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Sample records for fourier phase image

  1. Grid-Based Fourier Transform Phase Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad

    Low contrast in x-ray attenuation imaging between different materials of low electron density is a limitation of traditional x-ray radiography. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One recently developed phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a technique recently demonstrated by Bennett et al. that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 microm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 microm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the grid in the Fourier domain. A Matlab code was written to perform the image processing. For the first time, the effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the window function type used to separate the harmonics, and the window widths, were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and new methods investigated to form improved phase contrast images.

  2. Fourier-transform Ghost Imaging for pure phase object based on Compressive Sampling algorithm

    E-print Network

    Hui Wang; Shensheng Han

    2009-11-20

    A special algorithm for the Fourier-transform Ghost Imaging (GI) scheme is discussed based on the Compressive Sampling (CS) theory. Though developed mostly in real space, CS algorithm could also be used for the Fourier spectrum reconstruction of pure phase object by setting a proper sensing matrix. This could find its application in diffraction imaging of X-ray, neutron and electron with higher efficiency and resolution. Simulation and experiment results are also presented to prove the feasibility.

  3. Color image encryption based on joint fractional Fourier transform correlator and phase retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ding; Jin, Weimin

    2010-11-01

    A novel single-channel color image encryption technique based on joint fractional Fourier transform correlator(JFRTC) and phase retrieval algorithm (PRA) is proposed. The target color image is decomposed into three red, green, blue (RGB) components. A joint image is formed and encoded into two random phase masks (RPM) iteratively. The security of the system is enhanced because of the fractional order as a new added key. The system and the operation procedure are simplified. Simulation experiments show that the algorithm converges rapidly and has great design flexibility. The decryption can be realized by digital or optical methods.

  4. Single-channel color image encryption using phase retrieve algorithm in fractional Fourier domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Liansheng; Xin, Meiting; Tian, Ailing; Jin, Haiyan

    2013-12-01

    A single-channel color image encryption is proposed based on a phase retrieve algorithm and a two-coupled logistic map. Firstly, a gray scale image is constituted with three channels of the color image, and then permuted by a sequence of chaotic pairs generated by the two-coupled logistic map. Secondly, the permutation image is decomposed into three new components, where each component is encoded into a phase-only function in the fractional Fourier domain with a phase retrieve algorithm that is proposed based on the iterative fractional Fourier transform. Finally, an interim image is formed by the combination of these phase-only functions and encrypted into the final gray scale ciphertext with stationary white noise distribution by using chaotic diffusion, which has camouflage property to some extent. In the process of encryption and decryption, chaotic permutation and diffusion makes the resultant image nonlinear and disorder both in spatial domain and frequency domain, and the proposed phase iterative algorithm has faster convergent speed. Additionally, the encryption scheme enlarges the key space of the cryptosystem. Simulation results and security analysis verify the feasibility and effectiveness of this method.

  5. Color image encryption using iterative phase retrieve process in quaternion Fourier transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Liansheng; Duan, Kuaikuai

    2015-02-01

    A single-channel color image encryption method is proposed based on iterative phase iterative process in quaternion Fourier transform domain. First, three components of the plain color image is confused respectively by using cat map. Second, the confused components are combined into a pure quaternion image, which is encode to the phase only function by using an iterative phase retrieval process. Finally, the phase only function is encrypted into the gray scale ciphertext with stationary white noise distribution based on the chaotic diffusion, which has camouflage property to some extent. The corresponding plain color image can be recovered from the ciphertext only with correct keys in the decryption process. Simulation results verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Fractional Fourier domain optical image hiding using phase retrieval algorithm based on iterative nonlinear double random phase encoding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaogang; Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2014-09-22

    We present a novel image hiding method based on phase retrieval algorithm under the framework of nonlinear double random phase encoding in fractional Fourier domain. Two phase-only masks (POMs) are efficiently determined by using the phase retrieval algorithm, in which two cascaded phase-truncated fractional Fourier transforms (FrFTs) are involved. No undesired information disclosure, post-processing of the POMs or digital inverse computation appears in our proposed method. In order to achieve the reduction in key transmission, a modified image hiding method based on the modified phase retrieval algorithm and logistic map is further proposed in this paper, in which the fractional orders and the parameters with respect to the logistic map are regarded as encryption keys. Numerical results have demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms. PMID:25321769

