigraphic data allow assignment to late Egerian (Eggenburgian?).

  20. Tetrasulfated disaccharide unit in heparan sulfate: enzymatic formation and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Hideo; Yoshida, Keiichi; Shibata, Yuniko; Kimata, Koji

    2008-11-01

    We previously reported that the heparan sulfate 3-O-sulfotransferase (3OST)-5 produces a novel component of heparan sulfate, i.e. the tetrasulfated disaccharide (Di-tetraS) unit ( Mochizuki, H., Yoshida, K., Gotoh, M., Sugioka, S., Kikuchi, N., Kwon, Y.-D., Tawada, A., Maeyama, K., Inaba, N., Hiruma, T., Kimata, K., and Narimatsu, H. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 26780-26787 ). In the present study, we investigated the potential of other 3OST isoforms to produce Di-tetraS with heparan sulfate and heparin as acceptor substrates. 3OST-2, 3OST-3, and 3OST-4 produce Di-tetraS units as a major product from both substrates. 3OST-5 showed the same specificity for heparin, but the production from heparan sulfate was very low. Di-tetraS production by 3OST-1 was negligible. We then investigated the presence of Di-tetraS units in heparan sulfates from various rat tissues. Di-tetraS was detected in all of the tissues analyzed. Liver and spleen contain relatively high levels of Di-tetraS, 1.6 and 0.95%, respectively. However, the content of this unit in heart, large intestine, ileum, and lung is low, less than 0.2%. We further determined the expression levels of 3OST transcripts by quantitative real time PCR. The 3OST-3 transcripts are highly expressed in spleen and liver. The 3OST-2 and -4 are specifically expressed in brain. These results indicate that the Di-tetraS unit is widely distributed throughout the body as a rare and unique component of heparan sulfate and is synthesized by tissue-specific 3OST isoforms specific for Di-tetraS production. PMID:18757372

  1. Formation of functional CENP-B boxes at diverse locations in repeat units of centromeric DNA in New World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kugou, Kazuto; Hirai, Hirohisa; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Koga, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Centromere protein B, which is involved in centromere formation, binds to centromeric repetitive DNA by recognizing a nucleotide motif called the CENP-B box. Humans have large numbers of CENP-B boxes in the centromeric repetitive DNA of their autosomes and X chromosome. The current understanding is that these CENP-B boxes are located at identical positions in the repeat units of centromeric DNA. Great apes also have CENP-B boxes in locations that are identical to humans. The purpose of the present study was to examine the location of CENP-B box in New World monkeys. We recently identified CENP-B box in one species of New World monkeys (marmosets). In this study, we found functional CENP-B boxes in CENP-A-assembled repeat units of centromeric DNA in 2 additional New World monkeys (squirrel monkeys and tamarins) by immunostaining and ChIP-qPCR analyses. The locations of the 3 CENP-B boxes in the repeat units differed from one another. The repeat unit size of centromeric DNA of New World monkeys (340-350 bp) is approximately twice that of humans and great apes (171 bp). This might be, associated with higher-order repeat structures of centromeric DNA, a factor for the observed variation in the CENP-B box location in New World monkeys. PMID:27292628

  2. Formation of functional CENP-B boxes at diverse locations in repeat units of centromeric DNA in New World monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kugou, Kazuto; Hirai, Hirohisa; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Koga, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Centromere protein B, which is involved in centromere formation, binds to centromeric repetitive DNA by recognizing a nucleotide motif called the CENP-B box. Humans have large numbers of CENP-B boxes in the centromeric repetitive DNA of their autosomes and X chromosome. The current understanding is that these CENP-B boxes are located at identical positions in the repeat units of centromeric DNA. Great apes also have CENP-B boxes in locations that are identical to humans. The purpose of the present study was to examine the location of CENP-B box in New World monkeys. We recently identified CENP-B box in one species of New World monkeys (marmosets). In this study, we found functional CENP-B boxes in CENP-A-assembled repeat units of centromeric DNA in 2 additional New World monkeys (squirrel monkeys and tamarins) by immunostaining and ChIP-qPCR analyses. The locations of the 3 CENP-B boxes in the repeat units differed from one another. The repeat unit size of centromeric DNA of New World monkeys (340–350 bp) is approximately twice that of humans and great apes (171 bp). This might be, associated with higher-order repeat structures of centromeric DNA, a factor for the observed variation in the CENP-B box location in New World monkeys. PMID:27292628

  3. Precipitate Formation Potential of Resin Regeneration Effluent in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2009-10-09

    Calculations performed as part of this study indicate that injection of treated groundwater containing treated regenerant solution has a high potential for precipitate formation that could lead to plugging of formation porosity surrounding the injection well. In the worst case scenario, substantial plugging could occur within a year of the initiation of injection. Some uncertainty is associated with respect to this conclusion. The uncertainty results from the fact that equilibrium with the most stable mineral assemblage cannot always be assumed and that slow precipitation rates could occur and reliable estimates of precipitation kinetics under Hanford aquifer conditions are not available. It is recommended that the potential of calcium phosphate precipitation be investigated further using a combination of laboratory and field investigations.

  4. The impact of formative assessment techniques on the instruction of the high school biology units of photosynthesis and cellular respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tury, Shanna Fawn

    The effect of formative assessment on student learning during student-centered, inquiry-based instruction was studied in a high school biology class. The objective of this study was to test whether increasing the level of formative assessment, including feedback to students and reflection on laboratory activities, would make an impact on the learning of concepts related to cellular metabolism, such as cellular respiration and photosynthesis. Two units of instruction were evaluated, one utilizing active learning strategies along with formative assessment techniques, and the other taught in a more teacher-centered manner. The revised methodology showed a statistically significant increase in student learning gains as compared to the unimproved technique. The increased amount of hands-on activities for students, observation of students in an informal context, student and teacher interaction, immediate feedback to students, public discussion and reflection on lab activities and results, and modification of instruction by the teacher is implicated in the trend found in these data. The results suggest that the combined effect of active, inquiry-based instruction and a variety of formative assessments can have a significant positive effect on student learning of topics related to cellular metabolism, such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration.

  5. Organic nitrate aerosol formation via NO3 + biogenic volatile organic compounds in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, B. R.; Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Brown, S. S.; Wild, R. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Day, D. A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Hu, W.; de Gouw, J.; Koss, A.; Cohen, R. C.; Duffey, K. C.; Romer, P.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Takahama, S.; Thornton, J. A.; Lee, B. H.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Nguyen, T. B.; Teng, A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Olson, K.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Gas- and aerosol-phase measurements of oxidants, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and organic nitrates made during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS campaign, Summer 2013) in central Alabama show that a nitrate radical (NO3) reaction with monoterpenes leads to significant secondary aerosol formation. Cumulative losses of NO3 to terpenes are correlated with increase in gas- and aerosol-organic nitrate concentrations made during the campaign. Correlation of NO3 radical consumption to organic nitrate aerosol formation as measured by aerosol mass spectrometry and thermal dissociation laser-induced fluorescence suggests a molar yield of aerosol-phase monoterpene nitrates of 23-44 %. Compounds observed via chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) are correlated to predicted nitrate loss to BVOCs and show C10H17NO5, likely a hydroperoxy nitrate, is a major nitrate-oxidized terpene product being incorporated into aerosols. The comparable isoprene product C5H9NO5 was observed to contribute less than 1 % of the total organic nitrate in the aerosol phase and correlations show that it is principally a gas-phase product from nitrate oxidation of isoprene. Organic nitrates comprise between 30 and 45 % of the NOy budget during SOAS. Inorganic nitrates were also monitored and showed that during incidents of increased coarse-mode mineral dust, HNO3 uptake produced nitrate aerosol mass loading at a rate comparable to that of organic nitrate produced via NO3 + BVOCs.

  6. The politics of HPV vaccination policy formation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Abiola, Sara E; Colgrove, James; Mello, Michelle M

    2013-08-01

    This article explores the political dimensions of policy formation for the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine through case studies of six states: California, Indiana, New Hampshire, New York, Texas, and Virginia. Using thematic content analysis of semistructured key informant interviews with policy stakeholders, newspaper articles, and archival materials, we describe the trajectory of public health policy developments for HPV immunization and analyze key influences on policy outcomes through the theoretical lens of the Multiple Streams framework. Specifically, we examine factors influencing the extent to which HPV was perceived as a problem meriting policy action; political forces that facilitated and impeded policy adoption, including interest-group opposition and structural and ideological features of the states' political environments; and factors affecting which policy alternatives received consideration. We find that effective policy entrepreneurship played a critical role in determining policy outcomes. We conclude by discussing lessons from the case of HPV vaccination for future efforts to craft vaccination policies. PMID:23645875

  7. Dynamics of peat accumulation and marl flat formation in a calcareous fen, midwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miner, J.J.; Ketterling, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    The age and sequence of peat accumulation were investigated at a calcareous fen in northeastern Illinois, USA. The purpose of this study was to identify the processes that form and sustain marl flats, which are areas of marl or tufa substrate within the fen that contain numerous rare plant species. Geomorphic, stratigraphic, and radiocarbon evidence was used to establish the processes and chronology of peat accumulation and erosion adjacent to each marl flat. The age of the base of the peat deposit varies greatly throughout the fen, ranging from 14,679 calibrated years before present (cal. years BP) to nearly modern, indicating that colonization of the sand and gravel substrate by peat occurred throughout the period from the Late Pleistocene to present. Adjacent to one marl flat, trends in basal peat age and thickness show that peat accumulation has progressed laterally inward from both sides, suggesting that the marl flat has been infilling with peat progressively by accumulation at the margins since at least 5,370 cal. years BP or longer. A second marl flat in the fen is surrounded by older, thick peat of differing ages on either edge and is bounded by fresh scarps, indicating that the marl flat currently is expanding laterally by erosion into the preexisting peat blanket. These two examples suggest a continuously repeating process, where erosion of the accumulated peat blanket forms a marl flat, which is later covered by peat accumulation. Trends in basal peat age elsewhere in the fen suggest that other marl flats may have existed in the past that have been completely infilled with peat. This study suggests that marl flat formation is a natural process that has been occurring for millennia, continuously creating habitat for the rare plant species that occupy marl flats. There is no evidence that the marl flats at this site are indicative of anthropogenic disturbance, so that management options for these areas are limited to maintaining the quality and quantity

  8. Design optimization of large-size format edge-lit light guide units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastanin, J.; Lenaerts, C.; Fleury-Frenette, K.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an original method of dot pattern generation dedicated to large-size format light guide plate (LGP) design optimization, such as photo-bioreactors, the number of dots greatly exceeds the maximum allowable number of optical objects supported by most common ray-tracing software. In the proposed method, in order to simplify the computational problem, the original optical system is replaced by an equivalent one. Accordingly, an original dot pattern is splitted into multiple small sections, inside which the dot size variation is less than the ink dots printing typical resolution. Then, these sections are replaced by equivalent cells with continuous diffusing film. After that, we adjust the TIS (Total Integrated Scatter) two-dimensional distribution over the grid of equivalent cells, using an iterative optimization procedure. Finally, the obtained optimal TIS distribution is converted into the dot size distribution by applying an appropriate conversion rule. An original semi-empirical equation dedicated to rectangular large-size LGPs is proposed for the initial guess of TIS distribution. It allows significantly reduce the total time needed to dot pattern optimization.

  9. Regional impacts of oil and gas development on ozone formation in the western United States.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Marco A; Barna, Michael G; Moore, Tom

    2009-09-01

    The Intermountain West is currently experiencing increased growth in oil and gas production, which has the potential to affect the visibility and air quality of various Class I areas in the region. The following work presents an analysis of these impacts using the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx). CAMx is a state-of-the-science, "one-atmosphere" Eulerian photochemical dispersion model that has been widely used in the assessment of gaseous and particulate air pollution (ozone, fine [PM2.5], and coarse [PM10] particulate matter). Meteorology and emissions inventories developed by the Western Regional Air Partnership Regional Modeling Center for regional haze analysis and planning are used to establish an ozone baseline simulation for the year 2002. The predicted range of values for ozone in the national parks and other Class I areas in the western United States is then evaluated with available observations from the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET). This evaluation demonstrates the model's suitability for subsequent planning, sensitivity, and emissions control strategy modeling. Once the ozone baseline simulation has been established, an analysis of the model results is performed to investigate the regional impacts of oil and gas development on the ozone concentrations that affect the air quality of Class I areas. Results indicate that the maximum 8-hr ozone enhancement from oil and gas (9.6 parts per billion [ppb]) could affect southwestern Colorado and northwestern New Mexico. Class I areas in this region that are likely to be impacted by increased ozone include Mesa Verde National Park and Weminuche Wilderness Area in Colorado and San Pedro Parks Wilderness Area, Bandelier Wilderness Area, Pecos Wilderness Area, and Wheeler Peak Wilderness Area in New Mexico. PMID:19785277

  10. Peroxy radical concentration and ozone formation rate at a rural site in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, Lawrence; Lee, Yin-Nan; Springston, Stephen R.; Lee, Jai H.; Nunnermacker, Linda; Weinstein-Lloyd, Judith; Zhou, Xianliang; Newman, Leonard

    1995-04-01

    As part of the Southern Oxidants Study, Brookhaven National Laboratory operated an intensive measurement site near Metter, Georgia, during parts of the summers of 1991 and 1992. Measurements were made of photochemically active trace gases and meteorological parameters relevant to determining causes for elevated ambient ozone concentration. The 1992 data set was used to calculate peroxy radical concentration and ozone formation rate based on determining the departure from the photostationary state (PSS) and based on a radical budget equation, such as applied previously to the 1991 data set. Averaged over the 28-day experimental period, we find maximum radical production occurring near noon at 2.5 ppb h-1, maximum peroxy radical concentration also occurring near noon at 80 ppt, and maximum ozone production of 8 ppb h-1 occurring near 1000 EST. Ozone photolysis accounts for 55% of radical production, HCHO and other carbonyl compounds about 40%. The radical budget and PSS methods depend in different ways on atmospheric photochemistry and a comparison between them affords a test of our understanding of the photochemical production of O3. We find that these methods agree to the extent expected based on uncertainty estimates. For the data set as a whole, the median estimate for fractional error in hourly average peroxy radical concentration determined from the radical budget method is approximately 30% and from the PSS method, 50%. Error estimates for the PSS method are highly variable, becoming infinite as peroxy radical concentration approaches zero. This behavior can be traced back to the difference form of the PSS equations. To conduct a meaningful comparison between the methods, the data set was segregated into subsets based on PSS uncertainty estimates. For the low-uncertainty subset, consisting of a third of the whole data set, we find that the ratio of peroxy radical concentration predicted from the PSS method to that predicted from the radical budget method to be

  11. 'Would you eat cultured meat?': Consumers' reactions and attitude formation in Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Wim; Marcu, Afrodita; Rutsaert, Pieter; Gaspar, Rui; Seibt, Beate; Fletcher, Dave; Barnett, Julie

    2015-04-01

    Cultured meat has evolved from an idea and concept into a reality with the August 2013 cultured hamburger tasting in London. Still, how consumers conceive cultured meat is largely an open question. This study addresses consumers' reactions and attitude formation towards cultured meat through analyzing focus group discussions and online deliberations with 179 meat consumers from Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom. Initial reactions when learning about cultured meat were underpinned by feelings of disgust and considerations of unnaturalness. Consumers saw few direct personal benefits but they were more open to perceiving global societal benefits relating to the environment and global food security. Both personal and societal risks were framed in terms of uncertainties about safety and health, and possible adverse societal consequences dealing with loss of farming and eating traditions and rural livelihoods. Further reflection pertained to skepticism about 'the inevitable' scientific progress, concern about risk governance and control, and need for regulation and proper labeling. PMID:25541372

  12. Geologic map of the Peach Orchard Flat quadrangle, Carbon County, Wyoming, and descriptions of new stratigraphic units in the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation and Paleocene Fort Union Formation, eastern Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming-Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honey, J.D.; Hettinger, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    This report provides a geologic map of the Peach Orchard Flat 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface. In addition, four lithostratigraphic units were named: the Red Rim Member of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation, and the China Butte, Blue Gap, and Overland Members of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation.

  13. Farmers, Scientists, and Officers of Industry: The Formation and Reformation of Land-Grant Colleges in the Northeastern United States, 1862-1906

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorber, Nathan M.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation examines the formation, reformation, and standardization of land-grant colleges in the Northeastern United States during the last four decades of the nineteenth century. It is a history that explores the turbulent origins of land-grant colleges in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont,…

  14. Contribution of biogenic emissions to the formation of ozone and particulate matter in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Pun, Betty K; Wu, Shiang-Yuh; Seigneur, Christian

    2002-08-15

    As anthropogenic emissions of ozone (O3) precursors, fine particulate matter (PM2.5), and PM2.5 precursors continue to decrease in the United States, the fraction of O3 and PM2.5 attributable to natural sources may become significant in some locations, reducing the efficacy that can be expected from future controls of anthropogenic sources. Modeling studies were conducted to estimate the contribution of biogenic emissions to the formation of O3 and PM2.5 in Nashville/TN and the northeastern United States. Two approaches were used to bound the estimates. In an anthropogenic simulation, biogenic emissions and their influence at the domain boundaries were eliminated. Contributions of biogenic compounds to the simulated concentrations of O3 and PM2.5 were determined by the deviation of the concentrations in the anthropogenic case from those in the base case. A biogenic simulation was used to assess the amounts of O3 and PM2.5 produced in an environment free from anthropogenic influences in emissions and boundary conditions. In both locations, the contribution of biogenic emissions to O3 was small (<23%) on a domain-wide basis, despite significant biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions (65-89% of total VOC emissions). However, the production of O3 was much more sensitive to biogenic emissions in urban areas (22-34%). Therefore, the effects of biogenic emissions on O3 manifested mostly via their interaction with anthropogenic emissions of NOx. In the anthropogenic simulations, the average contribution of biogenic and natural sources to PM2.5 was estimated at 9% in Nashville/TN and 12% in the northeast domain. Because of the long atmospheric lifetimes of PM2.5, the contribution of biogenic/natural PM2.5 from the boundary conditions was higher than the contribution of biogenic aerosols produced within the domain. The elimination of biogenic emissions also affected the chemistry of other secondary PM2.5 components. Very little PM2.5 was formed in the biogenic

  15. Godiva Rim Member: A new stratigraphic unit of the Green River Formation in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado. Geology of the Eocene Wasatch, Green River, and Bridger (Washakie) Formations, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect

    Roehler, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    The report names and describes the Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation in the eastern part of the Washakie basin in southwest Wyoming and the central part of the Sand Wash basin in northwest Colorado. The Godiva Rim Member comprises lithofacies of mixed mudflat and lacustrine origin situated between the overlying lacustrine Laney Member of the Green River Formation and the underlying fluvial Cathedral Bluffs Tongue of the Wasatch Formation. The Godiva Rim Member is laterally equivalent to and grades westward into the LaClede Bed of the Laney Member. The Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation was deposited along the southeast margins of Lake Gosiute and is correlated to similar lithologic units that were deposited along the northeast margins of Lake Uinta in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. The stratigraphic data presented provide significant evidence that the two lakes were periodically connected around the east end of the Uinta Mountains during the middle Eocene.

  16. Managing the Nuclear Legacy in the United Kingdom: Strategies and Progress in the Formation of a Liabilities Management Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, A.; Meyers, B.

    2003-02-25

    This presentation describes the status of recent initiatives undertaken by the United Kingdom Government to address the long-standing problems confronting it with regards to discharge of public sector civil nuclear liabilities. It describes the enabling steps taken thus far in the creation of a Liabilities Management Unit (LMU) to prepare the ground for this important work, with specific reference to some of the more technically challenging problems which must be resolved in order to make progress towards cleaning up the UK's nuclear legacy facilities and waste materials. Finally, it addresses some of the approaches proposed by the LMU as it seeks to establish a robust, permanent entity to meet the challenges.

  17. Cleveland Diocesan Social Science Program. Social Studies Unit in Formation: A Supplement to the Social Science Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catholic Board of Education, Diocese of Cleveland, OH.

    Historical and cultural world understandings are presented to secondary students in this social studies teaching supplement to guidelines described in documents SO 003 186 and SO 003 188. The objective of the activity units is to encourage the students to become inquirers into the values of the non-western and western world. Emphasis is upon…

  18. War, Education and State Formation: Problems of Territorial and Political Integration in the United States, 1848-1912

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beadie, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    After the Civil War (1861-1865), the United States faced a problem of "reconstruction" similar to that confronted by other nations at the time and familiar to the US since at least the Mexican-American War (1846-1848). The problem was one of territorial and political (re)integration: how to take territories that had only recently been…

  19. A Formative Evaluation Plan of the Bartlett Saga: Part III "United We Stand: Confederation," 1864-1873.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willing, Kathlene R.

    This field test report was completed for a producer of an educational computer software program. The program, designed to help students learn about Canadian history, is outlined. The program simulates the events and atmosphere of the years 1864-1873, formative years in Canada's history; the student user is cast in the role of a journalist on the…

  20. Adolescent Substance Abuse in Mexico, Puerto Rico and The United States: Effect of Anonymous versus Confidential Survey Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latimer, William W.; O'Brien, Megan S.; Vasquez, Marco A.; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Rios-Bedoya, Carlos F.; Floyd, Leah J.

    2006-01-01

    Anonymous surveys have been widely used worldwide to describe adolescent substance use yet cannot elucidate causal drug abuse predictors. Studies in the U.S. have generally found that anonymous and confidential surveys yield comparable levels of self-reported substance use, yet the effect of survey format on youth self-report has not been…

  1. The Bouse Formation and bracketing units, southeastern California and western Arizona: Implications for the evolution of the proto-Gulf of California and the lower Colorado River

    SciTech Connect

    Buising, A.V. )

    1990-11-10

    Mio-Pliocene sediments of the lower Colorado River area represent the nothernmost well documented extent of the proto-Gulf of California, a tectonically enigmatic marine incursion that occupied much of what is now the Gulf of California region--including the lower Colorado River area and the Salton Trough--as much as 8 m.y. prior to the onset of spreading-and transform-related subsidence in that area. Syndepositional folding of the Bouse Formation and bracketing units is believed to reflect slumping on oversteepened slopes, perhaps exacerbated by episodic tectonic activity. The Bouse Formation and bracketing units record four stages in the evolution of the northern proto-Gulf/lower Colorado River area: (1) dissection of preexisting, detachment fault-controlled topography and localized, interior-drainage alluvial deposition (about 14-9 Ma); (2) regional subsidence and proto-Gulf transgression (perhaps as early as about 8 Ma; not later than about 5.5 Ma); (3) progradation of ancestral Colorado River delta into the northern end of the proto-Gulf basin (prior to about 4.3 Ma); and (4) arrival of throughgoing Colorado fluvial channel (prior to about 3.5-4 Ma). Outcrop relations between the Osborne Wash strata and the Bouse Formation, and the relationship of these units to modern landforms, indicate that topography in the lower Colorado River area has not changed significantly since middle Miocene time. Subsidence of the Bouse basin is believed to have occurred via broad regional downwarping. Timing suggests that incipient proto-Gulf extension in the lower Colorado River area was arrested by the approximately 5-Ma shift to the modern transtensional regime.

  2. [Conditions of professional activity of the staff of units and formations of special support and its medical and psychological support].

    PubMed

    Poluboyarinov, V N; Grabskii, Yu V; Zemlyannikov, D A; Kushchev, G G

    2016-02-01

    In the field of special support of nuclear- and radiation-dangerous objects "human factor" is highlighted, which means that psychological status of crew is at the first place. The authors analysed conditions of professional activity, determined morbidity rates and psychologically important labour characteristics for military specialists working at nuclear- and radiation-dangerous objects. The staff working at these objects undergoes irradiation, hostility of inhabitation and high psychological pressure. The authors presented data on peculiarities of health status and morbidity rate among military servicemen of the given category: the frequency of digestive apparatus diseases, diseases of nervous and circulatory systems is higher than in auxiliary subunits of the same military units. The authors determined the main principles and structure of measures of medical and psychological support of professional activity of the staff of military units of special support. PMID:27263211

  3. UNIT, PETROLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE FOR A UNIT ON PETROLOGY IS SUITABLE FOR ADAPTATION AT EITHER THE UPPER ELEMENTARY OR THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL LEVELS. THE UNIT BEGINS WITH A STORY THAT INTRODUCES VOLCANIC ACTION AND IGNEOUS ROCK FORMATION. SELECTED CONCEPTS ARE LISTED FOLLOWED BY SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES. A BIBLIOGRAPHY, FILM LIST, VOCABULARY LIST, AND QUESTION AND…

  4. Family Formation Processes: Assessing the Need for a New Nationally Representative Household Panel Survey in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Wendy D.

    2015-01-01

    The American family has undergone rapid transformation. Careful measurement attention to family formation is important because families are at the heart of numerous decisions, roles, and responsibilities with implications for understanding the well-being of families, adults and children. This paper considers whether there is a need for a new household panel study that addresses family formation. This paper consists of a review of the recent body of population-based, American surveys and finds a considerable gap in the ability to study the implications of families for the health and well-being of Americans. Earlier panel surveys used to assess family life anchored questions around marital events, but changes in family patterns require attention to a more diverse set of family forms. The paper concludes with recommendations for a multi-purpose panel study. The key challenge is to keep to pace with complexity and changes in American family life while at the same time maintaining a parsimonious set of survey questions. PMID:26612969

  5. A precursor role for DHA in a feto-placental unit for oestrogen formation in the mare.

    PubMed

    Raeside, J I; Liptrap, R M; McDonell, W N; Milne, F J

    1979-01-01

    Plasma levels of total oestrogens and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHA) were measured by radioimmunossay in samples taken from various blood vessels in both maternal and fetal compartments in 11 Pony mates. High concentrations of oestrogens (greater than 100 ng/ml of plasma), expressed as oestrone equivalents, were found in the fetal circulation. On both the fetal and maternal sides, oestrogen concentrations were lower in blood going to than from the placenta. DHA concentrations, on the other hand, were higher in blood flowing to the placenta from the fetus. The fetal gonads were seen as the source of DHA, which was present in remarkably high concentrations (greater than 800 ng/ml of plasma) in venous samples from fetal ovaries and fetal testes. A precursor role in placental oestrogen formation is suggested for DHA secretion by the fetal gonads. PMID:158087

  6. Preparation of a matrix type multiple-unit gastro retentive floating drug delivery system for captopril based on gas formation technique: in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Meka, Lingam; Kesavan, Bhaskar; Chinnala, Krishna Mohan; Vobalaboina, Venkateswarlu; Yamsani, Madhusudan Rao

    2008-01-01

    A gastro retentive floating drug delivery system with multiple-unit minitab's based on gas formation technique was developed in order to prolong the gastric residence time and to increase the overall bioavailability of the drug. The system consists of the drug-containing core units prepared by direct compression process, which are coated with three successive layers of an inner seal coat, effervescent layer (sodium bicarbonate) and an outer gas-entrapped polymeric membrane of an polymethacrylates (Eudragit RL30D, RS30D, and combinations of them). Only the system using Eudragit RL30D and combination of them as a gas-entrapped polymeric membrane could float. The time to float decreased as amount of the effervescent agent increased and coating level of gas-entrapped polymeric membrane decreased. The optimum system floated completely within 3 min and maintained the buoyancy over a period of 12 h. The drug release was controlled and linear with the square root of time. Increasing coating level of gas-entrapped polymeric membrane decreased the drug release. Both the rapid floating and the controlled release properties were achieved in the multiple-unit floating drug delivery system developed in this present study. The analysis of the parameter dissolution data after storage at 40 degrees C and 75% RH for 3 months showed, no significant change indicating the two dissolution profiles were considered to be similar (f2 value is more than 50). PMID:18459051

  7. The application of petrophysics to resolve fluid flow units and reservoir quality in the Upper Cretaceous Formations: Abu Sennan oil field, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, Amir Maher Sayed; El-sayed, Nahla Abd El-Aziz

    2015-02-01

    Petrophysical flow unit concept can be used to resolve some of the key challenges faced in the characterization of hydrocarbon reservoirs. The present study deals with petrophysical evaluation of some physical properties of the Upper Cretaceous rock samples obtained from the Abu-Roash and the Bahariya Formations at southwest of Sennan oil field in the Western Desert of Egypt. The aim of this study was achieved through carrying out some petrophysical measurements of porosity, bulk density, permeability, mean hydraulic radius (Rh), irreducible water saturation, and radius of pore throat at mercury saturation of 35% in order to determine reservoir characteristics. In this study, the relationships obtained between the measured petrophysical properties such as porosity, permeability and pore throat flow unit types were established for 53 sandstone core samples obtained from two different stratigraphic units. Flow zone indicator (FZI) has been calculated to quantify the flow character of the Abu-Roash and Bahariya reservoir rocks based on empirically derived equations of robust correlation coefficients. The correlations among porosity, permeability, bulk density, mean hydraulic radius and pore throat flow properties reflect the most important reservoir behavior characteristics. The calculated multiple regression models indicate close correlation among petrophysical properties and Rh and R35%. The obtained models are able to predict Rh and R35% by using porosity and permeability, to map reservoir performance and predict the location of stratigraphic traps.

  8. Geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources: Oligocene Frio and Anahuac Formations, United States Gulf of Mexico coastal plain and State waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Sharon M.; Karlsen, Alexander W.; Valentine, Brett J.

    2013-01-01

    Tertiary, combined with the reaction kinetic parameters used in the models. A number of studies indicate that the migration of oil and gas in the Cenozoic Gulf of Mexico basin is primarily vertical, occurring along abundant growth faults associated with sediment deposition or along faults associated with salt domes. The USGS Tertiary assessment team developed a geologic model based on recurring regional-scale structural and depositional features in Paleogene strata to define assessment units (AUs). Three general areas, as described in the model, are found in each of the Paleogene stratigraphic intervals assessed: “Stable Shelf,” “Expanded Fault,” and “Slope and Basin Floor” zones. On the basis of this model, three AUs for the Frio Formation were defined: (1) the Frio Stable Shelf Oil and Gas AU, containing reservoirs with a mean depth of about 4,800 feet in normally pressured intervals; (2) the Frio Expanded Fault Zone Oil and Gas AU, containing reservoirs with a mean depth of about 9,000 feet in primarily overpressured intervals; and (3) the Frio Slope and Basin Floor Gas AU, which currently has no production but has potential for deep gas resources (>15,000 feet). AUs also were defined for the Hackberry trend, which consists of a slope facies stratigraphically in the middle part of the Frio Formation, and the Anahuac Formation. The Frio Basin Margin AU, an assessment unit extending to the outcrop of the Frio (or basal Miocene), was not quantitatively assessed because of its low potential for production. Two proprietary, commercially available databases containing field and well production information were used in the assessment. Estimates of undiscovered resources for the five AUs were based on a total of 1,734 reservoirs and 586,500 wells producing from the Frio and Anahuac Formations. Estimated total mean values of technically recoverable, undiscovered resources are 172 million barrels of oil (MMBO), 9.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas (TCFG), and 542

  9. ATTAAA as well as downstream sequences are required for RNA 3'-end formation in the E3 complex transcription unit of adenovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, B M; Wold, W S

    1985-01-01

    We mapped the location of the E3A RNA 3' end site in the E3 transcription unit of adenovirus 2. The procedure used was nuclease-gel analysis with 32P-labeled RNA probes. The poly(A) addition sites were microheterogeneous and were located approximately 17 to 29 nucleotides downstream from an ATTAAA sequence. To identify the sequences that make up the E3A RNA 3' end signal, we constructed five viable virus mutants with deletions in or near the E3A RNA 3' end site. The mutants were analyzed for E3A RNA 3' end formation in vivo. No effect was observed from a 47-base-pair (bp) deletion (dl716) or a 72-bp deletion (dl714) located 22 and 19 nucleotides, respectively, upstream of the ATTAAA. In contrast, E3A RNA 3' end formation was abolished by a 554-bp deletion (dl708) that removes both the ATTAAA and the poly(A) addition sites, a 124-bp deletion (dl713) that removes the ATTAAA but leaves the poly(A) addition sites, and a 65-bp deletion (dl719) that leaves the ATTAAA but removes the poly(A) addition sites. These results indicate that the ATTAAA, as well as downstream sequences, including the poly(A) addition sites, are required for E3A RNA 3' end formation. Images PMID:3018506

  10. Radiating Amyloid Fibril Formation on the Surface of Lipid Membranes through Unit-Assembly of Oligomeric Species of α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Ho; Hong, Chul-Suk; Lee, Soonkoo; Yang, Jee-Eun; Park, Yong Il; Lee, Daekyun; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Jung, Seunho; Paik, Seung R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lewy body in the substantia nigra is a cardinal pathological feature of Parkinson's disease. Despite enormous efforts, the cause-and-effect relationship between Lewy body formation and the disorder is yet to be explicitly unveiled. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we showed that radiating amyloid fibrils (RAFs) were instantly developed on the surface of synthetic lipid membranes from the β-sheet free oligomeric species of α-synuclein through a unit-assembly process. The burgeoning RAFs were successfully matured by feeding them with additional oligomers, which led to concomitant dramatic shrinkage and disintegration of the membranes by pulling off lipid molecules to the extending fibrils. Mitochondria and lysosomes were demonstrated to be disrupted by the oligomeric α-synuclein via membrane-dependent fibril formation. Conclusion The physical structure formation of amyloid fibrils, therefore, could be considered as detrimental to the cells by affecting membrane integrity of the intracellular organelles, which might be a molecular cause for the neuronal degeneration observed in Parkinson's disease. PMID:23077644

  11. Common Formative Assessments Developed through Professional Learning Communities (PLCs): A Case Study to Analyze the Alignment of Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction in a Math PLC at a Title I Middle School in the Southern United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Tory C.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of No Child Left Behind increased performance expectations for students across the United States and compelled teachers to focus on standardized assessments instead of frequent formative assessments to monitor instruction and promote student learning. Common formative assessments (CFAs) help teachers align curriculum, assessment,…

  12. Percolation Cooling of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Lower Head by Way of Thermal Cracking and Gap Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, K.L.

    2002-01-15

    Two partial models have been developed to elucidate the Three Mile Island Unit 2 lower head coolability by water percolation from above into the thermally cracking debris bed and into a gap between the debris and the wall. The bulk permeability of the cracked top crust is estimated based on simple fracture mechanics and application of Poiseuille's law to the fractures. The gap is considered as an abstraction representing an initially rugged interface, which probably expanded by thermal deformation and cracking in connection with the water ingress. The coupled flow and heat conduction problem for the top crust is solved in slab geometry based on the two-phase Darcy equations together with quasi-steady mass and energy conservation equations. The resulting water penetration depth is in good agreement with the depth of the so-called loose debris bed. The lower-head and bottom-crust problem is treated analogously by a two-dimensional axisymmetric model. The notion of a gap is maintained as a useful concept in the flow analysis. Simulations show that a central hot spot with a peak wall temperature of 1075 to 1100 deg. C can be obtained, but the quenching rates are not satisfactory. It is concluded that a three-dimensional model with an additional mechanism to explain the sudden water ingress to the hot spot center would be more appropriate.

  13. Paléomagnétisme de l'unité inférieure autunienne de la formation rouge du bassin d'Abadla (Algérie)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouabdallah, Hamza; Mérabet, Nacer; Henry, Bernard

    1998-07-01

    A new palaeomagnetic pole situated at 29.1°S and 57.8°E has been obtained in the lower unit, of Autunian age ( Doubinger and Fabre, 1983) of the Abadla redbeds formation. The proximity of this pole with that of Morel et al. (1981), determined in the azoic and undated upper unit of the same formation, suggests an Autunian age for this upper unit. Thus, the subsidence of the Abadla basin and the deposition of the whole series occurred within a period no longer than 20-25 My.

  14. Stem cells are units of natural selection for tissue formation, for germline development, and in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Irving L

    2015-07-21

    It is obvious that natural selection operates at the level of individuals and collections of individuals. Nearly two decades ago we showed that in multi-individual colonies of protochordate colonial tunicates sharing a blood circulation, there exists an exchange of somatic stem cells and germline stem cells, resulting in somatic chimeras and stem cell competitions for gonadal niches. Stem cells are unlike other cells in the body in that they alone self-renew, so that they form clones that are perpetuated for the life of the organism. Stem cell competitions have allowed the emergence of competitive somatic and germline stem cell clones. Highly successful germline stem cells usually outcompete less successful competitors both in the gonads of the genotype partner from which they arise and in the gonads of the natural parabiotic partners. Therefore, natural selection also operates at the level of germline stem cell clones. In the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri the formation of natural parabionts is prevented by a single-locus highly polymorphic histocompatibility gene called Botryllus histocompatibility factor. This limits germline stem cell predation to kin, as the locus has hundreds of alleles. We show that in mice germline stem cells compete for gonad niches, and in mice and humans, blood-forming stem cells also compete for bone marrow niches. We show that the clonal progression from blood-forming stem cells to acute leukemias by successive genetic and epigenetic events in blood stem cells also involves competition and selection between clones and propose that this is a general theme in cancer. PMID:26195745

  15. Stem cells are units of natural selection for tissue formation, for germline development, and in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Irving L.

    2015-01-01

    It is obvious that natural selection operates at the level of individuals and collections of individuals. Nearly two decades ago we showed that in multi-individual colonies of protochordate colonial tunicates sharing a blood circulation, there exists an exchange of somatic stem cells and germline stem cells, resulting in somatic chimeras and stem cell competitions for gonadal niches. Stem cells are unlike other cells in the body in that they alone self-renew, so that they form clones that are perpetuated for the life of the organism. Stem cell competitions have allowed the emergence of competitive somatic and germline stem cell clones. Highly successful germline stem cells usually outcompete less successful competitors both in the gonads of the genotype partner from which they arise and in the gonads of the natural parabiotic partners. Therefore, natural selection also operates at the level of germline stem cell clones. In the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri the formation of natural parabionts is prevented by a single-locus highly polymorphic histocompatibility gene called Botryllus histocompatibility factor. This limits germline stem cell predation to kin, as the locus has hundreds of alleles. We show that in mice germline stem cells compete for gonad niches, and in mice and humans, blood-forming stem cells also compete for bone marrow niches. We show that the clonal progression from blood-forming stem cells to acute leukemias by successive genetic and epigenetic events in blood stem cells also involves competition and selection between clones and propose that this is a general theme in cancer. PMID:26195745

  16. Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-09-30

    Ohio River Valley corridor in the Appalachian Basin, which underlies large concentrations of CO{sub 2} emission sources. In addition, some wells in the Michigan basin are included. Assessment of the geologic and petrophysical properties of zones of interest has been conducted. Although a large number of formations have been evaluated across the geologic column, the primary focus has been on evaluating the Cambrian sandstones (Mt. Simon, Rose Run, Kerbel) and carbonates layers (Knox Dolomite) as well as on the Silurian-Devonian carbonates (Bass Island, Salina) and sandstones (Clinton, Oriskany, Berea). Factors controlling the development of porosity and permeability, such as the depositional setting have been explored. In northern Michigan the Bass Islands Dolomite appears to have favorable reservoir development. In west central Michigan the St. Peter sandstone exhibits excellent porosity in the Hart and Feuring well and looks promising. In Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian Basin, the Batten and Baird well provided valuable data on sequestration potential in organic shales through adsorption. In central and eastern Ohio and western West Virginia, the majority of the wells provided an insight to the complex geologic framework of the relatively little known Precambrian through Silurian potential injection targets. Although valuable data was acquired and a number of critical data gaps were filled through this effort, there are still many challenges ahead and questions that need answered. The lateral extent to which favorable potential injection conditions exist in most reservoirs is still generally uncertain. The prolongation of the characterization of regional geologic framework through partnership would continue to build confidence and greatly benefit the overall CO{sub 2} sequestration effort.

