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Sample records for four-level cell population

  1. Coherent population transfer and optical dipole force by chirped Gaussian femtosecond pulses in four level {sup 87}Rb

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Subhadeep Sarma, Amarendra K.

    2014-10-15

    We report coherent population transfer(CPT) in a four level atomic system, coupled by three chirped Gaussian femtosecond pulses. CPT is studied under two specific conditions beyond the RWA. It is observed that nearly complete population transfer to the states |3> and |4> can be achieved by maintaining proper resonance condition and judiciously choosing the laser parameters. In addition to this, the transverse optical dipole force on the four-level atomic system is numerically studied. The transverse force provides an acceleration to an atom which is eight order of magnitude higher than earth’s gravitational acceleration g. The force changes from a focusing force to a defocusing one as the initial population changes from the ground states to the excited states.

  2. Single chirped pulse control of hyperfine states population in Rb atom in the framework of the four-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Vladislav; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2012-06-01

    Electron population dynamics within the hyperfine structure in the Rb atom induced by a single ns pulse is theoretically investigated. The aim is to develop a methodology of the implementation of linearly chirped laser pulses for the desired excitations in the Rb atoms resulting in the creation of predetermined non-equilibrium states. A semi-classical model of laser pulse interaction with a four-level system representing the hyperfine energy levels of the Rb atom involved into dynamics has been developed. The equations for the probability amplitudes were obtained from the Schrodinger equation with the Hamiltonian that described the time evolution of the population of the four states in the field interaction representation. A code was written in Fortran for a numerical analysis of the time evolution of probability amplitudes as a function of the field parameters. The dependence of the quantum yield on the pulse duration, the linear chirp parameter and the Rabi frequency was studied to reveal the conditions for the entire population transfer to the upper hyperfine state of the 5S1/2 electronic level. The results may provide a robust tool for quantum operations in the alkali atoms.

  3. Selective population transfer and creation of an arbitrary superposition between quantum states in a Λ-type four-level system by a single linearly chirped pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Tian, Jin; Du, Juan

    2016-05-01

    We present a simple and robust way to execute selective population transfer and creation of an arbitrary superposition between quantum states in a Λ-type four-level system with doublet ground states driven by a single linearly chirped pulse. It is demonstrated that the population in the initial state can be completely and flexibly transferred to either of the target states by manipulating the chirp rate and detuning of the laser pulse. Besides, the formation of an arbitrary superposition between the initial state and either of the target states through properly changing the chirp rate and detuning is also exhibited. The results of this method can be useful for selective quantum coherent control in systems with multiple target states.

  4. Four-level refrigerator driven by photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhui; Lai, Yiming; Ye, Zhuolin; He, Jizhou; Ma, Yongli; Liao, Qinghong

    2015-05-01

    We propose a quantum absorption refrigerator driven by photons. The model uses a four-level system as its working substance and couples simultaneously to hot, cold, and solar heat reservoirs. Explicit expressions for the cooling power Q˙c and coefficient of performance (COP) ηCOP are derived, with the purpose of revealing and optimizing the performance of the device. Our model runs most efficiently under the tight coupling condition, and it is consistent with the third law of thermodynamics in the limit T →0 .

  5. Four-level refrigerator driven by photons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhui; Lai, Yiming; Ye, Zhuolin; He, Jizhou; Ma, Yongli; Liao, Qinghong

    2015-05-01

    We propose a quantum absorption refrigerator driven by photons. The model uses a four-level system as its working substance and couples simultaneously to hot, cold, and solar heat reservoirs. Explicit expressions for the cooling power Q̇(c) and coefficient of performance (COP) η(COP) are derived, with the purpose of revealing and optimizing the performance of the device. Our model runs most efficiently under the tight coupling condition, and it is consistent with the third law of thermodynamics in the limit T→0. PMID:26066099

  6. Evaluating a Training Using the "Four Levels Model"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steensma, Herman; Groeneveld, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: to present a training evaluation based on the "four levels model"; to demonstrate the value of experimental designs in evaluation studies; and to take a first step in the development of an evidence-based training program. Design/methodology/approach: The Kirkpatrick four levels model was used to evaluate the…

  7. Estimating cell populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. S.; Castleman, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    An important step in the diagnosis of a cervical cytology specimen is estimating the proportions of the various cell types present. This is usually done with a cell classifier, the error rates of which can be expressed as a confusion matrix. We show how to use the confusion matrix to obtain an unbiased estimate of the desired proportions. We show that the mean square error of this estimate depends on a 'befuddlement matrix' derived from the confusion matrix, and how this, in turn, leads to a figure of merit for cell classifiers. Finally, we work out the two-class problem in detail and present examples to illustrate the theory.

  8. Four-level atom interferometer with trichromatic laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Kazuhito; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Morinaga, Atsuo

    2007-02-15

    A four-level atom interferometer comprised of three excited states and one ground state with trichromatic fields coupled between them is investigated using Zeeman sublevels of {sup 3}P{sub 1} and {sup 1}S{sub 0} states of a calcium atom. A theoretical description of the interaction of four-level atoms with trichromatic laser fields is presented and compared with the experimental results of the interference fringes which are generated by the three excited states.

  9. A four level silicon microstructure fabrication by DRIE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahiminejad, S.; Cegielski, P.; Abassi, M.; Enoksson, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present a four level Si microstructure fabrication process with depths ranging from 70–400 μm. All four levels are etched from the same side, by using four hard masks (\\text{Si}{{\\text{O}}2} , Al, AZ4562 photo resist, and Al). The choice of the hard masks and their relative selectivity will be discussed. Also two different deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) processes, performed in two different machines, are compared and evaluated. The process evaluation and discussions are based on the vertical walls deviation from a right angle, the surface roughness and the resolution. In the end, a solution is proposed to remove spikes and grassing which appeared during both DRIE processes, and the impact of removing them from the surfaces is discussed.

  10. Quasi four-level Tm:LuAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor); Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Hutcheson, Ralph L. (Inventor); Rodriguez, Waldo J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A quasi four-level solid-state laser is provided. A laser crystal is disposed in a laser cavity. The laser crystal has a LuAG-based host material doped to a final concentration between about 2% and about 7% thulium (Tm) ions. For the more heavily doped final concentrations, the LuAG-based host material is a LuAG seed crystal doped with a small concentration of Tm ions. Laser diode arrays are disposed transversely to the laser crystal for energizing the Tm ions.

  11. Thermal entangled four-level quantum Otto heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xian; He, JiZhou

    2012-10-01

    Based on a two-qubit isotropic Heisenberg XXX model with a constant external magnetic field, we construct a four-level entangled quantum heat engine (QHE). The expressions for several thermodynamic quantities such as the heat transferred, the work and efficiency are derived. Moreover, the influence of the entanglement on the thermodynamic quantities is investigated analytically and numerically. Several interesting features of the variation of the heat transferred, the work and the efficiency with the concurrences of the thermal entanglement of different thermal equilibrium states are obtained.

  12. Controllable Atom Localization in Four-Level Atomic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Luling; Jin Shiqi; Gong Shangqing

    2007-12-26

    We propose controllable atom localization schemes for four-level atomic systems. In the alkaline earth atomic system we give the analytical expressions of the localization peak positions as well as the widths versus the parameters of the optical fields. We show that the probability of finding the atom at a particular position can be increased from 1/4 to 1/3 or 1/2 by adjusting the detuning of the probe field and the Rabi frequencies of the optical fields. Furthermore, the localization precision can be dramatically enhanced by increasing the intensity of the standing-wave field. In the ladder-type system, we use two standing-wave fields and find that the detecting probability can be increased to 1/2 by adjusting the Rabi frequencies of the standing-wave fields.

  13. Two-dimensional atom localization in a four-level tripod system in laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladimir; Rozhdestvensky, Yuri

    2010-03-15

    We propose a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization in a four-level tripod system under an influence of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom is retained in the atomic internal states by an additional probe field either of a standing or of a running wave. It is shown that the localization factors depend crucially on the atom-field coupling that results in such spatial structures of populations as spikes, craters, and waves. We demonstrate a high-precision localization due to measurement of population in the upper state or in any ground state.

  14. Heterogeneity in the muscle satellite cell population

    PubMed Central

    Biressi, Stefano; Rando, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Satellite cells, the adult stem cells responsible for skeletal muscle regeneration, are defined by their location between the basal lamina and the fiber sarcolemma. Increasing evidence suggests that satellite cells represent a heterogeneous population of cells with distinct embryological origin and multiple levels of biochemical and functional diversity. This review focuses on the rich diversity of the satellite cell population based on studies across species. Ultimately, a more complete characterization of the heterogeneity of satellite cells will be essential to understand the functional significance in terms of muscle growth, homeostasis, tissue repair, and aging. PMID:20849971

  15. Purifying Cytokinetic Cells from an Asynchronous Population

    PubMed Central

    Panet, Einat; Ozer, Efrat; Mashriki, Tal; Lazar, Itay; Itzkovich, Devora; Tzur, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinesis is an intensively studied process by which the cell cytoplasm divides to produce two daughter cells. Like any other aspect of cell cycle research, the study of cytokinesis relies heavily on cell synchronization. However, the synchronization of cells during cytokinesis is challenging due to the rapid nature of this process and the shortage of cell cycle blocking agents specifically targeting this phase. Here, we demonstrate the use of standard flow cytometry for directly isolating cytokinetic cells from an asynchronous population of normally proliferating cells. This approach is based on a cell cycle marker whose temporal proteolysis, in combination with DNA quantification or cell size approximation, distinguishes cells undergoing cytokinesis. Furthermore, by avoiding doublet discrimination, typically used in flow cytometry analyses, we were able to further increase selectivity, specifically purifying cells at late cytokinesis. Our method circumvents checkpoint activation, cell cycle arrest, and any other means of pre-synchronization. These qualities, as demonstrated for both unattached and adherent cells, enable high selectivity for cytokinetic cells despite their overall low abundance in an asynchronous population. The sorted cells can then be readily used for cell biological, biochemical, and genomic applications to facilitate cytokinesis and cell cycle research. PMID:26260981

  16. Dynamics of Entanglement between Moving Four-Level Atom and Single Mode Cavity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Khalek, S.; Abdel-Wahab, N. H.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we are interested in studying the entanglement between a single four-level ladder-type atom interacting with one-mode cavity field when the atomic motion is taken into account. The exact solution of the model is obtained by using Schrodinger equation for a specific initial conditions. The field entropy of this system is investigated in the non-resonant case. The effects of the detuning parameter and the atomic motion on the entanglement degree are examined. These investigations show that both of the detuning and the atomic motion play important roles in the evolution of the von Neumann entropy and atomic populations. Finally, conclusions and some features are given.

  17. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  18. Interval scanning photomicrography of microbial cell populations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A single reproducible area of the preparation in a fixed focal plane is photographically scanned at intervals during incubation. The procedure can be used for evaluating the aerobic or anaerobic growth of many microbial cells simultaneously within a population. In addition, the microscope is not restricted to the viewing of any one microculture preparation, since the slide cultures are incubated separately from the microscope.

  19. Proliferation of mutators in A cell population.

    PubMed Central

    Mao, E F; Lane, L; Lee, J; Miller, J H

    1997-01-01

    A Lac- strain of Escherichia coli that reverts by the addition of a G to a G-G-G-G-G-G sequence was used to study the proliferation of mutators in a bacterial culture. Selection for the Lac+ phenotype, which is greatly stimulated in mismatch repair-deficient strains, results in an increase in the percentage of mutators in the selected population from less than 1 per 100,000 cells to 1 per 200 cells. All the mutators detected were deficient in the mismatch repair system. Mutagenesis results in a similar increase in the percentage of mutators. Mutagenesis combined with a single selection can result in a population of more than 50% mutators when a sample of several thousand cells is grown out and selected. Mutagenesis combined with two or more successive selections can generate a population that is 100% mutator. These experiments are discussed in relation to ideas that an early step in carcinogenesis is the creation of a mutator phenotype. PMID:8990293

  20. The regulation of hematopoietic stem cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Mayani, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Evidence presented over the last few years indicates that the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment comprises not just one but a number of different cell populations. Based on HSCs’ proliferation and engraftment potential, it has been suggested that there are two classes of HSC, with long- and short-term engraftment potential. HSC heterogeneity seems to involve differentiation capacities as well, since it has been shown that some HSC clones are able to give rise to both myeloid and lymphoid progeny, whereas others are lymphoid deficient. It has been recognized that HSC function depends on intrinsic cell regulators, which are modulated by external signals. Among the former, we can include transcription factors and non-coding RNAs as well as epigenetic modifiers. Among the latter, cytokines and extracellular matrix molecules have been implicated. Understanding the elements and mechanisms that regulate HSC populations is of significant relevance both in biological and in clinical terms, and research in this area still has to face several complex and exciting challenges. PMID:27408695

  1. Cell cycle population effects in perturbation studies

    PubMed Central

    O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Lijnzaad, Philip; Benschop, Joris J; Lenstra, Tineke L; van Leenen, Dik; Groot Koerkamp, Marian JA; Margaritis, Thanasis; Brok, Mariel O; Kemmeren, Patrick; Holstege, Frank CP

    2014-01-01

    Growth condition perturbation or gene function disruption are commonly used strategies to study cellular systems. Although it is widely appreciated that such experiments may involve indirect effects, these frequently remain uncharacterized. Here, analysis of functionally unrelated Saccharyomyces cerevisiae deletion strains reveals a common gene expression signature. One property shared by these strains is slower growth, with increased presence of the signature in more slowly growing strains. The slow growth signature is highly similar to the environmental stress response (ESR), an expression response common to diverse environmental perturbations. Both environmental and genetic perturbations result in growth rate changes. These are accompanied by a change in the distribution of cells over different cell cycle phases. Rather than representing a direct expression response in single cells, both the slow growth signature and ESR mainly reflect a redistribution of cells over different cell cycle phases, primarily characterized by an increase in the G1 population. The findings have implications for any study of perturbation that is accompanied by growth rate changes. Strategies to counter these effects are presented and discussed. PMID:24952590

  2. SU(4) based classification of four-level systems and their semiclassical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Surajit Ahmed, Helal

    2014-12-15

    We present a systematic method to classify the four-level system using SU(4) symmetry as the basis group. It is shown that this symmetry allows three dipole transitions which eventually leads to six possible configurations of the four-level system. Using a dressed atom approach, the semi-classical version of each configuration is exactly solved under rotating wave approximation and the symmetry among the Rabi oscillation among various models is studied.

  3. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems. PMID:27226981

  4. Low light level all-optical switching in a four-level atom-cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yafan; Lin, Gongwei; Zhang, Shicheng; Niu, Yueping; Gong, Shangqing

    2016-01-01

    We report on an all-optical switching in a double ∧ four-level atom-cavity system both theoretically and experimentally. In this system, an extra coherence between two ground states is induced by two coupling lasers, thus the loss of the cavity field decreases. Then, we can use one weak field to control another weak field at low light levels. Compared to the three-level atom-cavity system, the power of the switching laser can be much weaker in the four-level atom-cavity system.

  5. Four Levels of Learning Centers for Use with Young Gifted Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Peggy L.; Christian, Linda Garris

    1998-01-01

    Describes a four-level system for planning and implementing learning centers for gifted early-childhood classrooms. The levels are: teacher-planned/teacher-directed, teacher-planned/student-directed, student-planned/teacher-directed, and student-planned/student-directed. The philosophical, curricular, and instructional foundations for the…

  6. Interior of sump/sewerage room looking up four levels, ladder on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of sump/sewerage room looking up four levels, ladder on pipe, view facing southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Dry Dock No. 1, Pumpwell, By-Pass Valve & Saltwater Pumphouse, North end of Fifth Street, between Dry Dock No. 1 & Facility GD2 , Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. A microarray analysis of two distinct lymphatic endothelial cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Schweighofer, Bernhard; Rohringer, Sabrina; Pröll, Johannes; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) to form two morphologically different populations, exhibiting significantly different surface protein expression levels of podoplanin, a major surface marker for this cell type. In vitro shockwave treatment (IVSWT) of LECs resulted in enrichment of the podoplaninhigh cell population and was accompanied by markedly increased cell proliferation, as well as 2D and 3D migration. Gene expression profiles of these distinct populations were established using Affymetrix microarray analyses. Here we provide additional details about our dataset (NCBI GEO accession number GSE62510) and describe how we analyzed the data to identify differently expressed genes in these two LEC populations. PMID:26484194

  8. Goos-Hänchen shifts in a four-level quantum system near plasmonic nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, M.

    2016-05-01

    Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts of the reflected and transmitted probe beams through a cavity with a four-level quantum system and plasmonic nanostructure is investigated. It is realized that for different values of distance between plasmonic nanostructure and quantum system, the negative and positive GH shifts of the reflected and transmitted probe beams can be controlled. In addition, it is found that the relative phase of applied fields in the presence of plasmonic nanostructure can be used as an important parameter for controlling the GH shifts in reflected and transmitted light through the cavity. Moreover, the distance effect between four-level quantum system and plasmonic nanostructure has also been discussed on lateral shifts of reflected and transmitted light.

  9. Observation of the continuous transformation of a four level laser into a two level system

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, J. D.; Readle, J. D.; Eden, J. G.

    2012-08-13

    A longstanding and fundamental question of laser and maser physics concerns the energy separation ({Delta}{epsilon}) required between the pumped and lasing states of a three (or four) level system. We observe a four level laser gradually transform into a two level (nonlasing) system by photoassociating Cs-Ar thermal atomic pairs and monitoring subsequent stimulated emission on the 6p{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} {yields} 6s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} (D{sub 2}) transition of Cs at 852.1 nm. Laser excitation spectra demonstrate that the value of {Delta}{epsilon} below which the system rapidly assumes the form of a two level structure and lasing ceases is {approx}0.7kT which corresponds to a Boltzmann factor (exp[-{Delta}{epsilon}/kT]) of 0.5.

  10. Enhanced refractive index without absorption in four-level asymmetrical double semiconductor quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chengxian; Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the absorptive-dispersive properties of a weak probe field in a four-level asymmetrical double semiconductor quantum well. It is found that the enhanced refraction index without absorption can be easily controlled via adjusting properly the corresponding parameters of the system. Our scheme may provide some new possibilities for technological applications in dispersion compensation and solid-state quantum communication for quantum information processing.

  11. AB241. Cancer stem cell-like side population cells in clear cell renal cell carcinoma cell line 769P

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Wang, Dao-Hu; Chen, Jun-Xing; Qiu, Shao-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background Although cancers are widely considered to be maintained by stem cells, the existence of stem cells in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has seldom been reported, in part due to the lack of unique surface markers. We here identified cancer stem cell-like cells with side population (SP) phenotype in five human RCC cell lines. Methods We here identified cancer stem cell-like cells with side population (SP) phenotype in five human RCC cell lines. Results Flow cytometry analysis revealed that 769P, a human clear cell RCC cell line, contained the largest amount of SP cells among five cell lines. These 769P SP cells possessed characteristics of proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation, as well as strong resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy that were possibly related to the ABCB1 transporter. In vivo experiments with serial tumor transplantation in mice also showed that 769P SP cells formed tumors in NOD/SCID mice. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicate that 769P SP cells have the properties of cancer stem cells, which may play important roles in tumorigenesis and therapy-resistance of RCC.

  12. Defining heterogeneity within bacterial populations via single cell approaches.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kimberly M; Isberg, Ralph R

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial populations are heterogeneous, which in many cases can provide a selective advantage during changes in environmental conditions. In some instances, heterogeneity exists at the genetic level, in which significant allelic variation occurs within a population seeded by a single cell. In other cases, heterogeneity exists due to phenotypic differences within a clonal, genetically identical population. A variety of mechanisms can drive this latter strategy. Stochastic fluctuations can drive differential gene expression, but heterogeneity in gene expression can also be driven by environmental changes sensed by individual cells residing in distinct locales. Utilizing multiple single cell approaches, workers have started to uncover the extent of heterogeneity within bacterial populations. This review will first describe several examples of phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity, and then discuss many single cell approaches that have recently been applied to define heterogeneity within bacterial populations. PMID:27273675

  13. Single cell motility and trail formation in populations of microglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung Jin

    2009-03-01

    Microglia are a special type of glia cell in brain that has immune responses. They constitute about 20 % of the total glia population within the brain. Compared to other glia cells, microglia are very motile, constantly moving to destroy pathogens and to remove dead neurons. While doing so, they exhibit interesting body shapes, have cell-to-cell communications, and have chemotatic responses to each other. Interestingly, our recent in vitro studies show that their unusual motile behaviors can self-organize to form trails, similar to those in populations of ants. We have studied the changes in the physical properties of these trails by varying the cell population density and by changing the degree of spatial inhomogeneities (``pathogens''). Our experimental observations can be quite faithfully reproduced by a simple mathematical model involving many motile cells whose mechanical motion are driven by actin polymerization and depolymerization process within the individual cell body and by external chemical gradients.

  14. 2-D isotropic negative refractive index in a N-type four-level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shun-Cai; Wu, Qi-Xuan; Ma, Kun

    2015-11-01

    2-D(Two-dimensional) isotropic negative refractive index (NRI) is explicitly realized via the orthogonal signal and coupling standing-wave fields coupling the Ntype four-level atomic system. Under some key parameters of the dense vapour media, the atomic system exhibits isotropic NRI with simultaneous negative permittivity and permeability (i.e. left-handedness) in the 2-D x-y plane. Compared with other 2-D NRI schemes, the coherent atomic vapour media in our scheme may be an ideal 2-D isotropic NRI candidate and has some potential advantages, significance or applications in the further investigation.

  15. Quantum Entropy of a Four-Level Atom with Arbitrary Nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eied, A. A.; Hanoura, S. A.; Obada, A.-S. F.

    2012-09-01

    General formalisms of a four-level atom in different configurations interacting with a single mode quantized electromagnetic field under multi-photon process with additional forms of nonlinearities of both the field and the intensity-dependent atom-field coupling are investigated. Analytical expressions for the time unitary evolution operator and density operator are obtained. The atom is prepared in its upper most and the field is prepared in a binomial state. The effects of the mean photon number, photon multiplicity, detuning, Kerr-like medium and the intensity-dependent coupling functional on the entropy are considered. General conclusions reached are illustrated by numerical results.

  16. Dynamics of N-configuration four-level atom interacting with one-mode cavity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, N. H.; Thabet, Lamia

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a model is presented to investigate the interaction between a four-level atom and a single mode of the radiation field. The relative phase, the detuning and the Kerr-like medium are taken into consideration. The exact solution is given when the atom is initially prepared in superposition coherent state. The influences of the relative phase, and the Kerr-like medium on the collapses-revivals, the field entropy and the amplitude-squared squeezing phenomena for the considered system are examined. It is found that these parameters have important effects on the properties of these phenomena.

  17. Effects of pump modulation on a four-level laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Chakmakjian, S.H.; Koch, K.; Papademetriou, S.; Stroud, C.R. Jr. )

    1989-09-01

    A theory is developed to describe the way in which modulations in the pump intensity produce modulations in the gain of a four-level, homogeneously broadened laser amplifier. The theory is tested by carrying out an experiment using an alexandrite crystal pumped by a cw dye laser. A second dye laser is used to measure the gain in the inverted laser transition. The dependence of the magnitude and the bandwidth of the gain on the pumping rate is determined. Agreement between theory and experiment is good.

  18. Effects of pump modulation on a four-level laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Chakmakjian, S.H.; Koch, K.; Papademetriou, S.; Stroud, C.R. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A theory is developed to describe the way in which modulations in the pump intensity produce modulations in the gain of a four-level, homogeneously broadened laser amplifier. The theory is tested by carrying out an experiment using an alexandrite crystal pumped by a c-w dye laser. A second dye laser is used to measure the gain in the inverted laser transition. The dependence of the magnitude and the bandwidth of the gain on the pumping rate is determined. Agreement between theory and experiment is good.

  19. Overshoot during phenotypic switching of cancer cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Sellerio, Alessandro L.; Ciusani, Emilio; Ben-Moshe, Noa Bossel; Coco, Stefania; Piccinini, Andrea; Myers, Christopher R.; Sethna, James P.; Giampietro, Costanza; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of tumor cell populations is hotly debated: do populations derive hierarchically from a subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs), or are stochastic transitions that mutate differentiated cancer cells to CSCs important? Here we argue that regulation must also be important. We sort human melanoma cells using three distinct cancer stem cell (CSC) markers — CXCR6, CD271 and ABCG2 — and observe that the fraction of non-CSC-marked cells first overshoots to a higher level and then returns to the level of unsorted cells. This clearly indicates that the CSC population is homeostatically regulated. Combining experimental measurements with theoretical modeling and numerical simulations, we show that the population dynamics of cancer cells is associated with a complex miRNA network regulating the Wnt and PI3K pathways. Hence phenotypic switching is not stochastic, but is tightly regulated by the balance between positive and negative cells in the population. Reducing the fraction of CSCs below a threshold triggers massive phenotypic switching, suggesting that a therapeutic strategy based on CSC eradication is unlikely to succeed. PMID:26494317

  20. Four-level N -scheme crossover resonances in Rb saturation spectroscopy in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotto, S.; Ciampini, D.; Rizzo, C.; Arimondo, E.

    2015-12-01

    We perform saturated absorption spectroscopy on the D2 line for room temperature rubidium atoms immersed in magnetic fields within the 0.05-0.13 T range. At those medium-high field values the hyperfine structure in the excited state is broken by the Zeeman effect, while in the ground-state hyperfine structure and Zeeman shifts are comparable. The observed spectra are composed by a large number of absorption lines. We identify them as saturated absorptions on two-level systems, on three-level systems in a V configuration, and on four-level systems in an N or double-N configuration where two optical transitions not sharing a common level are coupled by spontaneous emission decays. We analyze the intensity of all those transitions within a unified simple theoretical model. We concentrate our attention on the double-N crossovers signals whose intensity is very large because of the symmetry in the branching ratios of the four levels. We point out that these structures, present in all alkali-metal atoms at medium-high magnetic fields, have interesting properties for electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light applications.

  1. Emergence of cytotoxic resistance in cancer cell populations: Single-cell mechanisms and population-level consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzi, Tommaso; Chisholm, Rebecca H.; Lorz, Alexander; Larsen, Annette K.; de Almeida, Luís Neves; Escargueil, Alexandre; Clairambault, Jean

    2016-06-01

    We formulate an individual-based model and a population model of phenotypic evolution, under cytotoxic drugs, in a cancer cell population structured by the expression levels of survival-potential and proliferation-potential. We apply these models to a recently studied experimental system. Our results suggest that mechanisms based on fundamental laws of biology can reversibly push an actively-proliferating, and drug-sensitive, cell population to transition into a weakly-proliferative and drug-tolerant state, which will eventually facilitate the emergence of more potent, proliferating and drug-tolerant cells.

  2. Fluctuations of cell population in a colonic crypt.

    PubMed

    Pei, Qi-ming; Zhan, Xuan; Yang, Li-jian; Bao, Chun; Cao, Wei; Li, An-bang; Rozi, Anvar; Jia, Ya

    2014-03-01

    The number of stem cells in a colonic crypt is often very small, which leads to large intrinsic fluctuations in the cell population. Based on the model of cell population dynamics with linear feedback in a colonic crypt, we present a stochastic dynamics of the cell population [including stem cells (SCs), transit amplifying cells (TACs), and fully differentiated cells (FDCs)]. The Fano factor, covariance, and susceptibility formulas of the cell population around the steady state are derived by using the Langevin theory. In the range of physiologically reasonable parameter values, it is found that the stationary populations of TACs and FDCs exhibit an approximately threshold behavior as a function of the net growth rate of TACs, and the reproductions of TACs and FDCs can be classified into three regimens: controlled, crossover, and uncontrolled. With the increasing of the net growth rate of TACs, there is a maximum of the relative intrinsic fluctuations (i.e., the Fano factors) of TACs and FDCs in the crossover region. For a fixed differentiation rate and the net growth rate of SCs, the covariance of fluctuations between SCs and TACs has a maximum in the crossover region. However, the susceptibilities of both TACs and FDCs to the net growth rate of TACs have a minimum in the crossover region. PMID:24730882

  3. Fluctuations of cell population in a colonic crypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Qi-ming; Zhan, Xuan; Yang, Li-jian; Bao, Chun; Cao, Wei; Li, An-bang; Rozi, Anvar; Jia, Ya

    2014-03-01

    The number of stem cells in a colonic crypt is often very small, which leads to large intrinsic fluctuations in the cell population. Based on the model of cell population dynamics with linear feedback in a colonic crypt, we present a stochastic dynamics of the cell population [including stem cells (SCs), transit amplifying cells (TACs), and fully differentiated cells (FDCs)]. The Fano factor, covariance, and susceptibility formulas of the cell population around the steady state are derived by using the Langevin theory. In the range of physiologically reasonable parameter values, it is found that the stationary populations of TACs and FDCs exhibit an approximately threshold behavior as a function of the net growth rate of TACs, and the reproductions of TACs and FDCs can be classified into three regimens: controlled, crossover, and uncontrolled. With the increasing of the net growth rate of TACs, there is a maximum of the relative intrinsic fluctuations (i.e., the Fano factors) of TACs and FDCs in the crossover region. For a fixed differentiation rate and the net growth rate of SCs, the covariance of fluctuations between SCs and TACs has a maximum in the crossover region. However, the susceptibilities of both TACs and FDCs to the net growth rate of TACs have a minimum in the crossover region.

  4. Shifts from a distant neighboring resonance for a four-level atom

    SciTech Connect

    Horbatsch, M.; Hessels, E. A.

    2011-09-15

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. A 82, 052519 (2010)], the systematic shifts of a resonance due to quantum-mechanical interference from a distant neighboring resonance were derived. In that paper, the simplest three-level closed system was used to calculate analytic expressions for shifts in the resonant line centers. Here, we extend the analysis to the more relevant four-level system, which consists of two ground states and two excited states and which incorporates the physics of dark states. The shifts are shown to depend on the type of experiment performed and can be much larger than the shifts for the three-level system. The analytic formulas obtained are applied to the {sup 23}S-to-{sup 23}P transitions in atomic helium, where significant shifts are found.

  5. Study of a four-level system in vee + ladder configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Vineet; Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of a theoretical study of a four-level atomic system in vee + ladder configuration using a density matrix analysis. The absorption and dispersion profiles are derived for a weak probe field and for varying strengths of the two strong control fields. For specificity, we choose energy levels of 87Rb, and present results for both stationary atoms and moving atoms in room temperature vapor. An electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) peak with negative dispersion is observed at zero probe detuning when the control fields have equal strengths, which switches to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with positive dispersion (due to splitting of the EIA peak) when the control fields are unequal. There is significant linewidth narrowing in thermal vapor.

  6. Controllable cavity linewidth narrowing via spontaneously generated coherence in a four level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Shan, Xiao-Nan; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Qin, Li; Ning, Yong-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    A scheme for cavity linewidth narrowing in a four-level atomic system with spontaneously generated coherence is proposed. The atomic system consists of three closely spaced excited levels, which decay to one common ground level. In such a system, spontaneously generated coherence can result in the appearance of two narrow transparency windows accomplished by steep normal dispersion. When the medium is embedded in a ring cavity, two ultranarrow transmission peaks locating close to the position of the transparency windows can be obtained simultaneously. The cavity linewidth narrowing is owing to the quantum interference between the three decay channels and can be controlled by the frequency splitting of the excited levels, requiring no coupling lasers.

  7. Controlling pathway dynamics of a four-level quantum system with pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dewen; Yang, Ling; Wang, Yaoxiong; Shuang, Feng; Gao, Fang

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of two two-photon absorption (TPA) pathways in a four-level quantum system driven by a laser pulse is investigated in this work. An analytical solution for pulse shaping is proposed to be globally optimal for constructive interference between the two pathways, and accurate spectral boundaries for phase modulation are obtained. The TPA rate can be enhanced by a factor of 8.33 with the optimal pulse instead of the transform limited pulse (TL pulse). Simple control strategies modulating both amplitudes and phases are also designed to increase the TPA amplitude along one pathway while decreasing that along the other simultaneously. The strategies are intuitive and the two pathway amplitudes can differ by two orders of magnitude.

  8. Human Prostate Side Population Cells Demonstrate Stem Cell Properties in Recombination with Urogenital Sinus Mesenchyme

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Barbara A.; Gangavarapu, Kalyan J.; Mathew, Grinu; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Morrison, Carl D.; Miller, Austin; Huss, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell enrichment provides a tool to examine prostate stem cells obtained from benign and malignant tissue. Functional assays can enrich stem cells based on common stem cell phenotypes, such as high ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated efflux of Hoechst substrates (side population assay). This functional assay is based upon mechanisms that protect cells from environmental insult thus contributing to the survival and protection of the stem cell population. We have isolated and analyzed cells digested from twelve clinical prostate specimens based on the side population assay. Prostate stem cell properties of the isolated cells were tested by serial recombination with rat urogenital mesenchyme. Recombinants with side population cells demonstrate an increase in the frequency of human ductal growth and the number of glands per recombinant when compared to recombinants with non-side population cells. Isolated cells were capable of prostatic growth for up to three generations in the recombination assay with as little as 125 sorted prostate cells. The ability to reproducibly use cells isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting from human prostate tissue is an essential step to a better understanding of human prostate stem cell biology. ABC transporter G2 (ABCG2) was expressed in recombinants from side population cells indicating the side population cells have self-renewal properties. Epithelial cell differentiation of recombinants was determined by immunohistochemical analysis for expression of the basal, luminal, and neuroendocrine markers, p63, androgen receptor, prostate specific antigen, and chromogranin A, respectively. Thus, the ABCG2 expressing side population demonstrates multipotency and self-renewal properties indicating stem cells are within this population. PMID:23383057

  9. Human prostate side population cells demonstrate stem cell properties in recombination with urogenital sinus mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Foster, Barbara A; Gangavarapu, Kalyan J; Mathew, Grinu; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Morrison, Carl D; Miller, Austin; Huss, Wendy J

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell enrichment provides a tool to examine prostate stem cells obtained from benign and malignant tissue. Functional assays can enrich stem cells based on common stem cell phenotypes, such as high ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated efflux of Hoechst substrates (side population assay). This functional assay is based upon mechanisms that protect cells from environmental insult thus contributing to the survival and protection of the stem cell population. We have isolated and analyzed cells digested from twelve clinical prostate specimens based on the side population assay. Prostate stem cell properties of the isolated cells were tested by serial recombination with rat urogenital mesenchyme. Recombinants with side population cells demonstrate an increase in the frequency of human ductal growth and the number of glands per recombinant when compared to recombinants with non-side population cells. Isolated cells were capable of prostatic growth for up to three generations in the recombination assay with as little as 125 sorted prostate cells. The ability to reproducibly use cells isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting from human prostate tissue is an essential step to a better understanding of human prostate stem cell biology. ABC transporter G2 (ABCG2) was expressed in recombinants from side population cells indicating the side population cells have self-renewal properties. Epithelial cell differentiation of recombinants was determined by immunohistochemical analysis for expression of the basal, luminal, and neuroendocrine markers, p63, androgen receptor, prostate specific antigen, and chromogranin A, respectively. Thus, the ABCG2 expressing side population demonstrates multipotency and self-renewal properties indicating stem cells are within this population. PMID:23383057

  10. Unique multipotent cells in adult human mesenchymal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Kitada, Masaaki; Wakao, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kouki; Tanimura, Yukihiro; Makinoshima, Hideki; Goda, Makoto; Akashi, Hideo; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Niwa, Akira; Shigemoto, Taeko; Nabeshima, Yoko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Dezawa, Mari

    2010-01-01

    We found adult human stem cells that can generate, from a single cell, cells with the characteristics of the three germ layers. The cells are stress-tolerant and can be isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells, or directly from bone marrow aspirates. These cells can self-renew; form characteristic cell clusters in suspension culture that express a set of genes associated with pluripotency; and can differentiate into endodermal, ectodermal, and mesodermal cells both in vitro and in vivo. When transplanted into immunodeficient mice by local or i.v. injection, the cells integrated into damaged skin, muscle, or liver and differentiated into cytokeratin 14-, dystrophin-, or albumin-positive cells in the respective tissues. Furthermore, they can be efficiently isolated as SSEA-3(+) cells. Unlike authentic ES cells, their proliferation activity is not very high and they do not form teratomas in immunodeficient mouse testes. Thus, nontumorigenic stem cells with the ability to generate the multiple cell types of the three germ layers can be obtained through easily accessible adult human mesenchymal cells without introducing exogenous genes. These unique cells will be beneficial for cell-based therapy and biomedical research. PMID:20421459

  11. Multiple Cancer Cell Population Dynamics in a Complex Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ke-Chih; Targa, Gonzalo; Pienta, Kenneth; Sturm, James; Austin, Robert

    We have developed a technology for study of complex ecology cancer population dynamics. The technology includes complex drug gradients, full bright field/dark field/fluorescence imaging of areas of several square millimeters and thin gas-permable membranes which allow single cell extraction and analysis. We will present results of studies of prostate cancer cell dynamics.

  12. [Th9 cells: a new population of helper T cells].

    PubMed

    Vegran, Frédérique; Martin, François; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François

    2016-04-01

    Th9 cells are CD4 T helper cells characterized by their ability to produce IL-9 and IL-21. These cells are obtained from naive CD4(+) T cells cultured in the presence of TGF-β and IL-4. Thus their differentiation results from the balance between the signaling pathways induced by IL-4 in one hand and the one induced by TGF-β in the other hand. These cells are inflammatory cells and were first described in the context of atopic and autoimmune diseases in which they have a pathogenic role. They are also involved in the defense against parasite infections. Recently, some reports defined Th9 anticancer properties through their cytokine secretion. Indeed, their high secretion of IL-9 and IL-21 in the tumor bed contributes to their anticancer functions. These cytokines trigger the activation of dendritic cells, mast cells, natural killer cells, and CD8 T cells to mount an antitumor immune response. PMID:27137696

  13. Regulation of neural stem cells by choroid plexus cells population.

    PubMed

    Roballo, Kelly C S; Gonçalves, Natalia J N; Pieri, Naira C G; Souza, Aline F; Andrade, André F C; Ambrósio, Carlos E

    2016-07-28

    The choroid plexus is a tissue on the central nervous system responsible for producing cerebrospinal fluid, maintaining homeostasis and neural stem cells support; though, all of its functions still unclear. This study aimed to demonstrate the niches of choroid plexus cells for a better understanding of the cell types and functions, using the porcine as the animal model. The collected material was analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry, and cell culture. The cell culture was characterizated by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. Our results showed OCT-4, TUBIII, Nestin, CD45, CD73, CD90 positive expression and GFAP, CD105 negative expression, also methylene blue histological staining confirmed the presence of telocytes cells. We realized that the choroid plexus is a unique and incomparable tissue with different niches of cells as pluripotent, hematopoietic, neuronal progenitors and telocyte cells, which provide its complexity, differentiated functionality and responsibility on brain balance and neural stem cells regulation. PMID:27181512

  14. Metabolic Differences in Microbial Cell Populations Revealed by Nanophotonic Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Bennett; Antonakos, Cory; Retterer, Scott T; Vertes, Akos

    2013-01-01

    ellular differences are linked to cell differentiation, the proliferation of cancer and to the development of drug resistance in microbial infections. Due to sensitivity limitations, however, large- scale metabolic analysis at the single cell level is only available for cells significantly larger in volume than Saccharomyces cerevisiae (~30 fL). Here we demonstrate that by a nanophotonic ionization platform and mass spectrometry, over one hundred up to 108 metabolites, or up to 18% of the known S. cerevisiae metabolome, can be identified in very small cell populations (n < 100). Under ideal conditions, r Relative quantitation of up to 4% of the metabolites is achieved at the single cell level.

  15. Experimental depletion of different renal interstitial cell populations

    SciTech Connect

    Bohman, S.O.; Sundelin, B.; Forsum, U.; Tribukait, B.

    1988-04-01

    To define different populations of renal interstitial cells and investigate some aspects of their function, we studied the kidneys of normal rats and rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus (DI, Brattleboro) after experimental manipulations expected to alter the number of interstitial cells. DI rats showed an almost complete loss of interstitial cells in their renal papillae after treatment with a high dose of vasopressin. In spite of the lack of interstitial cells, the animals concentrated their urine to the same extent as vasopressin-treated normal rats, indicating that the renomedullary interstitial cells do not have an important function in concentrating the urine. The interstitial cells returned nearly to normal within 1 week off vasopressin treatment, suggesting a rapid turnover rate of these cells. To further distinguish different populations of interstitial cells, we studied the distribution of class II MHC antigen expression in the kidneys of normal and bone-marrow depleted Wistar rats. Normal rats had abundant class II antigen-positive interstitial cells in the renal cortex and outer medulla, but not in the inner medulla (papilla). Six days after 1000 rad whole body irradiation, the stainable cells were almost completely lost, but electron microscopic morphometry showed a virtually unchanged volume density of interstitial cells in the cortex and outer medulla, as well as the inner medulla. Thus, irradiation abolished the expression of the class II antigen but caused no significant depletion of interstitial cells.

  16. Characterization of side population cells from human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Tillie-Louise; Shaheen, Furquan; Johnson, Andrew; Wadsworth, Samuel; Pechkovsky, Dmitri V; Jacoby, David B; Kicic, Anthony; Stick, Stephen M; Knight, Darryl A

    2008-10-01

    The airway epithelium is the first line of contact with the inhaled external environment and is continuously exposed to and injured by pollutants, allergens, and viruses. However, little is known about epithelial repair and in particular the identity and role of tissue resident stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to epithelial regeneration. The aims of the present study were to identify, isolate, and characterize side population (SP) cells in human tracheobronchial epithelium. Epithelial cells were obtained from seven nontransplantable healthy lungs and four asthmatic lungs by pronase digestion. SP cells were identified by verapamil-sensitive efflux of the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Using flow cytometry, CD45(-) SP, CD45(+) SP, and non-SP cells were isolated and sorted. CD45(-) SP cells made up 0.12% +/- 0.01% of the total epithelial cell population in normal airway but 4.1% +/- 0.06% of the epithelium in asthmatic airways. All CD45(-) SP cells showed positive staining for epithelial-specific markers cytokeratin-5, E-cadherin, ZO-1, and p63. CD45(-) SP cells exhibited stable telomere length and increased colony-forming and proliferative potential, undergoing population expansion for at least 16 consecutive passages. In contrast with non-SP cells, fewer than 100 CD45(-) SP cells were able to generate a multilayered and differentiated epithelium in air-liquid interface culture. SP cells are present in human tracheobronchial epithelium, exhibit both short- and long-term proliferative potential, and are capable of generation of differentiated epithelium in vitro. The number of SP cells is significantly greater in asthmatic airways, providing evidence of dysregulated resident SP cells in the asthmatic epithelium. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article. PMID:18653771

  17. Natural cytotoxicity of haemopoietic cell populations against murine lymphoid tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Burton, R. C.; Grail, D.; Warner, N. L.

    1978-01-01

    Homozygous nude and normal mice of 3 strains, BALB/c, CBA and C57BL, were used as sources of nucleated haemopoietic "natural killer" (NK) cells. These killer cells could lyse a wide range of syngeneic and allogeneic lymphoid tumour cell lines in vitro, and it was found that cell suspensions from nude mice were always significantly more active than those from normal mice, and that the most active effector population was a polymorph-enriched peritoneal-exudate cell suspension. Eosinophils did not appear to be involved in the phenomenon, and mononuclear peritoneal-exudate cell suspensions were actually highly inhibitory. Three non-lymphoid tumours, a carcinoma, a fibrosarcoma and a mastocytoma, were totally resistant to in vitro lysis. Although all susceptible tumour cell lines were C-type virus-associated, not all of these tumours were killed by all strain sources of spleen cells, indicating a specificity of killing. PMID:656308

  18. A polyaxonal amacrine cell population in the primate retina.

    PubMed

    Greschner, Martin; Field, Greg D; Li, Peter H; Schiff, Max L; Gauthier, Jeffrey L; Ahn, Daniel; Sher, Alexander; Litke, Alan M; Chichilnisky, E J

    2014-03-01

    Amacrine cells are the most diverse and least understood cell class in the retina. Polyaxonal amacrine cells (PACs) are a unique subset identified by multiple long axonal processes. To explore their functional properties, populations of PACs were identified by their distinctive radially propagating spikes in large-scale high-density multielectrode recordings of isolated macaque retina. One group of PACs exhibited stereotyped functional properties and receptive field mosaic organization similar to that of parasol ganglion cells. These PACs had receptive fields coincident with their dendritic fields, but much larger axonal fields, and slow radial spike propagation. They also exhibited ON-OFF light responses, transient response kinetics, sparse and coordinated firing during image transitions, receptive fields with antagonistic surrounds and fine spatial structure, nonlinear spatial summation, and strong homotypic neighbor electrical coupling. These findings reveal the functional organization and collective visual signaling by a distinctive, high-density amacrine cell population. PMID:24599459

  19. Rapid Cell Population Identification in Flow Cytometry Data*

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Nikolic, Radina; Hoos, Holger H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed flowMeans, a time-efficient and accurate method for automated identification of cell populations in flow cytometry (FCM) data based on K-means clustering. Unlike traditional K-means, flowMeans can identify concave cell populations by modelling a single population with multiple clusters. flowMeans uses a change point detection algorithm to determine the number of sub-populations, enabling the method to be used in high throughput FCM data analysis pipelines. Our approach compares favourably to manual analysis by human experts and current state-of-the-art automated gating algorithms. flowMeans is freely available as an open source R package through Bioconductor. PMID:21182178

  20. Modelling Spread of Oncolytic Viruses in Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Michael; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2014-03-01

    One of the most promising areas in current cancer research and treatment is the use of viruses to attack cancer cells. A number of oncolytic viruses have been identified to date that possess the ability to destroy or neutralize cancer cells while inflicting minimal damage upon healthy cells. Formulation of predictive models that correctly describe the evolution of infected tumor systems is critical to the successful application of oncolytic virus therapy. A number of different models have been proposed for analysis of the oncolytic virus-infected tumor system, with approaches ranging from traditional coupled differential equations such as the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models, to contemporary modeling frameworks based on neural networks and cellular automata. Existing models are focused on tumor cells and the effects of virus infection, and offer the potential for improvement by including effects upon normal cells. We have recently extended the traditional framework to a 2-cell model addressing the full cellular system including tumor cells, normal cells, and the impacts of viral infection upon both populations. Analysis of the new framework reveals complex interaction between the populations and potential inability to simultaneously eliminate the virus and tumor populations.

  1. Coherent manipulation of absorption by intense fields in four level ladder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pardeep; Dasgupta, Shubhrangshu

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear optical processes attributed to the dependence of the susceptibility of the medium on the input fluence can be remarkably manipulated by the quantum interference and coherence. One of these processes, the optical bistability (OB), that refers to the possibilities of two stable outputs for the same input fields, can also be modified by quantum coherence. Further, the nonlinear dependence of the absorption on the power of the input light gives rise to interesting processes like saturable absorption (SA) and reverse saturable absorption (RSA). While the SA corresponds to the decrease in the absorption coefficient with the increase of intensity of input light, the RSA corresponds to otherwise, that finds applications in optical limiting. We show, using a four-level Ladder system, how a control field manipulates these processes for an intense probe field applied in the excited state transition. The nonlinear absorption increases whereas the threshold of OB decreases in presence of a control field. We further delineates how the control field and the decay rates modifies SA and RSA. The control of these processes find applications in optical switching, optical limiting and optical communications.

  2. Trail networks formed by populations of immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Kwon, Tae Goo; Park, Jin-sung; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2014-02-01

    Populations of biological cells that communicate with each other can organize themselves to generate large-scale patterns. Examples can be found in diverse systems, ranging from developing embryos, cardiac tissues, chemotaxing ameba and swirling bacteria. The similarity, often shared by the patterns, suggests the existence of some general governing principle. On the other hand, rich diversity and system-specific properties are exhibited, depending on the type of involved cells and the nature of their interactions. The study on the similarity and the diversity constitutes a rapidly growing field of research. Here, we introduce a new class of self-organized patterns of cell populations that we term as ‘cellular trail networks’. They were observed with populations of rat microglia, the immune cells of the brain and the experimental evidence suggested that haptotaxis is the key element responsible for them. The essential features of the observed patterns are well captured by the mathematical model cells that actively crawl and interact with each other through a decomposing but non-diffusing chemical attractant laid down by the cells. Our finding suggests an unusual mechanism of socially cooperative long-range signaling for the crawling immune cells.

  3. Cell Population Tracking and Lineage Construction with Spatiotemporal Context 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang; Chen, Mei; Kanade, Takeo; Miller, Eric D.; Weiss, Lee E.; Campbell, Phil G.

    2008-01-01

    Automated visual-tracking of cell populations in vitro using phase contrast time-lapse microscopy enables quantitative, systematic and high-throughput measurements of cell behaviors. These measurements include the spatiotemporal quantification of cell migration, mitosis, apoptosis, and the construction of cell lineages. The combination of low signal-to-noise ratio of phase contrast microscopy images, high and varying densities of the cell cultures, topological complexities of cell shapes, and wide range of cell behaviors pose many challenges to existing tracking techniques. This paper presents a fully-automated multi-target tracking system that can efficiently cope with these challenges while simultaneously tracking and analyzing thousands of cells observed using time-lapse phase contrast microscopy. The system combines bottom-up and top-down image analysis by integrating multiple collaborative modules, which exploit a fast geometric active contour tracker in conjunction with adaptive interacting multiple models (IMM) motion filtering and spatiotemporal trajectory optimization. The system, which was tested using a variety of cell populations, achieved tracking accuracy in the range of 86.9%–92.5%. PMID:18656418

  4. Galectin-1 Regulates Tissue Exit of Specific Dendritic Cell Populations*

    PubMed Central

    Thiemann, Sandra; Man, Jeanette H.; Chang, Margaret H.; Lee, Benhur; Baum, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    During inflammation, dendritic cells emigrate from inflamed tissue across the lymphatic endothelium into the lymphatic vasculature and travel to regional lymph nodes to initiate immune responses. However, the processes that regulate dendritic cell tissue egress and migration across the lymphatic endothelium are not well defined. The mammalian lectin galectin-1 is highly expressed by vascular endothelial cells in inflamed tissue and has been shown to regulate immune cell tissue entry into inflamed tissue. Here, we show that galectin-1 is also highly expressed by human lymphatic endothelial cells, and deposition of galectin-1 in extracellular matrix selectively regulates migration of specific human dendritic cell subsets. The presence of galectin-1 inhibits migration of immunogenic dendritic cells through the extracellular matrix and across lymphatic endothelial cells, but it has no effect on migration of tolerogenic dendritic cells. The major galectin-1 counter-receptor on both dendritic cell populations is the cell surface mucin CD43; differential core 2 O-glycosylation of CD43 between immunogenic dendritic cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells appears to contribute to the differential effect of galectin-1 on migration. Binding of galectin-1 to immunogenic dendritic cells reduces phosphorylation and activity of the protein-tyrosine kinase Pyk2, an effect that may also contribute to reduced migration of this subset. In a murine lymphedema model, galectin-1−/− animals had increased numbers of migratory dendritic cells in draining lymph nodes, specifically dendritic cells with an immunogenic phenotype. These findings define a novel role for galectin-1 in inhibiting tissue emigration of immunogenic, but not tolerogenic, dendritic cells, providing an additional mechanism by which galectin-1 can dampen immune responses. PMID:26216879

  5. Triplet correlations among similarly tuned cells impact population coding

    PubMed Central

    Cayco-Gajic, Natasha A.; Zylberberg, Joel; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Which statistical features of spiking activity matter for how stimuli are encoded in neural populations? A vast body of work has explored how firing rates in individual cells and correlations in the spikes of cell pairs impact coding. Recent experiments have shown evidence for the existence of higher-order spiking correlations, which describe simultaneous firing in triplets and larger ensembles of cells; however, little is known about their impact on encoded stimulus information. Here, we take a first step toward closing this gap. We vary triplet correlations in small (approximately 10 cell) neural populations while keeping single cell and pairwise statistics fixed at typically reported values. This connection with empirically observed lower-order statistics is important, as it places strong constraints on the level of triplet correlations that can occur. For each value of triplet correlations, we estimate the performance of the neural population on a two-stimulus discrimination task. We find that the allowed changes in the level of triplet correlations can significantly enhance coding, in particular if triplet correlations differ for the two stimuli. In this scenario, triplet correlations must be included in order to accurately quantify the functionality of neural populations. When both stimuli elicit similar triplet correlations, however, pairwise models provide relatively accurate descriptions of coding accuracy. We explain our findings geometrically via the skew that triplet correlations induce in population-wide distributions of neural responses. Finally, we calculate how many samples are necessary to accurately measure spiking correlations of this type, providing an estimate of the necessary recording times in future experiments. PMID:26042024

  6. Unmasking Chaotic Attributes in Time Series of Living Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Michel; Deschatrette, Jean; Wolfrom, Claire M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Long-range oscillations of the mammalian cell proliferation rate are commonly observed both in vivo and in vitro. Such complicated dynamics are generally the result of a combination of stochastic events and deterministic regulation. Assessing the role, if any, of chaotic regulation is difficult. However, unmasking chaotic dynamics is essential for analysis of cellular processes related to proliferation rate, including metabolic activity, telomere homeostasis, gene expression, and tumor growth. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a simple, original, nonlinear method based on return maps, we previously found a geometrical deterministic structure coordinating such fluctuations in populations of various cell types. However, nonlinearity and determinism are only necessary conditions for chaos; they do not by themselves constitute a proof of chaotic dynamics. Therefore, we used the same analytical method to analyze the oscillations of four well-known, low-dimensional, chaotic oscillators, originally designed in diverse settings and all possibly well-adapted to model the fluctuations of cell populations: the Lorenz, Rössler, Verhulst and Duffing oscillators. All four systems also display this geometrical structure, coordinating the oscillations of one or two variables of the oscillator. No such structure could be observed in periodic or stochastic fluctuations. Conclusion/Significance Theoretical models predict various cell population dynamics, from stable through periodically oscillating to a chaotic regime. Periodic and stochastic fluctuations were first described long ago in various mammalian cells, but by contrast, chaotic regulation had not previously been evidenced. The findings with our nonlinear geometrical approach are entirely consistent with the notion that fluctuations of cell populations can be chaotically controlled. PMID:20179755

  7. γδ T Cells Shape Preimmune Peripheral B Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yafei; Getahun, Andrew; Heiser, Ryan A; Detanico, Thiago O; Aviszus, Katja; Kirchenbaum, Greg A; Casper, Tamara L; Huang, Chunjian; Aydintug, M Kemal; Carding, Simon R; Ikuta, Koichi; Huang, Hua; Wysocki, Lawrence J; Cambier, John C; O'Brien, Rebecca L; Born, Willi K

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that selective ablation of certain γδ T cell subsets, rather than removal of all γδ T cells, strongly affects serum Ab levels in nonimmunized mice. This type of manipulation also changed T cells, including residual γδ T cells, revealing some interdependence of γδ T cell populations. For example, in mice lacking Vγ4(+) and Vγ6(+) γδ T cells (B6.TCR-Vγ4(-/-)/6(-/-)), we observed expanded Vγ1(+) cells, which changed in composition and activation and produced more IL-4 upon stimulation in vitro, increased IL-4 production by αβ T cells as well as spontaneous germinal center formation in the spleen, and elevated serum Ig and autoantibodies. We therefore examined B cell populations in this and other γδ-deficient mouse strains. Whereas immature bone marrow B cells remained largely unchanged, peripheral B cells underwent several changes. Specifically, transitional and mature B cells in the spleen of B6.TCR-Vγ4(-/-)/6(-/-) mice and other peripheral B cell populations were diminished, most of all splenic marginal zone (MZ) B cells. However, relative frequencies and absolute numbers of Ab-producing cells, as well as serum levels of Abs, IL-4, and BAFF, were increased. Cell transfers confirmed that these changes are directly dependent on the altered γδ T cells in this strain and on their enhanced potential of producing IL-4. Further evidence suggests the possibility of direct interactions between γδ T cells and B cells in the splenic MZ. Taken together, these data demonstrate the capability of γδ T cells of modulating size and productivity of preimmune peripheral B cell populations. PMID:26582947

  8. Functional heterogeneity of side population cells in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Ojima, Koichi; Fukada, So-ichiro; Ikemoto, Madoka; Masuda, Satoru; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi . E-mail: takeda@ncnp.go.jp

    2006-03-17

    Skeletal muscle regeneration has been exclusively attributed to myogenic precursors, satellite cells. A stem cell-rich fraction referred to as side population (SP) cells also resides in skeletal muscle, but its roles in muscle regeneration remain unclear. We found that muscle SP cells could be subdivided into three sub-fractions using CD31 and CD45 markers. The majority of SP cells in normal non-regenerating muscle expressed CD31 and had endothelial characteristics. However, CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells, which are a minor subpopulation in normal muscle, actively proliferated upon muscle injury and expressed not only several regulatory genes for muscle regeneration but also some mesenchymal lineage markers. CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells showed the greatest myogenic potential among three SP sub-fractions, but indeed revealed mesenchymal potentials in vitro. These SP cells preferentially differentiated into myofibers after intramuscular transplantation in vivo. Our results revealed the heterogeneity of muscle SP cells and suggest that CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells participate in muscle regeneration.

  9. Transcriptional and phenotypical heterogeneity of Trypanosoma cruzi cell populations.

    PubMed

    Seco-Hidalgo, Víctor; De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Osuna, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex life cycle comprising pools of cell populations which circulate among humans, vectors, sylvatic reservoirs and domestic animals. Recent experimental evidence has demonstrated the importance of clonal variations for parasite population dynamics, survival and evolution. By limiting dilution assays, we have isolated seven isogenic clonal cell lines derived from the Pan4 strain of T. cruzi. Applying different molecular techniques, we have been able to provide a comprehensive characterization of the expression heterogeneity in the mucin-associated surface protein (MASP) gene family, where all the clonal isogenic populations were transcriptionally different. Hierarchical cluster analysis and sequence comparison among different MASP cDNA libraries showed that, despite the great variability in MASP expression, some members of the transcriptome (including MASP pseudogenes) are conserved, not only in the life-cycle stages but also among different strains of T. cruzi. Finally, other important aspects for the parasite, such as growth, spontaneous metacyclogenesis or excretion of different catabolites, were also compared among the clones, demonstrating that T. cruzi populations of cells are also phenotypically heterogeneous. Although the evolutionary strategy that sustains the MASP expression polymorphism remains unknown, we suggest that MASP clonal variability and phenotypic heterogeneities found in this study might provide an advantage, allowing a rapid response to environmental pressure or changes during the life cycle of T. cruzi. PMID:26674416

  10. Transcriptional and phenotypical heterogeneity of Trypanosoma cruzi cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Seco-Hidalgo, Víctor; De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Osuna, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex life cycle comprising pools of cell populations which circulate among humans, vectors, sylvatic reservoirs and domestic animals. Recent experimental evidence has demonstrated the importance of clonal variations for parasite population dynamics, survival and evolution. By limiting dilution assays, we have isolated seven isogenic clonal cell lines derived from the Pan4 strain of T. cruzi. Applying different molecular techniques, we have been able to provide a comprehensive characterization of the expression heterogeneity in the mucin-associated surface protein (MASP) gene family, where all the clonal isogenic populations were transcriptionally different. Hierarchical cluster analysis and sequence comparison among different MASP cDNA libraries showed that, despite the great variability in MASP expression, some members of the transcriptome (including MASP pseudogenes) are conserved, not only in the life-cycle stages but also among different strains of T. cruzi. Finally, other important aspects for the parasite, such as growth, spontaneous metacyclogenesis or excretion of different catabolites, were also compared among the clones, demonstrating that T. cruzi populations of cells are also phenotypically heterogeneous. Although the evolutionary strategy that sustains the MASP expression polymorphism remains unknown, we suggest that MASP clonal variability and phenotypic heterogeneities found in this study might provide an advantage, allowing a rapid response to environmental pressure or changes during the life cycle of T. cruzi. PMID:26674416

  11. The Variance of Intraclass Correlations in Three- and Four-Level Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.; Hedberg, E. C.; Kuyper, Arend M.

    2012-01-01

    Intraclass correlations are used to summarize the variance decomposition in populations with multilevel hierarchical structure. There has recently been considerable interest in estimating intraclass correlations from surveys or designed experiments to provide design parameters for planning future large-scale randomized experiments. The large…

  12. The major cell populations of the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Jeon, C J; Strettoi, E; Masland, R H

    1998-11-01

    We report a quantitative analysis of the major populations of cells present in the retina of the C57 mouse. Rod and cone photoreceptors were counted using differential interference contrast microscopy in retinal whole mounts. Horizontal, bipolar, amacrine, and Müller cells were identified in serial section electron micrographs assembled into serial montages. Ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells were counted by subtracting the number of axons in the optic nerve, learned from electron microscopy, from the total neurons of the ganglion cell layer. The results provide a base of reference for future work on genetically altered animals and put into perspective certain recent studies. Comparable data are now available for the retinas of the rabbit and the monkey. With the exception of the monkey fovea, the inner nuclear layers of the three species contain populations of cells that are, overall, quite similar. This contradicts the previous belief that the retinas of lower mammals are "amacrine-dominated", and therefore more complex, than those of higher mammals. PMID:9786999

  13. Hematopoietic activity in putative mouse primordial germ cell populations.

    PubMed

    Scaldaferri, Maria Lucia; Klinger, Francesca Gioia; Farini, Donatella; Di Carlo, Anna; Carsetti, Rita; Giorda, Ezio; De Felici, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper, starting from the observation of heterogeneous expression of the GOF-18ΔPE-GFP Pou5f1 (Oct3/4) transgene in putative mouse PGC populations settled in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, we identified various OCT3/4 positive populations showing distinct expression of PGC markers (BLIMP-1, AP, TG-1, STELLA) and co-expressing several proteins (CD-34, CD-41, FLK-1) and genes (Brachyury, Hox-B4, Scl/Tal-1 and Gata-2) of hematopoietic precursors. Moreover, we found that Oct3/4-GFP(weak) CD-34(weak/high) cells possess robust hematopoietic colony forming activity (CFU) in vitro. These data indicate that the cell population usually considered PGCs moving toward the gonadal ridges encompasses a subset of cells co-expressing several germ cell and hematopoietic markers and possessing hematopoietic activity. These results are discussed within of the current model of germline segregation. PMID:25684074

  14. Monte Carlo approach to tissue-cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drasdo, D.; Kree, R.; McCaskill, J. S.

    1995-12-01

    We describe a stochastic dynamics of tissue cells with special emphasis on epithelial cells and fibro- blasts and fibrocytes of the connective tissue. Pattern formation and growth characteristics of such cell populations in culture are investigated numerically by Monte Carlo simulations for quasi-two-dimensional systems of cells. A number of quantitative predictions are obtained which may be confronted with experimental results. Furthermore we introduce several biologically motivated variants of our basic model and briefly discuss the simulation of two dimensional analogs of two complex processes in tissues: the growth of a sarcoma across an epithelial boundary and the wound healing of a skin cut. As compared to other approaches, we find the Monte Carlo approach to tissue growth and structure to be particularly simple and flexible. It allows for a hierarchy of models reaching from global description of birth-death processes to very specific features of intracellular dynamics. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  15. Classification method for heterogeneity in monoclonal cell population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburatani, S.; Tashiro, K.; Kuhara, S.

    2015-09-01

    Monoclonal cell populations are known to be composed of heterogeneous subpopulations, thus complicating the data analysis. To gain clear insights into the mechanisms of cellular systems, biological data from a homogeneous cell population should be obtained. In this study, we developed a method based on Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) combined with Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to divide mixed data into classes, depending on their heterogeneity. In general cluster analysis, the number of measured points is a constraint, and thereby the data must be classified into fewer groups than the number of samples. By our newly developed method, the measured data can be divided into groups depending on their latent effects, without constraints. Our method is useful to clarify all types of omics data, including transcriptome, proteome and metabolic information.