  7. Probing vacuum birefringence by phase-contrast Fourier imaging under fields of high-intensity lasers

    E-print Network

    Kensuke Homma; Dieter Habs; Toshiki Tajima

    2011-04-06

    In vacuum high-intensity lasers can cause photon-photon interaction via the process of virtual vacuum polarization which may be measured by the phase velocity shift of photons across intense fields. In the optical frequency domain, the photon-photon interaction is polarization-mediated described by the Euler-Heisenberg effective action. This theory predicts the vacuum birefringence or polarization dependence of the phase velocity shift arising from nonlinear properties in quantum electrodynamics (QED). We suggest a method to measure the vacuum birefringence under intense optical laser fields based on the absolute phase velocity shift by phase-contrast Fourier imaging. The method may serve for observing effects even beyond the QED vacuum polarization.

  8. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.

    1993-09-13

    This invention is comprised of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer providing a series of images to a focal plane array camera. The focal plane array camera is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and as detected by a laser detector such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The images are transmitted to a computer for processing such that representations of the images as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral ``fingerprint`` pattern can be displayed on a monitor or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer.

  9. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  10. Fourier multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jie; Ni, Chuan; Sarangan, Andrew; Hirakawa, Keigo

    2015-08-24

    Current multispectral imaging systems use narrowband filters to capture the spectral content of a scene, which necessitates different filters to be designed for each application. In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of Fourier multispectral imaging which uses filters with sinusoidally varying transmittance. We designed and built these filters employing a single-cavity resonance, and made spectral measurements with a multispectral LED array. The measurements show that spectral features such as transmission and absorption peaks are preserved with this technique, which makes it a versatile technique than narrowband filters for a wide range of multispectral imaging applications. PMID:26368233

  11. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  12. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Hermann, Mark R. (San Ramon, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Tiszauer, Detlev H. (Tracy, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  13. A higher dimensional homodyne filter for phase sensitive partial Fourier reconstruction of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Paul, Joseph Suresh; Krishna Swamy Pillai, Uma

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce procedural steps for extension of the 1D homodyne phase correction for k-space truncation in all gradient encoding directions. Compared to the existing method applied to 2D partial k-space, signal losses introduced by the phase correction filter are observed to be minimal for the modified approach. In addition, the modified form of phase correction retains the inherent property of homodyne filtering for elimination of incidental phase artifacts due to truncation. In parallel imaging, this new form of homodyne filtering is shown to be effective for minimizing the signal losses, when each of the channel k-spaces is truncated along both phase and frequency-encode directions. This is illustrated with 2D partial k-space for flow compensated multichannel susceptibility weighted imaging. Extension of this method to 3D partial k-space shows improved reconstruction of flow information in phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography with reduced blur and enhanced background suppression. PMID:26117692

  14. Electro-optic imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Znod, Hanying (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (EOIFTS) for Hyperspectral Imaging is described. The EOIFTS includes an input polarizer, an output polarizer, and a plurality of birefringent phase elements. The relative orientations of the polarizers and birefringent phase elements can be changed mechanically or via a controller, using ferroelectric liquid crystals, to substantially measure the spectral Fourier components of light propagating through the EIOFTS. When achromatic switches are used as an integral part of the birefringent phase elements, the EIOFTS becomes suitable for broadband applications, with over 1 micron infrared bandwidth.

  15. Real-time in vitro Fourier ptychographic microscopy for high resolution wide field of view phase imaging

    E-print Network

    Tian, Lei; Yeh, Li-Hao; Chen, Michael; Waller, Laura

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, microscopes have had to trade field of view (FOV) for resolution. Recently, a new computational imaging technique, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), circumvents this limit in order to capture gigapixel-scale images having both wide FOV and high resolution. FPM has enormous potential for revolutionizing biomedical microscopy; however, it has until now been limited to fixed samples, since acquisition time is on the order of minutes. Live biological samples are continuously evolving on multiple spatial and temporal scales, which can cause motion blur. Here, we present a Fast FPM method to achieve sub-second capture times for FPM results with 0.8 NA resolution across a 4x objective's FOV. We demonstrate the first FPM quantitative phase results for both growing and confluent in vitro cell cultures. Experiments capture real-time videos of HeLa and human mammary epithelial (MCF10A) cell division and migration and subcellular dynamical phenomena in adult rat neural stem cells.