  17. Terthiophene radical cations end-capped by bicyclo[2.2.2]octene units: formation of bent pi-dimers mutually attracted at the central position.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Daisuke; Nishinaga, Tohru; Tanino, Nobuhide; Komatsu, Koichi

    2006-11-15

    A terthiophene fused with bicyclo[2.2.2]octene units only at both ends was newly synthesized. Since there is no steric hindrance at the central position, this terthiophene has a possibility to interact only at the central position. One-electron oxidation of this terthiophene afforded a highly stable radical-cation salt as deep blue crystals. The result of X-ray crystal structural analysis demonstrated a characteristically bent pi-dimereric structure, which is formed by mutual attraction of single radical-cation species at the central position to minimize the steric repulsion. Remarkably short intermolecular distances between the central thiophene rings of each unit of the dimeric pair, that is, 2.976(10) A for Cbeta-Cbeta, 3.091(10) A for Calpha-Calpha, and 3.779(3) A for S-S, are good indication of the existence of attracting interaction, which was confirmed by theoretical calculations. This interaction was experimentally demonstrated by the reversible formation of the pi-dimer in CH2Cl2 solution using ESR and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. The crystal of the pi-dimer is in its singlet state and ESR silent in the solid state at 300 K, but the signal of a triplet state of the pi-dimer was observed by heating the solid at 400 K. This indicates that this pi-dimer has a quite small triplet-singlet enegy gap and the triplet state is thermally accessible. PMID:17090025

  18. A functional glucocorticoid-responsive unit composed of two overlapping inactive receptor-binding sites: evidence for formation of a receptor tetramer.

    PubMed Central

    Garlatti, M; Daheshia, M; Slater, E; Bouguet, J; Hanoune, J; Beato, M; Barouki, R

    1994-01-01

    An unusual glucocorticoid-responsive element (called GRE A) was found to mediate the induction of the cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase gene by glucocorticoids and was bound by the glucocorticoid receptor in a DNase I footprinting assay. GRE A consists of two overlapping GREs, each comprising a conserved half-site and an imperfect half-site. The complete unit was able to confer glucocorticoid inducibility to a heterologous promoter (delta MTV-CAT). Mutation of any of the half-sites, including the imperfect ones, abolished inducibility by the hormone, demonstrating that each of the isolated GREs was inactive. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor (GR) formed a low-mobility complex with GRE A, presumably containing a GR tetramer. When purified bacterially expressed DBD was used, low-mobility complexes as well as dimer and monomer complexes were formed. In inactive mutated oligonucleotides, no GR tetramer formation was detected. Modification of the imperfect half-sites in order to increase their affinity for GR gave a DNA sequence that bound a GR tetramer in a highly cooperative manner. This activated unit consisting of two overlapping consensus GREs mediated glucocorticoid induction with a higher efficiency than consensus GRE. Images PMID:7969140

  19. Salting Constants of Small Organic Molecules in Aerosol-Relevant Salts and Application to Aerosol Formation in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, E.; Carlton, A. M. G.; Ziemann, P. J.; Volkamer, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from small water-soluble molecules such as glyoxal and methyl glyoxal is a topic of emerging interest. Results from recent field campaigns, e.g. Waxman et al. (2013, GRL) and Knote et al. (2014, ACP), show that these molecules can form significant SOA mass as a result of 'salting-in'. Salting-in happens when a molecule's solubility increases with salt concentration and salting-out is the reverse. Salting effects modify the solubility exponentially with increasing salt concentration, and thus the effective Henry's law constant can strongly modify partitioning, and multiphase chemical reaction rates in aerosol water. Moreover, the solubility in aerosol water cannot easily inferred based on the solubility in cloud water, as the salting effects could change the solubility by a factor of 104 or more. In this work, we have devised and applied a novel experimental setup to measure salting constants using an ion trap mass spectrometer. We focus on small, water soluble molecules like methyl glyoxal and similar compounds and measure salting constants for aerosol-relevant salts including ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, and sodium chloride. The Setschenow salting-constant values are then used to parameterize the effects of salting in CMAQ. We present a series of sensitivity studies of the effects that inorganic aerosols have on the SOA formation from small soluble molecules in the southeastern United States.

  20. Structural basis for the formation of acylalkylpyrones from two β-ketoacyl units by the fungal type III polyketide synthase CsyB.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takahiro; Yang, Dengfeng; Matsui, Takashi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Morita, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Isao; Abe, Ikuro

    2015-02-20

    The acylalkylpyrone synthase CsyB from Aspergillus oryzae catalyzes the one-pot formation of the 3-acyl-4-hydroxy-6-alkyl-α-pyrone scaffold from acetoacetyl-CoA, fatty acyl-CoA, and malonyl-CoA. This is the first type III polyketide synthase that performs not only the polyketide chain elongation but also the condensation of two β-ketoacyl units. The crystal structures of wild-type CsyB and its I375F and I375W mutants were solved at 1.7-, 2.3-, and 2.0-Å resolutions, respectively. The crystal structures revealed a unique active site architecture featuring a hitherto unidentified novel pocket for accommodation of the acetoacetyl-CoA starter in addition to the conventional elongation/cyclization pocket with the Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad and the long hydrophobic tunnel for binding the fatty acyl chain. The structures also indicated the presence of a putative nucleophilic water molecule activated by the hydrogen bond networks with His-377 and Cys-155 at the active site center. Furthermore, an in vitro enzyme reaction confirmed that the (18)O atom of the H2(18)O molecule is enzymatically incorporated into the final product. These observations suggested that the enzyme reaction is initiated by the loading of acetoacetyl-CoA onto Cys-155, and subsequent thioester bond cleavage by the nucleophilic water generates the β-keto acid intermediate, which is placed within the novel pocket. The second β-ketoacyl unit is then produced by polyketide chain elongation of fatty acyl-CoA with one molecule of malonyl-CoA, and the condensation with the β-keto acid generates the final products. Indeed, steric modulation of the novel pocket by the structure-based I375F and I375W mutations resulted in altered specificities for the chain lengths of the substrates. PMID:25564614

  1. CpsE from Type 2 Streptococcus pneumoniae Catalyzes the Reversible Addition of Glucose-1-Phosphate to a Polyprenyl Phosphate Acceptor, Initiating Type 2 Capsule Repeat Unit Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cartee, Robert T.; Forsee, W. Thomas; Bender, Matthew H.; Ambrose, Karita D.; Yother, Janet

    2005-01-01

    The majority of the 90 capsule types made by the gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae are assembled by a block-type mechanism similar to that utilized by the Wzy-dependent O antigens and capsules of gram-negative bacteria. In this mechanism, initiation of repeat unit formation occurs by the transfer of a sugar to a lipid acceptor. In S. pneumoniae, this step is catalyzed by CpsE, a protein conserved among the majority of capsule types. Membranes from S. pneumoniae type 2 strain D39 and Escherichia coli containing recombinant Cps2E catalyzed incorporation of [14C]Glc from UDP-[14C]Glc into a lipid fraction in a Cps2E-dependent manner. The Cps2E-dependent glycolipid product from both membranes was sensitive to mild acid hydrolysis, suggesting that Cps2E was catalyzing the formation of a polyprenyl pyrophosphate Glc. Addition of exogenous polyprenyl phosphates ranging in size from 35 to 105 carbons to D39 and E. coli membranes stimulated Cps2E activity. The stimulation was due, in part, to utilization of the exogenous polyprenyl phosphates as an acceptor. The glycolipid product synthesized in the absence of exogenous polyprenyl phosphates comigrated with a 60-carbon polyprenyl pyrophosphate Glc. When 10 or 100 μM UMP was added to reaction mixtures containing D39 membranes, Cps2E activity was inhibited 40% and 80%, respectively. UMP, which acted as a competitive inhibitor of UDP-Glc, also stimulated Cps2E to catalyze the reverse reaction, with synthesis of UDP-Glc from the polyprenyl pyrophosphate Glc. These data indicated that Cps2E was catalyzing the addition of Glc-1-P to a polyprenyl phosphate acceptor, likely undecaprenyl phosphate. PMID:16237026

  2. Contributions of Selected Biogenic and Aromatic Compounds to the Formation of Tropospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol over Several Sites in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaoui, M.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Lewandowski, M.; Offenberg, J. H.; Corse, E. W.; Gerald, T.; Edney, E.

    2009-12-01

    The National Exposure Research Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently undertook an integrated laboratory and field research effort to better understand the contribution of biogenic and aromatic hydrocarbons to the formation of submicron ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In the laboratory, isoprene, α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, 1,3-butadiene, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, benzene, and toluene were individually irradiated under a wide range of conditions in a photochemical reaction chamber in the presence of nitrogen oxide (NOx). These hydrocarbons are thought to contribute to ambient SOA formation. In field studies conducted in Research Triangle Park, NC; Duke Forest in Chapel Hill, NC; Atlanta, GA; Pensacola, FL; Birmingham and Centerville, AL; Riverside, CA; Detroit, MI; Northbrook, East St. Louis and Bondville, IL; and Cincinnati, OH, ambient PM2.5 samples were collected for various periods between 2003 and 2006. The SOA collected from these laboratory experiments and the ambient PM2.5 samples were analyzed for organic carbon (OC) concentration and for organic tracer compounds by GC-MS using BSTFA derivatization for their identification and quantification. An organic tracer-based method was developed for estimating ambient SOA concentrations from individual SOA precursors to allow an assessment of SOA model predictions with ambient data. The results show that several major reaction products detected in SOA formed in the laboratory photooxidations were among the major compounds detected in field samples, effectively connecting laboratory and field results. Using the tracer-based method, the contributions of isoprene and monoterpenes to SOA formation show strong seasonal dependencies. However, no clear seasonal variations were observed for sesquiterpenes and aromatic hydrocarbons. The contribution of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol to ambient SOA was found to be not only season dependent but also higher in locations dominated by conifers, which are

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the balance of forces governing the formation of a guanine tetrad—a common structural unit of G-quadruplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Mateusz; Kleist, Cyprian; Czub, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are nucleic acid conformations of guanine-rich sequences, in which guanines are arranged in the square-planar G-tetrads, stacked on one another. G4 motifs form in vivo and are implicated in regulation of such processes as gene expression and chromosome maintenance. The structure and stability of various G4 topologies were determined experimentally; however, the driving forces for their formation are not fully understood at the molecular level. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics to probe the microscopic origin of the G4 motif stability. By computing the free energy profiles governing the dissociation of the 3′-terminal G-tetrad in the telomeric parallel-stranded G4, we examined the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of a single G-tetrad, as a common structural unit of G4 DNA. Our results indicate that the energetics of guanine association alone does not explain the overall stability of the G-tetrad and that interactions involving sugar–phosphate backbone, in particular, the constrained minimization of the phosphate–phosphate repulsion energy, are crucial in providing the observed enthalpic stabilization. This enthalpic gain is largely compensated by the unfavorable entropy change due to guanine association and optimization of the backbone topology. PMID:26980278

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the balance of forces governing the formation of a guanine tetrad-a common structural unit of G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Mateusz; Kleist, Cyprian; Czub, Jacek

    2016-04-20

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are nucleic acid conformations of guanine-rich sequences, in which guanines are arranged in the square-planar G-tetrads, stacked on one another. G4 motifs formin vivoand are implicated in regulation of such processes as gene expression and chromosome maintenance. The structure and stability of various G4 topologies were determined experimentally; however, the driving forces for their formation are not fully understood at the molecular level. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics to probe the microscopic origin of the G4 motif stability. By computing the free energy profiles governing the dissociation of the 3'-terminal G-tetrad in the telomeric parallel-stranded G4, we examined the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of a single G-tetrad, as a common structural unit of G4 DNA. Our results indicate that the energetics of guanine association alone does not explain the overall stability of the G-tetrad and that interactions involving sugar-phosphate backbone, in particular, the constrained minimization of the phosphate-phosphate repulsion energy, are crucial in providing the observed enthalpic stabilization. This enthalpic gain is largely compensated by the unfavorable entropy change due to guanine association and optimization of the backbone topology. PMID:26980278

  5. Fishes and tetrapods in the upper pennsylvanian (kasimovian) cohn coal member of the mattoon formation of illinois, United States: Systematics, paleoecology, and paleoenvironments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, D.; Falcon-Lang, H. J.; Benton, M.J.; Nelson, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    A newly discovered vertebrate assemblage is reported from the Upper Pennsylvanian (mid-to upper Kasimovian) Cohn Coal Member of the Mattoon Formation of southeast Illinois, United States. Teeth, scales, and spines of xenacanth (Dicentrodus, Orthacanthus, Triodus, Xenacanthus) and euselachian (Sphenacanthus) sharks dominate the assemblage. Less common are the teeth, scales, and centra of holocephalan (Helodus) and actinopterygian fishes, together with rare tetrapod (mainly pelycosaur) phalanges and centra. The assemblage occurs within a broad, shallow channel incised into a prominent Vertisol. The channel is interpreted as having been cut during a seasonally dry glacial phase when sea level was low, but filled during a subsequent transgression triggered by deglaciation. We interpret this as a brackish water (estuarine) assemblage, based on the co-occurrence of the vertebrate material with spirorbids (putative microconchids) and paleoecological inferences gleaned from a critical analysis of the literature dealing with Pennsylvanian fish ecology. This interpretation is broadly consistent with taphonomic data and the results of 87Sr/86Sr isotope analysis of shark material. The pelycosaur material may have been reworked from the lowstand Vertisol, however, and these animals occupied dryland niches that developed during glacial phases. ?? 2011 SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  6. REACH. Electricity Units. Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gene; Sappe, Hoyt

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of electricity. The instructional units focus on electricity fundamentals and electric motors. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit sheet,…

  7. The nature of porosity in organic-rich mudstones of the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation, North Sea, offshore United Kingdom

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Neil S.; Hackley, Paul C.; Lowers, Heather; Hill, Ronald J.; Egenhoff, Sven O.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Blum, Alex E.

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of organic-rich mudstones from wells that penetrated the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation, offshore United Kingdom, were performed to evaluate the nature of both organic and inorganic rock constituents and their relation to porosity in this world-class source rock. The formation is at varying levels of thermal maturity, ranging from immature in the shallowest core samples to mature in the deepest core samples. The intent of this study was to evaluate porosity as a function of both organic macerals and thermal maturity. At least four distinct types of organic macerals were observed in petrographic and SEM analyses and they all were present across the study area. The macerals include, in decreasing abundance: 1) bituminite admixed with clays; 2) elongate lamellar masses (alginite or bituminite) with small quartz, feldspar, and clay entrained within it; 3) terrestrial (vitrinite, fusinite, semifusinite) grains; and 4) Tasmanites microfossils. Although pores in all maceral types were observed on ion-milled surfaces of all samples, the pores (largely nanopores with some micropores) vary as a function of maceral type. Importantly, pores in the macerals do not vary systematically as a function of thermal maturity, insofar as organic pores are of similar size and shape in both the immature and mature Kimmeridge rocks. If any organic pores developed during the generation of hydrocarbons, they were apparently not preserved, possibly because of the highly ductile nature of much of the rock constituents of Kimmeridge mudstones (clays and organic material). Inorganic pores (largely micropores with some nanopores) have been observed in all Kimmeridge mudstones. These pores, particularly interparticle (i.e., between clay platelets), and intraparticle (i.e., in framboidal pyrite, in partially dissolved detrital K-feldspar, and in both detrital and authigenic dolomite) are noteworthy because they compose much of the observable porosity in the shales in both

  8. Lacustrine anoxic event 1 (LAE1) recorded by rock magnetism of Unit 1 of Qingshankou Formation, Late Cretaceous Songliao Basin in Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, K.; Wu, H.; Yang, T.

    2011-12-01

    Songliao Basin, located in northeastern China, is one of the biggest cretaceous lakes in Asia, with most completely developed cretaceous stratigraphy. Therefore, it is a key area to study cretaceous palaeontology evolution and paleoenvironmental changes. Especially, anoxic events and marine transgressional events have been the research focuses for a long time. The lacustrine anoxic event 1 (LAE1) has been reported to happen in Songliao Basin during the deposition of unit 1 of Qingshankou Formation (K2qn1). In this study, K2qn1 was sampled from China Cretaceous Continental Scientific Drilling-Songke Ι (CCSD-SK-Ι) south borehole. The K2qn1, from 1700 m to 1782.8 m in the well log, mainly consists black shale and mudstone. LAE1 is the section from 1750 m to 1775 m. Detailed rock magnetic measurements were conducted, including magnetic susceptibility (χ) and susceptibility of anhysteretic remanence (χARM), saturation isothermal remanence (SIRM), S-ratio (IRM-100mT/SIRM), medial destroyed field of ARM (MDFARM), and temperature-dependence of magnetic susceptibilities (χ/T curves), acquiring curves and reverse demagnetic curves of IRM and thermal demagnetization of ARM and SIRM and Lowrie experiment for selected samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was also carried out for selected samples. The acquiring curves and reverse demagnetic curves of typical specimens and the thermal demagnetization of ARM and SIRM and the Lowrie experiment confirm that the major remanence-carrier is soft magnetite. Results of χ/T curves indicate that: for some specimens, pyrite exists (Li and Zhang, 2005); for most specimens, their χ decreases slowly during heating, suggesting a dominant contribution from paramagnetic minerals. Results of XRD suggest that these paramagnetic minerals may be feldspar, kaolinite and pyrite. So paramagnetic clay minerals control χ of K2qn1; and more clay minerals may induce higher natural gamma ray (GR). Therefore, χ and GR should be positive. On the contrary

  9. Value Formation: The Role of Political Parties. Grade Seven, Unit Five, 7.5. Comprehensive Social Studies Curriculum for the Inner City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Earl

    This seventh grade unit is one of a sequential learning series of the Focus on Inner City Social Studies (FICSS) project developed in accordance with the needs and problems of an urban society. A description of the project is provided in SO 008 271. This unit studies ways in which political parties are both the source of many of our values and the…

  10. REACH. Heating Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Carter; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized units in the area of heating. The instructional units focus on electric heating systems, gas heating systems, and oil burning systems. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit…

  11. Examining the role of NOx and acidity on organic aerosol formation through predictions of key isoprene aerosol species in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isoprene is a significant contributor to organic aerosol in the Southeastern United States. Later generation isoprene products, specifically isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) and methacryloylperoxynitrate (MPAN), have been identified as SOA precursors. The contribution of each pathway ...

  12. Expected CO2-Water-Rock Interactions and Changes in Formation Porosity in a Deep Saline Aquifer in Florida, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, J. A.; Okwen, R. T.; Thomas, M. W.; Trotz, M. A.; Stewart, M.

    2009-12-01

    It has been proposed that deep saline aquifers in the state of Florida might be suitable repositories for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) during carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). In particular, the Cedar Keys Formation and the underlying Cretaceous Lawson Formation of south-central and south Florida have been identified as a potentially suitable repository. These formations are believed to consist predominantly of porous dolomite, with smaller amounts of calcite and gypsum also present. A key question related to the suitability of these formations as a CO2 repository is how the porosity of the formations will change in response to injection of supercritical CO2, e.g., due to dissolution or precipitation of minerals caused by the CO2 injection. In response to this question, we performed modeling studies to estimate the magnitude of likely changes in formation geochemistry, with particular attention to changes in porosity. Our simulations suggest that, as CO2 moves laterally outward from an injection well, dissolution of CO2 into native brine will cause a decrease in pH. This will, in turn, cause dissolution of dolomite and calcite and accompanying precipitation of gypsum. However, these dissolution/precipitation reactions are predicted to cause only slight changes in formation porosity over an injection period of 100 years, even at high injection rates (several million tons of CO2 per year). Furthermore, this result is relatively insensitive to model input parameters such as the background pH of the brine. Therefore, based on results to date, we have no reason to rule out the proposed formations as suitable repositories for long-term CO2 storage.

  13. The impact of contaminated biomass for the formation of emission in the combustion process of producer gas in the cogeneration unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kočanová, Slávka; Lukáč, Ladislav; Széplaky, Dávid; Lazić, Ladislav

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents the measurement result to the equipment designed for utilization contaminated biomass with segregated waste. Presented technology gasification of segregated waste together with biomass shows the optimization process of converting solid fuel to gas and its energy utilization in the cogeneration unit.

  14. A Formative Evaluation of Me Now, Unit I, Digestion and Circulation, Life Sciences for the Educable Mentally Handicapped Intermediate Grades (11-13 years).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, James T.; Tolman, Richard R.

    In order to evaluate Unit I (Digestion and Circulation) of the Me Now series of Life Sciences for the Educable Mentally Handicapped, 139 students in an experimental group (mean IQ 72.04; mean CA 144.9 months) and 154 control subjects (mean IQ 70.2; mean CA 148.3 months) were pre- and post-tested following instruction in the Me Now series…

  15. Pore-Water Quality in the Clay-Silt Confining Units of the Lower Miocene Kirkwood Formation and Hypothetical Effects on Water Quality in the Atlantic City 800-Foot Sand, Northeastern Cape May County, New Jersey, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, Zoltan; Keller, Elizabeth A.; Defawe, Rose M.

    2006-01-01

    Pore water was extracted from clay-silt core samples collected from a borehole at Ocean View, west of Sea Isle City, in northeastern Cape May County, New Jersey. The borehole intersects the lower Miocene Kirkwood Formation, which includes a thick sand and gravel unit between two clay-silt units. The sand and gravel unit forms a major confined aquifer in the region, known as the Atlantic City 800-foot sand, the major source of potable water along the Atlantic Coast of southern New Jersey. The pore water from the core is of interest because the borehole intersects the aquifer in an area where the ground water is sodium-rich and sulfidic. Locally in the aquifer in central and southern Cape May County, sodium concentrations are near the New Jersey secondary drinking-water standard of 50 mg/L (milligrams per liter), and typically are greater than 30 mg/L, but chloride and sulfate do not approach their respective secondary drinking-water standards except in southernmost Cape May County. Pore waters from the confining units are suspected to be a source of sodium, sulfur, and chloride to the aquifer. Constituent concentrations in filtered pore-water samples were determined using the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analytical technique to facilitate the determination of low-level concentrations of many trace constituents. Calcium-sodium-sulfate-bicarbonate, calcium-chloride-sulfate, calcium-sulfate, and sodium-sulfate-chloride-bicarbonate type waters characterize samples from the deepest part of the confining unit directly overlying the aquifer (termed the 'lower' confining unit). A sodium-chloride-sulfate type water is dominant in the composite confining unit below the aquifer. Sodium, chloride, and sulfate became increasingly dominant with depth. Pore water from the deepest sample recovered (1,390 ft (feet) below land surface) was brackish, with concentrations of sodium, chloride, and sulfate of 5,930, 8,400, and 5,070 mg/L, respectively. Pore-water samples

  16. K/Ar chronologies of tephra units from the Middle Jurassic Sundance, and Late Early Cretaceous Mowry and Shell Creek Formations, Big Horn Basin, WY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Meyer, E. E.; Johnson, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Middle Jurassic Sundance and Late Early Cretaceous Shell Creek and Mowry Formations of the Big Horn Basin, Wyoming, contain an extensive record of altered tephra. These tephra are likely related to contemporary volcanic activity in the Sierra Nevada and various Coast Range terranes to the west and provide valuable chronometric control on the sedimentary record within a portion of the Sevier-aged and later Cordilleran foreland basin. In addition, several of these altered tephra (bentonites) provide a valuable economic resource. Despite the prominence of these strata across the basin, few isotopic ages have been reported to date. Here we present new K/Ar ages on biotite phenocrysts from those tephra occurrences as a chronometric check on samples that contained zircons with significant Pb loss, that preclude more precise U/Pb age determinations. A bulk biotite sample extracted from an altered tuff in the Lower Sundance Formation gives an age of 167.5 × 5 Ma. This tuff occurs just above a dinosaur track-bearing peritidal sequence. Bulk biotite ages from the lower Shell Creek Formation give an age of 100.3 × 3 Ma and are statistically indistinguishable from biotite grains dated at 103.1 × 3 Ma extracted from the economically important 'Clay Spur' bentonite found at the top of the Mowry Shale. This work provides important new chronometric constraints on a portion of the Medial Jurassic to Late Early Cretaceous stratigraphy of the Big Horn Basin, Wyoming, and may be useful in understanding the regional tectonics that helped shape the development of the Sevier foreland basin and Western Interior Seaway.

  17. Glaciation and saline-freshwater mixing as a possible cause of cave formation in the eastern midcontinent region of the United States: A conceptual model

    SciTech Connect

    Panno, S.V. ); Bourcier, W.L. )

    1990-08-01

    We present a hypothesis for the formation of caves and associated karst features near the southern margins of the Illinois, Michigan, and Appalachian basins. Spatial and temporal relations among intracratonic basins, karstic terrain, and continental glaciation suggest that Pleistocene glaciation may have initiated the discharge of saline waters from the margins of these basins. Glaciation-induced discharge of saline waters could result from the consolidation of sediments due to the overlying pressure of glacial ice, and flushing of underlying aquifers as a result of bottom melting in recharge areas of basic aquifers. The upward migration of basin-derived saline waters into near-surface aquifers would result in the mixing of saline waters with infiltrating glacial meltwater and meteoric water. The development of a vertically restricted zone of mixing of saline and fresh water in limestone aquifers would result in the dissolution of limestone; this mechanism could be responsible for the formation, or at least the initiation of, some caves and associated karst features in the midcontinent region.

  18. Probing into regional O3 and particulate matter pollution in the United States: 2. An examination of formation mechanisms through a process analysis technique and sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Wen, Xin-Yu; Wang, Kai; Vijayaraghavan, Krish; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2009-11-01

    Following a comprehensive model evaluation in part 1, this part 2 paper describes results from 1 year process analysis and a number of sensitivity simulations using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system aimed to understand the formation mechanisms of O3 and PM2.5, their impacts on global environment, and implications for pollution control policies. Process analyses show that the most influential processes for O3 in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) are vertical and horizontal transport, gas-phase chemistry, and dry deposition and those for PM2.5 are primary PM emissions, horizontal transport, PM processes, and cloud processes. Exports of O3 and Ox from the U.S. PBL to free troposphere occur primarily in summer and at a rate of 0.16 and 0.65 Gmoles day-1, respectively. In contrast, export of PM2.5 is found to occur during all seasons and at rates of 25.68-34.18 Ggrams day-1, indicating a need to monitor and control PM2.5 throughout the year. Among nine photochemical indicators examined, the most robust include PH2O2/PHNO3, HCHO/NOy, and HCHO/NOz in winter and summer, H2O2/(O3 + NO2) in winter, and NOy in summer. They indicate a VOC-limited O3 chemistry in most areas in winter, but a NOx-limited O3 chemistry in most areas except for major cities in April-November, providing a rationale for nationwide NOx emission control and integrated control of NOx and VOCs emissions for large cities during high O3 seasons (May-September). For sensitivity of PM2.5 to its precursors, the adjusted gas ratio provides a more robust indicator than that without adjustment, especially for areas with insufficient sulfate neutralization in winter. NH4NO3 can be formed in most of the domain. Integrated control of emissions of PM precursors such as SO2, NOx, and NH3 are necessary for PM2.5 attainment. Among four types of VOCs examined, O3 formation is primarily affected by isoprene and low molecular weight anthropogenic VOCs, and PM2.5 formation is affected largely by

  19. Do ages of authigenic K-feldspar date the formation of Mississippi valley-type Pb-Zn deposits, central and southeastern United States?: Pb isotopic evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Walter, M.; Kunk, M.J.; Hearn, P.P., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Pb concentrations and isotopic compositions have been determined for authigenic overgrowths and detrital cores of K-feldspar from Cambrian sedimentary rocks in Texas, Tennessee, and Pennsylvania (group 1) and southeastern Missouri (group 2). Overgrowths and cores were separated by abrasion and analyzed separately. The disparity in Pb isotopic ratios of group 1 overgrowths and Pb in nearby Mississippi Valley-type deposits implies that the regional authigenic K-feldspar event was not synchronous with ore deposition in the southeastern United States. In contrast, Pb isotopic ratios from group 2 authigenic K-feldspar are similar to ratios in ores of southeastern Missouri, suggesting a genetic relation in late Paleozoic time. -from Authors

  20. Asteroid mega-impacts and Precambrian banded iron formations: 2.63 Ga and 2.56 Ga impact ejecta/fallout at the base of BIF/argillite units, Hamersley Basin, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glikson, Andrew; Vickers, John

    2007-02-01

    The temporal association between late Archaean to earliest Proterozoic asteroid impact ejecta/fallout units and overlying banded iron formations suggests that, in some instances, these impacts were closely followed by significant transformation in the nature of source terrains of the sediments. The Jeerinah Impact Layer (JIL) [B.M. Simonson, D. Davies, S.W. Hassler, Discovery of a layer of probable impact melt spherules in the late Archean Jeerinah Formation, Fortescue Group, Western Australia. Aust. J. Earth Sci. 47 (2000) 315-325; B.M. Simonson, S.W. Hassler, Revised correlations in the early Precambrian Hamersley Basin based on a horizon of resedimented impact spherules. Aust. J. Earth Sci. 44 (1997) 37-48; B.M. Simonson, B.P. Glass, Spherule layers - records of ancient impacts. Ann. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 32 (2004) 329-361; A.Y. Glikson, Early Precambrian asteroid impact-triggered tsunami: excavated seabed, debris flows, exotic boulders, and turbulence features associated with 3.47-2.47 Ga-old asteroid impact fallout units, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. Astrobiology 4 (2001) 19-50; S.W. Hassler, B.M. Simonson, D.Y. Sumner, D. Murphy, Neoarchaean impact spherule layers in the Fortescue and Hamersley Groups, Western Australia: stratigraphic and depositional implications of re-correlation. Aust. J. Earth Sci. 52 (2005) 759-772; B. Rasmussen, C. Koeberl, Iridium anomalies and shocked quartz in a late Archean spherule layer from the Pilbara Craton: new evidence for a major asteroid impact at 2.63 Ga. Geology 32 (2004) 1029-1032; B. Rasmussen, T.S. Blake, I.R. Fletcher, U-Pb zircon age constraints on the Hamersley spherule beds: Evidence for a single 2.63 Ga Jeerinah-Carawine impact ejecta layer. Geology, 33 (2005) 725-728.] overlies an argillite-dominated unit (Jeerinah Formation, 2684 ± 6 Ma [A.F. Trendall, W. Compston, D.R. Nelson, J.R. deLaeter, V.C. Bennett, SHRIMP zircon ages constraining the depositional chronology of the Hamersley Group, Western

  1. Assessment of the types of catheter infectivity caused by Candida species and their biofilm formation. First study in an intensive care unit in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Seddiki, Sidi Mohammed Lahbib; Boucherit-Otmani, Zahia; Boucherit, Kebir; Badsi-Amir, Souad; Taleb, Mourad; Kunkel, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Nosocomial candidiasis remains a potential risk in intensive care units (ICUs), wherein Candida albicans is most responsible for its occurrence. Equally, non-C. albicans species, especially C. glabrata, are also involved. These infections are frequently associated with biofilms that contaminate medical devices, such as catheters. These biofilms constitute a significant clinical problem, and cause therapeutic failures, because they can escape the immune response and considerably decrease sensitivity to antifungal therapy. The diagnosis of catheter-related candidiasis is difficult; however, the differentiation between an infection of the catheter (or other medical implant) and a simple contamination is essential to start an antifungal treatment. Among the methods used for this type of study is the Brun-Buisson method, but this method only examines the infectivity of catheters caused by bacteria. For this reason, we wanted to adapt this method to the yeast cells of Candida spp. To assess the various types of infectivity of catheters (contamination, colonization, or infection) and their corresponding rates, as well as the responsible yeast species, we conducted our study, between February 2011 and January 2012, in the ICU at the University Hospital Center of Sidi Bel Abbes, Algeria; during this study, we took photographic images of the tongue of one patient and of that patient's implanted orobronchial catheter. In addition, catheters contaminated by C. albicans biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy. PMID:23345986

  2. Assessment of the types of catheter infectivity caused by Candida species and their biofilm formation. First study in an intensive care unit in Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Seddiki, Sidi Mohammed Lahbib; Boucherit-Otmani, Zahia; Boucherit, Kebir; Badsi-Amir, Souad; Taleb, Mourad; Kunkel, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Nosocomial candidiasis remains a potential risk in intensive care units (ICUs), wherein Candida albicans is most responsible for its occurrence. Equally, non-C. albicans species, especially C. glabrata, are also involved. These infections are frequently associated with biofilms that contaminate medical devices, such as catheters. These biofilms constitute a significant clinical problem, and cause therapeutic failures, because they can escape the immune response and considerably decrease sensitivity to antifungal therapy. The diagnosis of catheter-related candidiasis is difficult; however, the differentiation between an infection of the catheter (or other medical implant) and a simple contamination is essential to start an antifungal treatment. Among the methods used for this type of study is the Brun-Buisson method, but this method only examines the infectivity of catheters caused by bacteria. For this reason, we wanted to adapt this method to the yeast cells of Candida spp. To assess the various types of infectivity of catheters (contamination, colonization, or infection) and their corresponding rates, as well as the responsible yeast species, we conducted our study, between February 2011 and January 2012, in the ICU at the University Hospital Center of Sidi Bel Abbes, Algeria; during this study, we took photographic images of the tongue of one patient and of that patient’s implanted orobronchial catheter. In addition, catheters contaminated by C. albicans biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy. PMID:23345986

  3. Influence of coarse lag formation on the mechanics of sediment pulse dispersion in a mountain stream, Squire Creek, North Cascades, Washington, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brummer, Chris J.; Montgomery, David R.

    2006-07-01

    Mountain channels closely coupled to landslide-prone hillslopes often exhibit bed surface grain sizes coarser than transportable by annual high flows. Coarse particles within poorly sorted sediment delivered to channels by mass-wasting processes may not be readily transported as bed load and can consequently form lag deposits that influence the morphology, hydraulic roughness, and sediment storage within mountain channel networks. A tracer study and comparison of supply and bed grain size distributions from a valley-spanning landslide in the North Cascades of Washington state were used to derive relations between shear stress and the probability of particle entrainment and erosion from the sediment pulse. Rapid bed surface armoring formed a relatively immobile lag deposit within 2 years. Covering of 20% of the bed by lag boulders with <5% probability of entrainment was sufficient to retard vertical incision and force considerable channel widening during a flood with an 8- to 152-year recurrence discharge on locally gauged streams. Our results imply that numerical models of sediment pulse evolution that do not explicitly incorporate the influence of lag formation may substantially overestimate long-term dispersion rates. The grain size distribution and lithology of a sediment input relative to the flow competence of the receiving channel are important factors influencing the rates and mechanisms of sediment pulse dispersion and the sediment capacitance provided by coarse-grained sediment pulses in mountain drainage basins.

  4. Spatial and seasonal variations of fine particle water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) over the Southeastern United States: implications for secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Liu, Z.; Hecobian, A.; Zheng, M.; Frank, N. H.; Edgerton, E. S.; Weber, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the Southeastern US is investigated by analyzing the spatial-temporal distribution of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and other PM2.5 components from 900 archived 24 h Teflon filters collected at 15 urban or rural EPA Federal Reference Method (FRM) network sites throughout 2007. Online measurements of WSOC at an urban/rural-paired site in Georgia in the summer of 2008 are contrasted to the filter data. Based on FRM filters, excluding biomass-burning events (levoglucosan < 50 ng m-3), WSOC and sulfate were highly correlated with PM2.5 mass and both comprised a large mass fraction of PM2.5 (13% and 35%, respectively). Sulfate and WSOC both tracked ambient temperature throughout the year, suggesting the temperature effects were mainly on the photochemical processes that lead to secondary formation. FRM WSOC, and to a lesser extent sulfate, were spatially homogeneous throughout the region, yet WSOC was moderately enhanced (27%) in locations of greater predicted isoprene emissions in summer. A Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis identified two major source types for the summer WSOC; 22% of the WSOC were associated with ammonium sulfate, and 56% of the WSOC was associated with brown carbon and oxalate. A small urban excess of FRM WSOC (10%) was observed in the summer of 2007, however, comparisons of online WSOC measurements at one urban/rural pair (Atlanta/Yorkville) in August 2008 showed substantially greater difference in WSOC (31%) relative to the FRM data, suggesting a low bias for urban filters. The measured Atlanta urban excess, combined with the estimated boundary layer heights, gave an estimated Atlanta daily WSOC production rate in August of 0.55 mg C m-2 h-1 between mid-morning and mid-afternoon. This study characterizes the regional nature of fine particles in the Southeastern US, confirming the importance of secondary organic aerosol and the roles of both biogenic and anthropogenic emissions.