  16. Octaploid Meth-A cells are established from a highly polyploidized cell population.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa-Yamamoto, Kohzaburo; Yamagishi, Hiroko; Miyagoshi, Minoru

    2003-04-01

    Tetraploid Meth-A cells were polyploidized by demecolcin, an inhibitor of spindle fibre formation in M phase, and then released from the drug 1, 2, 3 and 4 days after the addition. Octaploid cells were successfully established from cell populations including hexadecaploid cells produced by 2, 3 and 4 days of exposure to demecolcin. One-day-treated cells were polyploidized octaploid cells, but they returned to tetraploid cells. All of the octaploid Meth-A cells showed essentially the same features. The octaploid Meth-A cells had eight homologous chromosomes and double the DNA content of the parent tetraploid cells. The doubling time of octaploid Meth-A cells was 30.2 h, somewhat longer than the 28.3 and 24.0 h of tetraploid and diploid cells, respectively. The fractions of cells in the G1, S and G2/M phases were essentially the same in diploid, tetraploid and octaploid Meth-A cells. The cell volume of octaploid Meth-A cells was about two times that of the tetraploid cells. It was concluded that octaploid Meth-A cells were established from transient hexadecaploid cells produced by the polyploidization of tetraploid cells that had been established from diploid cells. PMID:12680876

  17. Cell population modelling describes intrinsic heterogeneity: a case study for hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Luni, C; Doyle, F J; Elvassore, N

    2011-05-01

    The control of stem cell properties during in vitro expansion is of paramount importance for their clinical use. According to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines, phenotypic heterogeneity is a critical aspect influencing therapeutic response. Even if the authors ability to reduce heterogeneity were limited, the sources from which it arises should be well understood for safe clinical applications. The aim of this work was to describe theoretically the intrinsic cell population heterogeneity that is present even when cells are cultured in a perfectly homogeneous environment. A bivariate population balance model is developed to account for the heterogeneity in the number of receptors and receptor-ligand complexes per cell, and is coupled with a ligand conservation equation. As a case study, the model is applied to the hematopoietic stem cell expansion, considering the c-Kit receptor and stem cell factor pair. Results show the dependence of intrinsic heterogeneity from ligand concentration and the kinetics of its administration. By tracking the cell generations within the total population, the authors highlight intra- and an inter-generational contributions to total population heterogeneity. In terms of dimensionless variables, intrinsic heterogeneity is dependent on the ratio of the characteristic time of cell division to that needed by a newborn cell to reach its single-cell steady state. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:21639590

  18. Population genetics inside a cell: Mutations and mitochondrial genome maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sidhartha; Shraiman, Boris; Gottschling, Dan

    2012-02-01

    In realistic ecological and evolutionary systems natural selection acts on multiple levels, i.e. it acts on individuals as well as on collection of individuals. An understanding of evolutionary dynamics of such systems is limited in large part due to the lack of experimental systems that can challenge theoretical models. Mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) are subjected to selection acting on cellular as well as organelle levels. It is well accepted that mtDNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unstable and can degrade over time scales comparable to yeast cell division time. We utilize a recent technology designed in Gottschling lab to extract DNA from populations of aged yeast cells and deep sequencing to characterize mtDNA variation in a population of young and old cells. In tandem, we developed a stochastic model that includes the essential features of mitochondrial biology that provides a null model for expected mtDNA variation. Overall, we find approximately 2% of the polymorphic loci that show significant increase in frequency as cells age providing direct evidence for organelle level selection. Such quantitative study of mtDNA dynamics is absolutely essential to understand the propagation of mtDNA mutations linked to a spectrum of age-related diseases in humans.

  19. Analyzing the Relationship between Poverty and Child Maltreatment: Investigating the Relative Performance of Four Levels of Geographic Aggregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aron, Sarah B.; McCrowell, Jean; Moon, Alyson; Yamano, Ryoichi; Roark, Duston A.; Simmons, Monica; Tatanashvili, Zurab; Drake, Brett

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare four different levels of aggregation to assess their utility as areal units in child maltreatment research. The units examined are county, zip code, tract, and block group levels. Each of the four levels is analyzed to determine which show the strongest effects in modeling the correlation between poverty…

  20. PopulationProfiler: A Tool for Population Analysis and Visualization of Image-Based Cell Screening Data

    PubMed Central

    Matuszewski, Damian J.; Wählby, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Image-based screening typically produces quantitative measurements of cell appearance. Large-scale screens involving tens of thousands of images, each containing hundreds of cells described by hundreds of measurements, result in overwhelming amounts of data. Reducing per-cell measurements to the averages across the image(s) for each treatment leads to loss of potentially valuable information on population variability. We present PopulationProfiler—a new software tool that reduces per-cell measurements to population statistics. The software imports measurements from a simple text file, visualizes population distributions in a compact and comprehensive way, and can create gates for subpopulation classes based on control samples. We validate the tool by showing how PopulationProfiler can be used to analyze the effect of drugs that disturb the cell cycle, and compare the results to those obtained with flow cytometry. PMID:26987120

  1. Collective Decision-Making and Oscillatory Behaviors in Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Koichi; Sawai, Satoshi

    2013-12-01

    Many examples of oscillations are known in multicellular dynamics, however how properties of individual cells can account for the collective rhythmic behaviors at the tissue level remain elusive. Recently, studies in chemical reactions, synthetic gene circuits, yeast and social amoeba Dictyostelium have greatly enhanced our understanding of collective oscillations in cell populations. From these relatively simple systems, a unified view of how excitable and oscillatory regulations could be tuned and coupled to give rise to tissue-level oscillations is emerging. This chapter reviews recent progress in these and other experimental systems and highlight similarities and differences. We will show how group-level information can be encoded in the oscillations depending on degree of autonomy of single cells and discuss some of their possible biological roles.

  2. Multiple cell and population-level interactions with mouse embryonic stem cell heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Danielle; Corrigan, Adam M; Miermont, Agnes; McDonel, Patrick; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Much of development and disease concerns the generation of gene expression differences between related cells sharing similar niches. However, most analyses of gene expression only assess population and time-averaged levels of steady-state transcription. The mechanisms driving differentiation are buried within snapshots of the average cell, lacking dynamic information and the diverse regulatory history experienced by individual cells. Here, we use a quantitative imaging platform with large time series data sets to determine the regulation of developmental gene expression by cell cycle, lineage, motility and environment. We apply this technology to the regulation of the pluripotency gene Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Our data reveal the diversity of cell and population-level interactions with Nanog dynamics and heterogeneity, and how this regulation responds to triggers of pluripotency. Cell cycles are highly heterogeneous and cycle time increases with Nanog reporter expression, with longer, more variable cycle times as cells approach ground-state pluripotency. Nanog reporter expression is highly stable over multiple cell generations, with fluctuations within cycles confined by an attractor state. Modelling reveals an environmental component to expression stability, in addition to any cell-autonomous behaviour, and we identify interactions of cell density with both cycle behaviour and Nanog. Rex1 expression dynamics showed shared and distinct regulatory effects. Overall, our observations of multiple partially overlapping dynamic heterogeneities imply complex cell and environmental regulation of pluripotent cell behaviour, and suggest simple deterministic views of stem cell states are inappropriate. PMID:26209649

  3. Multiple cell and population-level interactions with mouse embryonic stem cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Danielle; Corrigan, Adam M.; Miermont, Agnes; McDonel, Patrick; Chubb, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Much of development and disease concerns the generation of gene expression differences between related cells sharing similar niches. However, most analyses of gene expression only assess population and time-averaged levels of steady-state transcription. The mechanisms driving differentiation are buried within snapshots of the average cell, lacking dynamic information and the diverse regulatory history experienced by individual cells. Here, we use a quantitative imaging platform with large time series data sets to determine the regulation of developmental gene expression by cell cycle, lineage, motility and environment. We apply this technology to the regulation of the pluripotency gene Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Our data reveal the diversity of cell and population-level interactions with Nanog dynamics and heterogeneity, and how this regulation responds to triggers of pluripotency. Cell cycles are highly heterogeneous and cycle time increases with Nanog reporter expression, with longer, more variable cycle times as cells approach ground-state pluripotency. Nanog reporter expression is highly stable over multiple cell generations, with fluctuations within cycles confined by an attractor state. Modelling reveals an environmental component to expression stability, in addition to any cell-autonomous behaviour, and we identify interactions of cell density with both cycle behaviour and Nanog. Rex1 expression dynamics showed shared and distinct regulatory effects. Overall, our observations of multiple partially overlapping dynamic heterogeneities imply complex cell and environmental regulation of pluripotent cell behaviour, and suggest simple deterministic views of stem cell states are inappropriate. PMID:26209649

  4. A pure population of lung alveolar epithelial type II cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dachun; Haviland, David L; Burns, Alan R; Zsigmond, Eva; Wetsel, Rick A

    2007-03-13

    Alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells are small, cuboidal cells that constitute approximately 60% of the pulmonary alveolar epithelium. These cells are crucial for repair of the injured alveolus by differentiating into alveolar epithelial type I cells. ATII cells derived from human ES (hES) cells are a promising source of cells that could be used therapeutically to treat distal lung diseases. We have developed a reliable transfection and culture procedure, which facilitates, via genetic selection, the differentiation of hES cells into an essentially pure (>99%) population of ATII cells (hES-ATII). Purity, as well as biological features and morphological characteristics of normal ATII cells, was demonstrated for the hES-ATII cells, including lamellar body formation, expression of surfactant proteins A, B, and C, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance receptor, as well as the synthesis and secretion of complement proteins C3 and C5. Collectively, these data document the successful generation of a pure population of ATII cells derived from hES cells, providing a practical source of ATII cells to explore in disease models their potential in the regeneration and repair of the injured alveolus and in the therapeutic treatment of genetic diseases affecting the lung. PMID:17360544

  5. Evaluation of histone-modifying enzymes in stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Stalker, Leanne; Wynder, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The histone demethylases are a relatively novel family of histone-modifying enzymes. Their gene expression suggests that each of the subfamily members may have a discrete role in cell function. The KDM5 family of H3K4 histone demethylases has four members. Each family member has a distinct cellular role, including KDM5a, which is a tumor suppressor (Christensen et al. Cell 128: 1063-1076, 2007); KDM5b, which is an oncogene (Dey et al. Mol Cell Biol 17: 5312-5327, 2008); and KDM5c (Iwase et al. Cell 128: 1077-1088, 2007), which is expressed in terminally differentiated populations. To properly analyze how these enzymes are regulated, we interrogate their bioactivity in ES cells (ESCs) and during neural differentiation of ESCs. We evaluate the bioactivity from both affinity-purified complexes and reconstituted complexes and directly in the cell. These assays have allowed us to define a set of factors that regulate the KDM5 family of histone demethylases. PMID:22113291

  6. A multi-laboratory comparison of blood dendritic cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Phillip Dieter; Kupresanin, Fiona; Brooks, Anna Elizabeth Stella; Dunbar, Peter Rodney; Haniffa, Muzifilla; Hart, Derek Nigel John; Clark, Georgina Jane

    2016-01-01

    HLDA10 collated a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that primarily recognised molecules on human myeloid cell and dendritic cell (DC) populations. As part of the studies, we validated a backbone of mAbs to delineate monocyte and DC populations from peripheral blood. The mAb backbone allowed identification of monocyte and DC subsets using fluorochromes that were compatible with most ‘off the shelf' or routine flow cytometers. Three laboratories used this mAb backbone to assess the HLDA10 panel on blood monocytes and DCs. Each laboratory was provided with enough mAbs to perform five repeat experiments. The data were collated and analysed using Spanning-tree Progression Analysis of Density-normalised Events (SPADE). The data were interrogated for inter- and intra-laboratory variability. The results highlight the definition of DC populations using current readily available reagents. This collaborative process provides the broader scientific community with an invaluable data set that validates mAbs to leucocyte surface molecules. PMID:27195111

  7. Single cell sorting identifies progenitor cell population from full thickness bovine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yin; Zheng, Hongjun; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To date, no approved clinical intervention successfully prevents the progressive degradation of injured articular cartilage that leads to osteoarthritis (OA). Stem/progenitor cell populations within tissues of diarthrodial joint have shown their therapeutic potential in treating OA. However, this potential has not been fully realized due in part to the heterogeneity of these subpopulations. Characterization of clonal populations derived from a single cell may help identify more homogenous stem/progenitor populations within articular cartilage. Moreover, chondrogenic potential of clonal populations from different zones could be further examined to elucidate their differential roles in maintaining articular cartilage homeostasis. Method We combined FACS (Fluorescence-activated cell sorting) and clonogenicity screening to identify stem/progenitor cells cloned from single cells. High-efficiency colony-forming cells (HCCs) were isolated, and evaluated for stem/progenitor cell characteristics. HCCs were also isolated from different zones of articular cartilage. Their function was compared by lineage-specific gene expression, and differentiation potential. Results A difference in colony-forming efficiency was observed in terms of colony sizes. HCCs were highly clonogenic and multipotent, and overexpressed stem/progenitor cell markers. Also, proliferation and migration associated genes were over-expressed in HCCs. HCCs showed zonal differences with deep HCCs more chondrogenic and osteogenic than superficial HCCs. Conclusion Our approach is a simple yet practical way to identify homogeneous stem/progenitor cell populations with clonal origin. The discovery of progenitor cells demonstrates the intrinsic self-repairing potential of articular cartilage. Differences in differentiation potential may represent the distinct roles of superficial and deep zone stem/progenitor cells in the maintenance of articular cartilage homeostasis. PMID:25038490

  8. Intraocular pressure (IOP) in relation to four levels of daily geomagnetic and extreme yearly solar activity.

    PubMed

    Stoupel, E; Goldenfeld, M; Shimshoni, M; Siegel, R

    1993-02-01

    The link between geomagnetic field activity (GMA), solar activity and intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy individuals was investigated. The IOP of 485 patients (970 eyes) was recorded over three nonconsecutive years (1979, 1986, 1989) which were characterized by maximal solar activity (1979, 1989) or minimal solar activity (1986). The measurements were also correlated with four categories of GMA activity: quiet (level I0), unsettled (II0), active (III0), and stormy (IV0). Participants were also differentiated by age and sex. We found that IOP was lowest on days of level IV0 (stromy) GMA. The drop in IOP concomitant with a decrease in GMA level was more significant during periods of low solar activity and in persons over 65 years of age. There was a trend towards higher IOP values on days of levels II0 and IV0 GMA in years of high solar activity. Differences between the sexes and among individuals younger than 65 years were not significant. Our results show an interesting aspect of environmental influence on the healthy population. PMID:8468099

  9. Optimal annealing schedules for two-, three-, and four-level systems using a genetic algorithm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ronald P.; Mayne, Howard R.

    2000-05-01

    An annealing schedule, T(t), is the temperature as function of time whose goal is to bring a system from some initial low-order state to a final high-order state. We use the probability in the lowest energy level as the order parameter, so that an ideally annealed system would have all its population in its ground-state. We consider a model system comprised of discrete energy levels separated by activation barriers. We have carried out annealing calculations on this system for a range of system parameters. In particular, we considered the schedule as a function of the energy level spacing, of the height of the activation barriers, and, in some cases, as a function of degeneracies of the levels. For a given set of physical parameters, and maximum available time, tm, we were able to obtain the optimal schedule by using a genetic algorithm (GA) approach. For the two-level system, analytic solutions are available, and were compared with the GA-optimized results. The agreement was essentially exact. We were able to identify systematic behaviors of the schedules and trends in final probabilities as a function of parameters. We have also carried out Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) calculations on simple potential energy functions using the optimal schedules available from the model calculations. Agreement between the model and MMC calculations was excellent.

  10. Single-cell Migration Chip for Chemotaxis-based Microfluidic Selection of Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Allen, Steven G.; Ingram, Patrick N.; Buckanovich, Ronald; Merajver, Sofia D.; Yoon, Euisik

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cell migration toward and intravasation into capillaries is an early and key event in cancer metastasis, yet not all cancer cells are imbued with the same capability to do so. This heterogeneity within a tumor is a fundamental property of cancer. Tools to help us understand what molecular characteristics allow a certain subpopulation of cells to spread from the primary tumor are thus critical for overcoming metastasis. Conventional in vitro migration platforms treat populations in aggregate, which leads to a masking of intrinsic differences among cells. Some migration assays reported recently have single-cell resolution, but these platforms do not provide for selective retrieval of the distinct migrating and non-migrating cell populations for further analysis. Thus, to study the intrinsic differences in cells responsible for chemotactic heterogeneity, we developed a single-cell migration platform so that individual cells’ migration behavior can be studied and the heterogeneous population sorted based upon chemotactic phenotype. Furthermore, after migration, the highly chemotactic and non-chemotactic cells were retrieved and proved viable for later molecular analysis of their differences. Moreover, we modified the migration channel to resemble lymphatic capillaries to better understand how certain cancer cells are able to move through geometrically confining spaces.

  11. Molecular Diversity Subdivides the Adult Forebrain Neural Stem Cell Population

    PubMed Central

    Giachino, Claudio; Basak, Onur; Lugert, Sebastian; Knuckles, Philip; Obernier, Kirsten; Fiorelli, Roberto; Frank, Stephan; Raineteau, Olivier; Alvarez–Buylla, Arturo; Taylor, Verdon

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) in the ventricular domain of the subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of rodents produce neurons throughout life while those in humans become largely inactive or may be lost during infancy. Most adult NSCs are quiescent, express glial markers, and depend on Notch signaling for their self-renewal and the generation of neurons. Using genetic markers and lineage tracing, we identified subpopulations of adult V-SVZ NSCs (type 1, 2, and 3) indicating a striking heterogeneity including activated, brain lipid binding protein (BLBP, FABP7) expressing stem cells. BLBP+ NSCs are mitotically active components of pinwheel structures in the lateral ventricle walls and persistently generate neurons in adulthood. BLBP+ NSCs express epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, proliferate in response to EGF, and are a major clonogenic population in the SVZ. We also find BLBP expressed by proliferative ventricular and sub-ventricular progenitors in the fetal and postnatal human brain. Loss of BLBP+ stem/progenitor cells correlates with reduced neurogenesis in aging rodents and postnatal humans. These findings of molecular heterogeneity and proliferative differences subdivide the NSC population and have implications for neurogenesis in the forebrain of mammals during aging. PMID:23964022

  12. Biological characteristics of side population cells in a self-established human ovarian cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    WEI, ZHENTONG; LV, SHUANG; WANG, YISHU; SUN, MEIYU; CHI, GUANGFAN; GUO, JUN; SONG, PEIYE; FU, XIAOYU; ZHANG, SONGLING; LI, YULIN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish an ovarian cancer (OC) cell line from ascites of an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma patient and investigate the biological characteristics of its side population (SP) cells. The OC cell line was established by isolating, purifying and subculturing primary cells from ascites of an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma patient (stage IIIc; grade 3). SP and non-SP (NSP) cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and cultured in serum-free medium and soft agar to compare the tumorsphere and colony formation capacities. Furthermore, SP and NSP cell tumorigenesis was examined by subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injection of the cells to non-obese diabetic/severe combined immune deficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. Drug resistance to cisplatin was examined by cell counting kit-8. The OC cell line was successfully established from ascites of an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma patient, which exhibited properties similar to primary tumors subsequent to >50 passages and >2 years of culture. The SP cell ratio was 0.38% in the OC cell line, and a similar SP cell ratio (0.39%) was observed when sorted SP cells were cultured for 3 weeks. Compared with NSP cells, SP cells exhibited increased abilities in differentiation and tumorsphere and colony formation, in addition to the formation of xenografted tumors and ascites and metastasis of the tumors in NOD/SCID mice, even at low cell numbers (3.0×103 cells). The xenografted tumors demonstrated histological features similar to primary tumors and expressed the ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma marker CA125. In addition, SP cells demonstrated a significantly stronger drug resistance to cisplatin compared with NSP and unsorted cells, while treatment with verapamil, an inhibitor of ATP-binding cassette transporters, potently abrogated SP cell drug resistance. In conclusion, the present study verified SP cells from an established OC cell line and characterized the cells with self

  13. Efficient solution of an inverse problem in cell population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Andreas; Krebs, Jochen; Wagner, Mathias

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a size-structured model for cell division is examined and the question of determining the division (birth) rate from a measurable stable size distribution of the population is addressed. This inverse problem can be formulated as a differential-dilation equation. We propose a novel solution scheme based on mollification. The method of approximate inverse allows us to shift the derivative from the data to a precomputable reconstruction kernel. To comprise all available a priori information, a presmoothing step based on regression in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces is introduced. We establish an error theory for the emerging algorithm, prove convergence and deduce a parameter strategy. The results are substantiated with extensive numerical tests both for artificial and real data based on proliferating tumor cells.

  14. Quantum interference in a four-level system of a {sup 87}Rb atom: Effects of spontaneously generated coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dongsheng; Zheng Yujun

    2011-01-15

    In this work, the effects of quantum interference and spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) are theoretically analyzed in a four-level system of a {sup 87}Rb atom. For the effects of SGC, we find that a new kind of electromagnetically induced transparency channel can be induced due to destructive interference, and the nonlinear Kerr absorption can be coherently narrowed or eliminated under different strengths of the coupling and switching fields.

  15. Human Endometrial Side Population Cells Exhibit Genotypic, Phenotypic and Functional Features of Somatic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cervelló, Irene; Gil-Sanchis, Claudia; Mas, Aymara; Delgado-Rosas, Francisco; Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Galán, Amparo; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Martínez, Sebastian; Navarro, Ismael; Ferro, Jaime; Horcajadas, José Antonio; Esteban, Francisco José; O'Connor, José Enrique; Pellicer, Antonio; Simón, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    During reproductive life, the human endometrium undergoes around 480 cycles of growth, breakdown and regeneration should pregnancy not be achieved. This outstanding regenerative capacity is the basis for women's cycling and its dysfunction may be involved in the etiology of pathological disorders. Therefore, the human endometrial tissue must rely on a remarkable endometrial somatic stem cells (SSC) population. Here we explore the hypothesis that human endometrial side population (SP) cells correspond to somatic stem cells. We isolated, identified and characterized the SP corresponding to the stromal and epithelial compartments using endometrial SP genes signature, immunophenotyping and characteristic telomerase pattern. We analyzed the clonogenic activity of SP cells under hypoxic conditions and the differentiation capacity in vitro to adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Finally, we demonstrated the functional capability of endometrial SP to develop human endometrium after subcutaneous injection in NOD-SCID mice. Briefly, SP cells of human endometrium from epithelial and stromal compartments display genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of SSC. PMID:20585575

  16. Multiplexed tracking of combinatorial genomic mutations in engineered cell populations.

    PubMed

    Zeitoun, Ramsey I; Garst, Andrew D; Degen, George D; Pines, Gur; Mansell, Thomas J; Glebes, Tirzah Y; Boyle, Nanette R; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-06-01

    Multiplexed genome engineering approaches can be used to generate targeted genetic diversity in cell populations on laboratory timescales, but methods to track mutations and link them to phenotypes have been lacking. We present an approach for tracking combinatorial engineered libraries (TRACE) through the simultaneous mapping of millions of combinatorially engineered genomes at single-cell resolution. Distal genomic sites are assembled into individual DNA constructs that are compatible with next-generation sequencing strategies. We used TRACE to map growth selection dynamics for Escherichia coli combinatorial libraries created by recursive multiplex recombineering at a depth 10(4)-fold greater than before. TRACE was used to identify genotype-to-phenotype correlations and to map the evolutionary trajectory of two individual combinatorial mutants in E. coli. Combinatorial mutations in the human ES2 ovarian carcinoma cell line were also assessed with TRACE. TRACE completes the combinatorial engineering cycle and enables more sophisticated approaches to genome engineering in both bacteria and eukaryotic cells than are currently possible. PMID:25798935

  17. Assaying Blood Cell Populations of the Drosophila melanogaster Larva

    PubMed Central

    Petraki, Sophia; Alexander, Brandy; Brückner, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, hematopoiesis is regulated by inductive microenvironments (niches). Likewise, in the invertebrate model organism Drosophila melanogaster, inductive microenvironments known as larval Hematopoietic Pockets (HPs) have been identified as anatomical sites for the development and regulation of blood cells (hemocytes), in particular of the self-renewing macrophage lineage. HPs are segmentally repeated pockets between the epidermis and muscle layers of the larva, which also comprise sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. In the larva, resident (sessile) hemocytes are exposed to anti-apoptotic, adhesive and proliferative cues from these sensory neurons and potentially other components of the HPs, such as the lining muscle and epithelial layers. During normal development, gradual release of resident hemocytes from the HPs fuels the population of circulating hemocytes, which culminates in the release of most of the resident hemocytes at the beginning of metamorphosis. Immune assaults, physical injury or mechanical disturbance trigger the premature release of resident hemocytes into circulation. The switch of larval hemocytes between resident locations and circulation raises the need for a common standard/procedure to selectively isolate and quantify these two populations of blood cells from single Drosophila larvae. Accordingly, this protocol describes an automated method to release and quantify the resident and circulating hemocytes from single larvae. The method facilitates ex vivo approaches, and may be adapted to serve a variety of developmental stages of Drosophila and other invertebrate organisms. PMID:26650404

  18. Sickle cell disease in tribal populations in India

    PubMed Central

    Colah, Roshan B.; Mukherjee, Malay B.; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-01-01

    The sickle gene is widespread among many tribal population groups in India with prevalence of heterozygotes varying from 1-40 per cent. Co-inheritance of the sickle gene with β-thalassaemia, HbD Punjab and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has also been reported. Most of the screening programmes in India now use high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis although the solubility test is also sensitive and cheap. Sickle cell disease (SCD) among tribal populations is generally milder than among non-tribal groups with fewer episodes of painful crises, infections, acute chest syndrome and need for hospitalization. This has partly been attributed to the very high prevalence of α-thalassaemia among these tribes as well as higher foetal haemoglobin levels. However, the clinical presentation is variable with many cases having a severe presentation. There is not much information available on maternal and perinatal outcome in tribal women with sickle cell disease. Newborn screening programmes for SCD have recently been initiated in Maharashtra, Gujarat, Odisha and Chattisgarh and monitoring these birth cohorts will help to understand the natural history of SCD in India. Prenatal diagnosis is acceptable by tribal families in India. The Indian Council of Medical Research and the National Rural Health Mission in different States are undertaking outreach programmes for better management and control of the disease. PMID:26139766

  19. Regional differences in stem cell/progenitor cell populations from the mouse achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Mienaltowski, Michael J; Adams, Sheila M; Birk, David E

    2013-01-01

    Specific niches may affect how cells from different regions contribute to tendon biology, particularly in regard to the healing of certain tendinopathies. The objectives of this study are to determine whether distinct subpopulations of stem/progenitor cells are found within the tendon proper and the epi- and paratenon, the peritenon, as well as to characterize these stem/progenitor cell populations. In this study, we hypothesized that tendon stem/progenitor cells exist in each region, that these populations possess distinct features, and that these populations while multipotent could have differing potentials. To test this hypothesis, stem/progenitor cells were isolated and characterized from the peritenon and tendon proper of mouse Achilles tendons. Colony-forming unit and multipotency assays, as well as flow cytometry, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of stem cell markers were performed. Significantly, more stem/progenitor cell colonies were observed from cells derived from the tendon proper relative to the peritenon. Analysis of surface markers for stem/progenitor cells from both regions indicated that they were Sca1(+) (stem cell marker), Cd90(+) and Cd44(+) (fibroblast markers), Cd18(-) (leukocyte marker), Cd34(-) (hematopoietic and vascular marker), and Cd133(-) (perivascular marker). Tendon proper stem/progenitor cells had increased expression levels for tenomodulin (Tnmd) and scleraxis (Scx), indicative of enrichment of stem/progenitor cells of a tendon origin. In contrast, cells of the peritenon demonstrated relative increases in the vascular (endomucin) and pericyte (Cd133) markers relative to cells from the tendon proper. Stem/progenitor cells from both regions were multipotent (adipogenic, chondrogenic, osteogenic, and tenogenic). These findings demonstrated that different progenitor populations exist within discrete niches of the Achilles tendon-tendon proper versus peritenon. Overall, these data support the hypothesis that

  20. Autophagy variation within a cell population determines cell fate through selective degradation of Fap-1.

    PubMed

    Gump, Jacob M; Staskiewicz, Leah; Morgan, Michael J; Bamberg, Alison; Riches, David W H; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy regulates cell death both positively and negatively, but the molecular basis for this paradox remains inadequately characterized. We demonstrate here that transient cell-to-cell variations in autophagy can promote either cell death or survival depending on the stimulus and cell type. By separating cells with high and low basal autophagy using flow cytometry, we demonstrate that autophagy determines which cells live or die in response to death receptor activation. We have determined that selective autophagic degradation of the phosphatase Fap-1 promotes Fas apoptosis in Type I cells, which do not require mitochondrial permeabilization for efficient apoptosis. Conversely, autophagy inhibits apoptosis in Type II cells (which require mitochondrial involvement) or on treatment with TRAIL in either Type I or II cells. These data illustrate that differences in autophagy in a cell population determine cell fate in a stimulus- and cell-type-specific manner. This example of selective autophagy of an apoptosis regulator may represent a general mechanism for context-specific regulation of cell fate by autophagy. PMID:24316673

  1. Side population in hepatocellular carcinoma HCCLM3 cells is enriched with stem-like cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    GUO, ZHE; JIANG, JING-HANG; ZHANG, JUN; YANG, HAO-JIE; ZHONG, YAN-PING; SU, JIE; YANG, RI-RONG; LI, LE-QUN; XIANG, BANG-DE

    2016-01-01

    Substantial evidence implicates that low-abundance cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor metastasis and recurrence in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Side population (SP) cells possess typical CSCs-like features, and are frequently considered as a special subpopulation in which CSCs are enriched and in studies may be considered as a substitute for CSCs. The aim of the present study was to examine the abundance of SP cells in human HCC cell lines with different metastatic potentials and compare their CSC-like, tumorigenic and invasive properties with those of the main population (MP) cells. An experimental system is described for identifying SP cells and analyzing their CSC-like properties. The relative abundance of SP cells correlated directly with the metastatic potential of the HCC cell line: HCCLM3, 16.3±2.2%; MHCC97-H, 8.4±0.7%; MHCC97-L, 4.7±0.5%; and Huh7, 1.0±0.3% (P<0.05). SP cells isolated from HCCLM3 cultures showed significantly higher proliferation rates and clonogenicity than the corresponding MP cells, in addition to higher migration and invasive abilities in vitro and greater tumorigenicity in mice. Expression levels of all CSC-associated genes tested, except EpCAM and Oct4, were significantly higher in SP cells. The findings revealed that the proportion of SP cells correlates with metastatic potential, and SP cells demonstrated the characteristics expected of CSCs, implicating them in HCC metastasis. Further studies on the identification and characterization of SP cells using clinical HCC specimens will contribute to the understanding of how SP cells are involved in these disease processes. PMID:27123080

  2. Dielectrophoretic capture of low abundance cell population using thick electrodes.

    PubMed

    Marchalot, Julien; Chateaux, Jean-François; Faivre, Magalie; Mertani, Hichem C; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2015-09-01

    Enrichment of rare cell populations such as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) is a critical step before performing analysis. This paper presents a polymeric microfluidic device with integrated thick Carbon-PolyDimethylSiloxane composite (C-PDMS) electrodes designed to carry out dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of low abundance biological cells. Such conductive composite material presents advantages over metallic structures. Indeed, as it combines properties of both the matrix and doping particles, C-PDMS allows the easy and fast integration of conductive microstructures using a soft-lithography approach while preserving O2 plasma bonding properties of PDMS substrate and avoiding a cumbersome alignment procedure. Here, we first performed numerical simulations to demonstrate the advantage of such thick C-PDMS electrodes over a coplanar electrode configuration. It is well established that dielectrophoretic force ([Formula: see text]) decreases quickly as the distance from the electrode surface increases resulting in coplanar configuration to a low trapping efficiency at high flow rate. Here, we showed quantitatively that by using electrodes as thick as a microchannel height, it is possible to extend the DEP force influence in the whole volume of the channel compared to coplanar electrode configuration and maintaining high trapping efficiency while increasing the throughput. This model was then used to numerically optimize a thick C-PDMS electrode configuration in terms of trapping efficiency. Then, optimized microfluidic configurations were fabricated and tested at various flow rates for the trapping of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We reached trapping efficiencies of 97% at 20 μl/h and 78.7% at 80 μl/h, for 100 μm thick electrodes. Finally, we applied our device to the separation and localized trapping of CTCs (MDA-MB-231) from a red blood cells sample (concentration ratio of 1:10). PMID:26392836

  3. Sickle cell disease in the Kurdish population of northern Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Allawi, Nasir A S; Jalal, Sana D; Nerwey, Farida F; Al-Sayan, Galawezh O O; Al-Zebari, Sahima S M; Alshingaly, Awny A; Markous, Raji D; Jubrael, Jaladet M S; Hamamy, Hanan

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that sickle cell disease patients are clustered in two geographical areas in Iraq, one among the Arabs in the extreme south, another among the Kurdish population in the extreme north, where they constitute major health problems. However, no studies have focused on the genotypes responsible for sickle cell disease or the β-globin gene haplotypes associated with it. For the latter purpose, a total of 103 unrelated Kurdish sickle cell disease patients were evaluated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for the sickle cell mutation, followed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse hybridization for β- and α-thalassemia (β- and α-thal) mutations, whenever indicated. Results showed that the most common genotype was sickle cell anemia (68.0%) followed by Hb S/β(0)-thal and Hb S/β(+)-thal at frequencies of 24.2 and 7.8%, respectively. Eight β-thal mutations were associated with the latter two genotypes including: IVS-II-1 (G>A), IVS-I-110 (G>A), codon 8 (-AA), codon 44 (-C), codon 22 (-7 bp), IVS-I-1 (G>A), codon 30 (G>C) and IVS-I-6 (T>C). In Hb SS patients, the -α(3.7) deletion was documented in 10.0% and was the only α-thal mutation detected. Furthermore, 5' β-globin gene cluster haplotyping of 128 β(S) chromosomes revealed that the most common haplotype seen in 69.5% was the Benin haplotype, followed by the Arab-Indian haplotype in 12.5%. These latter findings closely resemble reports from neighboring Turkey, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Mediterranean countries, suggesting a possible common origin, but are in contrast to findings from the Eastern Arabian Peninsula and Iran. PMID:22686351

  4. Multiple hypothalamic cell populations encoding distinct visual information

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Timothy M; Wynne, Jonathan; Piggins, Hugh D; Lucas, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    the periventricular hypothalamus and ventral thalamus were excited or inhibited solely according to the activity of melanopsin. These cells appeared to convey a filtered version of the visual signal, suitable for modulating physiology/behaviour purely according to environmental irradiance. In summary, these findings reveal unexpectedly widespread hypothalamic cell populations encoding distinct qualities of visual information. PMID:21224225

  5. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo; Yoo, Young-Do; Park, Won-Bong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. {yields} The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. {yields} The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. {yields} P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. {yields} Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC{sup -/-} cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC{sup -/-} clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  6. Immunophenotyping of immune cell populations in the raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Franziska; Jungwirth, Nicole; Carlson, Regina; Tipold, Andrea; Böer, Michael; Scheibe, Thomas; Molnár, Viktor; von Dörnberg, Katja; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Puff, Christina; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2015-12-15

    The raccoon (Procyon lotor) is a highly adaptable carnivore that has rapidly conquered Europe over the last decades and represents a potential candidate as pathogen reservoir, bearing the risk for transmission of infectious agents, as zoonosis or spill-over, to other wild life and domestic animals and man. Comprehensive investigations of infectious diseases in raccoons require a detailed knowledge of the participating immune cell populations. To close this gap of knowledge, various antibodies were tested for cross-reactivity with leukocytes in lymphoid organs and peripheral blood of raccoons using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, respectively. Eight out of 16 antibodies, directed against CD3, CD79α, Pax-5, IgG, CD44, MHC class II, myeloid/histiocyte antigen (MAC387), and Iba-1 exhibited a specific immunoreaction with cells in distinct anatomical compartments in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymphoid tissues. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that 7 out of 18 antibodies directed against CD11c, CD14, CD21, CD44, CD79α, MHC class I and II cross-reacted with peripheral blood-derived raccoon leukocytes. Summarized, the usefulness of several cross-reacting antibodies was determined for the characterization of raccoon immune cells in immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, offering the opportunity to study the raccoon immune system under normal and diseased conditions. PMID:26672912

  7. Three-dimensional patterning of multiple cell populations through orthogonal genetic control of cell motility

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Joanna L.; Sood, Anshum

    2013-01-01

    The ability to independently assemble multiple cell types within a three-dimensional matrix would be a powerful enabling tool for modeling and engineering complex tissues. Here we introduce a strategy to dynamically pattern distinct subpopulations of cells through genetic regulation of cell motility. We first describe glioma cell lines that were genetically engineered to stably express constitutively active or dominant negative Rac1 GTPase mutants under the control of either a doxycycline-inducible or cumate-inducible promoter. We culture each population as multicellular spheroids and show that by adding or withdrawing the appropriate inducer at specific times, we can control the timing and extent of Rac1-dependent cell migration into three-dimensional collagen matrices. We then report results with mixed spheroids in which one subpopulation of cells expresses dominant negative Rac1 under a doxycycline-inducible promoter and the other expresses dominant negative Rac1 under a cumate-inducible promoter. Using this system, we demonstrate that doxycycline and cumate addition suppress Rac1-dependent motility in a subpopulation-specific and temporally-controlled manner. This allows us to orthogonally control the motility of each subpopulation and spatially assemble the cells into radially symmetric three-dimensional patterns through the synchronized addition and removal of doxycycline and cumate. This synthetic biology-inspired strategy offers a novel means of spatially organizing multiple cell populations in conventional matrix scaffolds and complements the emerging suite of technologies that seek to pattern cells by engineering extracellular matrix properties. PMID:24622945

  8. The side population of ovarian cancer cells defines a heterogeneous compartment exhibiting stem cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G; Reimer, Daniel; Schmidt, Stefan; Gastl, Guenther; Parson, Walther; Spoeck, Franziska; Hatina, Jiri; Wolf, Dominik; Sopper, Sieghart

    2014-08-30

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to be involved in tumor evasion of classical antitumor therapies and have thus become an attractive target for further improvement of anticancer strategies. However, the existence and identity of CSC are still a matter of controversy. In a systematic screen of 13 ovarian cancer cell lines we show that cells with stem cell properties are reliably detectable as a minor population, characterized by ABC transporter expression resulting in the side population (SP) phenotype. In different cell lines, either ABCG2 or ABCB1 was found to be responsible for this effect. Purified SP cells featured virtually all characteristics of bona fide CSC, including clonogenicity, asymmetric division and high tumorigenicity in vivo. Using in-depth phenotyping by multicolor flow cytometry, we found that among the investigated ovarian cancer cell lines the SP compartment exhibits tremendous heterogeneity and is composed of multiple phenotypically distinct subpopulations. Thus, our study confirms previous results showing that CSC are contained within the SP. However, the exact identity of the CSC is still disguised by the high complexity of the CSC-containing compartment. Further functional studies are needed to determine whether a single cellular subset can unambiguously be defined as CSC or whether multiple stem cell-like cells with different properties coexist. Moreover, the observed heterogeneity may reflect a high level of plasticity and likely influences tumor progression, escape from immune-surveillance and development of resistance to anticancer therapies and should therefore be considered in the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:25216521

  9. Toward Synthetic Spatial Patterns in Engineered Cell Populations with Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Solé, Ricard V

    2016-07-15

    A major force shaping form and patterns in biology is based in the presence of amplification mechanisms able to generate ordered, large-scale spatial structures out of local interactions and random initial conditions. Turing patterns are one of the best known candidates for such ordering dynamics, and their existence has been proven in both chemical and physical systems. Their relevance in biology, although strongly supported by indirect evidence, is still under discussion. Extensive modeling approaches have stemmed from Turing's pioneering ideas, but further confirmation from experimental biology is required. An alternative possibility is to engineer cells so that self-organized patterns emerge from local communication. Here we propose a potential synthetic design based on the interaction between population density and a diffusing signal, including also directed motion in the form of chemotaxis. The feasibility of engineering such a system and its implications for developmental biology are also assessed. PMID:27009520

  10. Two populations of Thy1-positive mesenchymal cells regulate in vitro maturation of hepatic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Naoko; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Fujii, Hideaki; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Machimoto, Takafumi; Ishii, Takamichi; Fujita, Naoya; Tsuruo, Takashi; Yamashita, Jun K; Kubo, Hajime; Ikai, Iwao

    2007-02-01

    We previously reported that the in vitro maturation of CD49f(+)Thy1(-)CD45(-) (CD49f positive) fetal hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) is supported by Thy1-positive mesenchymal cells derived from the fetal liver. These mesenchymal cell preparations contain two populations, one of a cuboidal shape and the other spindle shaped in morphology. In this study, we determined that the mucin-type transmembrane glycoprotein gp38 could distinguish cuboidal cells from spindle cells by immunocytochemistry. RT-PCR analysis revealed differences between isolated CD49f(+/-)Thy1(+)gp38(+)CD45(-) (gp38 positive) cells and CD49f(+/-)Thy1(+)gp38(-)CD45(-) (gp38 negative) cells, whereas both cells expressed mesenchymal cell markers. The coculture with gp38-positive cells promoted the maturation of CD49f-positive HPCs, which was estimated by positivity for periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining, whereas the coculture with gp38-negative cells maintained CD49f-positive HPCs negative for PAS staining. The expression of mature hepatocyte markers, such as tyrosine aminotransferase, tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase, and glucose-6-phosphatase, were upregulated on HPCs by coculture with gp38-positive cells. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy revealed the acquisition of mature hepatocyte features by HPCs cocultured with gp38-positive cells. This effect on maturation of HPCs was inhibited by the addition of conditioned medium derived from gp38-negative cells. By contrast, the upregulation of bromodeoxyuridine incorporation by HPCs demonstrated the proliferative effect of coculture with gp38-negative cells. In conclusion, these results suggest that in vitro maturation of HPCs promoted by gp38-positive cells may be opposed by an inhibitory effect of gp38-negative cells, which likely maintain the immature, proliferative state of HPCs. PMID:16990447

  11. Preface of the "Symposium on Mathematical Models and Methods to investigate Heterogeneity in Cell and Cell Population Biology"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clairambault, Jean

    2016-06-01

    This session investigates hot topics related to mathematical representations of cell and cell population dynamics in biology and medicine, in particular, but not only, with applications to cancer. Methods in mathematical modelling and analysis, and in statistical inference using single-cell and cell population data, should contribute to focus this session on heterogeneity in cell populations. Among other methods are proposed: a) Intracellular protein dynamics and gene regulatory networks using ordinary/partial/delay differential equations (ODEs, PDEs, DDEs); b) Representation of cell population dynamics using agent-based models (ABMs) and/or PDEs; c) Hybrid models and multiscale models to integrate single-cell dynamics into cell population behaviour; d) Structured cell population dynamics and asymptotic evolution w.r.t. relevant traits; e) Heterogeneity in cancer cell populations: origin, evolution, phylogeny and methods of reconstruction; f) Drug resistance as an evolutionary phenotype: predicting and overcoming it in therapeutics; g) Theoretical therapeutic optimisation of combined drug treatments in cancer cell populations and in populations of other organisms, such as bacteria.

  12. Enhanced gain and narrow linewidth of an optical cavity by the Doppler effect in a four-level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Zhang, Huiyun; Li, Peng; Jiang, Lin; Zhang, Luyin

    2013-07-01

    A scheme for high gain and narrow linewidth of an optical cavity with a four-level atomic system is proposed by the Doppler effect via active Raman gain (ARG) process. Atomic motion leads to Doppler frequency shift which induces constructive interference for the linear susceptibility. The enhanced normal dispersion greatly narrows the cavity linewidth, and the amplified gain gives rise to a high cavity transmission. Simulation results show that the cavity linewidth based on ARG is about one order of magnitude narrower than that based on electromagnetically-induced transparency under the same conditions, and the cavity transmission intensity could be enhanced by nearly 30 times.

  13. Influence of Fano interference and incoherent processes on optical bistability in a four-level quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyyed, Hossein Asadpour; G, Solookinejad; M, Panahi; E Ahmadi, Sangachin

    2016-03-01

    Role of Fano interference and incoherent pumping field on optical bistability in a four-level designed InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure embedded in a unidirectional ring cavity are analyzed. It is found that intensity threshold of optical bistability can be manipulated by Fano interference. It is shown that incoherent pumping fields make the threshold of optical bistability behave differently by Fano interference. Moreover, in the presence of Fano interference the medium becomes phase-dependent. Therefore, the relative phase of applied fields can affect the behaviors of optical bistability and intensity threshold can be controlled easily.

  14. High-precision three-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the three-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of atom localization can be significantly improved due to the interference effects induced by the vacuum radiation field and the two laser fields. More importantly, the almost 100% probability of finding an atom within a certain range can be reached when corresponding conditions are satisfied. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in a spatially selective single-qubit phase gate, entangling gates, and quantum error correction for quantum information processing.

  15. Tunable phase control of slow and fast light propagation in a slab doped by four-level quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, Hossein; Sangachin, Elnaz Ahmadi; Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein

    2015-12-01

    Tunable phase control of the slow and fast light propagation through a defect slab medium doped by four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot structure is demonstrated. By solving the Schrödinger and Poisson’s equations self-consistently, a spherical InGaN quantum dot with GaN barrier shell which can interact by terahertz (THz) signal field is designed numerically. It is found that the phase variation of THz signal field imparts the tunability in the group velocity of the transmitted and reflected pulses through a dielectric slab.

  16. Switching from subluminal to superluminal light propagation via a coherent pump field in a four-level atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang Shangqi; Wan Rengang; Kou Jun; Jiang Yun; Gao Jinyue

    2009-12-15

    We theoretically investigate the influence of a coherent pump field on the propagation of a weak light pulse of a probe field in a four-level atomic system. Due to the modulation of the pump field, the light pulse can be manipulated from subluminal to superluminal with negligible distortion. This scheme can be realized in both the ultracold and Doppler-broadened atomic systems. We also demonstrate that the spectral linewidth with an anomalous dispersion is reduced by thermal averaging; therefore, one can obtain a larger negative group refractive index in room-temperature vapor than the largest value achieved in ultracold atomic gas.

  17. Phase-dependent high refractive index without absorption in a four-level inverted-Y atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Qiang Zeng; Fu-Ti Liu; Yu-Ping Wang; Zeng-Hui Gao

    2015-01-31

    We consider a closed four-level inverted-Y system in the presence and the absence of a microwave field. It is found that due to the quantum coherence between the two lower levels, either induced by the spontaneous decay or by the microwave field, the refraction – absorption properties of the system can be modulated by controlling the relative phase of the applied fields in both driven ways. In particular, by properly setting the values of the relative phase, the desirable high index of refraction without absorption can be achieved. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  18. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  19. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  20. Cell population kinetic parameters for acute epidermal reactions in man

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, L.

    1986-11-01

    Cell population kinetic parameters for acute reactions in squamous epithelium were estimated using available data on skin tolerance doses. Roughly equivalent doses for kilovoltage radiation delivered in equal daily fractions, as reported by F. Ellis (Br. J. Radiol. 15, 348-350 (1942)) and by R. Paterson (The Treatment of Malignant Disease by Radium and X-Rays. Edward Arnold, London, 1948), were combined with data for nonstandard fractionation at longer intervals of 1 or 2 weeks. By analyzing the combined data set, well-determined parameters could be derived. The data show that repopulation, with a potential cell doubling time of about 7 days, must occur in irradiated human skin, though this may possibly be limited to no more than seven doublings. The parameters derived are distinctly different from those associated with late-reacting dose-limiting tissues. The main difference is the steeper initial slope of the computed survival curve, that is a larger J parameter (multitarget model) or a larger alpha component (linear-quadratic model).

  1. Combined Single-Cell Functional and Gene Expression Analysis Resolves Heterogeneity within Stem Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nicola K.; Kent, David G.; Buettner, Florian; Shehata, Mona; Macaulay, Iain C.; Calero-Nieto, Fernando J.; Sánchez Castillo, Manuel; Oedekoven, Caroline A.; Diamanti, Evangelia; Schulte, Reiner; Ponting, Chris P.; Voet, Thierry; Caldas, Carlos; Stingl, John; Green, Anthony R.; Theis, Fabian J.; Göttgens, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Summary Heterogeneity within the self-renewal durability of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) challenges our understanding of the molecular framework underlying HSC function. Gene expression studies have been hampered by the presence of multiple HSC subtypes and contaminating non-HSCs in bulk HSC populations. To gain deeper insight into the gene expression program of murine HSCs, we combined single-cell functional assays with flow cytometric index sorting and single-cell gene expression assays. Through bioinformatic integration of these datasets, we designed an unbiased sorting strategy that separates non-HSCs away from HSCs, and single-cell transplantation experiments using the enriched population were combined with RNA-seq data to identify key molecules that associate with long-term durable self-renewal, producing a single-cell molecular dataset that is linked to functional stem cell activity. Finally, we demonstrated the broader applicability of this approach for linking key molecules with defined cellular functions in another stem cell system. PMID:26004780

  2. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Pat; Landahl, John

    This pamphlet has been prepared in response to a new problem, a rapidly increasing population, and a new need, population education. It is designed to help teachers provide their students with some basic population concepts with stress placed on the elements of decision making. In the first section of the pamphlet, some of the basic concepts of…

  3. Androgen receptor expands the population of cancer stem cells in upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chi-Cheng; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Huang, Chi-Ping; Yu, Ai-Lin; Chang, Wen-Lin; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) affects the development and progression of upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma (UUTUC). However, the regulatory mechanism exerted by AR to affect UUTUC cells remains unclear. Here we investigated whether AR promotes UUTUC development and progression, possibly by expanding the population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are a particular population of cells within cancer cells responsible for tumor initiation, drug resistance and metastasis. We compared UUTUC cells with or without the addition of AR on their CSC population with flow cytometry, colony formation and sphere formation assay to determine the effect of AR on CSC activity, and real-time PCR was used to detect the expression stemness genes and miRNAs. In vivo tumor formation was evaluated with the implantation of cancer cells in nude mice. We found that the addition of AR in UUTUC cells, significantly increased the population of CSC, clonogenicity, sphere formation and the expression of stemness genes (Oct4, Bmi1 and Nanog), altered CSC-related miRNA profile, as well as promoted epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). And AR inhibitor, enzalutamide was shown to suppress AR’s effect on tumorsphere formation. Furthermore, in an immune-deficient mouse model, the addition of AR in UUTUC cells also increased the tumor formation capacity. This study will help us better understand the extent to which AR contributes to UUTUC progression by expanding their CSC population and capacity. Our findings could explain high incidence of UUTUC observed in males. And targeting AR may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for genetically diversified urothelial carcinomas in precision medicine era. PMID:27186399

  4. Prospects for a four-level super-radiant laser with ultra-narrow linewidth at 1469 nm based on cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanfei; Dai, Caihong; Wu, Zhifeng; Li, Xiangzhao

    2013-12-01

    We propose a four-level superradiant laser system based on Cs at 1469 nm corresponding to the transition of 7S1/2 and 6P3/2 with a 459.3 nm pumping laser. With density matrix method, we calculate the relative population probabilities at each level theoretically. In a steady state, when the Rabi frequency is set to 3.5 MHz, 5.1% atoms are at 7S1/2 level while 1.9% at 6P3/2 level, which leads to the population inversion between the two levels. We design the experiment setup for the superradiant laser. In the steady state, the average photon number in the cavity is 1.1 × 106. According to the further calculation, the power of output superradiant laser is 0.17 mW and the laser linewidth is 17 Hz. This calculation method can also be used in the area of optical metrology.

  5. A Millifluidic Study of Cell-to-Cell Heterogeneity in Growth-Rate and Cell-Division Capability in Populations of Isogenic Cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Damodaran, Shima P.; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes. PMID:25760649

  6. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes. PMID:25760649

  7. Phenotype overlap in glial cell populations: astroglia, oligodendroglia and NG-2(+) cells

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Badrah; Fern, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which NG-2(+) cells form a distinct population separate from astrocytes is central to understanding whether this important cell class is wholly an oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) or has additional functions akin to those classically ascribed to astrocytes. Early immuno-staining studies indicate that NG-2(+) cells do not express the astrocyte marker GFAP, but orthogonal reconstructions of double-labeled confocal image stacks here reveal a significant degree of co-expression in individual cells within post-natal day 10 (P10) and adult rat optic nerve (RON) and rat cortex. Extensive scanning of various antibody/fixation/embedding approaches identified a protocol for selective post-embedded immuno-gold labeling. This first ultrastructural characterization of identified NG-2(+) cells revealed populations of both OPCs and astrocytes in P10 RON. NG-2(+) astrocytes had classic features including the presence of glial filaments but low levels of glial filament expression were also found in OPCs and myelinating oligodendrocytes. P0 RONs contained few OPCs but positively identified astrocytes were observed to ensheath pre-myelinated axons in a fashion previously described as a definitive marker of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Astrocyte ensheathment was also apparent in P10 RONs, was absent from developing nodes of Ranvier and was never associated with compact myelin. Astrocyte processes were also shown to encapsulate some oligodendrocyte somata. The data indicate that common criteria for delineating astrocytes and oligodendroglia are insufficiently robust and that astrocyte features ascribed to OPCs may arise from misidentification. PMID:26106302

  8. Single Cell Analysis of Complex Thymus Stromal Cell Populations: Rapid Thymic Epithelia Preparation Characterizes Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kirsten M.; Mella, Heather; Lucas, Philip J.; Williams, Joy A.; Telford, William; Gress, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and dendritic cells are essential for the maintenance of thymopoiesis. Because these stromal elements define the progenitor niche, provide critical survival signals and growth factors, and direct positive and negative selection, detailed study of these populations is necessary to understand important elements for thymic renewal after cytotoxic injury. Study of TEC is currently hindered by lengthy enzymatic separation techniques with decreased viability. We present a new rapid separation technique that yields consistent viable TEC numbers in a quarter of the prior preparation time. Using this new procedure, we identify changes in stroma populations following total body irradiation (TBI). By flow cytometry, we show that TBI significantly depletes UEA+ medullary TEC, while sparing Ly51+ CD45− cells. Further characterization of the Ly51+ subset reveals enrichment of fibroblasts (CD45− Ly51+ MHCII−), while cortical TECs (CD45− Ly51+ MHCII+) were markedly reduced. Dendritic cells (CD11lc+ CD45+) were also decreased following TBI. These data suggest that cytotoxic preparative regimens may impair thymic renewal by reducing critical populations of cortical and medullary TEC, and that such thymic damage can be assessed by this new rapid separation technique, thereby providing a means of assessing optimal conditioning pretransplantfor enhancing thymic-dependent immune reconstitution posttranspiant. PMID:19750208

  9. Isolation of adult human pluripotent stem cells from mesenchymal cell populations and their application to liver damages.

    PubMed

    Wakao, Shohei; Kitada, Masaaki; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Dezawa, Mari

    2012-01-01

    We have found a novel type of pluripotent stem cells, Multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse) cells that can be isolated from mesenchymal cell populations. Muse cells are characterized by stress tolerance, expression of pluripotency markers, self-renewal, and the ability to differentiate into endodermal-, mesodermal-, and ectodermal-lineage cells from a single cell, demonstrating that they are pluripotent stem cells. They can be isolated as cells positive for stage-specific embryonic antigen-3, a human pluripotent stem cell marker. Here, we introduce the isolation method for Muse cells and the effect of transplantation of these cells on chronic liver diseases. PMID:22167642

  10. Cell populations can use aneuploidy to survive telomerase insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Caroline; Ausiannikava, Darya; Le Bihan, Thierry; Granneman, Sander; Makovets, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase maintains ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, telomeres. Telomerase loss results in replicative senescence and a switch to recombination-dependent telomere maintenance. Telomerase insufficiency in humans leads to telomere syndromes associated with premature ageing and cancer predisposition. Here we use yeast to show that the survival of telomerase insufficiency differs from the survival of telomerase loss and occurs through aneuploidy. In yeast grown at elevated temperatures, telomerase activity becomes limiting: haploid cell populations senesce and generate aneuploid survivors—near diploids monosomic for chromosome VIII. This aneuploidy results in increased levels of the telomerase components TLC1, Est1 and Est3, and is accompanied by decreased abundance of ribosomal proteins. We propose that aneuploidy suppresses telomerase insufficiency through redistribution of cellular resources away from ribosome synthesis towards production of telomerase components and other non-ribosomal proteins. The aneuploidy-induced re-balance of the proteome via modulation of ribosome biogenesis may be a general adaptive response to overcome functional insufficiencies. PMID:26489519

  11. Development of a novel cell sorting method that samples population diversity in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Geoffrey W; Andersen, Stacey B; Battye, Francis L

    2015-11-01

    Flow cytometry based electrostatic cell sorting is an important tool in the separation of cell populations. Existing instruments can sort single cells into multi-well collection plates, and keep track of cell of origin and sorted well location. However currently single sorted cell results reflect the population distribution and fail to capture the population diversity. Software was designed that implements a novel sorting approach, "Slice and Dice Sorting," that links a graphical representation of a multi-well plate to logic that ensures that single cells are sampled and sorted from all areas defined by the sort region/s. Therefore the diversity of the total population is captured, and the more frequently occurring or rarer cell types are all sampled. The sorting approach was tested computationally, and using functional cell based assays. Computationally we demonstrate that conventional single cell sorting can sample as little as 50% of the population diversity dependant on the population distribution, and that Slice and Dice sorting samples much more of the variety present within a cell population. We then show by sorting single cells into wells using the Slice and Dice sorting method that there are cells sorted using this method that would be either rarely sorted, or not sorted at all using conventional single cell sorting approaches. The present study demonstrates a novel single cell sorting method that samples much more of the population diversity than current methods. It has implications in clonal selection, stem cell sorting, single cell sequencing and any areas where population heterogeneity is of importance. PMID:25944021

  12. Characterization of rabbit limbal epithelial side population cells using RNA sequencing and single-cell qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Kameishi, Sumako; Umemoto, Terumasa; Matsuzaki, Yu; Fujita, Masako; Okano, Teruo; Kato, Takashi; Yamato, Masayuki

    2016-05-01

    Corneal epithelial stem cells reside in the limbus, a transitional zone between the cornea and conjunctiva, and are essential for maintaining homeostasis in the corneal epithelium. Although our previous studies demonstrated that rabbit limbal epithelial side population (SP) cells exhibit stem cell-like phenotypes with Hoechst 33342 staining, the different characteristics and/or populations of these cells remain unclear. Therefore, in this study, we determined the gene expression profiles of limbal epithelial SP cells by RNA sequencing using not only present public databases but also contigs that were created by de novo transcriptome assembly as references for mapping. Our transcriptome data indicated that limbal epithelial SP cells exhibited a stem cell-like phenotype compared with non-SP cells. Importantly, gene ontology analysis following RNA sequencing demonstrated that limbal epithelial SP cells exhibited significantly enhanced expression of mesenchymal/endothelial cell markers rather than epithelial cell markers. Furthermore, single-cell quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that the limbal epithelial SP population consisted of at least two immature cell populations with endothelial- or mesenchymal-like phenotypes. Therefore, our present results may propose the presence of a novel population of corneal epithelial stem cells distinct from conventional epithelial stem cells. PMID:26546824

  13. Implications of Epigenetic Variability within a Cell Population for “Cell Type” Classification

    PubMed Central

    Tabansky, Inna; Stern, Joel N. H.; Pfaff, Donald W.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we propose a new approach to defining nerve “cell types” in reaction to recent advances in single cell analysis. Among cells previously thought to be equivalent, considerable differences in global gene expression and biased tendencies among differing developmental fates have been demonstrated within multiple lineages. The model of classifying cells into distinct types thus has to be revised to account for this intrinsic variability. A “cell type” could be a group of cells that possess similar, but not necessarily identical properties, variable within a spectrum of epigenetic adjustments that permit its developmental path toward a specific function to be achieved. Thus, the definition of a cell type is becoming more similar to the definition of a species: sharing essential properties with other members of its group, but permitting a certain amount of deviation in aspects that do not seriously impact function. This approach accommodates, even embraces the spectrum of natural variation found in various cell populations and consequently avoids the fallacy of false equivalence. For example, developing neurons will react to their microenvironments with epigenetic changes resulting in slight changes in gene expression and morphology. Addressing the new questions implied here will have significant implications for developmental neurobiology. PMID:26733833

  14. Linear and nonlinear Faraday rotations of light polarization in a four-level active-Raman-gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengjie; Deng, L.; Hagley, E. W.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate linear and nonlinear Faraday effects in a room-temperature, coherently driven four-level active-Raman-gain (ARG) medium. By using the multiple-scale method, we derive two nonlinear coupled envelope equations governing the dynamics of left- and right-polarized components of a linearly polarized probe field. Under the weak probe field approximation, we demonstrate a factor of four increase of the Faraday rotation angle by the linear and nonlinear response of the ARG scheme without probe field loss. We further compare this ARG system with an M-type five-state electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) scheme and demonstrate the superiority of the ARG scheme over the conventional EIT scheme.

  15. Negative index of refraction in a four-level system with magnetoelectric cross coupling and local field corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, F.

    2011-07-15

    This research focuses on a coherently driven four-level atomic medium with the aim of inducing a negative index of refraction while taking into consideration local field corrections as well as magnetoelectric cross coupling (i.e.,chirality) within the material's response functions. Two control fields are used to render the medium transparent for a probe field which simultaneously couples to an electric and a magnetic dipole transition, thus allowing one to test the permittivity and permeability of the material at the same time. Numerical simulations show that a negative index of refraction with low absorption can be obtained for a range of probe detunings while depending on number density and the ratio between the intensities of the control fields.

  16. The cell-stretcher: A novel device for the mechanical stimulation of cell populations.

    PubMed

    Seriani, S; Del Favero, G; Mahaffey, J; Marko, D; Gallina, P; Long, C S; Mestroni, L; Sbaizero, O

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation appears to be a critical modulator for many aspects of biology, both of living tissue and cells. The cell-stretcher, a novel device for the mechanical uniaxial stimulation of populations of cells, is described. The system is based on a variable stroke cam-lever-tappet mechanism which allows the delivery of cyclic stimuli with frequencies of up to 10 Hz and deformation between 1% and 20%. The kinematics is presented and a simulation of the dynamics of the system is shown, in order to compute the contact forces in the mechanism. The cells, following cultivation and preparation, are plated on an ad hoc polydimethylsiloxane membrane which is then loaded on the clamps of the cell-stretcher via force-adjustable magnetic couplings. In order to show the viability of the experimentation and biocompatibility of the cell-stretcher, a set of two in vitro tests were performed. Human epithelial carcinoma cell line A431 and Adult Mouse Ventricular Fibroblasts (AMVFs) from a dual reporter mouse were subject to 0.5 Hz, 24 h cyclic stretching at 15% strain, and to 48 h stimulation at 0.5 Hz and 15% strain, respectively. Visual analysis was performed on A431, showing definite morphological changes in the form of cellular extroflections in the direction of stimulation compared to an unstimulated control. A cytometric analysis was performed on the AMVF population. Results show a post-stimulation live-dead ratio deviance of less than 6% compared to control, which proves that the environment created by the cell-stretcher is suitable for in vitro experimentation. PMID:27587132

  17. The cell-stretcher: A novel device for the mechanical stimulation of cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seriani, S.; Del Favero, G.; Mahaffey, J.; Marko, D.; Gallina, P.; Long, C. S.; Mestroni, L.; Sbaizero, O.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation appears to be a critical modulator for many aspects of biology, both of living tissue and cells. The cell-stretcher, a novel device for the mechanical uniaxial stimulation of populations of cells, is described. The system is based on a variable stroke cam-lever-tappet mechanism which allows the delivery of cyclic stimuli with frequencies of up to 10 Hz and deformation between 1% and 20%. The kinematics is presented and a simulation of the dynamics of the system is shown, in order to compute the contact forces in the mechanism. The cells, following cultivation and preparation, are plated on an ad hoc polydimethylsiloxane membrane which is then loaded on the clamps of the cell-stretcher via force-adjustable magnetic couplings. In order to show the viability of the experimentation and biocompatibility of the cell-stretcher, a set of two in vitro tests were performed. Human epithelial carcinoma cell line A431 and Adult Mouse Ventricular Fibroblasts (AMVFs) from a dual reporter mouse were subject to 0.5 Hz, 24 h cyclic stretching at 15% strain, and to 48 h stimulation at 0.5 Hz and 15% strain, respectively. Visual analysis was performed on A431, showing definite morphological changes in the form of cellular extroflections in the direction of stimulation compared to an unstimulated control. A cytometric analysis was performed on the AMVF population. Results show a post-stimulation live-dead ratio deviance of less than 6% compared to control, which proves that the environment created by the cell-stretcher is suitable for in vitro experimentation.