  16. Fourier Analysis of Ghost Imaging

    E-print Network

    Honglin Liu; Jing Cheng; Yanfeng Bai; Shensheng Han

    2006-09-28

    Fourier analysis of ghost imaging (FAGI) is proposed in this paper to analyze the properties of ghost imaging with thermal light sources. This new theory is compatible with the general correlation theory of intensity fluctuation and could explain some amazed phenomena. Furthermore we design a series of experiments to verify the new theory and investigate the inherent properties of ghost imaging.

  17. Electro-optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2005-01-01

    JPL is developing an innovative compact, low mass, Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (E-O IFTS) for hyperspectral imaging applications. The spectral region of this spectrometer will be 1 - 2.5 micron (1000-4000/cm) to allow high-resolution, high-speed hyperspectral imaging applications. One application will be the remote sensing of the measurement of a large number of different atmospheric gases simultaneously in the same airmass. Due to the use of a combination of birefringent phase retarders and multiple achromatic phase switches to achieve phase delay, this spectrometer is capable of hyperspectral measurements similar to that of the conventional Fourier transform spectrometer but without any moving parts. In this paper, the principle of operations, system architecture and recent experimental progress will be presented.

  18. Electro-optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2005-01-01

    JPL is developing an innovative compact, low mass, Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (E-0IFTS) for hyperspectral imaging applications. The spectral region of this spectrometer will be 1 - 2.5 pm (1000 -4000 cm-') to allow high-resolution, high-speed hyperspectral imaging applications [l-51. One application will be theremote sensing of the measurement of a large number of different atmospheric gases simultaneously in the sameairmass. Due to the use of a combination of birefiingent phase retarders and multiple achromatic phase switches toachieve phase delay, this spectrometer is capable of hyperspectral measurements similar to that of the conventionalFourier transform spectrometer but without any moving parts. In this paper, the principle of operations, systemarchitecture and recent experimental progress will be presen.

  19. Laser Field Imaging Through Fourier Transform Heterodyne

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Olivas, N.L.; Galbraith, A.E.; Strauss, C.E.; Grubler, A.C.

    1999-04-05

    The authors present a detection process capable of directly imaging the transverse amplitude, phase, and Doppler shift of coherent electromagnetic fields. Based on coherent detection principles governing conventional heterodyned RADAR/LADAR systems, Fourier Transform Heterodyne incorporates transverse spatial encoding of the reference local oscillator for image capture. Appropriate selection of spatial encoding functions allows image retrieval by way of classic Fourier manipulations. Of practical interest: (1) imaging may be accomplished with a single element detector/sensor requiring no additional scanning or moving components, (2) as detection is governed by heterodyne principles, near quantum limited performance is achievable, (3) a wide variety of appropriate spatial encoding functions exist that may be adaptively configured in real-time for applications requiring optimal detection, and (4) the concept is general with the applicable electromagnetic spectrum encompassing the RF through optical.

  20. Fourier phase microscopy with white light

    PubMed Central

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Laser-based Fourier phase microscopy (FPM) works on the principle of decomposition of an image field in two spatial components that can be controllably shifted in phase with respect to each other. However, due to the coherent illumination, the contrast in phase images is degraded by speckles. In this paper we present FPM with spatially coherent white light (wFPM), which offers high spatial phase sensitivity due to the low temporal coherence and high temporal phase stability due to common path geometry. Further, by using a fast spatial light modulator (SLM) and a fast scientific-grade complementary metal oxide semiconductor (sCMOS) camera, we report imaging at a maximum rate of 12.5 quantitative phase frames per second with 5.5 mega pixels image size. We illustrate the utility of wFPM as a contrast enhancement as well as dynamic phase measurement method by imaging section of benign colonic glands and red blood cell membrane fluctuation. PMID:24010005