  5. Mesenchymal stromal cells, colony-forming unit fibroblasts, from bone marrow of untreated advanced breast and lung cancer patients suppress fibroblast colony formation from healthy marrow.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Erica Leonor; Labovsky, Vivian; La Russa, Vincent; Vallone, Valeria Fernández; Honegger, Alba Elizabeth; Belloc, Carlos Gabriel; Wen, Huei Chi; Bordenave, Raúl Horacio; Bullorsky, Eduardo Oscar; Feldman, Leonardo; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra

    2010-03-01

    We have shown that bone marrow (BM) from untreated advanced lung and breast cancer patients (LCP and BCP) have a reduced number of colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Factors that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of CFU-F are produced by the patients' BM microenvironment. We have now examined whether conditioned media (CM) from patients' CFU-F-derived stromal cells also inhibits the colony-forming efficiency (CFE) of CFU-F in primary cultures from healthy volunteers (HV)-BM. Thus the number and proliferation potential of HV-CFU-F were also found to be decreased and similar to colony numbers and colony size of patients' CFU-F. Stromal cells from both of these types of colonies appeared relatively larger and lacked the characteristic spindle morphology typically seen in healthy stromal cells. We developed an arbitrary mesenchymal stromal cell maturational index by taking three measures consisting of stromal cell surface area, longitudinal and horizontal axis. All stromal indices derived from HV-CFU-F grown in patients' CM were similar to those from stromal elements derived from patients' CFU-F. These indices were markedly higher than stromal indices typical of HV-CFU-F cultured in healthy CM or standard medium [alpha-medium plus 20% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (FBS)]. Patients' CM had increased concentrations of the CFU-F inhibitor, GM-CSF, and low levels of bFGF and Dkk-1, strong promoters of self-renewal of MSCs, compared to the levels quantified in CM from HV-CFU-F. Moreover, the majority of patients' MSCs were unresponsive in standard medium and healthy CM to give CFU-F, indicating that the majority of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients' CFU-F are locked in maturational arrest. These results show that alterations of GM-CSF, bFGF, and Dkk-1 are associated with deficient cloning and maturation arrest of CFU-F. Defective autocrine and paracrine mechanisms may be involved in the BM microenvironments of

  6. Aqueous-phase mechanism for secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene: application to the Southeast United States and co-benefit of SO2 emission controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, E. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Hu, W.; Krechmer, J.; Zhu, L.; Kim, P. S.; Miller, C. C.; Fisher, J. A.; Travis, K.; Yu, K.; Hanisco, T. F.; Wolfe, G. M.; Arkinson, H. L.; Pye, H. O. T.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.; McNeill, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    Isoprene emitted by vegetation is an important precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but the mechanism and yields are uncertain. Aerosol is prevailingly aqueous under the humid conditions typical of isoprene-emitting regions. Here we develop an aqueous-phase mechanism for isoprene SOA formation coupled to a detailed gas-phase isoprene oxidation scheme. The mechanism is based on aerosol reactive uptake probabilities (γ) for water-soluble isoprene oxidation products, including sensitivity to aerosol acidity and nucleophile concentrations. We apply this mechanism to simulation of aircraft (SEAC4RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations over the Southeast US in summer 2013 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) over the Southeast US are such that the peroxy radicals produced from isoprene oxidation (ISOPO2) react significantly with both NO (high-NOx pathway) and HO2 (low-NOx pathway), leading to different suites of isoprene SOA precursors. We find a mean SOA mass yield of 3.3 % from isoprene oxidation, consistent with the observed relationship of OA and formaldehyde (a product of isoprene oxidation). The yield is mainly contributed by two immediate gas-phase precursors, isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX, 58 % of isoprene SOA) from the low-NOx pathway and glyoxal (28 %) from both low- and high-NOx pathways. This speciation is consistent with observations of IEPOX SOA from SOAS and SEAC4RS. Observations show a strong relationship between IEPOX SOA and sulfate aerosol that we explain as due to the indirect effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity and volume, rather than a direct mechanistic role for sulfate. Isoprene SOA concentrations increase as NOx emissions decrease (favoring the low-NOx pathway for isoprene oxidation), but decrease as SO2 emissions decrease (due to the effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity and volume). The US EPA projects 2013-2025 decreases in anthropogenic emissions of 34 % for NOx (leading to

  7. Aqueous-phase mechanism for secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene: application to the southeast United States and co-benefit of SO2 emission controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, E. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Hu, W.; Krechmer, J.; Zhu, L.; Kim, P. S.; Miller, C. C.; Fisher, J. A.; Travis, K.; Yu, K.; Hanisco, T. F.; Wolfe, G. M.; Arkinson, H. L.; Pye, H. O. T.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.; McNeill, V. F.

    2016-02-01

    Isoprene emitted by vegetation is an important precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but the mechanism and yields are uncertain. Aerosol is prevailingly aqueous under the humid conditions typical of isoprene-emitting regions. Here we develop an aqueous-phase mechanism for isoprene SOA formation coupled to a detailed gas-phase isoprene oxidation scheme. The mechanism is based on aerosol reactive uptake coefficients (γ) for water-soluble isoprene oxidation products, including sensitivity to aerosol acidity and nucleophile concentrations. We apply this mechanism to simulation of aircraft (SEAC4RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations over the southeast US in summer 2013 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) over the southeast US are such that the peroxy radicals produced from isoprene oxidation (ISOPO2) react significantly with both NO (high-NOx pathway) and HO2 (low-NOx pathway), leading to different suites of isoprene SOA precursors. We find a mean SOA mass yield of 3.3 % from isoprene oxidation, consistent with the observed relationship of total fine organic aerosol (OA) and formaldehyde (a product of isoprene oxidation). Isoprene SOA production is mainly contributed by two immediate gas-phase precursors, isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX, 58 % of isoprene SOA) from the low-NOx pathway and glyoxal (28 %) from both low- and high-NOx pathways. This speciation is consistent with observations of IEPOX SOA from SOAS and SEAC4RS. Observations show a strong relationship between IEPOX SOA and sulfate aerosol that we explain as due to the effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity and volume. Isoprene SOA concentrations increase as NOx emissions decrease (favoring the low-NOx pathway for isoprene oxidation), but decrease more strongly as SO2 emissions decrease (due to the effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity and volume). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) projects 2013-2025 decreases in anthropogenic emissions of

  8. The formation of volcanic centers at the Colorado Plateau as a result of the passage of aqueous fluid through the oceanic lithosphere and the subcontinental mantle: New implications for the planetary water cycle in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Holger; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Gasharova, Biliana; Jung, Haemyeong

    2012-10-01

    We provide new petrological evidence for the strong influence of water on the formation of the oceanic lithospheric mantle, the subcontinental mantle above, and the continental lithosphere. Our analysis throws new light on the hypothesis that new continental lithosphere was formed by the passage of silicate-rich aqueous fluid through the sub-continental mantle. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we analyzed a representative collection of lherzolite and harzburgite xenoliths from the sample volcano known as "The Thumb", located in the center of the Colorado Plateau, western United States. The studied sample collection exhibits multi-stage water enrichment processes along point, line and planar defect structures in nominally anhydrous minerals and the subsequent formation of the serpentine polymorph antigorite along grain boundaries and in totally embedded annealed cracks. Planar defect structures act like monomineralic and interphase grain boundaries in the oceanic lithosphere and the subcontinental mantle beneath the North American plate, which was hydrated by the ancient oceanic Farallon plate during the Cenozoic and Mesozoic eras. We used microspectroscopical, petrological, and seismological techniques to confirm multi-stage hydration from a depth of ˜150 km to just below the Moho depth. High-resolution mapping of the water distribution over homogeneous areas and fully embedded point, line and planar defects in olivine crystals of lherzolitic and harzburgitic origin by synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy enabled us to resolve local wet spots and thus reconstruct the hydration process occurring at a depth of ˜150 km (T ≈ 1225 °C). These lherzolites originated from the middle part of the Farallon mantle slab; they were released during the break up of the Farallon mantle slab, caused by the instability of the dipping slab. The background hydration levels in homogeneous olivines reached ˜138 ppm wt H2O, and the water concentration at the planar defects

  9. Cours Commercial (Business Education Unit).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Gerald

    This business education unit in French was prepared for use in a bilingual education program at the twelfth grade level. The purpose of the unit is to improve typing skills in French. The unit covers the following objectives: (1) the location and typing of French characters on the keyboard; (2) the format of a business letter in French; (3)…

  10. A late Miocene-early Pliocene chain of lakes fed by the Colorado River: Evidence from Sr, C, and O isotopes of the Bouse Formation and related units between Grand Canyon and the Gulf of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roskowski, J.A.; Patchett, P.J.; Spencer, J.E.; Pearthree, P.A.; Dettman, D.L.; Faulds, J.E.; Reynolds, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    We report strontium isotopic results for the late Miocene Hualapai Limestone of the Lake Mead area (Arizona-Nevada) and the latest Miocene to early Pliocene Bouse Formation and related units of the lower Colorado River trough (Arizona-California-Nevada), together with parallel oxygen and carbon isotopic analyses of Bouse samples, to constrain the lake-overflow model for integration of the Colorado River. Sr iso topic analyses on the basal 1-5 cm of marl, in particular along a transect over a range of altitude in the lowest-altitude basin that contains freshwater, brackish, and marine fossils, document the 87Sr/86Sr of first-arriving Bouse waters. Results reinforce the similarity between the 87Sr/86Sr of Bouse Formation carbonates and present-day Colorado River water, and the systematic distinction of these values from Neogene marine Sr. Basal Bouse samples show that 87Sr/86Sr decreased from 0.7111 to values in the range 0.7107-0.7109 during early basin filling. 87Sr/86Sr values from a recently identified marl in the Las Vegas area are within the range of Bouse Sr ratios. 87Sr/86Sr values from the Hualapai Limestone decrease upsection from 0.7195 to 0.7137, in the approach to a time soon after 6 Ma when Hualapai deposition ceased and the Colorado River became established through the Lake Mead area. Bouse Formation ??18O values range from -12.9??? to +1.0??? Vienna Pee Dee belemnite (VPDB), and ??13C between -6.5??? and +3.4??? VPDB. Negative ??18O values appear to require a continental origin for waters, and the trend to higher ??18O suggests evaporation in lake waters. Sr and stable isotopic results for sectioned barnacle shells and from bedding planes of the marine fish fossil Colpichthys regis demonstrate that these animals lived in saline freshwater, and that there is no evidence for incursions of marine water, either long-lived or brief in duration. Lack of correlation of Sr and O isotopic variations in the same samples also argue strongly against systematic

  11. Concerning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadlinger, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    SI units come in two distinct types: fundamental (kilogram, meter) and descriptive (atom, molecule). Proper/improper uses of atom/molecule from historical cases are presented followed by a re-introduction of a light "wave (cycle)" unit and the clearly defined photon model which is deduced. Also examines omission of the fundamental unit "radon."…

  12. The Use of SI Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Standards Institution, London (England).

    This booklet (referred to as PD 5686:1969) replaces the 1967 edition by including subsequent recommendations of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM). The International System of Units (SI) is described and rules are given for the formation of derived units and decimal…

  13. Imperfect Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Katherine

    This unit provides visual activities to engage students in learning the imperfect tense in Spanish. Upon completion of the unit, students will be able to do the following: identify imperfect tense conjugation in children's books; conjugate verbs in the imperfect tense; list uses of the imperfect tense; discriminate between the imperfect tense and…

  14. UNIT, ALASKA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THE UNIT DESCRIBED IN THIS BOOKLET DEALS WITH THE GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. THE UNIT IS PRESENTED IN OUTLINE FORM. THE FIRST SECTION DEALS PRINCIPALLY WITH THE PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. DISCUSSED ARE (1) THE SIZE, (2) THE MAJOR LAND REGIONS, (3) THE MOUNTAINS, VOLCANOES, GLACIERS, AND RIVERS, (4) THE NATURAL RESOURCES, AND (5) THE CLIMATE. THE…

  15. Concept Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidya, Narendera

    This document, published in India by the Regional College of Education, deals with 13 subjects: the tough context (thinking), definitions of concept, functions of concept, the process of concept formation, discriminant learning, mediation process, second signalling system, factors affecting concept formation, studies in concept formation, the…

  16. New Frontiers in Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noyce, Pendred E., Ed.; Hickey, Daniel T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Formative assessment is a powerful learning tool that is too seldom, too haphazardly, and too ineffectively used in the United States," Pendred E. Noyce writes in the introduction to this volume. "The purpose of this book is to delve into why this is so and how it can be changed." Formative assessment involves constantly monitoring student…

  17. Evaluation of real-time PM2.5 forecasts and process analysis for PM2.5 formation over the eastern United States using the Eta-CMAQ forecast model during the 2004 ICARTT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shaocai; Mathur, Rohit; Schere, Kenneth; Kang, Daiwen; Pleim, Jonathan; Young, Jeffrey; Tong, Daniel; Pouliot, George; McKeen, Stuart A.; Rao, S. T.

    2008-03-01

    The performance of the Eta-Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system in forecasting PM2.5 and chemical species is assessed over the eastern United States with the observations obtained by aircraft (NOAA P-3 and NASA DC-8) and four surface monitoring networks (AIRNOW, IMPROVE, CASTNet and STN) during the 2004 International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) study. The results of the statistical analysis at the AIRNOW sites show that the model was able to reproduce the day-to-day and spatial variations of observed PM2.5 and captured a majority (73%) of PM2.5 observations within a factor of 2, with normalized mean bias of -21%. The consistent underestimations in regional PM2.5 forecast at other networks (IMPROVE and STN) were mainly due to the underestimation of total carbonaceous aerosols at both urban and rural sites. The significant underestimation of the "other" category, which predominantly is composed of primary emitted trace elements in the current model configuration, is also one of the reasons leading to the underestimation of PM2.5 at rural sites. The systematic overestimations of SO42- both at the surface sites and aloft, in part, suggest too much SO2 cloud oxidation due to the overestimation of SO2 and H2O2 in the model. The underestimation of NH4+ at the rural sites and aloft may be attributed to the exclusion of some sources of NH3 in the emission inventory. The systematic underestimations of NO3- may result from the general overestimations of SO42-. Note that there are compensating errors among the underestimation of PM2.5 species (such as total carbonaceous aerosols) and overestimation of PM2.5 species (such as SO42-), leading to generally better performance of PM2.5 mass. The systematic underestimation of biogenic isoprene (by ˜30%) and terpene (by a factor of 4) suggests that their biogenic emissions may have been biased low, whereas the consistent overestimations of toluene by the model under

  18. Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In today's climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, educators are challenged to continuously monitor student progress to ensure achievement. This article details how formative assessment helps educators meet this challenge and to ensure achievement. Formative assessment can influence learning and support achievement, allowing teachers…

  19. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Instructional units deal with each aspect of conservation: forests, wildlife, rangelands, water, minerals, and soil. The area of the secondary school curriculum with which each is correlated is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the topic, questions to…

  20. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  1. Examining the Effects of READ 180 with Sixth Grade Students in a Southwest United States School District Based on a Formative Assessment--Measures of Academic Progress--and Its Impact on Leadership Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    An achievement gap in reading existed in a Southwest United States school district with Hispanic, economically disadvantaged, English Language Learners (ELLs), and special education sixth grade students based on Measures of Academic Progress data. This study investigated the effectiveness of the "READ 180" reading intervention program…

  2. Estimating permeability in the Wilcox G' sandstone in the Lake Creek Gas unit well No. 48 using data from logging measurements. The evaluation of formation permeability using time lapse measurements during and after drilling. Topical report, September 1991-August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Holditch, S.A.; Yao, C.Y.

    1993-08-01

    In this research, the authors have developed technology that allows an engineer to better understand mud filtration in low to medium permeability gas reservoirs. They use this knowledge to analyze log data to improve our estimates of formation permeability by layer. By developing accurate permeability profiles of the reservoir layers, they can optimize well completions in layered complex gas reservoirs.

  3. Educational Policy and the Choice of Language in Linguistically Complex South African Schools. Formative Decision-Making by Significant Language Professionals and Governing Bodies. Education Policy Unit (Natal) Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David

    A 1996 South African law vested elementary/secondary school governing bodies with formation of school policy concerning both language(s) used for instruction and those selected for second-language study. The study reported here investigated the perceptions of language teachers, principals, and governing body members on language policy, policy…

  4. Teaching an Endangered Species Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilty, Joan; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes how a student speech activity can serve as a culminating exercise in a unit on endangered species. Offers suggestions and guidelines for researching, formatting, and delivering the speech. A table is also included explaining the causes and prevention of species endangerment. (ML)

  5. Galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, J.

    1984-11-01

    Implications of the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background on large and small angular scales for galaxy formation are reviewed. In primeval adiabatic fluctuations, a universe dominated by cold, weakly interacting nonbaryonic matter, e.g., the massive photino is postulated. A possible signature of photino annihilation in our galactic halo involves production of cosmic ray antiprotons. If the density is near its closure value, it is necessary to invoke a biasing mechanism for suppressing galaxy formation throughout most of the universe in order to reconcile the dark matter density with the lower astronomical determinations of the mean cosmological density. A mechanism utilizing the onset of primordial massive star formation to strip gaseous protogalaxies is described. Only the densest, early collapsing systems form luminous galaxies. (ESA)

  6. Comet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.

    2014-07-01

    There has been vast progress in our understanding of planetesimal formation over the past decades, owing to a number of laboratory experiments as well as to refined models of dust and ice agglomeration in protoplanetary disks. Coagulation rapidly forms cm-sized ''pebbles'' by direct sticking in collisions at low velocities (Güttler et al. 2010; Zsom et al. 2010). For the further growth, two model approaches are currently being discussed: (1) Local concentration of pebbles in nebular instabilities until gravitational instability occurs (Johansen et al. 2007). (2) A competition between fragmentation and mass transfer in collisions among the dusty bodies, in which a few ''lucky winners'' make it to planetesimal sizes (Windmark et al. 2012a,b; Garaud et al. 2013). Predictions of the physical properties of the resulting bodies in both models allow a distinction of the two formation scenarios of planetesimals. In particular, the tensile strength (i.e, the inner cohesion) of the planetesimals differ widely between the two models (Skorov & Blum 2012; Blum et al. 2014). While model (1) predicts tensile strengths on the order of ˜ 1 Pa, model (2) results in rather compactified dusty bodies with tensile strengths in the kPa regime. If comets are km-sized survivors of the planetesimal-formation era, they should in principle hold the secret of their formation process. Water ice is the prime volatile responsible for the activity of comets. Thermophysical models of the heat and mass transport close to the comet-nucleus surface predict water-ice sublimation temperatures that relate to maximum sublimation pressures well below the kPa regime predicted for formation scenario (2). Model (1), however, is in agreement with the observed dust and gas activity of comets. Thus, a formation scenario for cometesimals involving gravitational instability is favored (Blum et al. 2014).

  7. Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klahr, Hubert; Brandner, Wolfgang

    2011-02-01

    1. Historical notes on planet formation Bodenheimer; 2. The formation and evolution of planetary systems Bouwman et al.; 3. Destruction of protoplanetary disks by photoevaporation Richling, Hollenbach and Yorke; 4. Turbulence in protoplanetary accretion disks Klahr, Rozyczka, Dziourkevitch, Wunsch and Johansen; 5. The origin of solids in the early solar system Trieloff and Palme; 6. Experiments on planetesimal formation Wurm and Blum; 7. Dust coagulation in protoplanetary disks Henning, Dullemond, Wolf and Dominik; 8. The accretion of giant planet cores Thommes and Duncan; 9. Planetary transits: direct vision of extrasolar planets Lecavelier des Etangs and Vidal-Madjar; 10. The core accretion - gas capture model Hubickyj; 11. Properties of exoplanets Marcy, Fischer, Butler and Vogt; 12. Giant planet formation: theories meet observations Boss; 13. From hot Jupiters to hot Neptures … and below Lovis, Mayor and Udry; 14. Disk-planet interaction and migration Masset and Kley; 15. The Brown Dwarf - planet relation Bate; 16. From astronomy to astrobiology Brandner; 17. Overview and prospective Lin.

  8. Dynamics of rock varnish formation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of rock varnish from the southwestern United States suggest that the Mn-phase in rock varnish has neither the chemistry nor the crystal structure of birnessite. Rather, the Mn-rich phase is non-crystalline and contains Ba, Ca, Fe, Al, and P. Unknowns concerning the formation of this non-crystalline Mn phase must be resolved before researchers are able to define chemical parameters of rock varnish formation based upon conditions of formation of the Mn phase. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Formation of the Late Palaeozoic Konya Complex and comparable units in southern Turkey by subduction-accretion processes: Implications for the tectonic development of Tethys in the Eastern Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair H. F.; Ustaömer, Timur

    2009-07-01

    The southern margin of Eurasia, from the Balkan region eastwards, is widely envisaged as an active continental margin related to northward subduction, at least during Late Carboniferous-Early Cenozoic time. By contrast, the Late Palaeozoic setting of the southern (Gondwana) margin was previously interpreted as an intra-continental marginal basin related to southward subduction beneath the northern margin of Gondwana, or as part of a forearc complex (e.g. forearc basin) related to northward subduction beneath Eurasia. Palaeotethyan evolution is recorded in the Konya Complex (new name), an assemblage of Palaeozoic (Silurian-Carboniferous) meta-sedimentary and meta-igneous rocks that is exposed beneath metamorphosed Upper Permian-Mesozoic shelf-type sediments in central southern Turkey to the north of the Tauride Mountains. The Konya Complex is dominated by large thrust slices of mainly Devonian shallow-water platform carbonates (Bozdağ unit). There is also a melange that is made up of lenticular sheets and blocks of mainly Lower Carboniferous shallow-water limestones, Silurian-Devonian black chert (lydite), pelagic limestones and rare blocks of mid-ocean ridge-type and within plate-type basaltic rocks. The blocks are set in a mainly terrigenous-derived siliciclastic matrix, locally including siliceous tuff. The matrix is interpreted as mainly deep-water turbidites and debris-flow deposits. An overlying, intact volcanic-sedimentary sequence includes chemically enriched extrusives (e.g. trachyandesites) that also exhibit a negative Nb anomaly, suggesting a subduction influence. Dykes crosscutting the carbonate platform units are relatively depleted and also show a subduction influence. Shallow-marine carbonates and terrigenous quartzose sediments of mainly Late Permian age are exposed above the Konya Complex in the west of the area. In contrast, Triassic non-marine, to shallow-marine, clastic sediments unconformably overlie the Konya Complex in the east of the area

  10. Formation testers

    SciTech Connect

    Brieger, E.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a method for use in obtaining multiple pressure tests of an earth formation traversed by a well bore by use of a sidewall fluid sampler well tool which has a fluid pressure sampling chamber in the well tool in open fluid communication with a pad sealing means, comprising the steps of: for one selected level in a well bore, moving a pad sealing means on the well tool into engagement with the wall of a well bore and isolating a wall segment of the earth formation; after the pad sealing means engges the wall segment of the earth formation, generating a hydraulic pressure in the well tool and applying said hydraulic pressure to said fluid pressure sampling chamber for increasing the volume of said fluid pressure sampling chamber thereby to dray a fluid sample from the earth formation engaged by the pad sealing means into the fluid pressure sampling chamber, sensing the pressure of said fluid sample as it is drawn into the fluid pressure sampling chamber while the volume of the sampling chamber is being increased, relieving the hydraulic pressure in the well tool with respect to said fluid pressur sampling chamber for decreasing the volume of said fluid pressure sampling chamber thereby to contact the sampling chamber to dischrge the fluid sample through the pad sealing means; retracting the sealing pad means and, after retrction of sealing pad means from engagement from the wall of the well bore, moving the well tool to a second location at another level in the well bore and, at the second location, repeating the steps of the method performed at the one selected level for obtaining another fluid sample and pressure sensing at said second location.

  11. SPOKEN COCHABAMBA QUECHUA, UNITS 13-24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LASTRA, YOLANDA; SOLA, DONALD F.

    UNITS 13-24 OF THE SPOKEN COCHABAMBA QUECHUA COURSE FOLLOW THE GENERAL FORMAT OF THE FIRST VOLUME (UNITS 1-12). THIS SECOND VOLUME IS INTENDED FOR USE IN AN INTERMEDIATE OR ADVANCED COURSE AND INCLUDES MORE COMPLEX DIALOGS, CONVERSATIONS, "LISTENING-INS," AND DICTATIONS, AS WELL AS GRAMMAR AND EXERCISE SECTIONS COVERING ADDITIONAL GRAMMATICAL…

  12. Termination unit

    DOEpatents

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  13. Termination unit

    DOEpatents

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  14. Amphiplex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Shannon; Laaser, Jennifer; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-micelle complexes are currently under heavy investigation due to their potential applications in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy, yet the dynamics of the complex formation is still relatively unstudied. By varying the ratios of poly(styrene sulfonate) chains and cationic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(styrene) micelles and the ionic strength of the system, we created a variety of complex configurations of different sizes and charges. The complexes were characterized dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements which provided information regarding the hydrodynamic radius, distribution of sizes, and effective charge.

  15. Habit formation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle S; Graybiel, Ann M

    2016-03-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network. PMID:27069378

  16. Habit formation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kyle S.; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network. PMID:27069378

  17. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  18. Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  19. History of United States Energy. A Basic Teaching Unit on Energy. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Hugh, Ed.; Scharmann, Larry, Ed.

    Intended as a supplement to the units "Oil: Fuel of the Past" and "Coal: Fuel of the Past, Hope of the Future," this 3-4 day unit contains three activities which briefly explain the chronological development of energy resources and the formation and development of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). The first activity…

  20. Short Note on Units: Planetary Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-01-01

    While the emphasis on SI units in introductory physics textbooks has mercifully eliminated the use of English units, the exclusion of other systems of units is not necessary. For years physicists have simplified calculations by doing things like setting [h-bar] = c = 1. We could not imagine putting 4[pi][epsilon][subscript 0] into the formulas for…

  1. Short Note on Units: Planetary Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-03-01

    While the emphasis on SI units in introductory physics textbooks has mercifully eliminated the use of English units, the exclusion of other systems of units is not necessary. For years physicists have simplified calculations by doing things like setting ℏ = c = 1. We could not imagine putting 4πɛ0 into the formulas for Bohr orbits.1

  2. AMHARIC BASIC COURSE. UNITS 51-60, READER, GLOSSARY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OBOLENSKY, SERGE; AND OTHERS

    THE FIRST 10 UNITS OF THIS SECOND VOLUME OF THE AMHARIC BASIC COURSE FOLLOW THE SAME GENERAL FORMAT OF THE PREVIOUS VOLUME IN PRESENTING FURTHER BASIC SENTENCES, DRILLS, AND NARRATIVES. AT THE END OF UNIT 60, AMHARIC ORTHOGRAPHY IS INTRODUCED. SUCCEEDING UNITS, COMPRISING THE READER, ARE WRITTEN IN AMHARIC SCRIPT ONLY. THE GLOSSARY, WHICH IS…

  3. India. Grade Eleven. [Resource Unit IV.] Project Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    This unit on India is one of four resource units for an eleventh grade area studies course. The objectives for this unit are listed as to generalizations, skills, and attitudes. A double-page format relates objectives to pertinent content, teaching procedures and instructional materials. The materials lead pupils to make comparisons between India…

  4. Mathematical Models for Somite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ruth E.; Schnell, Santiago; Maini, Philip K.

    2009-01-01

    Somitogenesis is the process of division of the anterior–posterior vertebrate embryonic axis into similar morphological units known as somites. These segments generate the prepattern which guides formation of the vertebrae, ribs and other associated features of the body trunk. In this work, we review and discuss a series of mathematical models which account for different stages of somite formation. We begin by presenting current experimental information and mechanisms explaining somite formation, highlighting features which will be included in the models. For each model we outline the mathematical basis, show results of numerical simulations, discuss their successes and shortcomings and avenues for future exploration. We conclude with a brief discussion of the state of modeling in the field and current challenges which need to be overcome in order to further our understanding in this area. PMID:18023728

  5. Learning unit: Thin lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, L.-S.

    2012-04-01

    Learning unit: Thin lenses "Why objects seen through lenses are sometimes upright and sometimes reversed" Nita Laura Simona National College of Arts and Crafts "Constantin Brancusi", Craiova, Romania 1. GEOMETRIC OPTICS. 13 hours Introduction (models, axioms, principles, conventions) 1. Thin lenses (Types of lenses. Defining elements. Path of light rays through lenses. Image formation. Required physical quantities. Lens formulas). 2. Lens systems (Non-collated lenses. Focalless systems). 3. Human eye (Functioning as an optical system. Sight defects and their corrections). 4. Optical instruments (Characteristics exemplified by a magnifying glass. Paths of light rays through a simplified photo camera. Path of light rays through a classical microscope) (Physics curriculum for the IXth grade/ 2011). This scenario exposes a learning unit based on experimental sequences (defining specific competencies), as a succession of lessons started by noticing a problem whose solution assumes the setup of an experiment under laboratory conditions. Progressive learning of theme objectives are realised with sequential experimental steps. The central cognitive process is the induction or the generalization (development of new knowledge based on observation of examples or counterexamples of the concept to be learnt). Pupil interest in theme objectives is triggered by problem-situations, for example: "In order to better see small objects I need a magnifying glass. But when using a magnifier, small object images are sometimes seen upright and sometimes seen reversed!" Along the way, pupils' reasoning will converge to the idea: "The image of an object through a lens depends on the relative distances among object, lens, and observer". Associated learning model: EXPERIMENT Specific competencies: derived from the experiment model, in agreement with the following learning unit steps I. Evoking - Anticipation: Size of the problem, formulation of hypotheses and planning of experiment. II

  6. 7 CFR 51.612 - Fairly good heart formation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fairly good heart formation. 51.612 Section 51.612... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.612 Fairly good heart formation. Fairly good heart formation means that the stalk has a moderate number of fairly stocky...

  7. 7 CFR 51.605 - Good heart formation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Good heart formation. 51.605 Section 51.605... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.605 Good heart formation. Good heart formation means that the stalk has a reasonable number of stocky inner heart branches...

  8. 7 CFR 51.612 - Fairly good heart formation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fairly good heart formation. 51.612 Section 51.612... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.612 Fairly good heart formation. Fairly good heart formation means that the stalk has a moderate number of fairly stocky...

  9. 7 CFR 51.612 - Fairly good heart formation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fairly good heart formation. 51.612 Section 51.612... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.612 Fairly good heart formation. Fairly good heart formation means that the stalk has a moderate number of fairly stocky...

  10. 7 CFR 51.605 - Good heart formation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Good heart formation. 51.605 Section 51.605... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.605 Good heart formation. Good heart formation means that the stalk has a reasonable number of stocky inner heart branches...

  11. 7 CFR 51.605 - Good heart formation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good heart formation. 51.605 Section 51.605... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.605 Good heart formation. Good heart formation means that the stalk has a reasonable number of stocky inner heart branches...

  12. Regents Biology Resource Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Nancy A., Comp.

    This publication provides supplemental information which can be used by the teacher to accompany each unit in the Regents Biology Syllabus. Each unit of the supplement addresses topics and understandings in the corresponding unit of the syllabus. These units are: (1) unity and diversity among living things; (2) maintenance in living things; (3)…

  13. Standard formatted data units-control authority operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to illustrate a Control Authority's (CA) possible operation. The document is an interpretation and expansion of the concept found in the CA Procedures Recommendation. The CA is described in terms of the functions it performs for the management and control of data descriptions (metadata). Functions pertaining to the organization of Member Agency Control Authority Offices (MACAOs) (e.g., creating and disbanding) are not discussed. The document also provides an illustrative operational view of a CA through scenarios describing interaction between those roles involved in collecting, controlling, and accessing registered metadata. The roles interacting with the CA are identified by their actions in requesting and responding to requests for metadata, and by the type of information exchanged. The scenarios and examples presented in this document are illustrative only. They represent possible interactions supported by either a manual or automated system. These scenarios identify requirements for an automated system. These requirements are expressed by identifying the information to be exchanged and the services that may be provided by a CA for that exchange.

  14. Dental unit waterlines disinfection using hypochlorous acid-based disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Shajahan, Irfana Fathima; Kandaswamy, D; Srikanth, Padma; Narayana, L Lakshmi; Selvarajan, R

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of a new disinfectant to disinfect the dental unit waterlines. Materials and Methods: New dental unit waterlines were installed in 13 dental chairs, and biofilm was allowed to grow for 10 days. Disinfection treatment procedure was carried out in the 12 units, and one unit was left untreated. The dental unit waterlines were removed and analyzed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) (TESCAN VEGA3 SBU). Result: On examination, SEM images showed that there was no slime layer or bacterial cells seen in any of the 12 cut sections obtained from the treated dental waterlines which mean that there was no evident of biofilm formation. Untreated dental unit waterlines showed a microbial colonization with continuous filamentous organic matrix. There was significant biofilm formation in the control tube relative to the samples. Conclusion: The tested disinfectant was found to be effective in the removal of biofilm from the dental unit waterlines. PMID:27563184

  15. Using The Discipline for integrative ministry formation.

    PubMed

    Smoot, F L

    2001-01-01

    One United Methodist Annual Conference has begun a program of ministry formation education for probationary, first-appointment ministers in conjunction with Emory Clergy Care, Atlanta. This program uses an adaptation of The Discipline as an integral part of their ongoing formation education. Participants have learned the basics of planned pastoral care delivery, family and congregational systems thinking and self-supervision. Using The Discipline, they have been effectively adapting it to their local church settings and ministries. PMID:11398536

  16. The Mass Media: An Integrated Unit. Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Barry

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive approach to a critical study of the mass media is presented in this journal insert, which also provides a format for planning an integrated unit. The main section of the insert focuses on seven questions and their answers concerning: (1) selection of the topic, (2) justifying a mass media curriculum, (3) entry experience, (4)…

  17. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of UCP blog for the latest updates. United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  18. United Leukodystrophy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... matters. Please make your tax-deductible gift today! United Leukodystrophy Foundation 224 N. Second Street, Suite 2 ... validation purposes and should be left unchanged. Copyright © United Leukodystrophy Foundation, Inc. 224 North Second Street, Suite ...

  19. Planning a Poetry Unit: The Process Is the Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coon, Lance

    1991-01-01

    Describes a flexible format for a literature unit which avoids the problems associated with a structure which is too rigid or allows too much latitude for students. Notes that the students produce some excellent thinking and writing. (MG)

  20. Malaria Treatment (United States)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  1. The Manipulation of Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stead, Keith

    1983-01-01

    Proposes a method for dealing with units that require involvement of units of each physical quantity at every stage of a calculation. Preliminary ideas on algebra and the concept of a physical quantity, equations relating two or more units, calculations of physical quantities, and logarithms are considered. (JM)

  2. Studies on Shell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Norimitsu; Sharp, D. Gordon; Wilbur, Karl M.

    1958-01-01

    Electron microscope observations have been made by means of the replica method on growth processes of calcite crystals of the nacreous layer of the shell of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Layer formation is initiated by the secretion of a conchiolin matrix and the deposition of rounded crystal seeds on or in this material. In some areas crystal seeds are elongate and within a given area show a similar orientation, probably due to slower deposition. The seeds appear to increase in size by dendritic growth, and smaller seeds become incorporated into larger ones which come into contact to form a single layer. With further growth, crystals overlap, forming a step-like arrangement. The direction of growth is frequently different in neighboring regions. Crystal seeds deposited on crystal surfaces are usually elongate and oriented. Well developed crystals have a tabular idiomorphic form and are parallel in their growth. Rounded and irregular crystals were also observed. The crystals show reticular structure with units of the order of 100 A and striations corresponding with the rhombohedral axes of the crystals. The role of the mantle is discussed in relation to the growth patterns of crystals and shell structure. PMID:13549499

  3. Promoting Economic Growth in the U.S. Grade Twelve. [Resource Unit II.] Project Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    This is the second unit of seven resource units for a twelfth grade course on value conflicts and policy decisions. The topic for this unit is promoting economic growth in the United States. The objectives are listed as to generalizations, skills, and values. The double-page format relates objectives to pertinent content, teaching procedures, and…

  4. The Earth as the Home of Man. Kindergarten. Resource Units I Through V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    Five resource units constitute the Kindergarten level of the Project Social Studies curriculum. The five units, on the theme of earth as the home of man, are preceded by a grid showing the concepts, generalizations, sequential development of skills, and attitudes appropriate to each unit. All the units follow a similar format, consisting of an…

  5. Star formation - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N. J., II

    1985-01-01

    Methods for studying star formation are reviewed. Stellar clusters and associations, as well as field stars, provide a fossil record of the star formation process. Regions of current star formation provide a series of snapshots of different epochs of star formation. A simplified picture of individual star formation as it was envisioned in the late 1970s is contrasted with the results of recent observations, in particular the outflow phenomenon.

  6. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production. PMID:21687599

  7. Unit: Light Forms Images, Inspection Set, National Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    The core portion of this trial unit developed by the Australian Science Education Project provides activities from which students gain experience in the formation of images by water and glass lenses. Additional optional sections of the unit contain suggested activities and questions which lead to a study of mirrors, refraction, eyes and…

  8. Civic Engagement in the United States: Roots and Branches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The adult education and civic education movements are not synonymous, but the two were intertwined during the early years of adult education's formation as a field in the United States. This chapter traces the development of adult civic education in the United States, focusing on the 1920s through the 1950s. First, the roots of civic education…

  9. Unit: Charge, Inspection Pack, National Trial Print. Reference No. 214.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    This physical science unit from the Australian Science Education Project (ASEP) focuses on electrostatics. After students complete the activities contained in the core of the unit, they have six optional activities to pursue: How do charged objects behave? (conductors, insulators, charged objects); What is blue? (formation of copper ion); Putting…

  10. Architectural studies of Jurassic-Cretaceous fluvial units, Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Miall, A.D.; Bromley, M.H.; Cowan, E.J.; Turner-Peterson, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    A sixfold hierarchy of architectural elements and bounding surfaces evolved from outcrop studies of three fluvial units: Westwater Canyon member (WCM), Morrison Formation, Upper Jurassic; Torrivio sandstone member (TSM), Gallup Sandstone, Upper Cretaceous, northwestern New Mexico; and Kayenta Formation (KF), Lower Jurassic, southwestern Colorado. This hierarchy is discussed.

  11. Preparation and Presentation of Digital Maps in Raster Format

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, K.; Batson, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    A set of algorithms has been developed at USGS Flagstaff for displaying digital map data in raster format. The set includes: FILLIN, which assigns a specified attribute code to units of a map which have been outlined on a digitizer and converted to raster format; FILBND, which removes the outlines; ZIP, which adds patterns to the map units; and COLOR, which provides a simplified process for creating color separation plates for either photographic or lithographic reproduction. - Authors

  12. Unit commitment literature synopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Sheble, G.B. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Fahd, G.N. )

    1994-02-01

    Several optimization techniques have been applied to the solution of the thermal unit commitment problem. They range from heuristics such as complete enumeration to the more sophisticated ones such as Augmented LaGrangian. The heuristics have even reappeared as expert systems. The problem to solve is the optimal scheduling of generating units over a short-term horizon, typically 168 hours. This paper is an overview of the literature in the unit commitment field over the past twenty five years.

  13. Structure Formation in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    Part I. Physical Processes and Numerical Methods Common to Structure Formations in Astrophysics: 1. The physics of turbulence E. Levêque; 2. The numerical simulation of turbulence W. Schmidt; 3. Numerical methods for radiation magnetohydrodynamics in astrophysics R. Klein and J. Stone; 4. The role of jets in the formation of planets, stars, and galaxies R. Banerjee, R. Pudritz and R. Ouyed; 5. Advanced numerical methods in astrophysical fluid dynamics A. Hujeirat and F. Heitsch; Part II. Structure and Star Formation in the Primordial Universe: 6. New frontiers in cosmology and galaxy formation challenges for the future R. Ellis and J. Silk; 7. Galaxy formation physics T. Abel, G. Bryan and R. Teyssier; 8. First stars formation, evolution, feedback effects V. Bromm, A. Ferrara and A. Heger; Part III. Contemporary Star and Brown Dwarf Formation: a) Cloud Formation and Fragmentation: 9. Diffuse interstellar medium and the formation of molecular clouds P. Hennebelle, M. Mac Low and E. Vazquez-Semadeni; 10. The formation of distributed and clustered stars in molecular clouds T. Megeath, Z. -Y. Li and A. Nordlund; b) Core Fragmentation and Star Formation: 11. The formation and evolution of prestellar cores P. André, S. Basu and S. Inutsuka; 12. Models for the formation of massive stars; Part IV. Protoplanetary Disks and Planet Formation M. Krumholz and I. Bonnell: 13. Observational properties of disks and young stellar objects G. Duchêne, F. Ménard, J. Muzzerolle and S. Mohanty; 14. Structure and dynamics of protoplanetary disks C. Dullemond, R. Durisen and J. Papaloizou; 15. Planet formation and evolution theory and observation Y. Alibert, I. Baraffe, W. Benz, G. Laughlin and S. Udry; 16. Planet formation assembling the puzzle G. Wurm and T. Guillot; Part V. Summary: 17. Open issues in small- and large-scale structure formation R. Klessen and M. Mac Low; 18. Final word E. Salpeter.