  18. Single cell analysis demonstrates how nutrient deprivation creates apoptotic and quiescent cell populations in tumor cylindroids

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung-jin; Forbes, Neil S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how quiescent and apoptotic populations form in tumors is necessary because these cell types can considerably diminish therapeutic efficacy. Most cancer therapeutics are ineffective against quiescent cells because they target rapidly proliferating cells. Distinguishing apoptosis is important because apoptotic cells are committed to death and do not require treatment. Regrowth of quiescent cell can lead to tumor reoccurrence and metastasis, which are the leading causes of cancer mortality. We hypothesized that cylindroid cultures and acridine orange staining could be used to determine how nutrient diffusion creates apoptotic and quiescent regions in tumors. To test this hypothesis we developed a microscopy technique to measure cellular DNA and RNA content in single cells using thin cylindroids and acridine orange staining. Cell classification was compared to flow cytometry of cells grown in defined monolayer cultures. The presence of apoptosis was confirmed by morphological nuclear analysis. The effect of diffusion was determined by varying incubation time, cylindroid size, and exposing cylindroids to nutrient-deficient media. Four overlapping regions were identified as a function of cylindroid radius: an outer viable/quiescent region; a second quiescent/apoptotic region; a third late-stage apoptotic region; and an inner dead region. In monolayer cultures the absence of glutamine and growth factors induced apoptosis and hypoxia induced quiescence. Treating with nutrient-deficient media suggested that cells became quiescent near the periphery because of glucose and oxygen limitations, and became apoptotic and died further from the edge because of glutamine and growth factor limitations. These results show that cellular microenvironments can be identified in cylindroids using simple acridine orange staining and that single cell florescence can be measured in three-dimensional culture. The developed techniques will be useful for developing cancer

  19. T cell receptor cross-reactivity between similar foreign and self peptides influences naive cell population size and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ryan W; Beisang, Daniel; Tubo, Noah J; Dileepan, Thamotharampillai; Wiesner, Darin L; Nielsen, Kirsten; Wüthrich, Marcel; Klein, Bruce S; Kotov, Dmitri I; Spanier, Justin A; Fife, Brian T; Moon, James J; Jenkins, Marc K

    2015-01-20

    T cell receptor (TCR) cross-reactivity between major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII)-binding self and foreign peptides could influence the naive CD4(+) T cell repertoire and autoimmunity. We found that nonamer peptides that bind to the same MHCII molecule only need to share five amino acids to cross-react on the same TCR. This property was biologically relevant because systemic expression of a self peptide reduced the size of a naive cell population specific for a related foreign peptide by deletion of cells with cross-reactive TCRs. Reciprocally, an incompletely deleted naive T cell population specific for a tissue-restricted self peptide could be triggered by related microbial peptides to cause autoimmunity. Thus, TCR cross-reactivity between similar self and foreign peptides can reduce the size of certain foreign peptide-specific T cell populations and might allow T cell populations specific for tissue-restricted self peptides to cause autoimmunity after infection. PMID:25601203

  20. Human Lymphoid Tissues Harbor a Distinct CD69+CXCR6+ NK Cell Population.

    PubMed

    Lugthart, Gertjan; Melsen, Janine E; Vervat, Carly; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, Monique M; Corver, Willem E; Roelen, Dave L; van Bergen, Jeroen; van Tol, Maarten J D; Lankester, Arjan C; Schilham, Marco W

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of human NK cells is based primarily on conventional CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from blood. However, most cellular immune interactions occur in lymphoid organs. Based on the coexpression of CD69 and CXCR6, we identified a third major NK cell subset in lymphoid tissues. This population represents 30-60% of NK cells in marrow, spleen, and lymph node but is absent from blood. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells have an intermediate expression of CD56 and high expression of NKp46 and ICAM-1. In contrast to circulating NK cells, they have a bimodal expression of the activating receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells do not express the early markers c-kit and IL-7Rα, nor killer cell Ig-like receptors or other late-differentiation markers. After cytokine stimulation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells produce IFN-γ at levels comparable to CD56(dim) NK cells. They constitutively express perforin but require preactivation to express granzyme B and exert cytotoxicity. After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells do not exhibit the hyperexpansion observed for both conventional NK cell populations. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells constitute a separate NK cell population with a distinct phenotype and function. The identification of this NK cell population in lymphoid tissues provides tools to further evaluate the cellular interactions and role of NK cells in human immunity. PMID:27226093

  1. Molecular analysis of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) subtypes reveals two distinct cell populations with different identities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The term endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is currently used to refer to cell populations which are quite dissimilar in terms of biological properties. This study provides a detailed molecular fingerprint for two EPC subtypes: early EPCs (eEPCs) and outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs). Methods Human blood-derived eEPCs and OECs were characterised by using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, 2D protein electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. Comparative analysis at the transcript and protein level included monocytes and mature endothelial cells as reference cell types. Results Our data show that eEPCs and OECs have strikingly different gene expression signatures. Many highly expressed transcripts in eEPCs are haematopoietic specific (RUNX1, WAS, LYN) with links to immunity and inflammation (TLRs, CD14, HLAs), whereas many transcripts involved in vascular development and angiogenesis-related signalling pathways (Tie2, eNOS, Ephrins) are highly expressed in OECs. Comparative analysis with monocytes and mature endothelial cells clusters eEPCs with monocytes, while OECs segment with endothelial cells. Similarly, proteomic analysis revealed that 90% of spots identified by 2-D gel analysis are common between OECs and endothelial cells while eEPCs share 77% with monocytes. In line with the expression pattern of caveolins and cadherins identified by microarray analysis, ultrastructural evaluation highlighted the presence of caveolae and adherens junctions only in OECs. Conclusions This study provides evidence that eEPCs are haematopoietic cells with a molecular phenotype linked to monocytes; whereas OECs exhibit commitment to the endothelial lineage. These findings indicate that OECs might be an attractive cell candidate for inducing therapeutic angiogenesis, while eEPC should be used with caution because of their monocytic nature. PMID:20465783

  2. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Populations; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The... public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations.'' The purpose... therapy clinical trials in pediatric populations, as well as challenges and considerations in the...

  3. IL-25 simultaneously elicits distinct populations of innate lymphoid cells and multipotent progenitor type 2 (MPPtype2) cells.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Steven A; Siracusa, Mark C; Monticelli, Laurel A; Ziegler, Carly G K; Kim, Brian S; Brestoff, Jonathan R; Peterson, Lance W; Wherry, E John; Goldrath, Ananda W; Bhandoola, Avinash; Artis, David

    2013-08-26

    The predominantly epithelial cell-derived cytokines IL-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) can promote CD4(+) Th2 cell-dependent immunity, inflammation, and tissue repair at barrier surfaces through the induction of multiple innate immune cell populations. IL-25 and IL-33 were previously shown to elicit four innate cell populations, named natural helper cells, nuocytes, innate type 2 helper cells, and multipotent progenitor type 2 (MPP(type2)) cells, now collectively termed group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2). In contrast to other types of ILC2, MPP(type2) cells exhibit multipotent potential and do not express T1/ST2 or IL-7Rα, suggesting that MPP(type2) cells may be a distinct population. Here, we show that IL-33 elicits robust ILC2 responses, whereas IL-25 predominantly promotes MPP(type2) cell responses at multiple tissue sites with limited effects on ILC2 responses. MPP(type2) cells were distinguished from ILC2 by their differential developmental requirements for specific transcription factors, distinct genome-wide transcriptional profile, and functional potential. Furthermore, IL-25-induced MPP(type2) cells promoted Th2 cytokine-associated inflammation after depletion of ILC2. These findings indicate that IL-25 simultaneously elicits phenotypically and functionally distinct innate lymphoid- and nonlymphoid-associated cell populations and implicate IL-25-elicited MPP(type2) cells and extramedullary hematopoiesis in the promotion of Th2 cytokine responses at mucosal surfaces. PMID:23960191

  4. Ubiquitin ligase CHIP suppresses cancer stem cell properties in a population of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Mai; Nakajima, Yuka; Hirata, Naoya; Morishita, Tamaki; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Kanda, Yasunari; Kimura, Keiji

    2014-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have several distinctive characteristics, including high metastatic potential, tumor-initiating potential, and properties that resemble normal stem cells such as self-renewal, differentiation, and drug efflux. Because of these characteristics, CSC is regarded to be responsible for cancer progression and patient prognosis. In our previous study, we showed that a ubiquitin E3 ligase carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) suppressed breast cancer malignancy. Moreover, a recent clinical study reported that CHIP expression levels were associated with favorable prognostic parameters of patients with breast cancer. Here we show that CHIP suppresses CSC properties in a population of breast cancer cells. CHIP depletion resulted in an increased proportion of CSCs among breast cancers when using several assays to assess CSC properties. From our results, we propose that inhibition of CSC properties may be one of the functions of CHIP as a suppressor of cancer progression. PMID:25234599

  5. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Fraction Contained in Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Populations Impairs Osteogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Lara de Freitas, Rafael; Loibl, Markus; Bittermann, Gido; Geoff Richards, R.; Alini, Mauro; Verrier, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    In bone tissue engineering (TE) endothelial cell-osteoblast cocultures are known to induce synergies of cell differentiation and activity. Bone marrow mononucleated cells (BMCs) are a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) able to develop an osteogenic phenotype. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are also present within BMC. In this study we investigate the effect of EPCs present in the BMC population on MSCs osteogenic differentiation. Human BMCs were isolated and separated into two populations. The MSC population was selected through plastic adhesion capacity. EPCs (CD34+ and CD133+) were removed from the BMC population and the resulting population was named depleted MSCs. Both populations were cultured over 28 days in osteogenic medium (Dex+) or medium containing platelet lysate (PL). MSC population grew faster than depleted MSCs in both media, and PL containing medium accelerated the proliferation for both populations. Cell differentiation was much higher in Dex+ medium in both cases. Real-time RT-PCR revealed upregulation of osteogenic marker genes in depleted MSCs. Higher values of ALP activity and matrix mineralization analyses confirmed these results. Our study advocates that absence of EPCs in the MSC population enables higher osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization and therefore may lead to advanced bone neoformation necessary for TE constructs. PMID:26491682

  6. Identification of various testicular cell populations in pubertal and adult cockerels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precise identification of the male germinal stem cell population is important for their practical use in programs dedicated to the integration of exogenous genetic material in testicular tissues. In the present study, our aim was to identify germinal cell populations in the testes of pubertal and ad...

  7. Population of Vibrational State of Carotenoid Molecules in Living Cells of Chlorella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Shuichi; Hirata, Kuniko; Kushida, Takashi

    1980-07-01

    Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra have been measured in living cells of Chlorella vulgaris as well as in chloroform, toluene, benzene and β-carotene. Population in the vibrational state has been determined by taking account of resonance Raman effect. The result shows that this population is well explained by thermal distribution even in the case of living biological cells, contrary to recently reported observation of some population enhancement. Possible experimental artifacts are discussed.

  8. flowCL: ontology-based cell population labelling in flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Courtot, Mélanie; Meskas, Justin; Diehl, Alexander D.; Droumeva, Radina; Gottardo, Raphael; Jalali, Adrin; Taghiyar, Mohammad Jafar; Maecker, Holden T.; McCoy, J. Philip; Ruttenberg, Alan; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Finding one or more cell populations of interest, such as those correlating to a specific disease, is critical when analysing flow cytometry data. However, labelling of cell populations is not well defined, making it difficult to integrate the output of algorithms to external knowledge sources. Results: We developed flowCL, a software package that performs semantic labelling of cell populations based on their surface markers and applied it to labelling of the Federation of Clinical Immunology Societies Human Immunology Project Consortium lyoplate populations as a use case. Conclusion: By providing automated labelling of cell populations based on their immunophenotype, flowCL allows for unambiguous and reproducible identification of standardized cell types. Availability and implementation: Code, R script and documentation are available under the Artistic 2.0 license through Bioconductor (http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/devel/bioc/html/flowCL.html). Contact: rbrinkman@bccrc.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25481008

  9. Emergence of bimodal cell population responses from the interplay between analog single-cell signaling and protein expression noise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cell-to-cell variability in protein expression can be large, and its propagation through signaling networks affects biological outcomes. Here, we apply deterministic and probabilistic models and biochemical measurements to study how network topologies and cell-to-cell protein abundance variations interact to shape signaling responses. Results We observe bimodal distributions of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation, which are generally thought to indicate bistable or ultrasensitive signaling behavior in single cells. Surprisingly, we find that a simple MAPK/ERK-cascade model with negative feedback that displays graded, analog ERK responses at a single cell level can explain the experimentally observed bimodality at the cell population level. Model analysis suggests that a conversion of graded input–output responses in single cells to digital responses at the population level is caused by a broad distribution of ERK pathway activation thresholds brought about by cell-to-cell variability in protein expression. Conclusions Our results show that bimodal signaling response distributions do not necessarily imply digital (ultrasensitive or bistable) single cell signaling, and the interplay between protein expression noise and network topologies can bring about digital population responses from analog single cell dose responses. Thus, cells can retain the benefits of robustness arising from negative feedback, while simultaneously generating population-level on/off responses that are thought to be critical for regulating cell fate decisions. PMID:22920937

  10. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Yousef; Azimi, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational) models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point) incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM), effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the communication between

  11. A Sub-Cellular Viscoelastic Model for Cell Population Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Yousef; Azimi, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and ‘in silico’ (computational) models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point) incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM), effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the communication

  12. Identification of a distinct population of CD133+CXCR4+ cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, Michele; D’Alterio, Crescenzo; Camerlingo, Rosalba; Tirino, Virginia; Consales, Claudia; Riccio, Anna; Ieranò, Caterina; Cecere, Sabrina Chiara; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Greggi, Stefano; Pignata, Sandro; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Scala, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    CD133 and CXCR4 were evaluated in the NCI-60 cell lines to identify cancer stem cell rich populations. Screening revealed that, ovarian OVCAR-3, -4 and -5 and colon cancer HT-29, HCT-116 and SW620 over expressed both proteins. We aimed to isolate cells with stem cell features sorting the cells expressing CXCR4+CD133+ within ovarian cancer cell lines. The sorted population CD133+CXCR4+ demonstrated the highest efficiency in sphere formation in OVCAR-3, OVCAR-4 and OVCAR-5 cells. Moreover OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and NANOG were highly expressed in CD133+CXCR4+ sorted OVCAR-5 cells. Most strikingly CXCR4+CD133+ sorted OVCAR-5 and -4 cells formed the highest number of tumors when inoculated in nude mice compared to CD133−CXCR4−, CD133+CXCR4−, CD133−CXCR4+ cells. CXCR4+CD133+ OVCAR-5 cells were resistant to cisplatin, overexpressed the ABCG2 surface drug transporter and migrated toward the CXCR4 ligand, CXCL12. Moreover, when human ovarian cancer cells were isolated from 37 primary ovarian cancer, an extremely variable level of CXCR4 and CD133 expression was detected. Thus, in human ovarian cancer cells CXCR4 and CD133 expression identified a discrete population with stem cell properties that regulated tumor development and chemo resistance. This cell population represents a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26020117

  13. Application of a Novel Population of Multipotent Stem Cells Derived from Skin Fibroblasts as Donor Cells in Bovine SCNT

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shaohui; Chen, Wuju; Liu, Xu; Xiao, Jiajia; Wang, Yanqin; Liu, Jun; Du, Yue; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Undifferentiated stem cells are better donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), resulting in more offspring than more differentiated cells. While various stem cell populations have been confirmed to exist in the skin, progress has been restricted due to the lack of a suitable marker for their prospective isolation. To address this fundamental issue, a marker is required that could unambiguously prove the differentiation state of the donor cells. We therefore utilized magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) to separate a homogeneous population of small SSEA-4+ cells from a heterogeneous population of bovine embryonic skin fibroblasts (BEF). SSEA-4+ cells were 8-10 μm in diameter and positive for alkaline phosphatase (AP). The percentage of SSEA-4+ cells within the cultured BEF population was low (2-3%). Immunocytochemistry and PCR analyses revealed that SSEA-4+ cells expressed pluripotency-related markers, and could differentiate into cells comprising all three germ layers in vitro. They remained undifferentiated over 20 passages in suspension culture. In addition, cloned embryos derived from SSEA-4 cells showed significant differences in cleavage rate and blastocyst development when compared with those from BEF and SSEA-4− cells. Moreover, blastocysts derived from SSEA-4+ cells showed a higher total cell number and lower apoptotic index as compared to BEF and SSEA-4– derived cells. It is well known that nuclei from pluripotent stem cells yield a higher cloning efficiency than those from adult somatic cells, however, pluripotent stem cells are relatively difficult to obtain from bovine. The SSEA-4+ cells described in the current study provide an attractive candidate for SCNT and a promising platform for the generation of transgenic cattle. PMID:25602959

  14. Phase control of probe response in a Doppler-broadened N-type four-level system

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Xijun; Liu Zhongbo; Liang Ying; Jia Kening; Tong Dianmin

    2011-04-15

    In this paper, we investigate theoretically the effect of the relative phase ({phi}) between the probe and driving fields on gain (absorption) and dispersion of the probe field in a Doppler-broadened N-type four-level system with spontaneously generated coherence from different respects. It is shown that gain (absorption) and dispersion are very sensitive to variations in the relative phase, and changing the Doppler width also has an obvious effect on the phase-dependent gain (absorption) and dispersion. When the probe and driving fields have the same propagation directions (copropagating), for the same Doppler width, the dispersion curve with {phi}={alpha} is the same as the gain (absorption) curve with {phi}={alpha}+{pi}/2; however, when the probe and driving fields have opposite propagation directions (counterpropagating), the dispersion curve and gain (absorption) curve are different and the difference becomes more considerable with an increase in Doppler width. In the co- and counterpropagating cases, gain (absorption) and dispersion always vary periodically with varying {phi}, and the period is 2{pi}. By adjusting the value of {phi}, the largest gain (absorption) and dispersion can be obtained, and a large index of refraction without absorption can be realized. Generally speaking, gain decreases with an increase in Doppler width, but by adjusting value of {phi}, at some special values of Doppler width, a larger gain than that without Doppler broadening can be obtained. Our study also shows that gain in the copropagating case is much larger than that in the counterpropagating case.

  15. Coherently prepared nondegenerate Y-shaped four-level correlated emission laser: A source of tripartite entangled light

    SciTech Connect

    Tesfa, Sintayehu

    2011-05-15

    A detailed derivation of the master equation of the cavity radiation of a coherently prepared Y-shaped four-level correlated emission laser is presented. The outline of the procedures that can be employed in analytically solving the stochastic differential equations and the rate equations of various correlations are also provided. It is shown that coherently preparing the atoms in the upper two energy levels and the lower level initially can lead to a genuine continuous-variable tripartite entanglement. Moreover, preparing the atoms in the coherent superposition, other than the possible maximum or minimum, of the upper two energy levels, leaving the lower level unpopulated, may lead to a similar observation. With the possibility of the atom at the intermediate energy level to take three different transition roots guided by the induced coherence, this system, in general, is found to encompass versatile options for practical utilization. In particular, coupling at least one of the dipole forbidden transitions by an external radiation is expected to enhance the degree of detectable entanglement.

  16. What Population Reveals about Individual Cell Identity: Single-Cell Parameter Estimation of Models of Gene Expression in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Versari, Cristian; Cinquemani, Eugenio; Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo; Hersen, Pascal; Batt, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Significant cell-to-cell heterogeneity is ubiquitously observed in isogenic cell populations. Consequently, parameters of models of intracellular processes, usually fitted to population-averaged data, should rather be fitted to individual cells to obtain a population of models of similar but non-identical individuals. Here, we propose a quantitative modeling framework that attributes specific parameter values to single cells for a standard model of gene expression. We combine high quality single-cell measurements of the response of yeast cells to repeated hyperosmotic shocks and state-of-the-art statistical inference approaches for mixed-effects models to infer multidimensional parameter distributions describing the population, and then derive specific parameters for individual cells. The analysis of single-cell parameters shows that single-cell identity (e.g. gene expression dynamics, cell size, growth rate, mother-daughter relationships) is, at least partially, captured by the parameter values of gene expression models (e.g. rates of transcription, translation and degradation). Our approach shows how to use the rich information contained into longitudinal single-cell data to infer parameters that can faithfully represent single-cell identity. PMID:26859137

  17. Clonal analysis of limbal epithelial stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    While convincing data clearly suggest the presence of stem cells in the basal limbal epithelium in vivo, testing the proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation capacity of stem cells relies on the development of methodologies that allow for their isolation and extensive propagation in vitro. Clonal analysis involving differentiation between short-lived transient cell clones and long-lived stem cell clones is an invaluable technique to identify stem cells in vitro, and allows cells to be expanded over multiple passages. This chapter describes a protocol for the isolation, expansion, and clonal analysis of limbal epithelial stem cells. The cultivation method described may be essential for long-term restoration of the damaged ocular surface in patients with limbal stem cell deficiency. PMID:23690004

  18. Growth of bone marrow and skeletal muscle side population stem cells in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Pacak, Christina A; Cowan, Douglas B

    2014-01-01

    The ability to efficiently isolate and expand various stem cell populations in vitro is crucial for successful translation of cell-based therapies to the clinical setting. One such heterogeneous population that possesses a remarkable potential for the development of cell-based treatments for a variety of degenerative diseases and disorders is called the Side Population (SP). For many years, investigators have isolated these primitive cells based upon their ability to efflux the fluorophore Hoechst 33342. This attribute enabled separation of SP cells derived from multiple tissue sources from other endogenous cell populations using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). While all tissue-specific SP fractions appear to contain cells with multi-potent stem cell activity, the therapeutic utility of these cells has yet to be fully realized because of the scarcity of this fraction in vivo. In view of that, we developed a method to expand adult murine bone marrow and skeletal muscle-derived SP cells in vitro. Here, we describe a spinner-flask culture system that supports the growth of SP cells in suspension when they are combined with feeder cells cultured on spherical microcarriers. In this way, their distinguishing biological characteristics can be maintained, attachment-stimulated differentiation is avoided, and therapeutically relevant quantities of SP cells are generated. Modification of the described procedure may permit expansion of the SP from other relevant tissue sources and our method is amenable to establishing compliance with current good manufacturing practices. PMID:25173160

  19. Distinct Human Stem Cell Populations in Small and Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Julie M.; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease. PMID:25751518

  20. Lin28a is a putative factor in regulating cancer stem cell-like properties in side population cells of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, S.; Tanaka, J.; Okada, S.; Isobe, T.; Yamamoto, G.; Yasuhara, R.; Irie, T.; Akiyama, C.; Kohno, Y.; Tachikawa, T.; Mishima, K.

    2013-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are among the target cells of cancer therapy because they are uniquely involved in both cancer progression and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. We identified side population (SP) cells, which are known to be an enriched population of CSC, in five oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC9, SCC25, TOSCC7, TOSCC17, and TOSCC23). The percentages of SP cells ranged from 0% to 3.3%, with TOSCC23 cells showing the highest percentages of SP cells (3.3% of the total cell population). The SP cells isolated from TOSCC23 cells also showed greater cell proliferation and invasion compared to non-SP (MP) cells. Therefore, our initial findings suggested that SP cells were enriched for CSC-like cells. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of cell proliferation-related and anti-apoptotic genes was greater in SP cells compared to MP cells. We focused on Lin28a, which showed the highest expression (approximately 22-fold) among the upregulated genes. The overexpression of Lin28a in TOSCC23 cells increased their proliferation, colony formation, and invasion. These findings suggest that Lin28a is an appropriate CSC target molecule for OSCC treatment - Highlights: ► Lin28a is a SP cell-specific factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. ► SP cells in OSCC cells show cancer stem cell-like properties. ► Lin28a regulates OSCC proliferative and invasive activities.

  1. A Mathematical and Computational Approach for Integrating the Major Sources of Cell Population Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Stamatakis, Michail; Zygourakis, Kyriacos

    2010-01-01

    Several approaches have been used in the past to model heterogeneity in bacterial cell populations, with each approach focusing on different source(s) of heterogeneity. However, a holistic approach that integrates all the major sources into a comprehensive framework applicable to cell populations is still lacking. In this work we present the mathematical formulation of a cell population master equation (CPME) that describes cell population dynamics and takes into account the major sources of heterogeneity, namely stochasticity in reaction, DNA-duplication, and division, as well as the random partitioning of species contents into the two daughter cells. The formulation also takes into account cell growth and respects the discrete nature of the molecular contents and cell numbers. We further develop a Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the stochastic processes considered here. To benchmark our new framework, we first use it to quantify the effect of each source of heterogeneity on the intrinsic and the extrinsic phenotypic variability for the well-known two-promoter system used experimentally by Elowitz et al. (2002). We finally apply our framework to a more complicated system and demonstrate how the interplay between noisy gene expression and growth inhibition due to protein accumulation at the single cell level can result in complex behavior at the cell population level. The generality of our framework makes it suitable for studying a vast array of artificial and natural genetic networks. Using our Monte Carlo algorithm, cell population distributions can be predicted for the genetic architecture of interest, thereby quantifying the effect of stochasticity in intracellular reactions or the variability in the rate of physiological processes such as growth and division. Such in silico experiments can give insight into the behavior of cell populations and reveal the major sources contributing to cell population heterogeneity. PMID:20685607

  2. Coarse-grained analysis of stochastically simulated cell populations with a positive feedback genetic network architecture.

    PubMed

    Aviziotis, I G; Kavousanakis, M E; Bitsanis, I A; Boudouvis, A G

    2015-06-01

    Among the different computational approaches modelling the dynamics of isogenic cell populations, discrete stochastic models can describe with sufficient accuracy the evolution of small size populations. However, for a systematic and efficient study of their long-time behaviour over a wide range of parameter values, the performance of solely direct temporal simulations requires significantly high computational time. In addition, when the dynamics of the cell populations exhibit non-trivial bistable behaviour, such an analysis becomes a prohibitive task, since a large ensemble of initial states need to be tested for the quest of possibly co-existing steady state solutions. In this work, we study cell populations which carry the lac operon network exhibiting solution multiplicity over a wide range of extracellular conditions (inducer concentration). By adopting ideas from the so-called "equation-free" methodology, we perform systems-level analysis, which includes numerical tasks such as the computation of coarse steady state solutions, coarse bifurcation analysis, as well as coarse stability analysis. Dynamically stable and unstable macroscopic (population level) steady state solutions are computed by means of bifurcation analysis utilising short bursts of fine-scale simulations, and the range of bistability is determined for different sizes of cell populations. The results are compared with the deterministic cell population balance model, which is valid for large populations, and we demonstrate the increased effect of stochasticity in small size populations with asymmetric partitioning mechanisms. PMID:24929336

  3. Coculture with endothelial cells reduces the population of cycling LeX neural precursors but increases that of quiescent cells with a side population phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Celine . E-mail: marc-andre.mouthon@cea.fr

    2006-04-01

    Neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation are regulated by external cues from their microenvironment. As endothelial cells are closely associated with neural stem cell in brain germinal zones, we investigated whether endothelial cells may interfere with neurogenesis. Neural precursor cells (NPC) from telencephalon of EGFP mouse embryos were cocultured in direct contact with endothelial cells. Endothelial cells did not modify the overall proliferation and apoptosis of neural cells, albeit they transiently delayed spontaneous apoptosis. These effects appeared to be specific to endothelial cells since a decrease in proliferation and a raise in apoptosis were observed in cocultures with fibroblasts. Endothelial cells stimulated the differentiation of NPC into astrocytes and into neurons, whereas they reduced differentiation into oligodendrocytes in comparison to adherent cultures on polyornithine. Determination of NPC clonogenicity and quantification of LeX expression, a marker for NPC, showed that endothelial cells decreased the number of cycling NPC. On the other hand, the presence of endothelial cells increased the number of neural cells having 'side population' phenotype, another marker reported on NPC, which we have shown to contain quiescent cells. Thus, we show that endothelial cells may regulate neurogenesis by acting at different level of NPC differentiation, proliferation and quiescence.

  4. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Identifies a Population of Human Skeletal Muscle Cells With High Myogenic Capacities

    PubMed Central

    Vauchez, Karine; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Schmid, Michel; Khattar, Patricia; Chapel, Alain; Catelain, Cyril; Lecourt, Séverine; Larghéro, Jérôme; Fiszman, Marc; Vilquin, Jean-Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH) activity is one hallmark of human bone marrow (BM), umbilical cord blood (UCB), and peripheral blood (PB) primitive progenitors presenting high reconstitution capacities in vivo. In this study, we have identified ALDH+ cells within human skeletal muscles, and have analyzed their phenotypical and functional characteristics. Immunohistofluorescence analysis of human muscle tissue sections revealed rare endomysial cells. Flow cytometry analysis using the fluorescent substrate of ALDH, Aldefluor, identified brightly stained (ALDHbr) cells with low side scatter (SSClo), in enzymatically dissociated muscle biopsies, thereafter abbreviated as SMALD+ (for skeletal muscle ALDH+) cells. Phenotypical analysis discriminated two sub-populations according to CD34 expression: SMALD+/CD34− and SMALD+/CD34+ cells. These sub-populations did not initially express endothelial (CD31), hematopoietic (CD45), and myogenic (CD56) markers. Upon sorting, however, whereas SMALD+/CD34+ cells developed in vitro as a heterogeneous population of CD56− cells able to differentiate in adipoblasts, the SMALD+/CD34− fraction developed in vitro as a highly enriched population of CD56+ myoblasts able to form myotubes. Moreover, only the SMALD+/CD34− population maintained a strong myogenic potential in vivo upon intramuscular transplantation. Our results suggest that ALDH activity is a novel marker for a population of new human skeletal muscle progenitors presenting a potential for cell biology and cell therapy. PMID:19738599

  5. The contribution of age structure to cell population responses to targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Pierre; Garbett, Shawn P.; Quaranta, Vito; Tyson, Darren R.; Webb, Glenn F.

    2013-01-01

    Cells grown in culture act as a model system for analyzing the effects of anticancer compounds, which may affect cell behavior in a cell cycle position-dependent manner. Cell synchronization techniques have been generally employed to minimize the variation in cell cycle position. However, synchronization techniques are cumbersome and imprecise and the agents used to synchronize the cells potentially have other unknown effects on the cells. An alternative approach is to determine the age structure in the population and account for the cell cycle positional effects post hoc. Here we provide a formalism to use quantifiable lifespans from live cell microscopy experiments to parameterize an age-structured model of cell population response. PMID:22796330

  6. Chase-and-run between adjacent cell populations promotes directional collective migration

    PubMed Central

    Theveneau, Eric; Steventon, Benjamin; Scarpa, Elena; Garcia, Simon; Trepat, Xavier; Streit, Andrea; Mayor, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration in morphogenesis and cancer progression often involves the coordination of multiple cell types. How reciprocal interactions between adjacent cell populations lead to new emergent behaviours remains unknown. Here we studied the interaction between Neural Crest (NC) cells, a highly migratory cell population, and placodal cells, an epithelial tissue that contributes to sensory organs. We found that NC cells “chase” placodal cells by chemotaxis, while placodal cells “run” when contacted by NC. Chemotaxis to Sdf1 underlies the chase, while repulsion involving PCP and N-Cadherin signalling is responsible for the run. This “chase-and-run” requires the generation of asymmetric forces, which depend on local inhibition of focal adhesions. The cell interactions described here are essential for correct NC migration and for segregation of placodes in vivo and are likely to represent a general mechanism of coordinated migration. PMID:23770678

  7. Detection and characterization of side population in Ewing's sarcoma SK-ES-1 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Min; Zhang, Rui; Yan, Ming; Ye, Zhengxu; Liang, Wei; Luo, Zhuojing

    2010-01-01

    Dye exclusion is a valuable technique to isolate cancer stem cells (CSCs) based on an ability of stem cell to efflux fluorescent DNA-binding dye, especially for tumors without unique surface markers. It has been proven that side population (SP) cells that exclude Hoechst 33342 dye are enriched with stem-like cells in several cancer cell lines. In this study, we isolated and characterized SP cells from human Ewing's sarcoma cell line SK-ES-1 in vitro. SP cells were detected in SK-ES-1 and comprised 1.2% of total cell population. Only SP cells had the capacity to regenerate both SP and non-SP cells. The proliferation rates were similar between SP and non-SP cells. However, the clonogenicity and invasiveness of SP cells were significantly higher than that of non-SP cells. Further characterization of this SP phenotype presented other properties. SP cells exhibited increased multi-drug resistance and the ATP binding cassette protein (ABC) transporters were up-regulated in SP population. These findings suggest that SP cells derived from Ewing's sarcoma play the critical role in tumor metastasis and recurrence and might be an ideal target for clinical therapy.

  8. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in CD133+ population in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-Qiang; Tan, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Bao-Wei; Wu, Tao; Liu, Ping; Sun, Shao-Jun; Cao, Yin-Guang

    2016-03-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the role of 3-bromopyruvate in inhibition of CD133+ U87 human glioma cell population growth. The results demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate inhibited the viability of both CD133+ and parental cells derived from U87 human glioma cell line. However, the 3-bromopyruvate-induced inhibition in viability was more prominent in CD133+ cells at 10 μM concentration after 48 h. Treatment of CD133+ cells with 3-bromopyruvate caused reduction in cell population and cell size, membrane bubbling, and degradation of cell membranes. Hoechst 33258 staining showed condensation of chromatin material and fragmentation of DNA in treated CD133+ cells after 48 h. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited the migration rate of CD133+ cells significantly compared to the parental cells. Flow cytometry revealed that exposure of CD133+ cells to 3-bromopyruvate increased the cell population in S phase from 24.5 to 37.9 % with increase in time from 12 to 48 h. In addition, 3-bromopyruvate significantly enhanced the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3 in CD133+ cells compared to the parental cells. Therefore, 3-bromopyruvate is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of glioma by targeting stem cells selectively. PMID:26453119

  9. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter; Abu Dawud, Raed; Adjaye, James; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2015-11-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and prospective isolation of BMSCs and committed progenitors are lacking. Here, we compared the transcriptome profile of CD markers expressed at baseline and during the course of osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation of two well-characterized osteogenic-committed murine BMSCs (mBMSC(Bone)) and adipogenic-committed mBMSCs (mBMSC(Adipo)), respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a core set of canonical mBMSC CD markers with comparable expression levels in mBMSC(Bone) and mBMSC(Adipo) at baseline and during their differentiation. We identified 11 CD markers that are differentially expressed between mBMSC(Adipo) and mBMSC(Bone). Among these, we identified osteoprogenitor-associated CD markers expressed only in mBMSC(Bone): CD34, CD54, CD73, CD132, CD200, CD227 and adipoprogenitor-associated CD markers expressed only in mBMSC(Adipo): CD53, CD80, CD134, CD141 and CD212. FACS analysis confirmed these results. We selected CD34 for further analysis. CD34 was expressed at baseline of mouse stromal cell line ST2, primary mBMSCs, mBMSC(Bone) and its expression decreased during osteoblast differentiation. FACS-sorted CD34(+) primary mBMSCs exhibited higher expression of 70% osteoblast-associated genes, and formed significantly higher heterotopic bone in vivo when implanted subcutaneously in immune-deficient mice compared with CD34(-) primary mBMSCs. Our results demonstrate that a set of CD markers can distinguish osteoprogenitor versus adipoprogenitor populations of mBMSCs. CD34 is suitable for prospective isolation of mouse bone marrow osteoprogenitors. PMID:26413784

  10. Distinct allelic patterns of nanog expression impart embryonic stem cell population heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S

    2013-01-01

    Nanog is a principal pluripotency regulator exhibiting a disperse distribution within stem cell populations in vivo and in vitro. Increasing evidence points to a functional role of Nanog heterogeneity on stem cell fate decisions. Allelic control of Nanog gene expression was reported recently in mouse embryonic stem cells. To better understand how this mode of regulation influences the observed heterogeneity of NANOG in stem cell populations, we assembled a multiscale stochastic population balance equation framework. In addition to allelic control, gene expression noise and random partitioning at cell division were considered. As a result of allelic Nanog expression, the distribution of Nanog exhibited three distinct states but when combined with transcriptional noise the profile became bimodal. Regardless of their allelic expression pattern, initially uniform populations of stem cells gave rise to the same Nanog heterogeneity within ten cell cycles. Depletion of NANOG content in cells switching off both gene alleles was slower than the accumulation of intracellular NANOG after cells turned on at least one of their Nanog gene copies pointing to Nanog state-dependent dynamics. Allelic transcription of Nanog also raises issues regarding the use of stem cell lines with reporter genes knocked in a single allelic locus. Indeed, significant divergence was observed in the reporter and native protein profiles depending on the difference in their half-lives and insertion of the reporter gene in one or both alleles. In stem cell populations with restricted Nanog expression, allelic regulation facilitates the maintenance of fractions of self-renewing cells with sufficient Nanog content to prevent aberrant loss of pluripotency. Our findings underline the role of allelic control of Nanog expression as a prime determinant of stem cell population heterogeneity and warrant further investigation in the contexts of stem cell specification and cell reprogramming. PMID:23874182

  11. Effects of four rice paddy herbicides on algal cell viability and the relationship with population recovery.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Ishihara, Satoru; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Iwafune, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    Paddy herbicides are a high-risk concern for aquatic plants, including algae, because they easily flow out from paddy fields into rivers, with toxic effects. The effect on algal population dynamics, including population recovery after timed exposure, must be assessed. Therefore, we demonstrated concentration-response relationships of four paddy herbicides for algal growth inhibition and mortality, and the relationship between the effect on algal cell viability and population recovery following exposure. We used SYTOX Green dye assay and flow cytometry to assess cell viability of the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Live cells could be clearly distinguished from dead cells during herbicide exposure. Our results showed that pretilachlor and quinoclamine had both algicidal and algistatic effects, whereas bensulfuron-methyl only had an algistatic effect, and pentoxazone only had an algicidal effect. Then, a population recovery test following a 72-h exposure was conducted. The algal population recovered in all tests, but the periods required for recovery differed among exposure concentrations and herbicides. The periods required for recovery were inconsistent with the dead cell ratio at the beginning of the recovery test; that is, population recovery could not be described only by cell viability. Consequently, the temporal effect of herbicides and subsequent recovery of the algal population could be described not only by the toxicity characteristics but also by toxicokinetics, such as rate of uptake, transport to the target site, and elimination of the substance from algal cells. PMID:21590715

  12. Targeting leukemic side population cells by isatin derivatives of nicotinic acid amide.

    PubMed

    Naglah, A M; Shinwari, Z; Bhat, M A; Al-Tahhan, M; Al-Omar, M A; Al-Dhfyan, A

    2016-01-01

    Side population (SP) cells mediate chemoresistance in leukemia. However, chemical inhibition approach to target SP cells has been poorly studied. Herein, we report the discovery of isatin derivatives of nicotinic acid amide as potent side population cell inhibitors. The selected derivatives showed superior potency over the reference drug verapamil. Furthermore, the treatment increased chemosensitivity and inhibited the cell proliferation on three different leukemic cell lines, K562, THP-1 and U937, suggesting that both SP and the bulk of leukemic cells are affected. Moreover, treatment with the most potent compound Nic9 reduced the expression of ABCG2, demonstrating that side population inhibition effect of the target derivatives is at least via ABCG2 inhibition. Importantly, the target derivatives induced erythrocyte/dendritic differentiation to leukemic cells mainly through Musashi/Numb pathway modulation. PMID:27358121

  13. Isonicotinic acid hydrazide inhibits cell population growth during teratogenesis of chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M V; Shah, V B; Modak, S P

    1991-01-01

    In chick embryos treated with a 4 hr pulse of 7.2 X 10(-5) M isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) the cell population growth is inhibited with an increased population doubling time. Teratogenised blastoderm cells complete their ongoing cell cycle and arrest in G1 phase. A chase with an equimolar concentration of pyridoxal-5-phosphate restores the growth rate after a lag of 4 hr equivalent to the duration of treatment with INH. Presumptive mesoblast cells invaginated through the primitive streak and neuroectoblast cells induced prior to the application of INH differentiate, while the teratogen inhibits morphogenesis and organization of organ primordia. PMID:1864614

  14. PHENOTYPE AND HEMATOPOIETIC POTENTIAL OF SIDE POPULATION CELLS THROUGHOUT EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult murine bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be purified by sorting Hoechst 33342-extruding side population (SP) cells. Herein we investigated whether SP cells reside within embryonic tissues and exhibit hematopoietic progenitor activity. We isolated yolk sac (YS) and embryonic tissu...

  15. Basal p21 controls population heterogeneity in cycling and quiescent cell cycle states

    PubMed Central

    Overton, K. Wesley; Spencer, Sabrina L.; Noderer, William L.; Meyer, Tobias; Wang, Clifford L.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity within a population of genetically identical cells is emerging as a common theme in multiple biological systems, including human cell biology and cancer. Using live-cell imaging, flow cytometry, and kinetic modeling, we showed that two states—quiescence and cell cycling—can coexist within an isogenic population of human cells and resulted from low basal expression levels of p21, a Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor (CKI). We attribute the p21-dependent heterogeneity in cell cycle activity to double-negative feedback regulation involving CDK2, p21, and E3 ubiquitin ligases. In support of this mechanism, analysis of cells at a point before cell cycle entry (i.e., before the G1/S transition) revealed a p21–CDK2 axis that determines quiescent and cycling cell states. Our findings suggest a mechanistic role for p21 in generating heterogeneity in both normal tissues and tumors. PMID:25267623

  16. PULMONARY CELL POPULATIONS IN HAMSTERS MAINTAINED UNDER EGYPTIAN LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was conducted to obtain baseline values for pulmonary cells in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) bred and maintained under the laboratory conditions of Al-Azhar University in Egypt. An improvised technique is presented for measuring pulmonary cells obtained by lung...

  17. Isolation and characterization of side population cells from the human ovarian cancer cell line SK-OV-3

    PubMed Central

    RUAN, ZHENGYI; LIU, JIANHUA; KUANG, YANPING

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the most malignant type of gynecological tumor due to its high recurrence rate following initial treatment. Previous studies have indicated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) may be a potential cause underlying the high proportion of recurrence. Side population (SP) cells isolated from cancer cell lines have been shown to exhibit characteristics associated with CSCs, but studies on SP cells in human ovarian SK-OV-3 cell line are limited. In the present study, the SP cell fraction (4.83% of the total cell population) was isolated using flow cytometry, and analyzed by immunocytochemical analysis and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that SP cells exhibited a high mean fluorescence intensity for CD44, a CSC marker, in addition to elevated expression of the CSCs-associated genes, ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 and Nestin. These findings indicated the stem cell-like features of the SP cells. Furthermore, a colony formation test showed that the isolated SP cells possessed a marked capacity for self-regeneration and proliferation. In addition, a cell cycle assay involving cisplatin indicated that the SP cells were strongly resistant to chemotherapy. In conclusion, the present results suggested that SP cells isolated from the SK-OV-3 cell line exhibited properties typically associated with CSCs. Therefore, the isolated SP cells may be used to provide novel insight into potential therapies against OC. PMID:26668597

  18. Tissue engineering and cell-populated collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Paul D

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering seeks to produce living, three-dimensional cellular constructs that can be used as clinical replacements of damaged tissues and organs as well as research tools to study cell and matrix interactions that occur in higher-order systems. To organize the cells into a three-dimensional structure in vitro, a provisional extracellular matrix support is required. The two main methods to achieve this are (a) to culture the stromal cells on a three-dimensional synthetic meshwork, or else (b) embed the cells within a three-dimensional lattice, for example type I collagen. The contracted collagen lattice can be used for a variety of practical applications including the support of epithelial growth and differentiation to produce a skin replacement (Toxic In vitro 5:591-596, 1991; J. Biomech. Eng. 113:113-119, 1991; Parenteau, 1994, Keratinocyte Methods, 1994, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp.45-55; Dermatol. Surg. 21:839-843, 1995; Biomaterials 17:311-320, 1996). This has been used successfully to treat patients with chronic ulcers. However, this model system can also be exploited for experiments to study cell-matrix interactions such as the influence of tension on cell phenotype (Exp. Cell Res. 193:198-207, 1991). PMID:19247605

  19. In Vivo Monitoring of Multiple Circulating Cell Populations Using Two-photon Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tkaczyk, Eric R.; Zhong, Cheng Frank; Ye, Jing Yong; Myc, Andrzej; Thomas, Thommey; Cao, Zhengyi; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, James R.

    2008-01-01

    To detect and quantify multiple distinct populations of cells circulating simultaneously in the blood of living animals, we developed a novel optical system for two-channel, two-photon flow cytometry in vivo. We used this system to investigate the circulation dynamics in live animals of breast cancer cells with low (MCF-7) and high (MDA-MB-435) metastatic potential, showing for the first time that two different populations of circulating cells can be quantified simultaneously in the vasculature of a single live mouse. We also non-invasively monitored a population of labeled, circulating red blood cells for more than two weeks, demonstrating that this technique can also quantify the dynamics of abundant cells in the vascular system for prolonged periods of time. These data are the first in vivo application of multichannel flow cytometry utilizing two-photon excitation, which will greatly enhance our capability to study circulating cells in cancer and other disease processes. PMID:19221581

  20. Identification of a unique double-negative regulatory T-cell population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung O; Jones, Joyce E; Peters, Cory J; Whitacre, David; Frelin, Lars; Hughes, Janice; Kim, Won-Keun; Milich, David R

    2011-12-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells represent one of the main mechanisms of regulating self-reactive immune cells. Treg cells are thought to play a role in down-regulating immune responses to self or allogeneic antigens in the periphery. Although the function of Treg cells has been demonstrated in many experimental settings, the precise mechanisms and antigen specificity often remain unclear. In a hepatitis B e antigen-T-cell receptor (HBeAg-TCR) double transgenic mouse model, we observed a phenotypically unique (TCR+)  CD4- /CD8-  CD25(+/-)  GITR(high)  PD-1(high)  FoxP3-) HBeAg-specific population that demonstrates immune regulatory function. This HBeAg-specific double-negative regulatory cell population proliferates vigorously in vitro, in contrast to any other known regulatory population, in an interleukin-2-independent manner. PMID:22044159

  1. Identification of a unique double-negative regulatory T-cell population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung O; Jones, Joyce E; Peters, Cory J; Whitacre, David; Frelin, Lars; Hughes, Janice; Kim, Won-Keun; Milich, David R

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells represent one of the main mechanisms of regulating self-reactive immune cells. Treg cells are thought to play a role in down-regulating immune responses to self or allogeneic antigens in the periphery. Although the function of Treg cells has been demonstrated in many experimental settings, the precise mechanisms and antigen specificity often remain unclear. In a hepatitis B e antigen–T-cell receptor (HBeAg-TCR) double transgenic mouse model, we observed a phenotypically unique (TCR+ CD4−/CD8− CD25+/− GITRhigh PD-1high FoxP3−) HBeAg-specific population that demonstrates immune regulatory function. This HBeAg-specific double-negative regulatory cell population proliferates vigorously in vitro, in contrast to any other known regulatory population, in an interleukin-2-independent manner. PMID:22044159

  2. A single dividing cell population with imbalanced fate drives oesophageal tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Frede, Julia; Greulich, Philip; Nagy, Tibor; Simons, Benjamin D; Jones, Philip H

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the cellular mechanisms of tumour growth is key for designing rational anticancer treatment. Here we used genetic lineage tracing to quantify cell behaviour during neoplastic transformation in a model of oesophageal carcinogenesis. We found that cell behaviour was convergent across premalignant tumours, which contained a single proliferating cell population. The rate of cell division was not significantly different in the lesions and the surrounding epithelium. However, dividing tumour cells had a uniform, small bias in cell fate so that, on average, slightly more dividing than non-dividing daughter cells were generated at each round of cell division. In invasive cancers induced by Kras(G12D) expression, dividing cell fate became more strongly biased towards producing dividing over non-dividing cells in a subset of clones. These observations argue that agents that restore the balance of cell fate may prove effective in checking tumour growth, whereas those targeting cycling cells may show little selectivity. PMID:27548914

  3. Microselection – affinity selecting antibodies against a single rare cell in a heterogeneous population

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Morten Dræby; Agerholm, Inge Errebo; Christensen, Britta; Kølvraa, Steen; Kristensen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Rare cells not normally present in the peripheral bloodstream, such as circulating tumour cells, have potential applications for development of non-invasive methods for diagnostics or follow up. Obtaining these cells however require some means of discrimination, achievable by cell type specific antibodies. Here we have generated a microselection method allowing antibody selection, by phage display, targeting a single cell in a heterogeneous population. One K562 cell (female origin) was positioned on glass slide among millions of lymphocytes from male donor, identifying the K562 cell by FISH (XX). Several single cell selections were performed on such individual slides. The phage particles bound to the target cell is protected by a minute disc, while inactivating all remaining phage by UV-irradiation; leaving only the phage bound to the target cell viable. We hereby retrieved up to eight antibodies per single cell selection, including three highly K562 cell type specific. PMID:20726925

  4. Size distribution of retrovirally marked lineages matches prediction from population measurements of cell cycle behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Li; Hayes, Nancy L.; Takahashi, Takao; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Nowakowski, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate neuron production in the developing mouse neocortex were examined by using a retroviral lineage marking method to determine the sizes of the lineages remaining in the proliferating population of the ventricular zone during the period of neuron production. The distribution of clade sizes obtained experimentally in four different injection-survival paradigms (E11-E13, E11-E14, E11-E15, and E12-E15) from a total of over 500 labeled lineages was compared with that obtained from three models in which the average behavior of the proliferating population [i.e., the proportion of cells remaining in the proliferative population (P) vs. that exiting the proliferative population (Q)] was quantitatively related to lineage size distribution. In model 1, different proportions of asymmetric, symmetric terminal, and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions coexisted during the entire developmental period. In model 2, the developmental period was divided into two epochs: During the first, asymmetric and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions occurred, but, during the second, asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions occurred. In model 3, the shifts in P and Q are accounted for by changes in the proportions of the two types of symmetric cell divisions without the inclusion of any asymmetric cell divisions. The results obtained from the retroviral experiments were well accounted for by model 1 but not by model 2 or 3. These findings demonstrate that: 1) asymmetric and both types of symmetric cell divisions coexist during the entire period of neurogenesis in the mouse, 2) neuron production is regulated in the proliferative population by the independent decisions of the two daughter cells to reenter S phase, and 3) neurons are produced by both asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions. In addition, the findings mean that cell death and/or tangential movements of cells in the proliferative population occur at only a low rate and that there are no

  5. Radioisotopic Method for Measuring Cell Division Rates of Individual Species of Diatoms from Natural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Rivkin, Richard B.

    1986-01-01

    Silicon is an essential element for diatom frustule synthesis and is usually taken up only by dividing cells. With 68Ge, a radioactive analog of Si, the cell cycle marker event of frustule formation was identified for individual species of diatom. The frequency of cells within a population undergoing this division event was estimated, and the cell division rate was calculated. In laboratory cultures, these rates of cell division and those calculated from changes in cell numbers were similar. By dual labeling with 68Ge(OH)4 and NaH14CO3, rates of cell division and photosynthesis were coincidently measured for diatoms both in laboratory cultures and when isolated from natural populations in estuarine, offshore, and polar environments. These techniques permit the coupling between photosynthesis and cell division to be examined in situ for individual species of diatom. PMID:16347039

  6. Correlations and Functional Connections in a Population of Grid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roudi, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    We study the statistics of spike trains of simultaneously recorded grid cells in freely behaving rats. We evaluate pairwise correlations between these cells and, using a maximum entropy kinetic pairwise model (kinetic Ising model), study their functional connectivity. Even when we account for the covariations in firing rates due to overlapping fields, both the pairwise correlations and functional connections decay as a function of the shortest distance between the vertices of the spatial firing pattern of pairs of grid cells, i.e. their phase difference. They take positive values between cells with nearby phases and approach zero or negative values for larger phase differences. We find similar results also when, in addition to correlations due to overlapping fields, we account for correlations due to theta oscillations and head directional inputs. The inferred connections between neurons in the same module and those from different modules can be both negative and positive, with a mean close to zero, but with the strongest inferred connections found between cells of the same module. Taken together, our results suggest that grid cells in the same module do indeed form a local network of interconnected neurons with a functional connectivity that supports a role for attractor dynamics in the generation of grid pattern. PMID:25714908

  7. Neural Potential of a Stem Cell Population in the Hair Follicle

    PubMed Central

    Mignone, John L.; Roig-Lopez, Jose L.; Fedtsova, Natalia; Schones, Dustin E.; Manganas, Louis N.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Keyes, William M.; Mills, Alea A.; Gleiberman, Anatoli; Zhang, Michael Q.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2013-01-01

    The bulge region of the hair follicle serves as a repository for epithelial stem cells that can regenerate the follicle in each hair growth cycle and contribute to epidermis regeneration upon injury. Here we describe a population of multipotential stem cells in the hair follicle bulge region; these cells can be identified by fluorescence in transgenic nestin-GFP mice. The morphological features of these cells suggest that they maintain close associations with each other and with the surrounding niche. Upon explantation, these cells can give rise to neurosphere-like structures in vitro. When these cells are permitted to differentiate, they produce several cell types, including cells with neuronal, astrocytic, oligodendrocytic, smooth muscle, adipocytic, and other phenotypes. Furthermore, upon implantation into the developing nervous system of chick, these cells generate neuronal cells in vivo. We used transcriptional profiling to assess the relationship between these cells and embryonic and postnatal neural stem cells and to compare them with other stem cell populations of the bulge. Our results show that nestin-expressing cells in the bulge region of the hair follicle have stem cell-like properties, are multipotent, and can effectively generate cells of neural lineage in vitro and in vivo. PMID:17873521

  8. From the cell cycle to population cycles in phytoplankton-nutrient interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pascual, M.; Caswell, H.

    1997-04-01

    The internal demographic structure of a population influences its dynamics and its response to the environment. Most models for phytoplankton ignore internal structure and group all cells in a single variable such as total biomass or density. However, a cell does have a life history, the cell division cycle. We investigate the significance of the cell cycle to phytoplankton population dynamics in a variable nutrient environment, using chemostate models. Following the transition point hypothesis, nutrient uptake affects cell development only within a limited segment of the cell cycle. Simulation results demonstrate oscillations in cell numbers and population structure generated by this interaction. When nutrient input is varied periodically, the population displays an aperiodic response with frequencies different from that of the forcing. These results also hold for a model that includes nutrient storage by the cells. These dynamics differ from those of traditional chemostate models and from cell cycle models driven by light cycles. Resource control of cell cycle progression may explain the time delays previously postulated to explain oscillatory transients in chemostate experiments. 78 refs., 22 figs.

  9. Simultaneous Isolation of Three Different Stem Cell Populations from Murine Skin.

    PubMed

    Forni, Maria Fernanda; Ramos Maia Lobba, Aline; Pereira Ferreira, Alexandre Hamilton; Sogayar, Mari Cleide

    2015-01-01

    The skin is a rich source of readily accessible stem cells. The level of plasticity afforded by these cells is becoming increasingly important as the potential of stem cells in Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine continues to be explored. Several protocols described single type stem cell isolation from skin; however, none of them afforded simultaneous isolation of more than one population. Herein, we describe the simultaneous isolation and characterization of three stem cell populations from the dermis and epidermis of murine skin, namely Epidermal Stem Cells (EpiSCs), Skin-derived Precursors (SKPs) and Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs). The simultaneous isolation was possible through a simple protocol based on culture selection techniques. These cell populations are shown to be capable of generating chondrocytes, adipocytes, osteocytes, terminally differentiated keratinocytes, neurons and glia, rendering this protocol suitable for the isolation of cells for tissue replenishment and cell based therapies. The advantages of this procedure are far-reaching since the skin is not only the largest organ in the body, but also provides an easily accessible source of stem cells for autologous graft. PMID:26462205

  10. Cell Competition Modifies Adult Stem Cell and Tissue Population Dynamics in a JAK-STAT-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Kolahgar, Golnar; Suijkerbuijk, Saskia J.E.; Kucinski, Iwo; Poirier, Enzo Z.; Mansour, Sarah; Simons, Benjamin D.; Piddini, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Throughout their lifetime, cells may suffer insults that reduce their fitness and disrupt their function, and it is unclear how these potentially harmful cells are managed in adult tissues. We address this question using the adult Drosophila posterior midgut as a model of homeostatic tissue and ribosomal Minute mutations to reduce fitness in groups of cells. We take a quantitative approach combining lineage tracing and biophysical modeling and address how cell competition affects stem cell and tissue population dynamics. We show that healthy cells induce clonal extinction in weak tissues, targeting both stem and differentiated cells for elimination. We also find that competition induces stem cell proliferation and self-renewal in healthy tissue, promoting selective advantage and tissue colonization. Finally, we show that winner cell proliferation is fueled by the JAK-STAT ligand Unpaired-3, produced by Minute−/+ cells in response to chronic JNK stress signaling. PMID:26212135

  11. Cell Competition Modifies Adult Stem Cell and Tissue Population Dynamics in a JAK-STAT-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Kolahgar, Golnar; Suijkerbuijk, Saskia J E; Kucinski, Iwo; Poirier, Enzo Z; Mansour, Sarah; Simons, Benjamin D; Piddini, Eugenia

    2015-08-10

    Throughout their lifetime, cells may suffer insults that reduce their fitness and disrupt their function, and it is unclear how these potentially harmful cells are managed in adult tissues. We address this question using the adult Drosophila posterior midgut as a model of homeostatic tissue and ribosomal Minute mutations to reduce fitness in groups of cells. We take a quantitative approach combining lineage tracing and biophysical modeling and address how cell competition affects stem cell and tissue population dynamics. We show that healthy cells induce clonal extinction in weak tissues, targeting both stem and differentiated cells for elimination. We also find that competition induces stem cell proliferation and self-renewal in healthy tissue, promoting selective advantage and tissue colonization. Finally, we show that winner cell proliferation is fueled by the JAK-STAT ligand Unpaired-3, produced by Minute(-/+) cells in response to chronic JNK stress signaling. PMID:26212135

  12. Regulatory effects on the population dynamics and wave propagation in a cell lineage model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Xiang; Ma, Yu-Qiang; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2016-03-21

    We consider the interplay of cell proliferation, cell differentiation (and de-differentiation), cell movement, and the effect of feedback regulations on the population and propagation dynamics of different cell types in a cell lineage model. Cells are assumed to secrete and respond to negative feedback molecules which act as a control on the cell lineage. The cell densities are described by coupled reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, and the propagating wave front solutions in one dimension are investigated analytically and by numerical solutions. In particular, wavefront propagation speeds are obtained analytically and verified by numerical solutions of the equations. The emphasis is on the effects of the feedback regulations on different stages in the cell lineage. It is found that when the progenitor cell is negatively regulated, the populations of the cell lineage are strongly down-regulated with the steady growth rate of the progenitor cell being driven to zero beyond a critical regulatory strength. An analytic expression for the critical regulation strength in terms of the model parameters is derived and verified by numerical solutions. On the other hand, if the inhibition is acting on the differentiated cells, the change in the population dynamics and wave propagation speed is small. In addition, it is found that only the propagating speed of the progenitor cells is affected by the regulation when the diffusion of the differentiated cells is large. In the presence of de-differentiation, the effect on down-regulating the progenitor population is weakened and there is no effect on the propagation speed due to regulation, suggesting that the effect of regulatory control is diminished by de-differentiation pathways. PMID:26796226

  13. Microfluidic isolation of cancer-cell-derived microvesicles from hetergeneous extracellular shed vesicle populations

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Steven M.; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles, including exosomes and microvesicles, are disseminated throughout the body and represent an important conduit of cell communication. Cancer-cell-derived microvesicles have potential as a cancer biomarker as they help shape the tumor microenvironment to promote the growth of the primary tumor and prime the metastatic niche. It is likely that, in cancer cell cultures, the two constituent extracellular shed vesicle subpopulations, observed in dynamic light scattering, represent an exosome population and a cancer-cell-specific microvesicle population and that extracellular shed vesicle size provides information about provenance and cargo. We have designed and implemented a novel microfluidic technology that separates microvesicles, as a function of diameter, from heterogeneous populations of cancer-cell-derived extracellular shed vesicles. We measured cargo carried by the microvesicle subpopulation processed through this microfluidic platform. Such analyses could enable future investigations to more accurately and reliably determine provenance, functional activity, and mechanisms of transformation in cancer. PMID:25342569

  14. Microfluidic isolation of cancer-cell-derived microvesicles from hetergeneous extracellular shed vesicle populations.

    PubMed

    Santana, Steven M; Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A; Kirby, Brian J

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles, including exosomes and microvesicles, are disseminated throughout the body and represent an important conduit of cell communication. Cancer-cell-derived microvesicles have potential as a cancer biomarker as they help shape the tumor microenvironment to promote the growth of the primary tumor and prime the metastatic niche. It is likely that, in cancer cell cultures, the two constituent extracellular shed vesicle subpopulations, observed in dynamic light scattering, represent an exosome population and a cancer-cell-specific microvesicle population and that extracellular shed vesicle size provides information about provenance and cargo. We have designed and implemented a novel microfluidic technology that separates microvesicles, as a function of diameter, from heterogeneous populations of cancer-cell-derived extracellular shed vesicles. We measured cargo carried by the microvesicle subpopulation processed through this microfluidic platform. Such analyses could enable future investigations to more accurately and reliably determine provenance, functional activity, and mechanisms of transformation in cancer. PMID:25342569

  15. Infection Spread and Virus Release in Vitro in Cell Populations as a System with Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Juan G. Diaz

    The comprehension of the innate immune system of cell populations is not only of interest to understand systems in vivo but also in vitro, for example, in the control of the release of viral particles for the production of vaccines. In this report I introduce a model, based on dynamical networks, that simulates the cell signaling responsible for this innate immune response and its effect on the infection spread and virus production. The central motivation is to represent a cell population that is constantly mixed in a bio-reactor where there is a cell-to-cell signaling of cytokines (which are proteins responsible for the activation of the antiviral response inside the cell). Such signaling allows the definition of clusters of linked immune cells. Additionally, depending on the density of links, it is possible to identify critical threshold parameters associated to a percolation phase transition. I show that the control of this antiviral response is equivalent to a percolation process.

  16. Using electroactive substrates to pattern the attachment of two different cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf, Muhammad N.; Houseman, Benjamin T.; Mrksich, Milan

    2001-05-01

    This report describes the development of an electroactive mask that permits the patterning of two different cell populations to a single substrate. This mask is based on a self-assembled monolayer of alkanethiolates on gold that could be switched from a state that prevents the attachment of cells to a state that promotes the integrin-mediated attachment of cells. Monolayers were patterned into regions having this electroactive monolayer and a second set of regions that were adhesive. After Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts had attached to the adhesive regions of this substrate, the second set of regions was activated electrically to permit the attachment of a second population of fibroblast cells. This method provides a general strategy for patterning the attachment of multiple cell types and will be important for studying heterotypic cell-cell interactions.

  17. Variability in Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population in Cultured Chicken Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Vaughn, Jeffrey R.