  1. Birefringent Fourier-transform imaging spectrometer

    E-print Network

    Harvey, Andy

    Birefringent Fourier-transform imaging spectrometer Andrew Robert Harvey and David William Fletcher.r.Harvey@hw.ac.uk http://www.ece.eps.hw.ac.uk/~arharvey Abstract: Fourier-transform imaging spectrometers offer important, for application in harsh environments, deployment of Fourier-transform instruments based on traditional moving

  2. Imaging vibration of the cochlear partition of an excised guinea pig cochlea using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Niloy; Zeng, Yaguang; Fridberger, Anders; Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2011-03-01

    Studying the sound stimulated vibrations of various membranes that form the complex structure of the organ of Corti in the cochlea of the inner ear is essential for understanding how the travelling sound wave of the basilar membrane couples its energy to the organ structures. In this paper we report the feasibility of using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) to image the vibration of various micro-structures of the cochlea at the same time. An excised cochlea of a guinea pig was stimulated using sounds at various frequencies and vibration image was obtained. When measuring the apex area, vibration signal from different turns, which have different best response frequencies are obtained in the same image. The method has the potential to measure the response from a much wider region of the cochlea than any other currently used method. The noise floor for vibration image for the system at 200 Hz was ~0.3nm.

  3. Rotational-translational fourier imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention has the ability to create Fourier-based images with only two grid pairs. The two grid pairs are manipulated in a manner that allows (1) a first grid pair to provide multiple real components of the Fourier-based image and (2) a second grid pair to provide multiple imaginary components of the Fourier-based image. The novelty of this invention resides in the use of only two grid pairs to provide the same imaging information that has been traditionally collected with multiple grid pairs.

  4. Gas-phase plume from laser-irradiated fiberglass-reinforced polymers via imaging fourier transform spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Roberto I; Gross, Kevin C; Perram, Glen P; Johnson, Shane M; Dao, Ly; Medina, David F; Roybal, Robert; Black, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Emissive plumes from laser-irradiated fiberglass-reinforced polymers (FRP) were investigated using a mid-infrared imaging Fourier transform spectrometer, operating at fast framing rates (50 kHz imagery and 2.5 Hz hyperspectral imagery) with adequate spatial (0.81 mm(2) per pixel) and spectral resolution (2 cm(-1)). Fiberglass-reinforced polymer targets were irradiated with a 1064 nm continuous wave neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser for 60 s at 100 W in air. Strong emissions from H(2)O, CO, CO(2), and hydrocarbons were observed between 1800 and 5000 cm(-1). A single-layer radiative transfer model was developed for the spectral region from 2000 to 2400 cm(-1) to estimate spatial maps of temperature and column densities of CO and CO(2) from the hyperspectral imagery. The spectral model was used to compute the absorption cross sections of CO and CO(2) using spectral line parameters from the high-temperature extension of the HITRAN. The analysis of pre-combustion spectra yields effective temperatures rising from ambient to 1200 K and suddenly increasing to 1515 K upon combustion. The peak signal-to-noise ratio for a single spectrum exceeds 60:1, enabling temperature and column density determinations with low statistical error. For example, the spectral analysis for a single pixel within a single frame yields an effective temperature of 1019 ± 6 K, and CO and CO(2) column densities of 1.14 ± 0.05 and 1.11 ± 0.03 × 10(18) molec/cm(2), respectively. Systematic errors associated with the radiative transfer model dominate, yielding effective temperatures with uncertainties of >100 K and column densities to within a factor of 2-3. Hydrocarbon emission at 2800 to 3200 cm(-1) is well correlated with CO column density. PMID:25014838

  5. Fourier interpolation stochastic optical fluctuation imaging

    E-print Network

    Enderlein, Jörg

    Fourier interpolation stochastic optical fluctuation imaging Simon C. Stein,1 Anja Huss,1,2 Dirk H¨ottingen, Germany *jenderl@gwdg.de www.joerg-enderlein.de Abstract: Stochastic Optical Fluctuation Imaging (SOFI of an image by evaluating the temporal fluctuations of blinking fluorescent emitters. SOFI is not based