  14. Structure Formation in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles

    2011-02-01

    Part I. Physical Processes and Numerical Methods Common to Structure Formations in Astrophysics: 1. The physics of turbulence E. Levêque; 2. The numerical simulation of turbulence W. Schmidt; 3. Numerical methods for radiation magnetohydrodynamics in astrophysics R. Klein and J. Stone; 4. The role of jets in the formation of planets, stars, and galaxies R. Banerjee, R. Pudritz and R. Ouyed; 5. Advanced numerical methods in astrophysical fluid dynamics A. Hujeirat and F. Heitsch; Part II. Structure and Star Formation in the Primordial Universe: 6. New frontiers in cosmology and galaxy formation challenges for the future R. Ellis and J. Silk; 7. Galaxy formation physics T. Abel, G. Bryan and R. Teyssier; 8. First stars formation, evolution, feedback effects V. Bromm, A. Ferrara and A. Heger; Part III. Contemporary Star and Brown Dwarf Formation: a) Cloud Formation and Fragmentation: 9. Diffuse interstellar medium and the formation of molecular clouds P. Hennebelle, M. Mac Low and E. Vazquez-Semadeni; 10. The formation of distributed and clustered stars in molecular clouds T. Megeath, Z. -Y. Li and A. Nordlund; b) Core Fragmentation and Star Formation: 11. The formation and evolution of prestellar cores P. André, S. Basu and S. Inutsuka; 12. Models for the formation of massive stars; Part IV. Protoplanetary Disks and Planet Formation M. Krumholz and I. Bonnell: 13. Observational properties of disks and young stellar objects G. Duchêne, F. Ménard, J. Muzzerolle and S. Mohanty; 14. Structure and dynamics of protoplanetary disks C. Dullemond, R. Durisen and J. Papaloizou; 15. Planet formation and evolution theory and observation Y. Alibert, I. Baraffe, W. Benz, G. Laughlin and S. Udry; 16. Planet formation assembling the puzzle G. Wurm and T. Guillot; Part V. Summary: 17. Open issues in small- and large-scale structure formation R. Klessen and M. Mac Low; 18. Final word E. Salpeter.

  15. Montezuma Formation of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, W.H.; Sen Gupta, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    The Montezuma Formation of the Nicoya Peninsula is one of the better known Neogene stratigraphic units of the Pacific side of Costa Rica. Past workers have reported its age to be Miocene-Pliocene or Miocene-Quaternary, and its environment of deposition to be inner shelf. The planktonic foraminiferal record of the unit in the type locality, however, places it firmly in the Lower Pliocene (Globorotalia margaritae zones). Furthermore, benthic such as Bolivina interjuncta var. bicostata, Epistominella exigua, and E. pacifica indicate that the sedimentation occurred at depths no shallower than the outermost shelf. No drastic faunal turnovers are observed within the formation; a cluster analysis of various Neogene samples from the Nicoya Peninsula and other Pacific areas of Costa Rica demonstrate an overall uniformity of the Montezuma fauna. The frequency trends of certain species, particularly of Epistominella exigua, however, suggest a transgression, the assemblage in the upper part of the section definitely representing upper bathyal depths. Judging by the present elevation of Montezuma outcrops, this part of Costa Rica has been uplifted at least 300 meters in the past 5 m.y.

  16. Preliminary correlation of geologic units in three coreholes along the Savannah River in Burke and Screven Counties, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Falls, W.F. ); Prowell, D.C. ); Edwards, L.E.; Frederiksen, N.O.; Gibson, T.G.; Bybell, L.M.; Gohn, G.S. )

    1993-03-01

    Preliminary lithologic and paleontologic correlations of geologic units in three deep coreholes along the Savannah River in Burke and Screven Counties in Georgia show four Upper Cretaceous units and five Tertiary units in a dip-oriented cross section. The basal unit of the Upper Cretaceous section consists of nonmarine sediments and is stratigraphically equivalent to the Cape Fear Formation. The next two successive units vary from nonmarine and marginal-marine sediments in up-dip areas to more marine sediments in down-dip areas. These strata are equivalent to the Middendorf Formation and the Black Creek Group. The uppermost unit of the Cretaceous sediments is present only in the down-dip cores and consists predominantly of marginal-marine sediments. This unit is probably equivalent to the Peedee Formation in South Carolina. Units in the Tertiary sediments include at least two Paleocene units, two middle Eocene units, and an upper Eocene unit. The lower unit in the Paleocene, the Ellenton Formation, consists of marginal-marine and marine clays and sands, whereas, the upper unit in the Paleocene consists of nonmarine kaolinitic clays and coarse sands and is probably equivalent to the Williamsburg Formation. The two middle Eocene units consist of marine sands, clays, and limestones and are correlative with the Congaree and Santee Formation. The upper Eocene unit, the Barnwell Group, includes marginal-marine clays and sands in up-dip areas and marine sands, clays and limestones in down-dip areas.

  17. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory...

  18. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory...

  19. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory...

  20. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory...

  1. 31 CFR 500.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 500.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including U.S. trust...

  2. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  3. The Format Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oder, Norman

    2002-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of public libraries that investigated trends in audiovisual materials. Highlights include format issues; audiobooks; media budgets for various formats; video collections; DVDs; circulation; collection sizes; music CDs; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  4. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokine, Alexandre

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layout system using customized styles.

  5. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 16 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 11o N, 159o W (201o E) and shows examples of the remarkable variations that can be seen in the erosion of the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region, like many others throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, the surface has been eroded by the wind into a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These ridges generally point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to erode the landscape of Mars. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Within this single image it is possible to see differing amounts of erosion and stripping of layers in the Medusae Fossae Formation. Near the bottom (southern) edge of the image a rock layer with a relatively smooth upper surface covers much of the image. Moving upwards (north) in the image this layer becomes more and more eroded. At first there are isolated regions where the smooth unit has been eroded to produce sets of parallel ridges and knobs. Further north these linear knobs increase in number, and only small, isolated patches of the smooth upper surface remain. Finally, at the top of the image, even the ridges have been removed, exposing the remarkably smooth top of hard, resistant layer below. This sequence of layers with differing hardness and resistance to erosion is common on Earth and on Mars, and suggests significant variations in the physical properties, composition, particle size, and/or cementation of these martian layers. As is common throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, very few impact craters are visible, indicating that the surface exposed is relatively young, and that the process of erosion may be active today

  6. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 16 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 11o N, 159o W (201o E) and shows examples of the remarkable variations that can be seen in the erosion of the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region, like many others throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, the surface has been eroded by the wind into a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These ridges generally point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to erode the landscape of Mars. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Within this single image it is possible to see differing amounts of erosion and stripping of layers in the Medusae Fossae Formation. Near the bottom (southern) edge of the image a rock layer with a relatively smooth upper surface covers much of the image. Moving upwards (north) in the image this layer becomes more and more eroded. At first there are isolated regions where the smooth unit has been eroded to produce sets of parallel ridges and knobs. Further north these linear knobs increase in number, and only small, isolated patches of the smooth upper surface remain. Finally, at the top of the image, even the ridges have been removed, exposing the remarkably smooth top of hard, resistant layer below. This sequence of layers with differing hardness and resistance to erosion is common on Earth and on Mars, and suggests significant variations in the physical properties, composition, particle size, and/or cementation of these martian layers. As is common throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, very few impact craters are visible, indicating that the surface exposed is relatively young, and that the process of erosion may be active today

  7. Camp Unit Design Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hultsman, John T.; Cottrell, Richard L.

    This document provides a set of generalized guidelines for the design of units in large family campgrounds. Managers of recreational lands have two responsibilities and goals: to protect the natural resources, and to provide an enjoyable experience for users. With these goals in mind, unique variables to each unit such as shade, site aesthetics,…

  8. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and…

  9. Quantities, Units, and Symbols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal Society, London (England).

    This booklet provides a reference to the quantities, units, and their symbols which are used in physical science. It is a revision of a 1969 report and takes account of the progress which has been made in obtaining international agreement on the definitions, names, and symbols for units and on the rules for the expression of relations involving…

  10. REACH. Refrigeration Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Rufus; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of refrigeration. The instructional units focus on refrigeration fundamentals, tubing and pipe, refrigerants, troubleshooting, window air conditioning, and…

  11. Neighbors United for Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westhoff, Wayne W.; Corvin, Jaime; Virella, Irmarie

    2009-01-01

    Modeled upon the ecclesiastic community group concept of Latin America to unite and strengthen the bond between the Church and neighborhoods, a community-based organization created Vecinos Unidos por la Salud (Neighbors United for Health) to bring health messages into urban Latino neighborhoods. The model is based on five tenants, and incorporates…

  12. Composite stabilizer unit

    DOEpatents

    Ebaugh, Larry R.; Sadler, Collin P.; Carter, Gary D.

    1992-01-01

    An improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabillizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

  13. Units of Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fava, N. A.; Molter, U.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the symbols for the fundamental units of mechanics, namely length, time and mass, are capable of a meaningful interpretation as positive real parameters. Then a suitable parameter domain allows one to take the derived units into account. The formal manipulations usually carried out with symbols of physical quantities, involving…

  14. Conflict Resolution Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busselle, Tish

    This 7-day unit, intended for use with secondary students, contains a statement of rationale and objectives, lesson plans, class assignments, teacher and student bibliographies, and suggestions for instructional materials on conflict resolution between individuals, groups, and nations. Among the six objectives listed for the unit are: 1) explain…

  15. Associative list processing unit

    DOEpatents

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.

    2013-01-29

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full. Also, an associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and using a tree of prioritized multiplexers descending from the plurality of cell blocks.

  16. The United Nations University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salam, Abdus

    1973-01-01

    Reports the progress already made toward the establishment of a postgraduate international university under United Nations auspices. The resolution adopted by the U.N. General Assembly provides a concise statement of the nature and aims of the United Nations University, which is likely to start operating in 1974. (JR)

  17. Commercial Carpentry: Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Donald W.; Penner, Wayman R.

    This manual contains instructional materials which measure student performance on commercial carpentry behavioral objectives; criterion-referenced evaluation instruments are also included. Each of the manual's eleven sections consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional unit includes behavioral objectives, suggested activities…

  18. Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN (HSPF) Data Formatting Tool (HDFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HSPF data formatting and unit conversion tool has two seperate applications: a web-based application and a desktop application. The tool was developed to aid users in formatting data for HSPF stormwater modeling applications. Unlike traditional HSPF modeling applications, sto...

  19. SOLITONS: Dynamics of strong coupling formation between laser solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosanov, Nikolai N.; Fedorov, S. V.; Shatsev, A. N.

    2005-03-01

    The dynamics of the strong coupling formation between two solitons with the unit topological charge is studied in detail for a wide-aperture class A laser. The sequence of bifurcations of the vector field of energy fluxes in the transverse plane was demonstrated during the formation of a soliton complex.

  20. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats. PMID:24338090

  1. Fan Unit Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Robert A.

    2005-03-01

    A lightweight motor-driven propeller mounted on a low-friction cart provides a nearly constant thrust over a moderate range of velocities and can be a powerful pedagogical tool for investigating force and motion. A variety of homemade and commercial versions are now available. This article revisits and extends the topic of fan unit use described earlier. It looks at the rationale for use of fan units, gives examples of teaching ideas, and describes construction of two homemade versions of fan units.

  2. Thermal Decomposition of Copper (II) Calcium (II) Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, A. G.; Polla, G.; de Perazzo, P. K.; Lanza, H.; de Benyacar, M. A. R.

    1996-05-01

    The presence of different stages in the thermal decomposition process of CuCa(HCOO) 4has been established by means of TGA at different heating rates, X-ray powder diffraction of quenched samples, and DSC methods. During the first stage, decomposition of one of the two copper formate structural units contained in the unit cell takes place. The presence of CuCa 2(HCOO) 6has been detected. Calcium formate structural units break down at higher temperatures; the last decomposition peak corresponds to the appearance of different calcium-copper oxides.

  3. Star Formation for Predictive Primordial Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence

    The elegance of inflationary cosmology and cosmological perturbation theory ends with the formation of the first stars and galaxies, the initial sources of light that launched the phenomenologically rich process of cosmic reionization. Here we review the current understanding of early star formation, emphasizing unsolved problems and technical challenges. We begin with the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang and trace how they influenced subsequent star formation. The onset of chemical enrichment coincided with a sharp increase in the overall physical complexity of star forming systems. Ab-initio computational treatments are just now entering the domain of the predictive and are establishing contact with local observations of the relics of this ancient epoch.

  4. Voltage verification unit

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Edward J.

    2008-01-15

    A voltage verification unit and method for determining the absence of potentially dangerous potentials within a power supply enclosure without Mode 2 work is disclosed. With this device and method, a qualified worker, following a relatively simple protocol that involves a function test (hot, cold, hot) of the voltage verification unit before Lock Out/Tag Out and, and once the Lock Out/Tag Out is completed, testing or "trying" by simply reading a display on the voltage verification unit can be accomplished without exposure of the operator to the interior of the voltage supply enclosure. According to a preferred embodiment, the voltage verification unit includes test leads to allow diagnostics with other meters, without the necessity of accessing potentially dangerous bus bars or the like.

  5. UnitedHealth Group

    Cancer.gov

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  6. Insects: An Interdisciplinary Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leger, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The author talks about an interdisciplinary unit on insects, and presents activities that can help students practice communication skills (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) and learn about insects with hands-on activities.

  7. Associative list processing unit

    DOEpatents

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D

    2014-04-01

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full.

  8. Evaporative precooling unit

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, A.R.

    1988-03-15

    In combination with a refrigeration unit, an evaporative heat exchange unit for precooling an air stream traveling toward and over the condensing coil of the refrigeration unit is described. The heat exchange unit includes: (a) a frame, (b) a porous heat transfer pad mounted in the frame; (c) nozzle means carried on the frame for directing a spray mist forwardly of the heat transfer pad, the spray mist emitted from the nozzle means initially traveling in a direction of travel such that the mist will not contact the porous heat transfer pad; (d) means mounted on the frame for causing the turbulent intermixing of the air stream with the spray mist prior to the air stream passing through the porous heat transfer pad; and (e) means for controlling the quantity of water emitted by the nozzle means such that substantially all of the spray mist is intermixed with the air stream prior to the air stream passing through the heat transfer pad.

  9. Your favourite units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2010-02-01

    Units are among the most intriguing features of science. They are the "bridges" between the empirical world of physical phenomena and the non-empirical abstract world of mathematics, allowing us to traffic back and forth. Once upon a time, many bridges of different varieties existed independently of each other. Over the years, the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) has consolidated them into a single network, the "International System of Units" (SI).

  10. Water sample filtration unit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skougstad, M.W.; Scarbro, G.F., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    A readily portable, all plastic, pressure filtration unit is described which greatly facilitates rapid micropore membrane field filtration of up to several liters of water with a minimum risk of inorganic chemical alteration or contamination of the sample. The unit accommodates standard 10.2-cm. (4-inch) diameter filters. The storage and carrying case serves as a convenient filter stand for both field and laboratory use.

  11. Tropical cyclone formation

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.T.; Farrell, B.F. )

    1993-01-15

    The physics of tropical cyclone formation is not well understood, and more is known about the mature hurricane than the formative mechanisms that produce it. It is believed part of the reason for this can be traced to insufficient upper-level atmospheric data. Recent observations suggest that tropical cyclones are initiated by asymmetric interactions associated with migratory upper-level potential vorticity disturbances and low-level disturbances. Favored theories of cyclones formation, however, focus on internal processes associated with cumulus convection and/or air-sea interaction. This work focuses on external mechanisms of cyclone formation and, using both a two- and three-dimensional moist geostrophic momentum model, investigates the role of upper-level potential vorticity disturbances on the formation process. A conceptual model of tropical cyclone formation is proposed, and implications of the theory are discussed. 71 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. CONVERT 15 WELLS TO BORS PUMPING UNITS AND TEST/COMPARE TO CONVENTIONAL UNITS

    SciTech Connect

    Walter B. North

    2003-02-04

    A new type of fluid lifting equipment called Balanced Oil Recovery System (trade named BORS Lift{trademark}) was installed on several idle oil wells to demonstrate the operating efficiency of this innovative equipment technology. The BORS Lift system is designed to bring oil to the surface without the accompanying formation water. The BORS Lift system uses an innovative strap mechanism that takes oil from the top of the downhole oilwater column and lifts it to the surface, eliminating production of the formation water. Eliminating salt water production could potentially increase oil production, reduce operational costs, benefit the environment, and cut salt water disposal costs. Although the BORS Lift units did not function as intended, lessons learned during the course of the field demonstration project resulted in improvements in the technology and redesign of subsequent generation BORS Lift units which are reported to have significantly improved their performance characteristics. BORS Lift units were installed on 15 temporarily abandoned wells which had been shut down due to low oil production, high water production, and uneconomic operating conditions. The wells had been producing with artificial lift at a high watercut from a shallow (850-900 feet), pressure depleted oil sand reservoir prior to being shut down. The electrical motor driven BORS Lift units provided a possible approach for economically returning the shallow, low-volume oil wells to production. The BORS Lift units used in this field demonstration were designed to recover up to roughly 22 barrels of fluid per day from depths ranging to 1,700 feet, ideal for many marginal stripper well operations. The BORS units were first-production-model test units, operated under oil field conditions for the first time, and were naturally expected to experience some design problems. From the onset, the operator experienced mechanical, design, and operational problems with the BORS Lift units and was unable to

  13. Comparing student understanding of quantum physics when embedding multimodal representations into two different writing formats: Presentation format versus summary report format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunel, Murat; Hand, Brian; Gunduz, Sevket

    2006-11-01

    Physics as a subject for school students requires an understanding and ability to move between different modes of representation for the concepts under review. However, the inability of students to have a multimodal understanding of the concepts is seen as restricting their understandings of the concepts. The aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness of using writing-to-learn strategies that required students to embed multimodal representations of the concepts. In particular, the study compared a presentation format with a summary report format for students learning quantum theory. A pre-post test design was used to compare performances of these two groups across two units. For unit 1, students' scores from groups that completed either a presentation format (PowerPoint presentation) or a summary report format (chapter summary) were compared. No limits were placed on the amount of text or the number of representations used. For unit 2, products of both groups were constructed for an audience of year 10 students. The presentation format group (PowerPoint) was limited to 15 slides, with a maximum of 10 words displayed per slide; a script was written to accompany the presentation. Slides could include graphical and mathematical formulae; however, the text could not. The summary report format group that wrote out its explanations was limited to four pages and was required to incorporate multimodal representations. Results indicated that for both units students using the presentation format group scored significantly better on tests than the summary report format group. The effect size difference between the groups increased for the second unit, indicating that more practice was leading to better student understanding of the physics concepts.

  14. Data format translation routines

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base.

  15. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layoutmore » system using customized styles.« less

  16. Career Education Program: Geneva Area City Schools. [Grade 6 Units: Food Production, Ecology, Mind and Body, and Food Services].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geneva Area City Schools, OH.

    Four curriculum units for the sixth grade level focus on: (1) food production and nutrition, (2) food services, (3) physical and mental health, and (4) environmental conservation. Each unit's behavioral unit objectives emphasize career possibilities in the industries related to the unit's topic. A chart format is used to list suggested content…

  17. Tree-Fruit Production. An Instructional Unit for Teachers of Adult Vocational Education in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Bryan, Robert C.; Iverson, Maynard J.

    Designed as a guide for teachers in planning and conducting young and adult farmer classes, the unit covers the basic areas of tree-fruit production. The format of the 10-lesson unit allows for the utilization of the problem-solving and discussion methods of teaching. The major objective of the unit is to develop the ability to effectively…

  18. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  19. Indexes of pumps for oil field pumping units

    SciTech Connect

    Ibragimov, E.S.

    1995-07-01

    As reported previously, a series of oil field pumping units has been developed with power outputs of 125, 250, 500, and 1000 kW, designed for injecting working fluids in cementing operations in oil and gas wells, hydraulic fracturing of formations, washing out sand plugs, and other production operations. The units are designed for the use of three-plunger pumps with individual power outputs of 125 or 500 kW. In the 250- and 1000-kW units, two such pumps are used. The 1000-kW pumping unit serves mainly for deep-penetration hydraulic fracturing of formations, and also for fracturing deep formations. The hydraulic fracturing process does not require the use of units with two pumps; this has been demonstrated by experience, both here and in other countries. All units intended for use in hydraulic fracturing are built with a single pump, transmission, and drive. Pumping units for well cementing must have two pumps that will give a high delivery rate. At the start of the operation, a single pump can be used to feed water into the cement mixer, with the second pump used to transfer the cement slurry to the well. Then both pumps are connected to the slurry injection line. The operation of these pumps is described.

  20. The Age of the Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, L.; Head, J. W.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction The Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) is a complicated and discontinuous formation located in the southern parts of Elysium Planitia and Amazonis Planitia (130°-230°E and 12°S-12°N), covering an area of approximately 2.1 x 106 km2 and having an estimated volume of 1.4 x 106 km3 [1]. It is thought to have been deposited during the Amazonian period [2,3]. However, much of the cratering record may have been erased as friable units were eroded and long-buried terrains exhumed [4-6]. The formation is characterized by large accumulations of fine-grained, friable deposits and evidence of large amounts of erosion. There are many theories regarding the emplacement of this formation; recently the literature has focused on three possibilities: ignimbrites, ash fall, and aeolian dust. Some modified and inverted fluvial channels have been found within the deposit [7,8], (Fig. 1), indicating that there was some fluvial activity during or after the emplacement of the MFF. If the MFF is among the youngest surficial deposits on Mars [9], it is implied that meandering, channelized flow must have extended into the Amazonian, a significant constraint when considering the atmospheric evolution of the planet through time. Because of the wide implications that these findings have for the evolution of Mars and the Martian atmosphere, it is instructive to re-examine the evidence for the Amazonian age of the MFF. The initial conclusion comes from two main arguments: the relatively few superposed craters on the unit, and the superposition of the MFF on young lowland lava deposits [1, 9]. Using new high resolution data, we reexamine the relationships both within the MFF and with respect to adjacent units. Cratering Record The cratering record of the MFF and other easily eroded units has often been deemed unreliable [4, 10, 12], but it continues to be cited as evidence for the formation's young age. Throughout the MFF, pedestal craters, inverted craters, and remnant knobs can be

  1. Battery thermal management unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nicholas A.

    1989-03-01

    A battery warming device has been designed which uses waste heat from an operating internal combustion engine to warm a battery. A portion of the waste heat is stored in the sensible and latent heat of a phase change type material for use in maintaining the battery temperature after the engine is shut off. The basic design of the device consists of a Phase Change Material (PCM) reservoir and a simple heat exchanger connected to the engineer's cooling system. Two types of units were built, tested and field trialed. A strap-on type which was strapped to the side of an automotive battery and was intended for the automotive after-market and a tray type on which a battery or batteries sat. This unit was intended for the heavy duty truck market. It was determined that both types of units increased the average cranking power of the batteries they were applied to. Although there were several design problems with the units such as the need for an automatic thermostatically controlled bypass valve, the overall feeling is that there is a market opportunity for both the strap-on and tray type battery warming units.

  2. Ice Formation on Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, L

    1939-01-01

    This report makes use of the results obtained in the Gottingen ice tunnel in which the atmospheric conditions are simulated and the process of ice formation photographed. The effect of ice formation is threefold: 1) added weight to the airplane; 2) a change in the lift and drag forces; 3) a change in the stability characteristics.

  3. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  4. Formative Assessment in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxenford-O'Brian, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation responds to critical gaps in current research on formative assessment practice which could limit successful implementation of this practice within the K-12 classroom context. The study applies a socio cultural perspective of learning to interpret a cross-case analysis of formative assessment practice occurring during one…

  5. School Formative Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Data-driven instructional improvement relies on developing coherent systems that allow school staff to generate, interpret, and act upon quality formative information on students and school programs. This article offers a formative feedback system model that captures how school leaders and teachers structure artifacts and practices to create…

  6. Universal thermoelectric unit

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, M.I.; Engalychev, A.E.; Zaitsev, V.K.; Kaliazin, A.E.; Solomkin, F.Y.

    1994-08-10

    The problems of energy supply of low power electric devices very often can be solved with thermoelectric generator even with low coefficient of performance, when other electric energy sources are not convenient. The problems of thermoelectric and construction choice for such generators are discussed in the paper. A series of domestic thermoelectric generators was designed by the authors. The work is based on designing an universal thermoelectric unit---a battery which consist of ten thermoelements. The coefficient of performance of the unit is about 4%. Any thermoelectric generator can be made as a combination of these units. Principal opportunity of production such thermoelectric generators on industrial scale was proved. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  7. Three conceptual units for behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Roy

    1987-01-01

    Three generic units for behavior are examined in terms of their background: an if-then unit for stimulus and response (S-R), a holistic unit for Kantor's behavior segment, and an AB-because-of-C unit for Skinner's three-term contingency. The units are distinguished in terms of their respective historical backgrounds, causal modes, advantages, and disadvantages. The ways in which these units may be compatible are discussed. PMID:22477957

  8. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Marcelina formation study - Maracaibo basin

    SciTech Connect

    D`Arlach, C.; Peralta, J.; Murillo, R.

    1996-08-01

    Recent development activity onshore, west of the Maracaibo Lake, has led to a better understanding of the Paleocene Marcelina formation in the basin. The Marcelina formation is divided into two sections, an upper coal dominated interval and a lower sand/claystone interval. The sandstone reservoir section consists of a number of fining upward sequences deposited in a fluvial environment. Laterally the section evolves to a shallow marine shaly and carbonatic section, or is truncated by a regional unconformity, being missing over much of the Lake area. The Marcelina sands are only commercially productive in the Alturitas Field, where oil is found in a combined stratigraphic/structural trap. This paper focuses on two aspects of the Marcelina. First, the study incorporates the field data into a regional framework to investigate the possibility of similar plays in the studied area. Second, the study integrates geology and engineering data to examine the Marcelina as a reservoir unit to optimize field development and increase the oil recovery efficiency. Information from seismic, logs, cores, reservoir pressures, and fluids is used to understand the depositional model and the field complexity. The study provides a model, supported by extensive data, which may help to develop other potential discoveries in the west coast area.

  10. TRW utility demonstration unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The TRW Advanced Entrained Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O R) Utility Corporation's Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/oil unit to fire 2.5% sulfur coal. The slagging combustor process will provide NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Environmental Standards. During this report period, activity continued to address the total program funding shortfall. Ideas and responsibilities for further evaluation have been put forward to reduce the shortfall. In addition, an effort aimed at gaining additional program sponsorships, was initiated.

  11. Eensey, weensey units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, B. Todd; Doyle, Keith; Atkin, J. Keith

    2010-05-01

    You reported last month (April p3) on the efforts of Austin Sendek, a physics student from the University of California, Davis, to establish the "hella" as an official International System of Units (SI) prefix for 1027. You also asked for suggestions on unit prefixes that go down to 10-27 - but surely this is not difficult. I have long declared the "tini" (pronounced with an "ee" sound) to denote this quantity. This designation has the additional value of suggesting the subsequent two prefixes as well: the "insi" (pronounced "eensey") for 10-30, to be followed closely by the "winsi" (pronounced "weensey").

  12. The Star Formation Relation in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schruba, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    I review observational studies of the large-scale star formation process in nearby galaxies. A wealth of new multi-wavelength data provide an unprecedented view on the interplay of the interstellar medium and (young) stellar populations on a few hundred parsec scale in 100+ galaxies of all types. These observations enable us to relate detailed studies of star formation in the Milky Way to the zoo of galaxies in the distant universe. Within the disks of spiral galaxies, recent star formation strongly scales with the local amount of molecular gas (as traced by CO) with a molecular gas depletion time of ˜2 Gyr. This is consistent with the picture that stars form in giant molecular clouds that have about universal properties. Galaxy centers and star-bursting galaxies deviate from this normal trend as they show enhanced star formation per unit gas mass suggesting systematic changes in the molecular gas properties and especially the dense gas fraction. In the outer disks of spirals and in dwarf galaxies, the decreasing availability of atomic gas inevitably limits the amount of star formation, though with large local variations. The critical step for the gas-stars cycle seems therefore to be the formation of a molecular gas phase, a process that shows complex dependencies on various environmental properties and is being investigated by intensive simulational work.

  13. Matching soil grid unit resolutions with polygon unit scales for DNDC modelling of regional SOC pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. D.; Yu, D. S.; Ni, Y. L.; Zhang, L. M.; Shi, X. Z.

    2015-03-01

    Matching soil grid unit resolution with polygon unit map scale is important to minimize uncertainty of regional soil organic carbon (SOC) pool simulation as their strong influences on the uncertainty. A series of soil grid units at varying cell sizes were derived from soil polygon units at the six map scales of 1:50 000 (C5), 1:200 000 (D2), 1:500 000 (P5), 1:1 000 000 (N1), 1:4 000 000 (N4) and 1:14 000 000 (N14), respectively, in the Tai lake region of China. Both format soil units were used for regional SOC pool simulation with DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) process-based model, which runs span the time period 1982 to 2000 at the six map scales, respectively. Four indices, soil type number (STN) and area (AREA), average SOC density (ASOCD) and total SOC stocks (SOCS) of surface paddy soils simulated with the DNDC, were attributed from all these soil polygon and grid units, respectively. Subjecting to the four index values (IV) from the parent polygon units, the variation of an index value (VIV, %) from the grid units was used to assess its dataset accuracy and redundancy, which reflects uncertainty in the simulation of SOC. Optimal soil grid unit resolutions were generated and suggested for the DNDC simulation of regional SOC pool, matching with soil polygon units map scales, respectively. With the optimal raster resolution the soil grid units dataset can hold the same accuracy as its parent polygon units dataset without any redundancy, when VIV < 1% of all the four indices was assumed as criteria to the assessment. An quadratic curve regression model y = -8.0 × 10-6x2 + 0.228x + 0.211 (R2 = 0.9994, p < 0.05) was revealed, which describes the relationship between optimal soil grid unit resolution (y, km) and soil polygon unit map scale (1:x). The knowledge may serve for grid partitioning of regions focused on the investigation and simulation of SOC pool dynamics at certain map scale.

  14. Fragmentation of interstellar clouds and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1982-01-01

    The principal issues are addressed: the fragmentation of molecular clouds into units of stellar mass and the impact of star formation on molecular clouds. The observational evidence for fragmentation is summarized, and the gravitational instability described of a uniform spherical cloud collapsing from rest. The implications are considered of a finite pressure for the minimum fragment mass that is attainable in opacity-limited fragmentation. The role of magnetic fields is discussed in resolving the angular momentum problem and in making the collapse anisotropic, with notable consequences for fragmentation theory. Interactions between fragments are described, with emphasis on the effect of protostellar winds on the ambient cloud matter and on inhibiting further star formation. Such interactions are likely to have profound consequences for regulating the rate of star formation and on the energetics and dynamics of molecular clouds.

  15. Surface effects in Si interstitial formation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Ann E.; Wixom, Ryan R.; Armiento, Rickard

    2007-03-01

    We are calculating Si self-interstitial formation energies using Density Functional Theory and several different exchange-correlation energy functionals. We show that the difference in results obtained with the LDA, PBE, PW91, and AM05 [1] functionals can be explained by the functionals' different surface intrinsic errors. We explain why surface effects are important for formation energies of interstitials in semi-conductors. Surface effects have previously been studied for metal vacancy formation energies. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. [1] R. Armiento and A. E. Mattsson, Phys. Rev. B 72, 085108 (2005).

  16. SI Units to be Used in Place of Imperial Units and Old Metric Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Science Teachers Journal, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A table lists the following quantities in imperial units, old metric units, and SI units: mass, force, energy, torque, power, pressure, temperature, thermal conductivity, frequency, dynamic viscosity, and kinematic viscosity. (MLH)

  17. Gemini facility calibration unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay-Howat, Suzanne K.; Harris, John W.; Gostick, David C.; Laidlaw, Ken; Kidd, Norrie; Strachan, Mel; Wilson, Ken

    2000-08-01

    High-quality, efficient calibration instruments is a pre- requisite for the modern observatory. Each of the Gemini telescopes will be equipped with identical facility calibration units (GCALs) designed to provide wavelength and flat-field calibrations for the suite of instruments. The broad range of instrumentation planned for the telescopes heavily constrains the design of GCAL. Short calibration exposures are required over wavelengths from 0.3micrometers to 5micrometers , field sizes up to 7 arcminutes and spectral resolution from R-5 to 50,000. The output from GCAL must mimic the f-16 beam of the telescope and provide a uniform illumination of the focal plane. The calibration units are mounted on the Gemini Instrument Support Structure, two meters from the focal pane, necessitating the use of large optical components. We will discuss the opto-mechanical design of the Gemini calibration unit, with reference to those feature which allow these stringent requirements to be met. A novel reflector/diffuser unit replaces the integration sphere more normally found in calibration systems. The efficiency of this system is an order of magnitude greater than for an integration sphere. A system of two off-axis mirrors reproduces the telescope pupil and provides the 7 foot focal plane. The results of laboratory test of the uniformity and throughput of the GCAL will be presented.

  18. Wyoming Indians, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming Indians provides concepts, activities, Indian stories, and resources for elementary school students. Indian values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "Indian," the Indians' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the land.…

  19. Understanding Haugh Units

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hand candling is the most common method of assessing interior egg quality. While this method is non-destructive, it is very subjective and takes some skill. The Haugh unit was developed in 1937 by R. Haugh and is revered as the “gold standard” for measuring interior egg quality. This objective me...

  20. Why Measure Haugh Units?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most people associate the determination of interior egg quality with candling eggs. While this is the most commonly utilized method, it is very subjective and takes some skill. The Haugh unit was developed in 1937 by R. Haugh and is revered as the “gold standard” for measuring interior egg quality...

  1. Unit III: International Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxey, Phyllis

    1983-01-01

    This lesson helps students understand the global network involved in international events. Students have an opportunity to examine the impact of international law and the role of international organizations, national governments, and private individuals in the effort to secure the release of United States hostages in Iran. (AM)

  2. Outdoorsman, Unit I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Agriculture, Edmonton.

    The first of three units of the 4-H Outdoorsman Program is designed to teach basic campcraft skills and to promote environmental awareness for 4-H members in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. The manual contains information and instruction on; special responsibilities in the outdoors (including conservation and clean up),…

  3. Police. An Experimental Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otero, George G.

    This unit examines four topic areas related to police: rules and enforcement, police discretion, variety of police tasks, and police differences among societies as products of certain social pressures. High-school students learn about the police as an institution that responds to social and historical pressures. Students study police systems in…

  4. NOVA SCIENCE UNIT 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1964

    THE MAJOR CONCEPT OF THE UNIT IS THAT SOMETHING MUST BE DONE TO PARTICLES IN ORDER TO STUDY THEM. ATOMS ARE COMPOSED OF TWO KINDS OF CHARGED PARTICLES--PROTONS AND ELECTRONS. ANY DIFFERENCE IN THEIR NUMBERS RESULTS IN A CHARGED BODY. IF ENOUGH CHARGED BODIES ARE PRODUCED, THEY WILL AFFECT CHARGE DETECTORS. CONCLUSIONS CAN BE DRAWN FROM THE…

  5. Sickle Cell Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    Included in this high school biology unit on sickle cell anemia are the following materials: a synopsis of the history of the discovery and the genetic qualities of the disease; electrophoresis diagrams comparing normal, homozygous and heterozygous conditions of the disease; and biochemical characteristics and population genetics of the disease. A…

  6. Insects. Thematic Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosnell, Kathee

    This book is a captivating whole-language thematic unit about the study of insects, relating it to our understanding of the past and our hopes for using our knowledge in the present to balance the ecosystem in the future. It contains a wide variety of lesson ideas and reproducible pages designed for use with intermediate students. At its core,…

  7. Whale Teaching Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peninsula Humane Society, San Mateo, CA.

    Materials in this teaching unit are designed to foster an interest in whale preservation among intermediate grade and junior high school students. Several readings provide background information on various types of whales and the economic value of whales. Student activities include a true and false game, a crossword, and a mobile. A resource list…

  8. Theme Unit. Horse Sense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagg, Ann

    1999-01-01

    This integrated, cross-curricular theme unit has children become immersed in the equine world as they broaden their vocabulary, participate in hands-on science and math, explore art, become aware of the horse's important role in history, and learn about good grooming. A student reproducible, a poetry poster, and a poster on the coloring of horses…

  9. CEU [Continuing Education Unit].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Basic Education Region V Staff Development Bulletin, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is a means of recording and accounting non-credit programs and activities which are professional in nature. Seven criteria have been established to assure the professionalism and quality of instruction. The criteria concern the need, objectives, and rationale of the activity; the course planning and…

  10. Outdoorsman, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Agriculture, Edmonton.

    The second of three units of the 4-H Outdoorsman Program introduces more advanced camping and survival techniques for 4-H members in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. Backpacking, finding food in the wild, making a fire without matches, lashing techniques, axemanship, finding your way (with and without a compass), making a…

  11. Outdoorsman, Unit III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Agriculture, Edmonton.

    The third and final unit of the 4-H Outdoorsman Program covers the most advanced and challenging campcraft skills for 4-H members in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Survival camping (including building shelters and finding food), in-depth map-reading and orienteering, game management, hiking themes and recordkeeping are all…

  12. Prefixes as Processing Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laudanna, Alessandro; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Two experiments assessed the performance of subjects on prefixed nonwords resulting from the incorrect combination of a prefix and a real word in Italian. The results support the view that prefixes may be represented as units of access or representation in the mental lexicon. (41 references) (MDM)

  13. Theme Unit: Veggie Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagg, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Presents a selection of activities for a cross-curricular unit based on vegetables. Activities address vocabulary, language arts, social studies, and health education. A student reproducible presents a tossed salad game. Game cards can be incorporated into the other activities. A poster describes plant parts that are edible. A sidebar offers…

  14. Everglades Environmental Study Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Environment Education.

    These environmental study units consist of four modules and a tape-slide presentation on the Everglades National Park. Although not required for completion of the modules, the slide-tape presentation provides a resource for orientation of teachers and parents to camping experience for school children in an environmental education program. The four…

  15. Social Studies Resource Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemiss, Clair W.

    Based on the premise that fundamental solutions to environmental problems must include social solutions, these three resource units are designed to study the interrelation of man and nature as part of the social studies curriculum. A series of inquiry questions are posed with the intent of stimulating students to find solutions to our…

  16. Planter unit test stand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A planter test stand was developed to evaluate individual row-crop metering units in early 2013. This test stand provided the ability to quantify actual seed metering in terms of population, seed spacing, skips, and multiples over a range of meter RPMs and vacuum pressures. Preliminary data has been...

  17. Wyoming Government, Unit VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming government presents concepts, activities, and stories for elementary school students. Concepts stress that the functions of government are determined according to the demands, needs, and traditions of the people; each part of government has a special function; as citizens, we should be loyal to the underlying concepts of our…

  18. Family Treatment Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawicki, Donna

    The document describes the Family Treatment Unit, a demonstration program to provide a variety of family treatment services to status offenders (11 to 17 years old) and their families. The goals of the program are: (1) to provide family services to families of status offenders; (2) to maintain status offenders in their natural homes by…

  19. Unitized paramagnetic salt thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.

    1982-06-01

    The details of construction and assembly of a cerous magnesium nitrate (CMN) paramagnetic thermometer are presented. The thermometer is a small unit consisting of a primary, two secondaries, the salt pill, and thermal links. The thermometer calibration changes very little on successive coolings and is reliable to 35 mK. A typical calibration curve is also presented.

  20. Teletype test unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couch, R. H.; Beall, H. C.

    1979-01-01

    Device may be used to facilitate testing and fault isolation in teletype and modem systems that are used for communication by people who having hearing disabilities. Unit uses CMOS digital integrated circuitry which may be operated from relatively inexpensive battery of any voltage from 3 to 18 volts.