    1998-01-01

    Investigations into expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) in chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture were initiated because several beta-adrenergic receptor agonists are known to increase skeletal muscle protein deposition in avian and mammalian species. During initial attempts to study the bAR population on the surface of chicken skeletal muscle cells, we observed a high degree of variability that was later found to be the result of using different batches of horse serum in the cell culture media. The separation between total binding and nonspecific binding in cells grown in two serum samples was approximately two-fold The number of nuclei within multinucleated myotubes was not significantly different in cells grown in the two serum samples. To investigate whether these two sera had an effect on coupling efficiency between bAR population and cAMP production, the ability of these cells to synthesize cAMP was also assessed. Despite the two-fold difference in receptor population, the ability of these cells to synthesize cAMP was not significantly different. Because of the possible link between bAR population and muscle protein, we also determined if the quantity of the major skeletal muscle protein, myosin, was affected by conditions that so drastically affected the bAR population. The quantity of myosin heavy chain was not significantly different.

  18. Proteomics analysis reveals a Th17-prone cell population in presymptomatic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Liu, Liangyi; Gomez, Aurelie; Zhang, Jilu; Ramadan, Abdulraouf; Zhang, Qing; Choi, Sung W.; Zhang, Peng; Greenson, Joel K.; Liu, Chen; Jiang, Di; Virts, Elizabeth; Kelich, Stephanie L.; Chu, Hong Wei; Flynn, Ryan; Blazar, Bruce R.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Hanash, Samir; Paczesny, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal graft-versus-host-disease (GI-GVHD) is a life-threatening complication occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and a blood biomarker that permits stratification of HCT patients according to their risk of developing GI-GVHD would greatly aid treatment planning. Through in-depth, large-scale proteomic profiling of presymptomatic samples, we identified a T cell population expressing both CD146, a cell adhesion molecule, and CCR5, a chemokine receptor that is upregulated as early as 14 days after transplantation in patients who develop GI-GVHD. The CD4+CD146+CCR5+ T cell population is Th17 prone and increased by ICOS stimulation. shRNA knockdown of CD146 in T cells reduced their transmigration through endothelial cells, and maraviroc, a CCR5 inhibitor, reduced chemotaxis of the CD4+CD146+CCR5+ T cell population toward CCL14. Mice that received CD146 shRNA–transduced human T cells did not lose weight, showed better survival, and had fewer CD4+CD146+CCR5+ T cells and less pathogenic Th17 infiltration in the intestine, even compared with mice receiving maraviroc with control shRNA– transduced human T cells. Furthermore, the frequency of CD4+CD146+CCR5+ Tregs was increased in GI-GVHD patients, and these cells showed increased plasticity toward Th17 upon ICOS stimulation. Our findings can be applied to early risk stratification, as well as specific preventative therapeutic strategies following HCT. PMID:27195312

  19. Macroscopic limits of individual-based models for motile cell populations with volume exclusion.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Louise; Maini, Philip K; Baker, Ruth E

    2012-09-01

    Partial differential equation models are ubiquitous in studies of motile cell populations, giving a phenomenological description of events which can be analyzed and simulated using a wide range of existing tools. However, these models are seldom derived from individual cell behaviors and so it is difficult to accurately include biological hypotheses on this spatial scale. Moreover, studies which do attempt to link individual- and population-level behavior generally employ lattice-based frameworks in which the artifacts of lattice choice at the population level are unclear. In this work we derive limiting population-level descriptions of a motile cell population from an off-lattice, individual-based model (IBM) and investigate the effects of volume exclusion on the population-level dynamics. While motility with excluded volume in on-lattice IBMs can be accurately described by Fickian diffusion, we demonstrate that this is not the case off lattice. We show that the balance between two key parameters in the IBM (the distance moved in one step and the radius of an individual) determines whether volume exclusion results in enhanced or slowed diffusion. The magnitude of this effect is shown to increase with the number of cells and the rate of their movement. The method we describe is extendable to higher-dimensional and more complex systems and thereby provides a framework for deriving biologically realistic, continuum descriptions of motile populations. PMID:23030940

  20. CD38 low IgG-secreting cells are precursors of various CD38 high-expressing plasma cell populations.

    PubMed

    Arce, Sergio; Luger, Elke; Muehlinghaus, Gwendolin; Cassese, Giuliana; Hauser, Anja; Horst, Alexander; Lehnert, Katja; Odendahl, Marcus; Hönemann, Dirk; Heller, Karl-Dieter; Kleinschmidt, Harald; Berek, Claudia; Dörner, Thomas; Krenn, Veit; Hiepe, Falk; Bargou, Ralf; Radbruch, Andreas; Manz, Rudolf A

    2004-06-01

    Despite the important role immunoglobulin G (IgG)-secreting plasma cells play in memory immune responses, the differentiation and homeostasis of these cells are not completely understood. Here, we studied the differentiation of human IgG-secreting cells ex vivo and in vitro, identifying these cells by the cellular affinity matrix technology. Several subpopulations of IgG-secreting cells were identified among the cells isolated from tonsils and bone marrow, particularly differing in the expression levels of CD9, CD19, and CD38. CD38 low IgG-secreting cells were present exclusively in the tonsils. A major fraction of these cells appeared to be early plasma cell precursors, as upon activation of B cells in vitro, IgG secretion preceded up-regulation of CD38, and on tonsillar sections, IgG-containing, CD38 low cells with a plasmacytoid phenotype were found in follicles, where plasma cell differentiation starts. A unitary phenotype of migratory peripheral blood IgG-secreting cells suggests that all bone marrow plasma cell populations share a common precursor cell. These data are compatible with a multistep model for plasma cell differentiation and imply that a common CD38 low IgG-secreting precursor gives rise to a diverse plasma cell compartment. PMID:15020647

  1. Endometrial Stromal Cells and Immune Cell Populations Within Lymph Nodes in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Fazleabas, A. T.; Braundmeier, A. G.; Markham, R.; Fraser, I. S.; Berbic, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that immunological responses may be altered in endometriosis. The baboon (Papio anubis) is generally considered the best model of endometriosis pathogenesis. The objective of the current study was to investigate for the first time immunological changes within uterine and peritoneal draining lymph nodes in a nonhuman primate baboon model of endometriosis. Paraffin-embedded femoral lymph nodes were obtained from 22 normally cycling female baboons (induced endometriosis n = 11; control n = 11). Immunohistochemical staining was performed with antibodies for endometrial stromal cells, T cells, immature and mature dendritic cells, and B cells. Lymph nodes were evaluated using an automated cellular imaging system. Endometrial stromal cells were significantly increased in lymph nodes from animals with induced endometriosis, compared to control animals (P = .033). In animals with induced endometriosis, some lymph node immune cell populations including T cells, dendritic cells and B cells were increased, suggesting an efficient early response or peritoneal drainage. PMID:21617251

  2. Identification and visualization of multidimensional antigen-specific T-cell populations in polychromatic cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Frelinger, Jacob; Jiang, Wenxin; Finak, Greg; Seshadri, Chetan; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; McElrath, Julie; DeRosa, Steve; Gottardo, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    An important aspect of immune monitoring for vaccine development, clinical trials, and research is the detection, measurement, and comparison of antigen-specific T-cells from subject samples under different conditions. Antigen-specific T-cells compose a very small fraction of total T-cells. Developments in cytometry technology over the past five years have enabled the measurement of single-cells in a multivariate and high-throughput manner. This growth in both dimensionality and quantity of data continues to pose a challenge for effective identification and visualization of rare cell subsets, such as antigen-specific T-cells. Dimension reduction and feature extraction play pivotal role in both identifying and visualizing cell populations of interest in large, multi-dimensional cytometry datasets. However, the automated identification and visualization of rare, high-dimensional cell subsets remains challenging. Here we demonstrate how a systematic and integrated approach combining targeted feature extraction with dimension reduction can be used to identify and visualize biological differences in rare, antigen-specific cell populations. By using OpenCyto to perform semi-automated gating and features extraction of flow cytometry data, followed by dimensionality reduction with t-SNE we are able to identify polyfunctional sub-populations of antigen-specific T-cells and visualize treatment-specific differences between them. PMID:25908275

  3. Predators inhibit brain cell proliferation in natural populations of electric fish, Brachyhypopomus occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Kent D; Tran, Alex; Ragazzi, Michael A; Krahe, Rüdiger; Salazar, Vielka L

    2016-02-10

    Compared with laboratory environments, complex natural environments promote brain cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Predators are one important feature of many natural environments, but, in the laboratory, predatory stimuli tend to inhibit brain cell proliferation. Often, laboratory predatory stimuli also elevate plasma glucocorticoids, which can then reduce brain cell proliferation. However, it is unknown how natural predators affect cell proliferation or whether glucocorticoids mediate the neurogenic response to natural predators. We examined brain cell proliferation in six populations of the electric fish, Brachyhypopomus occidentalis, exposed to three forms of predator stimuli: (i) natural variation in the density of predatory catfish; (ii) tail injury, presumably from predation attempts; and (iii) the acute stress of capture. Populations with higher predation pressure had lower density of proliferating (PCNA+) cells, and fish with injured tails had lower proliferating cell density than those with intact tails. However, plasma cortisol did not vary at the population level according to predation pressure or at the individual level according to tail injury. Capture stress significantly increased cortisol, but only marginally decreased cell proliferation. Thus, it appears that the presence of natural predators inhibits brain cell proliferation, but not via mechanisms that depend on changes in basal cortisol levels. This study is the first demonstration of predator-induced alteration of brain cell proliferation in a free-living vertebrate. PMID:26842566

  4. Antibiotic regimen based on population analysis of residing persister cells eradicates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shoufeng; Hay, Iain D.; Cameron, David R.; Speir, Mary; Cui, Bintao; Su, Feifei; Peleg, Anton Y.; Lithgow, Trevor; Deighton, Margaret A.; Qu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a major pathogenicity strategy of Staphylococcus epidermidis causing various medical-device infections. Persister cells have been implicated in treatment failure of such infections. We sought to profile bacterial subpopulations residing in S. epidermidis biofilms, and to establish persister-targeting treatment strategies to eradicate biofilms. Population analysis was performed by challenging single biofilm cells with antibiotics at increasing concentrations ranging from planktonic minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) to biofilm MBCs (MBCbiofilm). Two populations of “persister cells” were observed: bacteria that survived antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for 24/48 hours were referred to as dormant cells; those selected with antibiotics at 8 X MICs for 3 hours (excluding dormant cells) were defined as tolerant-but-killable (TBK) cells. Antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells were tested in vitro for their efficacies in eradicating persister cells and intact biofilms. This study confirmed that there are at least three subpopulations within a S. epidermidis biofilm: normal cells, dormant cells, and TBK cells. Biofilms comprise more TBK cells and dormant cells than their log-planktonic counterparts. Using antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells, i.e. effective antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for an extended period, might eradicate S. epidermidis biofilms. Potential uses for this strategy are in antibiotic lock techniques and inhaled aerosolized antibiotics. PMID:26687035

  5. Optimized Stem Cell Detection Using the DyeCycle-Triggered Side Population Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Wolf, Dominik; Sopper, Sieghart

    2016-01-01

    Tissue and cancer stem cells are highly attractive target populations for regenerative medicine and novel potentially curative anticancer therapeutics. In order to get a better understanding of stem cell biology and function, it is essential to reproducibly identify these stem cells from biological samples for subsequent characterization or isolation. ABC drug transporter expression is a hallmark of stem cells. This is utilized to identify (cancer) stem cells by exploiting their dye extrusion properties, which is referred to as the “side population assay.” Initially described for high-end flow cytometers equipped with ultraviolet lasers, this technique is now also amenable for a broader scientific community, owing to the increasing availability of violet laser-furnished cytometers and the advent of DyeCycle Violet (DCV). Here, we describe important technical aspects of the DCV-based side population assay and discuss potential pitfalls and caveats helping scientists to establish a valid and reproducible DCV-based side population assay. In addition, we investigate the suitability of blue laser-excitable DyeCycle dyes for side population detection. This knowledge will help to improve and standardize detection and isolation of stem cells based on their expression of ABC drug transporters. PMID:26798352

  6. Noise and Epigenetic Inheritance of Single-Cell Division Times Influence Population Fitness.

    PubMed

    Cerulus, Bram; New, Aaron M; Pougach, Ksenia; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2016-05-01

    The fitness effect of biological noise remains unclear. For example, even within clonal microbial populations, individual cells grow at different speeds. Although it is known that the individuals' mean growth speed can affect population-level fitness, it is unclear how or whether growth speed heterogeneity itself is subject to natural selection. Here, we show that noisy single-cell division times can significantly affect population-level growth rate. Using time-lapse microscopy to measure the division times of thousands of individual S. cerevisiae cells across different genetic and environmental backgrounds, we find that the length of individual cells' division times can vary substantially between clonal individuals and that sublineages often show epigenetic inheritance of division times. By combining these experimental measurements with mathematical modeling, we find that, for a given mean division time, increasing heterogeneity and epigenetic inheritance of division times increases the population growth rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the heterogeneity and epigenetic inheritance of single-cell division times can be linked with variation in the expression of catabolic genes. Taken together, our results reveal how a change in noisy single-cell behaviors can directly influence fitness through dynamics that operate independently of effects caused by changes to the mean. These results not only allow a better understanding of microbial fitness but also help to more accurately predict fitness in other clonal populations, such as tumors. PMID:27068419

  7. Skin telocytes versus fibroblasts: two distinct dermal cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuli; Zhu, Zaihua; Zheng, Yonghua; Wan, Weiguo; Manole, Catalin G; Zhang, Qiangqiang

    2015-11-01

    It is already accepted that telocytes (TCs) represent a new type of interstitial cells in human dermis. In normal skin, TCs have particular spatial relations with different dermal structures such as blood vessels, hair follicles, arrector pili muscles or segments of sebaceous and/or eccrine sweat glands. The distribution and the density of TCs is affected in various skin pathological conditions. Previous studies mentioned the particular (ultra)structure of TCs and also their immunophenotype, miR imprint or proteome, genome or secretome features. As fibroblast is the most common intersitital cell (also in human dermis), a dedicated comparison between human skin TCs and fibroblasts (Fbs) was required to be performed. In this study, using different techniques, we document several points of difference between human dermis TCs and Fbs. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we demonstrated TCs with their hallmark cellular prolongations - telopodes. Thus, we showed their ultrastructural distinctiveness from Fbs. By RayBio Human Cytokine Antibody Array V analyses performed on the supernatant from separately cultured TCs and Fbs, we detected the cytokine profile of both cell types, individually. Two of 79 detected cytokines - epithelial-derived neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 - were 1.5 times higher in the supernatant of TCs (comparing with Fbs). On the other hand, 37 cytokines were at least 1.5 higher in Fbs supernatant (comparing with TCs), and among them six cytokines - interleukin 5, monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3), MCP-4, macrophage inflammatory protein-3, angiogenin, thrombopoietin - being 9.5 times higher (results also confirmed by ELISA testing). In summary, using different techniques, we showed that human dermal TCs and Fbs are different in terms of ultrastructure and cytokine profile. PMID:26414534

  8. Skin telocytes versus fibroblasts: two distinct dermal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yuli; Zhu, Zaihua; Zheng, Yonghua; Wan, Weiguo; Manole, Catalin G; Zhang, Qiangqiang

    2015-01-01

    It is already accepted that telocytes (TCs) represent a new type of interstitial cells in human dermis. In normal skin, TCs have particular spatial relations with different dermal structures such as blood vessels, hair follicles, arrector pili muscles or segments of sebaceous and/or eccrine sweat glands. The distribution and the density of TCs is affected in various skin pathological conditions. Previous studies mentioned the particular (ultra)structure of TCs and also their immunophenotype, miR imprint or proteome, genome or secretome features. As fibroblast is the most common intersitital cell (also in human dermis), a dedicated comparison between human skin TCs and fibroblasts (Fbs) was required to be performed. In this study, using different techniques, we document several points of difference between human dermis TCs and Fbs. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we demonstrated TCs with their hallmark cellular prolongations – telopodes. Thus, we showed their ultrastructural distinctiveness from Fbs. By RayBio Human Cytokine Antibody Array V analyses performed on the supernatant from separately cultured TCs and Fbs, we detected the cytokine profile of both cell types, individually. Two of 79 detected cytokines – epithelial-derived neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 – were 1.5 times higher in the supernatant of TCs (comparing with Fbs). On the other hand, 37 cytokines were at least 1.5 higher in Fbs supernatant (comparing with TCs), and among them six cytokines – interleukin 5, monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3), MCP-4, macrophage inflammatory protein-3, angiogenin, thrombopoietin – being 9.5 times higher (results also confirmed by ELISA testing). In summary, using different techniques, we showed that human dermal TCs and Fbs are different in terms of ultrastructure and cytokine profile. PMID:26414534

  9. Modelling targets for anticancer drug control optimization in physiologically structured cell population models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billy, Frédérique; Clairambault, Jean; Fercoq, Olivier; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Perthame, Benoît

    2012-09-01

    The main two pitfalls of therapeutics in clinical oncology, that limit increasing drug doses, are unwanted toxic side effects on healthy cell populations and occurrence of resistance to drugs in cancer cell populations. Depending on the constraint considered in the control problem at stake, toxicity or drug resistance, we present two different ways to model the evolution of proliferating cell populations, healthy and cancer, under the control of anti-cancer drugs. In the first case, we use a McKendrick age-structured model of the cell cycle, whereas in the second case, we use a model of evolutionary dynamics, physiologically structured according to a continuous phenotype standing for drug resistance. In both cases, we mention how drug targets may be chosen so as to accurately represent the effects of cytotoxic and of cytostatic drugs, separately, and how one may consider the problem of optimisation of combined therapies.

  10. Sensitivity of bone cell populations to weightlessness and simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. E.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Gonsalves, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    A rat suspension model for simulating certain aspects of weightlessness is discussed. Perturbations in physiological systems induced by this head down suspension model are verified by flight data. Findings of a suppression of osteoblast differentiation help explain the inhibition of bone formation inflight and during Earth-bound simulations. Since the anatomical site for these studies was in the maxilla, which is gravity loaded but non weightbearing in ground-based simulations, the similarity of bone cell kinetic changes, both inflight and in the ground-based model, suggest that fluid shifts rather than unloading may play an important role in bone alterations, at least at this sampling site.

  11. Evidence for the existence of regulatory and effector B cell populations in Peyer's patches of sheep.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, S; Griebel, P J; Townsend, H; Babiuk, L A; Mutwiri, G

    2016-06-01

    IL-10 secreting CD21(+) B cells exist in sheep Peyer's patches (PP). It's not known however, whether all PP B cells are regulatory or whether an effector population also exists in this tissue. To further characterize the subpopulations of B cells in PP's, highly purified B cells were negatively sorted from jejunal PP and fractionated according to co-expression of CD72(+)CD21(+)or CD72(+)CD21(-) molecules and then stimulated with the TLR9-agonist, CpG ODN. IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ, and IgM production were then assayed. We observed that only highly purified CD72(+)CD21(+) B cells spontaneously secreted high levels of IL-10, but they did not produce any IL-12, IFN-γ or IgM suggesting that this cell population contains regulatory B cells. In contrast, CD72(+)CD21(-) B cells did not secrete IL-10, but secreted IL-12, IFN-γ, and IgM, suggesting they include effector cells. In addition, B cells expressing surface IgA, IgM and IgG1 all secreted similar levels of IL-10. We further confirmed that only B cells produce IL-10, while other cells in the PP including DCs and T cells do not. Our investigations may provide evidence for the existence of two sub-populations in sheep PP; IL-10 secreting regulatory (CD72(+)CD21(+)) cells, and IL-12/IFN-γ/IgM-secreting effector (CD72(+)CD21(-)) cells. PMID:27185260

  12. Repeated cisplatin treatment can lead to a multiresistant tumor cell population with stem cell features and sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Wintzell, My; Löfstedt, Lina; Johansson, Joel; Pedersen, Anne B; Fuxe, Jonas; Shoshan, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Cisplatin is used in treatment of several types of cancer, including epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). In order to mimic clinical treatment and to investigate longterm effects of cisplatin in surviving cancer cells, two EOC cell lines were repeatedly treated with low doses. In the SKOV-3 cell line originating from malignant ascites, but not in A2780 cells from a primary tumor, this led to emergence of a stable population (SKOV-3-R) which in the absence of cisplatin showed increased motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expression of cancer stem cell markers CD117, CD44 and ALDH1. Accordingly, the cells formed self-renewing spheres in serum-free stem cell medium. Despite upregulation of mitochondrial mass and cytochrome c, and no upregulation of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, SKOV-3-R were multiresistant to antineoplastic drugs. Cancer stem cells, or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are highly chemoresistant and are believed to cause relapse into disseminated and resistant EOC. Our second aim was therefore to target resistance in these TIC-like cells. Resistance could be correlated with upregulation of hexokinase-II and VDAC, which are known to form a survival-promoting mitochondrial complex. The cells were thus sensitive to 3-bromopyruvate, which dissociates hexokinase-II from this complex, and were particularly sensitive to combination treatment with cisplatin at doses down to 0.1 x IC 50. 3-bromopyruvate might thus be of use in targeting the especially aggressive TIC populations. PMID:22954696

  13. Changes in the population of perivascular cells in the bone tissue remodeling zones under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkova, Olena; Rodionova, Natalia; Shevel, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Microgravity and long-term hypokinesia induce reduction both in bone mass and mineral saturation, which can lead to the development of osteoporosis and osteopenia. (Oganov, 2003). Reorganizations and adaptive remodeling processes in the skeleton bones occur in the topographical interconnection with blood capillaries and perivascular cells. Radioautographic studies with 3H- thymidine (Kimmel, Fee, 1980; Rodionova, 1989, 2006) have shown that in osteogenesis zones there is sequential differentiation process of the perivascular cells into osteogenic. Hence the study of populations of perivascular stromal cells in areas of destructive changes is actual. Perivascular cells from metaphysis of the rat femoral bones under conditions of modeling microgravity were studied using electron microscopy and cytochemistry (hindlimb unloading, 28 days duration) and biosatellite «Bion-M1» (duration of flight from April 19 till May 19, 2013 on C57, black mice). It was revealed that both control and test groups populations of the perivascular cells are not homogeneous in remodeling adaptive zones. These populations comprise of adjacent to endothelium poorly differentiated forms and isolated cells with signs of differentiation (specific increased volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm). Majority of the perivascular cells in the control group (modeling microgravity) reveals reaction to alkaline phosphatase (marker of the osteogenic differentiation). In poorly differentiated cells this reaction is registered in nucleolus, nucleous and cytoplasm. In differentiating cells activity of the alkaline phosphatase is also detected on the outer surface of the cellular membrane. Unlike the control group in the bones of experimental animals reaction to the alkaline phosphatase is registered not in all cells of perivascular population. Part of the differentiating perivascular cells does not contain a product of the reaction. Under microgravity some poorly differentiated perivascular

  14. Comparison of nonciliated tracheal epithelial cells in six mammalian species: ultrastructure and population densities.

    PubMed

    Plopper, C G; Mariassy, A T; Wilson, D W; Alley, J L; Nishio, S J; Nettesheim, P

    1983-12-01

    Three types of nonciliated epithelial cells in mammalian conducting respiratory airways are thought to be secretory: mucous (goblet) cells, serous epithelial cells, and Clara cells. Mucous and serous cells are considered to be the secretory cells of the trachea. Clara cells are considered to be the secretory cells of the most distal conducting airways or bronchioles. To ascertain if mucous and serous epithelial cells are common to the tracheal epithelium of mammalian species, we characterized the ultrastructure and population densities of tracheal epithelial cells in six species: hamster (H), rat (Rt), rabbit (Rb), cat (C), Bonnet monkey (M. radiata) (B), and sheep (S). Following fixation by airway infusion with glutaraldehyde/paraformaldehyde, tracheal tissue was processed for light and electron microscopy (EM) by a selective embedding technique. Tracheal epithelium over cartilage was quantitated by light microscopy and characterized by transmission EM. Mucous cells were defined by abundant large nonhomogeneous granules, numerous Golgi complexes, basally located nuclei and granular endoplasmic reticulum (GER). The percentage of mucous cells in the tracheal epithelium was: H (0%), Rt (0.5%), Rb (1.3%), C (20.2%), B (8%), S (5.1%). Serous cells had homogeneous, electron-dense granules and extensive GER. Serous cells were present only in rats (39.2%). Clara cells had homogeneous electron-dense granules, abundant agranular endoplasmic reticulum (AER) and basal GER. Clara cells were found in hamsters (41.4%) and rabbits (17.6%). In sheep trachea, 35.9% of the epithelial cells had small electron-lucent granules, abundant AER and numerous Golgi complexes. In Bonnet monkey trachea, 16% of the epithelial cells had small electron-lucent granules, numerous polyribosomes, perinuclear Golgi apparatus and moderate GER. In cat trachea, 5.4% of the epithelial cells lacked granules, and had moderate numbers of mitochondria, moderate amounts of polyribosomes, a central nucleus, and

  15. Assessing Four Levels of Creative Mathematical Ability in Israeli Adolescents Utilizing Out-of-School Activities: A Circular Three-Stage Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livne, Nava L.; Milgram, Roberta M.

    2000-01-01

    A questionnaire of out-of-school activities was developed to assess mathematical creative ability at four levels using a three-stage circular technique. Israeli high school students (n=139) reported whether they had performed the activities. Resulting data provided evidence of the construct validity of a 12-item scale for assessing creative…

  16. The evolution of carrying capacity in constrained and expanding tumour cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlee, Philip; Anderson, Alexander R. A.

    2015-10-01

    Cancer cells are known to modify their micro-environment such that it can sustain a larger population, or, in ecological terms, they construct a niche which increases the carrying capacity of the population. It has however been argued that niche construction, which benefits all cells in the tumour, would be selected against since cheaters could reap the benefits without paying the cost. We have investigated the impact of niche specificity on tumour evolution using an individual based model of breast tumour growth, in which the carrying capacity of each cell consists of two components: an intrinsic, subclone-specific part and a contribution from all neighbouring cells. Analysis of the model shows that the ability of a mutant to invade a resident population depends strongly on the specificity. When specificity is low selection is mostly on growth rate, while high specificity shifts selection towards increased carrying capacity. Further, we show that the long-term evolution of the system can be predicted using adaptive dynamics. By comparing the results from a spatially structured versus well-mixed population we show that spatial structure restores selection for carrying capacity even at zero specificity, which poses a solution to the niche construction dilemma. Lastly, we show that an expanding population exhibits spatially variable selection pressure, where cells at the leading edge exhibit higher growth rate and lower carrying capacity than those at the centre of the tumour.

  17. Attenuated Toxoplasma gondii Stimulates Immunity to Pancreatic Cancer by Manipulation of Myeloid Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kiah L; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2015-08-01

    Suppressive myeloid cells represent a significant barrier to the generation of productive antitumor immune responses to many solid tumors. Eliminating or reprogramming suppressive myeloid cells to abrogate tumor-associated immune suppression is a promising therapeutic approach. We asked whether treatment of established aggressive disseminated pancreatic cancer with the immunotherapeutic attenuated Toxoplasma gondii vaccine strain CPS would trigger tumor-associated myeloid cells to generate therapeutic antitumor immune responses. CPS treatment significantly decreased tumor-associated macrophages and markedly increased dendritic cell infiltration of the pancreatic tumor microenvironment. Tumor-resident macrophages and dendritic cells, particularly cells actively invaded by CPS, increased expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 and concomitantly boosted their production of IL12. CPS treatment increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell infiltration into the tumor microenvironment, activated tumor-resident T cells, and increased IFNγ production by T-cell populations. CPS treatment provided a significant therapeutic benefit in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice. This therapeutic benefit depended on IL12 and IFNγ production, MyD88 signaling, and CD8(+) T-cell populations. Although CD4(+) T cells exhibited activated effector phenotypes and produced IFNγ, CD4(+) T cells as well as natural killer cells were not required for the therapeutic benefit. In addition, CD8(+) T cells isolated from CPS-treated tumor-bearing mice produced IFNγ after re-exposure to pancreatic tumor antigen, suggesting this immunotherapeutic treatment stimulated tumor cell antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. This work highlights the potency and immunotherapeutic efficacy of CPS treatment and demonstrates the significance of targeting tumor-associated myeloid cells as a mechanism to stimulate more effective immunity to pancreatic cancer. PMID:25804437

  18. Attenuated Toxoplasma gondii stimulates immunity to pancreatic cancer by manipulation of myeloid cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kiah L.; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Suppressive myeloid cells represent a significant barrier to the generation of productive antitumor immune responses to many solid tumors. Eliminating or reprogramming suppressive myeloid cells to abrogate tumor-associated immune suppression is a promising therapeutic approach. We asked whether treatment of established aggressive disseminated pancreatic cancer with the immunotherapeutic attenuated Toxoplasma gondii vaccine strain CPS would trigger tumor-associated myeloid cells to generate therapeutic antitumor immune responses. CPS treatment significantly decreased tumor-associated macrophages and markedly increased dendritic cell infiltration of the pancreatic tumor microenvironment. Tumor-resident macrophages and dendritic cells, particularly cells actively invaded by CPS, increased expression of co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 and concomitantly boosted their production of IL12. CPS treatment increased CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell infiltration into the tumor microenvironment, activated tumor-resident T cells, and increased IFNγ production by T-cell populations. CPS treatment provided a significant therapeutic benefit in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice. This therapeutic benefit depended on IL12 and IFNγ production, MyD88 signaling, and CD8+ T-cell populations. Although CD4+ T cells exhibited activated effector phenotypes and produced IFNγ, CD4+ T cells as well as NK cells were not required for the therapeutic benefit. In addition, CD8+ T cells isolated from CPS-treated tumor-bearing mice produced IFNγ after re-exposure to pancreatic tumor antigen, suggesting this immunotherapeutic treatment stimulated tumor cell antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. This work highlights the potency and immunotherapeutic efficacy of CPS treatment and demonstrates the significance of targeting tumor-associated myeloid cells as a mechanism to stimulate more effective immunity to pancreatic cancer. PMID:25804437

  19. Functional and phenotypic differences of pure populations of stem cell-derived astrocytes and neuronal precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Kleiderman, Susanne; Sá, João V; Teixeira, Ana P; Brito, Catarina; Gutbier, Simon; Evje, Lars G; Hadera, Mussie G; Glaab, Enrico; Henry, Margit; Sachinidis, Agapios; Alves, Paula M; Sonnewald, Ursula; Leist, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    Availability of homogeneous astrocyte populations would facilitate research concerning cell plasticity (metabolic and transcriptional adaptations; innate immune responses) and cell cycle reactivation. Current protocols to prepare astrocyte cultures differ in their final content of immature precursor cells, preactivated cells or entirely different cell types. A new method taking care of all these issues would improve research on astrocyte functions. We found here that the exposure of a defined population of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSC) to BMP4 results in pure, nonproliferating astrocyte cultures within 24-48 h. These murine astrocytes generated from embryonic stem cells (mAGES) expressed the positive markers GFAP, aquaporin 4 and GLT-1, supported neuronal function, and acquired innate immune functions such as the response to tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1. The protocol was applicable to several normal or disease-prone pluripotent cell lines, and the corresponding mAGES all exited the cell cycle and lost most of their nestin expression, in contrast to astrocytes generated by serum-addition or obtained as primary cultures. Comparative gene expression analysis of mAGES and NSC allowed quantification of differences between the two cell types and a definition of an improved marker set to define astrocytes. Inclusion of several published data sets in this transcriptome comparison revealed the similarity of mAGES with cortical astrocytes in vivo. Metabolic analysis of homogeneous NSC and astrocyte populations revealed distinct neurochemical features: both cell types synthesized glutamine and citrate, but only mature astrocytes released these metabolites. Thus, the homogeneous cultures allowed an improved definition of NSC and astrocyte features. PMID:26689134

  20. CD38 is a putative functional marker for side population cells in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Danwei; Liao, Shan; Zhu, Guangchao; Luo, Gengqiu; Xiao, Songshu; He, Junyu; Pei, Zhen; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2016-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for cancer progression and therapeutic resistance but identification of this subpopulation requires selective markers. Fortunately, side population (SP) cells analysis brings a novel method to CSCs study. In this study, we identified SP cells, which are demonstrated rich in CSCs, in four nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines. We investigated SP cells from HK-1 NPC cell line and showed CSCs characteristics in this subpopulation. SP cells displayed greater proliferation and invasion and expressed high levels of CSCs markers than NSP cells. Furthermore, our microRNA microarray analysis of SP versus NSP cells revealed that CD38-related miRNAs were down-regulated in SP cell, but the mRNA and protein level of CD38 were highly expressed in SP cells. We further searched for molecules interacting with CD38 and identified ZAP70, which was also well expressed in SP cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Our results uncover a CD38 pathway that may regulate the proliferation and migration of SP cells from HK-1 NPC cell line. PMID:25630761

  1. Clonal Dynamics Reveal Two Distinct Populations of Basal Cells in Slow-Turnover Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Watson, Julie K; Rulands, Steffen; Wilkinson, Adam C; Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Göttgens, Berthold; Blanpain, Cédric; Simons, Benjamin D; Rawlins, Emma L

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial lineages have been studied at cellular resolution in multiple organs that turn over rapidly. However, many epithelia, including those of the lung, liver, pancreas, and prostate, turn over slowly and may be regulated differently. We investigated the mouse tracheal epithelial lineage at homeostasis by using long-term clonal analysis and mathematical modeling. This pseudostratified epithelium contains basal cells and secretory and multiciliated luminal cells. Our analysis revealed that basal cells are heterogeneous, comprising approximately equal numbers of multipotent stem cells and committed precursors, which persist in the basal layer for 11 days before differentiating to luminal fate. We confirmed the molecular and functional differences within the basal population by using single-cell qRT-PCR and further lineage labeling. Additionally, we show that self-renewal of short-lived secretory cells is a feature of homeostasis. We have thus revealed early luminal commitment of cells that are morphologically indistinguishable from stem cells. PMID:26119728

  2. Population diversity and function of hyperpolarization-activated current in olfactory bulb mitral cells

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Kamilla; Margrie, Troy W.

    2011-01-01

    Although neurons are known to exhibit a broad array of intrinsic properties that impact critically on the computations they perform, very few studies have quantified such biophysical diversity and its functional consequences. Using in vivo and in vitro whole-cell recordings here we show that mitral cells are extremely heterogeneous in their expression of a rebound depolarization (sag) at hyperpolarized potentials that is mediated by a ZD7288-sensitive current with properties typical of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels. The variability in sag expression reflects a functionally diverse population of mitral cells. For example, those cells with large amplitude sag exhibit more membrane noise, a lower rheobase and fire action potentials more regularly than cells where sag is absent. Thus, cell-to-cell variability in sag potential amplitude reflects diversity in the integrative properties of mitral cells that ensures a broad dynamic range for odor representation across these principal neurons. PMID:22355569

  3. ADAM23 is downregulated in side population and suppresses lung metastasis of lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ota, Masahide; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Abe, Hitoshi; Miyamae, Yuka; Ishii, Ken; Kimura, Hiroshi; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-04-01

    Cancer cells contain a small population of cancer stem cells or cancer initiating cells, which can be enriched in the side population (SP) after fluorescence activated cell sorting. To examine the members of the ADAM, ADAMTS and MMP gene families related to phenotypes of the SP and the main population (MP), we screened the expression of all the members in the propagated SP and MP of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells, and found that the relative expression ratio of ADAM23 in the MP to the SP is most highly increased, but none of them are increased in the SP. A similar result on the ADAM23 expression was obtained with another cell line, Calu-3 cells. Overexpression of ADAM23 inhibited colony formation, cell adhesion and migration, and knockdown of ADAM23 by shRNA showed the reverse effects. ADAM23-mediated suppression of colony formation, cell adhesion and migration was greatly reduced by treatment with neutralizing anti-ADAM23 antibody, anti-αvβ3 integrin antibody and/or ADAM23 disintegrin peptide. Expression of cancer stem cell-related genes, including AKRC1/2, TM4SF1 and NR0B1, was increased by knockdown of ADAM23. In addition, lung metastasis of A549 transfectants with different levels of ADAM23 expression was negatively regulated by the ADAM23 expression levels. Our data provide evidence that ADAM23 plays a role in suppression of cancer cell progression through interaction with αvβ3 integrin, and suggest that downregulation of ADAM23 in SP cells may contribute toward providing a cancer stem cell phenotype by facilitating the activity of integrin αvβ3. PMID:26800504

  4. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI. PMID:27005516

  5. Immunocytochemical analysis of proliferative activity of endometrial and myometrial cell populations in focal and stromal adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Nepomnyashchikh, L M; Lushnikova, E L; Molodykh, O P; Pichigina, A K

    2013-08-01

    Immunocytochemical study has shown that Ki-67 antigen is detected in adenomyosis in both endometrial and myometrial cell populations (in the eutopic and ectopic endometrial glandular epithelium, stromal cells, smooth muscle cells, and vascular endotheliocytes of the endometrium and myometrium), the label index differing significantly in different cell populations. The highest labeled cell index is found in the endometrial gland epitheliocytes in focal adenomyosis (23.2 ± 2.9%); in the stromal variant this index is by 2.8 times lower despite the fact that this variant is associated with endometrial glandular hyperplasia in the majority of cases. Proliferative activity of secretory epitheliocytes is significantly lower in both adenomyosis variants than in the normal eutopic endometrium. Stromal adenomyosis is characterized by 2-fold higher proliferative activity of the cytogenic stroma than that in focal adenomyosis. PMID:24143380

  6. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI. PMID:27005516

  7. Unique spectral markers discern recurrent Glioblastoma cells from heterogeneous parent population

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ekjot; Sahu, Aditi; Hole, Arti R.; Rajendra, Jacinth; Chaubal, Rohan; Gardi, Nilesh; Dutt, Amit; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Krishna, C. Murali; Dutt, Shilpee

    2016-01-01

    An inability to discern resistant cells from bulk tumour cell population contributes to poor prognosis in Glioblastoma. Here, we compared parent and recurrent cells generated from patient derived primary cultures and cell lines to identify their unique molecular hallmarks. Although morphologically similar, parent and recurrent cells from different samples showed variable biological properties like proliferation and radiation resistance. However, total RNA-sequencing revealed transcriptional landscape unique to parent and recurrent populations. These data suggest that global molecular differences but not individual biological phenotype could differentiate parent and recurrent cells. We demonstrate that Raman Spectroscopy a label-free, non-invasive technique, yields global information about biochemical milieu of recurrent and parent cells thus, classifying them into distinct clusters based on Principal-Component-Analysis and Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant-Analysis. Additionally, higher lipid related spectral peaks were observed in recurrent population. Importantly, Raman spectroscopic analysis could further classify an independent set of naïve primary glioblastoma tumour tissues into non-responder and responder groups. Interestingly, spectral features from the non-responder patient samples show a considerable overlap with the in-vitro generated recurrent cells suggesting their similar biological behaviour. This feasibility study necessitates analysis of a larger cohort of naïve primary glioblastoma samples to fully envisage clinical utility of Raman spectroscopy in predicting therapeutic response. PMID:27221528

  8. Deconvolution of gene expression from cell populations across the C. elegans lineage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge of when and in which cells each gene is expressed across multicellular organisms is critical in understanding both gene function and regulation of cell type diversity. However, methods for measuring expression typically involve a trade-off between imaging-based methods, which give the precise location of a limited number of genes, and higher throughput methods such as RNA-seq, which include all genes, but are more limited in their resolution to apply to many tissues. We propose an intermediate method, which estimates expression in individual cells, based on high-throughput measurements of expression from multiple overlapping groups of cells. This approach has particular benefits in organisms such as C. elegans where invariant developmental patterns make it possible to define these overlapping populations of cells at single-cell resolution. Result We implement several methods to deconvolve the gene expression in individual cells from population-level data and determine the accuracy of these estimates on simulated data from the C. elegans embryo. Conclusion These simulations suggest that a high-resolution map of expression in the C. elegans embryo may be possible with expression data from as few as 30 cell populations. PMID:23800200

  9. Population dynamics during cell proliferation and neuronogenesis in the developing murine neocortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowakowski, Richard S.; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Takahashi, Takao; Hayes, Nancy L.

    2002-01-01

    During the development of the neocortex, cell proliferation occurs in two specialized zones adjacent to the lateral ventricle. One of these zones, the ventricular zone, produces most of the neurons of the neocortex. The proliferating population that resides in the ventricular zone is a pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE) that looks uniform in routine histological preparations, but is, in fact, an active and dynamically changing population. In the mouse, over the course of a 6-day period, the PVE produces approximately 95% of the neurons of the adult neocortex. During this time, the cell cycle of the PVE population lengthens from about 8 h to over 18 h and the progenitor population passes through a total of 11 cell cycles. This 6-day, 11-cell cycle period comprises the "neuronogenetic interval" (NI). At each passage through the cell cycle, the proportion of daughter cells that exit the cell cycle (Q cells) increases from 0 at the onset of the NI to 1 at the end of the NI. The proportion of daughter cells that re-enter the cell cycle (P cells) changes in a complementary fashion from 1 at the onset of the NI to 0 at the end of the NI. This set of systematic changes in the cell cycle and the output from the proliferative population of the PVE allows a quantitative and mathematical treatment of the expansion of the PVE and the growth of the cortical plate that nicely accounts for the observed expansion and growth of the developing neocortex. In addition, we show that the cells produced during a 2-h window of development during specific cell cycles reside in a specific set of laminae in the adult cortex, but that the distributions of the output from consecutive cell cycles overlap. These dynamic events occur in all areas of the PVE underlying the neocortex, but there is a gradient of maturation that begins in the rostrolateral neocortex near the striatotelencephalic junction and which spreads across the surface of the neocortex over a period of 24-36 h. The

  10. A new model to simulate and analyze proliferating cell populations in BrdU labeling experiments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper presents a novel model for proliferating cell populations in labeling experiments. It is especially tailored to the technique of Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), which is taken up by dividing cells and thus accumulates with increasing division number during uplabeling. The study of the evolving label intensities of BrdU labeled cell populations is aimed at quantifying proliferation properties such as division and death rates. Results In contrast to existing models, our model considers a labeling efficacy that follows a distribution, rather than a uniform value. It thereby allows to account for noise as well as possibly space-dependent heterogeneity in the effective label uptake of the individual cells in a population. Furthermore, it enables more informative comparison with experimental data: The population-level label distribution is provided as a model output, thereby increasing the information content compared to existing models that give the fraction of labeled cells or the mean label intensity. We employ our model to study some naturally arising examples of heterogeneity in label uptake, which are not covered by existing models. With simulations of noisy and spacially heterogeneous label uptake, we demonstrate that our model contributes a more realistic quantitative description of labeling experiments. Conclusion The presented model is to our knowledge the first one that predicts the full label distribution for BrdU labeling experiments. Thus, it can exploit more information, namely the full intensity distribution, from labeling measurements, and thereby opens up new quantitative insights into cell proliferation. PMID:24268033

  11. A study of the genetical structure of the Cuban population: red cell and serum biochemical markers.

    PubMed Central

    González, R; Ballester, J M; Estrada, M; Lima, F; Martínez, G; Wade, M; Colombo, B; Vento, R

    1976-01-01

    Gene frequencies of several red cell and serum gentic markers were determined in the three main racial groups--whites, mulattoes and Negroes--of the Cuban population. The results were used to estimate the relative contribution of Caucasian and Negro genes to the genetic makeup of these three groups and to calculate the frequencies of these genes in the general Cuban population. PMID:1008061

  12. Single cell functional analysis of multiple myeloma cell populations correlates with diffusion profiles in static microfluidic coculture systems.

    PubMed

    Moore, Thomas A; Young, Edmond W K

    2016-07-01

    Microfluidic cell culture systems are becoming increasingly useful for studying biology questions, particularly those involving small cell populations that are cultured within microscale geometries mimicking the complex cellular microenvironment. Depending on the geometry and spatial organization of these cell populations, however, paracrine signaling between cell types can depend critically on spatial concentration profiles of soluble factors generated by diffusive transport. In scenarios where single cell data are acquired to study cell population heterogeneities in functional response, uncertainty associated with concentration profiles can lead to interpretation bias. To address this issue and provide important evidence on how diffusion develops within typical microfluidic cell culture systems, a combination of experimental and computational approaches were applied to measure and predict concentration patterns within microfluidic geometries, and characterize the functional response of culture cells based on single-cell resolution transcription factor activation. Using a model coculture system consisting of multiple myeloma cells (MMCs) and neighboring bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), we measured concentrations of three cytokines (IL-6, VEGF, and TNF-α) in conditioned media collected from separate culture compartments using a multiplex ELISA system. A 3D numerical model was developed to predict biomolecular diffusion and resulting concentration profiles within the tested microsystems and compared with experimental diffusion of 20 kDa FITC-Dextran. Finally, diffusion was further characterized by controlling exogenous IL-6 diffusion and the coculture spatial configuration of BMSCs to stimulate STAT3 nuclear translocation in MMCs. Results showed agreement between numerical and experimental results, provided evidence of a shallow concentration gradient across the center well of the microsystem that did not lead to a bias in results, and demonstrated that

  13. ERBB3 Positively Correlates with Intestinal Stem Cell Markers but Marks a Distinct Non Proliferative Cell Population in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jardé, Thierry; Kass, Lisa; Staples, Margaret; Lescesen, Helen; Carne, Peter; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J.; Abud, Helen E.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested ERBB3/HER3 may be a useful prognostic marker for colorectal cancer. Tumours with an intestinal stem cell signature have also been shown to be more aggressive. Here, we investigate whether ERBB3 is associated with intestinal stem cell markers in colorectal cancer and if cancer stem cells within tumours are marked by expression of ERBB3. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers (LGR5, EPHB2, CD44s and CD44v6) was assessed by qRT-PCR in primary colorectal tumours (stages 0 to IV) and matched normal tissues from 53 patients. The localisation of ERBB3, EPHB2 and KI-67 within tumours was investigated using co-immunofluorescence. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers were significantly elevated in adenomas and colorectal tumours compared to normal tissue. Positive correlations were found between ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers. However, co-immunofluorescence analysis showed that ERBB3 and EPHB2 marked specific cell populations that were mutually exclusive within tumours with distinct proliferative potentials, the majority of ERBB3+ve cells being non-proliferative. This pattern resembles cellular organisation within normal colonic epithelium where EPHB2 labelled proliferative cells reside at the crypt base and ERBB3+ve cells mark differentiated cells at the top of crypts. Our results show that ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers correlate in colorectal cancers. ERBB3 localises to differentiated cell populations within tumours that are non-proliferative and distinct from cancer stem cells. These data support the concept that tumours contain discrete stem, proliferative and differentiation compartments similar to that present in normal crypts. PMID:26367378

  14. ERBB3 Positively Correlates with Intestinal Stem Cell Markers but Marks a Distinct Non Proliferative Cell Population in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jardé, Thierry; Kass, Lisa; Staples, Margaret; Lescesen, Helen; Carne, Peter; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J; Abud, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested ERBB3/HER3 may be a useful prognostic marker for colorectal cancer. Tumours with an intestinal stem cell signature have also been shown to be more aggressive. Here, we investigate whether ERBB3 is associated with intestinal stem cell markers in colorectal cancer and if cancer stem cells within tumours are marked by expression of ERBB3. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers (LGR5, EPHB2, CD44s and CD44v6) was assessed by qRT-PCR in primary colorectal tumours (stages 0 to IV) and matched normal tissues from 53 patients. The localisation of ERBB3, EPHB2 and KI-67 within tumours was investigated using co-immunofluorescence. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers were significantly elevated in adenomas and colorectal tumours compared to normal tissue. Positive correlations were found between ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers. However, co-immunofluorescence analysis showed that ERBB3 and EPHB2 marked specific cell populations that were mutually exclusive within tumours with distinct proliferative potentials, the majority of ERBB3+ve cells being non-proliferative. This pattern resembles cellular organisation within normal colonic epithelium where EPHB2 labelled proliferative cells reside at the crypt base and ERBB3+ve cells mark differentiated cells at the top of crypts. Our results show that ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers correlate in colorectal cancers. ERBB3 localises to differentiated cell populations within tumours that are non-proliferative and distinct from cancer stem cells. These data support the concept that tumours contain discrete stem, proliferative and differentiation compartments similar to that present in normal crypts. PMID:26367378

  15. [Nonadhesive populations in cultures of mesenchymal stromal cells from hematopoietic organs in mouse and rat].

    PubMed

    Byeverova, E I; Bragina, E V; Molchanova, E A

    2008-01-01

    The study of adhesive properties of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells evaluated from fibroblast colony-forming units in the bone marrow of adult mice and rats in populations of cells attached and unattached to plastic substrate after 2 h to 7 days in culture demonstrated both similarities and differences. The increase in the fibroblast colony-forming units in the adhesive population peaked on day 7 of in vitro culture in both cases; however, nearly no fibroblast colony-forming units were observed in the nonadhesive population from the mouse bone marrow in this period. Conversely, the number of colonies from the rat bone marrow nonadhesive population on day 7 of culture considerably increased, and this nonadhesive population in long-term culture became the source for subsequent nonadhesive subpopulations containing fibroblast colony-forming units. After 7 days of in vitro culture, the suspension of cells isolated from the liver of 17-day-old rat fetuses also contained a fraction of unattached fibroblast colony-forming units. In the nonadhesive subpopulations from the bone marrow and fetal liver, fibroblast colony-forming units were observed up to day 48 and 30, respectively. Stromal cell precursors of nonadhesive subpopulations from the rat bone marrow featured a period of colony formation reduced to 7 days (i.e., they were formed 1.5-2 times faster compared to the primary culture). The total number of fibroblast colony-forming units from all nonadhesive subpopulations was roughly 6 and 7.4 times that of the adhesive population of the primary culture from the bone marrow and fetal liver, respectively. Considering that the mammalian bone marrow remains the preferred source of mesenchymal stromal cells, using nonadhesive subpopulations in the presented culture system can considerably increase the yield of stromal precursor cells. PMID:19137707

  16. Single-cell variation leads to population invariance in NF-κB signaling dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hughey, Jacob J.; Gutschow, Miriam V.; Bajar, Bryce T.; Covert, Markus W.

    2015-01-01

    The activation dynamics of nuclear factor (NF)-κB have been shown to affect downstream gene expression. On activation, NF-κB shuttles back and forth across the nuclear envelope. Many dynamic features of this shuttling have been characterized, and most features vary significantly with respect to ligand type and concentration. Here, we report an invariant feature with regard to NF-κB dynamics in cellular populations: the distribution—the average, as well as the variance—of the time between two nuclear entries (the period). We find that this period is conserved, regardless of concentration and across several different ligands. Intriguingly, the distributions observed at the population level are not observed in individual cells over 20-h time courses. Instead, the average period of NF-κB nuclear translocation varies considerably among single cells, and the variance is much smaller within a cell than that of the population. Finally, analysis of daughter-cell pairs and isogenic populations indicates that the dynamics of the NF-κB response is heritable but diverges over multiple divisions, on the time scale of weeks to months. These observations are contrary to the existing theory of NF-κB dynamics and suggest an additional level of control that regulates the overall distribution of translocation timing at the population level. PMID:25473117

  17. Numerically exploring habitat fragmentation effects on populations using cell-based coupled map lattices.

    PubMed

    Bevers, M; Flather, C H

    1999-02-01

    We examine habitat size, shape, and arrangement effects on populations using a discrete reaction-diffusion model. Diffusion is modeled passively and applied to a cellular grid of territories forming a coupled map lattice. Dispersal mortality is proportional to the amount of nonhabitat and fully occupied habitat surrounding a given cell, with distance decay. After verifying that our model produces the results expected for single patches of uniform habitat, we investigate heterogeneous and fragmented model landscapes. In heterogeneous single-patch systems near critical patch size, populations approach Gaussian spatial distributions with total population constrained by the capacity of the most limiting cell. In fragmented habitat landscapes, threshold effects are more complex and parametrically sensitive. The results from our experiments suggest the following: the ability to achieve persistence in hyperdispersed patchy habitats by adding similarly fragmented patches requires meeting threshold reproduction rates; persistent metapopulations in which no local population is individually persistent appear when dispersal distances and reproduction rates are both high, but only within narrow parameter ranges that are close to extinction thresholds; successful use of stepping-stone patches to support metapopulation systems appears unlikely for passively diffusing species; elongated patches offer early colonization advantages, but blocky patches offer greater population resilience near extinction thresholds. A common theme running through our findings is that population viability estimates may depend on our ability to determine when population and habitat systems are approaching extinction threshold conditions. PMID:9925809

  18. Clonal genotype and population structure inference from single-cell tumor sequencing.

    PubMed

    Roth, Andrew; McPherson, Andrew; Laks, Emma; Biele, Justina; Yap, Damian; Wan, Adrian; Smith, Maia A; Nielsen, Cydney B; McAlpine, Jessica N; Aparicio, Samuel; Bouchard-Côté, Alexandre; Shah, Sohrab P

    2016-07-01

    Single-cell DNA sequencing has great potential to reveal the clonal genotypes and population structure of human cancers. However, single-cell data suffer from missing values and biased allelic counts as well as false genotype measurements owing to the sequencing of multiple cells. We describe the Single Cell Genotyper (https://bitbucket.org/aroth85/scg), an open-source software based on a statistical model coupled with a mean-field variational inference method, which can be used to address these problems and robustly infer clonal genotypes. PMID:27183439

  19. Identification of a population of cells with hematopoietic stem cell properties in mouse aorta-gonad-mesonephros cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Nobuhisa, Ikuo; Ohtsu, Naoki; Okada, Seiji; Nakagata, Naomi; Taga, Tetsuya . E-mail: taga@kaiju.medic.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-10

    The aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region is a primary source of definitive hematopoietic cells in the midgestation mouse embryo. In cultures of dispersed AGM regions, adherent cells containing endothelial cells are observed first, and then non-adherent hematopoietic cells are produced. Here we report on the characterization of hematopoietic cells that emerge in the AGM culture. Based on the expression profiles of CD45 and c-Kit, we defined three cell populations: CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells that had the ability to form hematopoietic cell colonies in methylcellulose media and in co-cultures with stromal cells; CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup -} cells that showed a granulocyte morphology; CD45{sup high} c-Kit{sup low/-} that exhibited a macrophage morphology. In co-cultures of OP9 stromal cells and freshly prepared AGM cultures, CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells from the AGM culture had the abilities to reproduce CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells and differentiate into CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup -} and CD45{sup high} c-Kit{sup low/-} cells, whereas CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup -} and CD45{sup high} c-Kit{sup low/-} did not produce CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells. Furthermore, CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells displayed a long-term repopulating activity in adult hematopoietic tissue when transplanted into the liver of irradiated newborn mice. These results indicate that CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells from the AGM culture have the potential to reconstitute multi-lineage hematopoietic cells.

  20. Label-Free Detection of Neuronal Differentiation in Cell Populations Using High-Throughput Live-Cell Imaging of PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Juliana M.; Knauer, Steffen; Offermann, Barbara; Murphy, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of neuronal cell differentiation is essential to study cell fate decisions under various stimuli and/or environmental conditions. Many tools exist that quantify differentiation by neurite length measurements of single cells. However, quantification of differentiation in whole cell populations remains elusive so far. Because such populations can consist of both proliferating and differentiating cells, the task to assess the overall differentiation status is not trivial and requires a high-throughput, fully automated approach to analyze sufficient data for a statistically significant discrimination to determine cell differentiation. We address the problem of detecting differentiation in a mixed population of proliferating and differentiating cells over time by supervised classification. Using nerve growth factor induced differentiation of PC12 cells, we monitor the changes in cell morphology over days by phase-contrast live-cell imaging. For general applicability, the classification procedure starts out with many features to identify those that maximize discrimination of differentiated and undifferentiated cells and to eliminate features sensitive to systematic measurement artifacts. The resulting image analysis determines the optimal post treatment day for training and achieves a near perfect classification of differentiation, which we confirmed in technically and biologically independent as well as differently designed experiments. Our approach allows to monitor neuronal cell populations repeatedly over days without any interference. It requires only an initial calibration and training step and is thereafter capable to discriminate further experiments. In conclusion, this enables long-term, large-scale studies of cell populations with minimized costs and efforts for detecting effects of external manipulation of neuronal cell differentiation. PMID:23451069

  1. A Versatile Strategy for Isolating a Highly Enriched Population of Intestinal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Nefzger, Christian M; Jardé, Thierry; Rossello, Fernando J; Horvay, Katja; Knaupp, Anja S; Powell, David R; Chen, Joseph; Abud, Helen E; Polo, Jose M

    2016-03-01

    The isolation of pure populations of mouse intestinal stem cells (ISCs) is essential to facilitate functional studies of tissue homeostasis, tissue regeneration, and intestinal diseases. However, the purification of ISCs has relied predominantly on the use of transgenic reporter alleles in mice. Here, we introduce a combinational cell surface marker-mediated strategy that allows the isolation of an ISC population transcriptionally and functionally equivalent to the gold standard Lgr5-GFP ISCs. Used on reporter-free mice, this strategy allows the isolation of functional, transcriptionally distinct ISCs uncompromised by Lgr5 haploinsufficiency. PMID:26923822

  2. A Versatile Strategy for Isolating a Highly Enriched Population of Intestinal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nefzger, Christian M.; Jardé, Thierry; Rossello, Fernando J.; Horvay, Katja; Knaupp, Anja S.; Powell, David R.; Chen, Joseph; Abud, Helen E.; Polo, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The isolation of pure populations of mouse intestinal stem cells (ISCs) is essential to facilitate functional studies of tissue homeostasis, tissue regeneration, and intestinal diseases. However, the purification of ISCs has relied predominantly on the use of transgenic reporter alleles in mice. Here, we introduce a combinational cell surface marker-mediated strategy that allows the isolation of an ISC population transcriptionally and functionally equivalent to the gold standard Lgr5-GFP ISCs. Used on reporter-free mice, this strategy allows the isolation of functional, transcriptionally distinct ISCs uncompromised by Lgr5 haploinsufficiency. PMID:26923822

  3. Array tomography: characterizing FAC-sorted populations of zebrafish immune cells by their 3D ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Irene; Chockley, Peter; Bartels, Carolin; Spomer, Waldemar; Hofmann, Andreas; Gengenbach, Ulrich; Singh, Sachin; Thaler, Marlene; Grabher, Clemens; SCHRÖDER, RASMUS R

    2015-01-01

    For 3D reconstructions of whole immune cells from zebrafish, isolated from adult animals by FAC-sorting we employed array tomography on hundreds of serial sections deposited on silicon wafers. Image stacks were either recorded manually or automatically with the newly released ZEISS Atlas 5 Array Tomography platform on a Zeiss FEGSEM. To characterize different populations of immune cells, organelle inventories were created by segmenting individual cells. In addition, arrays were used for quantification of cell populations with respect to the various cell types they contained. The detection of immunological synapses in cocultures of cell populations from thymus or WKM with cancer cells helped to identify the cytotoxic nature of these cells. Our results demonstrate the practicality and benefit of AT for high-throughput ultrastructural imaging of substantial volumes. Lay Description To look at immune cells from zebrafish we employed array tomography, a technique where arrays of serial sections deposited on solid substrates are used for imaging. Cell populations were isolated from the different organs of zebrafish involved in haematopoiesis, the production of blood cells. They were chemically fixed and centrifuged to concentrate them in a pellet that was then dehydrated and embedded in resin. Using a custom-built handling device it was possible to place hundreds of serial sections on silicon wafers as well ordered arrays. To image a whole cell at a resolution that would allow identifying all the organelles (i.e. compartments surrounded by membranes) inside the cell, stacks of usually 50–100 images were recorded in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). This recording was either done manually or automatically using the newly released Atlas Array Tomography platform on a ZEISS SEM. For the imaging of the sections a pixel size of about 5 nm was chosen, which defines membrane boundaries very well and allows segmentation of the membrane topology. After alignment of the

  4. The Murine Bladder Supports a Population of Stromal Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Meredith A; Kulkulka, Natalie A; Firmiss, Paula R; Ross, Michael J; Flum, Andrew S; Santos, Grace B Delos; Bowen, Diana K; Dettman, Robert W; Gong, Edward M

    2015-01-01

    Bladder fibrosis is an undesired end point of injury of obstruction and often renders the smooth muscle layer noncompliant. In many cases, the long-term effect of bladder fibrosis is renal failure. Despite our understanding of the progression of this disease, little is known about the cellular mechanisms that lead to a remodeled bladder wall. Resident stem (progenitor) cells have been identified in various organs such as the brain, heart and lung. These cells function normally during organ homeostasis, but become dysregulated after organ injury. Here, we aimed to characterize a mesenchymal progenitor cell population as a first step in understanding its role in bladder fibrosis. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), we identified a Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- (PECAM-: CD45-: Ter119-) population in the adult murine bladder. These cells were localized to the stromal layer of the adult bladder and appeared by postnatal day 1. Cultured Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- bladder cells self-renewed, formed colonies and spontaneously differentiated into cells expressing smooth muscle genes. These cells differentiated into other mesenchymal lineages (chondrocytes, adipocytes and osteocytes) upon culture in induction medium. Both acute and partial obstruction of the bladder reduced expression of CD34 and changed localization of Sca-1 to the urothelium. Partial obstruction resulted in upregulation of fibrosis genes within the Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- population. Our data indicate a resident, mesenchymal stem cell population in the bladder that is altered by bladder obstruction. These findings provide new information about the cellular changes in the bladder that may be associated with bladder fibrosis. PMID:26540309

  5. The Murine Bladder Supports a Population of Stromal Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Meredith A.; Kulkulka, Natalie A.; Firmiss, Paula R.; Ross, Michael J.; Flum, Andrew S.; Santos, Grace B. Delos; Bowen, Diana K.; Dettman, Robert W.; Gong, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder fibrosis is an undesired end point of injury of obstruction and often renders the smooth muscle layer noncompliant. In many cases, the long-term effect of bladder fibrosis is renal failure. Despite our understanding of the progression of this disease, little is known about the cellular mechanisms that lead to a remodeled bladder wall. Resident stem (progenitor) cells have been identified in various organs such as the brain, heart and lung. These cells function normally during organ homeostasis, but become dysregulated after organ injury. Here, we aimed to characterize a mesenchymal progenitor cell population as a first step in understanding its role in bladder fibrosis. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), we identified a Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- (PECAM-: CD45-: Ter119-) population in the adult murine bladder. These cells were localized to the stromal layer of the adult bladder and appeared by postnatal day 1. Cultured Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- bladder cells self-renewed, formed colonies and spontaneously differentiated into cells expressing smooth muscle genes. These cells differentiated into other mesenchymal lineages (chondrocytes, adipocytes and osteocytes) upon culture in induction medium. Both acute and partial obstruction of the bladder reduced expression of CD34 and changed localization of Sca-1 to the urothelium. Partial obstruction resulted in upregulation of fibrosis genes within the Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- population. Our data indicate a resident, mesenchymal stem cell population in the bladder that is altered by bladder obstruction. These findings provide new information about the cellular changes in the bladder that may be associated with bladder fibrosis. PMID:26540309

  6. Chemosensory Brush Cells of the Trachea. A Stable Population in a Dynamic Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Susan D.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Tracheal brush cells (BCs) are specialized epithelial chemosensors that use the canonical taste transduction cascade to detect irritants. To test whether BCs are replaced at the same rate as other cells in the surrounding epithelium of adult mice, we used 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. Although scattered BrdU-labeled epithelial cells are present 5–20 days after BrdU, no BCs are labeled. These data indicate that BCs comprise a relatively static population. To determine how BCs are generated during development, we injected 5-day-old mice with BrdU and found labeled BCs and non-BC epithelial cells 5 days after BrdU. During the next 60 days, the percentage of labeled BCs increased, whereas the percentage of other labeled cell types decreased. These data suggest that BCs are generated from non-BC progenitor cells during postnatal tracheal growth. To test whether the adult epithelium retains the capacity to generate BCs, tracheal epithelial cells were recovered from adult mice and grown in an air–liquid interface (ALI) culture. After transition to differentiation conditions, BCs are detected, and comprise 1% of the total cell population by Day 14. BrdU added to cultures before the differentiation of BCs was chased into BCs, indicating that the increase in BC density is attributable to the proliferation of a non-BC progenitor. We conclude that: (1) BCs are normally a static population in adult mice; (2) BC progenitors proliferate and differentiate during neonatal development; and (3) BCs can be regenerated from a proliferative population resident in adult epithelium. PMID:23526223

  7. Cellometer image cytometry as a complementary tool to flow cytometry for verifying gated cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kuksin, Dmitry; Kuksin, Christina Arieta; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2016-06-15

    Traditionally, many cell-based assays that analyze cell populations and functionalities have been performed using flow cytometry. However, flow cytometers remain relatively expensive and require highly trained operators for routine maintenance and data analysis. Recently, an image cytometry system has been developed by Nexcelom Bioscience (Lawrence, MA, USA) for automated cell concentration and viability measurement using bright-field and fluorescent imaging methods. Image cytometry is analogous to flow cytometry in that gating operations can be performed on the cell population based on size and fluorescent intensity. In addition, the image cytometer is capable of capturing bright-field and fluorescent images, allowing for the measurement of cellular size and fluorescence intensity data. In this study, we labeled a population of cells with an enzymatic vitality stain (calcein-AM) and a cell viability dye (propidium iodide) and compared the data generated by flow and image cytometry. We report that measuring vitality and viability using the image cytometer is as effective as flow cytometric assays and allows for visual confirmation of the sample to exclude cellular debris. Image cytometry offers a direct method for performing fluorescent cell-based assays but also may be used as a complementary tool to flow cytometers for aiding the analysis of more complex samples. PMID:27033005

  8. Lipid droplet organelle distribution in populations of dividing cells studied by simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalhaimer, Paul

    2013-06-01

    One of the key questions in cell biology is how organelles are passed from parent to daughter cells. To help address this question, I used Brownian dynamics to simulate lipid droplets as model organelles in populations of dividing cells. Lipid droplets are dynamic bodies that can form both de novo and by fission, they can also be depleted. The quantitative interplay among these three events is unknown but would seem crucial for controlling droplet distribution in populations of dividing cells. Surprisingly, of the three main events studied: biogenesis, fission, and depletion, the third played the key role in maintaining droplet organelle number—and to a lesser extent volume—in populations of dividing cells where formation events would have seemed paramount. In the case of lipid droplets, this provides computational evidence that they must be sustained, most likely through contacts with the endoplasmic reticulum. The findings also agree with video microscopy experiments over much shorter timescales where droplet depletion in fission yeast cells was not observed. In general, this work shows that organelle maintenance is invaluable and lack thereof cannot necessarily be compensated for by organelle formation. This study provides a time-accurate, physical-based template for long-term cell division studies.