  6. Proposal of snapshot line-imaging Fourier spectroscopy for smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Natsumi; Sato, Shun; Ishida, Akane; Inohara, Daichi; Tanaka, Naotaka; Wada, Kenji; Nishiyama, Akira; Fujiwara, Masaru; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    We propose the extremely-compact-size line-imaging Fourier spectroscopy for smartphones. We realize the near common-path interferometer with strong robustness for mechanical vibrations by installing the transmission-type relative-inclined phase-shifter. The interferogram of an imaging line is formed as 2-dimensional fringe pattern on imaging sensor, such as CCD camera. In other words, the horizontal axis on an imaging sensor is assigned to phase-shift value. And the vertical axis is corresponds to image formation coordinate. Thus, by installing a relatively-inclined thin glass into imaging optics, such as smartphone, we will realize the line-imaging Fourier spectroscopy for healthcare sensor in daily-life environments.

  7. Single-pixel imaging by means of Fourier spectrum acquisition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zibang; Ma, Xiao; Zhong, Jingang

    2015-01-01

    Single-pixel imaging techniques enable to capture a scene without a direct line of sight to the object, but high-quality imaging has been proven challenging especially in the presence of noisy environmental illumination. Here we present a single-pixel imaging technique that can achieve high-quality images by acquiring their Fourier spectrum. We use phase-shifting sinusoid structured illumination for the spectrum acquisition. Applying inverse Fourier transform to the obtained spectrum yields the desired image. The proposed technique is capable of capturing a scene without a direct view of it. Thus, it enables a feasible placement of detectors, only if the detectors can collect the light signals from the scene. The technique is also a compressive sampling like approach, so it can reconstruct an image from sub-Nyquist measurements. We experimentally obtain clear images by utilizing a detector not placed in direct view of the imaged scene even with noise introduced by environmental illuminations. PMID:25649009

  8. Fourier transform and reflective imaging pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Gerald

    2012-03-01

    A stationary Fourier transform pyrometer was used to record mid-wavelength IR spectra in dynamic shock experiments. The gated-IR camera used with this system was also used to record images of light produced and light reflected from shocked metals in order to constrain the dynamic emissivity and provide temperature estimates. This technique will be referred to as reflective imaging pyrometry.

  9. Coherent electromagnetic field imaging through Fourier transform heterodyne

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Olivas, N.L.; Goeller, R.M.; Cafferty, M.; Briles, S.D.; Galbraith, A.E. |; Grubler, A.C. |

    1998-12-31

    The authors present a detection process capable of directly imaging the transverse amplitude, phase, and if desired, Doppler shift of coherent electromagnetic fields. Based on coherent detection principles governing conventional heterodyned RADAR/LIDAR systems, Fourier Transform Heterodyne (FTH) incorporates transverse spatial encoding of the local oscillator for image capture. Appropriate selection of spatial encoding functions, or basis set, allows image retrieval by way of classic Fourier manipulations. Of practical interest: (1) imaging is accomplished on a single element detector requiring no additional scanning or moving components, and (2) a wide variety of appropriate spatial encoding functions exist that may be adaptively configured in real-time for applications requiring optimal detection. In this paper, they introduce the underlying principles governing FTH imaging, followed by demonstration of concept via a simple experimental setup based on a HeNe laser and a 69 element spatial phase modulator.

  10. Simultaneous encryption of a color and a gray-scale image using byte-level encoding based on single-channel double random-phase encoding architecture in fractional Fourier domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Madhusudan; Singh, Kehar

    2011-04-01

    A technique for simultaneous encryption of a color and a gray-scale image is proposed, using single-channel double random-phase encoding in the fractional Fourier domain. Prior to the encryption, the segregated red, green, and blue components of the color image and the gray-scale image are encoded into a single image after changing their bit formats. The format of the encoded image is such that it cannot be perceived by the human eye. The fractional orders of the fractional Fourier transform and two random-phase masks act as key parameters for the encryption. Performance of the scheme is verified against chosen plain-text and known plain-text attacks, respectively. The effect of noise on the performance of the proposed technique is analyzed.