  1. Gloucester Marine Biology Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearer, Sonja; And Others

    Objectives and activities for a field trip study of the seacoast environment of Gloucester, Massachusetts, are outlined in this guide. One phase of a six-week tenth grade biology unit, the field trip features study of tidal pool and salt marsh ecosystems. Specific objectives of the trip relate to observation and identification of various forms of…

  2. Extravehicular mobility unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, M. A.; Rouen, M. N.; Lutz, C. C.; Mcbarron, J. W., II

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) consisted of a highly mobile, anthropomorphic pressure vessel and a portable life support system. The EMU used for the first lunar landing is described along with the changes made in the EMU design during the program to incorporate the results of experience and to provide new capabilities. The performance of the EMU is discussed.

  3. Sparse Image Format

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. Itmore » supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.« less

  4. Sparse Image Format

    SciTech Connect

    Eads, Damian Ryan

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. It supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.

  5. Lessons Learned from Ongoing Field Tests of Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, B.; McColpin, G.; Rutledge, J.; Pawar, R.; Deo, M.; Rose, P.; Lee, S.; Han, W.; Lu, C.

    2008-12-01

    We present lessons learned - an attempt to describe what we know and do not know- based on ongoing field tests of geologic carbon sequestration. The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory, is conducting three separate field tests of geologic sequestration that include extensive monitoring and analysis of the fate of injected CO2. The CO2 injection sites include the Aneth oilfield in southern Utah, the coalbed "fairway" in the San Juan basin in northern New Mexico, and the SACROC oilfield in the Permian basin of west Texas. Results of the ongoing sequestration field tests are both encouraging and problematic. At the San Juan basin coalbed injection test, we forecasted coalbed swelling following injection to be detectable at the surface. Tiltmeter results indicated subsidence, not uplift, and poroelastic models of the site suggest that swelling is likely occurring, but cleat compaction may be responsible for the net subsidence. In a similar context, initial poroelastic models of the Aneth, Utah injection site suggested minimal rock strain would be induced by the 100,000 tons of CO2 injected over the past year, but this forecast is belied by daily microearthquakes recorded at the site (albeit very small events: M -1 to 0 ). On the other hand, our initial multiphase flow models of the Aneth site provided forecasts of CO2 migration that turned out to be extremely consistent with observed tracer test results, suggesting that our estimated permeability distributions and other model parameters were effective to some extent. These field tests suggest that probably the greatest challenges are (1) verification or confirmation of trapping mechanisms, and (2) monitoring of processes in the "intermediate zone," the section of strata above the sequestration formation topseal unit and below the upper 100 m of the section, (3) developing meaningful geologic

  6. Determining if Active Learning through a Formative Assessment Process Translates to Better Performance in Summative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosas, Aidan Bradley; Raju, Shiwani Rani; Schuett, Burkhardt Siegfried; Chuck, Jo-Anne; Millar, Thomas James

    2016-01-01

    Formative assessment used in a level 2 unit, Immunology, gave outcomes that were both surprising and applicable across disciplines. Four formative tests were given and reviewed during class time. The students' attitudes to formative assessment were evaluated using questionnaires and its effectiveness in closing the gap was measured by the…

  7. Teaching Letter Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Steve; Madan, Avi J.

    1981-01-01

    The authors describe a remedial technique for teaching letter formation to students with handwriting difficulties. The approach blends traditional procedures (modeling, physical prompts, tracing, self correction, etc.) with cognitive behavior modification principles. (CL)

  8. Circumstellar grain formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draine, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Dust formation around cool giant and supergiant stars is examined in terms of grain formulation. Optical properties of small clusters, molecular physics of cluster nucleation and growth, circumstellar mass flows, and their application to alpha Ori are discussed.

  9. Display formats manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The standards and procedures for the generation of operational display formats to be used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) display control system are presented. The required effort, forms, and fundamentals for the design, specifications, and production of display formats are identified. The principles of display design and system constraints controlling the creation of optimum operational displays for mission control are explained. The basic two types of MCC display systems for presenting information are described.

  10. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  11. Teaching about the United Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Ken, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on the 50th anniversary of the founding of the United Nations. Articles deal with aspects of the United Nations and include suggestions for teaching about the United Nations and using various teaching materials. Articles in this issue include: (1) "Celebrating United Nations Day" (Ken Osborne); (2) "Educating for World…

  12. Units that Make It Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner-Canham, Geoffrey

    1985-01-01

    The International System of Units (SI) or the metric system contains related units which make science simpler for students and teachers. By emphasizing descriptive units, requiring unit use throughout calculations, and using negative exponents, teachers can help students have a better understanding of energy, pressure, and mass concepts. (DH)

  13. Autonomous Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Strategic Plan for the Aerospace Technology Enterprise includes ambitious objectives focused on affordable air travel, reduced emissions, and expanded aviation-system capacity. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with NASA Ames Research Center, the Boeing Company, and the University of California, Los Angeles, has embarked on an autonomous-formation-flight project that promises to make significant strides towards these goals. For millions of years, birds have taken advantage of the aerodynamic benefit of flying in formation. The traditional "V" formation flown by many species of birds (including gulls, pelicans, and geese) enables each of the trailing birds to fly in the upwash flow field that exists just outboard of the bird immediately ahead in the formation. The result for each trailing bird is a decrease in induced drag and thus a reduction in the energy needed to maintain a given speed. Hence, for migratory birds, formation flight extends the range of the system of birds over the range of birds flying solo. The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) Project is seeking to extend this symbiotic relationship to aircraft.

  14. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Hartmann, John L.

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  15. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  16. Contamination analysis unit

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-05-28

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

  17. Contamination analysis unit

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, Hugh R.; Meltzer, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

  18. Coke formation in the thermal cracking of hydrocarbons. 4: Modeling of coke formation in naphtha cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Reyniers, G.C.; Froment, G.F. . Lab. voor Petrochemische Techniek); Kopinke, F.D.; Zimmermann, G. . Abteilung Hochtemperaturreaktionen am Inst. fuer Technische Chemie)

    1994-11-01

    An extensive experimental program has been carried out in a pilot unit for the thermal cracking of hydrocarbons. On the basis of the experimental information and the insight in the mechanisms for coke formation in pyrolysis reactors, a mathematical model describing the coke formation has been derived. This model has been incorporated in the existing simulation tools at the Laboratorium voor Petrochemische Techniek, and the run length of an industrial naphtha cracking furnace has been accurately simulated. In this way the coking model has been validated.

  19. Laser system preset unit

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, William L.

    1977-01-01

    An electronic circuit is provided which may be used to preset a digital display unit of a Zeeman-effect layer interferometer system which derives distance measurements by comparing a reference signal to a Doppler signal generated at the output of the interferometer laser head. The circuit presets dimensional offsets in the interferometer digital display by electronically inducing a variation in either the Doppler signal or the reference signal, depending upon the direction of the offset, to achieve the desired display preset.

  20. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Lambert, Winifred; Wheeler, Mark; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2007 (January - March 2007). Tasks reported on are: Obiective Lightning Probability Tool, Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting, Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida, Anvil Threat Corridor Forecast Tool in AWIPS, Volume Averaqed Heiqht lnteq rated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR), Tower Data Skew-t Tool, and Weather Research and Forecastini (WRF) Model Sensitivity Study

  1. United States crustal thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allenby, R. J.; Schnetzler, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The thickness of the crust, the thickness of the basal (intermediate or lower) crustal layer, and the average velocity at the top of the mantle have been mapped using all available deep-penetrating seismic-refraction profiles in the conterminous United States and surrounding border areas. These profiles are indexed to their literature data sources. The more significant long wavelength anomalies on the three maps are briefly discussed and analyzed. An attempt to use Bouguer gravity to validate mantle structure was inconclusive.

  2. Common drive unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, R. C.; Fink, R. A.; Moore, E. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Common Drive Unit (CDU) is a high reliability rotary actuator with many versatile applications in mechanism designs. The CDU incorporates a set of redundant motor-brake assemblies driving a single output shaft through differential. Tachometers provide speed information in the AC version. Operation of both motors, as compared to the operation of one motor, will yield the same output torque with twice the output speed.

  3. Gas purifier unit

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, J.

    1984-09-18

    A liquid contact type gas purifier unit in which gases to be treated are passed upwardly through a bath cleansing fluid to impart a circular and radially outward movement alone a central perforate support plate, the periphery of which has a circular rim with an adjacent collecting and reciprocating trough to provide for an even outward flow of cleansing fluid and stability of flow of the interacting fluid and gas streams and wider latitude of operable gas and pressure and flows.

  4. Bipartite units of nonlocality

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, Manuel; Wolf, Stefan

    2011-10-15

    Imagine a task in which a group of separated players aim to simulate a statistic that violates a Bell inequality. Given measurement choices the players shall announce an output based solely on the results of local operations--which they can discuss before the separation--on shared random data and shared copies of a so-called unit correlation. In the first part of this paper we show that in such a setting the simulation of any bipartite correlation, not containing the possibility of signaling, can be made arbitrarily accurate by increasing the number of shared Popescu-Rohrlich (PR) boxes. This establishes the PR box as a simple asymptotic unit of bipartite nonlocality. In the second part we study whether this property extends to the multipartite case. More generally, we ask if it is possible for separated players to asymptotically reproduce any nonsignaling statistic by local operations on bipartite unit correlations. We find that nonadaptive strategies are limited by a constant accuracy and that arbitrary strategies on n resource correlations make a mistake with a probability greater or equal to c/n, for some constant c.

  5. National Atlas of the United States Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2001-01-01

    The 'National Atlas of the United States of America?', published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1970, is out of print, but many of its maps can be purchased separately. Maps that span facing pages in the atlas are printed on one sheet. Maps dated after 1970 and before 1997 are either revisions of original atlas maps or new maps published in the original atlas format. The USGS and its partners in government and industry began work on a new 'National Atlas' in 1997. Though most new atlas products are designed for the World Wide Web, we are continuing our tradition of printing high-quality maps of America. In 1998, the first completely redesigned maps of the 'National Atlas of the United States?' were published.

  6. FORMATION OF 2-METHYL TETROLS AND 2-METHYLGLYCERIC ACID IN SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FROM LABORATORY IRRADIATED ISOPRENE/NO X/SO 2/AIR MIXTURES AND THEIR DETECTION IN AMBIENT PM 2.5 SAMPLES COLLECTED IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of isoprene/NOx/air irradiation experiments, carried out in both the absence and presence of SO2, were conducted to assess whether isoprene contributes to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. In the absence of SO2 , the SOA yield of 0.002 was low. However, in th...

  7. Midwayan (Paleocene) pollen correlations in the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederiksen, N.O.

    1991-01-01

    The Midwayan Stage of the eastern United States is divided into three new pollen zones, the Pseudoplicapollis serana, Tricolpites asper and Caryapollenites prodromus interval zones. Pollen data support the presence of an unconformity between the Rhems and Williamsburg Formations of South Carolina. The base of the Aquia Formation of Virginia and Maryland is slightly younger than the top of the Naheola Formation of Alabama. The Midwayan-Sabinian stage boundary is probably of late NP5 age and is probably only slightly younger than the important range base of Carya<29??m pollen. -from Author

  8. Positronium Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    Positronium formation in muscle at +4°C and -4°C was examined by the measurement of the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation. Since the positronium formation rate in ice is considerably higher than it is in water, there should be a comparable increase in the positronium formation rate in muscle tissue if recent speculation that cellular water is ordered in a semicrystalline icelike state is correct. Comparison of the angular correlation from muscle at +4°C with that from water at +4°C shows no enhancement of the positronium formation rate. Frozen muscle at -4°C shows an enhancement of the positronium formation rate of approximately half that found in ice at -4°C, indicating that most cellular water undergoes a normal water-ice transition when frozen. It is concluded therefore that cell water in muscle is not ordered in a hexagonal icelike structure. While the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cell water is in the liquid state, the hypothesis that cell water is ordered in an undetermined close packed structure which transforms to the hexagonal ice structure at or near 0°C cannot be ruled out. PMID:5436881

  9. Formation of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, George W.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of the earth is discussed in the context of the formation of the sun and the planets, and a standard model for such a formation assuming gravitational instability in a dense interstellar molecular cloud is outlined, along with the most significant variant of the model in which the loss of the nebular gas occurred after the formation of the earth. The formation of the sun and solar nebulae is addressed, and the coagulation of grains and the formation of small planetesimals are covered, along with the gravitational accumulation of planetesimals into planetary embryos and final stages of accumulation - embryos of planets. It is pointed out that the final stage of accumulation consists of the collision of these embryos; because of their large size, particularly after their further growth, these collisions represent giant impacts. It is concluded that the earth was initially an extremely hot and melted planet, surrounded by a fragile atmosphere and subject to violent impacts by bodies of the size of Ceres and even the moon.

  10. Molecules in star formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, F. H.

    The author reviews current ideas and models in the problem of star formation from molecular cloud cores that are relatively isolated from the influences of other forming stars. He discusses the time scales, flow dynamics, and density and temperature structures applicable to each of the four stages of the entire process: (1) formation of a magnetized cloud core by ambipolar diffusion and evolution to a pivotal state of gravomagneto catastrophe; (2) self-similar collapse of the pivotal configuration and the formation of protostars, disks, and pseudo-disks; (3) onset of a magnetocentrifugally driven, lightly ionized wind from the interaction of an accretion disk and the magnetosphere of the central star, and the driving of bipolar molecular outflows; (4) evolution of pre-main-sequence stars surrounded by dusty accretion disks. For each of these stages and processes, he considers the characteristics of the molecular diagnostics needed to investigate the crucial aspects of the observational problem.

  11. Engram formation in psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gebicke-Haerter, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors substantially influence beginning and progression of mental illness, reinforcing or reducing the consequences of genetic vulnerability. Often initiated by early traumatic events, “engrams” or memories are formed that may give rise to a slow and subtle progression of psychiatric disorders. The large delay between beginning and time of onset (diagnosis) may be explained by efficient compensatory mechanisms observed in brain metabolism that use optional pathways in highly redundant molecular interactions. To this end, research has to deal with mechanisms of learning and long-term memory formation, which involves (a) epigenetic changes, (b) altered neuronal activities, and (c) changes in neuron-glia communication. On the epigenetic level, apparently DNA-methylations are more stable than histone modifications, although both closely interact. Neuronal activities basically deliver digital information, which clearly can serve as basis for memory formation (LTP). However, research in this respect has long time neglected the importance of glia. They are more actively involved in the control of neuronal activities than thought before. They can both reinforce and inhibit neuronal activities by transducing neuronal information from frequency-encoded to amplitude and frequency-modulated calcium wave patterns spreading in the glial syncytium by use of gap junctions. In this way, they serve integrative functions. In conclusion, we are dealing with two concepts of encoding information that mutually control each other and synergize: a digital (neuronal) and a wave-like (glial) computing, forming neuron-glia functional units with inbuilt feedback loops to maintain balance of excitation and inhibition. To better understand mental illness, we have to gain more insight into the dynamics of adverse environmental impact on those cellular and molecular systems. This report summarizes existing knowledge and draws some outline about further research in molecular

  12. Perceptions and practices of U.S. dental schools regarding curriculum integrated format and traditional format licensure exams.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shamik; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Donoff, R Bruce; Howell, T Howard; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2013-08-01

    The dental licensure exam in the United States has evolved over the past ten years, and two formats-the traditional format and curriculum integrated format-are now available for students to satisfy licensure requirements. The objective of this study was to examine the differences and relative merits of the two formats. A twenty-five-question survey was distributed to the fifty-seven U.S. dental schools at the time. The survey included both quantitative and discrete variables and followed a strategic sequential order. The first set of questions sought to determine what type of board preparatory/mock exam each dental school offered, and the next set of questions asked which licensure exam each school formally offered. The final questions were qualitative in nature and aimed to determine the school representatives' opinions about the curriculum integrated format versus traditional format. Of the fifty-seven schools contacted, thirty-seven agreed to participate (response rate=64.9 percent). Fourteen schools reported that they administer the traditional format only and twelve administer the curriculum integrated format only, while eleven offer both. Thirty-two schools offered mock board exams to their graduating students, and twenty-four of those said their mock exams were identical in format to the actual qualifying clinical exams offered at their institution. The respondents reported no significant advantage to preparing for the curriculum integrated format examination as compared to the traditional format examination with regards to number of clock hours taken from regular curriculum time. In reporting on this study, this article provides an overview of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the two examination formats used for the dental licensure process in the United States. PMID:23929575

  13. Thrombus formation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara C.

    2005-01-01

    To examine thrombus formation in a living mouse, new technologies involving intravital videomicroscopy have been applied to the analysis of vascular windows to directly visualize arterioles and venules. After vessel wall injury in the microcirculation, thrombus development can be imaged in real time. These systems have been used to explore the role of platelets, blood coagulation proteins, endothelium, and the vessel wall during thrombus formation. The study of biochemistry and cell biology in a living animal offers new understanding of physiology and pathology in complex biologic systems. PMID:16322780

  14. Crystal Formation in Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Bernardo S; Mangan, Matthew S; Latz, Eicke

    2016-05-20

    The formation and accumulation of crystalline material in tissues is a hallmark of many metabolic and inflammatory conditions. The discovery that the phase transition of physiologically soluble substances to their crystalline forms can be detected by the immune system and activate innate immune pathways has revolutionized our understanding of how crystals cause inflammation. It is now appreciated that crystals are part of the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including gout, silicosis, asbestosis, and atherosclerosis. In this review we discuss current knowledge of the complex mechanisms of crystal formation in diseased tissues and their interplay with the nutrients, metabolites, and immune cells that account for crystal-induced inflammation. PMID:26772211

  15. Gaussian entanglement of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.M.; Giedke, G.; Krueger, O.; Werner, R. F.; Cirac, J.I.

    2004-05-01

    We introduce a Gaussian version of the entanglement of formation adapted to bipartite Gaussian states by considering decompositions into pure Gaussian states only. We show that this quantity is an entanglement monotone under Gaussian operations and provide a simplified computation for states of arbitrary many modes. For the case of one mode per site the remaining variational problem can be solved analytically. If the considered state is in addition symmetric with respect to interchanging the two modes, we prove additivity of the considered entanglement measure. Moreover, in this case and considering only a single copy, our entanglement measure coincides with the true entanglement of formation.

  16. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of

  17. SOA from BVOCs in the Southeastern United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic hydrocarbons contribute to organic aerosol in the southeast United States. In this work, we represent aerosol formation from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes in CMAQ and compare to data from the Southeast Oxidants and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Sensitivity simulatio...

  18. Unit: Rocks from Sediments, Inspection Pack, National Trial Print.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    Four compulsory introductory activities, involving learning to use a stream tray, observing the relationship between water speed and entraining, transporting and depositing sediments, studying the formation of sedimentary rocks, and examining several types of sedimentary rocks, are completed by all students using the unit prepared for Australian…

  19. Unit: Rocks from Sediments, Inspection Set, First Trial Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    Four compulsory introductory activities involving learning to use a stream tray, observing the relationship between water speed and entraining, transporting and depositing sediments, studying the formation of sedimentary rocks, and examining several types of sedimentary rocks are completed by all students using the unit prepared for Australian…

  20. The European Currency Unit: An Economical, Financial, and Political Currency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strysick, Pam

    Intended to provide a basic understanding of the history and complexity of a relatively new foreign currency measure, this paper briefly describes the history leading to the formation of the European Economic Community (EEC), its objectives, its governance structure, and its development of the European Currency Unit (ECU) as a means of stabilizing…

  1. Biodiversity of Aspergillus section Flavi in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungi belonging to Aspergillus section Flavi are of great economic importance in the United States due to the formation of toxic and carcinogenic aflatoxins in agricultural commodities. Development of control strategies against A. flavus and A. parasiticus, the major aflatoxin-producing species, is...

  2. The Development of Wage Statistics in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douty, H. M.

    This bulletin briefly traces the development of wage statistics in nonfarm employments in the United States, focusing mainly on the work of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The formative period of wage statistics was the final quarter of the nineteenth century, although some information was assembled and systematic insight into the behavior of…

  3. The Beginnings of Communication Study in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, Wilbur

    The history of communication research in the United States is reviewed in this paper through an extensive look at the lives of four men who made significant contributions to the field: Harold Lasswell, Kurt Lewin, Paul Lazarsfeld, and Carl Hovland. The pattern of institute formation in the social sciences is briefly reviewed to explain the…

  4. Multipurpose auxiliary power unit

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, C.

    1990-04-17

    This patent describes a gas turbine alternately usable as an auxiliary power unit, load compressor, air turbine started or the like. It comprises: a centrifugal compressor mounted for rotation; a turbine wheel mounted for rotation; a clutch interconnecting the compressor and the turbine wheel and selectively operable to couple or decouple the compressor and the turbine wheel; and inlet to the compressor; variable inlet guide vanes in the inlet and movable between positions substantially opening and substantially closing the inlet; a compressed air outlet from the compressor; a gas inlet to the turbine wheel, a combustor interconnecting the gas inlet and the turbine wheel.

  5. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., Jr.; Crawford, Winifred; Short, David; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2008 (January - March 2008). Projects described are: (1) Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), (2) Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting, (3) Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida. Phase III, (4) Volume Averaged Height Integrated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR), (5) Impact of Local Sensors, (6) Radar Scan Strategies for the PAFB WSR-74C Replacement and (7) WRF Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base.

  6. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela; Wheeler, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2010 (October - December 2009). A detailed project schedule is included in the Appendix. Included tasks are: (1) Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), (2) Objective Lightning Probability Tool, Phase III, (3) Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting, Phase II, (4) Upgrade Summer Severe Weather Tool in Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS), (5) Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) Update and Maintainability, (5) Verify 12-km resolution North American Model (MesoNAM) Performance, and (5) Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) Graphical User Interface.

  7. Power-processing unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessel, Frank J. (Inventor); Hancock, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Power-processing unit uses AC buses (30, 32) to supply all current dependent needs such as connections (54, 56) to an ion thruster through an inductor (88) and the primary of a transformer (90), to assure limited currents to such loads. Where temperature control is also required, such as to the main discharge vaporizer heater connection (36, 38), switches (100, 102) are serially connected with inductor (96) and the primary of transformer (98). Temperature sensor (104) controls the switches (100, 102) for temperature regulation.

  8. Intensive Care Unit Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Monks, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    Patients who become psychotic in intensive care units are usually suffering from delirium. Underlying causes of delirium such as anxiety, sleep deprivation, sensory deprivation and overload, immobilization, an unfamiliar environment and pain, are often preventable or correctable. Early detection, investigation and treatment may prevent significant mortality and morbidity. The patient/physician relationship is one of the keystones of therapy. More severe cases may require psychopharmacological measures. The psychotic episode is quite distressing to the patient and family; an educative and supportive approach by the family physician may be quite helpful in patient rehabilitation. PMID:21279016

  9. Toxic Hazards Research Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macewen, J. D.; Vernot, E. H.

    1971-01-01

    The activities of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit (THRU) for the period of June 1970 through May 1971 reviewed. Modification of the animal exposure facilities primarily for improved human safety but also for experimental integrity and continuity are discussed. Acute toxicity experiments were conducted on hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) both singly and in combination with carbon dioxide (CO). Additional acute toxicity experiments were conducted on oxygen difluoride (OF2) and chlorine pentafluoride (ClF5). Subacute toxicity studies were conducted on methylisobutylketone and dichloromethane (methylene dichloride). The interim results of further chronic toxicity experiments on monomethylhydrazine (MMH) are also described.

  10. Formate metabolism in the cobalamin-inactivated rat.

    PubMed

    Deacon, R; Perry, J; Lumb, M; Chanarin, I

    1990-03-01

    Endogenous formate levels in blood and liver were assayed in rats both after inactivation of cobalamin (Cbl) by exposure to N2O as well as in air-breathing controls. The uptake of [14C]formate by tetrahydrofolate (H4folate) in bone marrow cells and liver homogenate and the incorporation of [14C]formate into purine, pyrimidine, methionine, serine and choline, was measured. There was a significant accumulation of endogenous formate following Cbl inactivation. There was impaired utilization of [14C]formate for single unit carbon (C1 unit) transfers mediated by folate in Cbl-inactivated tissues, other than for synthesis of adenine. The impairment was not accompanied by any accumulation of labelled methylH4folate indicating that methylfolate trapping played no part in impaired single carbon unit transfer. The effect of Cbl lack was a failure to form formylH4folate so that formate accumulated. The reason for this is not known. PMID:2334642

  11. Automatic delineation of geomorphological slope units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvioli, Massimiliano; Marchesini, Ivan; Fiorucci, Federica; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Reichenbach, Paola; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    Slope units are portions of land surface, defined by the general requirement of maximizing homogeneity within a single unit and heterogeneity between different units, but whose formal characterization and practical delineation has been done in different ways. This is often justified by the statement that the slope unit partitioning of a territory can be used to describe a variety of landforms and processes, and for the assessment of natural hazards. As a result, they need to be tailored according to the specific model in use. This may result in an ambiguous definition of such objects, while an objective definition is highly desirable, which would also allow their reproducibility. We have developed a publicly accessible Web Processing Service (WPS) with the aim of incrementally achieve a satisfactory definition of slope unit. The service allows any user to connect to a CNR-IRPI (Perugia) server, upload his own Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and optional additional data, specify parameters constraining the size and aspect of slope units, and quickly obtain the result in a layer in vector format. The calculation is performed using a parallel algorithm, resulting in a processing time short enough to allow the user to tune the input parameters, repeating the process for a sufficient number of times in order to obtain a satisfactory result. We use quantitative criteria to define and draw the slope units, depending on the input parameters. The algorithm starts from a hydrologically consistent partition of the study area into half-basins with a large number of contributing DEM cells. Each of the half-basins is then checked against a few requirements: maximum area required by the user and maximum standard deviation of the aspect on two orthogonal directions. Those specific half-basin that do not meet the requirements are partitioned further, requiring a lower number of contributing cells. The process is iterated until no half-basin exceeds the user-specified thresholds. Our

  12. The Vernier delay unit

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, W.B.

    1985-02-01

    One of the most critical timing specifications for the SLC machine occurs at the injector and ejector magnets for the Damping Ring. It has been determined that the trigger pulses to the magnets must be controlled to 0.1 ns. The primary source for all trigger pulses for the SLC machine is the Programmable Delay Unit (PDU). The PDU generates a 67.2 ns wide pulse with delay increments of 8.7 ns. The gap between the required accuracy and that available from the PDU requires the design of a new module that is called the Vernier Delay Unit (VDU). This module accepts the 67.2 ns pulse from the PDU and is capable of increasing the delay in steps of 0.1 ns from 0 to 10.7 ns plus the minimum 9 ns delay. The module has two totally independent channels. The pulse input to the module is software selectable from either the auxiliary backplane or a front panel Lemo connector. The auxiliary backplane pulses are to be the 67 ns differential ECL pulses from the PDU. The front panel input is to be a NIM level (-0.7 V 50 termination).

  13. BISAC Variable Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Technology and Libraries, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents revision of Book Industry Systems Advisory Committee (BISAC) format designed specifically for electronic transmission of purchase orders for monograph or series titles combining fixed and variable length data fields which was approved in January 1983. Special characters, sample address descriptions, summary of fixed records, glossary, and…

  14. The Formation of Trihalomethanes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, R. Rhodes; Umphres, Mark D.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are a number of factors important in the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) including the nature of aquatic humus and the influences of preozonation, bromide, pH, and chlorine. A brief investigation is also conducted into the kinetics of the THM reaction. Several major research needs are represented. (CS)

  15. Reconsidering Formative Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Roy D.; Breivik, Einar; Wilcox, James B.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between observable responses and the latent constructs they are purported to measure has received considerable attention recently, with particular focus on what has become known as formative measurement. This alternative to reflective measurement in the area of theory-testing research is examined in the context of the potential…

  16. Formation of Freirian Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Phyllis

    This paper is written for people who are already familiar with the philosophy and methodology of Paulo Freire's liberatory education and are interested in creating a formation program for adult education facilitators using his ideas. The author describes the paper as "a collection of thoughts, of things to consider," when organizing such a…

  17. Formation of planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, Stuart J.

    1991-01-01

    Formation of planetesimals is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) nebular structure; (2) aerodynamics of the solid bodies in the nebula; (3) problems with gravitational instability; (4) particle growth by coagulation; properties of fractal aggregates; and (5) coagulation and settling of fractal aggregates.

  18. Technobabble: File Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    1999-01-01

    Considers the confusion of over 20 different kinds of graphics programs. Briefly distinguishes between some of the more popular graphics formats (Photoshop, TIFF, JPEG, GIF, PICT, and EPS), and describes the benefits and disadvantages of each in the context of journalism education. (SC)

  19. FORMATION OF PHOTOCHEMICAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective was to develop a better understanding of smog aerosol formation with particular reference to haze in the Southern California area. This study combined laboratory work with ambient air studies. Counting of particles by light scattering was the principle physical tech...

  20. Common file formats.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Shonda A; Littlejohn, Timothy G; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2007-01-01

    This appendix discusses a few of the file formats frequently encountered in bioinformatics. Specifically, it reviews the rules for generating FASTA files and provides guidance for interpreting NCBI descriptor lines, commonly found in FASTA files. In addition, it reviews the construction of GenBank, Phylip, MSF and Nexus files. PMID:18428774

  1. Bacterial formate hydrogenlyase complex

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Jennifer S.; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Haumann, Michael; Palmer, Tracy; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Sargent, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli can carry out a mixed-acid fermentation that ultimately produces molecular hydrogen. The enzyme directly responsible for hydrogen production is the membrane-bound formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex, which links formate oxidation to proton reduction and has evolutionary links to Complex I, the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase. Although the genetics, maturation, and some biochemistry of FHL are understood, the protein complex has never been isolated in an intact form to allow biochemical analysis. In this work, genetic tools are reported that allow the facile isolation of FHL in a single chromatographic step. The core complex is shown to comprise HycE (a [NiFe] hydrogenase component termed Hyd-3), FdhF (the molybdenum-dependent formate dehydrogenase-H), and three iron-sulfur proteins: HycB, HycF, and HycG. A proportion of this core complex remains associated with HycC and HycD, which are polytopic integral membrane proteins believed to anchor the core complex to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. As isolated, the FHL complex retains formate hydrogenlyase activity in vitro. Protein film electrochemistry experiments on Hyd-3 demonstrate that it has a unique ability among [NiFe] hydrogenases to catalyze production of H2 even at high partial pressures of H2. Understanding and harnessing the activity of the FHL complex is critical to advancing future biohydrogen research efforts. PMID:25157147

  2. Kepler Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler has vastly increased our knowledge of planets and planetary systems located close to stars. The new data shows surprising results for planetary abundances, planetary spacings and the distribution of planets on a mass-radius diagram. The implications of these results for theories of planet formation will be discussed.

  3. 500+ Writing Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Margaret E.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests a multitude of ideas for students to communicate their ideas in writing using the language of mathematics. Includes a sampling of 500+ writing formats, 67 abbreviated writing assignments, and three complete assignments along with a sample student response to each. Sample assignments include advice column, biographical sketch, commercial,…

  4. Formation in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennon, Fred; Jacobsen, Douglas; Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt; Thatamanil, John J.; Porterfield, Amanda; Moore, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    What is the relationship between the academic knowledge of the guild and the formation of students in the classroom? This Forum gathers four essays originally presented at a Special Topics Session at the 2009 conference of the American Academy of Religion (Atlanta, Georgia), with a brief introductory essay by Fred Glennon explaining the genesis of…

  5. The new system of units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Joachim; Ullrich, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The redefinition of several physical base units planned for 2018 requires precise knowledge of the values of certain fundamental physical constants. Scientists are working hard to meet the deadlines for realizing the ultimate International System of Units.

  6. Insights on galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James Steven

    1999-12-01

    Recent advances in theoretical modeling coupled with a wealth of new observational data, provide a unique opportunity for gaining insight into process of galaxy formation. I present results which test and develop current theories. The analysis utilizes state of the art theoretical modeling and makes predictions aimed at comparisons with some of the latest and upcoming observational data sets. In part I, I discuss an analysis of the structure and properties of dark matter halos (believed to govern the dynamical evolution of galaxies). The results make use of very high-resolution N-body simulations, and are derived from a new hierarchical halo finder, designed especially for these projects and to complement advancements in simulation technology. I present information on the dark matter halo substructure, density profiles, angular momentum structure, and collision rates. In part II, I discuss some aspects of galaxy formation theory in light of new observational data. The discussion includes an investigation of the nature of high-redshift galaxies, the local velocity function of galaxies, and the use of gamma ray telescopes to probe the extra-galactic background light-the latter analysis is done in the context of semi-analytic modeling of galaxy formation. The most important conclusions of this thesis are as follows. (1)Dark matter halos at high redshift are much less concentrated than previously believed. implying that quiescently star-forming galaxies at high redshift are larger and dimmer than expected. (2)The observed bright. abundant. and highly clustered high- redshift (Lyman-break) galaxies are likely starbursts driven by collisions between relatively small galaxies at z ~ 3. And (3)there is a real possibility of using the growing advances in γ-ray astronomy to probe many poorly constrained processes of galaxy formation, including the stellar initial mass function and the star formation history of the universe.

  7. Pattern formation today

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Richardson, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Patterns are orders embedded in randomness. They may appear as spatial arrangements or temporal series, and the elements may appear identical or with variations. Patterns exist in the physical world as well as in living systems. In the biological world, patterns can range from simple to complex, forming the basic building blocks of life. The process which generates this ordering in the biological world was termed pattern formation. Since Wolpert promoted this concept four decades ago, scientists from molecular biology, developmental biology, stem cell biology, tissue engineering, theoretical modeling and other disciplines have made remarkable progress towards understanding its mechanisms. It is time to review and re-integrate our understanding. Here, we explore the origin of pattern formation, how the genetic code is translated into biological form, and how complex phenotypes are selected over evolutionary time. We present four topics: Principles, Evolution, Development, and Stem Cells and Regeneration. We have interviewed several leaders in the field to gain insight into how their research and the field of pattern formation have shaped each other. We have learned that both molecular process and physico-chemical principles are important for biological pattern formation. New understanding will emerge through integration of the analytical approach of molecular-genetic manipulation and the systemic approach of model simulation. We regret that we could not include every major investigator in the field, but hope that this Special Issue of the Int. J. Dev. Biol. represents a sample of our knowledge of pattern formation today, which will help to stimulate more research on this fundamental process. PMID:19557673

  8. The United States Congress Can Tax Interest on State Bonds: "South Carolina v. Baker".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Terrence M.; Sparkman, William E.

    1988-01-01

    The United States Supreme Court has made it clear that Congress can tax state bonds. All public purpose bonds issued by school districts must be issued in a registered format in order to continue their tax-exempt status. (MLF)

  9. Kilometer-scale Roughness of Geological Units on Mars: Initial Results from MOLA Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreslavsky, M. A.; Head, J. W.

    1999-03-01

    Scale dependence of the median slope is studied for a number of geological units. Similarity of km-scale roughness of Vastitas Borealis Formation subunits and the circumpolar mantling deposits suggests similarity of their origin.

  10. REACH. Residential Electrical Wiring Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansley, Jimmy; Ennis, Mike

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of residential electrical wiring. The instructional units focus on grounded outlets, service entrance, and blueprint reading. Each unit follows a typical format…

  11. Snakes: An Integrated Unit Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Lisa

    This document presents an integrated unit plan on snakes targeting second grade students. Objectives of the unit include developing concepts of living things, understanding the contribution and importance of snakes to the environment, and making connections between different disciplines. The unit integrates the topic of snakes into the areas of…

  12. Famous Presidents Unit, Third Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowlin, Isabel

    This teaching unit is composed of six parts: (1) content outline, (2) unit goals, (3) objectives, (4) activities, (5) evaluation plan, and (6) bibliography. The content of the unit centers on the lives of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. Specifically it investigates what made these men exceptional heroes, and it differentiates between facts…

  13. Design of hydraulic recuperation unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandourek, Pavel; Habán, Vladimír; Hudec, Martin; Dobšáková, Lenka; Štefan, David

    2016-03-01

    This article deals with design and measurement of hydraulic recuperation unit. Recuperation unit consist of radial turbine and axial pump, which are coupled on the same shaft. Speed of shaft with impellers are 6000 1/min. For economic reasons, is design of recuperation unit performed using commercially manufactured propellers.

  14. Using SI Units in Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meriam, J. L.

    This paper provides an historical account of the development of the International System of Units (SI), a complete listing of these units, and rules concerning their use and proper abbreviation. Ambiguities concerning the use of the system are explained. Appendices contain conversion factors for U.S. - British to SI units along with several…

  15. Measurements, Physical Quantities, and Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Laurence E.

    1988-01-01

    Explains the significance of the mole as a unit of measure by showing the relationship between physical quantities and their mathematical representations. Offers a summary of the principles of metrology that make creation of physical quantities and units seem reasonable. A table of base physical quantities and units is included. (RT)

  16. What's It Worth? Unit Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Mint (Dept. of Treasury), Washington, DC.

    This hands-on coin unit is for students in grades 1-2. Students play games and work with coin manipulatives to practice coin and value recognition, finding coin combinations, and adding coins. The unit provides keywords; recommends subject areas and approximate length of time; poses an essential question or problem; provides a unit introduction;…

  17. Creative Coin Combinations. Unit Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Mint (Dept. of Treasury), Washington, DC.

    This unit of study for grades K-2 focuses on counting coins and coin equivalencies up to 50 cents, making use of a literature connection. The unit provides key words; recommends subject areas and approximate length of time; poses an essential question or problem; provides a unit introduction; notes four individual lessons ((1) For Sale!; (2)…

  18. United Nations Day, 24 October.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Ken, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Serving as the journal of the Manitoba Social Science Teachers' Association, this issue commemorates United Nations Day with the editorial, "Teaching about the United Nations" (Ken Osborne). Another article devoted to the international organization is "The United Nations and International Peace and Security" (Ken Osborne). The article is intended…

  19. Hydrologic Unit Map -- 1974, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1974-01-01

    This map and accompanying table show Hydrologic Units that are basically hydrographic in nature.  The Cataloging Units shown will supplant the Cataloging Units previously used by the U.S. Geological Survey in its Catalog of Information on Water Data (1966-72).   

  20. Metric Units in Primary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lighthill, M. J.; And Others

    Although this pamphlet is intended as background material for teachers in English primary schools changing to the System International d'Unites (SI units), the form of the metric system being adopted by the United Kingdom, the educational implications of the change and the lists of apparatus suitable for use with children up to 14 years of age are…

  1. Descriptive Writing: A Thematic Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Joanna J.

    This thematic unit for teaching descriptive writing is organized around 10 days of lesson plans. The unit begins by asking key questions about descriptive writing and providing information on grade level, ability level, number of lessons and length of classes, and prior knowledge students should have. It also offers a unit rationale and key…

  2. Towards to Creation Unit Theory Oil Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galant, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Creating a unified theory of the genesis of oil encompasses all aspects of oil's life beginning from the formation the chemical elements. Globally, in the spatio-temporal aspect oil's life covers a Cosmic (pre geological) stage and geologically stage of formation of the planet Earth. In conces of spatio-temporal aspect unified theory of oil formation is based on the sequence of occurrences of chemical elements from which to create the Planet Earth and its Granite and Basalt Domains. From this standpoint is an independent Oil Domain along with Granite and Basalt. Sequence analysis of the appearance of chemical elements (H, C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Fe, etc.) reveals the genesis of oil at a very early stage of the creation of Earth according appearance first of H and C. Next, according to the sequence of appearance (creation) of the elements are formed of Granite and Basalt Domain. The appearance of: (chemical element - serial number of) H 1, O 8 corresponds to the appearance of the aqueous layer. The appearance of Na 11, Al 13, Si 14 corresponds to the appearance of the Granite layer. The appearance of Ca 20, Fe 26 corresponds to the appearance of the Basalt layer. The process of formation of domains continues to today. Currently, Oil Domain encircles Globe on the south and north and manifests itself from micro quantities to gigantic clusters. In the formation of unit oil involves various methods involving initial elements C and H of various geneses. A unity of theory of oil generation in her polygenic !