  9. The selected B cell population in PRRS has a naive phenotype, undiversified repertoire and unusually hydrophobic HCDR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isolator piglets infected with PRRS virus (PRRSV) develop lymphoid hyperplasia, hypergammaglobulinemia and autoimmunity. Preliminary characterization of the expanded B cell population in these animals reveals a naive population that continues to express CD2. Spectratypic analyses (CDR3 length analy...

  10. Further analyses of human kidney cell populations separated on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Robin M.; Todd, Paul; Cole, Kenneth D.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1992-01-01

    Cultured human embryonic kidney cells were separated into electrophoretic subpopulations in laboratory experiments and in two separation experiments on the STS-8 (Challenger) Space Shuttle flight using the mid-deck Continuous Flow Electrophoretic Separator (CFES). Populations of cells from each fraction were cultured for the lifetime of the cells, and supernatant medium was withdrawn and replaced at 4-day intervals. Withdrawn medium was frozen at -120 C for subsequent analysis. Enzyme assays, antibodies and gel electrophoresis were used as analytical tools for the detection and quantization of plasminogen activators in these samples. These assays of frozen-culture supernatant fluids confirmed the electrophoretic separation of plasminogen-activator-producing cells from nonproducing cells, the isolation of cells capable of sustained production, and the separation of cells that produce different plasminogen activators from one other.

  11. Further analyses of human kidney cell populations separated on the space shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robin M.; Todd, Paul; Cole, Kenneth D.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    Cultured human embryonic kidney cells were separated into electrophoretic subpopulations in laboratory experiments and in two separation experiments on the STS-8 (Challenger) Space Shuttle flight using the mid-deck Continuous Flow Electrophoretic Separator (CFES). Populations of cells from each fraction were cultured for the lifetime of the cells, and supernatant medium was withdrawn and replaced at 4-day intervals. Withdrawn medium was frozen at -120°C for subsequent analysis. Enzyme assays, antibodies and gel electrophoresis were used as analytical tools for the detection and quantitation of plasminogen activators in these samples. These assays of frozen culture supernatant fluids confirmed the electrophoretic separation of plasminogen-activator producing cells from non-producing cells, the isolation of cells capable of sustained production, and the separation of cells that produce different plasminogen activators from one another.

  12. Further analyses of human kidney cell populations separated on the Space Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Stewart, R M; Todd, P; Cole, K D; Morrison, D R

    1992-01-01

    Cultured human embryonic kidney cells were separated into electrophoretic subpopulations in laboratory experiments and in two separation experiments on the STS-8 (Challenger) Space Shuttle flight using the mid-deck Continuous Flow Electrophoretic Separator (CFES). Populations of cells from each fraction were cultured for the lifetime of the cells, and supernatant medium was withdrawn and replaced at 4-day intervals. Withdrawn medium was frozen at -120 degrees C for subsequent analysis. Enzyme assays, antibodies and gel electrophoresis were used as analytical tools for the detection and quantitation of plasminogen activators in these samples. These assays of frozen culture supernatant fluids confirmed the electrophoretic separation of plasminogen-activator producing cells from non-producing cells, the isolation of cells capable of sustained production, and the separation of cells that produce different plasminogen activators from one another. PMID:11537068

  13. Inhibition of hedgehog signaling reduces the side population in human malignant mesothelioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H-A; Kim, M-C; Kim, N-Y; Kim, Y

    2015-01-01

    Deregulation of crucial embryonic pathways, including hedgehog signaling, has been frequently implicated in a variety of human cancers and is emerging as an important target for anticancer therapy. This study evaluated the potential anticancer effects of cyclopamine, a chemical inhibitor of hedgehog signaling, in human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) cell lines. Cyclopamine treatment significantly decreased the proliferation of HMM cells by promoting apoptosis and shifting the cell cycle toward dormant phase. The clonogenicity and mobility of HMM cells were significantly decreased by cyclopamine treatment. Treatment of HMM cells with cyclopamine significantly reduced the abundance of side population cells, which were measured using an assay composed of Hoechst 33342 dye staining and subsequent flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression levels of stemness-related genes were significantly affected by cyclopamine treatment. Taken together, the present study showed that targeting hedgehog signaling could reduce a more aggressive subpopulation of the cancer cells, suggesting an alternative approach for HMM therapy. PMID:26206198

  14. Taxonomic Separation of Hippocampal Networks: Principal Cell Populations and Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, R Maarten; Huang, Shih-Hui; Slomianka, Lutz; Amrein, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    While many differences in hippocampal anatomy have been described between species, it is typically not clear if they are specific to a particular species and related to functional requirements or if they are shared by species of larger taxonomic units. Without such information, it is difficult to infer how anatomical differences may impact on hippocampal function, because multiple taxonomic levels need to be considered to associate behavioral and anatomical changes. To provide information on anatomical changes within and across taxonomic ranks, we present a quantitative assessment of hippocampal principal cell populations in 20 species or strain groups, with emphasis on rodents, the taxonomic group that provides most animals used in laboratory research. Of special interest is the importance of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) in species-specific adaptations relative to other cell populations. Correspondence analysis of cell numbers shows that across taxonomic units, phylogenetically related species cluster together, sharing similar proportions of principal cell populations. CA3 and hilus are strong separators that place rodent species into a tight cluster based on their relatively large CA3 and small hilus while non-rodent species (including humans and non-human primates) are placed on the opposite side of the spectrum. Hilus and CA3 are also separators within rodents, with a very large CA3 and rather small hilar cell populations separating mole-rats from other rodents that, in turn, are separated from each other by smaller changes in the proportions of CA1 and granule cells. When adult neurogenesis is included, the relatively small populations of young neurons, proliferating cells and hilar neurons become main drivers of taxonomic separation within rodents. The observations provide challenges to the computational modeling of hippocampal function, suggest differences in the organization of hippocampal information streams in rodent and non-rodent species, and

  15. Taxonomic Separation of Hippocampal Networks: Principal Cell Populations and Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, R. Maarten; Huang, Shih-Hui; Slomianka, Lutz; Amrein, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    While many differences in hippocampal anatomy have been described between species, it is typically not clear if they are specific to a particular species and related to functional requirements or if they are shared by species of larger taxonomic units. Without such information, it is difficult to infer how anatomical differences may impact on hippocampal function, because multiple taxonomic levels need to be considered to associate behavioral and anatomical changes. To provide information on anatomical changes within and across taxonomic ranks, we present a quantitative assessment of hippocampal principal cell populations in 20 species or strain groups, with emphasis on rodents, the taxonomic group that provides most animals used in laboratory research. Of special interest is the importance of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) in species-specific adaptations relative to other cell populations. Correspondence analysis of cell numbers shows that across taxonomic units, phylogenetically related species cluster together, sharing similar proportions of principal cell populations. CA3 and hilus are strong separators that place rodent species into a tight cluster based on their relatively large CA3 and small hilus while non-rodent species (including humans and non-human primates) are placed on the opposite side of the spectrum. Hilus and CA3 are also separators within rodents, with a very large CA3 and rather small hilar cell populations separating mole-rats from other rodents that, in turn, are separated from each other by smaller changes in the proportions of CA1 and granule cells. When adult neurogenesis is included, the relatively small populations of young neurons, proliferating cells and hilar neurons become main drivers of taxonomic separation within rodents. The observations provide challenges to the computational modeling of hippocampal function, suggest differences in the organization of hippocampal information streams in rodent and non-rodent species, and

  16. The effect of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1973-01-01

    The problem studied involved cell proliferation in mice thymus undergoing irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roetgens/day for 105 days. Specifically, the aim was to determine wheather or not a steady state of cell population can be established for the indicated period of time and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population are involved.

  17. Peripheral Immune Cell Populations Associated with Cognitive Deficits and Negative Symptoms of Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Lorinda; Mustafa, Syed; Hatton, Alex; Smith, Kenneth G. C.; Lyons, Paul A.; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothetically, psychotic disorders could be caused or conditioned by immunological mechanisms. If so, one might expect there to be peripheral immune system phenotypes that are measurable in blood cells as biomarkers of psychotic states. Methods We used multi-parameter flow cytometry of venous blood to quantify and determine the activation state of 73 immune cell subsets for 18 patients with chronic schizophrenia (17 treated with clozapine), and 18 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex, BMI and smoking. We used multivariate methods (partial least squares) to reduce dimensionality and define populations of differentially co-expressed cell counts in the cases compared to controls. Results Schizophrenia cases had increased relative numbers of NK cells, naïve B cells, CXCR5+ memory T cells and classical monocytes; and decreased numbers of dendritic cells (DC), HLA-DR+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs), and CD4+ memory T cells. Likewise, within the patient group, more severe negative and cognitive symptoms were associated with decreased relative numbers of dendritic cells, HLA-DR+ Tregs, and CD4+ memory T cells. Motivated by the importance of central nervous system dopamine signalling for psychosis, we measured dopamine receptor gene expression in separated CD4+ cells. Expression of the dopamine D3 (DRD3) receptor was significantly increased in clozapine-treated schizophrenia and covaried significantly with differentiated T cell classes in the CD4+ lineage. Conclusions Peripheral immune cell populations and dopaminergic signalling are disrupted in clozapine-treated schizophrenia. Immuno-phenotypes may provide peripherally accessible and mechanistically specific biomarkers of residual cognitive and negative symptoms in this treatment-resistant subgroup of patients. PMID:27244229

  18. An Atypical Splenic B Cell Progenitor Population Supports Antibody Production during Plasmodium Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debopam; Wikenheiser, Daniel J; Kennedy, Brian; McGovern, Kathryn E; Stuart, Johnasha D; Wilson, Emma H; Stumhofer, Jason S

    2016-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) function to replenish the immune cell repertoire under steady-state conditions and in response to inflammation due to infection or stress. Whereas the bone marrow serves as the primary niche for hematopoiesis, extramedullary mobilization and differentiation of HSPCs occur in the spleen during acute Plasmodium infection, a critical step in the host immune response. In this study, we identified an atypical HSPC population in the spleen of C57BL/6 mice, with a lineage(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(-) (LSK(-)) phenotype that proliferates in response to infection with nonlethal Plasmodium yoelii 17X. Infection-derived LSK(-) cells upon transfer into naive congenic mice were found to differentiate predominantly into mature follicular B cells. However, when transferred into infection-matched hosts, infection-derived LSK(-) cells gave rise to B cells capable of entering into a germinal center reaction, and they developed into memory B cells and Ab-secreting cells that were capable of producing parasite-specific Abs. Differentiation of LSK(-) cells into B cells in vitro was enhanced in the presence of parasitized RBC lysate, suggesting that LSK(-) cells expand and differentiate in direct response to the parasite. However, the ability of LSK(-) cells to differentiate into B cells was not dependent on MyD88, as myd88(-/-) LSK(-) cell expansion and differentiation remained unaffected after Plasmodium infection. Collectively, these data identify a population of atypical lymphoid progenitors that differentiate into B lymphocytes in the spleen and are capable of contributing to the ongoing humoral immune response against Plasmodium infection. PMID:27448588

  19. Phototheranostics of CD44-positive cell populations in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiefu; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Mironchik, Yelena; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one of the most lethal subtypes of breast cancer that has limited treatment options. Its high rates of recurrence and metastasis have been associated, in part, with a subpopulation of breast cancer stem-like cells that are resistant to conventional therapies. A compendium of markers such as CD44(high)/CD24(low), and increased expression of the ABCG2 transporter and increased aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1), have been associated with these cells. We developed a CD44-targeted monoclonal antibody photosensitizer conjugate for combined fluorescent detection and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of CD44 expressing cells in TNBC. The CD44-targeted conjugate demonstrated acute cell killing of breast cancer cells with high CD44 expression. This cell death process was dependent upon CD44-specific cell membrane binding combined with near-infrared irradiation. The conjugate selectively accumulated in CD44-positive tumors and caused dramatic tumor shrinkage and efficient elimination of CD44-positive cell populations following irradiation. This novel phototheranostic strategy provides a promising opportunity for the destruction of CD44-positive populations that include cancer stem-like cells, in locally advanced primary and metastatic TNBC. PMID:27302409

  20. Restricted differentiation potential of progenitor cell populations obtained from the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT)

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, William James Edward; Comerford, Eithne Josephine Veronica; Clegg, Peter David; Canty‐Laird, Elizabeth Gail

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to characterize stem and progenitor cell populations from the equine superficial digital flexor tendon, an energy‐storing tendon with similarities to the human Achilles tendon, which is frequently injured. Using published methods for the isolation of tendon‐derived stem/progenitor cells by low‐density plating we found that isolated cells possessed clonogenicity but were unable to fully differentiate towards mesenchymal lineages using trilineage differentiation assays. In particular, adipogenic differentiation appeared to be restricted, as assessed by Oil Red O staining of stem/progenitor cells cultured in adipogenic medium. We then assessed whether differential adhesion to fibronectin substrates could be used to isolate a population of cells with broader differentiation potential. However we found little difference in the stem and tenogenic gene expression profile of these cells as compared to tenocytes, although the expression of thrombospondin‐4 was significantly reduced in hypoxic conditions. Tendon‐derived stem/progenitor cells isolated by differential adhesion to fibronectin had a similar differentiation potential to cells isolated by low density plating, and when grown in either normoxic or hypoxic conditions. In summary, we have found a restricted differentiation potential of cells isolated from the equine superficial digital flexor tendon despite evidence for stem/progenitor‐like characteristics. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 33:849–858, 2015. PMID:25877997

  1. Phototheranostics of CD44-positive cell populations in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jiefu; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Mironchik, Yelena; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one of the most lethal subtypes of breast cancer that has limited treatment options. Its high rates of recurrence and metastasis have been associated, in part, with a subpopulation of breast cancer stem-like cells that are resistant to conventional therapies. A compendium of markers such as CD44high/CD24low, and increased expression of the ABCG2 transporter and increased aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1), have been associated with these cells. We developed a CD44-targeted monoclonal antibody photosensitizer conjugate for combined fluorescent detection and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of CD44 expressing cells in TNBC. The CD44-targeted conjugate demonstrated acute cell killing of breast cancer cells with high CD44 expression. This cell death process was dependent upon CD44-specific cell membrane binding combined with near-infrared irradiation. The conjugate selectively accumulated in CD44-positive tumors and caused dramatic tumor shrinkage and efficient elimination of CD44-positive cell populations following irradiation. This novel phototheranostic strategy provides a promising opportunity for the destruction of CD44-positive populations that include cancer stem-like cells, in locally advanced primary and metastatic TNBC. PMID:27302409

  2. Microelectromechanical System-Based Sensing Arrays for Comparative in Vitro Nanotoxicity Assessment at Single Cell and Small Cell-Population Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pratikkumar; Zhu, Xuena; Zhang, Xueji; He, Jin; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2016-03-01

    The traditional in vitro nanotoxicity assessment approaches are conducted on a monolayer of cell culture. However, to study a cell response without interference from the neighbor cells, a single cell study is necessary; especially in cases of neuronal, cancerous, and stem cells, wherein an individual cell's fate is often not explained by the whole cell population. Nonetheless, a single cell does not mimic the actual in vivo environment and lacks important information regarding cell communication with its microenvironment. Both a single cell and a cell population provide important and complementary information about cells' behaviors. In this research, we explored nanotoxicity assessment on a single cell and a small cell population using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device. We demonstrated a controlled capture of PC12 cells in different-sized microwells (to capture a different number of cells) using a combined method of surface functionalization and dielectrophoresis. The present approach provides a rapid nanotoxicity response as compared to other conventional approaches. This is the first study, to our knowledge, which demonstrates a comparative response of a single cell and small cell colonies on the same MEMS platform, when exposed to metaloxide nanoparticles. We demonstrated that the microenvironment of a cell is also accountable for cells' behaviors and their responses to nanomaterials. The results of this experimental study open up a new hypothesis to be tested for identifying the role of cell communication in spreading toxicity in a cell population. PMID:26860350

  3. Controlling of group velocity via terahertz signal radiation in a defect medium doped by four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, Hossein; Sangachin, Elnaz Ahmadi; Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel scheme for controlling the group velocity of transmitted and reflected pulse from defect medium doped with four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure. Quantum dot nanostructure is designed numerically by Schrödinger and Poisson equations which solve self consistently. By size control of quantum dot and external voltage, one can design a four-level quantum dot with appropriate energy levels which can be suitable for controlling the group velocity of pulse transmission and reflection from defect slab with terahertz signal field. It is found that in the presence and absence of terahertz signal field the behaviors of transmission and reflection pulses are completely different. Moreover, it is shown that for strong terahertz signal field, by changing the thickness of the slab, simultaneous peak and dip for transmission and reflection pulse are obtained.

  4. Increased autophagic response in a population of metastatic breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, YI; LIBBY, EMILY FALK; LEWIS, MONICA J.; LIU, JIANZHONG; SHACKA, JOHN J.; HURST, DOUGLAS R.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer cells are heterogeneous in their ability to invade and fully metastasize, and thus also in their capacity to survive the numerous stresses encountered throughout the multiple steps of the metastatic cascade. Considering the role of autophagy as a survival response to stress, the present study hypothesized that distinct populations of breast cancer cells may possess an altered autophagic capacity that influences their metastatic potential. It was observed that a metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, that was sensitive to autophagic induction additionally possessed the ability to proliferate following nutrient deprivation. Furthermore, a selected subpopulation of these cells that survived multiple exposures to starvation conditions demonstrated a heightened response to autophagic induction compared to their parent cells. Although this subpopulation maintained a more grape-like pattern in three-dimensional culture compared to the extended spikes of the parent population, autophagic induction in this subpopulation elicited an invasive phenotype with extended spikes. Taken together, these results suggest that autophagic induction may contribute to the ability of distinct breast cancer cell populations to survive and invade. PMID:27347175

  5. There are four dynamically and functionally distinct populations of E-cadherin in cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Erami, Zahra; Timpson, Paul; Yao, Wu; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Anderson, Kurt I.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT E-cadherin is a trans-membrane tumor suppressor responsible for epithelial cell adhesion. E-cadherin forms adhesive clusters through combined extra-cellular cis- and trans-interactions and intracellular interaction with the actin cytoskeleton. Here we identify four populations of E-cadherin within cell junctions based on the molecular interactions which determine their mobility and adhesive properties. Adhesive and non-adhesive populations of E-cadherin each consist of mobile and immobile fractions. Up to half of the E-cadherin immobilized in cell junctions is non-adhesive. Incorporation of E-cadherin into functional adhesions require all three adhesive interactions, with deletion of any one resulting in loss of effective cell-cell adhesion. Interestingly, the only interaction which could independently slow the diffusion of E-cadherin was the tail-mediated intra-cellular interaction. The adhesive and non-adhesive mobile fractions of E-cadherin can be distinguished by their sensitivity to chemical cross-linking with adhesive clusters. Our data define the size, mobility, and adhesive properties of four distinct populations of E-cadherin within cell junctions, and support association with the actin cytoskeleton as the first step in adhesion formation. PMID:26471767

  6. There are four dynamically and functionally distinct populations of E-cadherin in cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Erami, Zahra; Timpson, Paul; Yao, Wu; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Anderson, Kurt I

    2015-01-01

    E-cadherin is a trans-membrane tumor suppressor responsible for epithelial cell adhesion. E-cadherin forms adhesive clusters through combined extra-cellular cis- and trans-interactions and intracellular interaction with the actin cytoskeleton. Here we identify four populations of E-cadherin within cell junctions based on the molecular interactions which determine their mobility and adhesive properties. Adhesive and non-adhesive populations of E-cadherin each consist of mobile and immobile fractions. Up to half of the E-cadherin immobilized in cell junctions is non-adhesive. Incorporation of E-cadherin into functional adhesions require all three adhesive interactions, with deletion of any one resulting in loss of effective cell-cell adhesion. Interestingly, the only interaction which could independently slow the diffusion of E-cadherin was the tail-mediated intra-cellular interaction. The adhesive and non-adhesive mobile fractions of E-cadherin can be distinguished by their sensitivity to chemical cross-linking with adhesive clusters. Our data define the size, mobility, and adhesive properties of four distinct populations of E-cadherin within cell junctions, and support association with the actin cytoskeleton as the first step in adhesion formation. PMID:26471767

  7. Cancer stem cells and cisplatin-resistant cells isolated from non-small-lung cancer cell lines constitute related cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Ayllon, Blanca D; Moncho-Amor, Veronica; Abarrategi, Ander; de Cáceres, Inmaculada Ibañez; Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the top cause of cancer-related deceases. One of the reasons is the development of resistance to the chemotherapy treatment. In particular, cancer stem cells (CSCs), can escape treatment and regenerate the bulk of the tumor. In this article, we describe a comparison between cancer cells resistant to cisplatin and CSCs, both derived from the non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines H460 and A549. Cisplatin-resistant cells were obtained after a single treatment with the drug. CSCs were isolated by culture in defined media, under nonadherent conditions. The isolated CSCs were clonogenic, could be differentiated into adherent cells and were less sensitive to cisplatin than the original cells. Cisplatin resistant and CSCs were able to generate primary tumors and to metastasize when injected into immunodeficient Nu/Nu mice, although they formed smaller tumors with a larger latency than untreated cells. Notably, under appropriated proportions, CSCs synergized with differentiated cells to form larger tumors. CSCs also showed increased capacity to induce angiogenesis in Nu/Nu mice. Conversely, H460 cisplatin-resistant cells showed increased tendency to develop bone metastasis. Gene expression analysis showed that several genes involved in tumor development and metastasis (EGR1, COX2, MALAT1, AKAP12, ADM) were similarly induced in CSC and cisplatin-resistant H460 cells, in agreement with a close similarity between these two cell populations. Cells with the characteristic growth properties of CSCs were also isolated from surgical samples of 18 out of 44 lung cancer patients. A significant correlation (P = 0.028) was found between the absence of CSCs and cisplatin sensitivity. PMID:24961511

  8. Cancer stem cells and cisplatin-resistant cells isolated from non-small-lung cancer cell lines constitute related cell populations.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Ayllon, Blanca D; Moncho-Amor, Veronica; Abarrategi, Ander; Ibañez de Cáceres, Inmaculada; Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the top cause of cancer-related deceases. One of the reasons is the development of resistance to the chemotherapy treatment. In particular, cancer stem cells (CSCs), can escape treatment and regenerate the bulk of the tumor. In this article, we describe a comparison between cancer cells resistant to cisplatin and CSCs, both derived from the non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines H460 and A549. Cisplatin-resistant cells were obtained after a single treatment with the drug. CSCs were isolated by culture in defined media, under nonadherent conditions. The isolated CSCs were clonogenic, could be differentiated into adherent cells and were less sensitive to cisplatin than the original cells. Cisplatin resistant and CSCs were able to generate primary tumors and to metastasize when injected into immunodeficient Nu/Nu mice, although they formed smaller tumors with a larger latency than untreated cells. Notably, under appropriated proportions, CSCs synergized with differentiated cells to form larger tumors. CSCs also showed increased capacity to induce angiogenesis in Nu/Nu mice. Conversely, H460 cisplatin-resistant cells showed increased tendency to develop bone metastasis. Gene expression analysis showed that several genes involved in tumor development and metastasis (EGR1, COX2, MALAT1, AKAP12, ADM) were similarly induced in CSC and cisplatin-resistant H460 cells, in agreement with a close similarity between these two cell populations. Cells with the characteristic growth properties of CSCs were also isolated from surgical samples of 18 out of 44 lung cancer patients. A significant correlation (P = 0.028) was found between the absence of CSCs and cisplatin sensitivity. PMID:24961511

  9. Connexin43 (GJA1) is required in the population of dividing cells during fin regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hoptak-Solga, Angela D.; Nielsen, Sarah; Jain, Isha; Thummel, Ryan; Hyde, David R.; Iovine, M. Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    In zebrafish, mutations in the gap junction gene connexin43 lead to short bony fin ray segments that give rise to the short fin phenotype. The sofb123 mutant exhibits fins that are half the length of wild-type fins and have reduced levels of cx43 mRNA. We find that sofb123 regenerating fins exhibit reduced levels of cell proliferation. Interestingly, the number of dividing cells per unit length of fin growth is similar between wild-type and mutant fins, suggesting that the number of cells that enter the cell cycle is specifically affected in sofb123. Expression of cx43 is identified in mitotic cells, which further suggests that Cx43 may contribute to establishing or maintaining the population of dividing cells. Indeed, missense alleles exhibiting high or low levels of gap junctional communication reveal a correlation between defects in direct cell-cell communication, cell proliferation, and segment length. Finally, targeted gene knockdown of cx43 in adult regenerating fins recapitulates the sofb123phenotype, revealing that the loss of Cx43 is sufficient to reduce both cell proliferation and segment length. We hypothesize that the level of gap junctional intercellular communication among dividing cells regulates the level of cell proliferation and ultimately regulates bone growth. PMID:18406403

  10. Reducing Four-Level Two-Mode Hamiltonian to AN Effective Two-Level Hamiltonian with the Addition of Kerr-Like Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Deberky, M. A. A.; Ali, M. F. M.

    We consider a two-mode quantized field described in a coherent state interacting with a four-level atom. An effective Hamiltonian is obtained by adiabatically eliminating the intermediate two levels in a cascade process. The influence of the Stark shifts and the Kerr-like medium on the atomic inversion are examined, as well as on the field entropy, atomic purity and Mandel's Q-parameter. The results of the calculations are illustrated numerically.

  11. Melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells on macaque and human retinas form two morphologically distinct populations.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hsi-Wen; Ren, Xiaozhi; Peterson, Beth B; Marshak, David W; Yau, King-Wai; Gamlin, Paul D; Dacey, Dennis M

    2016-10-01

    The long-term goal of this research is to understand how retinal ganglion cells that express the photopigment melanopsin, also known as OPN4, contribute to vision in humans and other primates. Here we report the results of anatomical studies using our polyclonal antibody specifically against human melanopsin that confirm and extend previous descriptions of melanopsin cells in primates. In macaque and human retina, two distinct populations of melanopsin cells were identified based on dendritic stratification in either the inner or the outer portion of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Variation in dendritic field size and cell density with eccentricity was confirmed, and dendritic spines, a new feature of melanopsin cells, were described. The spines were the sites of input from DB6 diffuse bipolar cell axon terminals to the inner stratifying type of melanopsin cells. The outer stratifying melanopsin type received inputs from DB6 bipolar cells via a sparse outer axonal arbor. Outer stratifying melanopsin cells also received inputs from axon terminals of dopaminergic amacrine cells. On the outer stratifying melanopsin cells, ribbon synapses from bipolar cells and conventional synapses from amacrine cells were identified in electron microscopic immunolabeling experiments. Both inner and outer stratifying melanopsin cell types were retrogradely labeled following tracer injection in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). In addition, a method for targeting melanopsin cells for intracellular injection using their intrinsic fluorescence was developed. This technique was used to demonstrate that melanopsin cells were tracer coupled to amacrine cells and would be applicable to electrophysiological experiments in the future. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2845-2872, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26972791

  12. Coherent population trapping on 87Rb atoms in small-size absorption cells with buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermak, S. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) on 87Rb atoms in neon atmosphere has been studied in small-size glass absorption cells under conditions of pumping with narrow-band laser radiation at the D2 line of the main doublet. Parameters of the absorption signal have been measured in 3-mm-diameter cells at buffer gas (Ne) pressures varied within 200-400 Torr, cell temperatures within 65-120°C, and pumping radiation power densities within 30-400 μW/cm2. Optimum values of the buffer gas pressures, cell temperature, and pumping power are determined at which the short-term instability of the resonance line is at minimum. Orientational shifts of the CPT resonance signal in gas-filled cells and small-size cells with antirelaxation coating have been compared.

  13. Layered Alginate Constructs: A Platform for Co-culture of Heterogeneous Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Poonam; Twomey, Julianne D; Patkin, Michelle; Hsieh, Adam H

    2016-01-01

    Many load bearing tissues possess structurally and functionally distinct regions, typically accompanied by different cell phenotypes with differential mechanosensing characteristics. Engineering and analysis of these tissue types remain a challenge. Layered hydrogel constructs provide an opportunity for investigating the interactions among multiple cell populations within single constructs. Alginate hydrogels are both biocompatible and allow for easy isolation of cells after experimentation. Here, we describe a method for the development of small sized dual layered alginate hydrogel discs. This process maintains high cell viability of human mesenchymal stem cells during the formation process and these layered discs can withstand unconfined cyclic compression, commonly used for stimulation of hMSCs undergoing chondrogenesis. These layered constructs can potentially be scaled up to include additional levels, and also be used to segregate cell populations initially after layering. This dual layer alginate hydrogel culture platform can be used for many different applications including engineering and analysis of cells of load bearing tissues and co-cultures of other cell types. PMID:27583983

  14. The identification of different endothelial cell populations within the mouse proepicardium

    PubMed Central

    Cossett, Stephanie; Misra, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    The proepicardium is a transient embryonic structure that is a source of precursors of the epicardium, coronary smooth muscle cells, and may be a source of coronary endothelial cells (EC). To better understand proepicardium development a systematic analysis of EC appearance was performed. Multiple marker analysis showed that EC are present in the mouse proepicardium at E9.0 through E9.75. Distinct populations of EC were found that were associated with the liver bud, and the sinus venosus, as well as a population that do not appear to be associated with either of these structures. There was a temporal increase in the number of EC and temporal changes in the distribution of EC within the different populations during PE development. These findings indicate that EC exist in the proepicardium prior to coronary vasculogenesis, and support a model in which there is a heterogeneous origin for EC in the proepicardium. PMID:21932312

  15. A Retrospective Analysis of Oral Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Iranian Population: a 20-year Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Atarbashi Moghadam, Saede; Lotfi, Ali; Piroozhashemi, Batool; Mokhtari, Sepideh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease with unknown pathogenesis and is characterized by local or disseminated proliferation of Langerhans cells. There is no previous investigation on prevalence of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis in Iranian population. Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis in an Iranian population and to compare the data with previous reports. Materials and Method Pathology files of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Department of Dental School of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from 1992 to 2012 were searched for cases recorded as oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis. A total number of 20 cases were found and the clinical information of patients was recorded. Results The relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis was 0.34% and the most common location was the posterior mandible. In addition, the mean age of patients was 27 years and there was a definite male predominance. Most lesions were localized and tooth mobility was the most common oral presentation. Conclusion In Iranian population as in many other countries, the relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis is low. Moreover, tooth mobility and periodontal lesions are the frequent early signs of disease. Therefore, in patients with periodontal problems, good oral health, and no response to the treatment; Langerhans cell histiocytosis must be considered. Additionally, although most cases of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis are localized, systemic involvement must also be considered and dental professionals have an important role in early detection of the disease. PMID:26535408

  16. Temporal patterns of cortical proliferation of glial cell populations after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Susarla, Bala T.S.; Villapol, Sonia; Yi, Jae-Hyuk; Geller, Herbert M.; Symes, Aviva J.

    2014-01-01

    TBI (traumatic brain injury) triggers an inflammatory cascade, gliosis and cell proliferation following cell death in the pericontusional area and surrounding the site of injury. In order to better understand the proliferative response following CCI (controlled cortical impact) injury, we systematically analyzed the phenotype of dividing cells at several time points post-lesion. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to mild to moderate CCI over the left sensory motor cortex. At different time points following injury, mice were injected with BrdU (bromodeoxyuridine) four times at 3-h intervals and then killed. The greatest number of proliferating cells in the pericontusional region was detected at 3 dpi (days post-injury). At 1 dpi, NG2+ cells were the most proliferative population, and at 3 and 7 dpi the Iba-1+ microglial cells were proliferating more. A smaller, but significant number of GFAP+ (glial fibrillary acidic protein) astrocytes proliferated at all three time points. Interestingly, at 3 dpi we found a small number of proliferating neuroblasts [DCX+ (doublecortin)] in the injured cortex. To determine the cell fate of proliferative cells, mice were injected four times with BrdU at 3 dpi and killed at 28 dpi. Approximately 70% of proliferative cells observed at 28 dpi were GFAP+ astrocytes. In conclusion, our data suggest that the specific glial cell types respond differentially to injury, suggesting that each cell type responds to a specific pattern of growth factor stimulation at each time point after injury. PMID:24670035

  17. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  18. Distribution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors genes in the Italian Caucasian population

    PubMed Central

    Bontadini, A; Testi, M; Cuccia, MC; Martinetti, M; Carcassi, C; Chiesa, A; Cosentini, E; Dametto, E; Frison, S; Iannone, AM; Lombardo, C; Malagoli, A; Mariani, M; Mariotti, L; Mascaretti, L; Mele, L; Miotti, V; Nesci, S; Ozzella, G; Piancatelli, D; Romeo, G; Tagliaferri, C; Vatta, S; Andreani, M; Conte, R

    2006-01-01

    Background Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are a family of inhibitory and activatory receptors that are expressed by most natural killer (NK) cells. The KIR gene family is polymorphic: genomic diversity is achieved through differences in gene content and allelic polymorphism. The number of KIR loci has been reported to vary among individuals, resulting in different KIR haplotypes. In this study we report the genotypic structure of KIRs in 217 unrelated healthy Italian individuals from 22 immunogenetics laboratories, located in the northern, central and southern regions of Italy. Methods Two hundred and seventeen DNA samples were studied by a low resolution PCR-SSP kit designed to identify all KIR genes. Results All 17 KIR genes were observed in the population with different frequencies than other Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations; framework genes KIR3DL3, KIR3DP1, KIR2DL4 and KIR3DL2 were present in all individuals. Sixty-five different profiles were found in this Italian population study. Haplotype A remains the most prevalent and genotype 1, with a frequency of 28.5%, is the most commonly observed in the Italian population. Conclusion The Italian Caucasian population shows polymorphism of the KIR gene family like other Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations. Although 64 genotypes have been observed, genotype 1 remains the most frequent as already observed in other populations. Such knowledge of the KIR gene distribution in populations is very useful in the study of associations with diseases and in selection of donors for haploidentical bone marrow transplantation. PMID:17069649

  19. Concise Review: Different Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cell Populations Reside in the Adult Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Stefania; Chiabotto, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    During fetal life, mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) surround glomeruli and tubules and contribute to the development of the renal interstitium by secretion of growth factors that drive nephron differentiation. In the adult, an MSC-like population has been demonstrated in different compartments of human and murine nephrons. After injury, these cells might provide support for kidney regeneration by recapitulating the role they have in embryonic life. In this short review, we discuss the evidence of an MSC presence within the adult kidney and their potential contribution to the turnover of renal cells and injury repair. PMID:25355731

  20. Analysis of rare high-DNA cell populations in serous effusions using continuous-motion imaging.

    PubMed

    Tucker, J H; Stark, M H; Eason, P; Duvall, E

    1991-07-01

    The rare high-DNA cell sub-populations in a series of serous effusion specimens were analysed to determine whether such measurements could provide a basis for the improved diagnosis of malignancy. Monolayer specimens stained with gallocyanin chrome-alum were scanned with the CERVIFIP continuous-motion image analyser to locate and measure the highest-DNA cells in the sample. Two types of features were obtained for the detected sub-populations; firstly, 'percentile ploidy' values which characterise the ploidy levels above which specified proportions of the total cells are found; and secondly 'percentage abnormal' values which characterise the proportion of the cells diagnosed as malignant during examination by a cytopathologist. The classification accuracy for one or both of these features was then obtained by comparison with the clinical outcome of each patient. The results gave a classification error of 9/44 (20%) using the 0.01% percentile ploidy alone, 6/44 (14%) using the 75% percentage abnormal feature alone, but only 2/44 (5%) from a box discriminant using both features. It was therefore concluded that the analysis of the high-DNA cell population could be of value in the diagnosis of malignancy in serous effusion specimens. PMID:1883747

  1. Pentoxifylline Inhibits WNT Signalling in β-Cateninhigh Patient-Derived Melanoma Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Talar, Beata; Gajos-Michniewicz, Anna; Talar, Marcin; Chouaib, Salem; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Background The heterogeneity of melanoma needs to be addressed and combination therapies seem to be necessary to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to newly developed immunotherapies and targeted therapies. Although the role of WNT/β-catenin pathway in melanoma was early demonstrated, its contribution to the lack of the melanoma patient response to treatment was only recently recognized. Using patient-derived melanoma cell populations, we investigated the influence of pentoxifylline on melanoma cells with either high or low expression of β-catenin. Findings Our results indicate that pentoxifylline inhibits the activity of the canonical WNT pathway in melanoma cell populations with high basal activity of this signalling. This is supported by lowered overall activity of transcription factors TCF/LEF and reduced nuclear localisation of active β-catenin. Moreover, treatment of β-cateninhigh melanoma cell populations with pentoxifylline induces downregulation of genes that are targets of the WNT/β-catenin pathway including connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF-M), a melanocyte- and melanoma cell-specific regulator. Conclusions These results suggest that pentoxifylline, a drug approved by the FDA in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, might be tested in a subset of melanoma patients with elevated activity of β-catenin. This pharmaceutical might be tested as an adjuvant drug in combination therapies when the response to immunotherapy is prevented by high activity of the WNT/β-catenin pathway. PMID:27351373

  2. Genetic barcode sequencing for screening altered population dynamics of hematopoietic stem cells transduced with lentivirus

    PubMed Central

    Zanatta, Daniela B; Tsujita, Maristela; Borelli, Primavera; Aguiar, Rodrigo B; Ferrari, Daniel G; Strauss, Bryan E

    2014-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis has been associated with malignant cell transformation in gene therapy protocols, leading to discussions about vector security. Therefore, clonal analysis is important for the assessment of vector safety and its impact on patient health. Here, we report a unique approach to assess dynamic changes in clonality of lentivirus transduced cells upon Sanger sequence analysis of a specially designed genetic barcode. In our approach, changes in the electropherogram peaks are measured and compared between successive time points, revealing alteration in the cell population. After in vitro validation, barcoded lentiviral libraries carrying IL2RG or LMO2 transgenes, or empty vector were used to transduce mouse hematopoietic (ckit+) stem cells, which were subsequently transplanted in recipient mice. We found that neither the empty nor IL2RG encoding vector had an effect on cell dynamics. In sharp contrast, the LMO2 oncogene was associated with altered cell dynamics even though hematologic counts remained unchanged, suggesting that the barcode could reveal changes in cell populations not observed by the frontline clinical assay. We describe a simple and sensitive method for the analysis of clonality, which could be easily used by any laboratory for the assessment of cellular behavior upon lentiviral transduction. PMID:26052520

  3. CD133 marks a stem cell population that drives human primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Triviai, Ioanna; Stübig, Thomas; Niebuhr, Birte; Hussein, Kais; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios; Fehse, Boris; Stocking, Carol; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis is a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by bone marrow fibrosis, megakaryocyte atypia, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. To date the stem cell that undergoes the spatial and temporal chain of events during the development of this disease has not been identified. Here we describe a CD133+ stem cell population that drives the pathogenesis of primary myelofibrosis. Patient-derived circulating CD133+ but not CD34+CD133− cells, with a variable burden for JAK2V617F mutation, had multipotent cloning capacity in vitro. CD133+ cells engrafted for up to 10 months in immunocompromised mice and differentiated into JAK2-V617F+ myeloid but not lymphoid progenitors. We observed the persistence of human, atypical JAK2-V617F+ megakaryocytes, the initiation of a prefibrotic state, bone marrow/splenic fibrosis and transition to acute myeloid leukemia. Leukemic cells arose from a subset of CD133+ cells harboring EZH2D265H but lacking a secondary JAK2V617F mutation, consistent with the hypothesis that deregulation of EZH2 activity drives clonal growth and increases the risk of acute myeloid leukemia. This is the first characterization of a patient-derived stem cell population that drives disease resembling both chronic and acute phases of primary myelofibrosis in mice. These results reveal the importance of the CD133 antigen in deciphering the neoplastic clone in primary myelofibrosis and indicate a new therapeutic target for myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:25724578

  4. Cellular Dynamics of Memory B Cell Populations: IgM+ and IgG+ Memory B Cells Persist Indefinitely as Quiescent Cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek D; Wilmore, Joel R; Allman, David

    2015-11-15

    Despite their critical role in long-term immunity, the life span of individual memory B cells remains poorly defined. Using a tetracycline-regulated pulse-chase system, we measured population turnover rates and individual t1/2 of pre-established Ag-induced Ig class-switched and IgM-positive memory B cells over 402 d. Our results indicate that, once established, both IgG-positive and less frequent IgM-positive memory populations are exceptionally stable, with little evidence of attrition or cellular turnover. Indeed, the vast majority of cells in both pools exhibited t1/2 that appear to exceed the life span of the mouse, contrasting dramatically with mature naive B cells. These results indicate that recall Ab responses are mediated by stable pools of extremely long-lived cells, and suggest that Ag-experienced B cells employ remarkably efficient survival mechanisms. PMID:26438523

  5. Cell Differentiation in a Bacillus thuringiensis Population during Planktonic Growth, Biofilm Formation, and Host Infection

    PubMed Central

    Verplaetse, Emilie; Slamti, Leyla; Gohar, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is armed to complete a full cycle in its insect host. During infection, virulence factors are expressed under the control of the quorum sensor PlcR to kill the host. After the host’s death, the quorum sensor NprR controls a necrotrophic lifestyle, allowing the vegetative cells to use the insect cadaver as a bioincubator and to survive. Only a part of the Bt population sporulates in the insect cadaver, and the precise composition of the whole population and its evolution over time are unknown. Using fluorescent reporters to record gene expression at the single-cell level, we have determined the differentiation course of a Bt population and explored the lineage existing among virulent, necrotrophic, and sporulating cells. The dynamics of cell differentiation were monitored during growth in homogenized medium, biofilm formation, and colonization of insect larvae. We demonstrated that in the insect host and in planktonic culture in rich medium, the virulence, necrotrophism, and sporulation regulators are successively activated in the same cell. In contrast, in biofilms, activation of PlcR is dispensable for NprR activation and we observed a greater heterogeneity than under the other two growth conditions. We also showed that sporulating cells arise almost exclusively from necrotrophic cells. In biofilm and in the insect cadaver, we identified an as-yet-uncharacterized category of cells that do not express any of the reporters used. Overall, we showed that PlcR, NprR, and Spo0A act as interconnected integrators to allow finely tuned adaptation of the pathogen to its environment. PMID:25922389

  6. F protein increases CD4+CD25+ T cell population in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Hashempour, Tayebeh; Bamdad, Taravat; Bergamini, Alberto; Lavergne, Jean Pierre; Haj-Sheykholeslami, Arghavan; Brakier-Gingras, Léa; Ajorloo, Mehdi; Merat, Shahin

    2015-06-01

    HCV is a global health problem with an estimated 230 million chronically infected people worldwide. It has been reported that a 17-kd protein translated from core-encoding genomic region can contribute to immune-mediated mechanisms associated with the development of the chronic disease. Also, Treg cells can be contributed to an inadequate response against the viruses, leading to chronic infection. Here we evaluated the ability of protein F to modulate the frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+T and IL-10+T cells in patients with chronic HCV infection. F gene was amplified and cloned in the expression vector. The protein was purified and used for stimulation of PBMCs in the HCV chronic patients and the control groups. The frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cell-like populations and IL-10-producing CD4+CD25+ T cells was assessed in the HCV-infected patients and in the healthy controls by flow cytometry, which showed an increase of both CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cell-like population and IL-10-producing CD4+CD25+ T cells in the HCV-infected patients positive for anti-F antibody. Our results suggest the potential involvement of F and core antigens in increasing the frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cell-like population and IL-10-producing CD4+CD25+ T cells which may be associated with HCV-persistent infection. PMID:25862675

  7. Consequences of cell-to-cell P-glycoprotein transfer on acquired multidrug resistance in breast cancer: a cell population dynamics model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer is a proliferation disease affecting a genetically unstable cell population, in which molecular alterations can be somatically inherited by genetic, epigenetic or extragenetic transmission processes, leading to a cooperation of neoplastic cells within tumoural tissue. The efflux protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is overexpressed in many cancer cells and has known capacity to confer multidrug resistance to cytotoxic therapies. Recently, cell-to-cell P-gp transfers have been shown. Herein, we combine experimental evidence and a mathematical model to examine the consequences of an intercellular P-gp trafficking in the extragenetic transfer of multidrug resistance from resistant to sensitive cell subpopulations. Methodology and Principal Findings We report cell-to-cell transfers of functional P-gp in co-cultures of a P-gp overexpressing human breast cancer MCF-7 cell variant, selected for its resistance towards doxorubicin, with the parental sensitive cell line. We found that P-gp as well as efflux activity distribution are progressively reorganized over time in co-cultures analyzed by flow cytometry. A mathematical model based on a Boltzmann type integro-partial differential equation structured by a continuum variable corresponding to P-gp activity describes the cell populations in co-culture. The mathematical model elucidates the population elements in the experimental data, specifically, the initial proportions, the proliferative growth rates, and the transfer rates of P-gp in the sensitive and resistant subpopulations. Conclusions We confirmed cell-to-cell transfer of functional P-gp. The transfer process depends on the gradient of P-gp expression in the donor-recipient cell interactions, as they evolve over time. Extragenetically acquired drug resistance is an additional aptitude of neoplastic cells which has implications in the diagnostic value of P-gp expression and in the design of chemotherapy regimens. Reviewers This article was reviewed by

  8. Murine peripheral NK-cell populations originate from site-specific immature NK cells more than from BM-derived NK cells.

    PubMed

    Pinhas, Nissim; Sternberg-Simon, Michal; Chiossone, Laura; Shahaf, Gitit; Walzer, Thierry; Vivier, Eric; Mehr, Ramit

    2016-05-01

    Murine NK cells can be divided by the expression of two cell surface markers, CD27 and Mac-1 (a.k.a. CD11b), into four separate subsets. These subsets suggest a linear development model: CD27(-) Mac-1(-) → CD27(+) Mac-1(-) → CD27(+) Mac-1(+) → CD27(-) Mac-1(+) . Here, we used a combination of BrdU labeling experiments and mathematical modeling to gain insights regarding NK-cell development in mouse bone marrow (BM), spleen and liver. The modeling results that best fit the experimental data show that the majority of NK cells already express CD27 upon entering the NK-cell developmental pathway. Additionally, only a small fraction of NK cells exit the BM to other sites, suggesting that peripheral NK-cell populations originate from site-specific immature NK cells more than from BM-derived mature NK cells. PMID:26919267

  9. Fractional Proliferation: A method to deconvolve cell population dynamics from single-cell data

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, Darren R.; Garbett, Shawn P.; Frick, Peter L.; Quaranta, Vito

    2012-01-01

    We present an integrated method that exploits extended time-lapse automated imaging to quantify dynamics of cell proliferation. Cell counts are fit with a Quiescence-Growth model that estimates rates of cell division, entry into quiescence and death. The model is constrained with rates extracted experimentally from the behavior of tracked single cells over time. We visualize the output of the analysis in Fractional Proliferation graphs, which deconvolve dynamic proliferative responses to perturbations into the relative contributions of dividing, quiescent (non-dividing) and dead cells. The method reveals that the response of “oncogene-addicted” human cancer cells to tyrosine kinase inhibitors is a composite of altered rates of division, death and entry into quiescence, challenging the notion that such cells simply ‘die’ in response to oncogene-targeted therapy. PMID:22886092

  10. Robust detection of alternative splicing in a population of single cells.

    PubMed

    Welch, Joshua D; Hu, Yin; Prins, Jan F

    2016-05-01

    Single cell RNA-seq experiments provide valuable insight into cellular heterogeneity but suffer from low coverage, 3' bias and technical noise. These unique properties of single cell RNA-seq data make study of alternative splicing difficult, and thus most single cell studies have restricted analysis of transcriptome variation to the gene level. To address these limitations, we developed SingleSplice, which uses a statistical model to detect genes whose isoform usage shows biological variation significantly exceeding technical noise in a population of single cells. Importantly, SingleSplice is tailored to the unique demands of single cell analysis, detecting isoform usage differences without attempting to infer expression levels for full-length transcripts. Using data from spike-in transcripts, we found that our approach detects variation in isoform usage among single cells with high sensitivity and specificity. We also applied SingleSplice to data from mouse embryonic stem cells and discovered a set of genes that show significant biological variation in isoform usage across the set of cells. A subset of these isoform differences are linked to cell cycle stage, suggesting a novel connection between alternative splicing and the cell cycle. PMID:26740580

  11. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F; Gomez, Marcus V; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Ronglih

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration. PMID:25724498

  12. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F.; Gomez, Marcus V.; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration. PMID:25724498

  13. A Framework for Image-Based Classification of Mitotic Cells in Asynchronous Populations

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Scott D.; Newberg, Justin Y.; Szafran, Adam T.; Hall, Rebecca M.; Brinkley, Bill R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract High content screening (HCS) has emerged an important tool for drug discovery because it combines rich readouts of cellular responses in a single experiment. Inclusion of cell cycle analysis into HCS is essential to identify clinically suitable anticancer drugs that disrupt the aberrant mitotic activity of cells. One challenge for integration of cell cycle analysis into HCS is that cells must be chemically synchronized to specific phases, adding experimental complexity to high content screens. To address this issue, we have developed a rules-based method that utilizes mitotic phosphoprotein monoclonal 2 (MPM-2) marker and works consistently in different experimental conditions and in asynchronous populations. Further, the performance of the rules-based method is comparable to established machine learning approaches for classifying cell cycle data, indicating the robustness of the features we use in the framework. As such, we suggest the use of MPM-2 analysis and its associated expressive features for integration into HCS approaches. PMID:22084958

  14. Enrichment of diluted cell populations from large sample volumes using 3D carbon-electrode dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Islam, Monsur; Natu, Rucha; Larraga-Martinez, Maria Fernanda; Martinez-Duarte, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    Here, we report on an enrichment protocol using carbon electrode dielectrophoresis to isolate and purify a targeted cell population from sample volumes up to 4 ml. We aim at trapping, washing, and recovering an enriched cell fraction that will facilitate downstream analysis. We used an increasingly diluted sample of yeast, 10(6)-10(2) cells/ml, to demonstrate the isolation and enrichment of few cells at increasing flow rates. A maximum average enrichment of 154.2 ± 23.7 times was achieved when the sample flow rate was 10 μl/min and yeast cells were suspended in low electrically conductive media that maximizes dielectrophoresis trapping. A COMSOL Multiphysics model allowed for the comparison between experimental and simulation results. Discussion is conducted on the discrepancies between such results and how the model can be further improved. PMID:27375816

  15. Dynamic Heterogeneity of the Heart Valve Interstitial Cell Population in Mitral Valve Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sauls, Kimberly; Koenig, Sara N.; Anstine, Lindsey J.; Garg, Vidu; Norris, Russell A.; Lincoln, Joy

    2015-01-01

    The heart valve interstitial cell (VIC) population is dynamic and thought to mediate lay down and maintenance of the tri-laminar extracellular matrix (ECM) structure within the developing and mature valve throughout life. Disturbances in the contribution and distribution of valve ECM components are detrimental to biomechanical function and associated with disease. This pathological process is associated with activation of resident VICs that in the absence of disease reside as quiescent cells. While these paradigms have been long standing, characterization of this abundant and ever-changing valve cell population is incomplete. Here we examine the expression pattern of Smooth muscle α-actin, Periostin, Twist1 and Vimentin in cultured VICs, heart valves from healthy embryonic, postnatal and adult mice, as well as mature valves from human patients and established mouse models of disease. We show that the VIC population is highly heterogeneous and phenotypes are dependent on age, species, location, and disease state. Furthermore, we identify phenotypic diversity across common models of mitral valve disease. These studies significantly contribute to characterizing the VIC population in health and disease and provide insights into the cellular dynamics that maintain valve structure in healthy adults and mediate pathologic remodeling in disease states. PMID:26527432

  16. ABCG2 Transporter Identifies a Population of Clonogenic Human Limbal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Paiva, Cintia S.; Chen, Zhuo; Corrales, Rosa M.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Li, De-Quan

    2010-01-01

    ABCG2, a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, has been identified as a molecular determinant for bone marrow stem cells and proposed as a universal marker for stem cells. This study investigates ABCG2 expression and its potential as a marker that identifies human limbal epithelial stem cells. ABCG2 expression was evaluated by immunofluorescent and immunohistochemical staining, laser scanning confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Cells selected from primary limbal epithelial cultures by flow cytometry with ABCG2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or Hoechst 33342 dye staining were evaluated for their gene expression and colony-forming efficiency (CFE). ABCG2 protein was mainly located in the basal cells of limbal epithelia but not in the limbal suprabasal and corneal epithelia. ABCG2 staining was also observed in primary limbal epithelial cultures. Limbal epithelia express higher levels of ABCG2 and ΔNp63 mRNAs than corneal epithelia. Labeling with ABCG2 mAb yielded 2.5%–3.0% positive cells by flow cytometry. The ABCG2-positive cells exhibited greater CFE on a 3T3 fibroblast feeder layer than ABCG2-negative cells. A side population (SP) was detected by the Hoechst 33342 exclusion assay. SP cells displayed stronger expression of ABCG2 and ΔNp63 mRNA and greater CFE than the non-SP cells. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that ABCG2 transporter was exclusively expressed by limbal basal cells and that the ABCG2-positive and SP cells possess enriched stem cell properties, suggesting for the first time that ABCG2 could serve as a marker to identify the putative limbal epithelial stem cells. PMID:15625123

  17. The unforeseen challenge: from genotype-to-phenotype in cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Erez

    2015-02-01

    Biological cells present a paradox, in that they show simultaneous stability and flexibility, allowing them to adapt to new environments and to evolve over time. The emergence of stable cell states depends on genotype-to-phenotype associations, which essentially reflect the organization of gene regulatory modes. The view taken here is that cell-state organization is a dynamical process in which the molecular disorder manifests itself in a macroscopic order. The genome does not determine the ordered cell state; rather, it participates in this process by providing a set of constraints on the spectrum of regulatory modes, analogous to boundary conditions in physical dynamical systems. We have developed an experimental framework, in which cell populations are exposed to unforeseen challenges; novel perturbations they had not encountered before along their evolutionary history. This approach allows an unbiased view of cell dynamics, uncovering the potential of cells to evolve and develop adapted stable states. In the last decade, our experiments have revealed a coherent set of observations within this framework, painting a picture of the living cell that in many ways is not aligned with the conventional one. Of particular importance here, is our finding that adaptation of cell-state organization is essentially an efficient exploratory dynamical process rather than one founded on random mutations. Based on our framework, a set of concepts underlying cell-state organization—exploration evolving by global, non-specific, dynamics of gene activity—is presented here. These concepts have significant consequences for our understanding of the emergence and stabilization of a cell phenotype in diverse biological contexts. Their implications are discussed for three major areas of biological inquiry: evolution, cell differentiation and cancer. There is currently no unified theoretical framework encompassing the emergence of order, a stable state, in the living cell. Hopefully

  18. Defining the Heterogeneity of Skeletal Muscle-Derived Side and Main Population Cells Isolated Immediately Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    KALLESTAD, KRISTEN M.; MCLOON, LINDA K.

    2011-01-01

    Myoblast transfer therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) largely fails due to cell death and inability of transplanted cells to engraft in diseased muscles. One method attempting to enrich for cell subpopulations is the Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion assay, yielding a side population (SP) thought to be progenitor enriched and a main population (MP). However, in vitro and transplant studies yielded inconsistent results relative to downstream progeny. Cell surface markers expressed by skeletal muscle-derived MP and SP cells have not been fully characterized directly ex vivo. Using flow cytometry, MP and SP cells were characterized based on their expression of several well-accepted progenitor cell antigens. Both the MP and SP populations are heterogeneous and overlapping in the cells they contain. The percentages of cells in each population vary with species and specific muscle examined. MP and SP populations contain both satellite and multipotent progenitor cells, based on expression of CD34, Sca-1, Pax7, and M-cadherin. Thus, isolation using this procedure cannot be used to predict downstream differentiation outcomes, and explains the conflicting literature on these cells. Hoechst dye also results in significant mortality of sorted cells. As defined subpopulations are easily obtained using flow cytometry, sorting immediately ex vivo based on accepted myogenic precursor cell markers will yield superior results in terms of cell homogeneity for transplantation therapy. PMID:20020527

  19. Protective Heterologous Antiviral Immunity and Enhanced Immunopathogenesis Mediated by Memory T Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Selin, Liisa K.; Varga, Steven M.; Wong, Iris C.; Welsh, Raymond M.

    1998-01-01

    A basic principle of immunology is that prior immunity results in complete protection against a homologous agent. In this study, we show that memory T cells specific to unrelated viruses may alter the host's primary immune response to a second virus. Studies with a panel of heterologous viruses, including lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCMV), Pichinde (PV), vaccinia (VV), and murine cytomegalo (MCMV) viruses showed that prior immunity with one of these viruses in many cases enhanced clearance of a second unrelated virus early in infection. Such protective immunity was common, but it depended on the virus sequence and was not necessarily reciprocal. Cell transfer studies showed that both CD4 and CD8 T cell populations from LCMV-immune mice were required to transfer protective immunity to naive hosts challenged with PV or VV. In the case of LCMV-immune versus naive mice challenged with VV, there was an enhanced early recruitment of memory phenotype interferon (IFN) γ–secreting CD4+ and CD8+ cells into the peritoneal cavity and increased IFN-γ levels in this initial site of virus replication. Studies with IFN-γ receptor knockout mice confirmed a role for IFN-γ in mediating the protective effect by LCMV-immune T cell populations when mice were challenged with VV but not PV. In some virus sequences memory cell populations, although clearing the challenge virus more rapidly, elicited enhanced IFN-γ–dependent immunopathogenesis in the form of acute fatty necrosis. These results indicate that how a host responds to an infectious agent is a function of its history of previous infections and their influence on the memory T cell pool. PMID:9802982

  20. Characterization of Cs vapor cell coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane using coherent population trapping spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hafiz, Moustafa Abdel; Maurice, Vincent; Chutani, Ravinder; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Guérandel, Stéphane; Clercq, Emeric de

    2015-05-14

    We report the realization and characterization using coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy of an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-coated centimeter-scale Cs vapor cell. The dual-structure of the resonance lineshape, with presence of a narrow structure line at the top of a Doppler-broadened structure, is clearly observed. The linewidth of the narrow resonance is compared to the linewidth of an evacuated Cs cell and of a buffer gas Cs cell of similar size. The Cs-OTS adsorption energy is measured to be (0.42 ± 0.03) eV, leading to a clock frequency shift rate of 2.7 × 10{sup −9}/K in fractional unit. A hyperfine population lifetime, T{sub 1}, and a microwave coherence lifetime, T{sub 2}, of 1.6 and 0.5 ms are reported, corresponding to about 37 and 12 useful bounces, respectively. Atomic-motion induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances is observed in Cs-OTS cells by reducing the optical beam diameter. Ramsey CPT fringes are detected using a pulsed CPT interrogation scheme. Potential applications of the Cs-OTS cell to the development of a vapor cell atomic clock are discussed.