  11. Fourier Transform and Reflective Imaging Pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Gerald

    2011-06-01

    A stationary Fourier transform pyrometer was used to record mid-wavelength IR spectra in dynamic shock experiments. The gated-IR camera used with this system was also used to record images of light produced and light reflected from shocked metals in order to constrain the dynamic emissivity and provide temperature estimates.

  12. Fourier removal of stripe artifacts in IRAS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, Dave

    1987-01-01

    By working in the Fourier plane, approximate removal of stripe artifacts in IRAS images can be effected. The image of interest is smoothed and subtracted from the original, giving the high-spatial-frequency part. This 'filtered' image is then clipped to remove point sources and then Fourier transformed. Subtracting the Fourier components contributing to the stripes in this image from the Fourier transform of the original and transforming back to the image plane yields substantial removal of the stripes.

  13. Fresnel and Fourier hologram generation using orthographic projection images.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Hyeung; Kim, Min-Su; Baasantseren, Ganbat; Kim, Nam

    2009-04-13

    A novel technique for synthesizing a hologram of three-dimensional objects from multiple orthographic projection view images is proposed. The three-dimensional objects are captured under incoherent white illumination and their orthographic projection view images are obtained. The orthographic projection view images are multiplied by the corresponding phase terms and integrated to form a Fourier or Fresnel hologram. Using simple manipulation of the orthographic projection view images, it is also possible to shift the three-dimensional objects by an arbitrary amount along the three axes in the reconstruction space or invert their depths with respect to the given depth plane. The principle is verified experimentally. PMID:19365458

  14. Fourier transform digital holographic adaptive optics imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Yu, Xiao; Kim, Myung K.

    2013-01-01

    A Fourier transform digital holographic adaptive optics imaging system and its basic principles are proposed. The CCD is put at the exact Fourier transform plane of the pupil of the eye lens. The spherical curvature introduced by the optics except the eye lens itself is eliminated. The CCD is also at image plane of the target. The point-spread function of the system is directly recorded, making it easier to determine the correct guide-star hologram. Also, the light signal will be stronger at the CCD, especially for phase-aberration sensing. Numerical propagation is avoided. The sensor aperture has nothing to do with the resolution and the possibility of using low coherence or incoherent illumination is opened. The system becomes more efficient and flexible. Although it is intended for ophthalmic use, it also shows potential application in microscopy. The robustness and feasibility of this compact system are demonstrated by simulations and experiments using scattering objects. PMID:23262541

  15. Fourier interpolation stochastic optical fluctuation imaging.

    PubMed

    Stein, Simon C; Huss, Anja; Hähnel, Dirk; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg

    2015-06-15

    Stochastic Optical Fluctuation Imaging (SOFI) is a super-resolution fluorescence microscopy technique which allows to enhance the spatial resolution of an image by evaluating the temporal fluctuations of blinking fluorescent emitters. SOFI is not based on the identification and localization of single molecules such as in the widely used Photoactivation Localization Microsopy (PALM) or Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM), but computes a superresolved image via temporal cumulants from a recorded movie. A technical challenge hereby is that, when directly applying the SOFI algorithm to a movie of raw images, the pixel size of the final SOFI image is the same as that of the original images, which becomes problematic when the final SOFI resolution is much smaller than this value. In the past, sophisticated cross-correlation schemes have been used for tackling this problem. Here, we present an alternative, exact, straightforward, and simple solution using an interpolation scheme based on Fourier transforms. We exemplify the method on simulated and experimental data. PMID:26193588

  16. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, A.; Faridian, A.; Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V.; Dubey, S. K.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W.; Javidi, B.

    2014-03-01

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  17. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, A. Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V.; Faridian, A.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W.; Dubey, S. K.; Javidi, B.

    2014-03-10

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  18. Adaptive chirp-Fourier transform for chirp estimation with applications in ISAR imaging of maneuvering targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiang-Gen; Wang, Genyuan; Chen, Victor C.

    2001-03-01

    This paper first reviews some basic properties of the discrete chirp-Fourier transform and then present an adaptive chirp- Fourier transform, a generalization of the amplitude and phase estimation of sinusoids (APES) algorithm proposed by Li and Stoica for sinusoidal signals. We finally applied it to the ISAR imaging of maneuvering targets.