  3. United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    1985-02-01

    This discussion of the United Arab Emirates focuses on the following: the people; geography; history; government; political conditions; defense; the economy; foreign relations; and relations between the US and the United Arab Emirates. In 1983 the population was estimated at 1,194,000. In 1984 the annual growth rate was negative. Life expectancy is about 60 years. Fewer than 20% of the population are UAE citizens. Indigenous Emiris are Arab; the rest of the population includes significant numbers of other Arabs -- Palestinians, Egyptians, Jordanians, Yemenis, Omanis, as well as many Iranians, Pakistanis, Indians, and West Europeans, especially in Dubai. The UAE is in the eastern Arabian Peninsula, bounded on the north by the Persian Gulf. European and Arab pirates roamed the Trucial Coast area from the 17th century into the 19th century. Early British expeditions against the pirates led to further campaigns against their headquarters. Piracy continued intermittently until 1835, when the shaikhs agreed not to engage in hostilities at sea. Primarily in reaction to the ambitions of other European countries, the UK and the Trucial States established closer bonds in an 1892 treaty. In 1968 the British government announced its decision, reaffirmed in March 1971, to end the treaty relationship with the gulf shaikhdoms. When the British protective treaty with the Trucial Shaikhdoms ended on December 1, they became fully independent. On December 2, 1971, 6 of them entered into a union called the United Arab Emirates. The 7th, Ras al-Khaimah, joined in early 1972. Administratively, the UAE is a loose federation of 7 emirates, each with its own ruler. The pace at which local government in each emirate is evolving, from traditional to modern, is set primarily by the ruler. Under the provisional constitution of 1971, each emirate reserves considerable powers, including control over mineral rights, taxation, and police powers. In this milieu, the growth of federal powers has

  4. Theories and controversies on urine formation.

    PubMed

    Timio, Mario; Saronio, Paolo; Capodicasa, Enrico; Timio, Francesca

    2003-01-01

    The theories of urine formation developed in the wake of progressing scientific knowledge in renal anatomy and physiology. From the philosophical theories which for a long time swung between vitalism and mechanism, the "scientific revolution" gave a great impulse to morpho/functional unit of kidney. Bowman's secretory hypothesis, as an expression of the vitalistic based theory, describes for the first time many features of the nephron and its blood supply. New insight into the inevitable errors of Bowman led Ludwig to develop the filtration-reabsorption theory, which based its scientific approach on the emerging physics and chemistry theories. The Heidenhain's secretory hypothesis which does not admit the physical filtration in Ludwig's sense, nor the hydrostatic pressure of the blood, even though incomplete and in some part without unequivocal experimental evidence, adds a fragment to the right theory of the urine formation and heralds the modern approach to the renal function of the 20th century. PMID:14736027

  5. Forward Deployed Robotic Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendle, Bruce E., Jr.; Bornstein, Jonathan A.

    2000-07-01

    Forward Deployed Robotic Unit (FDRU) is a core science and technology objective of the US Army, which will demonstrate the impact of autonomous systems on all phases of future land warfare. It will develop, integrate and demonstrate technology required to achieve robotic and fire control capabilities for future land combat vehicles, e.g., Future Combat Systems, using a system of systems approach that culminates in a field demonstration in 2005. It will also provide the required unmanned assets and conduct the demonstration. Battle Lab Warfighting Experiments and data analysis required to understand the effects of unmanned assets on combat operations. The US Army Tank- Automotive & Armaments Command and the US Army Research Laboratory are teaming in an effort to leverage prior technology achievements in the areas of autonomous mobility, architecture, sensor and robotics system integration; advance the state-of-the-art in these areas; and to provide field demonstration/application of the technologies.

  6. Composite material impregnation unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, S. P.; Marchello, J. M.; Johnston, N. J.

    1993-01-01

    This memorandum presents an introduction to the NASA multi-purpose prepregging unit which is now installed and fully operational at the Langley Research Center in the Polymeric Materials Branch. A description of the various impregnation methods that are available to the prepregger are presented. Machine operating details and protocol are provided for its various modes of operation. These include, where appropriate, the related equations for predicting the desired prepreg specifications. Also, as the prepregger is modular in its construction, each individual section is described and discussed. Safety concerns are an important factor and a chapter has been included that highlights the major safety features. Initial experiences and observations for fiber impregnation are described. These first observations have given great insight into the areas of future work that need to be addressed. Future memorandums will focus on these individual processes and their related problems.

  7. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 7o S, 172o W (188o E) and shows a remarkable martian geologic deposit known as the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation, seen here as the raised plateau in the upper two-thirds of the image, is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region the deposit has been heavily eroded by the wind to produce a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These parallel ridges point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to sculpt the dry landscape of Mars. The Medusae Fossae Formation has been completely stripped from the surface in the lower third of the image, revealing a harder layer below that is more resistant to wind erosion. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Several ancient craters that were once completely buried by this deposit are being exposed, or exhumed, as the overlying Medusae Formation is removed. Very few impact craters are visible on this Formation, indicating that the surface seen today is relatively young, and that the processes of erosion are likely to be actively occurring. The Story Medusa of Greek mythology fame, the name-giver to this region, had snaky locks of hair that could turn a person to stone. Wild and unruly, this monster of the underworld could certainly wreak havoc on the world of the human imagination. As scary as she was, Medusa would have no advantage over the fierce, masterful winds blowing across Mars, which once carved the streaky, terrain at the top of this image. Wild and whipping, these winds have slowly eroded away the 'topsoil,' revealing ancient craters and other surface features they once covered. The loosely cemented particles of this 'topsoil' are likely made up of dust

  8. Format( )MEDIC( )Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, K.

    1994-09-01

    This document is a description of a computer program called Format( )MEDIC( )Input. The purpose of this program is to allow the user to quickly reformat wind velocity data in the Model Evaluation Database (MEDb) into a reasonable 'first cut' set of MEDIC input files (MEDIC.nml, StnLoc.Met, and Observ.Met). The user is cautioned that these resulting input files must be reviewed for correctness and completeness. This program will not format MEDb data into a Problem Station Library or Problem Metdata File. A description of how the program reformats the data is provided, along with a description of the required and optional user input and a description of the resulting output files. A description of the MEDb is not provided here but can be found in the RAS Division Model Evaluation Database Description document.

  9. Pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Czirok, Andras; Little, Charles D

    2012-06-01

    Vasculogenesis, the assembly of the first vascular network, is an intriguing developmental process that yields the first functional organ system of the embryo. In addition to being a fundamental part of embryonic development, vasculogenic processes also have medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how morphogenesis of tissue level structures can be controlled through cell behavior patterns that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes. Mathematical analyses and computer simulations can help conceptualize how to bridge organizational levels and thus help in evaluating hypotheses regarding the formation of vascular networks. Here, we discuss the ideas that have been proposed to explain the formation of the first vascular pattern: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. PMID:22692888

  10. Cosmological structure formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the current forefront problem of physical cosmology, the formation of structures (galaxies, clusters, great walls, etc.) in the universe is presented. Solutions require two key ingredients: (1) matter; and (2) seeds. Regarding the matter, it now seems clear that both baryonic and non-baryonic matter are required. Whether the non-baryonic matter is hot or cold depends on the choice of seeds. Regarding the seeds, both density fluctuations and topological defects are discussed. The combination of isotropy of the microwave background and the recent observations indicating more power on large scales have severly constrained, if not eliminated, Gaussian fluctuations with equal power on all scales, regardless of the eventual resolution of both the matter and seed questions. It is important to note that all current structure formation ideas require new physics beyond SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1).

  11. Emptiness Formation Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Nicholas; Ng, Stephen; Starr, Shannon

    2016-08-01

    We present rigorous upper and lower bounds on the emptiness formation probability for the ground state of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg XXZ quantum spin system. For a d-dimensional system we find a rate of decay of the order {exp(-c L^{d+1})} where L is the sidelength of the box in which we ask for the emptiness formation event to occur. In the {d=1} case this confirms previous predictions made in the integrable systems community, though our bounds do not achieve the precision predicted by Bethe ansatz calculations. On the other hand, our bounds in the case {d ≥ 2} are new. The main tools we use are reflection positivity and a rigorous path integral expansion, which is a variation on those previously introduced by Toth, Aizenman-Nachtergaele and Ueltschi.

  12. Formation of bacterial nanocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Mikhail; Kudryashova, Ekaterina; Suzina, Natalia; Ariskina, Elena; Voronkov, Vadim

    1998-07-01

    Existence of nanobacteria received increasing attention both in environmental microbiology/geomicro-biology and in medical microbiology. In order to study a production of nanoforms by typical bacterial cells. Effects of different physical factors were investigated. Treatment of bacterial cultures with microwave radiation, or culturing in field of electric current resulted in formation a few types of nanocells. The number and type of nanoforms were determined with type and dose of the treatment. The produced nanoforms were: i) globules, ii) clusters of the globules--probably produced by liaison, iii) nanocells coated with membrane. The viability of the globules is an object opened for doubts. The nanocells discovered multiplication and growth on solidified nutrient media. The authors suggest that formation of nanocells is a common response of bacteria to stress-actions produced by different agents.

  13. Prominence Formation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, B. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    Martens and Zwaan (ApJ v. 558 872) have proposed a prominence/ filament formation model in which differential rotation drives reconnection between two initially unconnected active regions to form helical field lines that support mass and are held down by overlying field. Using an MHD solver with adaptive refinement we simulated this process by imposing a shear flow meant to mimic differential rotation on two bipolar flux distributions meant to mimic distinct active regions. In some runs the flux systems are initially potential while in others they have been twisted by footpoint rotation to inject helicity prior to imposing the shear flow. The resulting structures are studied to understand the role of helicity in the formation of prominence-like structures.

  14. Format-Preserving Encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellare, Mihir; Ristenpart, Thomas; Rogaway, Phillip; Stegers, Till

    Format-preserving encryption (FPE) encrypts a plaintext of some specified format into a ciphertext of identical format—for example, encrypting a valid credit-card number into a valid credit-card number. The problem has been known for some time, but it has lacked a fully general and rigorous treatment. We provide one, starting off by formally defining FPE and security goals for it. We investigate the natural approach for achieving FPE on complex domains, the “rank-then-encipher” approach, and explore what it can and cannot do. We describe two flavors of unbalanced Feistel networks that can be used for achieving FPE, and we prove new security results for each. We revisit the cycle-walking approach for enciphering on a non-sparse subset of an encipherable domain, showing that the timing information that may be divulged by cycle walking is not a damaging thing to leak.

  15. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  16. Hail Formation in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Matthew

    Hail poses a substantial threat to life and property in the state of Florida. These losses could be minimized through better understanding of the relationships between atmospheric variables that impact hail formation in Florida. Improving hail forecasting in Florida requires analyzing a number of meteorological parameters and synoptic data related to hail formation. NOAA archive data was retrieved to create a database that was used to categorize text files of hail days. The text files were entered into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory website to create National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis maps of atmospheric variables for Florida hail days as well as days leading to the hail event. These data were then analyzed to determine the relationship between variables that affect hail formation, in general, across different regions and seasons in Florida using Statistical Product and Service Solutions. The reasoning for the differing factors affecting hail formation between regions, seasons and hail sizes were discussed, as well as forecasting suggestions relating to region and month in Florida. The study found that the majority of all hail that occurs in Florida is during the wet season. A low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water and lower than average Sea Level Pressure, in most cases, is present during hail days in Florida. Furthermore, results show that Vector Wind magnitude increases as hail size increases. Additionally, several atmospheric variables useful to studying hail events, such as Lifted Index, Precipitable Water, Sea Level Pressure, Vector Wind and Temperature have significant correlations with each other depending on the region and season being observed. Strong correlations between low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water values and the occurrence of hail events are discussed, as well as the relationship between temperature anomalies at various

  17. Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamine, Kentaro; Reddy, Naveen; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark T.

    2016-07-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the current status of observational and computational studies on galaxy formation and evolution. In particular, a joint analysis of star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and metallicities of galaxies throughout cosmic time can shed light on the processes by which galaxies build up their stellar mass and enrich the environment with heavy elements. Comparison of such observations and the results of numerical simulations can give us insights on the physical importance of various feedback effects by supernovae and active galactic nuclei. In Sect. 1, we first discuss the primary methods used to deduce the SFRs, stellar masses, and (primarily) gas-phase metallicities in high-redshift galaxies. Then, we show how these quantities are related to each other and evolve with time. In Sect. 2, we further examine the distribution of SFRs in galaxies following the `Main Sequence' paradigm. We show how the so-called `starbursts' display higher specific SFRs and SF efficiencies by an order of magnitude. We use this to devise a simple description of the evolution of the star-forming galaxy population since z ˜3 that can successfully reproduce some of the observed statistics in the infrared (IR) wavelength. We also discuss the properties of molecular gas. In Sect. 3, we highlight some of the recent studies of high-redshift galaxy formation using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We discuss the physical properties of simulated galaxies such as luminosity function and escape fraction of ionizing photons, which are important statistics for reionization of the Universe. In particular the escape fraction of ionizing photons has large uncertainties, and studying gamma-ray bursts (which is the main topic of this conference) can also set observational constraints on this uncertain physical parameter as well as cosmic star formation rate density.

  18. Mesospheric cloud formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Formation of mesospheric clouds as a result of deposition of large amounts of H2O by the heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) of the solar power satellite system is discussed. The conditions which must be met in order to form and maintain clouds near the mesopause are described. The frequency and magnitude of H2O injections from the HLLV rocket exhaust are considered.

  19. Formation of Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph; Bouwens, Rychard

    1999-07-01

    Bulges, often identified with the spheroidal component of a galaxy,have a complex pedigree. Massive bulges are generally red and old,but lower mass bulges have broader dispersions in color that may becorrelated with disk colors. This suggests different formationscenarios. I will review possible formation sequences for bulges,describe the various signatures that distinguish these scenarios, anddiscuss implications for the high redshift universe.

  20. An Action Research Study: Engaging in Authentic Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drost, Bryan R.

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching in the United States over the last decade has been based on student performance on standardized tests (Darling-Hammond, 2010). Many school districts, in attempts to make gains on standardized assessments, have implemented standardized formative assessment procedures that dictate intervention for students not making gains…

  1. METEOROLOGICAL FACTORS IN THE FORMATION OF REGIONAL HAZE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research project was to determine the role of meteorological factors in the formation of widespread areas of haze in the eastern United States. Three case studies were made: A summer haze episode, an off-season haze episode and a non-haze episode.

  2. POLLUTANT FORMATION DURING FIXED-BED AND SUSPENSION COAL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes a 3-year study of the formation and control of nitrogen and sulfur oxides (NOx and SOx) in industrial coal-fired boilers, with emphasis on stoker-fired units. Three major research areas were considered: the evolution and oxidation of fuel nitrogen and sulfur...

  3. Preliminary Rock Physics Analysis on Lodgepole Formation in Manitoba, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, N.; Keehm, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We present rock physics analysis results of Lodgepole Formation, a carbonate reservoir in Daly Field, Manitoba, Canada. We confirmed that the Lodgepole Formation can be divided into six units in the study area: Basal Limestone, Cromer Shale, Cruickshank Crinoidal, Cruickshank Shale, Daly member and Flossie Lake member from the bottom, using eight well log data and previous works. We then performed rock physics analyses on four carbonate units (Basal Limestone, Cruickshank Crinoidal, Daly and Flossie Lake), such as Vp-porosity, AI-porosity, DEM (differential effective medium) modeling, and fluid substitution analysis. In Vp-porosity domain, the top unit, Flossie Lake member has lower porosity and higher velocity, while the other units show similar porosity and velocity. We think that this results from the diagenesis of Flossie Lake member since it bounds with unconformity. However, the four units show very similar trend in Vp-porosity domain, and we can report one Vp-porosity relation for all carbonate units of the Lodgepole formation. We also found that the acoustic impedance varies more than 10% from low porosity zone (3-6%) to high porosity zone (9-12%) from AI-porosity analysis. Thus one can delineate high porosity zone from seismic impedance data. DEM modeling showed that Flossie Lake would have relatively low aspect ratio of pores than the others, which implies that the top unit has been influenced by diagenesis. To determine fluid sensitivity of carbonate units, we conducted fluid substitution on four units from 100% water to 100% oil. The top unit, Flossie Lake, showed slight increase of Vp, which seems to be density effect. The others showed small decrease of Vp, but not significant. If we observe Vp/Vs rather than Vp, the sensitivity increases. However, fluid discrimination would be difficult because of high stiffness of rock frame. In summary, three lower carbonate units of Lodgepole Formation would be prospective and high porosity zone can be delineated

  4. Terrestrial planet formation

    PubMed Central

    Righter, K.; O’Brien, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (∼106 y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few × 106 y), and finally embryos to planets (107–108 y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  5. Tetrahedron Formation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Jose J.

    2003-01-01

    Spacecraft flying in tetrahedron formations are excellent instrument platforms for electromagnetic and plasma studies. A minimum of four spacecraft - to establish a volume - is required to study some of the key regions of a planetary magnetic field. The usefulness of the measurements recorded is strongly affected by the tetrahedron orbital evolution. This paper considers the preliminary development of a general optimization procedure for tetrahedron formation control. The maneuvers are assumed to be impulsive and a multi-stage optimization method is employed. The stages include targeting to a fixed tetrahedron orientation, rotating and translating the tetrahedron and/or varying the initial and final times. The number of impulsive maneuvers citn also be varied. As the impulse locations and times change, new arcs are computed using a differential corrections scheme that varies the impulse magnitudes and directions. The result is a continuous trajectory with velocity discontinuities. The velocity discontinuities are then used to formulate the cost function. Direct optimization techniques are employed. The procedure is applied to the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) to compute preliminary formation control fuel requirements.

  6. Mars brine formation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Bullock, Mark A.; Stoker, Carol R.

    1992-01-01

    Evaporites, particularly carbonates, nitrates, and sulfates, may be major sinks of volatiles scavenged from the martian atmosphere. Mars is thought to have once had a denser, warmer atmosphere that permitted the presence of liquid surface water. The conversion of atmospheric CO2 into carbonate is hypothesized to have degraded the martian climate to its present state of a generally subfreezing, desiccated desert. The rate for such a conversion under martian conditions is poorly known, so the time scale of climate degradation by this process cannot be easily evaluated. If some models are correct, carbonate formation may have been fast at geological time scales. The experiments of Booth and Kieffer also imply fast (10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7) yr) removal of the missing CO2 inventory, estimated to be 1 - 5 bar, by means of carbonate formation. The timing of formation of many of the fluvial features observed on Mars is, in large part, dependent on when and how fast the atmosphere changed. A knowledge of the rate at which carbonates and nitrates formed is also essential for assessing the probability that life, or its chemical precursors, could have developed on Mars. No previous experiments have quantitatively evaluated the rate of solution for a suite of mobile anions and cations from unaltered minerals and atmospheric gases into liquid water under Mars-like conditions. Such experiments are the focus of this task.

  7. Terrestrial planet formation.

    PubMed

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  8. Radon potential, geologic formations, and lung cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Andrews, William M.; Overfield, Bethany L.; Robertson, Heather; Wiggins, Amanda; Rayens, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    Objective Exposure to radon is associated with approximately 10% of U.S. lung cancer cases. Geologic rock units have varying concentrations of uranium, producing fluctuating amounts of radon. This exploratory study examined the spatial and statistical associations between radon values and geological formations to illustrate potential population-level lung cancer risk from radon exposure. Method This was a secondary data analysis of observed radon values collected in 1987 from homes (N = 309) in Kentucky and geologic rock formation data from the Kentucky Geological Survey. Radon value locations were plotted on digital geologic maps using ArcGIS and linked to specific geologic map units. Each map unit represented a package of different types of rock (e.g., limestone and/or shale). Log-transformed radon values and geologic formation categories were compared using one-way analysis of variance. Results Observed radon levels varied significantly by geologic formation category. Of the 14 geologic formation categories in north central Kentucky, four were associated with median radon levels, ranging from 8.10 to 2.75 pCi/L. Conclusion Radon potential maps that account for geologic factors and observed radon values may be superior to using observed radon values only. Knowing radon-prone areas could help target population-based lung cancer prevention interventions given the inequities that exist related to radon. PMID:26844090

  9. The Integration of the Four Pillars of Priestly Formation According to the Fifth Edition of the "Program of Priestly Formation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nydegger, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    The integration of the four pillars of priestly formation (human, spiritual, intellectual and pastoral) is the principal task of Roman Catholic seminaries today. Using a single case study methodology, the faculty and seminarians of a seminary in the Northeastern United States were surveyed and interviewed to determine how programmatic integration…

  10. Number Theory. Mathematics-Methods Program Unit. Student Manual [and] Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Maynard; And Others

    This unit is 1 of 12 developed for the university classroom portion of the Mathematics-Methods Program (MMP), created by the Indiana University Mathematics Education Development Center (MEDC) as an innovative program for the mathematics training of prospective elementary school teachers (PSTs). Each unit is written in an activity format that…

  11. Stages in Constructing and Coordinating Units Additively and Multiplicatively (Part 2)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part article that presents a theory of unit construction and coordination that underlies radical constructivist empirical studies of student learning ranging from young students' counting strategies to high school students' algebraic reasoning. In Part I, I discussed the formation of arithmetical units and composite…

  12. Stages in Constructing and Coordinating Units Additively and Multiplicatively (Part 1)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of a two-part article that presents a theory of unit construction and coordination that underlies radical constructivist empirical studies of student learning ranging from young students' counting strategies to high school students' algebraic reasoning. My explanation starts with the formation of arithmetical units, which presage…

  13. A Word Processing Module. A Short Unit for the IBM PC and Apple IIe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortland-Madison Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Cortland, NY.

    This unit introduces students to the basic skills, procedures, and formats used in operating most word processing equipment. Introductory materials include an overview of the three-week unit, its scope, and student behavioral objectives. Teacher materials provided are a lesson plan outline, glossary, and some masters for visual aids. Two student…

  14. Traveling Uncharted Waters: The Exchange of Government Information between the United States and China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Rui

    1998-01-01

    Describes a program established between the United States and China for exchange of government publications through their national libraries, the Library of Congress and the National Library of China. Challenges to the program, including the shift to electronic formats in the United States and government Internet censorship in China, are…

  15. Nanoconstructions based on double-stranded DNA molecules and their applications as optical biosensing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, M. A.; Kazankov, G. M.; Sergeeva, V. S.; Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    2006-02-01

    We describe the formation and the properties of biosensing units based on the cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions of the double-stranded nucleic acid molecules. The resulting biosensing units are proved to be sensitive to the presence of some relevant chemical or biological compounds in a liquid to be analyzed.

  16. Aquarius Digital Processing Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgione, Joshua; Winkert, George; Dobson, Norman

    2009-01-01

    Three documents provide information on a digital processing unit (DPU) for the planned Aquarius mission, in which a radiometer aboard a spacecraft orbiting Earth is to measure radiometric temperatures from which data on sea-surface salinity are to be deduced. The DPU is the interface between the radiometer and an instrument-command-and-data system aboard the spacecraft. The DPU cycles the radiometer through a programmable sequence of states, collects and processes all radiometric data, and collects all housekeeping data pertaining to operation of the radiometer. The documents summarize the DPU design, with emphasis on innovative aspects that include mainly the following: a) In the radiometer and the DPU, conversion from analog voltages to digital data is effected by means of asynchronous voltage-to-frequency converters in combination with a frequency-measurement scheme implemented in field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). b) A scheme to compensate for aging and changes in the temperature of the DPU in order to provide an overall temperature-measurement accuracy within 0.01 K includes a high-precision, inexpensive DC temperature measurement scheme and a drift-compensation scheme that was used on the Cassini radar system. c) An interface among multiple FPGAs in the DPU guarantees setup and hold times.

  17. Flameless nitrogen skid unit

    SciTech Connect

    Loesch, S.B.; John, J.C.; Mints, D.K.

    1984-03-27

    A flameless nitrogen vaporizing unit includes a first internal combustion engine driving a nitrogen pump through a transmission. A second internal combustion engine drives three hydraulic oil pumps against a variable back pressure so that a variable load may be imposed upon the second engine. Liquid nitrogen is pumped from the nitrogen pump driven by the first engine into a first heat exchanger where heat is transferred from exhaust gases from the first and second internal combustion engines to the liquid nitrogen to cause the nitrogen to be transformed into a gaseous state. The gaseous nitrogen then flows into a second heat exchanger where it is superheated by an engine coolant fluid to heat the gaseous nitrogen to essentially an ambient temperature. The superheated nitrogen is then injected into the well. The engine coolant fluid flows in a coolant circulation system. Heat is transferred to the coolant fluid directly from the internal combustion engine. Heat is also provided to the coolant fluid from lubrication oil pumped by the three pumps attached to the second internal combustion engine. The coolant fluid circulating system includes a comingling chamber for comingling warmer coolant fluid flowing from the internal combustion engines to the second heat exchanger with cooler coolant fluids flowing from the second heat exchanger to the internal combustion engines. Methods of vaporizing nitrogen are also disclosed.

  18. Transportation monitoring unit qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1990-01-01

    Transportation monitoring unit (TMU) qualification testing was performed between 3 Mar. and 14 Dec. 1989. The purpose of the testing was to qualify the TMUs to monitor and store temperature and acceleration data on redesigned solid rocket motor segments and exit cones while they are being shipped from Utah's Thiokol Corporation, Space Operations, to Kennedy Space Center. TMUs were subjected to transportation tests that concerned the structural integrity of the TMUs only, and did not involve TMU measuring capability. This testing was terminated prior to completion due to mounting plate failures, high and low temperature shutdown failures, and data collection errors. Corrective actions taken by the vendor to eliminate high temperature shutdowns were ineffective. An evaluation was performed on the TMUs to determine the TMU vibration and temperature measuring accuracy at a variety of temperatures. This test demonstrated that TMU measured shock levels are high, and that TMUs are temperature sensitive because of decreased accuracy at high and low temperatures. It was determined that modifications to the current TMU system, such that it could be qualified for use, would require a complete redesign and remanufacture. Because the cost of redesigning and remanufacturing the present TMU system exceeds the cost of procuring a new system that could be qualified without modification, it is recommended that an alternate transportation monitoring system be qualified.

  19. United States West Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Thursday (Feb. 14, 2002), the cloud cover that often overshadows the western United States this time of year broke to provide those at the Olympic Games with a beautiful day. The nearly cloud-free day was captured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASAs Terra spacecraft. A thick layer of snow blankets northernmost Nevada, northern Utah, most of Idaho and western Wyoming. The snow surrounds and highlights Utahs Great Salt Lake. Just south of the lake, clouds can be seen hovering over southern Utah. (In general, clouds appear streaky and uneven on a satellite image, and snow cover appears solid with definable borders.) North of the Great Salt Lake, one can clearly discern the light gray Northern Rocky Mountains cutting through Idaho and up into Canada. Moving southwest, the spine-like Sierra Nevada mountains separate the greenery of Southern California from the brown deserts of Arizona and Nevada. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  20. Model of kimberlite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrovitsky, Sergey; Fiveyskaya, Lyudmila

    2013-04-01

    The critical goals in recognizing the nature of kimberlites are to find out: (1) the primary composition of melt of these rocks and (2) the principal processes of evolution of primary composition of kimberlites while ascending from mantle depth towards earth surface. Suppose, that the primary composition of kimberlite melt-fluid was in fact the composition of asthenosphere melt geochemically being close to alkaline-basalt (Hi-µ) saturated with high CO2. The genetic relation of kimberlites with basaltoids is indicated by a spatial and temporal affinity of their formation (Carlson et al, 2006; Lehmann et al, 2010; Tappe et al, 2012), similarity of the pattern of incompatible elements distribution, presence of megacryst minerals in alkaline basaltoids, Pyr-Alm garnet included, and finally, model calculation of parent melt composition for low-Cr megacryst minerals; it showed this composition to be typical for the alkaline basaltoid (Jones, 1980). At the asthenosphere level there was differentiation of basaltoid melt-fluid which was responsible for formation of its different parts with varying melt to fluid ratio and possibly varying content of alkalis (K2O). The outbreak of asthenosphere substance through lithosphere mantle proceeded by different scenarios: (a) With a noticeable dominance of fluid component kimberlites were formed by the capture and contamination of high-Mg, high-Cr rocks of lithosphere mantle that caused formation of high-Mg kimberlites. That corresponds to model of Russell (2012). (b) With a considerable proportion of melt phase depending on saturation in fluid there formed magnesium-ferriferous and ferriferous-titaniferous petrochemical types of kimberlites. There is no doubt that in formation of these kimberlite types the contamination of lithosphere material was the case, at the much lower level than in formation of high-Mg kimberlites. This model logically explains steady differences of petrochemistry of kimberlites making up clusters of

  1. Formation of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, G.; Coradini, A.

    2003-04-01

    In this presentation we address the problem of the formation of giant planets and their regular satellites. We study in particular the problem of formation of the Jupiter System comparing the results of the model with the present characteristics of the system, in order to identify what are those better represented by our approach. In fact here, using a 3-D hydro-dynamical code, we study the modalities of gas accretion onto a solid core, believed to be the seed from which Jupiter started. To do that we have modelled three main regions: the central planet, a turbulent accretion disk surrounding it and an extended region from which the gas is collected. In the extended region we treat the gas as a frictionless fluid. Our main goal is to identify what are the characteristics of the planet during its growth and the physical parameters affecting its growth at the expenses of the nebular gas present in the feeding zone. Moreover we want to understand what are the thermodynamical parameters characterizing the gas captured by the planet and swirling around it. Finally, we check if a disk can be formed in prograde rotation around the planet and if this disk can survive the final phases of the planet formation. Due to the interaction between the accreting planet and the disk it has been necessary to develop a complete model of the Jupiter’s structure. In fact the radiation emitted by the growing planet heats up the surrounding gas. In turn the planet’s thermodynamic structure depend on the mass accretion rate onto it. When the accretion is rapid, shock waves in the gas are formed close to the planet. This region cannot be safely treated by a numerical code; for this reason we have developed a semi-analytically model of a a turbulent accretion disk to be considered as transition between the planet and the surrounding disk.

  2. Liposome formation in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claassen, D. E.; Spooner, B. S.

    Liposomes are artificial vesicles with a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The formation of liposomes is a self-assembly process that is driven by the amphipathic nature of phospholipid molecules and can be observed during the removal of detergent from phospholipids dissolved in detergent micelles. As detergent concentration in the mixed micelles decreases, the non-polar tail regions of phospholipids produce a hydrophobic effect that drives the micelles to fuse and form planar bilayers in which phospholipids orient with tail regions to the center of the bilayer and polar head regions to the external surface. Remaining detergent molecules shield exposed edges of the bilayer sheet from the aqueous environment. Further removal of detergent leads to intramembrane folding and membrane vesiculation, forming liposomes. We have observed that the formation of liposomes is altered in microgravity. Liposomes that were formed at 1-g did not exceed 150 nm in diameter, whereas liposomes that were formed during spaceflight exhibited diameters up to 2000 nm. Using detergent-stabilized planar bilayers, we determined that the stage of liposome formation most influenced by gravity is membrane vesiculation. In addition, we found that small, equipment-induced fluid disturbances increased vesiculation and negated the size-enhancing effects of microgravity. However, these small disturbances had no effect on liposome size at 1-g, likely due to the presence of gravity-induced buoyancy-driven fluid flows (e.g., convection currents). Our results indicate that fluid disturbances, induced by gravity, influence the vesiculation of membranes and limit the diameter of forming liposomes.

  3. Star Formation in The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, A.; Bigiel, F.; Walter, F.; Brinks, E.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Madore, B.

    2008-05-01

    We combine The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) with our new survey of CO at the IRAM~30m, the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey, and the GALEX Nearby Galaxies Survey to assemble an atlas of "star formation in context" for 24 nearby galaxies. This includes kinematics and estimates of the surface densities of atomic gas, molecular gas, stellar mass, and star formation rate. We use these data to test theories and recipes of star formation on galactic scales. Here we present two basic results for spiral galaxies. First, molecular gas and star formation rate surface density (SFRSD) are well related by a linear relation across most of our sample while atomic gas and SFRSD are essentially uncorrelated. We interpret this as evidence that star formation is proceeding in a more or less universal population of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) across most of the area we survey. Second, while the star formation efficiency (SFE), i.e., the star formation per unit neutral gas, is nearly constant where the ISM is mostly molecular, it drops steadily with increasing galactocentric radius where the ISM is mostly atomic. This drop is well-defined and common to most galaxies. We interpret this as a decreasing efficiency of GMC formation with changing local conditions. At intermediate galactocentric radii, the observed SFE is roughly consistent with several expectations for GMC formation: either formation occuring over the free fall time in the disk or the equilibrium molecular fraction being set by the gas pressure. If GMC formation occurs over a dynamical timescale, a star formation threshold must come into play in the outer disk to match the observed SFE.

  4. Multiple star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Adam L.

    2010-11-01

    In this thesis, I present a study of the formation and evolution of stars, particularly multiple stellar systems. Binary stars provide a key constraint on star formation because any successful model should reproduce the mass-dependent frequency, distribution of separations, and distribution of mass ratios. I have pursued a number of surveys for different ranges of parameter space, all yielding one overarching conclusion: binary formation is fundamentally tied to mass. Solar-mass stars have a high primordial binary frequency (50%--75%) and a wide range of separations (extending to >10,000 AU), but as the system mass decreases, the frequency and separation distribution also decrease. For brown dwarfs, binaries are rare (~10%--15%) and have separations of <5 AU. Inside of this outer separation cutoff, the separation distribution appears to be log-flat for solar-mass stars, and perhaps for lower-mass systems. Solar-mass binary systems appear to have a flat mass ratio distribution, but for primary masses <0.3 Msun, the distribution becomes increasingly biased toward similar-mass companions. My results also constrain the binary formation timescale and the postformation evolutionary processes that sculpt binary populations. The dynamical interaction timescale in sparse associations like Taurus and Upper Sco is far longer than their ages, which suggests that those populations are dynamically pristine. However, binary systems in denser clusters undergo significant dynamical processing that strips outer binary companions; the difference in wide binary properties between my sample and the field is explained by the composite origin of the field population. I also have placed the individual components of young binary systems on the HR diagram in order to infer their coevality. In Taurus, binary systems are significantly more coeval (Δτ~0.5 Myr) than the association as a whole (Δτ~3--5 Myr). Finally, my survey of young very-low-mass stars and brown dwarfs found no planetary

  5. Modeling river delta formation.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-10-23

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  6. Modeling river delta formation

    PubMed Central

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2007-01-01

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  7. Adiabatic Halo Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzani, A.; Turchetti, G.; Benedetti, C.; Rambaldi, S.; Servizi, G.

    2005-06-08

    In a high intensity circular accelerator the synchrotron dynamics introduces a slow modulation in the betatronic tune due to the space-charge tune depression. When the transverse motion is non-linear due to the presence of multipolar effects, resonance islands move in the phase space and change their amplitude. This effect introduces the trapping and detrapping phenomenon and a slow diffusion in the phase space. We apply the neo-adiabatic theory to describe this diffusion mechanism that can contribute to halo formation.

  8. Six Week Slavery Novel Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Darolyn Lyn

    Developed in conjunction with a graduate course and used in classrooms with all types of learners, this paper presents a 6-week unit of study on slavery based on two adolescent novels--"NIGHTJOHN" by Gary Paulson and "My Name Is not Angelica" by Scott O'Dell. After a brief introduction to the unit, the paper presents the 14 activities of the unit:…

  9. TEMPORAL SELF-ORGANIZATION IN GALAXY FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-04-20

    We report on the discovery of a relation between the number of star formation (SF) peaks per unit time, ν{sub peak}, and the size of the temporal smoothing window function, Δt, used to define the peaks: ν{sub peak}∝Δt {sup 1} {sup –} {sup φ} (φ ∼ 1.618). This relation holds over the range of Δt = 10-1000 Myr that can be reliably computed here, using a large sample of galaxies obtained from a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. This means that the temporal distribution of SF peaks in galaxies as a population is fractal with a Hausdorff fractal dimension equal to φ – 1. This finding reveals, for the first time, that the superficially chaotic process of galaxy formation is underlined by temporal self-organization up to at least one gigayear. It is tempting to suggest that, given the known existence of spatial fractals (such as the power-law two-point function of galaxies), there is a joint spatio-temporal self-organization in galaxy formation. From an observational perspective, it will be urgent to devise diagnostics to probe the SF histories of galaxies with good temporal resolution to facilitate a test of this prediction. If confirmed, it would provide unambiguous evidence for a new picture of galaxy formation that is interaction driven, cooperative, and coherent in and between time and space. Unravelling its origin may hold the key to understanding galaxy formation.

  10. Modular weapon control unit

    SciTech Connect

    Boccabella, M.F.; McGovney, G.N.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the Modular Weapon Control Unit (MWCU) program was to design and develop a reconfigurable weapon controller (programmer/sequencer) that can be adapted to different weapon systems based on the particular requirements for that system. Programmers from previous systems are conceptually the same and perform similar tasks. Because of this commonality and the amount of re-engineering necessary with the advent of every new design, the idea of a modular, adaptable system has emerged. Also, the controller can be used in more than one application for a specific weapon system. Functionality has been divided into a Processor Module (PM) and an Input/Output Module (IOM). The PM will handle all operations that require calculations, memory, and timing. The IOM will handle interfaces to the rest of the system, input level shifting, output drive capability, and detection of interrupt conditions. Configuration flexibility is achieved in two ways. First, the operation of the PM is determined by a surface mount Read-Only Memory (ROM). Other surface-mount components can be added or neglected as necessary for functionality. Second, IOMs consist of configurable input buffers, configurable output drivers, and configurable interrupt generation. Further, these modules can be added singly or in groups to a Processor Module to achieve the required I/O configuration. The culmination of this LDRD was the building of both Processor Module and Input/Output Module. The MWCU was chosen as a test system to evaluate Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology, desirable for high component density and good thermal characteristics.