  1. Profiling the Behavior of Distinct Populations of Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Guimarães, Douglas M.; Squarize, Cristiane H.; Castilho, Rogerio M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of tumor cells endowed with self-renewal properties and the capacity to dynamically adapt to physiological changes that occur in the tumor microenvironment. CSCs play a central role in resistance to therapy and long-term disease recurrence. Better characterization and understanding of the available in vitro tools to study the biology of CSCs will improve our knowledge of the processes underlying tumor response to therapy, and will help in the screening and development of novel strategies targeting CSCs. We investigated the behavior of different populations of head and neck CSCs grown under ultra-low adhesion conditions. We found that invasion and adhesion differ among tumorsphere subtypes (holospheres, merospheres and paraspheres), and their tumor cell progeny also harbor distinct self-renewal and clonogenic potentials. Furthermore, holospheres contained higher numbers of head and neck CSCs, as detected by the CD44 cancer stem cell marker and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymatic activity. In addition, holospheres showed reduced proliferation (Ki67), hypoacetylation of histones, and increased expression of the BMI-1 epithelial stem cell marker, suggesting activation of stem cell programs. Collectively, our results suggest that holospheres enrich a specific population of CSCs with enhanced “stemness” and invasive potential. PMID:26742076

  2. The Musashi family of RNA binding proteins: master regulators of multiple stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Jessie M; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Hime, Gary R; Siddall, Nicole A

    2013-01-01

    In order to maintain their unlimited capacity to divide, stem cells require controlled temporal and spatial protein expression. The Musashi family of RNA-binding proteins have been shown to exhibit this necessary translational control through both repression and activation in order to regulate multiple stem cell populations. This chapter looks in depth at the initial discovery and characterisation of Musashi in the model organism Drosophila, and its subsequent emergence as a master regulator in a number of stem cell populations. Furthermore the unique roles for mammalian Musashi-1 and Musashi-2 in different stem cell types are correlated with the perceived diagnostic power of Musashi expression in specific stem cell derived oncologies. In particular the potential role for Musashi in the identification and treatment of human cancer is considered, with a focus on the role of Musashi-2 in leukaemia. Finally, the manipulation of Musashi expression is proposed as a potential avenue towards the targeted treatment of specific aggressive stem cell cancers. PMID:23696360

  3. Computer-aided design of T-cell epitope-based vaccines: addressing population coverage.

    PubMed

    Oyarzun, P; Kobe, B

    2015-10-01

    Epitope-based vaccines (EVs) make use of short antigen-derived peptides corresponding to immune epitopes, which are administered to trigger a protective humoral and/or cellular immune response. EVs potentially allow for precise control over the immune response activation by focusing on the most relevant - immunogenic and conserved - antigen regions. Experimental screening of large sets of peptides is time-consuming and costly; therefore, in silico methods that facilitate T-cell epitope mapping of protein antigens are paramount for EV development. The prediction of T-cell epitopes focuses on the peptide presentation process by proteins encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Because different MHCs have different specificities and T-cell epitope repertoires, individuals are likely to respond to a different set of peptides from a given pathogen in genetically heterogeneous human populations. In addition, protective immune responses are only expected if T-cell epitopes are restricted by MHC proteins expressed at high frequencies in the target population. Therefore, without careful consideration of the specificity and prevalence of the MHC proteins, EVs could fail to adequately cover the target population. This article reviews state-of-the-art algorithms and computational tools to guide EV design through all the stages of the process: epitope prediction, epitope selection and vaccine assembly, while optimizing vaccine immunogenicity and coping with genetic variation in humans and pathogens. PMID:26211755

  4. Endothelial Side Population Cells Contribute to Tumor Angiogenesis and Antiangiogenic Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Naito, Hisamichi; Wakabayashi, Taku; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Muramatsu, Fumitaka; Takara, Kazuhiro; Eino, Daisuke; Yamane, Keitaro; Iba, Tomohiro; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Angiogenesis plays a crucial role in tumor growth, with an undisputed contribution of resident endothelial cells (EC) to new blood vessels in the tumor. Here, we report the definition of a small population of vascular-resident stem/progenitor-like EC that contributes predominantly to new blood vessel formation in the tumor. Although the surface markers of this population are similar to other ECs, those from the lung vasculature possess colony-forming ability in vitro and contribute to angiogenesis in vivo These specific ECs actively proliferate in lung tumors, and the percentage of this population significantly increases in the tumor vasculature relative to normal lung tissue. Using genetic recombination and bone marrow transplant models, we show that these cells are phenotypically true ECs and do not originate from hematopoietic cells. After treatment of tumors with antiangiogenic drugs, these specific ECs selectively survived and remained in the tumor. Together, our results established that ECs in the peripheral vasculature are heterogeneous and that stem/progenitor-like ECs play an indispensable role in tumor angiogenesis as EC-supplying cells. The lack of susceptibility of these ECs to antiangiogenic drugs may account for resistance of the tumor to this drug type. Thus, inhibiting these ECs might provide a promising strategy to overcome antiangiogenic drug resistance. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3200-10. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197162

  5. Systematic approach to Escherichia coli cell population control using a genetic lysis circuit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell population control allows for the maintenance of a specific cell population density. In this study, we use lysis gene BBa_K117000 from the Registry of Standard Biological Parts, formed by MIT, to lyse Escherichia coli (E. coli). The lysis gene is regulated by a synthetic genetic lysis circuit, using an inducer-regulated promoter-RBS component. To make the design more easily, it is necessary to provide a systematic approach for a genetic lysis circuit to achieve control of cell population density. Results Firstly, the lytic ability of the constructed genetic lysis circuit is described by the relationship between the promoter-RBS components and inducer concentration in a steady state model. Then, three types of promoter-RBS libraries are established. Finally, according to design specifications, a systematic design approach is proposed to provide synthetic biologists with a prescribed I/O response by selecting proper promoter-RBS component set in combination with suitable inducer concentrations, within a feasible range. Conclusion This study provides an important systematic design method for the development of next-generation synthetic gene circuits, from component library construction to genetic circuit assembly. In future, when libraries are more complete, more precise cell density control can be achieved. PMID:25559865

  6. Serotonin 5-HT4 receptors and forebrain cholinergic system: receptor expression in identified cell populations.

    PubMed

    Peñas-Cazorla, Raúl; Vilaró, M Teresa

    2015-11-01

    Activation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors has pro-cognitive effects on memory performance. The proposed underlying neurochemical mechanism is the enhancement of acetylcholine release in frontal cortex and hippocampus elicited by 5-HT4 agonists. Although 5-HT4 receptors are present in brain areas related to cognition, e.g., hippocampus and cortex, the cellular localization of the receptors that might modulate acetylcholine release is unknown at present. We have analyzed, using dual label in situ hybridization, the cellular localization of 5-HT4 receptor mRNA in identified neuronal populations of the rat basal forebrain, which is the source of the cholinergic innervation to cortex and hippocampus. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was visualized with isotopically labeled oligonucleotide probes, whereas cholinergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and parvalbumin-synthesizing neurons were identified with digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probes. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was not detected in the basal forebrain cholinergic cell population. In contrast, basal forebrain GABAergic, parvalbumin synthesizing, and glutamatergic cells contained 5-HT4 receptor mRNA. Hippocampal and cortical glutamatergic neurons also express this receptor. These results indicate that 5-HT4 receptors are not synthesized by cholinergic cells, and thus would be absent from cholinergic terminals. In contrast, several non-cholinergic cell populations within the basal forebrain and its target hippocampal and cortical areas express these receptors and are thus likely to mediate the enhancement of acetylcholine release elicited by 5-HT4 agonists. PMID:25183542

  7. Accounting for randomness in measurement and sampling in studying cancer cell population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, Siavash; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Lahouti, Farshad; Ullah, Mukhtar; Linnebacher, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Knowing the expected temporal evolution of the proportion of different cell types in sample tissues gives an indication about the progression of the disease and its possible response to drugs. Such systems have been modelled using Markov processes. We here consider an experimentally realistic scenario in which transition probabilities are estimated from noisy cell population size measurements. Using aggregated data of FACS measurements, we develop MMSE and ML estimators and formulate two problems to find the minimum number of required samples and measurements to guarantee the accuracy of predicted population sizes. Our numerical results show that the convergence mechanism of transition probabilities and steady states differ widely from the real values if one uses the standard deterministic approach for noisy measurements. This provides support for our argument that for the analysis of FACS data one should consider the observed state as a random variable. The second problem we address is about the consequences of estimating the probability of a cell being in a particular state from measurements of small population of cells. We show how the uncertainty arising from small sample sizes can be captured by a distribution for the state probability. PMID:25257023

  8. A novel stem cell source for vasculogenesis in ischemia: subfraction of side population cells from dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Iohara, Koichiro; Zheng, Li; Wake, Hiroaki; Ito, Masataka; Nabekura, Junichi; Wakita, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Into, Takeshi; Matsushita, Kenji; Nakashima, Misako

    2008-09-01

    Cell therapy with stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to stimulate vasculogenesis as a potential treatment for ischemic disease is an exciting area of research in regenerative medicine. EPCs are present in bone marrow, peripheral blood, and adipose tissue. Autologous EPCs, however, are obtained by invasive biopsy, a potentially painful procedure. An alternative approach is proposed in this investigation. Permanent and deciduous pulp tissue is easily available from teeth after extraction without ethical issues and has potential for clinical use. We isolated a highly vasculogenic subfraction of side population (SP) cells based on CD31 and CD146, from dental pulp. The CD31(-);CD146(-) SP cells, demonstrating CD34+ and vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (VEGFR2)/Flk1+, were similar to EPCs. These cells were distinct from the hematopoietic lineage as CD11b, CD14, and CD45 mRNA were not expressed. They showed high proliferation and migration activities and multilineage differentiation potential including vasculogenic potential. In models of mouse hind limb ischemia, local transplantation of this subfraction of SP cells resulted in successful engraftment and an increase in the blood flow including high density of capillary formation. The transplanted cells were in proximity of the newly formed vasculature and expressed several proangiogenic factors, such as VEGF-A, G-CSF, GM-CSF, and MMP3. Conditioned medium from this subfraction showed the mitogenic and antiapoptotic activity on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In conclusion, subfraction of SP cells from dental pulp is a new stem cell source for cell-based therapy to stimulate angiogenesis/vasculogenesis during tissue regeneration. PMID:18583536

  9. Two-Step Regulation of a Meristematic Cell Population Acting in Shoot Branching in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bihai; Zhang, Cui; Tian, Caihuan; Wang, Jin; Wang, Quan; Xu, Tengfei; Xu, Yan; Ohno, Carolyn; Sablowski, Robert; Heisler, Marcus G; Theres, Klaus; Wang, Ying; Jiao, Yuling

    2016-07-01

    Shoot branching requires the establishment of new meristems harboring stem cells; this phenomenon raises questions about the precise regulation of meristematic fate. In seed plants, these new meristems initiate in leaf axils to enable lateral shoot branching. Using live-cell imaging of leaf axil cells, we show that the initiation of axillary meristems requires a meristematic cell population continuously expressing the meristem marker SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM). The maintenance of STM expression depends on the leaf axil auxin minimum. Ectopic expression of STM is insufficient to activate axillary buds formation from plants that have lost leaf axil STM expressing cells. This suggests that some cells undergo irreversible commitment to a developmental fate. In more mature leaves, REVOLUTA (REV) directly up-regulates STM expression in leaf axil meristematic cells, but not in differentiated cells, to establish axillary meristems. Cell type-specific binding of REV to the STM region correlates with epigenetic modifications. Our data favor a threshold model for axillary meristem initiation, in which low levels of STM maintain meristematic competence and high levels of STM lead to meristem initiation. PMID:27398935

  10. Two-Step Regulation of a Meristematic Cell Population Acting in Shoot Branching in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Caihuan; Wang, Jin; Xu, Tengfei; Xu, Yan; Ohno, Carolyn; Sablowski, Robert; Heisler, Marcus G.; Theres, Klaus; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Shoot branching requires the establishment of new meristems harboring stem cells; this phenomenon raises questions about the precise regulation of meristematic fate. In seed plants, these new meristems initiate in leaf axils to enable lateral shoot branching. Using live-cell imaging of leaf axil cells, we show that the initiation of axillary meristems requires a meristematic cell population continuously expressing the meristem marker SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM). The maintenance of STM expression depends on the leaf axil auxin minimum. Ectopic expression of STM is insufficient to activate axillary buds formation from plants that have lost leaf axil STM expressing cells. This suggests that some cells undergo irreversible commitment to a developmental fate. In more mature leaves, REVOLUTA (REV) directly up-regulates STM expression in leaf axil meristematic cells, but not in differentiated cells, to establish axillary meristems. Cell type-specific binding of REV to the STM region correlates with epigenetic modifications. Our data favor a threshold model for axillary meristem initiation, in which low levels of STM maintain meristematic competence and high levels of STM lead to meristem initiation. PMID:27398935

  11. Connecting multiple spatial scales to decode the population activity of grid cells

    PubMed Central

    Stemmler, Martin; Mathis, Alexander; Herz, Andreas V. M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian grid cells fire when an animal crosses the points of an imaginary hexagonal grid tessellating the environment. We show how animals can navigate by reading out a simple population vector of grid cell activity across multiple spatial scales, even though neural activity is intrinsically stochastic. This theory of dead reckoning explains why grid cells are organized into discrete modules within which all cells have the same lattice scale and orientation. The lattice scale changes from module to module and should form a geometric progression with a scale ratio of around 3/2 to minimize the risk of making large-scale errors in spatial localization. Such errors should also occur if intermediate-scale modules are silenced, whereas knocking out the module at the smallest scale will only affect spatial precision. For goal-directed navigation, the allocentric grid cell representation can be readily transformed into the egocentric goal coordinates needed for planning movements. The goal location is set by nonlinear gain fields that act on goal vector cells. This theory predicts neural and behavioral correlates of grid cell readout that transcend the known link between grid cells of the medial entorhinal cortex and place cells of the hippocampus. PMID:26824061

  12. Connecting multiple spatial scales to decode the population activity of grid cells.

    PubMed

    Stemmler, Martin; Mathis, Alexander; Herz, Andreas V M

    2015-12-01

    Mammalian grid cells fire when an animal crosses the points of an imaginary hexagonal grid tessellating the environment. We show how animals can navigate by reading out a simple population vector of grid cell activity across multiple spatial scales, even though neural activity is intrinsically stochastic. This theory of dead reckoning explains why grid cells are organized into discrete modules within which all cells have the same lattice scale and orientation. The lattice scale changes from module to module and should form a geometric progression with a scale ratio of around 3/2 to minimize the risk of making large-scale errors in spatial localization. Such errors should also occur if intermediate-scale modules are silenced, whereas knocking out the module at the smallest scale will only affect spatial precision. For goal-directed navigation, the allocentric grid cell representation can be readily transformed into the egocentric goal coordinates needed for planning movements. The goal location is set by nonlinear gain fields that act on goal vector cells. This theory predicts neural and behavioral correlates of grid cell readout that transcend the known link between grid cells of the medial entorhinal cortex and place cells of the hippocampus. PMID:26824061

  13. Generation of Highly Enriched Populations of Optic Vesicle-Like Retinal Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohlemacher, Sarah K.; Iglesias, Clara L.; Sridhar, Akshayalakshmi; Gamm, David M.; Meyer, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    The procedure to efficiently and reproducibly differentiate retinal cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is described below. Cells are taken through a stepwise protocol to direct them toward a neural fate by treatment with neural induction medium (NIM), then to a retinal fate by exposure to retinal differentiation medium (RDM). Undifferentiated hPSCs are enzymatically lifted from matrigel-coated plates and exposed to NIM in suspension. Differentiation in suspension allows the cells to form 3 dimensional aggregates. At 7 days of differentiation, aggregates are plated and attach to 6 well plates, where a neuroepithelial fate begins to be established. Upon 16 days of differentiation, neurospheres are lifted and maintained in RDM to create a three-dimensional optic vesicle-like structure. This procedure allows for the efficient and timely generation of a variety of retinal cell types, including ganglion cells, retinal pigment epithelium, as well as cone and rod photoreceptors. The use of this protocol to generate a myriad of retinal cell types facilitates in vitro studies of human retinogenesis, and will enable retinal dysfunction to be more easily studied in vitro, as well as providing a large population of cells with which to aid in drug development and patient specific therapies. PMID:25640818

  14. Network properties derived from deep sequencing of human B-cell receptor repertoires delineate B-cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Bashford-Rogers, Rachael J.M.; Palser, Anne L.; Huntly, Brian J.; Rance, Richard; Vassiliou, George S.; Follows, George A.; Kellam, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The adaptive immune response selectively expands B- and T-cell clones following antigen recognition by B- and T-cell receptors (BCR and TCR), respectively. Next-generation sequencing is a powerful tool for dissecting the BCR and TCR populations at high resolution, but robust computational analyses are required to interpret such sequencing. Here, we develop a novel computational approach for BCR repertoire analysis using established next-generation sequencing methods coupled with network construction and population analysis. BCR sequences organize into networks based on sequence diversity, with differences in network connectivity clearly distinguishing between diverse repertoires of healthy individuals and clonally expanded repertoires from individuals with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other clonal blood disorders. Network population measures defined by the Gini Index and cluster sizes quantify the BCR clonality status and are robust to sampling and sequencing depths. BCR network analysis therefore allows the direct and quantifiable comparison of BCR repertoires between samples and intra-individual population changes between temporal or spatially separated samples and over the course of therapy. PMID:23742949

  15. An evolutionary stability perspective on oncogenesis control in mature T-cell populations.

    PubMed

    Diebner, Hans H; Kirberg, Jörg; Roeder, Ingo

    2016-01-21

    Here we present a mathematical model for the dynamics of oncogenesis control in mature T-cell populations within the blood and lymphatic system. T-cell homeostasis is maintained by clonal competition for trophic niches (survival signals stimulated through interactions with self-antigens bound to major histocompatibility molecules), where a clone is defined as the set of T cells carrying the same antigen specific T-cell receptor (TCR). We analytically derive fitness functions of healthy and leukemic clone variants, respectively, that capture the dependency of the stability of the healthy T-cell pool against leukemic invaders on clonal diversity and kinetic parameters. Similar to the stability of ecosystems with high biodiversity, leukemic mutants are suppressed within polyclonal T-cell populations, i.e., in the presence of a huge number of different TCRs. To the contrary, for a low clonal diversity the leukemic clone variants are able to invade the healthy T-cell pool. The model, therefore, describes the experimentally observed phenomenon that preleukemic clone variants prevail in quasi-monoclonal experimental settings (in mice), whereas in polyclonal settings the healthy TCR variants are able to suppress the outgrowth of tumours. Between the two extremal situations of mono- and polyclonality there exists a range of coexistence of healthy and oncogenic clone variants with moderate fitness (stability) each. A variation of cell cycle times considerably changes the dynamics within this coexistence region. Faster proliferating variants increase their chance to dominate. Finally, a simplified niche variation scheme illustrates a possible mechanism to increase clonal T-cell diversity given a small niche diversity. PMID:26549469

  16. Effect of X-Irradiation at Different Stages in the Cell Cycle on Individual Cell-Based Kinetics in an Asynchronous Cell Population.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Eri; Kaida, Atsushi; Pratama, Endrawan; Ikeda, Masa-Aki; Suzuki, Keiji; Harada, Kiyoshi; Miura, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Using an asynchronously growing cell population, we investigated how X-irradiation at different stages of the cell cycle influences individual cell-based kinetics. To visualize the cell-cycle phase, we employed the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci). After 5 Gy irradiation, HeLa cells no longer entered M phase in an order determined by their previous stage of the cell cycle, primarily because green phase (S and G2) was less prolonged in cells irradiated during the red phase (G1) than in those irradiated during the green phase. Furthermore, prolongation of the green phase in cells irradiated during the red phase gradually increased as the irradiation timing approached late G1 phase. The results revealed that endoreduplication rarely occurs in this cell line under the conditions we studied. We next established a method for classifying the green phase into early S, mid S, late S, and G2 phases at the time of irradiation, and then attempted to estimate the duration of G2 arrest based on certain assumptions. The value was the largest when cells were irradiated in mid or late S phase and the smallest when they were irradiated in G1 phase. In this study, by closely following individual cells irradiated at different cell-cycle phases, we revealed for the first time the unique cell-cycle kinetics in HeLa cells that follow irradiation. PMID:26086724

  17. Quantum mutual entropy of a single four-level atom strongly coupled to a cavity field and driven by a laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aty, Mahmoud

    2007-07-01

    Based on exact quantum dynamics of a single four-level atom strongly coupled to a cavity field mode and driven by a coherent laser field, we investigate quantum mutual entropy as a measure of the amount of total correlations. Through the analysis of the dynamic of the total correlation, we show that under the influence of the decoherence, the total correlation may terminate abruptly in a finite time. Further consequences of our results include a description of total correlations of a general multi-level atomic system.

  18. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Selective Deflection of Polarized Light Via Coherently Driven Four-Level Atoms in a Double-Λ Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu

    2010-05-01

    We study the interaction of a weak probe field, having two circular polarized components, i.e., σ- and σ+ polarization, with an optically dense medium of four-level atoms in a double-Λ configuration, which is mediated by the electromagnetically induced transparency with a polarized control light with spatially inhomogeneous profile. We analyse the deflection of the polarized probe light and we find that we can selectively determine which circular component will be deflected after the polarized probe light enters the atom medium via adjusting the polarization and detuning of the control field.

  19. Highly dissipative Hénon map behavior in the four-level model of the CO 2 laser with modulated losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pando L., C. L.; Acosta, G. A. Luna; Meucci, R.; Ciofini, M.

    1995-02-01

    We show that the four-level model for the CO 2 laser with modulated losses behaves in a qualitatively similar way as the highly dissipative Hénon map. The ubiquity of elements of the universal sequence, their related symbolic dynamics, and the presence of reverse bifurcations of chaotic bands in the model are reminiscent of the logistic map which is the limit of the Hénon map when the Jacobian equals zero. The coexistence of attractors, its dynamics related to contraction of volumes in phase space and the associated return maps can be correlated with those of the highly dissipative Hénon map.

  20. CD161int CD8+ T cells: a novel population of highly functional, memory CD8+ T cells enriched within the gut

    PubMed Central

    Fergusson, J.R.; Hühn, M.H.; Swadling, L.; Walker, L.J.; Kurioka, A.; Llibre, A.; Bertoletti, A.; Holländer, G.; Newell, E.W.; Davis, M.M.; Sverremark-Ekström, E.; Powrie, F.; Capone, S.; Folgori, A.; Barnes, E.; Willberg, C.B.; Ussher, J.E.; Klenerman, P.

    2015-01-01

    The C-type lectin-like receptor CD161 is expressed on lymphocytes found in human gut and liver, as well as blood, especially Natural Killer cells, T helper 17 cells and a population of unconventional T cells known as Mucosal Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells. The association of high CD161 expression with innate T cell populations including MAIT cells is established. Here we show that CD161 is also expressed, at intermediate levels, on a prominent subset of polyclonal CD8+ T cells, including anti-viral populations, which display a memory phenotype. These memory CD161int CD8+ T cells are enriched within the colon and express both CD103 and CD69, markers associated with tissue residence. Furthermore, this population was characterised by enhanced polyfunctionality, increased levels of cytotoxic mediators and high expression of the transcription factors T-bet and Eomesodermin. Such populations were induced by novel vaccine strategies based on adenoviral vectors, currently in trial against Hepatitis C virus. Thus, intermediate CD161 expression marks potent polyclonal, polyfunctional tissue-homing CD8+ T cell populations in humans. Since induction of such responses represents a major aim of T cell prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines in viral disease and cancer, analysis of these populations could be of value in the future. PMID:26220166

  1. Computing local edge probability in natural scenes from a population of oriented simple cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, Chaithanya A.; Mel, Bartlett W.

    2013-01-01

    A key computation in visual cortex is the extraction of object contours, where the first stage of processing is commonly attributed to V1 simple cells. The standard model of a simple cell—an oriented linear filter followed by a divisive normalization—fits a wide variety of physiological data, but is a poor performing local edge detector when applied to natural images. The brain's ability to finely discriminate edges from nonedges therefore likely depends on information encoded by local simple cell populations. To gain insight into the corresponding decoding problem, we used Bayes's rule to calculate edge probability at a given location/orientation in an image based on a surrounding filter population. Beginning with a set of ∼ 100 filters, we culled out a subset that were maximally informative about edges, and minimally correlated to allow factorization of the joint on- and off-edge likelihood functions. Key features of our approach include a new, efficient method for ground-truth edge labeling, an emphasis on achieving filter independence, including a focus on filters in the region orthogonal rather than tangential to an edge, and the use of a customized parametric model to represent the individual filter likelihood functions. The resulting population-based edge detector has zero parameters, calculates edge probability based on a sum of surrounding filter influences, is much more sharply tuned than the underlying linear filters, and effectively captures fine-scale edge structure in natural scenes. Our findings predict nonmonotonic interactions between cells in visual cortex, wherein a cell may for certain stimuli excite and for other stimuli inhibit the same neighboring cell, depending on the two cells' relative offsets in position and orientation, and their relative activation levels. PMID:24381295

  2. Changes in genital tract immune cell populations after initiation of intrauterine contraception

    PubMed Central

    ACHILLES, Sharon L.; CREININ, Mitchell D.; STONER, Kevin A.; CHEN, Beatrice A.; MEYN, Leslie; HILLIER, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The primary target cells for HIV infection in the genital tract are CD4 T-cells expressing CCR5 on the surface. Alterations in genital tract T-cells expressing CCR5 could impact human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition risk. We hypothesized that when compared to baseline, use of a hormonal intrauterine device (IUD) would alter HIV target cells (primarily CCR5+ CD4 cells) in the female genital tract more than a non-hormonal IUD. Study Design Thirty-four healthy, HIV negative women age 18-40 seeking an IUD for contraception were randomized to receive a levonorgestrel IUD or a copper T380A IUD. A parallel group of 8 control women not needing contraception was also enrolled. Genital tract mucosal immune cell populations collected by cervical cytobrush and endometrial biopsy before and two months after IUD placement were analyzed by flow cytometry. Mean differences in cell number and percent expressing receptors from baseline to follow-up were evaluated using paired Student’s t-tests. Results Neither IUD altered the number of T-cells within the upper and lower genital tracts. Levonorgestrel IUD users had a decrease in T-cells expressing the HIV co-receptor CCR5 in the endometrium and cervix after two months of use compared with baseline. There was a decrease in activated endometrial T-cells in levonorgestrel IUD users and a decrease in activated cervical T-cells in copper IUD users after two months of IUD use compared with baseline. Conclusions Women using IUDs have reduced expression of the CCR5 HIV co-receptor on T-cells in the endometrium and cervix compared to expression prior to IUD placement. These findings suggest that susceptibility to HIV infection would not be increased by IUD use. PMID:24834865

  3. Dual-modality wide-field photothermal quantitative phase microscopy and depletion of cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turko, Nir A.; Barnea, Itay; Blum, Omry; Korenstein, Rafi; Shaked, Natan T.

    2015-03-01

    We review our dual-modality technique for quantitative imaging and selective depletion of populations of cells based on wide-field photothermal (PT) quantitative phase imaging and simultaneous PT cell extermination. The cells are first labeled by plasmonic gold nanoparticles, which evoke local plasmonic resonance when illuminated by light in a wavelength corresponding to their specific plasmonic resonance peak. This reaction creates changes of temperature, resulting in changes of phase. This phase changes are recorded by a quantitative phase microscope (QPM), producing specific imaging contrast, and enabling bio-labeling in phase microscopy. Using this technique, we have shown discrimination of EGFR over-expressing (EGFR+) cancer cells from EGFR under-expressing (EGFR-) cancer cells. Then, we have increased the excitation power in order to evoke greater temperatures, which caused specific cell death, all under real-time phase acquisition using QPM. Close to 100% of all EGFR+ cells were immediately exterminated when illuminated with the strong excitation beam, while all EGFR- cells survived. For the second experiment, in order to simulate a condition where circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are present in blood, we have mixed the EGFR+ cancer cells with white blood cells (WBCs) from a healthy donor. Here too, we have used QPM to observe and record the phase of the cells as they were excited for selective visualization and then exterminated. The WBCs survival rate was over 95%, while the EGFR+ survival rate was under 5%. The technique may be the basis for real-time detection and controlled treatment of CTCs.

  4. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice.

    PubMed

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A; Marignani, Paola A; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D; Marshall, Jean S

    2016-07-01

    Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1(-/-)/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  5. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  6. Individual intestinal symbionts induce a distinct population of RORγ+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sefik, Esen; Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Oh, Sungwhan; Konnikova, Liza; Zemmour, David; McGuire, Abigail Manson; Burzyn, Dalia; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Lobera, Mercedes; Yang, Jianfei; Ghosh, Shomir; Earl, Ashlee; Snapper, Scott B.; Jupp, Ray; Kasper, Dennis; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    T regulatory cells that express the transcription factor Foxp3 (Foxp3+ Treg) promote tissue homeostasis in several settings. We now report that symbiotic members of the human gut microbiota induce a distinct Treg population in the mouse colon, which constrains immuno-inflammatory responses. This induction, which we find to map to a broad, but specific, array of individual bacterial species, requires the transcription factor Rorγ, paradoxically in that Rorγ is thought to antagonize FoxP3 and promote T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation. Rorγ's transcriptional footprint differs in colonic Tregs and Th17 cells, controlling important effector molecules. Rorγ, and the Tregs that express it, contribute substantially to regulating colonic Th1/Th17 inflammation. Thus, the marked context-specificity of Rorγ results in very different outcomes even in closely related cell-types. PMID:26272906

  7. The new cell culture smallpox vaccine should not be offered to the general population.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Philip P

    2003-01-01

    Cell based smallpox vaccines are to be welcomed, but any decision to vaccinate whole populations must await firstly better intelligence about the gravity of the threat from bioterrorists, including their ability to release smallpox in such a way that wide dissemination could take place; secondly evidence that vaccines grown in cell culture are protective and safe; and thirdly that the vaccines would be generally acceptable and their introduction would not compromise the rest of national immunisation programmes. Smallpox vaccination should not be offered to the general population until these uncertainties have been resolved, by which time bioterrorism might possibly have been overcome or the development of antiviral treatment might have made renewed smallpox vaccination unnecessary. Meanwhile, preparations for rapid deployment of the historically well-tried containment measures at the epicentres of any smallpox release should proceed, their effectiveness should be tested, and their adequacy kept under review. PMID:12516059

  8. Genomically Encoded Analog Memory with Precise In vivo DNA Writing in Living Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Farzadfard, Fahim; Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular memory is crucial to many natural biological processes and for sophisticated synthetic-biology applications. Existing cellular memories rely on epigenetic switches or recombinases, which are limited in scalability and recording capacity. Here, we use the DNA of living cell populations as genomic ‘tape recorders’ for the analog and distributed recording of long-term event histories. We describe a platform for generating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in vivo in response to arbitrary transcriptional signals. When co-expressed with a recombinase, these intracellularly expressed ssDNAs target specific genomic DNA addresses, resulting in precise mutations that accumulate in cell populations as a function of the magnitude and duration of the inputs. This platform could enable long-term cellular recorders for environmental and biomedical applications, biological state machines, and enhanced genome engineering strategies. PMID:25395541

  9. Putative population of adipose-derived stem cells isolated from mediastinal tissue during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amit N; Yockman, James; Vargas, Vanessa; Bull, David A

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been isolated from various adult human tissues and are valuable for not only therapeutic applications but for the study of tissue homeostasis and disease progression. Subcutaneous adipose depots have been shown to contain large amounts of stem cells. There is little information that has been reported to date describing the isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from visceral adipose tissue. In this study, we describe a mesenchymal stem cell population isolated from mediastinal adipose depots. The cells express CD44, CD105, CD166, and CD90 and are negative for hematopoietic markers CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR. In addition, the cells have a multilineage potential, with the ability to differentiate into adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic cell types. The biological function of visceral adipose tissue remains largely unknown and uncharacterized. However, the proximity of adipose tissue to the heart suggests a potential role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in obesity. In addition, with the ability of fat to regulate metabolic activity in humans, this novel stem cell source may be useful to further study the mechanisms involved in metabolic disorders. PMID:22490339

  10. Clonal Dynamics Reveal Two Distinct Populations of Basal Cells in Slow-Turnover Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Julie K.; Rulands, Steffen; Wilkinson, Adam C.; Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Göttgens, Berthold; Blanpain, Cédric; Simons, Benjamin D.; Rawlins, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epithelial lineages have been studied at cellular resolution in multiple organs that turn over rapidly. However, many epithelia, including those of the lung, liver, pancreas, and prostate, turn over slowly and may be regulated differently. We investigated the mouse tracheal epithelial lineage at homeostasis by using long-term clonal analysis and mathematical modeling. This pseudostratified epithelium contains basal cells and secretory and multiciliated luminal cells. Our analysis revealed that basal cells are heterogeneous, comprising approximately equal numbers of multipotent stem cells and committed precursors, which persist in the basal layer for 11 days before differentiating to luminal fate. We confirmed the molecular and functional differences within the basal population by using single-cell qRT-PCR and further lineage labeling. Additionally, we show that self-renewal of short-lived secretory cells is a feature of homeostasis. We have thus revealed early luminal commitment of cells that are morphologically indistinguishable from stem cells. PMID:26119728

  11. Ovarian Stimulation Affects the Population of Mouse Uterine NK Cells at Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dorfeshan, Parvin; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of ovarian stimulation on endometrial mouse NK cell population. For superovulation, the female adult NMRI mice were injected i.p. with 10 IU of the pregnant mare serum gonadotropin followed 48 h later by an i.p. injection of 10 IU human chorionic gonadotropin hormone. Ovarian stimulated and nonstimulated mice were mated with fertile male. The presence of vaginal plug proved natural pregnancy, and this day was considered as day one of pregnancy. Tissue samples were prepared from the uterine horn and spleen of both groups of study on 7th day of pregnancy. Serum estradiol-17β and progesterone were measured at the same time. The tissue cryosections were prepared and double stained for CD 161 and CD3 markers, and NK cells population was analyzed. Relative frequency of NK cells was significantly lower in stroma and myometrium in hyperstimulated mice compared with the control group. However, no difference was seen in percentage of NK cells in spleen. The ovarian stimulation influences the proportion of uterine NK cells and may affect the embryo implantation. PMID:24350248

  12. Distinct intervertebral disc cell populations adopt similar phenotypes in three-dimensional culture.

    PubMed

    Chou, Alice I; Reza, Anna T; Nicoll, Steven B

    2008-12-01

    Tissue engineering strategies have the potential to improve upon current techniques for intervertebral disc repair. However, determining a suitable biomaterial scaffold for disc regeneration is difficult due to the complex fibrocartilaginous structure of the tissue. In this study, cells isolated from three distinct regions of the intervertebral disc, the outer and inner annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, were expanded and seeded on resorbable polyester fiber meshes and encapsulated in calcium crosslinked alginate hydrogels, both chosen to approximate the native tissue architecture. Three-dimensional (3D) constructs were cultured for 14 days in vitro and evaluated histologically and quantitatively for gene expression and production of types I and II collagen and proteoglycans. During monolayer expansion, the cell populations maintained their distinct phenotypic morphology and gene expression profiles. However, after 14 days in 3D culture, there were no significant differences in morphology, gene expression, or protein production between all three cell populations grown in either alginate or polyester fiber meshes. The results of this study indicate that the culture environment may have a greater impact on cellular behavior than the intrinsic origin of the cells, and suggest that only a single-cell type may be required for intervertebral disc regenerative therapies. PMID:18636941

  13. Accurate Prediction of Drug-Induced Liver Injury Using Stem Cell-Derived Populations

    PubMed Central

    Szkolnicka, Dagmara; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Lucendo-Villarin, Baltasar; Storck, Christopher; Zhou, Wenli; Iredale, John P.; Flint, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Despite major progress in the knowledge and management of human liver injury, there are millions of people suffering from chronic liver disease. Currently, the only cure for end-stage liver disease is orthotopic liver transplantation; however, this approach is severely limited by organ donation. Alternative approaches to restoring liver function have therefore been pursued, including the use of somatic and stem cell populations. Although such approaches are essential in developing scalable treatments, there is also an imperative to develop predictive human systems that more effectively study and/or prevent the onset of liver disease and decompensated organ function. We used a renewable human stem cell resource, from defined genetic backgrounds, and drove them through developmental intermediates to yield highly active, drug-inducible, and predictive human hepatocyte populations. Most importantly, stem cell-derived hepatocytes displayed equivalence to primary adult hepatocytes, following incubation with known hepatotoxins. In summary, we have developed a serum-free, scalable, and shippable cell-based model that faithfully predicts the potential for human liver injury. Such a resource has direct application in human modeling and, in the future, could play an important role in developing renewable cell-based therapies. PMID:24375539

  14. COX-2 Promotes Migration and Invasion by the Side Population of Cancer Stem Cell-Like Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhe; Jiang, Jing-Hang; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Hao-Jie; Yang, Fu-Quan; Qi, Ya-Peng; Zhong, Yan-Ping; Su, Jie; Yang, Ri-Rong; Li, Le-Qun; Xiang, Bang-De

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor relapse and metastasis due to their abilities to self-renew, differentiate, and give rise to new tumors. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is highly expressed in several kinds of CSCs, and it helps promote stem cell renewal, proliferation, and radioresistance. Whether and how COX-2 contributes to CSC migration and invasion is unclear. In this study, COX-2 was overexpressed in the CSC-like side population (SP) of the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line HCCLM3. COX-2 overexpression significantly enhanced migration and invasion of SP cells, while reducing expression of metastasis-related proteins PDCD4 and PTEN. Treating SP cells with the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib down-regulated COX-2 and caused a dose-dependent reduction in cell migration and invasion, which was associated with up-regulation of PDCD4 and PTEN. These results suggest that COX-2 exerts pro-metastatic effects on SP cells, and that these effects are mediated at least partly through regulation of PDCD4 and PTEN expression. These results further suggest that celecoxib may be a promising anti-metastatic agent to reduce migration and invasion by hepatic CSCs. PMID:26554780

  15. Bovine mammary dendritic cells: a heterogeneous population, distinct from macrophages and similar in phenotype to afferent lymph veiled cells.

    PubMed

    Maxymiv, Nicolas G; Bharathan, Mini; Mullarky, Isis K

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are a heterogeneous population of professional antigen presenting cells and are potent stimulators of naïve T-cells. However, there is little previous research describing DC in bovine mammary tissue, primarily because of the difficulty distinguishing these cells from macrophages, which possess a similar phenotype. Using immunohistofluorescence and a combination of markers (MHC-II, CD205, CD11c), DC were localized in the bovine mammary gland and supramammary lymph node. In mammary tissue DC were found within the alveolar epithelium and within the intralobular connective tissue. In the lymph node DC were found on the periphery of B-cell areas, in the cortex, and among T-cells in the paracortex and medulla. DC in mammary parenchyma and supramammary lymph nodes were quantified and further characterized using flow cytometry. DC were CD11c(hi), CD14(lo) cells that expressed MHC-II and CD205. DC could be distinguished from macrophages based on their low CD14 expression. This research provides a better understanding of mammary gland immunology, while potentially aiding in the targeting of antigens to mucosal DC for vaccine development. PMID:22019401

  16. The IL-17A-producing CD8+ T-cell population in psoriatic lesional skin comprises mucosa-associated invariant T cells and conventional T cells.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Marcel B M; Yeremenko, Nataliya G; Baeten, Dominique L P; Chielie, Saskia; Spuls, Phyllis I; de Rie, Menno A; Lantz, Olivier; Res, Pieter C M

    2014-12-01

    IL-17A is pivotal in the etiology of psoriasis, and CD8(+) T cells with the ability to produce this cytokine (Tc17 cells) are over-represented in psoriatic lesions. Here we demonstrate that the frequency of Tc17 cells in peripheral blood of psoriasis patients correlated with the clinical severity of the disease. Analysis of cutaneous-associated lymphocyte antigen expression showed that the blood Tc17 population contains a significantly higher proportion of cells with skin-homing potential compared with the CD8(+) T-cell population lacking IL-17A/IL-22 expression. IL-17A-producing CD8(+) T cells in blood have previously been reported to belong mainly to the mucosa-associated invariant T-cell (MAIT cell) lineage characterized by TCR Vα7.2 chain, CD161, IL-18Rα, and multidrug transporter ABCB1 expression. We demonstrate the presence of CD8(+) MAIT cells in the dermis and epidermis of psoriatic plaques, as well as healthy skin; however, IL-17A-producing CD8(+) MAIT cells were predominantly found in psoriatic skin. Notably, we observed IL-17A production in a large proportion of psoriatic plaque-derived CD8(+) T cells devoid of MAIT cell characteristics, likely representing conventional CD8(+) T cells. In conclusion, we provide supporting evidence that implicates Tc17 cells in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and describe the presence of innate CD8(+) MAIT cells in psoriatic lesions as an alternative source of IL-17A. PMID:24945094

  17. Experimentally Verified Parameter Sets for Modelling Heterogeneous Neocortical Pyramidal-Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Paul M.; Badel, Laurent; Wall, Mark J.; Richardson, Magnus J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Models of neocortical networks are increasingly including the diversity of excitatory and inhibitory neuronal classes. Significant variability in cellular properties are also seen within a nominal neuronal class and this heterogeneity can be expected to influence the population response and information processing in networks. Recent studies have examined the population and network effects of variability in a particular neuronal parameter with some plausibly chosen distribution. However, the empirical variability and covariance seen across multiple parameters are rarely included, partly due to the lack of data on parameter correlations in forms convenient for model construction. To addess this we quantify the heterogeneity within and between the neocortical pyramidal-cell classes in layers 2/3, 4, and the slender-tufted and thick-tufted pyramidal cells of layer 5 using a combination of intracellular recordings, single-neuron modelling and statistical analyses. From the response to both square-pulse and naturalistic fluctuating stimuli, we examined the class-dependent variance and covariance of electrophysiological parameters and identify the role of the h current in generating parameter correlations. A byproduct of the dynamic I-V method we employed is the straightforward extraction of reduced neuron models from experiment. Empirically these models took the refractory exponential integrate-and-fire form and provide an accurate fit to the perisomatic voltage responses of the diverse pyramidal-cell populations when the class-dependent statistics of the model parameters were respected. By quantifying the parameter statistics we obtained an algorithm which generates populations of model neurons, for each of the four pyramidal-cell classes, that adhere to experimentally observed marginal distributions and parameter correlations. As well as providing this tool, which we hope will be of use for exploring the effects of heterogeneity in neocortical networks, we also provide

  18. Mononucleated Blood Cell Populations Display Different Abilities To Transmit Prion Disease by the Transfusion Route

    PubMed Central

    Douet, Jean-Yves; Lacroux, Caroline; Litaise, Claire; Lugan, Séverine; Corbière, Fabien; Arnold, Mark; Simmons, Hugh; Aron, Naima; Costes, Pierrette; Tillier, Cécile; Cassard, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous experiments carried out in a sheep scrapie model demonstrated that the transfusion of 200 μl of prion-infected whole blood has an apparent 100% efficacy for disease transmission. These experiments also indicated that, despite the apparent low infectious titer, the intravenous administration of white blood cells (WBC) resulted in efficient disease transmission. In the study presented here, using the same transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal model, our aim was to determine the minimal number of white blood cells and the specific abilities of mononucleated cell populations to transmit scrapie by the transfusion route. Our results confirmed that the transfusion of 100 μl, but not 10 μl, of fresh whole blood collected in asymptomatic scrapie-infected donor sheep can transmit the disease. The data also show that the intravenous administration of 105 WBCs is sufficient to cause scrapie in recipient sheep. Cell-sorted CD45R+ (predominantly B lymphocytes), CD4+/CD8+ (T lymphocytes), and CD14+ (monocytes/macrophages) blood cell subpopulations all were shown to contain prion infectivity by bioassays in ovine PrP transgenic mice. However, while the intravenous administration of 106 CD45+ or CD4+/8+ living cells was able to transmit the disease, similar numbers of CD14+ cells failed to infect the recipients. These data support the contention that mononucleated blood cell populations display different abilities to transmit TSE by the transfusion route. They also represent an important input for the risk assessment of blood-borne prion disease transmission and for refining the target performance of leukoreduction processes that currently are applied to mitigate the transmission risk in transfusion medicine. IMPORTANCE Interindividual variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) transmission through blood and blood-derived products is considered a major public health issue in transfusion medicine. Over the last decade, TSE in sheep has emerged as a

  19. Ablation and analysis of small cell populations and single cells by consecutive laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Bindesh; Nemes, Peter; Vertes, Akos

    2010-10-01

    Laser ablation of single cells through a sharpened optical fiber is used for the detection of metabolites by laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry (MS). Ablation of the same Allium cepa epidermal cell by consecutive pulses indicates the rupture of the cell wall by the second shot. Intracellular sucrose heterogeneity is detected by subsequent laser pulses pointing to rupturing the vacuolar membrane by the third exposure. Ion production by bursts of laser pulses shows that the drying of ruptured A. cepa cells occurs in ˜50 s at low pulse rates (10 pulses/s bursts) and significantly faster at high pulse rates (100 pulses/s bursts). These results point to the competing role of cytoplasm ejection and evaporative drying in diminishing the LAESI-MS signal in ˜50 s or 100 laser pulses, whichever occurs first.

  20. Immunophenotypic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid cell populations with the Cell-Dyn Sapphire haematology analyser: method feasibility and preliminary observations.

    PubMed

    Adam, P; Sobek, O; Scott, C S; Dolezil, D; Kasik, J; Hajdukova, L; Adam, D

    2010-02-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples (n=50) from patients with neurological disease (bacterial infection, viral infection, neuroborreliosis and multiple sclerosis) were analysed to characterize cell populations by fluorescent immunocytometry with the CD-Sapphire haematology analyser. Reagent combinations applied to all CSF samples comprised CD3/CD19/HLA-DR and CD4/CD8, with some being further analysed using CD3/CD4, CD3/CD16 and CD3/CD25 protocols. Of the 50 samples, 11 were excluded because of high proportions of nonviable cells (n=2) or insufficient cell numbers (n=9). Apart from bacterial infection with granulocytosis, all diagnostic groups showed high proportions (51.4-77.0%) of CD3+ T cells. There was a modest association between T-cell and B-cell counts, but absolute B-cell numbers exceeded 5 cells/microl in only 7/39 cases (neuroborreliosis, n=6; bacterial meningitis, n=1). CD3/Ia antigen (activation) co-expression was low and only exceeded 5% in 7/39 samples with no diagnostic correlation. Primary CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets showed similar quantitative trends and CD4/CD8 co-analysis revealed the presence in all diagnostic groups (neuroborreliosis and multiple sclerosis in particular) of a CD4+CD8int fraction that was predominantly CD3+ and CD16- and had a morphological profile consistent with small lymphoid cells. Supplementary CD-Sapphire cellular immunological analysis of most CSF samples is feasible using the procedure detailed in this communication. PMID:19500178

  1. Cell mass and cell cycle dynamics of an asynchronous budding yeast population: experimental observations, flow cytometry data analysis, and multi-scale modeling.

    PubMed

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Carlquist, Magnus; Lundin, Luisa; Heins, Anna-Lena; Dutta, Abhishek; Sørensen, Søren J; Jensen, Anker D; Nopens, Ingmar; Lantz, Anna Eliasson; Gernaey, Krist V

    2013-03-01

    Despite traditionally regarded as identical, cells in a microbial cultivation present a distribution of phenotypic traits, forming a heterogeneous cell population. Moreover, the degree of heterogeneity is notably enhanced by changes in micro-environmental conditions. A major development in experimental single-cell studies has taken place in the last decades. It has however not been fully accompanied by similar contributions within data analysis and mathematical modeling. Indeed, literature reporting, for example, quantitative analyses of experimental single-cell observations and validation of model predictions for cell property distributions against experimental data is scarce. This study focuses on the experimental and mathematical description of the dynamics of cell size and cell cycle position distributions, of a population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in response to the substrate consumption observed during batch cultivation. The good agreement between the proposed multi-scale model (a population balance model [PBM] coupled to an unstructured model) and experimental data (both the overall physiology and cell size and cell cycle distributions) indicates that a mechanistic model is a suitable tool for describing the microbial population dynamics in a bioreactor. This study therefore contributes towards the understanding of the development of heterogeneous populations during microbial cultivations. More generally, it consists of a step towards a paradigm change in the study and description of cell cultivations, where average cell behaviors observed experimentally now are interpreted as a potential joint result of various co-existing single-cell behaviors, rather than a unique response common to all cells in the cultivation. PMID:23055296

  2. Robust generation of hepatocyte-like cells from human embryonic stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Medine, Claire N; Lucendo-Villarin, Baltasar; Zhou, Wenli; West, Christopher C; Hay, David C

    2011-01-01

    Despite progress in modelling human drug toxicity, many compounds fail during clinical trials due to unpredicted side effects. The cost of clinical studies are substantial, therefore it is essential that more predictive toxicology screens are developed and deployed early on in drug development (Greenhough et al 2010). Human hepatocytes represent the current gold standard model for evaluating drug toxicity, but are a limited resource that exhibit variable function. Therefore, the use of immortalised cell lines and animal tissue models are routinely employed due to their abundance. While both sources are informative, they are limited by poor function, species variability and/or instability in culture (Dalgetty et al 2009). Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are an attractive alternative source of human hepatocyte like cells (HLCs) (Medine et al 2010). PSCs are capable of self renewal and differentiation to all somatic cell types found in the adult and thereby represent a potentially inexhaustible source of differentiated cells. We have developed a procedure that is simple, highly efficient, amenable to automation and yields functional human HLCs (Hay et al 2008 ; Fletcher et al 2008 ; Hannoun et al 2010 ; Payne et al 2011 and Hay et al 2011). We believe our technology will lead to the scalable production of HLCs for drug discovery, disease modeling, the construction of extra-corporeal devices and possibly cell based transplantation therapies. PMID:22064456

  3. Joint Modeling and Registration of Cell Populations in Cohorts of High-Dimensional Flow Cytometric Data

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Saumyadipta; Lee, Sharon X.; Wang, Kui; Irish, Jonathan; Tamayo, Pablo; Nazaire, Marc-Danie; Duong, Tarn; Ng, Shu-Kay; Hafler, David; Levy, Ronald; Nolan, Garry P.; Mesirov, Jill; McLachlan, Geoffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    In biomedical applications, an experimenter encounters different potential sources of variation in data such as individual samples, multiple experimental conditions, and multivariate responses of a panel of markers such as from a signaling network. In multiparametric cytometry, which is often used for analyzing patient samples, such issues are critical. While computational methods can identify cell populations in individual samples, without the ability to automatically match them across samples, it is difficult to compare and characterize the populations in typical experiments, such as those responding to various stimulations or distinctive of particular patients or time-points, especially when there are many samples. Joint Clustering and Matching (JCM) is a multi-level framework for simultaneous modeling and registration of populations across a cohort. JCM models every population with a robust multivariate probability distribution. Simultaneously, JCM fits a random-effects model to construct an overall batch template – used for registering populations across samples, and classifying new samples. By tackling systems-level variation, JCM supports practical biomedical applications involving large cohorts. Software for fitting the JCM models have been implemented in an R package EMMIX-JCM, available from http://www.maths.uq.edu.au/~gjm/mix_soft/EMMIX-JCM/. PMID:24983991

  4. Isolated human islets contain a distinct population of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, Françoise; Zaldumbide, Arnaud; Loomans, Cindy J; van Rossenberg, Evelien; Engelse, Marten; de Koning, Eelco J; Hoeben, Rob C

    2010-01-01

    Islet replacement is a promising approach for type-1 diabetes treatment, but the shortage of organ donors demands new sources of β-cells. The use of stem/precursor cells may represent an attractive alternative. Islet-derived stem/precursor cells (hIPC) have been isolated from human islet preparations, but neither their origin, nor their contribution to β-cell formation in the adult pancreas, are well understood. To study these cells in more detail hIPC were isolated from purified human islets, cultured and functionally characterized. Cultured hIPC did not express the genes for endocrine hormones. These cells exhibited the capacity to aggregate and form clusters when transferred to serum-free medium. In these clusters the expression of insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin genes is induced. Human IPC lack expression of Von Willebrand Factor, CD31, CD34, CD45, and CK19 and CA19.9, demonstrating that hIPC are neither of hematopoietic, endothelial, nor of ductal origin. The mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) markers CD105, CD90, CD73, CD44, CD29, and CD13 are expressed, as well as nestin and vimentin. With the appropriate stimuli the cells can differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts lineages. Also hIPC express the pericyte markers CD146, NG2, αSMA and PDGF-Rβ. Immunoflowcytometry revealed that human islets contain 2.0 ± 0.8% of CD105/CD90 double-positive cells. Confocal microscopy showed that these cells reside within the human islets. Altogether our data revealed the presence of a distinct MSC-like stem cell population in isolated human islets. PMID:21099310

  5. Integration of red cell genotyping into the blood supply chain: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Willy A; Gottschall, Jerome L; Denomme, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Background When problems with compatibility arise, transfusion services often perform time-consuming serologic testing to locate antigen-negative red cell units for safe transfusion. New technologies enabled red cell genotyping for all clinically relevant blood group antigens. We performed mass-scale genotyping and provided access to a large red cell database to meet the demand for antigen-negative red cell units beyond ABO and Rh. Methods A red cell genotype database was established in 2010. Hospitals were given online access to a web-based antigen query portal in 2013 to find antigen-negative units in their inventories. Findings Genotype data were analyzed for 43,066 blood donors covering a set of 42 clinically relevant red cell antigens. Requests were filled for 5661 of 5672 patient encounters (99.8%) requiring antigen-negative red cell units in a multi-ethnic and multi-racial population. Red cell genotyping met the demand for antigen-negative blood in 5339 of 5672 (95%) patient encounters, while 333 remaining requests were filled using serologic data. In a pilot phase, seven community and rural transfusion services searched their local inventories using an online antigen query portal. Interpretation Red cell genotyping has the potential to transform the way antigen-negative red cell units are provided. An antigen query portal may reduce the need to ship blood or perform serologic screening. The wealth of genotype data, easily accessible online, facilitates the supply of affordable antigen-negative red cell units for patient safety. Physicians may recognize these new efficiencies for patient transfusion support. Funding BloodCenter of Wisconsin Diagnostic Laboratories Strategic Initiative and the NIH Clinical Center Intramural Research Program. PMID:26207259

  6. Incoherent control of Goos-Hänchen shifts in a four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solookinejad, G.; Panahi, M.; Ahmadi Sangachin, E.; Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new configuration for manipulating Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts in reflected and transmitted probe beams in a fixed geometrical scheme with a confined four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure. Here, the four-level quantum dot nanostructure is driven by a weak probe light, a coherent coupling field, and two broadband polarized fields that serve as the incoherent pumping fields. We theoretically show that by modulation of the external coupling field, incoherent pumping rates, and detuning of the probe light, the GH shifts in the reflected and transmitted probe light can be controlled. Our results show that enhanced GH shifts of reflected and transmitted probe beams can be obtained by simultaneous use of incoherent pumping rates and detuning of the probe light. Moreover, we find that the GH shifts in both reflected and transmitted probe beams can be negative or positive at certain angles of the incident probe field. Thus, these results may provide some new possibilities for technological applications in all-optical systems based on nanostructure devices.

  7. Simultaneous electromagnetically induced transparency for two circularly polarized lasers coupled to the same linearly polarized laser in a four-level atomic system in the W scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrim, Cristian; Nelson, Chris

    2011-03-15

    Electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT) can be produced in a four-level atomic system in the W scheme using a linearly polarized optical field for simultaneously slowing down two {sigma}{sup +} and {sigma}{sup -} circularly polarized optical fields. This four-level atomic system can be set up with a |{sup 1}S{sub 0}> ground state and three Zeeman levels of the |{sup 1}P{sub 1}> excited state of any alkali-metal atom placed in a weak magnetic field. We apply our W scheme to ultracold magnesium atoms for neglecting the collisional dephasing. Atomic coherences are reported after solving a density matrix master equation including radiative relaxations from Zeeman states of the |{sup 1}P{sub 1}> multiplet to the |{sup 1}S{sub 0}> ground state. The EIT feature is analyzed using the transit time between the normal dispersive region and the EIT region. The evolution of the EIT feature with the variation of the coupling field is discussed using an intuitive dressed-state representation. We analyze the sensitivity of an EIT feature to pressure broadening of the excited Zeeman states.

  8. Grid cells analysis of urban growth using remote sensing and population census data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagan, H.; Yamagata, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Urban growth and sprawl have drastically altered the ecosystems and ecosystem services. Urban areas are an increasingly important component of the global environment, yet they remain one of the most challenging areas for conducting research. Remote sensing based information is one of the most important resources to support urban planning and administration in megacities. It is possible to provide the up-to-date information regarding the extent, growth, and physical characteristics of urban land. Remote sensing provides spatially consistent image information that covers broad areas with both high spatial resolution and high temporal frequency. Therefore, remote sensing is an important tool for providing information on urban land-cover characteristics and their changes over time at various spatial and temporal scales. Urban land-use and land-cover changes are linked to socio-economic activities. Urbanization includes both the physical growth of a city and the movement of people to urban areas. As a consequence, it is essential to combine remote sensing derived parameters with socio-economic parameter to analyze the spatial-temporal changes and interaction of both factors. The aim of the research was to use1-km2 grid cells to investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics of urban growth in the world mega cities. The research was conducted in the 50 global cities using Landsat ETM/TM remote sensing imagery from 1985 - 2011, and time series population census data (1-km2 resolution gridded population census data of Japan and 2.5 arc-minute resolutions Gridded Population of the World). First, maximum likelihood classification (MLC) method were used to produce land cover maps by using Landsat images. Then intersect the land cover maps with 1-km2 grid cell maps to represents the proportion of each land cover category within each 1-km2 grid cell. Finally, we combined the proportional land cover maps with gridded population census data on 1-km2 resolution grid cells to

  9. Flow cytometry and cell sorting of heterogeneous microbial populations: the importance of single-cell analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, H M; Kell, D B

    1996-01-01

    The most fundamental questions such as whether a cell is alive, in the sense of being able to divide or to form a colony, may sometimes be very hard to answer, since even axenic microbial cultures are extremely heterogeneous. Analyses that seek to correlate such things as viability, which is a property of an individual cell, with macroscopic measurements of culture variables such as ATP content, respiratory activity, and so on, must inevitably fail. It is therefore necessary to make physiological measurements on individual cells. Flow cytometry is such a technique, which allows one to analyze cells rapidly and individually and permits the quantitative analysis of microbial heterogeneity. It therefore offers many advantages over conventional measurements for both routine and more exploratory analyses of microbial properties. While the technique has been widely applied to the study of mammalian cells, is use in microbiology has until recently been much more limited, largely because of the smaller size of microbes and the consequently smaller optical signals obtainable from them. Since these technical barriers no longer hold, flow cytometry with appropriate stains has been used for the rapid discrimination and identification of microbial cells, for the rapid assessment of viability and of the heterogeneous distributions of a wealth of other more detailed physiological properties, for the analysis of antimicrobial drug-cell interactions, and for the isolation of high-yielding strains of biotechnological interest. Flow cytometric analyses provide an abundance of multivariate data, and special methods have been devised to exploit these. Ongoing advances mean that modern flow cytometers may now be used by nonspecialists to effect a renaissance in our understanding of microbial heterogeneity. PMID:8987359

  10. Distinct and Conserved Prominin-1/CD133–Positive Retinal Cell Populations Identified across Species

    PubMed Central

    Jászai, József; Fargeas, Christine A.; Graupner, Sylvi; Tanaka, Elly M.; Brand, Michael; Huttner, Wieland B.; Corbeil, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Besides being a marker of various somatic stem cells in mammals, prominin-1 (CD133) plays a role in maintaining the photoreceptor integrity since mutations in the PROM1 gene are linked with retinal degeneration. In spite of that, little information is available regarding its distribution in eyes of non-mammalian vertebrates endowed with high regenerative abilities. To address this subject, prominin-1 cognates were isolated from axolotl, zebrafish and chicken, and their retinal compartmentalization was investigated and compared to that of their mammalian orthologue. Interestingly, prominin-1 transcripts—except for the axolotl—were not strictly restricted to the outer nuclear layer (i.e., photoreceptor cells), but they also marked distinct subdivisions of the inner nuclear layer (INL). In zebrafish, where the prominin-1 gene is duplicated (i.e., prominin-1a and prominin-1b), a differential expression was noted for both paralogues within the INL being localized either to its vitreal or scleral subdivision, respectively. Interestingly, expression of prominin-1a within the former domain coincided with Pax-6–positive cells that are known to act as progenitors upon injury-induced retino-neurogenesis. A similar, but minute population of prominin-1–positive cells located at the vitreal side of the INL was also detected in developing and adult mice. In chicken, however, prominin-1–positive cells appeared to be aligned along the scleral side of the INL reminiscent of zebrafish prominin-1b. Taken together our data indicate that in addition to conserved expression of prominin-1 in photoreceptors, significant prominin-1–expressing non-photoreceptor retinal cell populations are present in the vertebrate eye that might represent potential sources of stem/progenitor cells for regenerative therapies. PMID:21407811

  11. Molecular profiles of cancer stem-like cell populations in aggressive thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Dima, Mariavittoria; Pecce, Valeria; Biffoni, Mauro; Di Gioia, Cira Rosaria Tiziana; Tallini, Giovanni; Biffoni, Marco; Rosignolo, Francesca; Verrienti, Antonella; Sponziello, Marialuisa; Damante, Giuseppe; Russo, Diego; Durante, Cosimo

    2016-07-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with advanced thyroid carcinoma fail to respond to or at some point become refractory to conventional therapies. This resistance and the phenomena of thyroid cancer progression and metastasis themselves are thought to be related to tumor-cell sub-populations with stem-like properties. We isolated thyrospheres from four advanced thyroid carcinomas that were resistant to radioiodine therapy and analyzed their molecular profiles. ALDH activity and proteomic profile of main stem cell markers were used to assess stem cell properties. The TaqMan Low Density Array approach was used to evaluate the expression of several genes involved in the EMT process. The phosphorylation status of tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs) was analyzed to identify potential markers for targeted therapies. We then investigated the effects of the EMT-inhibitor crizotinib on both cell proliferation and phosphorylation status of RTK targets. The cancer stem-like properties of a subset of cells from primary cultures of each tumor were demonstrated. A wide variability among thyrospheres arising from the four thyroid cancers in terms of ALDH activity, stem cell marker expression, and phosphoproteome profiling was present. Dysregulated expression of genes involved in the EMT was observed in all four thyrosphere lines. Treatment with crizotinib was ineffective in cancer stem-like cells, suggesting the presence of a mechanism of resistance in thyrospheres. Collectively, our data indicate that thyroid cancer stem-like populations vary markedly from tumor to tumor and require detailed molecular and biological characterization if they are to be used as the basis of "personalized" treatment of aggressive disease. PMID:26370117

  12. Epitope specific T-cell responses against influenza A in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Savic, Miloje; Dembinski, Jennifer L; Kim, Yohan; Tunheim, Gro; Cox, Rebecca J; Oftung, Fredrik; Peters, Bjoern; Mjaaland, Siri

    2016-02-01

    Pre-existing human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity may be a useful correlate of protection against severe influenza disease. Identification and evaluation of common epitopes recognized by T cells with broad cross-reactivity is therefore important to guide universal influenza vaccine development, and to monitor immunological preparedness against pandemics. We have retrieved an optimal combination of MHC class I and class II restricted epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database (www.iedb.org), by defining a fitness score function depending on prevalence, sequence conservancy and HLA super-type coverage. Optimized libraries of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell epitopes were selected from influenza antigens commonly present in seasonal and pandemic influenza strains from 1934 to 2009. These epitope pools were used to characterize human T-cell responses in healthy donors using interferon-γ ELISPOT assays. Upon stimulation, significant CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were induced, primarily recognizing epitopes from the conserved viral core proteins. Furthermore, the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were phenotypically characterized regarding functionality, cytotoxic potential and memory phenotype using flow cytometry. Optimized sets of T-cell peptide epitopes may be a useful tool to monitor the efficacy of clinical trials, the immune status of a population to predict immunological preparedness against pandemics, as well as being candidates for universal influenza vaccines. PMID:26489873

  13. Expansion of a BDCA1+CD14+ Myeloid Cell Population in Melanoma Patients May Attenuate the Efficacy of Dendritic Cell Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bakdash, Ghaith; Buschow, Sonja I; Gorris, Mark A J; Halilovic, Altuna; Hato, Stanleyson V; Sköld, Annette E; Schreibelt, Gerty; Sittig, Simone P; Torensma, Ruurd; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Schröder, Christoph; Smits, Evelien L; Figdor, Carl G; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2016-08-01

    The tumor microenvironment is characterized by regulatory T cells, type II macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and other immunosuppressive cells that promote malignant progression. Here we report the identification of a novel BDCA1(+)CD14(+) population of immunosuppressive myeloid cells that are expanded in melanoma patients and are present in dendritic cell-based vaccines, where they suppress CD4(+) T cells in an antigen-specific manner. Mechanistic investigations showed that BDCA1(+)CD14(+) cells expressed high levels of the immune checkpoint molecule PD-L1 to hinder T-cell proliferation. While this BDCA1(+)CD14(+) cell population expressed markers of both BDCA1(+) dendritic cells and monocytes, analyses of function, transcriptome, and proteome established their unique nature as exploited by tumors for immune escape. We propose that targeting these cells may improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4332-46. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325645

  14. I Want More and Better Cells! – An Outreach Project about Stem Cells and Its Impact on the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Varela Amaral, Sara; Forte, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João; Girão da Cruz, M. Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Although science and technology impact every aspect of modern societies, there is still an extensive gap between science and society, which impairs the full exercise of citizenship. In the particular case of biomedical research increased investment should be accompanied by parallel efforts in terms of public information and engagement. We have carried out a project involving the production and evaluation of educational contents focused on stem cells - illustrated newspaper chronicles, radio interviews, a comic book, and animated videos - and monitored their impact on the Portuguese population. The study of the outreach materials in a heterogeneous sample of the population suggests that they are valuable tools to disseminate scientific messages, and that this is especially true for the comic-book format. Furthermore, the data showed that clear and stimulating outreach materials, that are able to teach new concepts and to promote critical thinking, increase engagement in science at different levels, depending on the depth of the concepts involved. Additionally, these materials can influence political, social and personal attitudes toward science. These results, together with the importance attributed to scientific research in stem cells by the population sampled, validates the diffusion of such materials as a significant contribution towards an overall public understanding and engagement in contemporary science, and this strategy should thus be considered in future projects. Regardless, stringent quality control must be implemented in order to efficiently communicate accurate scientific developments, and the public stimulated in terms of finding additional sources of reliable information. PMID:26222053

  15. I Want More and Better Cells! - An Outreach Project about Stem Cells and Its Impact on the General Population.

    PubMed

    Varela Amaral, Sara; Forte, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João; Girão da Cruz, M Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Although science and technology impact every aspect of modern societies, there is still an extensive gap between science and society, which impairs the full exercise of citizenship. In the particular case of biomedical research increased investment should be accompanied by parallel efforts in terms of public information and engagement. We have carried out a project involving the production and evaluation of educational contents focused on stem cells - illustrated newspaper chronicles, radio interviews, a comic book, and animated videos - and monitored their impact on the Portuguese population. The study of the outreach materials in a heterogeneous sample of the population suggests that they are valuable tools to disseminate scientific messages, and that this is especially true for the comic-book format. Furthermore, the data showed that clear and stimulating outreach materials, that are able to teach new concepts and to promote critical thinking, increase engagement in science at different levels, depending on the depth of the concepts involved. Additionally, these materials can influence political, social and personal attitudes toward science. These results, together with the importance attributed to scientific research in stem cells by the population sampled, validates the diffusion of such materials as a significant contribution towards an overall public understanding and engagement in contemporary science, and this strategy should thus be considered in future projects. Regardless, stringent quality control must be implemented in order to efficiently communicate accurate scientific developments, and the public stimulated in terms of finding additional sources of reliable information. PMID:26222053

  16. Adherence, accumulation, and cell division of a natural adherent bacterial population.

    PubMed Central

    Bloomquist, C G; Reilly, B E; Liljemark, W F

    1996-01-01

    Developing dental bacterial plaques formed in vivo on enamel surfaces were examined in specimens from 18 adult volunteers during the first day of plaque formation. An intraoral model placing enamel pieces onto teeth was used to study bacterial plaque populations developing naturally to various cell densities per square millimeter of surface area of the enamel (W. F. Liljemark, C. G. Bloomquist, C. L. Bandt, B. L. Philstrom, J. E. Hinrichs, and L. F. Wolff, Oral Microbiol. Immunol. 8:5-15, 1993). Radiolabeled nucleoside incorporation was used to measure DNA synthesis concurrent with the taking of standard viable cell counts of the plaque samples. Results showed that in vivo plaque formation began with the rapid adherence of bacteria until ca. 12 to 32% of the enamel's salivary pellicle was saturated (ca. 2.5 x 10(5) to 6.3 x 10(5) cells per mm2). The pioneer adherent species were predominantly those of the "sanguis streptococci." At the above-noted density, the bacteria present on the salivary pellicle incorporated low levels of radiolabeled nucleoside per viable cell. As bacterial numbers reached densities between 8.0 x 10(5) and 2.0 x 10(6) cells per mm2, there was a small increase in the incorporation of radiolabeled nucleosides per cell. At 2.5 x 10(6) to 4.0 x 10(6) cells per mm2 of enamel surface, there was a marked increase in the incorporation of radiolabeled nucleosides per cell which appeared to be cell-density dependent. The predominant species group in developing dental plaque films during density-dependent growth was the sanguis streptococci; however, most other species present showed similar patterns of increased DNA synthesis as the density noted above approached 2.5 x 10(6) to 4.0 x 10(6) cells per mm2. PMID:8576054

  17. Verapamil inhibits tumor progression of chemotherapy-resistant pancreatic cancer side population cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LU; ZHAO, YUE; SCHWARZ, BETTINA; MYSLIWIETZ, JOSEF; HARTIG, ROLAND; CAMAJ, PETER; BAO, QI; JAUCH, KARL-WALTER; GUBA, MAKUS; ELLWART, JOACHIM WALTER; NELSON, PETER JON; BRUNS, CHRISTIANE JOSEPHINE

    2016-01-01

    Tumor side population (SP) cells display stem-like properties that can be modulated by treatment with the calcium channel blocker verapamil. Verapamil can enhance the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs and multi-drug resistance by targeting the transport function of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study focused on the therapeutic potential of verapamil on stem-like SP tumor cells, and further investigated its chemosensitizing effects using L3.6pl and AsPC-1 pancreatic carcinoma models. As compared to parental L3.6pl cells (0.9±0.22%), L3.6pl gemcitabine-resistant cells (L3.6plGres) showed a significantly higher percentage of SP cells (5.38±0.99%) as detected by Hoechst 33342/FACS assays. The L3.6plGres SP cells showed stable gemcitabine resistance, enhanced colony formation ability and increased tumorigenicity. Verapamil effectively inhibited L3.6plGres and AsPC-1 SP cell proliferation in vitro. A pro-apoptotic effect of verapamil was observed in L3.6pl cells, but not in L3.6plGres cells, which was linked to their differential expression of P-gp and equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (ENT-1). In an orthotopic pancreatic cancer mouse model, both low and high dose verapamil was shown to substantially reduce L3.6plGres-SP cell tumor growth and metastasis, enhance tumor apoptosis, and reduce microvascular density. PMID:27177126

  18. Verapamil inhibits tumor progression of chemotherapy-resistant pancreatic cancer side population cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Zhao, Yue; Schwarz, Bettina; Mysliwietz, Josef; Hartig, Roland; Camaj, Peter; Bao, Qi; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Guba, Makus; Ellwart, Joachim Walter; Nelson, Peter Jon; Bruns, Christiane Josephine

    2016-07-01

    Tumor side population (SP) cells display stem-like properties that can be modulated by treatment with the calcium channel blocker verapamil. Verapamil can enhance the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs and multidrug resistance by targeting the transport function of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study focused on the therapeutic potential of verapamil on stem-like SP tumor cells, and further investigated its chemosensitizing effects using L3.6pl and AsPC-1 pancreatic carcinoma models. As compared to parental L3.6pl cells (0.9±0.22%), L3.6pl gemcitabine-resistant cells (L3.6plGres) showed a significantly higher percentage of SP cells (5.38±0.99%) as detected by Hoechst 33342/FACS assays. The L3.6plGres SP cells showed stable gemcitabine resistance, enhanced colony formation ability and increased tumorigenicity. Verapamil effectively inhibited L3.6plGres and AsPC-1 SP cell proliferation in vitro. A pro-apoptotic effect of verapamil was observed in L3.6pl cells, but not in L3.6plGres cells, which was linked to their differential expression of P-gp and equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (ENT-1). In an orthotopic pancreatic cancer mouse model, both low and high dose verapamil was shown to substantially reduce L3.6plGres-SP cell tumor growth and metastasis, enhance tumor apoptosis, and reduce microvascular density. PMID:27177126

  19. Role of resident CNS cell populations in HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Lepoutre, Veronique; Jain, Pooja; Quann, Kevin; Wigdahl, Brian; Khan, Zafar K

    2009-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the etiologic agent for a number of disorders; the two most common pathologies include adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and a progressive demyelinating neuroinflammatory disease, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The neurologic dysfunction associated with HAM/TSP is a result of viral intrusion into the central nervous system (CNS) and the generation of a hyperstimulated host response within the peripheral and central nervous system that includes expanded populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This robust, yet detrimental immune response likely contributes to the death of myelin producing oligodendrocytes and degeneration of neuronal axons. The mechanisms of neurological degeneration in HAM/TSP have yet to be fully delineated in vivo and may involve the immunogenic properties of the HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax. This comprehensive review characterizes the available knowledge to date concerning the effects of HTLV-1 on CNS resident cell populations with emphasis on both viral and host factors contributing to the genesis of HAM/TSP. PMID:19273122

  20. Projection specificity in heterogeneous locus coeruleus cell populations: implications for learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Akira; Tan, Bao Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) play a critical role in many functions including learning and memory. This relatively small population of cells sends widespread projections throughout the brain including to a number of regions such as the amygdala which is involved in emotional associative learning and the medial prefrontal cortex which is important for facilitating flexibility when learning rules change. LC noradrenergic cells participate in both of these functions, but it is not clear how this small population of neurons modulates these partially distinct processes. Here we review anatomical, behavioral, and electrophysiological studies to assess how LC noradrenergic neurons regulate these different aspects of learning and memory. Previous work has demonstrated that subpopulations of LC noradrenergic cells innervate specific brain regions suggesting heterogeneity of function in LC neurons. Furthermore, noradrenaline in mPFC and amygdala has distinct effects on emotional learning and cognitive flexibility. Finally, neural recording data show that LC neurons respond during associative learning and when previously learned task contingencies change. Together, these studies suggest a working model in which distinct and potentially opposing subsets of LC neurons modulate particular learning functions through restricted efferent connectivity with amygdala or mPFC. This type of model may provide a general framework for understanding other neuromodulatory systems, which also exhibit cell type heterogeneity and projection specificity. PMID:26330494

  1. Regulating the Tumor Cell Population Dynamics by Controlling the Proliferation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschbeck, Sarah; Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra

    2007-03-01

    The two-compartment model of cancer cell population dynamics introduces two subpopulations for a tumor (proliferating and quiescent). In precious theoretical models, the interaction of tumor cells with chemotherapeutic drugs is expressed as an additional term which reduces the size of subpopulations because of the killing effect of the drug with different killing rates. We develop a simple mathematical model for a more realistic interaction of anti-cancer drugs with tumor cells. The key assumption used in developing this model is that the anti-cancer drug not only kills the subpopulations but also decreases the proliferating rate of the proliferating subpopulation during the course of therapy. Finally, we present the numerical result for the evolution of the subpopulations based on this model.