  19. Imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy with multi-aperture telescopes

    E-print Network

    Fienup, James R.

    Imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy with multi-aperture telescopes Samuel T. Thurman and James R Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304 Abstract: Fourier spectroscopy can be performed with multi Society of America OCIS codes: (300.6300) Spectroscopy, Fourier transforms; (110.6770) Telescopes; (120

  20. Optical aperture synthesis imaging with fractional Fourier-domain filtering.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuesong; Zhang, Jingjing; He, Yuntao; Wang, Haiyang; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jun

    2012-03-01

    The fractional Fourier transform, which is a generalization of the classical Fourier transform, is introduced into an optical aperture synthesis (OAS) system by which imaging of an astronomical object can be achieved. We introduce fractional Fourier optical imaging and fractional Fourier-domain filtering (FFDF), and then present the schematic diagram of an OAS imaging system with FFDF. The modulation transfer function of an OAS system with FFDF is compared with that of an OAS system in the same condition. The result indicates that the OAS system with FFDF has larger practical cutoff frequency when the fill factor is smaller. Furthermore, the quality of imaging and restoration also demonstrates this conclusion. PMID:22472760

  1. Phase retrieval using iterative Fourier transform and convex optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fen; Cheng, Hong; Zhang, Quanbing; Wei, Sui

    2015-05-01

    Phase is an inherent characteristic of any wave field. Statistics show that greater than 25% of the information is encoded in the amplitude term and 75% of the information is in the phase term. The technique of phase retrieval means acquire phase by computation using magnitude measurements and provides data information for holography display, 3D field reconstruction, X-ray crystallography, diffraction imaging, astronomical imaging and many other applications. Mathematically, solving phase retrieval problem is an inverse problem taking the physical and computation constraints. Some recent algorithms use the principle of compressive sensing, such as PhaseLift, PhaseCut and compressive phase retrieval etc. they formulate phase retrieval problems as one of finding the rank-one solution to a system of linear matrix equations and make the overall algorithm a convex program over n × n matrices. However, by "lifting" a vector problem to a matrix one, these methods lead to a much higher computational cost as a result. Furthermore, they only use intensity measurements but few physical constraints. In the paper, a new algorithm is proposed that combines above convex optimization methods with a well known iterative Fourier transform algorithm (IFTA). The IFTA iterates between the object domain and spectral domain to reinforce the physical information and reaches convergence quickly which has been proved in many applications such as compute-generated-hologram (CGH). Herein the output phase of the IFTA is treated as the initial guess of convex optimization methods, and then the reconstructed phase is numerically computed by using modified TFOCS. Simulation results show that the combined algorithm increases the likelihood of successful recovery as well as improves the precision of solution.

  2. Optical image processing for synthetic-aperture imaging ladar based on two-dimensional Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiwei; Hou, Peipei; Zhi, Ya'nan; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhou, Yu; Xu, Qian; Lu, Zhiyong; Liu, Liren

    2014-03-20

    A two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform algorithm for the image reconstruction of synthetic-aperture imaging ladar (SAIL) collected data is suggested. This algorithm consists of quadratic phase compensation in azimuth direction and 2D fast Fourier transform. Based on this algorithm and the parallel 2D Fourier transform capability of spherical lens, an optical principle scheme that processes the SAIL data is proposed. The basic principle, design equations, and necessary analysis are presented. To verify this principle scheme, an experimental optical SAIL processor setup is constructed. The imaging results of SAIL data obtained by our SAIL demonstrator are presented. The optical processor is compact, lightweight, and consumes low power. This optical processor can also provide inherent parallel and speed-of-light computing capability, and thus has potential applications in on-board and satellite-borne SAIL systems. PMID:24663462

  3. Fourier Imaging Spectroscopy of the Galactic Center D. A. Simons

    E-print Network

    imaging FTS (Maillard 1995) works by coupling the facility Fourier Transform Spectrometer (MaillardFourier Imaging Spectroscopy of the Galactic Center D. A. Simons Gemini 8 m Telescopes Project, 950 the other scans through various bandpasses are further reduced and interpreted. 2. Brfl Results Shown

  4. Color image encryption based on joint fractional Fourier transform correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ding; Jin, Weimin

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, an optical color image encryption/decryption technology based on joint fractional Fourier transform correlator and double random phase encoding (DRPE) is developed. In this method, the joint fractional power spectrum of the image to be encrypted and the key codes is recorded as the encrypted data. Different from the case with classical DRPE, the same key code was used both in the encryption and decryption. The security of the system is enhanced because of the fractional order as a new added key. This method takes full advantage of the parallel processing features of the optical system, and could optically realize single-channel color image encryption. The experimental results indicate that the new method is feasible.