  11. GPS Metric Tracking Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    As Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) applications become more prevalent for land- and air-based vehicles, GPS applications for space vehicles will also increase. The Applied Technology Directorate of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has developed a lightweight, low-cost GPS Metric Tracking Unit (GMTU), the first of two steps in developing a lightweight, low-cost Space-Based Tracking and Command Subsystem (STACS) designed to meet Range Safety's link margin and latency requirements for vehicle command and telemetry data. The goals of STACS are to improve Range Safety operations and expand tracking capabilities for space vehicles. STACS will track the vehicle, receive commands, and send telemetry data through the space-based asset, which will dramatically reduce dependence on ground-based assets. The other step was the Low-Cost Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Transceiver (LCT2), developed by the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), which allows the vehicle to communicate with a geosynchronous relay satellite. Although the GMTU and LCT2 were independently implemented and tested, the design collaboration of KSC and WFF engineers allowed GMTU and LCT2 to be integrated into one enclosure, leading to the final STACS. In operation, GMTU needs only a radio frequency (RF) input from a GPS antenna and outputs position and velocity data to the vehicle through a serial or pulse code modulation (PCM) interface. GMTU includes one commercial GPS receiver board and a custom board, the Command and Telemetry Processor (CTP) developed by KSC. The CTP design is based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) with embedded processors to support GPS functions.

  12. Apollo Telescope Mount Thermal Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) was designed and developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and served as the primary scientific instrument unit aboard Skylab (1973-1979). The ATM consisted of eight scientific instruments as well as a number of smaller experiments. This image is of the ATM thermal unit being tested in MSFC's building 4619. The thermal unit consisted of an active fluid-cooling system of water and methanol that was circulated to radiators on the outside of the canister. The thermal unit provided temperature stability to the ultrahigh resolution optical instruments that were part of the ATM.

  13. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Lambert, Winifred; Case, Jonathan; Short, David; Barrett, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Develop climatologies of gridded CG lightning densities and frequencies of occurrence for the Melbourne, FL National Weather Service (NWS MLB) county warning area. These grids are used to create a first-guess field for the lightning threat index map that is available on the NWS MLB NASA KSCIKT website. Forecasters previously created this map from scratch. Having the climatologies as a background field will increase consistency between forecasters and decrease their workload. Delivered all files containing the lightning climatologies, the data, and the code used to create the climatologies to NWS MLB. Completed and distributed a final memorandum describing how the climatologies were created. All the files were installed on the NWS MLB computer system, and then the code was compiled and tested to ensure that it worked properly on their operating system. The climatologies and their descriptions are posted on the NWS MLB website. Forecasting Low-Level Convergent Bands Under Southeast Flow Provide guidance to operational personnel that will help improve their forecasts of cloud bands under large-scale southeast flow. When these bands occur, they can lead to cloud, rain, and thunderstorm occurrences that adversely affect launch, landing, and ground operations at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (KSC/CCAFS). Completed the first draft of the final report. The conclusions from this task indicated low-level wind speed and direction, low-level high pressure ridge position, east coast sea breeze front activity and upper-level jet streak position have the greatest influence on convergent band formation and movement during southeasterly flow.

  14. Environmental Engineering Unit Operations and Unit Processes Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, John T., Ed.

    This manual was prepared for the purpose of stimulating the development of effective unit operations and unit processes laboratory courses in environmental engineering. Laboratory activities emphasizing physical operations, biological, and chemical processes are designed for various educational and equipment levels. An introductory section reviews…

  15. CARPORT OF UNIT B. THE SPACE BETWEEN UNITS IS IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CARPORT OF UNIT B. THE SPACE BETWEEN UNITS IS IN THE BACKGROUND AT LEFT. VIEW FACING SOUTH - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. OBLIQUE VIEW OF UNIT B. THE SPACE BETWEEN UNITS IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF UNIT B. THE SPACE BETWEEN UNITS IS ON THE RIGHT. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. CARPORT OF UNIT B WITH THE AREA BETWEEN UNITS TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CARPORT OF UNIT B WITH THE AREA BETWEEN UNITS TO THE RIGHT. VIEW FACING NORTH - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. OBLIQUE VIEW OF UNIT A. THE SPACE BETWEEN UNITS IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF UNIT A. THE SPACE BETWEEN UNITS IS ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. The Executive Process, Grade Eight. Resource Unit (Unit III).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    This resource unit, developed by the University of Minnesota's Project Social Studies, introduces eighth graders to the executive process. The unit uses case studies of presidential decision making such as the decision to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, the Cuba Bay of Pigs and quarantine decisions, and the Little Rock decision. A case study of…

  20. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  1. Formats for Presenting Procedural Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaiwes, Arthur S.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty male college students performed a mock communication controller's task under three different instructional formats, short sentences, logical tree, and coding. It was concluded that format variations mainly influence the more difficult tasks. (Author/DE)

  2. Tooth formation - delayed or absent

    MedlinePlus

    Delayed or absent tooth formation; Teeth - delayed or absent formation ... The age at which the tooth comes in varies. Most infants get their first tooth between 6 and 9 months, but it may be earlier or later. ...

  3. A description of aquifer units in eastern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Geologic formations in Oregon, east of the crest of the Cascade Range, have been grouped according to similarities in their hydrogeologic and geologic properties into six major aquifer units. Two of the units, the Mesozoic-Paleozoic and the John Day-Clarno aquifers, are low-permeability aquifers, have hydraulic conductivities generally less than 1 ft/d (feet per day), and are generally capable of yielding only a few gallons per minute to wells. These are important aquifer units, nevertheless, because they are the only economical source of domestic water present in east-central Oregon where they outcrop. Four of the aquifer units contain beds or zones of high permeability materials with hydraulic conductivities that commonly range between 5 and 50 ft/d. In many localities where these units are present, they are capable of yielding 200 gallons/min or more to wells. These productive aquifer units are the Columbia River Basalt, the Cenozoic volcanic and sedimentary , Cenozoic sedimentary, and the Quaternary sediment aquifers, respectively. North of the Blue Mountains, the Columbia River Basalt aquifer is a major aquifer of regional extent and, in that area, heavy withdrawals, chiefly for irrigation, have resulted in regional groundwater level declines. South of the Blue Mountains, the basalt underlies rugged terrane, is not developed, and little is known about its hydraulic properties. Other major aquifer units are heavily developed in localized areas or in basins throughout eastern Oregon. (USGS)

  4. Introducing Narrative Practices in a Locked, Inpatient Psychiatric Unit

    PubMed Central

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Narrative approaches to psychotherapy are becoming more prevalent throughout the world. We wondered if a narrative-oriented psychotherapy group on a locked, inpatient unit, where most of the patients were present involuntarily, could be useful. The goal would be to help involuntary patients develop a coherent story about how they got to the hospital and what happened that led to their being admitted and link that to a story about what they would do after discharge that would prevent their returning to hospital in the next year. Methods: A daily, one-hour narrative group was implemented on one of three locked adult units in a psychiatric hospital. Quality-improvement procedures were already in place for assessing outcomes by unit using the BASIS-32 (32-item Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale). Unit outcomes were compared for the four quarters before the group was started and then four months after the group had been ongoing. Results: The unit on which the narrative group was implemented had a mean overall improvement in BASIS-32 scores of 2.8 units, compared with 1.0 unit for the other locked units combined. The results were statistically significant at the p < 0.0001 level. No differences were found between units for the four quarters prior to implementation of the intervention, and no other changes occurred during the quarter in which the group was conducted. Qualitative descriptions of the leaders' experiences are included in this report. Conclusions: A daily, one-hour narrative group can make a difference in a locked inpatient unit, presumably by creating cognitive structure for patients in how to understand what has happened to them. Further research is indicated in a randomized, controlled-trial format. PMID:21412477

  5. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  6. The Planet Formation Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, S.; Buscher, D. F.; Monnier, J. D.; PFI Science, the; Technical Working Group

    2014-04-01

    Among the most fascinating and hotly-debated areas in contemporary astrophysics are the means by which planetary systems are assembled from the large rotating disks of gas and dust which attend a stellar birth. Although important work is being done both in theory and observation, a full understanding of the physics of planet formation can only be achieved by opening observational windows able to directly witness the process in action. The key requirement is then to probe planet-forming systems at the natural spatial scales over which material is being assembled. By definition, this is the so-called Hill Sphere which delineates the region of influence of a gravitating body within its surrounding environment. The Planet Formation Imager project has crystallized around this challenging goal: to deliver resolved images of Hill-Sphere-sized structures within candidate planet-hosting disks in the nearest star-forming regions. In this contribution we outline the primary science case of PFI and discuss how PFI could significantly advance our understanding of the architecture and potential habitability of planetary systems. We present radiation-hydrodynamics simulations from which we derive preliminary specifications that guide the design of the facility. Finally, we give an overview about the interferometric and non-interferometric technologies that we are investigating in order to meet the specifications.

  7. Fullerene formation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Mintmire, J.W.

    1996-04-05

    Why does the highly symmetric carbon cluster C{sub 60} form in such profusion under the right conditions? This question was first asked in 1985, when Kroto suggested that the predominance of the C{sub 60} carbon clusters observed in the molecular beam experiments could be explained by the truncated icosahedral (or soccer ball) form. The name given to this cluster, buckminsterfullerene, led to the use of the term fullerenes for the family of hollow-cage carbon clusters made up of even numbers of triply coordinated carbons arranged with 12 pentagonal rings and an almost arbitrary number of hexagonal rings. More than a decade later, we still lack a completely satisfying understanding of the fundamental chemistry that takes place during fullerene formation. Most current models for fullerene formation require a facile mechanism for ring rearrangement in the fullerene structure, but the simplest proposed mechanisms are believed to have unrealistically high activation barriers. In recent research calculations have suggested that atomic carbon in the reaction mixture could act as a catalyst and allow substantially lower activation barriers for fullerene annealing. This article discusses the background for this research and other adjunct research. 14 refs.

  8. Biofilm formation by haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Fröls, Sabrina; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2012-12-01

    A fluorescence-based live-cell adhesion assay was used to examine biofilm formation by 20 different haloarchaea, including species of Halobacterium, Haloferax and Halorubrum, as well as novel natural isolates from an Antarctic salt lake. Thirteen of the 20 tested strains significantly adhered (P-value  < 0.05) to a plastic surface. Examination of adherent cell layers on glass surfaces by differential interference contrast, fluorescence and confocal microscopy showed two types of biofilm structures. Carpet-like, multi-layered biofilms containing micro- and macrocolonies (up to 50 μm in height) were formed by strains of Halobacterium salinarum and the Antarctic isolate t-ADL strain DL24. The second type of biofilm, characterized by large aggregates of cells adhering to surfaces, was formed by Haloferax volcanii DSM 3757T and Halorubrum lacusprofundi DL28. Staining of the biofilms formed by the strongly adhesive haloarchaeal strains revealed the presence of extracellular polymers, such as eDNA and glycoconjugates, substances previously shown to stabilize bacterial biofilms. For Hbt. salinarum DSM 3754T and Hfx. volcanii DSM 3757T , cells adhered within 1 day of culture and remained viable for at least 2 months in mature biofilms. Adherent cells of Hbt. salinarum DSM 3754T showed several types of cellular appendages that could be involved in the initial attachment. Our results show that biofilm formation occurs in a surprisingly wide variety of haloarchaeal species. PMID:23057712

  9. STUDIES ON SHELL FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Norimitsu; Wilbur, Karl M.

    1961-01-01

    Details of crystal growth in the calcitostracum of Crassostrea virginica have been studied with the purpose of analyzing the formation of the overlapping rows of oriented tabular crystals characteristic of this part of the shell. Crystal elongation, orientation, and dendritic growth suggest the presence of strong concentration gradients in a thin layer of solution in which crystallization occurs. Formation of the overlapping rows can be explained by three processes observed in the shell: a two-dimensional tree-like dendritic growth in which one set of crystal branchings creeps over an adjacent set of branchings; three-dimensional dendritic growth; and growth by dislocation of crystal surfaces. Multilayers of crystals may thus be formed at one time. This is favored by infrequent secretion of a covering organic matrix which would inhibit crystal growth. The transitional zone covering the outer part of the calcitostracum and the inner part of the prismatic region is generally characterized by aggregates of small crystals with definite orientation. Growth in this zone appears to take place in a relatively homogeneous state of solution without strong concentration gradients. Thin membranes and bands of organic matrix were commonly observed in the transitional zone bordering the prismatic region. The membrane showed a very fine oriented network pattern. PMID:13783329

  10. Urbanization and Slum Formation

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Kai Hong

    2007-01-01

    The formation of slums need not be inevitable with rapid urbanization. Such an argument appears to be contradicted by evidence of large slum populations in a large number of developing countries and particularly in rapidly urbanizing regions like Asia. The evidence discussed suggests that city authorities faced with rapid urban development lack the capacity to cope with the diverse demands for infrastructural provision to meet economic and social needs. Not only are strategic planning and intervention major issues in agenda to manage rapid urbanization, but city governments are not effectively linking the economic development trajectory to implications for urban growth and, hence, housing needs. In the following discussion, a case study is presented in support of the argument that city governments have to first recognize and then act to establish the link that is crucial between economic development, urban growth, and housing. This is the agendum that has been largely neglected by city and national governments that have been narrowly focused on economic growth with the consequent proliferation of slum formation as a housing solution. PMID:17387618

  11. Modeling of microstructure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaz, M.; Gandin, C.A.; Jacot, A.; Charbon, C.

    1995-12-31

    As macroscopic models of solidification are now well advanced, the simulation of microstructure formation is becoming increasingly important. Tools based on Greens` functions (i.e., front-tracking) or diffuse interface methods (e.g., phase field) have been developed recently for the calculation of individual dendritic grains or of a few eutectic lamellae. Although very powerful and useful, such methods cannot be extended at present to the scale of a whole process mainly because of the very large computation time involved. At the intermediate mesoscopic scale of the grains, Monte Carlo (MC) or Cellular Automata (CA) methods can integrate nucleation and grain growth mechanisms in order to simulate the formation of grains during solidification. These latter methods have been coupled with Finite Element (FE) heat flow calculations in order to predict the grain structure at the scale of a whole process (computer metallography). The microstructural features which can be predicted using this coupled CA-FE model are: the morphology of the grains (columnar, equiaxed), the columnar-to-equiaxed transition, the selection of grains in the columnar zone, the crystallographic texture of the grains, the extension of grains in open regions of liquid, etc. Calculated parameters of the three-dimensional grain structure can also be related to the same entities obtained in metallographic cross sections (computer stereology).

  12. Method for measuring pollutant formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annen, Kurt (Inventor); Stickler, David B. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Diagnostic methods for determining an instantaneous rate of pollutant formation in a combustion system are based on measurement of chemiluminescence intensity generated simultaneously with the formation of the pollutant. The chemiluminescent signal is generated by an analog reaction which occurs in parallel with a key step in the formation of a specific pollutant of interest. The connection between the analog reaction and the pollution reaction is such that the chemiluminescent signal indicates the local, instantaneous formation rate of the pollutant of interest.

  13. Formative Assessment: Simply, No Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos, Kathleen; Neuman, Susan B.

    2012-01-01

    Among the types of assessment the closest to daily reading instruction is formative assessment. In contrast to summative assessment, which occurs after instruction, formative assessment involves forming judgments frequently in the flow of instruction. Key features of formative assessment include identifying gaps between where students are and…

  14. Occupational Channels for Mexican Migration: New Destination Formation in a Binational Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Matthew; Painter, Matthew, II

    2011-01-01

    In the 1990s, Mexican immigration dispersed spatially, leading to the emergence of many "new destinations," in nonmetropolitan areas of the United States. Previous studies constrain the scope of the analysis to the United States, limiting our understanding of how new destinations are formed. We place new destination formation into a binational…

  15. Records and history of the United States Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Clifford M.

    2000-01-01

    This publication contains two presentations in Portable Document Format (PDF). The first is Renee M. Jaussaud's inventory of the documents accessioned by the end of 1997 into Record Group 57 (Geological Survey) at the National Archives and Records Administration's (NARA) Archives II facility in College Park, Md., but not the materials in NARA's regional archives. The second is Mary C. Rabbitt's 'The United States Geological Survey 1879-1989,' which appeared in 1989 as USGS Circular 1050. Additionally, USGS Circular 1050 is also presented in Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) format.

  16. Pleistocene succession of the central interior United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frye, J.C.

    1973-01-01

    The Quaternary of the continental interior of the United States is characterized by deposits from glacial ice, with associated outwash and eolian deposits, and by alluvial deposits produced by the same climatic pulses. Erosional incision of valleys occurred early in the glacial pulse, outwash deposition during the waning phase of the pulse, and soil formation during times of relative stability between the glacial pulses. These features of deposition, erosion, and soil formation are presented in a series of curves. One way the marine record could be correlated with that of the continental interior is to compare and match the physical records of both environments. ?? 1973.

  17. HIERARCHICAL STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY LEGUS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Adamo, Angela; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Aloisi, Alessandra; Bright, Stacey N.; Cignoni, Michele; Lee, Janice; Sabbi, Elena; Andrews, Jennifer; Calzetti, Daniela; Annibali, Francesca; Evans, Aaron S.; Johnson, Kelsey; Gallagher III, John S.; Grebel, Eva K.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Kim, Hwihyun; Smith, Linda J.; Thilker, David; and others

    2014-05-20

    Hierarchical structure in ultraviolet images of 12 late-type LEGUS galaxies is studied by determining the numbers and fluxes of nested regions as a function of size from ∼1 to ∼200 pc, and the number as a function of flux. Two starburst dwarfs, NGC 1705 and NGC 5253, have steeper number-size and flux-size distributions than the others, indicating high fractions of the projected areas filled with star formation. Nine subregions in seven galaxies have similarly steep number-size slopes, even when the whole galaxies have shallower slopes. The results suggest that hierarchically structured star-forming regions several hundred parsecs or larger represent common unit structures. Small galaxies dominated by only a few of these units tend to be starbursts. The self-similarity of young stellar structures down to parsec scales suggests that star clusters form in the densest parts of a turbulent medium that also forms loose stellar groupings on larger scales. The presence of super star clusters in two of our starburst dwarfs would follow from the observed structure if cloud and stellar subregions more readily coalesce when self-gravity in the unit cell contributes more to the total gravitational potential.

  18. Hierarchical Star Formation in Nearby LEGUS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Adamo, Angela; Aloisi, Alessandra; Andrews, Jennifer; Annibali, Francesca; Bright, Stacey N.; Calzetti, Daniela; Cignoni, Michele; Evans, Aaron S.; Gallagher, John S., III; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Grebel, Eva K.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Johnson, Kelsey; Kim, Hwihyun; Lee, Janice; Sabbi, Elena; Smith, Linda J.; Thilker, David; Tosi, Monica; Ubeda, Leonardo

    2014-05-01

    Hierarchical structure in ultraviolet images of 12 late-type LEGUS galaxies is studied by determining the numbers and fluxes of nested regions as a function of size from ~1 to ~200 pc, and the number as a function of flux. Two starburst dwarfs, NGC 1705 and NGC 5253, have steeper number-size and flux-size distributions than the others, indicating high fractions of the projected areas filled with star formation. Nine subregions in seven galaxies have similarly steep number-size slopes, even when the whole galaxies have shallower slopes. The results suggest that hierarchically structured star-forming regions several hundred parsecs or larger represent common unit structures. Small galaxies dominated by only a few of these units tend to be starbursts. The self-similarity of young stellar structures down to parsec scales suggests that star clusters form in the densest parts of a turbulent medium that also forms loose stellar groupings on larger scales. The presence of super star clusters in two of our starburst dwarfs would follow from the observed structure if cloud and stellar subregions more readily coalesce when self-gravity in the unit cell contributes more to the total gravitational potential.

  19. LISA satellite formation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, J. J. C. M.; Visser, P. N. A. M.; Jennrich, O.

    The joint ESA-NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission consists of a triangular formation of three satellites aiming at detecting gravitational waves. In linear approximation the LISA satellites describe a circle around a reference point, maintaining a fixed position with respect to each other. The reference point, the center of the triangle, orbits the Sun in a circular orbit, trailing the Earth at twenty degrees. In reality the distance between the satellites will vary by about one to two percent and the angle between the arms of the antenna will vary by about 0.5° over the course of one year for the nominal LISA satellite configuration. For measurement accuracy it is desirable that the pointing offset of the telescopes be kept small. This makes it necessary to actuate the telescopes or to control the formation. It was assumed that the LISA satellites are equipped with six μN engines that would allow to keep the two cubical proof masses within each satellite in almost perfect free fall. It was found that control forces up to about 700 μN are required for maintaining the absolute triangular LISA formation, leading to unacceptable excursions of the proof masses from free fall. However, these forces compensate predominantly very low frequency variations of the arm lengths and angles of the triangle, which are then to be compensated by the telescope actuators. The variations are outside the aimed LISA measurement bandwidth (10 -4-0.1 Hz). In addition, the effect of thruster noise, orbit determination errors and orbit injection errors was examined. The effect of these error sources on the arm lengths and orientation angles between the LISA satellites was assessed both in open loop and in closed loop, where the closed loop was based on a proportional-derivative (PD) controller. It was found that orbit determination errors of the order of a few km in position and a few mm/s in velocity lead to negligible closed loop control forces. In addition, orbit

  20. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 504 - Customer Notice of Formal Written Request-Sample Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Format E Appendix E to Part 504 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY.... 504, App. E Appendix E to Part 504—Customer Notice of Formal Written Request—Sample Format (Official... clerk of any one of the following United States District Courts: (List applicable courts) c. Mail...

  1. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 504 - Customer Notice of Formal Written Request-Sample Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Format E Appendix E to Part 504 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY.... 504, App. E Appendix E to Part 504—Customer Notice of Formal Written Request—Sample Format (Official... clerk of any one of the following United States District Courts: (List applicable courts) c. Mail...

  2. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 504 - Customer Notice of Formal Written Request-Sample Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Format E Appendix E to Part 504 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY.... 504, App. E Appendix E to Part 504—Customer Notice of Formal Written Request—Sample Format (Official... clerk of any one of the following United States District Courts: (List applicable courts) c. Mail...

  3. An Evaluation of Forced-Choice and True-False Item Formats in Personality Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Douglas N.; And Others

    In a comparative evaluation of a standard true-false format for personality assessment and a forced-choice format, subjects from college residential units were assigned randomly to respond either to the forced-choice or standard true-false form of the Personality Research Form (PRF). All subjects also rated themselves and the members of their…

  4. Commitment, Compliance and Comfort Zones: The Effects of Formative Assessment on Vocational Education Students' Learning Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecclestone, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Research evidence that well-executed formative assessment raises achievement and enhances motivation and autonomy has influenced policy and practice in schools and universities in the United Kingdom. Formative assessment is also built into the aims and assessment activities of outcome-based qualifications in post-compulsory education. Behind these…

  5. 37 CFR 2.52 - Types of drawings and format for drawings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Types of drawings and format for drawings. 2.52 Section 2.52 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.52 Types of drawings and format for drawings. A drawing depicts...

  6. Unit 903: Approaches to Grammar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Center for Curriculum Development in English.

    This unit is intended to give ninth-grade students a brief survey of the changes in the study of language from the time of the Greeks to the present. Organized to proceed from the teacher's introduction of a subject to class examination and discussion of an excerpt from a grammarian's work, the unit focuses on the belief that a grammarian's…

  7. Landforms of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in landforms of the United States with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Separate sections examine deposital versus erosional landforms in the central stable region of the United States, the Appalachian Highlands, the Ozark Region,…

  8. Multicultural Mini-Units. Elementary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flora, Sherrill B.

    The teaching mini-units in this teacher's guide are designed for use with elementary level students. Thematic study units are given for each of the following countries or continents: Africa, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, England, France, Germany, Greece, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, and the…

  9. International Relations: Library Instruction Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Cathie

    In support of the United States Naval Academy's program in international relations, library reference staff developed an instruction unit featuring appropriate research guides and a videotape produced at the Naval Academy Educational Resource Center. The videotape illustrates a sample search strategy and then highlights the use of four basic…

  10. Enrollment Management in Academic Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBiaso, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an understanding of how administrative leaders make decisions regarding enrollment management within academic units at a major research university in the southwestern United States. Key enrollment management functions of recruiting, admissions, marketing, orientation, financial aid/scholarships, academic advising, student…

  11. Climates of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, John L.

    This document is designed to provide basic information about the climates of the United States and the causes of these climates. Events of interest in the climatological history of the United States are described and illustrated by many maps, charts and diagrams. The booklet has three major parts. Part I discusses climate and climate control in…

  12. NOVA SCIENCE UNIT 1. MEASUREMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broward County Schools, Fort Lauderdale, FL.

    A SCIENCE UNIT ON MEASUREMENT IS PRESENTED. INCLUDED ARE AN INTRODUCTION TO THE METRIC SYSTEM AND SOME TOOLS OF MEASUREMENT. STUDENTS ARE GIVEN A HOMEMADE SYSTEM OF MEASUREMENT WHICH UTILIZES A GRAIN OF RICE AS ITS BASIC UNIT. THE STUDENTS ARE GIVEN EXPERIENCES WITH THE METRIC SYSTEM. THROUGH THESE EXPERIENCES, THE STUDENTS SEE THE NEED FOR…

  13. Science Unit Plans. PACE '94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.; Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.

    This booklet contains mathematics unit plans for Biology, Chemistry, and Physical Science developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each unit plan contains suggested timing, objectives, skills to be acquired, workplace relationships, learning activities with suggested…

  14. Unit Resource Book on Slavery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Public Schools, Minn.

    This integrated social studies and English resource unit for secondary students on plantation slavery in the United States contains readings which provide an opportunity for the student to learn in an effective way how enslavement feels. In Part One, Social Studies, historical source materials are offered consisting of essays of slaves and freemen…

  15. UNITED STATES RENAL DATA SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) is a national data system that collects, analyzes, and distributes information about end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States. The USRDS is funded directly by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseas...

  16. Mathematics Unit Plans. PACE '94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.; Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.

    This booklet contains mathematics unit plans for Algebra 1, Geometry, Math for Technology, Mathematical Problem Solving, and Pre-Algebra developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each unit plan contains suggested timing, objectives, skills to be acquired, workplace…

  17. A Botany Unit: Seed Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smythe, Cathy

    1983-01-01

    Presents a botany unit designed to provide understanding of a plant life cycle, plant parts and functions, and variety within the plant world. The unit is organized according to plant morphology (structure). Each section includes concepts fostered, suggestions for focused discussions, experiments, and activities to support concept development.…

  18. Developing a Solar Experiment Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, Kuan-Chong

    1983-01-01

    Suggesting that selected research activities be integrated into engineering technology programs to give students experiences in new technology, this article discusses a project incorporating teaching, research, and service. A photograph and description of the solar experiment unit resulting from the project are provided. The unit runs on air,…

  19. 77 FR 27481 - United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division United States v. Exelon Corporation, et al.; Public Comment and Response on Proposed Final Judgment Pursuant to the Antitrust Procedures and Penalties Act, 15 U.S.C. 16(b)-(h), the United States hereby publishes below the...

  20. Digital tape unit test facility software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. T.

    1971-01-01

    Two computer programs are described which are used for the collection and analysis of data from the digital tape unit test facility (DTUTF). The data are the recorded results of skew tests made on magnetic digital tapes which are used on computers as input/output media. The results of each tape test are keypunched onto an 80 column computer card. The format of the card is checked and the card image is stored on a master summary tape via the DTUTF card checking and tape updating system. The master summary tape containing the results of all the tape tests is then used for analysis as input to the DTUTF histogram generating system which produces a histogram of skew vs. date for selected data, followed by some statistical analysis of the data.

  1. Theories of galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.J.T.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of some theories of galaxy formation that are consistent with the hot big bang origin of the universe is reviewed. In the cosmic turbulence theory, an attempt is made to explain not only the characteristic masses and angular momenta of galaxies, but to describe in detail the spectrum of galaxy clustering problems with regard to the observed abundances of the light elements, a Kolmogorov spectrum of turbulence and the fireball are discussed. Attention is given to a primordial chaotic magnetic field, the comparison between baryon-symmetric cosmologies, the origin of galactic spin and theories starting from isothermal perturbations. Also considered are the dilemma of the initial conditions with respect to the era after 10 to the -4th s, and the pancake theory, in which the planar structures that arise provide a natural explanation for filamentary structures.

  2. Physics of amniote formation.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vincent; Murukutla, Ameya Vaishnavi; Chevalier, Nicolas R; Gallois, Benjamin; Capellazzi-Resta, Marina; Picquet, Pierre; Peaucelle, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    We present a detailed study of the formation of the amniotic sac in the avian embryo, and a comparison with the crocodile amniotic sac. We show that the amniotic sac forms at a circular line of stiffness contrast, separating rings of cell domains. Cells align at this boundary, and this in turn orients and concentrates the tension forces. The tissue fold which forms the amniotic sac is locked exactly along this line due to the colocalization of the stiffness contrast and of the tensile force. In addition, the tensile force plays a regenerative role when the amniotic sac is cut. The fold forming the ventral side of the embryo displays the same characteristics. This work shows that amniote embryogenesis consists of a cascade of buckling events taking place at the boundaries between regions of differing mechanical properties. Hence, amniote embryogenesis relies on a simple and robust biomechanical scheme used repeatedly, and selected ancestrally. PMID:27627351

  3. Pattern Formation in Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2011-04-01

    Pattern formation is ubiquitous in nature, from sand ripples formed by wind to the development of a complex biological organism with different organs and a central nervous system. In the realm of materials, patterns are formed invariably when matter is transformed between different solid, liquid or gaseous states far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Material failure is itself mediated by the propagation of cracks that form intricate patterns. Understanding how patterns form and evolve is key to design materials with desired properties and to optimize their performance and safety. This talk will discuss recent progress made to understand three distinct class of patterns including the highly branched snow-flake-like dendritic patterns formed during the solidification process, polycrystalline patterns shaped by grain boundaries, and crack patterns.

  4. Dislocation Formation in Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Akihiko; Onuki, Akira

    2006-05-01

    An interaction between dislocations and phase transitions is studied by a phase field model both in two and three dimensional systems. Our theory is a simple extension of the traditional linear elastic theory, and the elastic energy is a periodic function of local strains which is reflecting the periodicity of crystals. We find that the dislocations are spontaneously formed by quenching. Dislocations are formed from the interface of binary alloys, and slips are preferentially gliding into the soft metals. In three dimensional systems, formation of dislocations under applied strain is studied in two phase state. We find that the dislocation loops are created from the surface of hard metals. We also studied the phase separation above the coexisting temperature which is called as the Cottrell atmosphere. Clouds of metals cannot catch up with the motion of dislocations at highly strained state.

  5. Group Formation in Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demange, Gabrielle; Wooders, Myrna

    2005-01-01

    Broad and diverse ranges of activities are conducted within and by organized groups of individuals, including political, economic and social activities. These activities have recently become a subject of intense interest in economics and game theory. Some of the topics investigated in this collection are models of networks of power and privilege, trade networks, co-authorship networks, buyer-seller networks with differentiated products, and networks of medical innovation and the adaptation of new information. Other topics are social norms on punctuality, clubs and the provision of club goods and public goods, research and development and collusive alliances among corporations, and international alliances and trading agreements. While relatively recent, the literature on game theoretic studies of group formation in economics is already vast. This volume provides an introduction to this important literature on game-theoretic treatments of situations with networks, clubs, and coalitions, including some applications.

  6. Mechanism of GEMS formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R

    2004-03-10

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) were examined using 200 keV analytical transmission electron microscopy. The morphologies and crystallography of embedded relict grains reveal that GEMS are pseudomorphs formed by irradiation processing of crystals free-floating in space. Some GEMS retain a compositional and morphological ''memory'' of the crystal from which they formed. Pseudomorphism rules out condensation, annealing, flash heating, or shock melting as alternative mechanisms of GEMS formation. A significant and often dominant fraction of the atoms in GEMS were sputtered deposited from other grains. Therefore, a normal (solar) isotopic composition is not a reliable indicator of whether GEMS formed in the solar system or in presolar interstellar or circumstellar environments.

  7. Myxobacteria Fruiting Body Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi

    2006-03-01

    Myxobacteria are social bacteria that swarm and glide on surfaces, and feed cooperatively. When starved, tens of thousands of cells change their movement pattern from outward spreading to inward concentration; they form aggregates that become fruiting bodies, inside which cells differentiate into nonmotile, environmentally resistant spores. Traditionally, cell aggregation has been considered to imply chemotaxis, a long-range cell interaction mediated by diffusing chemicals. However, myxobacteria aggregation is the consequence of direct cell-contact interactions. I will review our recent efforts in modeling the fruiting body formation of Myxobacteria, using lattice gas cellular automata models that are based on local cell-cell contact signaling. These models have reproduced the individual phases in Myxobacteria development such as the rippling, streaming, early aggregation and the final sporulation; the models can be unified to simulate the whole developmental process of Myxobacteria.

  8. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Hajime; Ioka, Kunihito; Nozawa, Takaya E-mail: kunihito.ioka@kek.jp

    2014-07-01

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission.

  9. Glass formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. S.; Day, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of containerless glass-forming experiments conducted aboard the Space Shuttle in 1985, using a single-axis acoustic levitator furnace apparatus. An attempt was made to obtain quantitative evidence for the suppression of heterogeneous nucleation/crystallization in containerless melts under microgravity conditions, as well as to study melt homogenization in the absence of gravity-driven convection and assess the feasibility of laser fusion target glass microsphere preparation with a microgravity apparatus of the present type. A ternary calcia-gallia-silica glass thus obtained indicated a 2-3-fold increase in glass-formation tendency for this material composition in microgravity, by comparison with 1g.

  10. Recipes for planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael R.

    2009-11-01

    Anyone who has ever used baking soda instead of baking powder when trying to make a cake knows a simple truth: ingredients matter. The same is true for planet formation. Planets are made from the materials that coalesce in a rotating disk around young stars - essentially the "leftovers" from when the stars themselves formed through the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds of gas and dust. The planet-making disk should therefore initially have the same gas-to-dust ratio as the interstellar medium: about 100 to 1, by mass. Similarly, it seems logical that the elemental composition of the disk should match that of the star, reflecting the initial conditions at that particular spot in the galaxy.

  11. Streamer formation in sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHarg, M. G.; Kammae, T.; Nielsen, H. C.

    2005-12-01

    Models of sprite formation for positive cloud-to-ground lightning strokes predict both downward (positive), and upward (negative) propagating streamers. Previous high speed camera observations of sprites are generally consistent with these predictions, but have been unable to resolve the temporal formation of the streamers due to frame rates limited to a few thousand frames per second. We report observations made during the evening of 9 July 2005 at 10,000 frames per second, with the image intensifier gated to 50 microseconds per frame. These observations often show the streamer head to be a bead-like structure propagating downward at approximately 7x106 m/s for 1,500 microseconds. The bead is followed by a dark region, and the main emissions from the sprite column are delayed ~800 microseconds after the passage of the streamer head. There are also "beads" which clearly propagate upward. Some events appear to be very similar to laboratory images of time resolved streamer zones. We interpret these observations in terms of positive/negative streamers. We see evidence for branching of the streamer tips in several cases, as well as evidence of upward propagating streamers transitioning into a more diffuse emission. Previous work (Pasko and Stenbaek-Nielsen, GRL 29(10), 2002) indicates this transition region has a lower border at an altitude when the dielectric relaxation time scale equals the time scale for an individual electron to develop into a streamer, and an upper border when the dielectric relaxation time scale roughly equals the dissociative attachment time scale. The present observations appear to be broadly consistent with this interpretation.

  12. Hazards to Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, J.

    2001-05-01

    The Orion Nebula provides a remarkable window on the first few million years in the lives of typical young stars and planetary systems. HST has demonstrated that most young stars in the Nebula are surrounded by circumstellar disks (the so-called `proplyds'). While these observations show that planet forming environments may be common, they also demonstrate that Orion's disks are being destroyed by intense UV radiation fields. `Gravel' sufficiently large to resist photo-erosion (meter scale solids or ices) may lock-up sufficient material to eventually build rocky planets. Indeed, there is evidence for large solids in some proplyds. But, the hydrogen and helium needed for the formation of giant planets will be removed. To form in Orion-like environments, giant planets must be assembled promptly prior to UV exposure. Even rocky planets may not form if the photoionized disk corona causes surviving large particles in the disk to spiral into the central star. Thus, nearby massive stars pose severe hazards to planet formation. Star counts indicate that most stars form in Orion-like environments. Only about 10% of young stars are born in shielded environments such as the Taurus or L1641 clouds where disks may escape photo-erosion. In dark clouds, the majority of stars (> 80%) form in non-hierarchal multiple star systems where close encounters with sibling stars can destroy disks and eject young planets. Thus, most stars may never develop planetary systems. These considerations indicate that extra-Solar planets may be rare, contrary to the popular view. These conclusions are consistent with the recent discoveries of extra-Solar planets around a few percent of single stars.

  13. Multi-unit operations considerations.

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Walter E.; Bennett, Thomas C.; Brannon, Nathan Gregory

    2005-09-01

    Several nuclear weapons programs have or are pursuing the implementation of multi-unit operations for tasks such as disassembly and inspection, and rebuild. A multi-unit operation is interpreted to mean the execution of nuclear explosive operating procedures in a single facility by two separate teams of technicians. The institution of a multi-unit operations program requires careful consideration of the tools, resources, and environment provided to the technicians carrying out the work. Therefore, a systematic approach is necessary to produce safe, secure, and reliable processes. In order to facilitate development of a more comprehensive multi-unit operations program, the current work details categorized issues that should be addressed prior to the implementation of multi-unit operations in a given weapons program. The issues have been organized into the following categories: local organizational conditions, work process flow/material handling/workplace configuration, ambient environmental conditions, documented safety analysis, and training.

  14. The International System of Units (SI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Chester H., Ed.; Vigoureux, Paul, Ed.

    This document gives definitions and symbols for the basic units of measure, for derived units, and for supplementary units. Decimal multiples and sub-multiples of units and units outside the International System also are discussed. Appendix I reproduces the decisions made on units and on the International System by two committees (the General…

  15. 7 CFR 1160.104 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true United States. 1160.104 Section 1160.104 Agriculture... Definitions § 1160.104 United States. United States means the 48 contiguous states in the continental United States and the District of Columbia, except that United States means the 50 states of the United...

  16. Foraminifera from Paleocene Clayton Formation lithostratotype, Barbour Count, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Fluegeman, R.H. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    A detailed search of the Clayton lithostratotype for microfossils has produced the first significant foraminifera fauna from the section and only the second occurrence of foraminifera in the Clayton Formation in eastern Alabama. The fauna is well preserved, but low in abundance and diversity; all assemblages are dominated by species of Anomalinoides. No planktonic species were identified in the studied samples. The benthic assemblages bear little resemblance to the more diverse foraminifera faunas of the Pine Barren and McBryde Members of the Clayton in western Alabama. The fauna from the Clayton lithostratotype closely resembles an assemblage collected from a sand unit within the middle part of the Porters Creek Formation of Butler County, Alabama. Biostratigraphic information is presently unavailable for the Clayton Formation in eastern Alabama; therefore, the authors cannot determine whether the Clayton and Porters Creek are time-equivalent units. However, occurrences of like foraminiferal assemblages imply equivalent paleoecologic conditions, and similarities in lithology are found between the Clayton Formation at its stratotype and the Porters Creek in Butler County, both of which indicate that both units represent the same depositional aspect of the early Paleocene transgressive-regressive cycle.