  2. Identification of Stem Cell Populations in Sweat Glands and Ducts: Roles in Homeostasis and Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Catherine P.; Polak, Lisa; Rocha, Ana Sofia; Pasolli, H. Amalia; Chen, Shann-Ching; Sharma, Neha; Blanpain, Cedric; Fuchs, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Summary Sweat glands are abundant glands of our body and essential for thermoregulation. Like mammary glands, they originate from epidermal progenitors. However, they display few signs of cellular turnover, and whether they have stem cells and tissue regenerative capacity remain largely unexplored. Here we address these issues. Using lineage-tracing, we identify multipotent progenitors in sweat duct that transition to unipotency after developing the sweat gland. In characterizing four adult stem cell populations of glandular skin, we show that they display distinct regenerative capabilities and remain unipotent when healing epidermal, myoepithelial-specific and luminal-specific injuries. We devise purification schemes, isolate and transcriptionally profile progenitors. Exploiting molecular differences between sweat and mammary glands, we show that only some progenitors regain multipotency to produce de novo ductal and glandular structures, but that these can retain their identity even within certain foreign microenvironments. Our findings provide new concepts about glandular stem cells and sweat gland biology. PMID:22770217

  3. Interacting Linear and Nonlinear Characteristics Produce Population Coding Asymmetries between ON and OFF Cells in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Zachary; Nirenberg, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    The early visual system is a model for understanding the roles of cell populations in parallel processing. Cells in this system can be classified according to their responsiveness to different stimuli; a prominent example is the division between cells that respond to stimuli of opposite contrasts (ON vs OFF cells). These two cell classes display many asymmetries in their physiological characteristics (including temporal characteristics, spatial characteristics, and nonlinear characteristics) that, individually, are known to have important roles in population coding. Here we describe a novel distinction between the information that ON and OFF ganglion cell populations carry in mouse—that OFF cells are able to signal motion information about both light and dark objects, while ON cells have a selective deficit at signaling the motion of dark objects. We found that none of the previously reported asymmetries in physiological characteristics could account for this distinction. We therefore analyzed its basis via a recently developed linear–nonlinear-Poisson model that faithfully captures input/output relationships for a broad range of stimuli (Bomash et al., 2013). While the coding differences between ON and OFF cell populations could not be ascribed to the linear or nonlinear components of the model individually, they had a simple explanation in the way that these components interact. Sensory transformations in other systems can likewise be described by these models, and thus our findings suggest that similar interactions between component properties may help account for the roles of cell classes in population coding more generally. PMID:24027295

  4. Distributions of cell populations within. cap alpha. -particle range of plutonium deposits in the rat and beagle testis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.C.; Rowland, H.G.; Bowman, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Plutonium is not uniformly distributed in testicular tissues; thus some cell populations may receive larger or smaller radiation exposures than would be expected if the nuclide were uniformly distributed. The distributions of cell populations within ..cap alpha..-particle range of Pu deposits in rat and beagle testes were determined. The data were collected from autoradiographs of testicular tissues containing /sup 241/Pu. A cell distribution factor (CDF) was determined for each cell population and is defined as the average number of each cell type within ..cap alpha..-particle range of each observed Pu deposit relative to the number of each cell type that would be expected within ..cap alpha..-particle range of each Pu deposit, if the deposits were distributed uniformly. In addition, the percentage of the spermatogonial stem cell population within ..cap alpha..-particle range of Pu deposits was determined. The largest CDFs seen in both species were in the interstitial tissues, particulary for Leydig cells. Because the organization of testicular tissues in the beagle is quite different from rodents but more similar to human, the results from this study suggest that extrapolations from rodents to humans may tend to overestimate the potential for radiation exposure to spermatogonial stem cells as well as the fraction of the spermatogonial stem cell population at risk to exposure from internally deposited /sup 239/Pu.

  5. The influence of gut function on lymphoid cell populations in the intestinal mucosa of lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J D; Morris, B

    1983-01-01

    The number and type of lymphoid cells in the intestinal mucosa of lambs change during the first weeks after birth. The influence of gut function on these changes was examined by comparing the evolution of lymphoid cell populations in normal ileum with that in lengths of ileum which had been isolated surgically from the functional intestinal tract of the lamb before birth. The isolated lengths of ileum had a normal blood and nerve supply and they remained healthy throughout a period of at least 2 years, although they did not have a normal histological development. In comparison with normal ileum, the villi of the isolated ileal segments were much smaller and there were many fewer intraepithelial lymphocytes; the lamina propria had significantly fewer lymphocytes than the functional ileum and only a few plasma cells. When isolated ileal segments were reconnected into the intestinal tract after having been isolated from it for 1-3 months, the histology of the mucosa reverted to that of the normal gut, with the same number and types of lymphoid cells. Radiolabelled lymphoblasts collected from intestinal lymph and injected intravenously accumulated to only a small extent in isolated segments of ileum compared with either the normal or the reconnected segments of ileum. This suggested that the paucity of lymphocytes in the mucosa of the isolated segments was due to a reduced extravasation of these cells there. The influence which the gut contents exert on the lymphoid cell population in the mucosa is probably associated with antigenic stimulation but may also be related to other factors concerned in the normal digestive functions of the gut. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6862523

  6. Vitamin A and immune function: retinoic acid modulates population dynamics in antigen receptor and CD38-stimulated splenic B cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiuyan; Ross, A Catharine

    2005-10-01

    Vitamin A and its active metabolite, all-trans retinoic acid (RA), regulate the antibody response in vivo, although the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We have investigated the regulation by RA of B cell population dynamics and Ig gene expression in purified splenic mouse B cells stimulated through the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) and/or CD38, a BCR coreceptor. After ligation of the BCR and/or CD38, B cells became more heterogeneous in size. RA substantially restrained this change, concomitant with inhibition of cell proliferation. To examine B cell heterogeneity more closely, we categorized stimulated B cells by size (forward angle light scatter) and determined cell division dynamics, germ-line Ig heavy chain gene transcription and surface IgG1 (sIgG1) expression. Flow cytometric analysis of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-labeled B cells costained for sIgG1 showed that the more proliferative groups of B cells were smaller, whereas cells expressing more sIgG1 were larger. RA enriched the latter population, whereas cell division frequency in general and the number of smaller B cells that had undergone division cycles were reduced. Although RA significantly inhibited Ig germ-line transcript levels in the total B cell population, CD19(-)IgG1(+) B cells, which represent a more differentiated phenotype, were enriched. Furthermore, pax-5 mRNA was decreased and activation-induced cytidine deaminase mRNA was increased in RA-treated stimulated B cells. Thus, RA regulated factors known to be required for Ig class switch recombination and modulated the population dynamics of ligation-stimulated B cells, while promoting the progression of a fraction of B cells into differentiated sIgG-expressing cells. PMID:16093312

  7. Confocal Fluorescence Imaging Enables Noninvasive Quantitative Assessment of Host Cell Populations In Vivo Following Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Soumya; Mironov, Oleg; Foster, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    We report the use of optical imaging strategies to noninvasively examine photosensitizer distribution and physiological and host responses to 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2 devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) of EMT6 tumors established in the ears of BALB/c mice. 24 h following intravenous (IV) administration of 1 μmol kg-1 HPPH, wide-field fluorescence imaging reveals tumor selectivity with an approximately 2-3-fold differential between tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Confocal microscopy demonstrates a relatively homogeneous intratumor HPPH distribution. Labeling of host cells using fluorophore-conjugated antibodies allowed the visualization of Gr1+/CD11b+ leukocytes and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)+ cells in vivo. Imaging of the treated site at different time-points following irradiation shows significant and rapid increases in Gr1+ cells in response to therapy. The maximum accumulation of Gr1+ cells is found at 24 h post-irradiation, followed by a decrease at the 48 h time-point. Using IV-injected FITC-conjugated dextran as a fluorescent perfusion marker, we imaged tissue perfusion at different times post-irradiation and found that the reduced Gr1+ cell density at 48 h correlated strongly with functional damage to the vasculature as reported via decreased perfusion status. Dual color confocal imaging experiments demonstrates that about 90% of the anti-Gr1 cell population co-localized with anti-CD11b labeling, thus indicating that majority of the Gr1-labeled cells were neutrophils. At 24 h post-PDT, an approximately 2-fold increase in MHC-II+ cells relative to untreated control is also observed. Co-localization analysis reveals an increase in the fraction of Gr1+ cells expressing MHC-II, suggesting that HPPH-PDT is stimulating neutrophils to express an antigen-presenting phenotype. PMID:23082097

  8. Origin of cell populations after bone marrow transplantation. Analysis using DNA sequence polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, D; Antin, J H; Smith, B R; Orkin, S H; Rappeport, J M

    1985-01-01

    After successful bone marrow transplantation, patient hematopoietic and lymphoid cells are replaced by cells derived from the donor marrow. To document and characterize successful engraftment, host and donor cells must be distinguished from each other. We have used DNA sequence polymorphism analysis to determine reliably the host or donor origin of posttransplant cell populations. Using a selected panel of six cloned DNA probes and associated sequence polymorphisms, at least one marker capable of distinguishing between a patient and his sibling donor can be detected in over 95% of cases. Posttransplant patient peripheral leukocytes were examined by DNA restriction enzyme digestion and blot hybridization analysis. We have studied 18 patients at times varying from 13 to 1,365 d after marrow transplantation. Mixed lymphohematopoietic chimerism was detected in 3 patients, with full engraftment documented in 15. One patient with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome was demonstrated to have T cells of purely donor origin, with granulocytes and B cells remaining of host origin. Posttransplant leukemic relapse was studied in one patient and shown to be of host origin. DNA analysis was of particular clinical value in three cases where failure of engraftment or graft loss was suspected. In two of the three cases, full engraftment was demonstrated and in the third mixed lymphohematopoietic chimerism was detected. DNA sequence polymorphism analysis provides a powerful tool for the documentation of engraftment after bone marrow transplantation, for the evaluation of posttransplant lymphoma or leukemic relapse, and for the comprehensive study of mixed hematopoietic and lymphoid chimeric states. Images PMID:3882761

  9. Osteoclast cytomorphometry demonstrates an abnormal population in B cell malignancies but not in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Chappard, D; Rossi, J F; Bataille, R; Alexandre, C

    1991-01-01

    Increased bone resorption in the vicinity of myeloma cells is mediated by local stimulating factors. Other malignancies of the B cell lineage are also able to produce resorbing factors responsible for increased bone resorption. We have studied three groups of subjects: 10 patients with overt multiple myeloma, 10 patients with a B cell malignancy, and 10 healthy human subjects as controls. Patients were studied at the time of diagnosis and had a transiliac bone biopsy. Osteoclasts were evident on histological sections by their acid phosphatase activity. A software was developed on an automatic image analyzer (Leitz TAS+) for measuring the maximal Feret's diameter (Oc.Le) of each osteoclast (corresponding to the osteoclast length). The histogram of Oc.Le frequency distribution was supplied in each group. In myeloma patients, the Oc.Le frequency distribution was similar to that in normal subjects and showed the histogram to be asymetric with a positive skew (maximum peak at 20-25 microns). With a graphical analysis, this distribution was shown to follow a lognormal distribution corresponding to a homogeneous osteoclast population. In other B cell malignancies, Oc.Le displayed a bimodal distribution with a peak at 20-25 microns and a lower peak at 10-15 microns. The graphical analysis showed that small (mononucleated?) osteoclasts are present in B cell malignancies with normal osteoclasts. This might reflect the secretion of different soluble factors by malignant cells of the B lymphocyte lineage. PMID:1706639

  10. Single cell genomics indicates horizontal gene transfer and viral infections in a deep subsurface Firmicutes population.

    PubMed

    Labonté, Jessica M; Field, Erin K; Lau, Maggie; Chivian, Dylan; Van Heerden, Esta; Wommack, K Eric; Kieft, Thomas L; Onstott, Tullis C; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-01-01

    A major fraction of Earth's prokaryotic biomass dwells in the deep subsurface, where cellular abundances per volume of sample are lower, metabolism is slower, and generation times are longer than those in surface terrestrial and marine environments. How these conditions impact biotic interactions and evolutionary processes is largely unknown. Here we employed single cell genomics to analyze cell-to-cell genome content variability and signatures of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and viral infections in five cells of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, which were collected from a 3 km-deep fracture water in the 2.9 Ga-old Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa. Between 0 and 32% of genes recovered from single cells were not present in the original, metagenomic assembly of Desulforudis, which was obtained from a neighboring subsurface fracture. We found a transposable prophage, a retron, multiple clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and restriction-modification systems, and an unusually high frequency of transposases in the analyzed single cell genomes. This indicates that recombination, HGT and viral infections are prevalent evolutionary events in the studied population of microorganisms inhabiting a highly stable deep subsurface environment. PMID:25954269

  11. Slow-growing cells within isogenic populations have increased RNA polymerase error rates and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, David; Dhar, Riddhiman; Missarova, Alsu M; Espinar, Lorena; Blevins, William R; Lehner, Ben; Carey, Lucas B

    2015-01-01

    Isogenic cells show a large degree of variability in growth rate, even when cultured in the same environment. Such cell-to-cell variability in growth can alter sensitivity to antibiotics, chemotherapy and environmental stress. To characterize transcriptional differences associated with this variability, we have developed a method--FitFlow--that enables the sorting of subpopulations by growth rate. The slow-growing subpopulation shows a transcriptional stress response, but, more surprisingly, these cells have reduced RNA polymerase fidelity and exhibit a DNA damage response. As DNA damage is often caused by oxidative stress, we test the addition of an antioxidant, and find that it reduces the size of the slow-growing population. More generally, we find a significantly altered transcriptome in the slow-growing subpopulation that only partially resembles that of cells growing slowly due to environmental and culture conditions. Slow-growing cells upregulate transposons and express more chromosomal, viral and plasmid-borne transcripts, and thus explore a larger genotypic--and so phenotypic--space. PMID:26268986

  12. Rate control in yeast protein synthesis at the population and single-cell levels.

    PubMed

    Dacheux, Estelle; Firczuk, Helena; McCarthy, John E G

    2015-12-01

    Yeast commits approximately 76% of its energy budget to protein synthesis and the efficiency and control of this process are accordingly critical to organism growth and fitness. We now have detailed genetic, biochemical and biophysical knowledge of the components of the eukaryotic translation machinery. However, these kinds of information do not, in themselves, give us a satisfactory picture of how the overall system is controlled. This is where quantitative system analysis can enable a step-change in our understanding of biological resource management and how this relates to cell physiology and evolution. An important aspect of this more system-oriented approach to translational control is the inherent heterogeneity of cell populations that is generated by gene expression noise. In this short review, we address the fact that, although the vast majority of our knowledge of the translation machinery is based on experimental analysis of samples that each contain hundreds of millions of cells, in reality every cell is unique in terms of its composition and control properties. We have entered a new era in which research into the heterogeneity of cell systems promises to provide answers to many (previously unanswerable) questions about cell physiology and evolution. PMID:26614671

  13. Single cell genomics indicates horizontal gene transfer and viral infections in a deep subsurface Firmicutes population

    PubMed Central

    Labonté, Jessica M.; Field, Erin K.; Lau, Maggie; Chivian, Dylan; Van Heerden, Esta; Wommack, K. Eric; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, Tullis C.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-01-01

    A major fraction of Earth's prokaryotic biomass dwells in the deep subsurface, where cellular abundances per volume of sample are lower, metabolism is slower, and generation times are longer than those in surface terrestrial and marine environments. How these conditions impact biotic interactions and evolutionary processes is largely unknown. Here we employed single cell genomics to analyze cell-to-cell genome content variability and signatures of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and viral infections in five cells of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, which were collected from a 3 km-deep fracture water in the 2.9 Ga-old Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa. Between 0 and 32% of genes recovered from single cells were not present in the original, metagenomic assembly of Desulforudis, which was obtained from a neighboring subsurface fracture. We found a transposable prophage, a retron, multiple clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and restriction-modification systems, and an unusually high frequency of transposases in the analyzed single cell genomes. This indicates that recombination, HGT and viral infections are prevalent evolutionary events in the studied population of microorganisms inhabiting a highly stable deep subsurface environment. PMID:25954269

  14. Slow-growing cells within isogenic populations have increased RNA polymerase error rates and DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, David; Dhar, Riddhiman; Missarova, Alsu M.; Espinar, Lorena; Blevins, William R.; Lehner, Ben; Carey, Lucas B.

    2015-01-01

    Isogenic cells show a large degree of variability in growth rate, even when cultured in the same environment. Such cell-to-cell variability in growth can alter sensitivity to antibiotics, chemotherapy and environmental stress. To characterize transcriptional differences associated with this variability, we have developed a method—FitFlow—that enables the sorting of subpopulations by growth rate. The slow-growing subpopulation shows a transcriptional stress response, but, more surprisingly, these cells have reduced RNA polymerase fidelity and exhibit a DNA damage response. As DNA damage is often caused by oxidative stress, we test the addition of an antioxidant, and find that it reduces the size of the slow-growing population. More generally, we find a significantly altered transcriptome in the slow-growing subpopulation that only partially resembles that of cells growing slowly due to environmental and culture conditions. Slow-growing cells upregulate transposons and express more chromosomal, viral and plasmid-borne transcripts, and thus explore a larger genotypic—and so phenotypic — space. PMID:26268986

  15. Rapid and unambiguous detection of DNase I hypersensitive site in rare population of cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Ping; McFarland, Margaret M

    2014-01-01

    DNase I hypersensitive (DHS) sites are important for understanding cis regulation of gene expression. However, existing methods for detecting DHS sites in small numbers of cells can lead to ambiguous results. Here we describe a simple new method, in which DNA fragments with ends generated by DNase I digestion are isolated and used as templates for two PCR reactions. In the first PCR, primers are derived from sequences up- and down-stream of the DHS site. If the DHS site exists in the cells, the first PCR will not produce PCR products due to the cuts of the templates by DNase I between the primer sequences. In the second PCR, one primer is derived from sequence outside the DHS site and the other from the adaptor. This will produce a smear of PCR products of different sizes due to cuts by DNase I at different positions at the DHS site. With this design, we detected a DHS site at the CD4 gene in two CD4 T cell populations using as few as 2×10(4) cells. We further validated this method by detecting a DHS site of the IL-4 gene that is specifically present in type 2 but not type 1 T helper cells. Overall, this method overcomes the interference by genomic DNA not cut by DNase I at the DHS site, thereby offering unambiguous detection of DHS sites in the cells. PMID:24465674

  16. The impact of early- and late-onset preeclampsia on umbilical cord blood cell populations.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Emilie M; Eggink, Alex J; van der Zee, Marten; Lagendijk, Jacqueline; Willemsen, Sten P; de Jonge, Robert; Steegers, Eric A P; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P M

    2016-08-01

    Pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (PE) are characterised by an enhanced maternal and fetal inflammatory response with increased numbers of leukocytes in maternal peripheral blood. The impact of PE on newborn umbilical cord blood cell (UCBC) populations however, has been scarcely studied. We hypothesise that PE deranges fetal haematopoiesis and subsequently UCBC populations. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate newborn umbilical cord blood cell populations in early- (EOPE) and late-onset PE (LOPE). A secondary cohort analysis in The Rotterdam Periconceptional Cohort was conducted comprising 23 PE cases, including 11 EOPE and 12 LOPE, and 195 controls, including 153 uncomplicated and 23 fetal growth restriction- and 19 preterm birth complicated controls. UCBC counts and differentials were quantified by flow cytometry and analysed as main outcome measures. Multivariable regression analysis revealed associations of EOPE with decreased leucocyte- (monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, immature granulocytes) and thrombocyte counts and increased NRBC counts (all p<0.05). EOPE remained associated with neutrophil- (β-0.92, 95%CI -1.27,-0.57, p<0.001) and NRBC counts (β1.11, 95%CI 0.27,1.95, p=0.010) after adjustment for gestational age and birth weight. LOPE did not reveal any significant association. We conclude that derangements of fetal haematopoiesis, in particular of neutrophil- and NRBC counts, are associated with EOPE only, with a potential impact for future health of the offspring. This heterogeneity in UCBC should be considered as confounder in epigenetic association studies examining EOPE. PMID:27239988

  17. Molecular Genetic Characterization of β-Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Syndrome in the Albanian Population.

    PubMed

    Babameto-Laku, A; Mitre, A; Berisha, S; Mokini, V; Roko, D

    2011-06-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is a major public health problem in Albania as it is in many Mediterranean countries. We determined the different β-thal alleles that are present in the Albanian population by using the temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (TTGE) method because of its high throughput, cost-effectiveness, sensitivity and simplicity. DNA from blood of 68 patients with β-thal, 26 with sickle cell anemia or sickle cell β-thal, 54 parents of these patients and 14 heterozygotes related to these families. We found the IVS-I-110 (G>A), codon 39 (C>T), IVS-I-6 (T>C), IVS-I-1 (G>A) and codon 44 (-C) mutations that accounted for nearly 90% of the β-thal alleles. Their frequencies were similar to those found in other studies in the Albanian population. This method has permitted the detection of heterozygotes for β-thal in this population and offers a prenatal diagnosis with a probability of 90% accuracy. PMID:24052702

  18. Only a small population of adult Sertoli cells actively proliferates in culture.

    PubMed

    Kulibin, Andrey Yu; Malolina, Ekaterina A

    2016-10-01

    Adult mammalian Sertoli cells (SCs) have been considered to be quiescent terminal differentiated cells for many years, but recently, proliferation of adult SCs was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo We further examined mouse SC behavior in culture and found that there are two populations of adult SCs. The first population is SCs from seminiferous tubules that hardly proliferate in vitro The second population is small and consists of SCs with atypical nuclear morphology from the terminal segments of seminiferous tubules, a transitional zone (TZ). TZ SCs multiply in culture and form colonies, display mixture of mature and immature SC characteristics, and generate cord-like structures in a collagen matrix. The specific features of TZ SCs are ACTA2 expression in vitro and DMRT1 low levels in vivo and in vitro Although the in vivo function of TZ SCs still remains unclear, this finding has significant implications for our understanding of SC differentiation and functioning in adult mammals. PMID:27512121

  19. Molecular Genetic Characterization of β-Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Syndrome in the Albanian Population

    PubMed Central

    Babameto-Laku, A; Mitre, A; Berisha, S; Mokini, V; Roko, D

    2011-01-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is a major public health problem in Albania as it is in many Mediterranean countries. We determined the different β-thal alleles that are present in the Albanian population by using the temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (TTGE) method because of its high throughput, cost-effectiveness, sensitivity and simplicity. DNA from blood of 68 patients with β-thal, 26 with sickle cell anemia or sickle cell β-thal, 54 parents of these patients and 14 heterozygotes related to these families. We found the IVS-I-110 (G>A), codon 39 (C>T), IVS-I-6 (T>C), IVS-I-1 (G>A) and codon 44 (–C) mutations that accounted for nearly 90% of the β-thal alleles. Their frequencies were similar to those found in other studies in the Albanian population. This method has permitted the detection of heterozygotes for β-thal in this population and offers a prenatal diagnosis with a probability of 90% accuracy. PMID:24052702

  20. Goos-Hänchen shifts of partially coherent light beams from a cavity with a four-level Raman gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziauddin; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically investigate spatial and angular Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts (both negative and positive) in the reflected light for a partial coherent light incident on a cavity. A four-level Raman gain atomic medium is considered in a cavity. The effects of spatial coherence, beam width, and mode index of partial coherent light fields on spatial and angular GH shifts are studied. Our results reveal that a large magnitude of negative and positive GH shifts in the reflected light is achievable with the introduction of partial coherent light fields. Furthermore, the amplitude of spatial (negative and positive) GH shifts are sharply affected by the partial coherent light beam as compared to angular (negative and positive) GH shifts in the reflected light.

  1. On a moving four-level N-type atom interacting with two-mode cavity field in the presence of the cross-Kerr medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, N. H.; Thabet, Lamia E.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, some properties through the moving four-level N-type atom interacting with a two-mode radiation field are presented. We study this system in the presence of the nonlinearity. The exact solution of this model is given by using the Schrödinger equation when the atom and the field are initially in an excited state and a squeezed state, respectively. We employed the results to perform a careful investigation of the temporal evolution of the cross-correlation function, the momentum increment, the difference mean photon numbers and the normal squeezing. The influence of the Kerr and the cross-Kerr medium parameters on these aspects is examined. It is found that the atom-field properties are affected by the changing of these parameters.

  2. Proposal for efficient two-dimensional atom localization using probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Xiong Hao; Zhang Duo

    2011-10-15

    The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is explored by monitoring the probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic medium under the action of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Because of the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the information about the position of the atom can be obtained via the absorption measurement of the weak probe field. It is found that the localization behavior is significantly improved due to the joint quantum interference induced by the standing-wave and microwave-driven fields. Most importantly, the atom can be localized at a particular position and the maximal probability of finding the atom in one period of the standing-wave fields reaches unity by properly adjusting the system parameters. The proposed scheme may provide a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization.

  3. Practical Dyspnea Assessment: Relationship Between the 0–10 Numerical Rating Scale and the Four-Level Categorical Verbal Descriptor Scale of Dyspnea Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Wysham, Nicholas G.; Miriovsky, Benjamin J.; Currow, David C.; Herndon, James E.; Samsa, Gregory P.; Wilcock, Andrew; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2016-01-01

    Context Measurement of dyspnea is important for clinical care and research. Objectives To characterize the relationship between the 0–10 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and four-level categorical Verbal Descriptor Scale (VDS) for dyspnea assessment. Methods This was a substudy of a double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing palliative oxygen to room air for relief of refractory breathlessness in patients with life-limiting illness. Dyspnea was assessed with both a 0–10 NRS and a four-level categorical VDS over the one-week trial. NRS and VDS responses were analyzed in cross section and longitudinally. Relationships between NRS and VDS responses were portrayed using descriptive statistics and visual representations. Results Two hundred twenty-six participants contributed responses. At baseline, mild and moderate levels of breathlessness were reported by 41.9% and 44.6% of participants, respectively. NRS scores demonstrated increasing mean and median levels for increasing VDS intensity, from a mean (SD) of 0.6 (±1.04) for VDS none category to 8.2 (1.4) for VDS severe category. The Spearman correlation coefficient was strong at 0.78 (P < 0.0001). Based on the distribution of NRS scores within VDS categories, we calculated test characteristics of two different cutpoint models. Both models yielded 75% correct translations from NRS to VDS; however, Model A was more sensitive for moderate or greater dyspnea, with fewer misses downcoded. Conclusion There is strong correlation between VDS and NRS measures for dyspnea. Proposed practical cutpoints for the relationship between the dyspnea VDS and NRS are 0 for none, 1–4 for mild, 5–8 for moderate, and 9–10 for severe. PMID:26004401

  4. Host–virus dynamics and subcellular controls of cell fate in a natural coccolithophore population

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Assaf; Haramaty, Liti; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.; Fredricks, Helen F.; Kimmance, Susan A.; Larsen, Aud; Bidle, Kay D.

    2012-01-01

    Marine viruses are major evolutionary and biogeochemical drivers in marine microbial foodwebs. However, an in-depth understanding of the cellular mechanisms and the signal transduction pathways mediating host–virus interactions during natural bloom dynamics has remained elusive. We used field-based mesocosms to examine the “arms race” between natural populations of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi and its double-stranded DNA-containing coccolithoviruses (EhVs). Specifically, we examined the dynamics of EhV infection and its regulation of cell fate over the course of bloom development and demise using a diverse suite of molecular tools and in situ fluorescent staining to target different levels of subcellular resolution. We demonstrate the concomitant induction of reactive oxygen species, caspase-specific activity, metacaspase expression, and programmed cell death in response to the accumulation of virus-derived glycosphingolipids upon infection of natural E. huxleyi populations. These subcellular responses to viral infection simultaneously resulted in the enhanced production of transparent exopolymer particles, which can facilitate aggregation and stimulate carbon flux. Our results not only corroborate the critical role for glycosphingolipids and programmed cell death in regulating E. huxleyi–EhV interactions, but also elucidate promising molecular biomarkers and lipid-based proxies for phytoplankton host–virus interactions in natural systems. PMID:23134731

  5. CD71(high) population represents primitive erythroblasts derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ruihua; Gong, Xueping; Wang, Libo; Wang, Pengxiang; Wang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The CD71/Ter119 combination has been widely used to reflect dynamic maturation of erythrocytes in vivo. However, because CD71 is expressed on all proliferating cells, it is unclear whether it can be utilized as an erythrocyte-specific marker during differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). In this study, we revealed that a population expressing high level of CD71 (CD71(high)) during mouse ESC differentiation represented an in vitro counterpart of yolk sac-derived primitive erythroblasts (EryPs) isolated at 8.5days post coitum. In addition, these CD71(high) cells went through "maturational globin switching" and enucleated during terminal differentiation in vitro that were similar to the yolk sac-derived EryPs in vivo. We further demonstrated that the formation of CD71(high) population was regulated differentially by key factors including Scl, HoxB4, Eaf1, and Klf1. Taken together, our study provides a technical advance that allows efficient segregation of EryPs from differentiated ESCs in vitro for further understanding molecular regulation during primitive erythropoiesis. PMID:25485690

  6. Single gene-based distinction of individual microbial genomes from a mixed population of microbial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tamminen, Manu V.; Virta, Marko P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in environmental microbiology has revealed vast populations of microbes in any given habitat that cannot be detected by conventional culturing strategies. The use of sensitive genetic detection methods such as CARD-FISH and in situ PCR have been limited by the cell wall permeabilization requirement that cannot be performed similarly on all cell types without lysing some and leaving some nonpermeabilized. Furthermore, the detection of low copy targets such as genes present in single copies in the microbial genomes, has remained problematic. We describe an emulsion-based procedure to trap individual microbial cells into picoliter-volume polyacrylamide droplets that provide a rigid support for genetic material and therefore allow complete degradation of cellular material to expose the individual genomes. The polyacrylamide droplets are subsequently converted into picoliter-scale reactors for genome amplification. The amplified genomes are labeled based on the presence of a target gene and differentiated from those that do not contain the gene by flow cytometry. Using the Escherichia coli strains XL1 and MC1061, which differ with respect to the presence (XL1), or absence (MC1061) of a single copy of a tetracycline resistance gene per genome, we demonstrate that XL1 genomes present at 0.1% of MC1061 genomes can be differentiated using this method. Using a spiked sediment microbial sample, we demonstrate that the method is applicable to highly complex environmental microbial communities as a target gene-based screen for individual microbes. The method provides a novel tool for enumerating functional cell populations in complex microbial communities. We envision that the method could be optimized for fluorescence-activated cell sorting to enrich genetic material of interest from complex environmental samples. PMID:25814987

  7. Distribution of CD4 Lymphocyte Cells Among Apparently Healthy HIV Seropositive and Seronegative Populations

    PubMed Central

    Abubakar, Abdulazeez A

    2012-01-01

    Background: CD4 lymphocyte cells are often used as prognostic markers for monitoring the progression of immunosupression such as HIV infection. Aim: This study was conducted to assess the distribution of CD4 lymphocytes among apparently healthy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seronegative and seropositive populations in a Nigerian state. Materials and Methods: A total of 1520 apparently healthy subjects aged 18–64 years, composed of 800 males and 720 females attending some selected health institutions in the state, participated in the study. Ten milliliters of blood was collected from each subject; 5 ml of this was used for HIV antibodies sero-typing while the remaining 5 ml was anticoagulated and used for CD4 lymphocytes level determination. Only samples tested positive both with Capillus and Determine HIV test kits were further differentiated into sero-types with a standard diagnostic HIV test kit. The CD4 lymphocyte levels of all the sample were determined; mean CD4 levels of 205.1±0.09 and 287.4±0.3 cells/μl were recorded among females seropositives and seronagatives respectively. Statistical analysis by the Student t-test showed a significant difference in the mean CD4 lymphocyte count by gender. Results: Findings showed a mean CD4 level of 311.7±1.2 cells/μl among seropositive males while 399.3±0.6 cells/μl was recorded among seronegatives (t=5.86). The study also recorded a CD4 lymphocyte range of 232–464 cells/μl among apparently healthy seronegative population in this locality. Conclusion: The findings showed a significantly higher mean CD4 lymphocyte count among adult male HIV seronegatives (χ2=9.22) and seropositives (χ2=15.07) than their female counterparts. Further research work using the automation technique is suggested to confirm this new range for monitoring HIV subjects on antiretroviral therapy. PMID:22454823

  8. Licensing by Inflammatory Cytokines Abolishes Heterogeneity of Immunosuppressive Function of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Population.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Enikő; Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Kriston-Pál, Éva; Hornung, Ákos; Makra, Ildikó; Kudlik, Gyöngyi; Uher, Ferenc; Katona, Róbert László; Monostori, Éva; Czibula, Ágnes

    2015-09-15

    When mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are used for therapy of immunological pathologies, they get into an inflammatory environment, altering the effectiveness of the treatment. To establish the impact of environmental inflammatory factors on MSCs' immunofunction in the mirror of intrinsic heterogeneity of mouse MSC population, individual MSC clones were generated and characterized. Adipogenic but not osteogenic differentiation and pro-angiogenic activity of five independent MSC cell lines were similar. Regarding osteogenic differentiation, clones MSC3 and MSC6 exhibited poorer capacity than MSC2, MSC4, and MSC5. To study the immunosuppressive heterogeneity, in vitro and in vivo experiments have been carried out using T-cell proliferation assay and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response, respectively. A remarkable difference was found between the clones in their ability to inhibit T-cell proliferation in the following order: MSC2≥MSC5>MSC4>MSC3 > MSC6. Nevertheless, the differences between the immunosuppressive activities of the individual clones disappeared on pretreatment of the cells with pro-inflammatory cytokines, a procedure called licensing. Stimulation of all clones with IFN-γ and TNF-α resulted in elevation of their inhibitory capability to a similar level. Nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were identified as major mediators of immunofunction of the MSC clones. The earlier findings were also supported by in vivo results. Without licensing, MSC2 inhibited DTH response, while MSC6 did not affect DTH response. In contrast, prestimulation of MSC6 with inflammatory cytokines resulted in strong suppression by this clone as well. Here, we have showed that MSC population is functionally heterogeneous in terms of immunosuppressive function; however, this variability is largely reduced under pro-inflammatory conditions. PMID:26153898

  9. Surmounting limited gene delivery into primary immune cell populations: Efficient cell type-specific adenoviral transduction by CAR.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Björn E; Brand, Anna; Karram, Khalad

    2015-06-01

    Ectopic gene expression studies in primary immune cells have been notoriously difficult to perform due to the limitations in conventional transfection and viral transduction methods. Although replication-defective adenoviruses provide an attractive alternative for gene delivery, their use has been hampered by the limited susceptibility of murine leukocytes to adenoviral infection, due to insufficient expression of the human coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (CAR). In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Heger et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: XXXX-XXXX] report the generation of transgenic mice that enable conditional Cre/loxP-mediated expression of human CAR. The authors demonstrate that this R26/CAG-CAR∆1(StopF) mouse strain facilitates the faithful monitoring of Cre activity in situ as well as the specific and efficient adenoviral transduction of primary immune cell populations in vitro. Further tweaking of the system towards more efficient gene transfer in vivo remains a future challenge. PMID:25903647

  10. Visual pattern discrimination by population retinal ganglion cells' activities during natural movie stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Wang, Ru-Bin; Pan, Xiao-Chuan; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-02-01

    In the visual system, neurons often fire in synchrony, and it is believed that synchronous activities of group neurons are more efficient than single cell response in transmitting neural signals to down-stream neurons. However, whether dynamic natural stimuli are encoded by dynamic spatiotemporal firing patterns of synchronous group neurons still needs to be investigated. In this paper we recorded the activities of population ganglion cells in bullfrog retina in response to time-varying natural images (natural scene movie) using multi-electrode arrays. In response to some different brief section pairs of the movie, synchronous groups of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) fired with similar but different spike events. We attempted to discriminate the movie sections based on temporal firing patterns of single cells and spatiotemporal firing patterns of the synchronous groups of RGCs characterized by a measurement of subsequence distribution discrepancy. The discrimination performance was assessed by a classification method based on Support Vector Machines. Our results show that different movie sections of the natural movie elicited reliable dynamic spatiotemporal activity patterns of the synchronous RGCs, which are more efficient in discriminating different movie sections than the temporal patterns of the single cells' spike events. These results suggest that, during natural vision, the down-stream neurons may decode the visual information from the dynamic spatiotemporal patterns of the synchronous group of RGCs' activities. PMID:24465283

  11. Coherent population trapping in small- and chip-scale 87Rb vapor cells with buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermak, S. V.; Semenov, V. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Pyatyshev, E. N.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics of coherent population trapping (CPT) signal were investigated in small-size glass vapor cells containing 87Rb and Ne buffer gas with narrow line-width laser pumping on D2 line. The parameters of CPT signals were measured using small-size vapor cells with Ne buffer gas pressure in the range of 200-400 Torr, cell temperature in the range of 65-120 ∘C and the values of laser pumping power of 30-400 μW/cm2. Optimal conditions, under which the minimal value of short-term instability of resonance line is achieved, were obtained in experiments. Orientation frequency shifts of CPT resonance using glass 87Rb vapor cells containing buffer gas and anti-relaxation coating were compared. CPT signals using vapor cells based on integrated technologies containing 87Rb in atmosphere of Ne were also investigated. The CPT signals with typical line widths of 2-3 kHz and signal-to-noise ratio of 1500 in 1 Hz bandwidth are observed, which allows one to provide relative frequency instability of 10-11 at 100 s.

  12. MPTP and MPP+ target specific aminergic cell populations in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sallinen, V; Torkko, V; Sundvik, M; Reenilä, I; Khrustalyov, D; Kaslin, J; Panula, P

    2009-02-01

    Larval zebrafish offers a good model to approach brain disease mechanisms, as structural abnormalities of their small brains can be correlated to quantifiable behavior. In this study, the structural alterations in one diencephalic dopaminergic nucleus induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), a toxin inducing Parkinson's disease in humans, and those found in several neuronal groups after 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), the pretoxin, were associated with decreased swimming speed. Detailed cell counts of dopaminergic groups indicated a transient decline of tyrosine hydroxylase expressing neurons up to about 50% after MPTP. The MPTP effect was partly sensitive to monoamine oxidase inhibitor deprenyl. Detailed analysis of the developing catecholaminergic cell groups suggests that the cell groups emerged at their final positions and no obvious significant migration from the original positions was seen. One 5-HT neuron group was also affected by MPTP treatment, whereas other groups remained intact, suggesting that the effect is selective. New nomenclature for developing catecholaminergic cell groups corresponding to adult groups is introduced. The diencephalic cell population consisting of groups 5,6 and 11 was sensitive to both MPTP and MPP+ and in this respect resembles mammalian substantia nigra. The results suggest that MPTP and MPP+ induce a transient functional deficit and motility disorder in larval zebrafish. PMID:19046410

  13. Toward compression of small cell population: harnessing stress in passive regions of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Alexandre; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2014-03-01

    We present a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) for in vitro analysis of mm2 biological samples under periodic compressive stress. Understanding how mechanical stimuli affect cell functions could lead to significant advances in diseases diagnosis and drugs development. We previously reported an array of 72 micro-DEAs on a chip to apply a periodic stretch to cells. To diversify our cell mechanotransduction toolkit we have developed an actuator for periodic compression of small cell populations. The device is based on a novel design which exploits the effects of non-equibiaxial pre-stretch and takes advantage of the stress induced in passive regions of DEAs. The device consists of two active regions separated by a 2mm x 2mm passive area. When connected to an AC high-voltage source, the two active regions periodically compress the passive region. Due to the non-equibiaxial pre-stretch it induces uniaxial compressive strain greater than 10%. Cells adsorbed on top of this passive gap would experience the same uniaxial compressive stain. The electrodes configuration confines the electric field and prevents it from reaching the biological sample. A thin layer of silicone is casted on top of the device to ensure a biocompatible environment. This design provides several advantages over alternative technologies such as high optical transparency of the area of interest (passive region under compression) and its potential for miniaturization and parallelization.

  14. A population balance equation model of aggregation dynamics in Taxus suspension cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kolewe, Martin E.; Roberts, Susan C.; Henson, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of plant cells to grow as multicellular aggregates in suspension culture has profound effects on bioprocess performance. Recent advances in the measurement of plant cell aggregate size allow for routine process monitoring of this property. We have exploited this capability to develop a conceptual model to describe changes in the aggregate size distribution that are observed over the course of a Taxus cell suspension batch culture. We utilized the population balance equation framework to describe plant cell aggregates as a particulate system, accounting for the relevant phenomenological processes underlying aggregation, such as growth and breakage. We compared model predictions to experimental data to select appropriate kernel functions, and found that larger aggregates had a higher breakage rate, biomass was partitioned asymmetrically following a breakage event, and aggregates grew exponentially. Our model was then validated against several data sets with different initial aggregate size distributions and was able to quantitatively predict changes in total biomass and mean aggregate size, as well as actual size distributions. We proposed a breakage mechanism where a fraction of biomass was lost upon each breakage event, and demonstrated that even though smaller aggregates have been shown to produce more paclitaxel, an optimum breakage rate was predicted for maximum paclitaxel accumulation. We believe this is the first model to use a segregated, corpuscular approach to describe changes in the size distribution of plant cell aggregates, and represents an important first step in the design of rational strategies to control aggregation and optimize process performance. PMID:21910121

  15. TCDD-induced activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor regulates the skin stem cell population.

    PubMed

    Mandavia, Chirag

    2015-03-01

    The environmental toxin 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo p-dioxin (TCDD) plays an important role in the development of chloracne. Chloracne is characterized by hyperkeratosis of the interfollicular squamous epithelium and metaplasia of sebaceous glands. Dysregulation of keratinocyte terminal differentiation leading to accelerated formation of the cornified envelope as a result of TCDD-mediated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) activation has been implicated as one of the molecular pathogenic mechanisms contributing to the development of chloracne. In addition, chloracne is characterized by altered skin stem cell characteristics, and it has been speculated that the phenotype of chloracne closely matches that of c-Myc overexpressing transgenic mice. Therefore, we sought to determine whether TCDD plays a role in regulation of the skin stem cell population. We have proposed in this report that TCDD may directly or indirectly (via AHR receptor cross-talk) upregulate c-Myc via epidermal growth factor receptor-extracellular signal regulated kinase (EGFR-ERK) axis stimulation, which may correspond with an increase in human epidermal stem cell activation and differentiation of EPSCs into keratinocytes, with eventual depletion of the epidermal stem cell compartment of the skin. Thus, TCDD may cause increased epidermal stem cell turnover during chloracne. PMID:25618441

  16. A population balance equation model of aggregation dynamics in Taxus suspension cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Kolewe, Martin E; Roberts, Susan C; Henson, Michael A

    2012-02-01

    The nature of plant cells to grow as multicellular aggregates in suspension culture has profound effects on bioprocess performance. Recent advances in the measurement of plant cell aggregate size allow for routine process monitoring of this property. We have exploited this capability to develop a conceptual model to describe changes in the aggregate size distribution that are observed over the course of a Taxus cell suspension batch culture. We utilized the population balance equation framework to describe plant cell aggregates as a particulate system, accounting for the relevant phenomenological processes underlying aggregation, such as growth and breakage. We compared model predictions to experimental data to select appropriate kernel functions, and found that larger aggregates had a higher breakage rate, biomass was partitioned asymmetrically following a breakage event, and aggregates grew exponentially. Our model was then validated against several datasets with different initial aggregate size distributions and was able to quantitatively predict changes in total biomass and mean aggregate size, as well as actual size distributions. We proposed a breakage mechanism where a fraction of biomass was lost upon each breakage event, and demonstrated that even though smaller aggregates have been shown to produce more paclitaxel, an optimum breakage rate was predicted for maximum paclitaxel accumulation. We believe this is the first model to use a segregated, corpuscular approach to describe changes in the size distribution of plant cell aggregates, and represents an important first step in the design of rational strategies to control aggregation and optimize process performance. PMID:21910121

  17. Computational Model of Population Dynamics Based on the Cell Cycle and Local Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Oprisan, Sorinel Adrian; Oprisan, Ana

    2005-03-31

    Our study bridges cellular (mesoscopic) level interactions and global population (macroscopic) dynamics of carcinoma. The morphological differences and transitions between well and smooth defined benign tumors and tentacular malignat tumors suggest a theoretical analysis of tumor invasion based on the development of mathematical models exhibiting bifurcations of spatial patterns in the density of tumor cells. Our computational model views the most representative and clinically relevant features of oncogenesis as a fight between two distinct sub-systems: the immune system of the host and the neoplastic system. We implemented the neoplastic sub-system using a three-stage cell cycle: active, dormant, and necrosis. The second considered sub-system consists of cytotoxic active (effector) cells -- EC, with a very broad phenotype ranging from NK cells to CTL cells, macrophages, etc. Based on extensive numerical simulations, we correlated the fractal dimensions for carcinoma, which could be obtained from tumor imaging, with the malignat stage. Our computational model was able to also simulate the effects of surgical, chemotherapeutical, and radiotherapeutical treatments.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Human Trophoblast Side-Population (SP) Cells in Primary Villous Cytotrophoblasts and HTR-8/SVneo Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Tomoka; Asanoma, Kazuo; Kato, Kiyoko; Fukushima, Kotaro; Tsunematsu, Ryosuke; Hirakawa, Toshio; Matsumura, Sueo; Seki, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Satoru; Wake, Norio

    2011-01-01

    Recently, numerous studies have identified that immature cell populations including stem cells and progenitor cells can be found among “side-population” (SP) cells. Although SP cells isolated from some adult tissues have been reported elsewhere, isolation and characterization of human trophoblast SP remained to be reported. In this study, HTR-8/SVneo cells and human primary villous cytotrophoblasts (vCTBs) were stained with Hoechst 33342 and SP and non-SP (NSP) fractions were isolated using a cell sorter. A small population of SP cells was identified in HTR-8/SVneo cells and in vCTBs. SP cells expressed several vCTB-specific markers and failed to express syncytiotrophoblast (STB) or extravillous cytotrophopblast (EVT)-specific differentiation markers. SP cells formed colonies and proliferated on mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) feeder cells or in MEF conditioned medium supplemented with heparin/FGF2, and they also showed long-term repopulating property. SP cells could differentiate into both STB and EVT cell lineages and expressed several differentiation markers. Microarray analysis revealed that IL7R and IL1R2 were exclusively expressed in SP cells and not in NSP cells. vCTB cells sorted as positive for both IL7R and IL1R2 failed to express trophoblast differentiation markers and spontaneously differentiated into both STB and EVT in basal medium. These features shown by the SP cells suggested that IL7R and IL1R2 are available as markers to detect the SP cells and that vCTB progenitor cells and trophoblast stem cells were involved in the SP cell population. PMID:21760941

  19. A novel lymphoid progenitor cell population (LSK(low)) is restricted by p18(INK4c).

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Hao, Sha; Ma, Shihui; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Yajie; Zhou, Wen; Yuan, Weiping; Ema, Hideo; Cheng, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN2C (p18(INK4c)) restrains self-renewal in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and participates in the development and maturation of lymphoid cells. Deficiency in p18 predisposes mice and humans to hematopoietic lymphoid malignancies such as T-cell leukemia and multiple myeloma. However, the mechanism by which p18 regulates differentiation from HSCs to lymphoid cells is poorly understood. In this study, we found that a progenitor population characterized by its expression of surface markers, Lin(-) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(low) (LSK(low)), was markedly expanded in the bone marrow of p18 knock-out (p18(-/-)) mice. This novel population possessed lymphoid differentiation potential, but not myeloid differentiation potential, both in vitro and in vivo. Whereas LSK(low) cells and common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) overlapped functionally in generating lymphoid cells, they were distinct cell populations, because they had different gene expression profiles. Unlike CLPs, LSK(low) cells did not express the interleukin-7 receptor. LSK(low) cells were derived from HSCs and were independent of the p18-deleted microenvironment. This cell population may represent a previously unappreciated transitional stage from HSCs to lymphoid progenitors that is strictly restricted by p18 under physiological conditions. Likewise, LSK(low) might serve as a new cellular target of lymphoid malignances in the absence of p18. PMID:27287689

  20. Age-Related Changes in Population of Stromal Precursor Cells in Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Organs.

    PubMed

    Gorskaya, Yulia F.; Latzinik, Natalia V.; Shuklina, Ekaterina U.; Nesterenko, Vladimir G.

    2000-07-01

    It is shown that the content of precursor cells of stromal tissue (CFC-F) in the hemopoietic and lymphoid organs of SAMP (rapidly-ageing mice) and SAMR mice (mice with a normal ageing rate) decreases as the animals grow older. However the decrease in the content of CFC-F in SAMP mice begins substantially earlier - in the age group of 9-11 months, while in the SAMR mice - only in the age group of 16-19 months. It was found that the age reduction of the number to an equal degree relates to the whole population of CFC-F, in particular both the fraction of weakly-linked CFC-F, which is isolated by means of mechanical disaggregation of the tissue, and the fraction which may only be isolated using trypsin. It is shown that the concentration of inducible osteogenic precursor cells (IOPC) in the spleen of guinea pigs does not change with age, but their content in that organ in old animals (2-3 years old) drops by two times. It was found that in elderly animals the mass of the ectopic osseous tissue, formed by the implantation of an osteoinductor (autologous epithelium of the urinary bladder) in a system open for entrance of cells, decreases by two times. After curettage of the medullary cavity of guinea pig tibia (i.e. under conditions of an increased demand for osteogenic cells) the mass of induced ectopic osseous tissue decreases by 4 times, which indicates to the possible functional relationship between the pool of determined and inducible osteogenic precursor cells. On the whole, the obtained data show that during ageing there is a reduction in the number of stromal precursor cells (CFC-F and IOPC), which form a specific microenvironment for hemopoietic and lymphoid organs, which is important to understand the role of these cells in the development of age pathologies, in particular senile osteoporosis. PMID:12687170

  1. Alternate protein kinase A activity identifies a unique population of stromal cells in adult bone.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Kit Man; Starost, Matthew F; Nesterova, Maria; Boikos, Sosipatros A; Watkins, Tonya; Almeida, Madson Q; Harran, Michelle; Li, Andrew; Collins, Michael T; Cheadle, Christopher; Mertz, Edward L; Leikin, Sergey; Kirschner, Lawrence S; Robey, Pamela; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-05-11

    A population of stromal cells that retains osteogenic capacity in adult bone (adult bone stromal cells or aBSCs) exists and is under intense investigation. Mice heterozygous for a null allele of prkar1a (Prkar1a(+/-)), the primary receptor for cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and regulator of protein kinase A (PKA) activity, developed bone lesions that were derived from cAMP-responsive osteogenic cells and resembled fibrous dysplasia (FD). Prkar1a(+/-) mice were crossed with mice that were heterozygous for catalytic subunit Calpha (Prkaca(+/-)), the main PKA activity-mediating molecule, to generate a mouse model with double heterozygosity for prkar1a and prkaca (Prkar1a(+/-)Prkaca(+/-)). Unexpectedly, Prkar1a(+/-)Prkaca(+/-) mice developed a greater number of osseous lesions starting at 3 months of age that varied from the rare chondromas in the long bones and the ubiquitous osteochondrodysplasia of vertebral bodies to the occasional sarcoma in older animals. Cells from these lesions originated from an area proximal to the growth plate, expressed osteogenic cell markers, and showed higher PKA activity that was mostly type II (PKA-II) mediated by an alternate pattern of catalytic subunit expression. Gene expression profiling confirmed a preosteoblastic nature for these cells but also showed a signature that was indicative of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and increased Wnt signaling. These studies show that a specific subpopulation of aBSCs can be stimulated in adult bone by alternate PKA and catalytic subunit activity; abnormal proliferation of these cells leads to skeletal lesions that have similarities to human FD and bone tumors. PMID:20421483

  2. Leaf extracts from Nitraria retusa promote cell population growth of human cancer cells by inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In this report the phytochemical profile of Nitraria. Retusa (N. Retusa) leaf extracts were identified and their ability to induce apoptosis in human chronic myelogenous erythroleukaemia (K562) was evaluated. Methods Apoptosis of the human chronic myelogenous erythroleukaemia (K562) was evidenced by investigating DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage and caspases 3 and 8 inducing activities, in the presence of N. retusa extracts. Results Our study revealed that the tested extracts from N. Retusa contain many useful bioactive compounds. They induced in a time-dependent manner the apoptosis the tested cancerous our cell line. This result was confirmed by ladder DNA fragmentation profile and PARP cleavage, as well as a release in caspase-3 and caspase-8 level. Conclusion Our results indicate that the tested compounds have a significant antiproliferative effect which may be due to their involvement in the induction of the extrinsic apoptosic pathway. PMID:22040460

  3. Dose Dependent Side Effect of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Labeling on Cell Motility in Two Fetal Stem Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Diana, Valentina; Bossolasco, Patrizia; Moscatelli, Davide; Silani, Vincenzo; Cova, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells (SCs) could substitute damaged cells and also rescue degeneration through the secretion of trophic factors able to activate the endogenous SC compartment. Therefore, fetal SCs, characterized by high proliferation rate and devoid of ethical concern, appear promising candidate, particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide nanoparticles (SPIOn), routinely used for pre-clinical cell imaging and already approved for clinical practice, allow tracking of transplanted SCs and characterization of their fate within the host tissue, when combined with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In this work we investigated how SPIOn could influence cell migration after internalization in two fetal SC populations: human amniotic fluid and chorial villi SCs were labeled with SPIOn and their motility was evaluated. We found that SPIOn loading significantly reduced SC movements without increasing production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Moreover, motility impairment was directly proportional to the amount of loaded SPIOn while a chemoattractant-induced recovery was obtained by increasing serum levels. Interestingly, the migration rate of SPIOn labeled cells was also significantly influenced by a degenerative surrounding. In conclusion, this work highlights how SPIOn labeling affects SC motility in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, shedding the light on an important parameter for the creation of clinical protocols. Establishment of an optimal SPIOn dose that enables both a good visualization of grafted cells by MRI and the physiological migration rate is a main step in order to maximize the effects of SC therapy in both animal models of neurodegeneration and clinical studies. PMID:24244310

  4. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    PubMed Central

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.; Argoul, F.; Rappailles, A.; Guilbaud, G.; Petryk, N.; Kahli, M.; Hyrien, O.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a non-local model of DNA replication that takes into account the observed uncertainty on the position and time of replication initiation in eukaryote cell populations. By picturing replication initiation as a two-state system and considering all possible transition configurations, and by taking into account the chromatin’s fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement with corresponding experimental data from both S. cerevisiae and human cells and provides a quantitative estimate of initiation site redundancy. This study shows that, to a large extent, the program that regulates the dynamics of eukaryotic DNA replication is a collective phenomenon that emerges from the stochastic nature of replication origins initiation. PMID:26935043

  5. Complications of the naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: results of a population based study.

    PubMed

    Evans, D G; Ladusans, E J; Rimmer, S; Burnell, L D; Thakker, N; Farndon, P A

    1993-06-01

    There are many potential complications which have been reported in association with the naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. We have been able to show the relative frequencies of these problems in a population based study of 84 cases in the north west of England. The major complications of basal cell carcinomas and jaw cysts occur in over 90% of patients by 40 years of age, but may both occur before 10 years of age. Less well described complications are ovarian calcification or fibroma (24%), medulloblastoma (5%), cardiac fibroma (3%), cleft palate (5%), and ophthalmic abnormalities such as squint or cataract (26%). This study more clearly defines the possible complications of the syndrome and gives clearer guidelines for counselling and screening affected and at risk persons. PMID:8326488

  6. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.; Argoul, F.; Rappailles, A.; Guilbaud, G.; Petryk, N.; Kahli, M.; Hyrien, O.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a non-local model of DNA replication that takes into account the observed uncertainty on the position and time of replication initiation in eukaryote cell populations. By picturing replication initiation as a two-state system and considering all possible transition configurations, and by taking into account the chromatin’s fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement with corresponding experimental data from both S. cerevisiae and human cells and provides a quantitative estimate of initiation site redundancy. This study shows that, to a large extent, the program that regulates the dynamics of eukaryotic DNA replication is a collective phenomenon that emerges from the stochastic nature of replication origins initiation.