  17. Gas formation. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane.

    PubMed

    Stolper, D A; Lawson, M; Davis, C L; Ferreira, A A; Santos Neto, E V; Ellis, G S; Lewan, M D; Martini, A M; Tang, Y; Schoell, M; Sessions, A L; Eiler, J M

    2014-06-27

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a "clumped isotope" technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models. PMID:24970083

  18. Fuel Cell Based Auxiliary Power Unit for Refrigerated Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.

    2014-09-02

    This is the annual report for the Market Transformation project as required by DOE EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office. We have been provided with a specific format. It describes the work that was done in developing fuel-cell powered Transport Refrigeration Units for Reefer Trucks. It describes the progress that has been made by Nuvera and Plug Power as they develop and ultimately demonstrate this technology in real world application.

  19. Second United States Microgravity Payload: One Year Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A. (Editor); McCauley, Dannah E. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The second United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-2), flown in March 1994, carried four major microgravity experiments plus a sophisticated accelerometer system. The USMP program is designed to accommodate experiments requiring extensive resources short of a full Spacelab mission. The four USMP-2 experiments dealt with understanding fundamental aspects of materials behavior, three with the formation of crystals from melts and one with the critical point of a noble gas. This successful, scientifically rich mission also demonstrated telescience operations.

  20. Stratigraphic analysis and distribution of breccia deposits in the Kirkman Formation, central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, R.L.; Allard, J.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Sedimentary, tectonic and collapse breccia allow the Kirkman Formation to be differentiated from the Oquirrh Group below and the Diamond Creek Sandstone above in the Wasatch Mountains of central Utah. Thickness of the Kirkman Formation varies from 480 m in Hobble Creek Canyon to 23 m in Spanish Fork Canyon. Variations in thickness, along with vertical bedding indicate, that the Kirkman Formation acted as an incompetent unit between the Oquirrh Group and the Diamond Creek Sandstone during the development of the Cretaceous overthrust belt. Rapid changes in thickness of the Kirkman Formation are not the result of variations in the Permian sedimentation rate in the Oquirrh Basin. Stratigraphic analysis shows that the Kirkman Formation contains a silty limestone at the bottom, intraformational sedimentary breccia to laminated limestone in the middle, and a sandy limestone interbedded with sandstone units of the Diamond Creek Sandstone at the top. The Kirkman Formation is characterized by sedimentary breccia that have been found from Co-op Creek, east of Heber City, Utah to Bennie Creek, southeast of Spanish Fork, Utah. A facies change from sedimentary breccia to thin bedded limestone occurs in the Kirkman Formation between Bennie Creek and Salt Creek Canyon east of Nephi, Utah. West of Nephi, the Oquirrh Group contains similar limestone units to those of the Kirkman Formation in Salt Creek Canyon, indicating that the Kirkman Formation interfingers with the upper part of the Oquirrh Group.

  1. Polygenetic Aspect of Unit Theory Oil Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galant, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of a unified theory Oil Generation one of important moments is the consideration of the distribution of oil in the Earth's Crust. Analysis of the distribution of oil deposits in the Earth's Crust showed that oil distributed throughout the stratigraphic section from ancient to modern sediments and from a depth of 12 kilometers to the Earth's surface. The distribution of oil almost meets all stages of metamorphism of rocks. Correlation of the section of oil distribution to genetic types of ore deposits showed that each genetic type ore deposits has its analogue oil field . So it is possible to classify oil fields on 1) endogenous: the actual magmatic, post-magmatic, contact-metasomatic (skarn), hydrothermal, exhalation, carbonatite, pegmatite, 2) exogenous: weathering, oxidation, sedimentary,3) metamorphogenic: metamorphosed, metamorphic. Model of such distribution of oil deposits can be a process of successive formation of oil deposits of mantle degassing tube. Thus oil is polygenic by way of formation of deposits, but their source is united.

  2. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, B.I.; Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. |; Deo, M.D.

    1996-11-01

    The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter core, Formation Micro Imaging (FMI) logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using high-temperature gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2,000 barrels per day.

  3. Sequence stratigraphy of the Misoa Formation (Eocene) Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Marais-Gilchrist, G.; Higgs, R. )

    1993-02-01

    A preliminary sequence analysis of the Misoa Formation has been done in the Maraven concession area, Lake Maracaibo, using well logs supported by palynological and seismic data. The Misoa Formation is interpreted to comprise a lower transgressive unit containing at least four third-order cycles (lithostratigraphic units C7 to C3, approximately), and an upper dominantly regressive unit consisting of six third-order cycles (approximately C2 to B1). A major flooding surface (gamma-ray log maximum) provides a marker near the top of the lower unit, almost coincident with the important N-M local pollen zone. A tentative correlation can be achieved with the Haq-Vail coastal onlap curves for the Tejas A 2.3 to 3.3 third-order cycles, 55 to 44 ma. The maximum flooding surface would correlate with the maximum Eocene onlap at 52.5 ma. These ages broadly agree with the local pollen zonation. Incised valley fill units interpreted on the basis of blocky log character in some wells could have accumulated during global Eocene sea level falls, particularly those between 55 and 54 ma. The sequences gradually onlap onto the Paleocene unconformity and converge in a southwestward (landward) direction. Although north-south-oriented high-angle sinusoidal events are evident on some seismic lines, these are thought to indicate rotated listric fault-bounded blocks formed during an extensional episode, possibly syn-Misoa. The study should aid exploration for stratigraphic traps in the lake area.

  4. Vertebrate-bearing eolian unit from the Ogallala Group (Miocene) in northwestern Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, D.A.

    1987-08-01

    The upper Couch Formation is part of the lower of two formations composing the Ogallala Group in Blanco and Yellowhouse canyons in northwestern Texas. An eolian origin for the upper Couch Formation is indicated by its mean grain size, pedogenic carbonate nodules, massive bedding, and blanketlike morphology. The unit conforms poorly to the usual eolian depositional models; it resulted from a combination of the processes involved in loess and sand-sheet formation. Grassland or savanna vegetation probably existed over the area and aided in sediment trapping. Vertebrates are unusual in eolian units, but the adaptations and mode of preservation of those in the upper Couch Formation also support an eolian interpretation. This and other widespread silty sand sheets in the Ogallala indicate major fluctuations in depositional style, possibly climatically controlled. Lateral continuity and preservation of vertebrates give silty sand sheets great potential as correlation tools.

  5. Micrometer-size vesicle formation triggered by UV light.

    PubMed

    Shima, Tatsuya; Muraoka, Takahiro; Hamada, Tsutomu; Morita, Masamune; Takagi, Masahiro; Fukuoka, Hajime; Inoue, Yuichi; Sagawa, Takashi; Ishijima, Akihiko; Omata, Yuki; Yamashita, Takashi; Kinbara, Kazushi

    2014-07-01

    Vesicle formation is a fundamental kinetic process related to the vesicle budding and endocytosis in a cell. In the vesicle formation by artificial means, transformation of lamellar lipid aggregates into spherical architectures is a key process and known to be prompted by e.g. heat, infrared irradiation, and alternating electric field induction. Here we report UV-light-driven formation of vesicles from particles consisting of crumpled phospholipid multilayer membranes involving a photoactive amphiphilic compound composed of 1,4-bis(4-phenylethynyl)benzene (BPEB) units. The particles can readily be prepared from a mixture of these components, which is casted on the glass surface followed by addition of water under ultrasonic radiation. Interestingly, upon irradiation with UV light, micrometer-size vesicles were generated from the particles. Neither infrared light irradiation nor heating prompted the vesicle formation. Taking advantage of the benefits of light, we successfully demonstrated micrometer-scale spatiotemporal control of single vesicle formation. It is also revealed that the BPEB units in the amphiphile are essential for this phenomenon. PMID:24898450

  6. The Star Formation Properties of Void Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Crystal; Vogeley, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the star formation properties of two large samples of galaxies from the SDSS in large-scale cosmic voids on time scales of 10 Myr and 100 Myr, using Ha emission line strengths and GALEX FUV fluxes, respectively. The first sample consists of 109,818 optically selected galaxies. We find that void galaxies in this sample have higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs; star formation rates per unit stellar mass) than similar stellar mass galaxies in denser regions. The second sample is a subset of the optically selected sample containing 8070 galaxies with reliable S/N HI detections from ALFALFA. For the HI detected sample, SSFRs are similar regardless of large-scale environment. Investigating only the HI detected dwarf galaxies reveals a trend towards higher SSFRs in voids. Furthermore, we estimate the star formation rate per unit HI mass, known as the star formation efficiency (SFE) of a galaxy, as a function of environment. For the overall HI detected population, we notice no environmental dependence. Limiting the sample to dwarf galaxies again reveals a trend towards higher SFEs in voids. These results suggest that void environments provide a nurturing environment for dwarf galaxy evolution.

  7. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive experimental program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms leading to bubble generation during fluid handling procedures in a microgravity environment. Several key fluid handling procedures typical for PCG experiments were identified for analysis in that program. Experiments were designed to specifically understand how such procedures can lead to bubble formation. The experiments were then conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which is capable of simulating a low gravity environment by executing a parabolic flight attitude. However, such a flight attitude can only provide a low gravity environment of approximately 10-2go for a maximum period of 30 seconds. Thus all of the tests conducted for these experiments were designed to last no longer than 20 seconds. Several experiments were designed to simulate some of the more relevant fluid handling procedures during protein crystal growth experiments. These include submerged liquid jet cavitation, filling of a cubical vessel, submerged surface scratch, attached drop growth, liquid jet impingement, and geysering experiments. To date, four separate KC-135 flight campaigns were undertaken specifically for performing these experiments. However, different experiments were performed on different flights.

  8. Nuclear ``pasta'' formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Hughto, J.; Berry, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of complex nonuniform phases of nuclear matter, known as nuclear pasta, is studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations containing 51200 nucleons. A phenomenological nuclear interaction is used that reproduces the saturation binding energy and density of nuclear matter. Systems are prepared at an initial density of 0.10fm-3 and then the density is decreased by expanding the simulation volume at different rates to densities of 0.01fm-3 or less. An originally uniform system of nuclear matter is observed to form spherical bubbles (“swiss cheese”), hollow tubes, flat plates (“lasagna”), thin rods (“spaghetti”) and, finally, nearly spherical nuclei with decreasing density. We explicitly observe nucleation mechanisms, with decreasing density, for these different pasta phase transitions. Topological quantities known as Minkowski functionals are obtained to characterize the pasta shapes. Different pasta shapes are observed depending on the expansion rate. This indicates nonequilibrium effects. We use this to determine the best ways to obtain lower energy states of the pasta system from MD simulations and to place constraints on the equilibration time of the system.

  9. Acromioclavicular joint cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Andrew D; Miller, Joshua D; Zeller, John L

    2010-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an uncommon and unusual sequela associated with shoulder pathophysiology. The majority of literature on ACJ cysts consists of individual case reports with no definitive literature review currently available. In addition to a comprehensive literature review, four clinical cases are presented in this report. First described by Craig (1984), a total of 41 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Of these cases, five occurred with the rotator cuff musculature intact. The remaining 36 cases of ACJ cysts occurred in patients with a complete tear/avulsion of the rotator cuff. Previous attempts at compiling a complete record of all reported cases have combined several distinct conditions into a single category. This article presents two distinct etiologies for the pathogenesis of ACJ cyst formation. In the presence of an intact rotator cuff, a Type 1 cyst can form superficially and be limited to the ACJ. Following a massive or traumatic tear of the rotator cuff, mechanical instability of the humeral head can cause a deterioration of the inferior acromioclavicular capsule (cuff tear arthropathy) and an overproduction of synovial fluid. Overtime, a "geyser" of fluid can form between the glenohumeral and the ACJ, forming a Type 2 cyst. This differentiation and categorization is essential for appropriate classification and treatment. PMID:20069645

  10. Beach-cusp formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Field experiments on beach-cusp formation were undertaken to document how the cuspate form develops and to test the edge-wave hypothesis on the uniform spacing of cusps. These involved observations of cusps forming from an initially plane foreshore. The cuspate form was observed to be a product of swash modification of an intertidal beach ridge as follows. A ridge, cut by a series of channels quasi-equally spaced along its length, was deposited onto the lower foreshore. The ridge migrated shoreward with flood tide, while the longshore positions of the channels remained fixed. On ebb tide, changes in swash circulation over the ridge allowed the upwash to flow shoreward through the channels and the channel mouths were eroded progressively wider until adjacent mouths met, effecting a cuspate shape. Measured spacings of cusps, ranging in size from less than 1 m to more than 12 m, agree well with computed spacings due to either zero-mode subharmonic or zero-mode synchronous edge waves. Edge-wave-induced longshore variations in run up will cause water ponded behind a ridge to converge at points of low swash and flow seaward as relatively narrow currents eroding channels spaced at one edge-wave wavelength for synchronous edge waves or one half wavelength for subharmonic edge waves. The channels are subsequently modified into cusp troughs as described above.

  11. Large Format Radiographic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. Rohrer; Lacey Stewart; M. D. Wilke; N. S. King; S. A Baker; Wilfred Lewis

    1999-08-01

    Radiographic imaging continues to be a key diagnostic in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiographic recording systems have taken on many form, from high repetition-rate, gated systems to film recording and storage phosphors. Some systems are designed for synchronization to an accelerator while others may be single shot or may record a frame sequence in a dynamic radiography experiment. While film recording remains a reliable standby in the radiographic community, there is growing interest in investigating electronic recording for many applications. The advantages of real time access to remote data acquisition are highly attractive. Cooled CCD camera systems are capable of providing greater sensitivity with improved signal-to-noise ratio. This paper begins with a review of performance characteristics of the Bechtel Nevada large format imaging system, a gated system capable of viewing scintillators up to 300 mm in diameter. We then examine configuration alternatives in lens coupled and fiber optically coupled electro-optical recording systems. Areas of investigation include tradeoffs between fiber optic and lens coupling, methods of image magnification, and spectral matching from scintillator to CCD camera. Key performance features discussed include field of view, resolution, sensitivity, dynamic range, and system noise characteristics.

  12. The formation of dew

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beysens, D.

    Dew is the condensation into liquid droplets of water vapor on a substrate. The presence of a substrate is the origin of the peculiarities and richness of the phenomenon. We review the aspects related to heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth of water droplets. A key point is the drop interaction through drop fusion or coalescence, which leads to scaling in the growth and gives universality to the process. The effects of substrate heterogeneity and gravity effects are also considered. Coalescence events lead to temporal and spatio-temporal fluctuations in the substrate coverage, drop configuration, etc., which give rise to a very peculiar dynamics. When the substrate is a liquid or a liquid crystal, the drop pattern can exhibit special spatial orders, such as crystalline, hexatic phases and fractal contours. And condensation on a solid substrate near its melting point can make the drop jump. The applications of monitoring dew formation are manyfold. Examples can be found in nanoelectronics and optics (vapor deposition and thin films), medicine (sterilization process), agriculture (green houses). We here discuss in greater details the production of clean water by "atmospheric wells".

  13. Thermal Decomposition of Copper (II) Dicalcium (II) Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Perazzo, P. K.; Leyva, A. G.; Polla, G.; Parisi, F.; de Benyacar, M. A. R.; Smichowski, P.; Lanza, H.

    1997-09-01

    The unit cell obtained through X-ray single crystal analysis of the synthetized CuCa 2(HCOO) 6crystals corresponds to a supercell of the basic structure described by M. Sanchis et al.( Inorg. Chem.31, 2915 (1992)). Thermal decomposition of this sample shows two stages up to 300°C; the first can be related to the superstructure, and the second corresponds to the breaking down of the remaining copper formate structural units and the simultaneous decomposition of the sample.

  14. Dynamics and design of a power unit with a hydraulic piston actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misyurin, S. Yu.; Kreinin, G. V.

    2016-07-01

    The problem of the preselection of parameters of a power unit of a mechatronic complex on the basis of the condition for providing a required control energy has been discussed. The design of the unit is based on analysis of its dynamics under the effect of a special-type test conditional control signal. The specific features of the approach used are a reasonably simplified normalized dynamic model of the unit and the formation of basic similarity criteria. Methods of designing a power unit with a hydraulic piston actuator that operates in point-to-point and oscillatory modes have been considered.

  15. Gaining Insight into Star Formation: Resolved Star Formation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebst, Kelley; Scowen, Paul A.

    2014-06-01

    Until recently astronomers have used star formation laws to measure the star formation rate and star formation efficiency of galaxies only on global scales because of the poor resolution of available data. What I am now capable of producing is a spatially resolved star formation law that can provide direct insight into the physical processes that govern star formation and assess the short-term nature of bursts of star formation and the longer-term nature of larger-scale events that can dictate the global distribution of stars and the ultimate fate of a galaxy as a whole. I am using exquisite narrowband optical data from a variety of sources, including the Hubble Space Telescope, and Kitt Peak National Observatory, etc., in conjunction with infrared data from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey and the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey, neutral gas data from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, and molecular gas data from the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association Survey of Nearby Galaxies, to provide star formation rates and star formation efficiencies on previously inaccessible small spatial scales across a suite of galaxies that represent a range of star formation environments and scales. My sample includes 18 spiral galaxies ranging from 2.1 to 15.1 Mpc in distance and offers a large range of morphological types (i.e. a large range of star formation environments). I am using these data to test different models of star formation modes under a variety of physical conditions and relate the variations I observe to the known local physical conditions and the associated star formation histories for each locale within each galaxy.This is the heart of the matter - that the nature and evolution of the local physical environment intimately influences how stars can form, how quickly and how massive those stars are allowed to form, and as a result how they shape the local conditions for subsequent star formation. It is this tracking of the stellar ecology that is vital for

  16. The vacuum system for technological unit development and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukeshov, A. M.; Gabdullina, A. T.; Amrenova, A. U.; Giniyatova, Sh G.; Kaibar, A.; Sundetov, A.; Fermakhan, K.

    2015-11-01

    The paper shows results of development of plasma technological unit on the basis of accelerator of vacuum arc and automated system. During the previous years, the authors investigated the operation of pulsed plasma accelerator and developed unique technologies for hardening of materials. Principles of plasma formation in pulsed plasma accelerator were put into basis of the developed unit. Operation of the pulsed arc accelerator was investigated at different parameters of the charge. The developed vacuum system is designed for production of hi-tech plasma units in high technologies in fields of nanomaterials, mechanical and power engineering and production with high added value. Unlike integrated solutions, the system is a module one to allow its low cost, high reliability and simple maintenance. The problems of use of robots are discussed to modernize the technological process.

  17. Weather--An Integrated Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Vivian

    1976-01-01

    Outlined is a two week unit on weather offered as independent study for sixth- and seventh-year students in Vancouver, Canada, schools. Included is a section on weather lore and a chart of weather symbols. (SL)

  18. United States laws under review.

    PubMed

    Leahey, M

    2007-01-01

    As well as reauthorisation of the Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act, others isues are under consideration by the United States Congress. These include the introduction of incentives for the development of medical devices for paediatric care. PMID:17585722

  19. Electronegativity Equalization with Pauling Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratsch, Steven G.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses electronegativity equalization using Pauling units. Although Pauling has qualitatively defined electronegativity as the power of an atom in a molecule to attract electrons to itself, Pauling electronegativities are treated in this paper as prebonded, isolated-atom quantities. (JN)

  20. Advanced extravehicular mobility unit study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, W.

    1982-01-01

    Components of the advanced extravehicular mobility unit (suit) are described. Design considerations for radiation protection, extravehicular operational pressure, mobility effects, tool/glove/effector, anthropometric definition, lighting, and equipment turnaround are addressed.

  1. Environmental Control Unit Harness Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Testing four new Environmental Control Unit Harnesses for improved user comfort during SCAPE operations. Phase I, testing in a lab environment, Phase II will continue testing the best candidates in a field environment.

  2. Revised stratigraphic nomenclature for the Wasatch and Green River formations of Eocene age, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Roehler, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    In this book the nomenclature of the Eocene Wasatch and Green River formations is revised to establish a stratigraphic framework that can be used for the accurate basinwide correlations of lithologic and chronologic units. To implement these revisions, the names Alkali Creek Tongue of the Wasatch Formation, and Farson Sandstone Member of the Green River Formation, Scheggs and Rife beds of the Tipton Shale Member of the Green River Formation are introduced. The continued use of the names New Fork Tongue, Desertion Point Tongue, and upper tongue of the Wasatch Formation, and the Fontenelle Tongue, upper Tipton Shale Member, middle tongue, and upper tongue of the Green River Formation is discouraged.

  3. Bile Formation and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Bile is a unique and vital aqueous secretion of the liver that is formed by the hepatocyte and modified down stream by absorptive and secretory properties of the bile duct epithelium. Approximately 5% of bile consists of organic and inorganic solutes of considerable complexity. The bile-secretory unit consists of a canalicular network which is formed by the apical membrane of adjacent hepatocytes and sealed by tight junctions. The bile canaliculi (~1 μm in diameter) conduct the flow of bile countercurrent to the direction of portal blood flow and connect with the canal of Hering and bile ducts which progressively increase in diameter and complexity prior to the entry of bile into the gallbladder, common bile duct, and intestine. Canalicular bile secretion is determined by both bile salt-dependent and independent transport systems which are localized at the apical membrane of the hepatocyte and largely consist of a series of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transport proteins that function as export pumps for bile salts and other organic solutes. These transporters create osmotic gradients within the bile canalicular lumen that provide the driving force for movement of fluid into the lumen via aquaporins. Species vary with respect to the relative amounts of bile salt-dependent and independent canalicular flow and cholangiocyte secretion which is highly regulated by hormones, second messengers, and signal transduction pathways. Most determinants of bile secretion are now characterized at the molecular level in animal models and in man. Genetic mutations serve to illuminate many of their functions. PMID:23897680

  4. Formation of Bidisperse Particle Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, Jenn Wei; Zhao, Bing; Law, Adrian W. K.; Adams, E. Eric

    2014-11-01

    When a group of dense particles is released instantaneously into water, their motion has been conceptualized as a circulating particle thermal (Ruggerber 2000). However, Wen and Nacamuli (1996) observed the formation of particle clumps characterized by a narrow, fast moving core shedding particles into wakes. They observed the clump formation even for particles in the non-cohesive range as long as the source Rayleigh number was large (Ra > 1E3) or equivalently the source cloud number (Nc) was small (Nc < 3.2E2). This physical phenomenon has been investigated by Zhao et al. (2014) through physical experiments. They proposed the theoretical support for Nc dependence and categorized the formation processes into cloud formation, transitional regime and clump formation. Previous works focused mainly on the behavior of monodisperse particles. The present study further extends the experimental investigation to the formation process of bidisperse particles. Experiments are conducted in a glass tank with a water depth of 90 cm. Finite amounts of sediments with various weight proportions between coarser and finer particles are released from a cylindrical tube. The Nc being tested ranges from 6E-3 to 9.9E-2, which covers all the three formation regimes. The experimental results showed that the introduction of coarse particles promotes cloud formation and reduce the losses of finer particles into the wake. More quantitative descriptions of the effects of source conditions on the formation processes will be presented during the conference.

  5. Plasmapause formation at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Jia, X.; Jackman, C. M.; Hospodarsky, G.; Coates, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    Cassini observations during a rapid, high-latitude, dawnside pass from Saturn's lobe to inner magnetosphere on 25 June 2009 provide strong evidence for the formation of a "plasmapause" at Saturn by Vasyliunas-type nightside reconnection of previously mass-loaded flux tubes. A population of hot, tenuous plasma that lies between the lobe and the dense inner magnetospheric plasma is consistent with a region formed by very recent injection from a reconnection region in the tail, including low density, high temperature, supercorotational flow, a significant O+ content, and the near-simultaneous observation of enhanced Saturn kilometric radiation emissions. The sharp boundary between that region and the cool dense inner magnetospheric plasma thus separates flux tubes that were involved in the reconnection from those that successfully traversed the nightside without mass loss. This event demonstrates that tail reconnection can strip off inner magnetospheric plasma in to at least dipole L = 8.6. Clear evidence of flux tube interchange driven by the sharp boundary is found, both inward moving flux tubes of hotter plasma and, for the first time, the outward moving cool population. The outward moving cool regions have azimuthal sizes less than 1 RS, were probably created within the past 1.2 h, and have outflow speeds greater than about 5 km/s. At the outer edge of the reconnected region, there is also a possible signature of Dungey-type lobe reconnection following the initial Vasyliunas-type reconnection. Observations from this event are entirely consistent with previously described global MHD simulations of tail reconnection, plasmoid departure, and Saturnward injection of reconnected flux.

  6. The Tuscaloosa Formation revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hansley, P.L.

    1996-09-01

    A petrologic study of the Upper Cretaceous lower Tuscaloosa Formation in the Gulf Coast from depths of 2,700 to 6,000 in indicates that anomalously high porosity (>20 percent) in deep gas and condensate-bearing sandstones (5,000 to 6,000 m) is approximately evenly divided between primary and secondary porosity. Primary porosity was preserved by early, iron-rich grain-rimming chlorite and quartz overgrowths. Most secondary porosity resulted from dissolution of carbonate cements. Moldic pores outlined by chlorite were created by dissolution of unstable feldspars and rock fragments. Interparticle clay microporosity is significant in sandstones containing authigenic kaolinite and (or) chlorite. Pores were filled in the deepest sandstones by quartz overgrowths and a late magnesium-rich chlorite that is commonly obscured by fibrous illite. Voids were created in the early Tertiary(?) by acidic meteoric waters and during deep burial by brines carrying organic and inorganic acids that were released during hydrocarbon maturation in neighboring shales. Oil fills dissolution voids in ankerite cement and albitized plagioclase and coats most authigenic minerals. Two-phase primary fluid inclusions in quartz overgrowths which also contain oil-bearing inclusions have homogenization temperatures between 125{degrees}C and 134{degrees}C. These temperatures combined with a burial history reconstruction indicate that hydrocarbons migrated into Tuscaloosa sandstones during the Miocene. Overpressuring began in the middle Tertiary along with gas generation in the Tuscaloosa. These events coincided with the end of deep meteoric flow through the Gulf section and the beginning of a compactional hydrologic regime. Precipitation of quartz overgrowths and hydrocarbons at this time locally created effective pressure seals.

  7. Planet formation and searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Ryan Michael

    2009-08-01

    This thesis explores the possibilities for discovery of terrestrial-mass planets in the habitable zones of their host stars. Towards this aim, we present the results of three projects and discuss another two preliminary studies of further explorations. In so doing, we explore a fairly comprehensive range of possibilities regarding the formation and detection of terrestrial- mass planets in the habitable zone. We first study the potential for terrestrial planets to form in situ in and around the habitable zones of M-dwarf stars. We proceed to explore the feasibility of searches for these planets using the transit method via Monte- Carlo simulations. We find that M-dwarfs pose an interesting challenge for study: being inherently dim, widely spread on the sky, and photometrically variable. We present results of simulated ground-based transit search campaigns as well as simulated searches from a modest satellite mission. Our second project is a straightforward extension of the previous study: a collaborative effort to search for transit signals around the nearest M-dwarf: Proxima Centauri. We describe our observations as well as the Monte-Carlo analysis used to place constraints on the possible planetary radii and periods. Our third project is a search for transiting extra-solar Jovian planets using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. We search through the private Keck radial- velocity datasets for undiscovered Rossiter-McLaughlin signals. We present our results in the form of both strong null-result datasets as well as potential transiting systems. We then briefly analyze these larger Jovian planets for potential to harbor potentially habitable terrestrial satellites. Our final preliminary analysis looks into the potential for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope to detect transiting Neptune-mass planets orbiting M-dwarfs which could then lead to terrestrial-mass planet detections. The sum of these efforts is a comprehensive investigation into the likelihood and

  8. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An exotic terrain of wind-eroded ridges and residual smooth surfaces are seen in one of the highest resolution images ever taken of Mars from orbit. The Medusae Fossae formation is believed to be formed of the fragmental ejecta of huge explosive volcanic eruptions. When subjected to intense wind-blasting over hundreds of millions of years, this material erodes easily once the uppermost tougher crust is breached. In the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shown on the right, the crust, or cap rock, can be seen in the upper right part of the picture. The finely-spaced ridges are similar to features on Earth called yardangs, which are formed by intense winds plucking individual grains from, and by wind-driven sand blasting particles off, sedimentary deposits.

    The MOC image was taken on October 30, 1997 at 11:05 AM PST, shortly after the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft's 31st closest approach to Mars. The image covers an area 3.6 X 21.5 km (2.2 X 13.4 miles) at 3.6 m (12 feet) per picture element--craters only 11 m (36 feet, about the size of a swimming pool) across can be seen. The context image (left; the best Viking view of the area; VO 1 387S34) has a resolution of 240 m/pixel, or 67 times lower resolution than the MOC frame.

    Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  9. Synthrusting deposition of the Pennsylvanian and Permian Strathearn Formation, Northern Carlin Trend, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Ted G.; Berger, Vladimir I.; Singer, Donald A.; Harris, Anita G.; Stevens, Calvin H.

    2004-03-01

    The middle Upper Pennsylvanian and middle Lower Permian Strathearn Formation belongs to the overlap assemblage of the Antler orogen in Nevada. At Beaver Peak, near the Carlin Trend of gold deposits, it contains synorogenic conglomerate deposits associated with emplacement of a regionally extensive, 1-km-thick tectonic wedge that is floored by the Coyote thrust. Normal marine conodont biofacies throughout the Strathearn Formation suggest middle shelf or deeper, depositional environments. The allochthon floored by the Coyote thrust has been thrust above a middle Upper Pennsylvanian, lower conglomerate unit of the Strathearn Formation. A middle Lower Permian upper conglomerate unit, the highest unit recognized in the Strathearn Formation, as well as similarly aged dolomitic siltstone, onlap directly onto Ordovician quartzarenite of the Vinini Formation that makes up most of the Coyote allochthon. Quartz grains and quartzarenite fragments of variable roundness and shape in the conglomerate units were derived from the presently adjoining tectonic lobe of mostly quartzarenite that advanced southeast (present geographic coordinates) during the late Paleozoic into the developing Strathearn basin. Chert fragments in the conglomerates probably were derived mostly from Devonian Slaven Chert, including a widespread thick mélange unit of the Slaven Chert in the footwall of the Coyote thrust. Lithologic and shape ratio data from approximately 4200 clasts at 17 sites of the two major conglomerate units in the Strathearn Formation at Beaver Peak are roughly similar in that they contain only chert and quartzarenite clasts, and chert clasts predominate in both units. They differ in the relative proportion of the two lithologies whereby quartzarenite clasts increase sixfold in the upper unit (middle Lower Permian) versus its content in the lower conglomerate unit. Relations at the unconformity between the upper conglomerate unit and its underlying quartzarenite shows quartzarenite

  10. Formative Assessment Probes: Is It a Rock? Continuous Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2013-01-01

    A lesson plan is provided for a formative assessment probe entitled "Is It a Rock?" This probe is designed for teaching elementary school students about rocks through the use of a formative assessment classroom technique (FACT) known as the group Frayer Model. FACT activates students' thinking about a concept and can be used to…

  11. Stratigraphy of Mid-Cretaceous Blackleaf and lower part of the Frontier formations in parts of Beaverhead and Madison counties, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Dyman, T.S.; Nichols, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Albian Blackleaf Formation and the overlying Cenomanian to Turonian lower part of the Frontier formation in Beaverhead and Madison counties, Montana, were deposited within or east of the southwestern Montana fold-and-thrust belt. The Blackleaf Formation is subdivided into four mappable lithofacies units. The Albian age for this formation was determined from fossil bivalves and palynomorphs. The lower part of the Frontier Formation is composed of lithic sandstone, conglomerate, and subordinate mudstone and shale.

  12. Stratigraphy of mid-cretaceous Black-leaf and lower part of the frontier formations in parts of Beaverhead and Madison counties

    SciTech Connect

    Dyman, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Albian Blackleaf Formation and the overlying Cenomanian to Turonian lower part of the Frontier Formation in Beaverhead and Madison countries, Montana fold-and-thrust belt. This book describes the Blackleaf Formation which is subdivided into four mappable lithofacies units. The Albian age for this formation was determined from fossil bivalves and palynomorphs. The lower part of the Frontier Formation is composed of lithic sandstone, conglomerate, and subordinate mudstone and shale.

  13. Patterning and Compartment Formation in the Diencephalon

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Mallika; Li, James Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    The diencephalon gives rise to structures that play an important role in connecting the anterior forebrain with the rest of the central nervous system. The thalamus is the major diencephalic derivative that functions as a relay station between the cortex and other lower order sensory systems. Almost two decades ago, neuromeric/prosomeric models were proposed describing the subdivision and potential segmentation of the diencephalon. Unlike the laminar structure of the cortex, the diencephalon is progressively divided into distinct functional compartments consisting principally of thalamus, epithalamus, pretectum, and hypothalamus. Neurons generated within these domains further aggregate to form clusters called nuclei, which form specific structural and functional units. We review the recent advances in understanding the genetic mechanisms that are involved in the patterning and compartment formation of the diencephalon. PMID:22593732

  14. Otoconial formation in the fetal rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salamat, M. S.; Ross, M. D.; Peacor, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Otoconial formation in the fetal rat is examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and by X-ray elemental analysis. The primitive otoconia appear highly organic, but are trigonal in cross section, indicating that they already possess a three-fold axis of symmetry and a complement of calcite. These otoconia develop into spindle-shaped and, subsequently, dumbbell-shaped units. Transmission electron microscopy of dumbbell-shaped otoconia not exposed to fluids during embedment showed that calcite deposits mimicked the arrangement of the organic material. X-ray elemental analysis demonstrated that calcium was present in lower quantities in the central core than peripherally. It is concluded that organic material is essential to otoconial seeding and directs otoconial growth.

  15. Sedimentology of the Pennsylvanian and Permian Strathearn Formation, Northern Carlin Trend, Nevada; with a section on microfossil controls on the age of the Strathearn Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, Vladimir I.; Singer, Donald A.; Theodore, Ted G.; Harris, Anita G.; Stevens, Calvin H.

    2001-01-01

    Two framework-supported, poorly bedded conglomerate units of the middle Upper Pennsylvanian and middle Lower Permian Strathearn Formation belonging to the overlap assemblage of the Antler orogen are prominent in the northern Carlin trend. These horizons stratigraphically and temporally bracket thrust emplacement of a major allochthonous thrust plate of mainly quartzarenite of the Ordovician Vinini Formation. Lithologic and shape-ratio data from approximately 4,200 pebbles and cobbles at 17 sites as well as biostratigraphic data in the Strathearn, and their geologic implications, are included in this report. Conodont biofacies throughout the Strathearn Formation are normal marine and suggest middle shelf or deeper depositional environments. The conglomerate units roughly are similar in that they contain only chert and quartzarenite pebbles, but they differ in compositional proportions of the two lithologies. The relative proportion of quartzarenite pebbles increases sixfold in the middle Lower Permian upper conglomerate unit versus its content in the middle Upper Pennsylvanian lower unit, whereas chert pebbles predominate in both units. Various roundness categories of chert pebbles in both conglomerate units of the Strathearn show that the equant pebble class (B/A) = 1 clearly is represented strongly even in the subangular category, the lowest roundness categories for the pebbles. Thus, development of equant pebbles cannot be ascribed totally to a rounding process during predeposition transport. The equant character of many pebbles might, in part, be an original feature inherited from pre-erosion rock fractures and (or) bedding that control overall form of the fragments prior to their release to the transport environment. The allochthon of the Coyote thrust has been thrust above the lower conglomerate unit of the Strathearn during a regionally extensive contractional event in the late Paleozoic. The middle Lower Permian upper conglomerate unit, highest unit

  16. Lithostratigraphy of the Calico Hills Formation and Prow Pass Tuff (Crater Flat Group) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, T.C.; Geslin, J.K.

    1995-07-01

    Lithostratigraphic relations within the Calico Hills Formation and Prow Pass Tuff (Crater Flat Group) were reconstructed from analysis of core samples and observation of outcrop exposures. The Calico Hills Formation is composed of five nonwelded pyroclastic units (each formed of one or more pyroclastic-flow deposits) that overlie an interval of bedded tuff and a basal volcaniclastic sandstone unit. The Prow Pass Tuff is divided into four pyroclastic units and an underlying interval of bedded tuff. The pyroclastic units of the Prow Pass Tuff are distinguished by the sizes and amounts of their pumice and lithic clasts and their degree of welding. Pyroclastic units of the Prow Pass Tuff are distinguished from those of the Calico Hills Formation by their phenocryst assemblage, chemical composition, and ubiquitous siltstone lithic clasts. Downhole resistivity tends to mirror the content of authigenic minerals, primarily zeolites, in both for-mations and may be useful for recognizing the vitric-zeolite boundary in the study area. Maps of zeolite distribution illustrate that the bedded tuff and basal sandstone units of the Calico Hills Formation are altered over a wider area than the pyroclastic units of both the Calico Hills Formation and the upper Prow Pass Tuff.

  17. The Formation of Galactic Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carollo, C. Marcella; Ferguson, Henry C.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2000-03-01

    Part I. Introduction: What are galactic bulges?; Part II. The Epoch of Bulge Formation: Origin of bulges; Deep sub-mm surveys: High-z ULIRGs and the formation of spheroids; Ages and metallicities for stars in the galactic bulge; Integrated stellar populations of bulges: First results; HST-NICMOS observations of galactic bulges: Ages and dust; Inside-out bulge formation and the origin of the Hubble sequence; Part III. The Timescales of Bulge Formation: Constraints on the bulge formation timescale from stellar populations; Bulge building with mergers and winds; Role of winds, starbursts, and activity in bulge formation; Dynamical timescales of bulge formation; Part IV. Physical Processes in Bulge Formation: the role of bars for secular bulge formation; Bars and boxy/peanut-shaped bulges: an observational point of view; Boxy- and peanut-shaped bulges; A new class of bulges; The role of secondary bars in bulge formation; Radial transport of molecular gas to the nuclei of spiral galaxies; Dynamical evolution of bulge shapes; Two-component stellar systems: Phase-space constraints; Central NGC 2146 - a firehose-type bending instability?; Bulge formation: the role of the multi-phase ISM; Global evolution of a self-gravitating multi-phase ISM in the central kpc region of galaxies; Part V. Bulge Phenomenology: Bulge-disk decomposition of spiral galaxies in the near-infrared; The triaxial bulge of NGC 1371; The bulge-disk orthogonal decoupling in galaxies: NGC 4698 and NGC 4672; The kinematics and the origin of the ionized gas in NGC 4036; Optically thin thermal plasma in the galactic bulge; X-ray properties of bulges; The host galaxies of radio-loud AGN; The centers of radio-loud early-type galaxies with HST; Central UV spikes in two galactic spheroids; Conference summary: where do we stand?

  18. Instructional Units for Industrial Materials, Vol. II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Jose State Coll., CA.

    This second volume contains the remainder of the experiments and instructional material developed at the NDEA Institute. Included are seven units on polymers, three units on electronics, three units on graphic arts, 10 units on fuels and lubricants, and one unit on textiles. A list of reviewed films and source availability is appended. Volume I is…

  19. Nations United: The United Nations, the United States, and the Global Campaign Against Terrorism. A Curriculum Unit & Video for Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houlihan, Christina; McLeod, Shannon

    This curriculum unit and 1-hour videotape are designed to help students understand the purpose and functions of the United Nations (UN) and explore the relationship between the United Nations and the United States. The UN's role in the global counterterrorism campaign serves as a case study for the unit. The students are asked to develop a basic…

  20. 7 CFR 60.127 - United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false United States. 60.127 Section 60.127 Agriculture... FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH General Provisions Definitions § 60.127 United States. United States means the... the United States, and the waters of the United States as defined in § 60.132....