  7. Cell Population Kinetics of a Spontaneous Rat Tumour During Serial Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Steel, G. G.; Adams, K.; Hodgett, J.; Janik, P.

    1971-01-01

    Studies have been made on the growth and cell population kinetics of a spontaneous rat mammary fibroadenoma and of 10 successive transplantation passages. The volume doubling time decreased from about 30 days in the primary tumour and first two transplants to 1·7 days in the tenth transplant. This acceleration was accompanied by a considerable shortening of the mitotic cycle and of its S and G1 phases but without change in the proportion of time spent in S. There was also a reduction in the apparent extent of cell loss and a considerable increase in the growth fraction. Histological changes were noted and studies by feulgen densitometry indicated a considerable shift in ploidy from hyperdiploid to hypertetraploid. The results constitute a detailed example of the effect on tumour growth kinetics of serial transplantation. ImagesFig. 5 PMID:5144541

  8. Can manipulation of differentiation conditions eliminate proliferative cells from a population of ES cell-derived forebrain cells?

    PubMed

    Precious, Sophie V; Kelly, Claire M; Allen, Nicholas D; Rosser, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    There is preliminary evidence that implantation of primary fetal striatal cells provides functional benefit in patients with Huntington's disease, a neurodegenerative condition resulting in loss of medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN) of the striatum. Scarcity of primary fetal tissue means it is important to identify a renewable source of cells from which to derive donor MSNs. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, which predominantly default to telencephalic-like precursors in chemically defined medium (CDM), offer a potentially inexhaustible supply of cells capable of generating the desired neurons. Using an ES cell line, with the forebrain marker FoxG1 tagged to the LacZ reporter, we assessed effects of known developmental factors on the yield of forebrain-like precursor cells in CDM suspension culture. Addition of FGF2, but not DKK1, increased the proportion of FoxG1-expressing cells at day 8 of neural induction. Oct4 was expressed at day 8, but was undetectable by day 16. Differentiation of day 16 precursors generated GABA-expressing neurons, with few DARPP32 positive MSNs. Transplantation of day 8 precursor cells into quinolinic acid-lesioned striata resulted in generation of teratomas. However, transplantation of day 16 precursors yielded grafts expressing neuronal markers including NeuN, calbindin and parvalbumin, but no DARPP32 6 weeks post-transplantation. Manipulation of fate of ES cells requires optimization of both concentration and timing of addition of factors to culture systems to generate the desired phenotypes. Furthermore, we highlight the value of increasing the precursor phase of ES cell suspension culture when directing differentiation toward forebrain fate, so as to dramatically reduce the risk of teratoma formation. PMID:27606335

  9. [Regulation of potential-dependant calcium channels by 5-HT1B serotonin receptors in various populations of hippocampal cells].

    PubMed

    Kononov, A V; Ivanov, S V; Zinchenko, V P

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic serotonin receptors of 5HT1-type in brain neurons participate in regulation of such human emotional states as aggression, fear and dependence on alcohol. Activated presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors suppress the Ca2+ influx through the potential-dependent calcium channels in certain neurons. The Ca2+ influx into the cells has been measured by increase of calcium ions concentration in cytoplasm in reply to the depolarization caused by 35mM KC1. Using system of image analysis in hippocampal cells culture we found out that Ca2+-signals to depolarization oin various populations of neurons differed in form, speed and amplitude. 5HT1B receptor agonists in 86 +/- 3 % of neurons slightly suppressed the activity of potential-dependent calcium channels. Two minor cell populations (5-8 % of cells each) were found out, that strongly differed in Ca2+ signal desensitization. Calcium signal caused by depolarization in one cells population differed in characteristic delay and high rate of decay. 5HT1B receptor agonists strongly inhibited the amplitude of the Ca2+ response on KCl only in this population of neurons. The calcium signal in second cell population differed by absence desensitization and smaller amplitude which constantly increased during depolarization. 5HT 1 B receptor agonists increased the calcium response amplitude to depolarization in this population of neurons. Thus we show various sensitivity of potential-dependent calcium channels of separate neurons to 5HTB1 receptor agonist. PMID:23659057

  10. Hoxb4 Overexpression in CD4 Memory Phenotype T Cells Increases the Central Memory Population upon Homeostatic Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Marilaine; Labrecque, Nathalie; Bijl, Janet J.

    2013-01-01

    Memory T cell populations allow a rapid immune response to pathogens that have been previously encountered and thus form the basis of success in vaccinations. However, the molecular pathways underlying the development and maintenance of these cells are only starting to be unveiled. Memory T cells have the capacity to self renew as do hematopoietic stem cells, and overlapping gene expression profiles suggested that these cells might use the same self-renewal pathways. The transcription factor Hoxb4 has been shown to promote self-renewal divisions of hematopoietic stem cells resulting in an expansion of these cells. In this study we investigated whether overexpression of Hoxb4 could provide an advantage to CD4 memory phenotype T cells in engrafting the niche of T cell deficient mice following adoptive transfer. Competitive transplantation experiments demonstrated that CD4 memory phenotype T cells derived from mice transgenic for Hoxb4 contributed overall less to the repopulation of the lymphoid organs than wild type CD4 memory phenotype T cells after two months. These proportions were relatively maintained following serial transplantation in secondary and tertiary mice. Interestingly, a significantly higher percentage of the Hoxb4 CD4 memory phenotype T cell population expressed the CD62L and Ly6C surface markers, characteristic for central memory T cells, after homeostatic proliferation. Thus Hoxb4 favours the maintenance and increase of the CD4 central memory phenotype T cell population. These cells are more stem cell like and might eventually lead to an advantage of Hoxb4 T cells after subjecting the cells to additional rounds of proliferation. PMID:24324706

  11. Epidemiology of giant‐cell arteritis in an Arab population: a 22‐year study

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Imtiaz A; Shamsi, Farrukh A; Elzaridi, Elsanusi; Arat, Yonca O; Bosley, Thomas M; Riley, Fenwick C

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the epidemiology of biopsy‐proven giant‐cell arteritis (GCA) in an Arab population with clinical features suggestive of GCA. Methods Clinical records of 102 patients who underwent temporal artery biopsy (TAB) at King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 1983 to December 2004 were reviewed. Results Among the 56 men and 46 women who had TAB, 7 (6.8%) had biopsy‐proven GCA. The mean (SD) age of the biopsy‐positive group (71.7 (8.6) years) was higher than in the biopsy‐negative group (65 (9.8) years; p = 0.005). None of the untreated patients with a negative TAB developed additional symptoms that are typical of GCA. Conclusion The small absolute number of biopsy‐proven cases of GCA implies a relatively low incidence of GCA in Arab population, confirming previous observations that GCA occurs primarily in the Caucasian population. PMID:17229803

  12. Live cell imaging of SOS and prophage dynamics in isogenic bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Helfrich, Stefan; Pfeifer, Eugen; Krämer, Christina; Sachs, Christian Carsten; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Nöh, Katharina; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Almost all bacterial genomes contain DNA of viral origin, including functional prophages or degenerated phage elements. A frequent but often unnoted phenomenon is the spontaneous induction of prophage elements (SPI) even in the absence of an external stimulus. In this study, we have analyzed SPI of the large, degenerated prophage CGP3 (187 kbp), which is integrated into the genome of the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fluorescent reporter strains grown in microfluidic chips revealed the sporadic induction of the SOS response as a prominent trigger of CGP3 SPI but also displayed a considerable fraction (∼30%) of RecA-independent SPI. Whereas approx. 20% of SOS-induced cells recovered from this stress and resumed growth, the spontaneous induction of CGP3 always led to a stop of growth and likely cell death. A carbon source starvation experiment clearly emphasized that SPI only occurs in actively proliferating cells, whereas sporadic SOS induction was still observed in resting cells. These data highlight the impact of sporadic DNA damage on the activity of prophage elements and provide a time-resolved, quantitative description of SPI as general phenomenon of bacterial populations. PMID:26235130

  13. Unexpected diversity in populations of the many-celled magnetotactic prokaryote.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Sheri L; Edwards, Katrina J

    2007-01-01

    The many-celled magnetotactic prokaryote (MMP) is an uncultivated, highly motile aggregate of 10-30 cells containing numerous chains of greigite (Fe(3)S(4)) magnetosomes. It is unique to marine environments and is abundant in slightly sulfidic sediments of the Little Sippewissett salt marsh (Falmouth, MA). We sequenced 16s rDNA genes from a natural population of MMP and found five lineages separated by at least 5% sequence divergence. Fluorescent in situ hybridization probes for three of these lineages showed significant variation in their relative abundances across a seasonal cycle in marsh productivity. The MMP should therefore be considered a separate genus in the delta-proteobacteria rather than a single species as previously thought. All cells in each aggregate express identical SSU rRNAs, suggesting that the aggregates are composed of a single MMP phylotype. This observation supports a model of the MMP as comprised of clonal cells which reproduce by binary fission of the aggregate. PMID:17227425

  14. Killing Hypoxic Cell Populations in a 3D Tumor Model with EtNBS-PDT

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Conor L.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Park, Yong Jin; Klein, Oliver J.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Rizvi, Imran; Zheng, Xiang; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2011-01-01

    An outstanding problem in cancer therapy is the battle against treatment-resistant disease. This is especially true for ovarian cancer, where the majority of patients eventually succumb to treatment-resistant metastatic carcinomatosis. Limited perfusion and diffusion, acidosis, and hypoxia play major roles in the development of resistance to the majority of front-line therapeutic regimens. To overcome these limitations and eliminate otherwise spared cancer cells, we utilized the cationic photosensitizer EtNBS to treat hypoxic regions deep inside in vitro 3D models of metastatic ovarian cancer. Unlike standard regimens that fail to penetrate beyond ∼150 µm, EtNBS was found to not only penetrate throughout the entirety of large (>200 µm) avascular nodules, but also concentrate into the nodules' acidic and hypoxic cores. Photodynamic therapy with EtNBS was observed to be highly effective against these hypoxic regions even at low therapeutic doses, and was capable of destroying both normoxic and hypoxic regions at higher treatment levels. Imaging studies utilizing multiphoton and confocal microscopies, as well as time-lapse optical coherence tomography (TL-OCT), revealed an inside-out pattern of cell death, with apoptosis being the primary mechanism of cell killing. Critically, EtNBS-based photodynamic therapy was found to be effective against the model tumor nodules even under severe hypoxia. The inherent ability of EtNBS photodynamic therapy to impart cytotoxicity across a wide range of tumoral oxygenation levels indicates its potential to eliminate treatment-resistant cell populations. PMID:21876751

  15. The regulation of proenkephalin expression in a distinct population of glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Melner, M H; Low, K G; Allen, R G; Nielsen, C P; Young, S L; Saneto, R P

    1990-01-01

    The expression of opioid genes was examined in isolated populations of glial cells in primary culture. Northern blot analysis of purified type I astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and mixed oligodendrocyte-type-2-astrocyte lineage cells derived from cerebral cortex demonstrated robust expression of proenkephalin mRNA exclusively in type I astrocytes. The expression of proenkephalin mRNA was stimulated by the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol, and 8-(4-chlorophenyl thio)adenosine 3'-5'-cyclic monophosphate (cpt-cAMP). Both of these compounds regulated a proenkephalin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion gene transiently transfected into type I astrocytes. HPLC and immunoassay of the cell culture media revealed significant levels of unprocessed proenkephalin secreted by the cell and this secretion was stimulated by isoproterenol and cpt-cAMP. The relatively high levels of proenkephalin expressed suggest that enhanced expression in astrocytes may be important during neural development, in trauma-induced gliosis and in neuroimmune interactions. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2311581

  16. Transcriptional modulation in a leukocyte-depleted splenic cell population during prion disease.

    PubMed

    Huzarewich, Rhiannon L C H; Medina, Sarah; Robertson, Catherine; Parchaliuk, Debra; Booth, Stephanie A

    2011-01-01

    Prion replication in the periphery precedes neuroinvasion in many experimental rodent scrapie models, and in natural sheep scrapie and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids. Prions propagate in the germinal centers of secondary lymphoid organs and are strongly associated with follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and possibly circulating dendritic cells and macrophages. Given the importance of lymphoid organs in prion disease transmission and pathogenesis, gene expression studies may reveal host factors or biological pathways related to prion replication and accumulation. A procedure was developed to enrich for FDC, dendritic cells, and macrophages prior to the investigation of transcriptional alterations in murine splenic cells during prion pathogenesis. In total, 1753 transcripts exhibited fold changes greater than three (false discovery rates less than 2%) in this population isolated from spleens of prion-infected versus uninfected mice. The gene for the small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin (DCN) was one of the genes most overexpressed in infected mice, and the splenic protein levels mirrored this in mice infected with scrapie as well as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). A number of groups of functionally related genes were also significantly decreased in infected spleens. These included genes related to iron metabolism and homeostasis, pathways that have also been implicated in prion pathogenesis in the brain. These gene expression alterations provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying prion disease pathogenesis and may serve as a pool of potential surrogate markers for the early detection and diagnosis of some prion diseases. PMID:22043911

  17. CIP2A is a candidate therapeutic target in clinically challenging prostate cancer cell populations.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Anchit; Rane, Jayant K; Kivinummi, Kati K; Urbanucci, Alfonso; Helenius, Merja A; Tolonen, Teemu T; Saramäki, Outi R; Latonen, Leena; Manni, Visa; Pimanda, John E; Maitland, Norman J; Westermarck, Jukka; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2015-08-14

    Residual androgen receptor (AR)-signaling and presence of cancer stem-like cells (SCs) are the two emerging paradigms for clinically challenging castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Therefore, identification of AR-target proteins that are also overexpressed in the cancer SC population would be an attractive therapeutic approach.Our analysis of over three hundred clinical samples and patient-derived prostate epithelial cultures (PPECs), revealed Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) as one such target. CIP2A is significantly overexpressed in both hormone-naïve prostate cancer (HN-PC) and CRPC patients . CIP2A is also overexpressed, by 3- and 30-fold, in HN-PC and CRPC SCs respectively. In vivo binding of the AR to the intronic region of CIP2A and its functionality in the AR-moderate and AR-high expressing LNCaP cell-model systems is also demonstrated. Further, we show that AR positively regulates CIP2A expression, both at the mRNA and protein level. Finally, CIP2A depletion reduced cell viability and colony forming efficiency of AR-independent PPECs as well as AR-responsive LNCaP cells, in which anchorage-independent growth is also impaired.These findings identify CIP2A as a common denominator for AR-signaling and cancer SC functionality, highlighting its potential therapeutic significance in the most clinically challenging prostate pathology: castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:25965834

  18. High mitochondrial mass identifies a sub-population of stem-like cancer cells that are chemo-resistant

    PubMed Central

    Farnie, Gillian; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Chemo-resistance is a clinical barrier to more effective anti-cancer therapy. In this context, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are thought to be chemo-resistant, resulting in tumor recurrence and distant metastasis. Our hypothesis is that chemo-resistance in CSCs is driven, in part, by enhanced mitochondrial function. Here, we used breast cell lines and metastatic breast cancer patient samples to begin to dissect the role of mitochondrial metabolism in conferring the CSC phenotype. More specifically, we employed fluorescent staining with MitoTracker (MT) to metabolically fractionate these cell lines into mito-high and mito-low sub-populations, by flow-cytometry. Interestingly, cells with high mitochondrial mass (mito-high) were specifically enriched in a number of known CSC markers, such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, and they were ESA+/CD24-/low and formed mammospheres with higher efficiency. Large cell size is another independent characteristic of the stem cell phenotype; here, we observed a >2-fold increase in mitochondrial mass in large cells (>12-μm), relative to the smaller cell population (4–8-μm). Moreover, the mito-high cell population showed a 2.4-fold enrichment in tumor-initiating cell activity, based on limiting dilution assays in murine xenografts. Importantly, primary human breast CSCs isolated from patients with metastatic breast cancer or a patient derived xenograft (PDX) also showed the co-enrichment of ALDH activity and mitochondrial mass. Most significantly, our investigations demonstrated that mito-high cells were resistant to paclitaxel, resulting in little or no DNA damage, as measured using the comet assay. In summary, increased mitochondrial mass in a sub-population of breast cancer cells confers a stem-like phenotype and chemo-resistance. As such, our current findings have important clinical implications for over-coming drug resistance, by therapeutically targeting the mito-high CSC population. PMID:26421710

  19. RFPL4A increases the G1 population and decreases sensitivity to chemotherapy in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Naito, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Kagawa, Yoshinori; Naito, Yoko; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Otani, Keisuke; Iwamoto, Yoriko; Maeda, Sakae; Kikuta, Junichi; Nishikawa, Keizo; Uemura, Mamoru; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Ishii, Hideshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Masaru

    2015-03-01

    Cell cycle-arrested cancer cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapy that acts on the mitotic phases of the cell cycle, although the molecular mechanisms involved in halting cell cycle progression remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that RFPL4A, an uncharacterized ubiquitin ligase, induced G1 retention and thus conferred decreased sensitivity to chemotherapy in the human colorectal cancer cell line, HCT116. Long term time lapse observations in HCT116 cells bearing a "fluorescence ubiquitin-based cell cycle indicator" identified a characteristic population that is viable but remains in the G1 phase for an extended period of time (up to 56 h). Microarray analyses showed that expression of RFPL4A was significantly up-regulated in these G1-arrested cells, not only in HCT116 cells but also in other cancer cell lines, and overexpression of RFPL4A increased the G1 population and decreased sensitivity to chemotherapy. However, knockdown of RFPL4A expression caused the cells to resume mitosis and induced their susceptibility to anti-cancer drugs in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that RFPL4A is a novel factor that increases the G1 population and decreases sensitivity to chemotherapy and thus may be a promising therapeutic target for refractory tumor conditions. PMID:25605732

  20. Human skin is protected by four functionally and phenotypically discrete populations of resident and recirculating memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rei; Gehad, Ahmed; Yang, Chao; Campbell, Laura; Teague, Jessica E.; Schlapbach, Christoph; Elco, Christopher; Huang, Victor; Matos, Tiago R.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Clark, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    The skin of an adult human contains approximately 20 billion memory T cells. Epithelial barrier tissues are infiltrated by a combination of resident and recirculating T cells in mice but the relative proportions and functional activities of resident versus recirculating T cells have not been evaluated in human skin. We discriminated resident from recirculating T cells in human engrafted mice and lymphoma patients using alemtuzumab, a medication that depletes recirculating T cells from skin, and then analyzed these T cell populations in healthy human skin. All non-recirculating resident memory T cells (TRM) expressed CD69, but the majority were CD4+, CD103− and located in the dermis, in contrast to studies in mice. Both CD4+ and CD8+ CD103+ TRM were enriched in the epidermis, had potent effector functions and had a limited proliferative capacity compared to CD103− TRM. TRM of both types had more potent effector functions than recirculating T cells. Induction of CD103 on human T cells was enhanced by keratinocyte contact, depended on TGFβ and was independent of T cell keratinocyte adhesive interactions. We observed two distinct populations of recirculating T cells, CCR7+/L-selectin+ central memory T cells (TCM) and CCR7+/L-selectin− T cells, which we term migratory memory T cells (TMM). Circulating skin-tropic TMM were intermediate in cytokine production between TCM and effector memory T cells. In patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma, malignant TCM and TMM induced distinct inflammatory skin lesions and TMM were depleted more slowly from skin after alemtuzumab, suggesting TMM may recirculate more slowly. In summary, human skin is protected by four functionally distinct populations of T cells, two resident and two recirculating, with differing territories of migration and distinct functional activities. PMID:25787765

  1. Identification of co-expressed gene signatures in mouse B1, marginal zone and B2 B-cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Mabbott, Neil A; Gray, David

    2014-01-01

    In mice, three major B-cell subsets have been identified with distinct functionalities: B1 B cells, marginal zone B cells and follicular B2 B cells. Here, we used the growing body of publicly available transcriptomics data to create an expression atlas of 84 gene expression microarray data sets of distinct mouse B-cell subsets. These data were subjected to network-based cluster analysis using BioLayout Express3D. Using this analysis tool, genes with related functions clustered together in discrete regions of the network graph and enabled the identification of transcriptional networks that underpinned the functional activity of distinct cell populations. Some gene clusters were expressed highly by most of the cell populations included in this analysis (such as those with activity related to house-keeping functions). Others contained genes with expression patterns specific to distinct B-cell subsets. While these clusters contained many genes typically associated with the activity of the cells they were specifically expressed in, many novel B-cell-subset-specific candidate genes were identified. A large number of uncharacterized genes were also represented in these B-cell lineage-specific clusters. Further analysis of the activities of these uncharacterized candidate genes will lead to the identification of novel B-cell lineage-specific transcription factors and regulators of B-cell function. We also analysed 36 microarray data sets from distinct human B-cell populations. These data showed that mouse and human germinal centre B cells shared similar transcriptional features, whereas mouse B1 B cells were distinct from proposed human B1 B cells. PMID:24032749

  2. 'Stealth' nanoparticles evade neural immune cells but also evade major brain cell populations: Implications for PEG-based neurotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Stuart I; Weinberg, Daniel; Al-Shakli, Arwa F; Fernandes, Alinda R; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Telling, Neil D; Roach, Paul; Chari, Divya M

    2016-02-28

    Surface engineering to control cell behavior is of high interest across the chemical engineering, drug delivery and biomaterial communities. Defined chemical strategies are necessary to tailor nanoscale protein interactions/adsorption, enabling control of cell behaviors for development of novel therapeutic strategies. Nanoparticle-based therapies benefit from such strategies but particle targeting to sites of neurological injury remains challenging due to circulatory immune clearance. As a strategy to overcome this barrier, the use of stealth coatings can reduce immune clearance and prolong circulatory times, thereby enhancing therapeutic capacity. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is the most widely-used stealth coating and facilitates particle accumulation in the brain. However, once within the brain, the mode of handling of PEGylated particles by the resident immune cells of the brain itself (the 'microglia') is unknown. This is a critical question as it is well established that microglia avidly sequester nanoparticles, limiting their bioavailability and posing a major translational barrier. If PEGylation can be proved to promote evasion of microglia, then this information will be of high value in developing tailored nanoparticle-based therapies for neurological applications. Here, we have conducted the first comparative study of uptake of PEGylated particles by all the major (immune and non-immune) brain cell types. We prove for the first time that PEGylated nanoparticles evade major brain cell populations - a phenomenon which will enhance extracellular bioavailability. We demonstrate changes in protein coronas around these particles within biological media, and discuss how surface chemistry presentation may affect this process and subsequent cellular interactions. PMID:26780172

  3. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    SciTech Connect

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal {beta} III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  4. Adverse effects of small-volume red blood cell transfusions in the neonatal population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adverse transfusion reactions in the neonatal population are poorly understood and defined. The incidence and pattern of adverse effects due to red blood cell (RBC) transfusion are not well known, and there has been no systematic review of published adverse events. RBC transfusions continue to be linked to the development of morbidities unique to neonates, including chronic lung disease, retinopathy of prematurity, intraventricular haemorrhage and necrotising enterocolitis. Uncertainties about the exact nature of risks alongside benefits of RBC transfusion may contribute to evidence of widespread variation in neonatal RBC transfusion practice. Our review aims to describe clinical adverse effects attributed to small-volume (10–20 mL/kg) RBC transfusions and, where possible, their incidence rates in the neonatal population through the systematic identification of all relevant studies. Methods A comprehensive search of the following bibliographic databases will be performed: MEDLINE (PubMed/OVID which includes the Cochrane Library) and EMBASE (OVID). The intervention of interest is small-volume (10–20 mL/kg) RBC transfusions in the neonatal population. We will undertake a narrative synthesis of the evidence. If clinical similarity and data quantity and quality permit, we will also carry out meta-analyses on the listed outcomes. Discussion This systematic review will identify and synthesise the reported adverse effects and associations of RBC transfusions in the neonatal population. We believe that this systematic review is timely and will make a valuable contribution to highlight an existing research gap. Trial Registration PROSPERO, CRD42013005107 http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.asp?ID=CRD42013005107 PMID:25143009

  5. Levels of dendritic cell populations and regulatory T cells vary significantly between two commonly used mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, Petra; Hovden, Arnt-Ove; Jonsson, Roland; Appel, Silke

    2009-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are a heterogeneous group of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) involved in both initiating immune responses and maintaining tolerance. Roughly, DC can be divided into plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and conventional DC (cDC). By controlling regulatory T cells (Treg), DC can influence the outcome of both immunity and autoimmunity. Since the use of mice as in vivo models became a practical tool for researchers studying pathological events in all kind of human diseases, we decided to compare levels of cDC, pDC and Treg in both spleen and blood between two inbred mouse strains. Here we show that two commonly used mouse strains, BALB/c and C57BL/10J mice, have significantly different levels of distinct CD11c(+)/CD4(-)/CD8a(+), CD11c(+)/CD4(+)/CD8a(-) and CD11c(+)/CD4(-)/CD8a(-) cDC populations, pDC and Treg. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of considering the proper model when comparing data sets from different mouse strains. PMID:19906196

  6. The human CD77- B cell population represents a heterogeneous subset of cells comprising centroblasts, centrocytes, and plasmablasts, prompting phenotypical revision.

    PubMed

    Högerkorp, Carl-Magnus; Borrebaeck, Carl A K

    2006-10-01

    The process of becoming an Ig-producing plasma cell takes the mature B cell through the germinal center, where Ig genes are diversified through somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination. To more clearly define functional characteristics of the germinal center dark zone centroblasts and the light zone centrocytes, we have performed expression analysis of the CD77(+) and CD77(-) populations, because CD77 has been accepted as a discriminator of centroblasts and centrocytes. Our results demonstrated that the CD77(+) and the CD77(-) populations lack functional associated expression programs discriminating the two populations. Both populations are shown to be actively cycling and to share common features associated with cell cycle regulation and DNA maintenance. They are also shown to have an equally active DNA repair program, as well as components involved in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination. Moreover, the data also demonstrated that the CD77(-) population comprises cells with an already initiated plasma cell differentiation program. Together this demonstrates that CD77 does not discriminate centroblasts and centrocytes and that the CD77(-) population represents a heterogeneous subset of cells, comprising centroblasts, centrocytes, and plasmablast. PMID:16982868

  7. Localized populations of CD8 MHC class I tetramer SIV-specific T cells in lymphoid follicles and genital epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jung Joo; Reynolds, Matthew R; Mattila, Teresa L; Hage, Aaron; Watkins, David I; Miller, Christopher J; Skinner, Pamela J

    2009-01-01

    CD8 T cells play an important role in controlling viral infections. We investigated the in situ localization of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-specific T cells in lymph and genital tissues from SIV-infected macaques using MHC-class I tetramers. The majority of tetramer-binding cells localized in T cell zones and were CD8(+). Curiously, small subpopulations of tetramer-binding cells that had little to no surface CD8 were detected in situ both early and late post-infection, and in both vaginally and rectally inoculated macaques. These tetramer(+)CD8(low/-) cells were more often localized in apparent B cell follicles relative to T cell zones and more often found near or within the genital epithelium than the submucosa. Cells analyzed by flow cytometry showed similar populations of cells. Further immunohistological characterization revealed small populations of tetramer(+)CD20(-) cells inside B cell follicles and that tetramer(+) cells did not stain with gammadelta-TCR nor CD4 antibodies. Negative control tetramer staining indicated that tetramer(+)CD8(low/-) cells were not likely NK cells non-specifically binding to MHC tetramers. These findings have important implications for SIV-specific and other antigen-specific T cell function in these specific tissue locations, and suggest a model in which antigen-specific CD8+ T cells down modulate CD8 upon entering B cell follicles or the epithelial layer of tissues, or alternatively a model in which only antigen-specific CD8 T cells that down-modulate CD8 can enter B cell follicles or the epithelium. PMID:19122815

  8. Quantitative dynamics of triacylglycerol accumulation in microalgae populations at single-cell resolution revealed by Raman microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapid, real-time and label-free measurement of the cellular contents of biofuel molecules such as triacylglycerol (TAG) in populations at single-cell resolution are important for bioprocess control and understanding of the population heterogeneity. Raman microspectroscopy can directly detect the changes of metabolite profile in a cell and thus can potentially serve these purposes. Results Single-cell Raman spectra (SCRS) of the unicellular oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis oceanica from the cultures under nitrogen depletion (TAG-producing condition) and nitrogen repletion (non-TAG-producing condition) were sampled at eight time points during the first 96 hours upon the onset of nitrogen depletion. Single N. oceanica cells were captured by a 532-nm laser and the SCRS were acquired by the same laser within one second per cell. Using chemometric methods, the SCRS were able to discriminate cells between nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions at as early as 6 hours with >93.3% accuracy, and among the eight time points under nitrogen depletion with >90.4% accuracy. Quantitative prediction of TAG content in single cells was achieved and validated via SCRS and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis at population level. SCRS revealed the dynamics of heterogeneity in TAG production among cells in each isogenic population. A significant negative correlation between TAG content and lipid unsaturation degree in individual microalgae cells was observed. Conclusions Our results show that SCRS can serve as a label-free and non-invasive proxy for quantitatively tracking and screening cellular TAG content in real-time at single-cell level. Phenotypic comparison of single cells via SCRS should also help investigating the mechanisms of functional heterogeneity within a cellular population. PMID:24716544

  9. Bovine apolipoprotein B-100 is a dominant immunogen in therapeutic cell populations cultured in FCS in mice and humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cell populations intended for therapeutic purposes that are cultured in heterologous animal products can acquire xenoantigens, potentially limiting their utility. In investigations of the immune response to murine ES cells, we found that a strong antibody respon...

  10. A model system illustrating the isolation and enrichment of a rare population of tumour cells in bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Gibson, F M; Liberti, P A; Kemshead, J T

    1988-11-01

    A model system employing a modified nylon matrix is described for the separation of rare cells titrated into either a leukaemic cell line or normal bone marrow. A 75- to 125-fold enrichment and recovery of the rare cell population was achieved, starting from an initial level of 0.014 to 0.2% of the total population. The rare cell population was identified by pre-labelling with Hoechst 33342, which intercalates into the DNA, and renders cells highly fluorescent. Separation and recovery of cells was totally dependent on the use of a panel of monoclonal antibodies binding to the labelled population. The nylon matrix, precoated with an anti-mouse immunoglobulin, traps the cells coated with monoclonal antibodies, and these can be released simply by gentle manipulation of the matrix. The matrix employed has been shown to not specifically trap committed bone marrow progenitors as determined by CFU-GM, BFU-E and CFU-GEMM assays. The use of this technique should simplify the isolation of rare tumour cells metastasizing to bone marrow. PMID:3063325

  11. : Bovine apolipoprotein B-100 is a dominant immunogen in therapeutic cell populations cultured in FCS in mice and humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cell populations intended for therapeutic purposes that are cultured in heterologous animal products can acquire xenoantigens, potentially limiting their utility. In investigations of the immune response to murine ES cells, we found that a strong antibody respon...

  12. The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD) v.5: a metadata management system based on a four level (meta)genome project classification

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Tatiparthi B. K.; Thomas, Alex D.; Stamatis, Dimitri; Bertsch, Jon; Isbandi, Michelle; Jansson, Jakob; Mallajosyula, Jyothi; Pagani, Ioanna; Lobos, Elizabeth A.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2014-10-27

    The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD; http://www.genomesonline.org) is a comprehensive online resource to catalog and monitor genetic studies worldwide. GOLD provides up-to-date status on complete and ongoing sequencing projects along with a broad array of curated metadata. Within this paper, we report version 5 (v.5) of the database. The newly designed database schema and web user interface supports several new features including the implementation of a four level (meta)genome project classification system and a simplified intuitive web interface to access reports and launch search tools. The database currently hosts information for about 19 200 studies, 56 000 Biosamples, 56 000 sequencing projects and 39 400 analysis projects. More than just a catalog of worldwide genome projects, GOLD is a manually curated, quality-controlled metadata warehouse. The problems encountered in integrating disparate and varying quality data into GOLD are briefly highlighted. Lastly, GOLD fully supports and follows the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Minimum Information standards.

  13. Steady-state linear optical properties and Kerr nonlinear optical response of a four-level quantum dot with phonon-assisted transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Chao, She; Ting-Ting, Luo; Wei-Xi, Zhang; Mao-Wu, Ran; Deng-Long, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The linear optical properties and Kerr nonlinear optical response in a four-level loop configuration GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor quantum dot are analytically studied with the phonon-assisted transition (PAT). It is shown that the changes among a single electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) window, a double EIT window and the amplification of the probe field in the absorption curves can be controlled by varying the strength of PAT κ. Meanwhile, double switching from the anomalous dispersion regime to the normal dispersion regime can likely be achieved by increasing the Rabi energy of the external optical control field. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the group velocity of the probe field can be practically regulated by varying the PAT and the intensity of the optical control field. In the nonlinear case, it is shown that the large SPM and XPM can be achieved as linear absorption vanishes simultaneously, and the PAT can suppress both third-order self-Kerr and the cross-Kerr nonlinear effect of the QD. Our study is much more practical than its atomic counterpart due to its flexible design and the controllable interference strength, and may provide some new possibilities for technological applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61367003), the Scientific Research Fund of Hunan Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. 12A140), and the Scientific Research Fund of Guizhou Provincial Education Department, China (Grant Nos. KY[2015]384 and KY[2015]446).

  14. Design and Characterization of Next-Generation Micromirrors Fabricated in a Four-Level, Planarized Surface-Micromachined Polycrystalline Silicon Process

    SciTech Connect

    Michalicek, M.A.; Comtois, J.H.; Barron, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the design and characterization of several types of micromirror devices to include process capabilities, device modeling, and test data resulting in deflection versus applied potential curves. These micromirror devices are the first to be fabricated in the state-of-the-art four-level planarized polysilicon process available at Sandia National Laboratories known as the Sandia Ultra-planar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiT). This enabling process permits the development of micromirror devices with near-ideal characteristics which have previously been unrealizable in standard three-layer polysilicon processes. This paper describes such characteristics as elevated address electrodes, individual address wiring beneath the device, planarized mirror surfaces using Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP), unique post-process metallization, and the best active surface area to date. This paper presents the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of several variations of Flexure-Beam (FBMD) and Axial-Rotation Micromirror Devices (ARMD). The released devices are first metallized using a standard sputtering technique relying on metallization guards and masks that are fabricated next to the devices. Such guards are shown to enable the sharing of bond pads between numerous arrays of micromirrors in order to maximize the number of on-chip test arrays. The devices are modeled and then empirically characterized using a laser interferometer setup located at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio. Unique design considerations for these devices and the process are also discussed.

  15. The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD) v.5: a metadata management system based on a four level (meta)genome project classification

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, T.B.K.; Thomas, Alex D.; Stamatis, Dimitri; Bertsch, Jon; Isbandi, Michelle; Jansson, Jakob; Mallajosyula, Jyothi; Pagani, Ioanna; Lobos, Elizabeth A.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2015-01-01

    The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD; http://www.genomesonline.org) is a comprehensive online resource to catalog and monitor genetic studies worldwide. GOLD provides up-to-date status on complete and ongoing sequencing projects along with a broad array of curated metadata. Here we report version 5 (v.5) of the database. The newly designed database schema and web user interface supports several new features including the implementation of a four level (meta)genome project classification system and a simplified intuitive web interface to access reports and launch search tools. The database currently hosts information for about 19 200 studies, 56 000 Biosamples, 56 000 sequencing projects and 39 400 analysis projects. More than just a catalog of worldwide genome projects, GOLD is a manually curated, quality-controlled metadata warehouse. The problems encountered in integrating disparate and varying quality data into GOLD are briefly highlighted. GOLD fully supports and follows the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Minimum Information standards. PMID:25348402

  16. The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD) v.5: a metadata management system based on a four level (meta)genome project classification.

    PubMed

    Reddy, T B K; Thomas, Alex D; Stamatis, Dimitri; Bertsch, Jon; Isbandi, Michelle; Jansson, Jakob; Mallajosyula, Jyothi; Pagani, Ioanna; Lobos, Elizabeth A; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-01-01

    The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD; http://www.genomesonline.org) is a comprehensive online resource to catalog and monitor genetic studies worldwide. GOLD provides up-to-date status on complete and ongoing sequencing projects along with a broad array of curated metadata. Here we report version 5 (v.5) of the database. The newly designed database schema and web user interface supports several new features including the implementation of a four level (meta)genome project classification system and a simplified intuitive web interface to access reports and launch search tools. The database currently hosts information for about 19,200 studies, 56,000 Biosamples, 56,000 sequencing projects and 39,400 analysis projects. More than just a catalog of worldwide genome projects, GOLD is a manually curated, quality-controlled metadata warehouse. The problems encountered in integrating disparate and varying quality data into GOLD are briefly highlighted. GOLD fully supports and follows the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Minimum Information standards. PMID:25348402

  17. Proceedings: Human Leukocyte Antigen Haplo-Homozygous Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Haplobank Modeled After the California Population: Evaluating Matching in a Multiethnic and Admixed Population

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Derek James; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Le Gall, Caroline; Laurent, Julie; Trounson, Alan; DeWitt, Natalie; Talib, Sohel

    2015-01-01

    Summary The development of a California-based induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) bank based on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype matching represents a significant challenge and a valuable opportunity for the advancement of regenerative medicine. However, previously published models of iPSC banks have neither addressed the admixed nature of populations like that of California nor evaluated the benefit to the population as a whole. We developed a new model for evaluating an iPSC haplobank based on demographic and immunogenetic characteristics reflecting California. The model evaluates haplolines or cell lines from donors homozygous for a single HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 haplotype. We generated estimates of the percentage of the population matched under various combinations of haplolines derived from six ancestries (black/African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic, and white/not Hispanic) and data available from the U.S. Census Bureau, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and the National Marrow Donor Program. The model included both cis (haplotype-level) and trans (genotype-level) matching between a modeled iPSC haplobank and the recipient population following resampling simulations. We showed that serving a majority (>50%) of a simulated California population through cis matching would require the creation, redundant storage, and maintenance of almost 207 different haplolines representing the top 60 most frequent haplotypes from each ancestry group. Allowances for trans matching reduced the haplobank to fewer than 141 haplolines found among the top 40 most frequent haplotypes. Finally, we showed that a model optimized, custom haplobank was able to serve a majority of the California population with fewer than 80 haplolines. PMID:25926330

  18. Various Cell Populations Within the Mononuclear Fraction of Bone Marrow Contribute to the Beneficial Effects of Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Therapy in a Rodent Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Parsha, Kaushik; Schaar, Krystal; Xi, XiaoPei; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Savitz, Sean I

    2016-08-01

    Cell-based therapies including bone-marrow derived mononuclear cells (MNCs) are now widely being studied because of their pleotropic effects and promising results to improve recovery after stroke in animal models. Unlike other types of cell therapies, MNCs is a mixture of lymphoid, myeloid, erythroid, and stem cell populations. Which cell population(s) accounts for the beneficial effects of MNCs in stroke recovery is unclear. In this paper, we employed a mouse stroke model with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo), and used positively and negatively sorted autologous MNCs by MACs to determine which fractions of the MNCs contribute to their beneficial effects. We evaluated the benefits of neurofunctional recovery produced by individual cell lineages within MNCs in a long-term observation study up to 28 days after stroke. Mortality and modulation of inflammation were also compared among different sub-populations. We further studied the impact of neurotoxicity posed by activated microglia in the presence of different cell lineages within MNCs. We concluded that myeloid cell lineage and stem cell/progenitors appeared to be important components within MNCs that contribute to improved outcomes after stroke. PMID:26997513

  19. A Few Autoreactive Cells in an Autoimmune Infiltrate Control a Vast Population of Nonspecific Cells: A Tale of Smart Bombs and the Infantry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinman, Lawrence

    1996-03-01

    Inflammatory infiltrates in tissue-specific autoimmune disease comprise a collection of T cells with specificity for an antigen in the target organ. These specific cells recruit a population of nonspecific T cells and macrophages. The rare tissue-specific T cells in the infiltrate have the capacity to regulate both the influx and the efflux of cells from the tissue. Administration of an altered peptide ligand for the specific T cell which triggers autoimmunity can lead to the regression of the entire inflammatory ensemble in a few hours. Interleukin 4 is a critical cytokine involved in the regression of the inflammatory infiltrate.

  20. Expression of mesenchyme-specific gene signatures by follicular dendritic cells: insights from the meta-analysis of microarray data from multiple mouse cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Mabbott, Neil A; Kenneth Baillie, J; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Donaldson, David S; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Yoon, Sun-Ok; Freedman, Arnold S; Freeman, Tom C; Summers, Kim M

    2011-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDC) are an important subset of stromal cells within the germinal centres of lymphoid tissues. They are specialized to trap and retain antigen-containing immune complexes on their surfaces to promote B-cell maturation and immunoglobulin isotype class-switching. However, little is known of the cell types from which FDC originate. To address fundamental questions associated with the relationships between FDC and other cell populations, we took advantage of the growing body of publicly available data for transcriptome analysis. We obtained a large number of gene expression data files from a range of different primary mouse cells and cell lines and subjected these data to network-based cluster analysis using BiolayoutExpress3D. Genes with related function clustered together in distinct regions of the graph and enabled the identification of transcriptional networks that underpin the functional activity of distinct cell populations. Several gene clusters were identified that were selectively expressed by cells of mesenchymal lineage and contained classic mesenchymal cell markers and extracellular matrix genes including various collagens, Acta2, Bgn, Fbn1 and Twist1. Our analysis showed that FDC also express highly many of these mesenchyme-associated genes. Promoter analysis of the genes comprising the mesenchymal clusters identified several regulatory motifs that are binding sites for candidate transcription factors previously known to be candidate regulators of mesenchyme-specific genes. Together, these data suggest FDC are a specialized mesenchymal cell population within the germinal centres of lymphoid tissues. PMID:21635249

  1. Perlecan expression influences the keratin 15-positive cell population fate in the epidermis of aging skin.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Morgan; Michopoulou, Anna; André-Frei, Valérie; Boulesteix, Sophie; Guicher, Christine; Dayan, Guila; Whitelock, John; Damour, Odile; Rousselle, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    The epidermis is continuously renewed by stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Basal keratinocytes append the dermal-epidermal junction, a cell surface-associated, extracellular matrix that provides structural support and influences their behaviour. It consists of laminins, type IV collagen, nidogens, and perlecan, which are necessary for tissue organization and structural integrity. Perlecan is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan known to be involved in keratinocyte survival and differentiation. Aging affects the dermal epidermal junction resulting in decreased contact with keratinocytes, thus impacting epidermal renewal and homeostasis. We found that perlecan expression decreased during chronological skin aging. Our in vitro studies revealed reduced perlecan transcript levels in aged keratinocytes. The production of in vitro skin models revealed that aged keratinocytes formed a thin and poorly organized epidermis. Supplementing these models with purified perlecan reversed the phenomenon allowing restoration of a well-differentiated multi-layered epithelium. Perlecan down-regulation in cultured keratinocytes caused depletion of the cell population that expressed keratin 15. This phenomenon depended on the perlecan heparan sulphate moieties, which suggested the involvement of a growth factor. Finally, we found defects in keratin 15 expression in the epidermis of aging skin. This study highlighted a new role for perlecan in maintaining the self-renewal capacity of basal keratinocytes. PMID:26996820

  2. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    PubMed

    Cetinbaş, Murat; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI) network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics. PMID:24244114

  3. pEffect of MRI tags: SPIO nanoparticles and 19F nanoemulsion on various populations of mouse mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Ghulam; Jablonska, Anna; Rose, Laura; Walczak, Piotr; Janowski, Miroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of myriad human disorders, including several neurological diseases. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and fluorine nanoemulsion (19F) are characterized by low toxicity and good sensitivity, and, as such, are among the most frequently used cell-labeling agents. However, to date, their impact across the various populations of MSCs has not been comprehensively investigated. Thus, the impact of MRI tags (independent variable) has been set as a primary endpoint. The various populations of mouse MSCs in which the effect of tag was investigated consisted of 1) tissue of cell origin: bone marrow vs. adipose tissue; 2) age of donor: young vs. old; 3) cell culture conditions: hypoxic vs. normal vs. normal +ascorbic acid (AA); 4) exposure to acidosis: yes vs. no. The impact of those populations has been also analyzed and considered as secondary endpoints. The experimental readouts (dependent variables) included: 1) cell viability; 2) cell size; 3) cell doubling time; 4) colony formation; 5) efficiency of labeling; and 6) cell migration. We did not identify any impact of cell labeling for these investigated populations in any of the readouts. In addition, we found that the harsh microenvironment of injured tissue modeled by a culture of cells in a highly acidic environment has a profound effect on all readouts, and both age of donor and cell origin tissue also have a substantial influence on most of the readouts, while oxygen tension in the cell culture conditions has a smaller impact on MSCs. A detailed characterization of the factors that influence the quality of MSCs is vital to the proper pursuit of preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26232992

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase and ATP binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2) functional assays isolate different populations of prostate stem cells where ABCG2 function selects for cells with increased stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction High expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase1A1 (ALDH1A1) is observed in many organs and tumors and may identify benign and cancer stem cell populations. Methods In the current study, the stem cell characteristics were determined in cells isolated from human prostate cell lines and clinical prostate specimens based upon the ALDEFLUOR™ assay. Cells isolated based on the ALDEFLUOR™ assay were compared to cells isolated based on ATP binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2) activity using the side population assay. To test for stem cell characteristics of self-renewal and multipotency, cells with high and low ALDH1A1 activity, based on the ALDEFLUOR™ assay (ALDHHi and ALDHLow), were isolated from prostate clinical specimens and were recombined with rat urogenital sinus mesenchyme to induce prostate gland formation. Results The percentage of ALDHHi cells in prostate cell lines (RWPE-1, RWPE-2, CWR-R1, and DU-145) was 0.5 to 6%, similarly in non-tumor and tumor clinical specimens the percentage of ALDHHi cells was 0.6 to 4%. Recombinants using ALDHHi cells serially generated prostate tissue up to three generations with as few as 250 starting cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of the recombinants using ALDHHi cells contained prostatic glands frequently expressing androgen receptor (AR), p63, chromogranin A, ALDH1A1, ABCG2, and prostate specific antigen (PSA), compared to their ALDHLow counterparts. Inhibition of ALDH resulted in the reduction of sphere formation capabilities in the CWR-R1, but not in the RWPE-2 and DU-145, prostate cell lines. ABCG2 inhibition resulted in a more robust decrease of sphere formation in androgen sensitive cell lines, CWR-R1 and RWPE-2, but not androgen insensitive DU-145. ALDH1A1 expression was enriched in ALDHHi cells and non-side population cells. ABCG2 expression was only enriched in side population cells. Conclusions The percentage of ALDHHi cells in prostate cell lines and prostate tissue was consistently higher compared

  5. Identification of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the reactive stroma of a prostate cancer xenograft by side population analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria-Martinez, Albert; Barquinero, Jordi; Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hurtado, Antoni; Pinos, Tomas; Seoane, Joan; Poupon, Marie-France; Morote, Joan; Reventos, Jaume; Munell, Francina

    2009-10-15

    Cancer stem cells are a distinct cellular population that is believed to be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Recent data suggest that solid tumors also contain another type of stem cells, the mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which contribute to the formation of tumor-associated stroma. The Hoechst 33342 efflux assay has proved useful to identify a rare cellular fraction, named Side Population (SP), enriched in cells with stem-like properties. Using this assay, we identified SP cells in a prostate cancer xenograft containing human prostate cancer cells and mouse stromal cells. The SP isolation, subculture and sequential sorting allowed the generation of single-cell-derived clones of murine origin that were recognized as MSC by their morphology, plastic adherence, proliferative potential, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability and immunophenotype (CD45{sup -}, CD81{sup +} and Sca-1{sup +}). We also demonstrated that SP clonal cells secrete transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and that their inhibition reduces proliferation and accelerates differentiation. These results reveal the existence of SP cells in the stroma of a cancer xenograft, and provide evidence supporting their MSC nature and the role of TGF-{beta}1 in maintaining their proliferation and undifferentiated status. Our data also reveal the usefulness of the SP assay to identify and isolate MSC cells from carcinomas.

  6. Identification of a novel human memory T-cell population with the characteristics of stem-like chemo-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Emori, Makoto; Shibayama, Yuji; Mizushima, Emi; Matsumiya, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Keiji; Kaya, Mitsunori; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Kubo, Terufumi; Himi, Tetsuo; Ichimiya, Shingo; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-dose chemotherapy may kill not only tumor cells but also immunocytes, and frequently induces severe lymphocytopenia. On the other hand, patients who recover from the nadir maintain immunity against infection, suggesting the existence of an unknown memory T-cell population with stress resistance, long-living capacity, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, the differentiation system of T-cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T-cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. Here we report a novel human T-cell memory population, “young memory” T (TYM) cells. TYM cells are defined by positive expression of CD73, which represents high aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity and CXCR3 among CD8+CD45RA+CD62L+ T cells. TYM proliferate upon TCR stimulation, with differentiation capacity into TCM and TEM and drug resistance. Moreover, TYM are involved in memory function for viral and tumor-associated antigens in healthy donors and cancer patients, respectively. Regulation of TYM might be very attractive for peptide vaccination, adoptive cell-transfer therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27471640

  7. A role for E-cadherin in ensuring cohesive migration of a heterogeneous population of non-epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kyra; Casanova, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Collective cell migration is a key process underlying the morphogenesis of many organs as well as tumour invasion, which very often involves heterogeneous cell populations. Here we investigated how such populations can migrate cohesively in the Drosophila posterior midgut, comprised of epithelial and mesenchymal cells and show a novel role for the epithelial adhesion molecule E-cadherin (E-Cad) in mesenchymal cells. Despite a lack of junctions at the ultrastructure level, reducing E-Cad levels causes mesenchymal cells to detach from one another and from neighbouring epithelial cells; as a result, coordination between the two populations is lost. Moreover, Bazooka and recycling mechanisms are also required for E-Cad accumulation in mesenchymal cells. These results indicate an active role for E-Cad in mediating cohesive and ordered migration of non-epithelial cells, and discount the notion of E-Cad as just an epithelial feature that has to be switched off to enable migration of mesenchymal cells. PMID:26272476

  8. RELATIONSHIP OF TOTAL VIABLE AND CULTURABLE CELLS TO EPIPHYTIC POPULATIONS OF PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The accuracy of the plate count method used routinely for enumeration of viable bacterial populations in natural environments is limited by the culturability of the target population. he method was modified to examine epiphytic populations of Pseudomonas syringae. iable populatio...

  9. Characterization of distinct mesenchymal-like cell populations from human skeletal muscle in situ and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Lecourt, Severine; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Fromigue, Olivia; Vauchez, Karine; Andriamanalijaona, Rina; Ternaux, Brigitte; Lacassagne, Marie-Noelle; Robert, Isabelle; Boumediene, Karim; Chereau, Frederic; Marie, Pierre; and others

    2010-09-10

    Human skeletal muscle is an essential source of various cellular progenitors with potential therapeutic perspectives. We first used extracellular markers to identify in situ the main cell types located in a satellite position or in the endomysium of the skeletal muscle. Immunohistology revealed labeling of cells by markers of mesenchymal (CD13, CD29, CD44, CD47, CD49, CD62, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146, and CD15 in this study), myogenic (CD56), angiogenic (CD31, CD34, CD106, CD146), hematopoietic (CD10, CD15, CD34) lineages. We then analysed cell phenotypes and fates in short- and long-term cultures of dissociated muscle biopsies in a proliferation medium favouring the expansion of myogenic cells. While CD56{sup +} cells grew rapidly, a population of CD15{sup +} cells emerged, partly from CD56{sup +} cells, and became individualized. Both populations expressed mesenchymal markers similar to that harboured by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In differentiation media, both CD56{sup +} and CD15{sup +} cells shared osteogenic and chondrogenic abilities, while CD56{sup +} cells presented a myogenic capacity and CD15{sup +} cells presented an adipogenic capacity. An important proportion of cells expressed the CD34 antigen in situ and immediately after muscle dissociation. However, CD34 antigen did not persist in culture and this initial population gave rise to adipogenic cells. These results underline the diversity of human muscle cells, and the shared or restricted commitment abilities of the main lineages under defined conditions.

  10. Insights into collective cell behaviour from populations of coupled chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Annette F; Tinsley, Mark R; Showalter, Kenneth

    2015-08-21

    Biological systems such as yeast show coordinated activity driven by chemical communication between cells. Here, we show how experiments with coupled chemical oscillators can provide insights into collective behaviour in cellular systems. Two methods of coupling the oscillators are described: exchange of chemical species with the surrounding solution and computer-controlled illumination of a light-sensitive catalyst. The collective behaviour observed includes synchronisation, dynamical quorum sensing (a density dependent transition to population-wide oscillations), and chimera states, where oscillators spontaneously split into coherent and incoherent groups. At the core of the different types of behaviour lies an intracellular autocatalytic signal and an intercellular communication mechanism that influences the autocatalytic growth. PMID:26195263

  11. A differential equation with state-dependent delay from cell population biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, Philipp; Waurick, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a differential equation, describing the maturation of a stem cell population, with a state-dependent delay, which is implicitly defined via the solution of an ODE. We elaborate smoothness conditions for the model ingredients, in particular vital rates, that guarantee the existence of a local semiflow and allow to specify the linear variational equation. The proofs are based on theoretical results of Hartung et al. combined with implicit function arguments in infinite dimensions. Moreover we elaborate a criterion for global existence for differential equations with state-dependent delay. To prove the result we adapt a theorem by Hale and Lunel to the C1-topology and use a result on metric spaces from Diekmann et al.

  12. Characteristics of acute care utilization of a Delaware adult sickle cell disease patient population.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nina; Bellot, Jennifer; Senu-Oke, Oluseyi; Ballas, Samir K

    2014-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder that is chronic in nature and manifests itself through many facets of the patient's life. Comprehensive specialty centers have the potential to reduce health care costs and improve the quality of care for patients who have chronic medical conditions such as heart failure and SCD. The purpose of this practice inquiry was to analyze de-identified data for acute care episodes involving SCD in order to create a detailed picture of acute care utilization for adult patients in Delaware with SCD from 2007 to 2009. Gaining a better understanding of acute care utilization for adults with SCD may provide evidence to improve access to high-quality health care services for this vulnerable patient population in the state of Delaware. PMID:23965046

  13. Ankylosing spondylitis patients display altered dendritic cell and T cell populations that implicate pathogenic roles for the IL-23 cytokine axis and intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Pamela B.; McEntegart, Anne; McCarey, David; McInnes, Iain B.; Siebert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. AS is a systemic inflammatory disease of the SpA family. Polymorphisms at loci including HLA-B27, IL-23R and ERAP-1 directly implicate immune mechanisms in AS pathogenesis. Previously, in an SpA model, we identified HLA-B27–mediated effects on dendritic cells that promoted disease-associated Th17 cells. Here we extend these studies to AS patients using deep immunophenotyping of candidate pathogenic cell populations. The aim of our study was to functionally characterize the immune populations mediating AS pathology. Methods. Using 11-parameter flow cytometry, we characterized the phenotype and functions of lymphocyte and myeloid cells from peripheral blood, and the synovial phenotype of AS patients and age-matched healthy controls. Results. Significantly fewer circulating CD1c-expressing dendritic cells were observed in AS patients, offset by an increase in CD14− CD16+ mononuclear cells. Ex vivo functional analysis revealed that this latter population induced CCR6 expression and promoted secretion of IL-1β and IL-6 when co-cultured with naive CD4+ T cells. Additionally, systemic inflammation in AS patients significantly correlated with increased proportions of activated CCR9+ CD4+ T cells. Conclusion. CD14− CD16+ mononuclear cells may contribute to AS by promoting Th17 responses, and antigen-presenting cells of mucosal origin are likely to contribute to systemic inflammation in AS. PMID:26320138

  14. Interferon (IFN) production by peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells of an elderly population

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, B.J.; Murasko, D.M.

    1986-03-05

    Previous investigations in the laboratory have reported decreased mitogen responses of PBM's from elderly individuals compared to responses of young adults to PHA and ConA. Current studies have investigated the role of IFN in this decreased T cell responsiveness of the elderly. Supernatants of PBM's from 80 elderly (mean age 85) and 50 young individuals (mean age 28) were assayed for antiviral activity, after incubation with optimum and supraoptimum concentrations of mitogen for 24-120 hrs. IFN levels were maximum for both elderly and young populations at 72 hrs coinciding with time of maximum proliferation as determined by uptake of /sup 3/H thymidine. IFN levels declined with longer incubation periods. All IFN produced was IFN-gamma as determined by sensitivity to pH 2 and by neutralizations with monoclonal antibody specific for human IFN-gamma and polyclonal antiserum specific for IFN-alpha. The elderly population's mean IFN titers for both PHA and ConA were about 39% of the mean titers of the young (p less than or equal to 0.02). Both elderly and young groups displayed significant positive correlation between the amount of IFN produced and the level of proliferation in response to the mitogens (p less than or equal to 0.036). Therefore, the above data suggests the decreased levels of IFN produced by elderly PBM's may be one of the factors responsible for the observed decreased proliferative response to mitogens.

  15. Genetic polymorphisms of cell adhesion molecules in Behcet's disease in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minming; Zhang, Lijun; Yu, Hongsong; Hu, Jiayue; Cao, Qingfeng; Huang, Guo; Huang, Yang; Yuan, Gangxiang; Kijlstra, Aize; Yang, Peizeng

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are involved in various immune-mediated diseases. This study was conducted to investigate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CAMs with Behçet's disease (BD) in a Chinese Han population. A two-stage association study was carried out in 1149 BD patients and 2107 normal controls. Genotyping of 43 SNPs was performed using MassARRAY System (Sequenom), polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and TaqMan SNP assays. The expression of CD6 and CD11c was examined by real-time PCR and cytokine production was measured by ELISA. A significantly higher frequency of the CT genotype, and a lower frequency of the CC genotype and C allele of CD6 rs11230563 were observed in BD as compared with controls. Analysis of CD11c rs2929 showed that patients with BD had a significantly higher frequency of the GG genotype and G allele, and a lower frequency of the AG genotype as compared with controls. Functional experiments showed an increased CD11c expression and increased production of TNF-α and IL-1beta by LPS stimulated PBMCs in GG carriers of CD11c rs2929 compared to AA/AG carriers. Our study provides evidence that CD6 and CD11c are involved in the susceptibility to BD in a Chinese Han population. PMID:27108704

  16. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4(+)SNS-Cre/TdTomato(+), 2) IB4(-)SNS-Cre/TdTomato(+), and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato(+) cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation. PMID:25525749

  17. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4+SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, 2) IB4−SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato+ cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04660.001 PMID:25525749

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of cell adhesion molecules in Behcet’s disease in a Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Minming; Zhang, Lijun; Yu, Hongsong; Hu, Jiayue; Cao, Qingfeng; Huang, Guo; Huang, Yang; Yuan, Gangxiang; Kijlstra, Aize; Yang, Peizeng

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are involved in various immune-mediated diseases. This study was conducted to investigate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CAMs with Behçet’s disease (BD) in a Chinese Han population. A two-stage association study was carried out in 1149 BD patients and 2107 normal controls. Genotyping of 43 SNPs was performed using MassARRAY System (Sequenom), polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and TaqMan SNP assays. The expression of CD6 and CD11c was examined by real-time PCR and cytokine production was measured by ELISA. A significantly higher frequency of the CT genotype, and a lower frequency of the CC genotype and C allele of CD6 rs11230563 were observed in BD as compared with controls. Analysis of CD11c rs2929 showed that patients with BD had a significantly higher frequency of the GG genotype and G allele, and a lower frequency of the AG genotype as compared with controls. Functional experiments showed an increased CD11c expression and increased production of TNF-α and IL-1beta by LPS stimulated PBMCs in GG carriers of CD11c rs2929 compared to AA/AG carriers. Our study provides evidence that CD6 and CD11c are involved in the susceptibility to BD in a Chinese Han population. PMID:27108704

  19. Development of a population of cancer cells: Observation and modeling by a Mixed Spatial Evolutionary Games approach.

    PubMed

    Świerniak, Andrzej; Krześlak, Michał; Student, Sebastian; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2016-09-21

    Living cells, like whole living organisms during evolution, communicate with their neighbors, interact with the environment, divide, change their phenotypes, and eventually die. The development of specific ways of communication (through signaling molecules and receptors) allows some cellular subpopulations to survive better, to coordinate their physiological status, and during embryonal development to create tissues and organs or in some conditions to become tumors. Populations of cells cultured in vitro interact similarly, also competing for space and nutrients and stimulating each other to better survive or to die. The results of these intercellular interactions of different types seem to be good examples of biological evolutionary games, and have been the subjects of simulations by the methods of evolutionary game theory where individual cells are treated as players. Here we present examples of intercellular contacts in a population of living human cancer HeLa cells cultured in vitro and propose an evolutionary game theory approach to model the development of such populations. We propose a new technique termed Mixed Spatial Evolutionary Games (MSEG) which are played on multiple lattices corresponding to the possible cellular phenotypes which gives the possibility of simulating and investigating the effects of heterogeneity at the cellular level in addition to the population level. Analyses performed with MSEG suggested different ways in which cellular populations develop in the case of cells communicating directly and through factors released to the environment. PMID:27216640

  20. Trophic transfer of lead through a model marine four-level food chain: Tetraselmis suecica, Artemia franciscana, Litopenaeus vannamei, and Haemulon scudderi.

    PubMed

    Soto-Jiménez, M F; Arellano-Fiore, C; Rocha-Velarde, R; Jara-Marini, M E; Ruelas-Inzunza, J; Páez-Osuna, F

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to assess the transfer of lead (Pb) along an experimental, four-level food chain: Tetraselmis suecica (phytoplankton) → Artemia franciscana (crustacean, brine shrimp) → Litopenaeus vannamei (crustacean, white shrimp) → Haemulon scudderi (fish, grunt). T. suecica was exposed to a sublethal dose of Pb in solution and then used as the base of a marine food chain. Significant differences in Pb concentrations were found between exposed organisms of the different trophic levels and the control. Particularly, Pb concentrations in fish of the simulated trophic chain were two-to three times higher in the exposed specimens than in the control. Levels of Pb in phytoplankton showed a substantial increase with respect to the solution (level I), with bioconcentration factors averaging from 930 to 3630. In contrast, a strong decrease in Pb concentration from phytoplankton to zooplankton (level II) and from zooplankton to shrimp tissues (level III) was evidenced by bioaccumulation factors <1. Despite the decrease in the assimilation efficiency of metal transfer observed in these two predators, Pb concentration in the grunt fish (level IV) was higher than in the shrimp (level III) (bioaccumulation factor >1.0). Some of the added Pb is transferred from the phytoplankton along the food chain, thus producing a net accumulation of Pb mainly in fish and, to a lesser extent, in shrimp tissues. Because Pb is one of the most pervasive contaminants in coastal ecosystems, its transference by way of diet and potential net accumulation in higher predators is of ecologic importance for marine life. In addition, because shrimp and adult Haemulon scudderi are commercially important resources, this issue is of particular relevance to the safety of marine products. PMID:21082317