  5. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometry of chemical plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Kenneth C.; Gross, Kevin C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2009-05-01

    A midwave infrared (MWIR) imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), the Telops FIRST-MWE (Field-portable Imaging Radiometric Spectrometer Technology - Midwave Extended) has been utilized for the standoff detection and characterization of chemical plumes. Successful collection and analysis of MWIR hyperspectral imagery of jet engine exhaust has allowed us to produce spatial profiles of both temperature and chemical constituent concentrations of exhaust plumes. Successful characterization of this high temperature combustion event has led to the collection and analysis of hyperspectral imagery of lower temperature emissions from industrial smokestacks. This paper presents MWIR data from remote collection of hyperspectral imagery of methyl salicilate (MeS), a chemical warfare agent simulant, during the Chemical Biological Distributed Early Warning System (CBDEWS) test at Dugway Proving Grounds, UT in 2008. The data did not contain spectral lines associated with emission of MeS. However, a few broad spectral features were present in the background-subtracted plume spectra. Further analysis will be required to assign these features, and determine the utility of MWIR hyperspectral imagery for analysis of chemical warfare agent plumes.

  6. Calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, F. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Bingham, G. E.; Knuteson, R. O.; Tobin, D. C.; LaPorte, D. D.; Smith, W. L.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA New Millennium Program's Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) requires highly accurate radiometric and spectral calibration in order to carry out its mission to provide water vapor, wind, temperature, and trace gas profiling from geostationary orbit. A calibration concept has been developed for the GIFTS Phase A instrument design. The in-flight calibration is performed using views of two on-board blackbody sources along with cold space. A radiometric calibration uncertainty analysis has been developed and used to show that the expected performance for GIFTS exceeds its top level requirement to measure brightness temperature to better than 1 K. For the Phase A GIFTS design, the spectral calibration is established by the highly stable diode laser used as the reference for interferogram sampling, and verified with comparisons to atmospheric calculations.

  7. Improving imaging resolution of shaking targets by Fourier-transform ghost diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cong; Gong, Wenlin; Han, Shensheng

    2013-01-01

    For conventional imaging, shaking of the imaging system or the target leads to the degradation of imaging resolution. The influence of the target's shaking to Fourier-transform ghost diffraction (FGD) is investigated and phase-retrieval method is used to recover the target's imaging. The analytical results, which are backed up by numerical simulation and experiments, demonstrate that the quiver of target has no effect on the resolution of FGD and high-resolution imaging can be always achieved by phase-retrieval method from FGD patterns. This approach can be applied in high-precision imaging systems, to overcome the influence of the system's shaking to imaging resolution.

  8. Fourier Imaging Spectroscopy of the Galactic Center D. A. Simons

    E-print Network

    (Maillard 1995) works by coupling the facility Fourier Transform Spectrometer (Maillard and Michel 1982)andFourier Imaging Spectroscopy of the Galactic Center D. A. Simons Gemini 8 m Telescopes Project, 950 for the Br scan while the other scans through various bandpasses are further reduced and interpreted. 2. Br

  9. Fourier-transform ghost imaging with pure far-field correlated thermal light

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Honglin; Shen Xia; Han Shensheng; Zhu Daming

    2007-11-15

    Pure far-field correlated thermal light beams are created with phase grating, and Fourier-transform ghost imaging depending only on the far-field correlation is demonstrated experimentally. Theoretical analysis and the results of experimental investigation of this pure far-field correlated thermal light are presented. Applications which may be exploited with this imaging scheme are discussed.

  10. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and imaging of the nucleus to characterize DNA contributions in different phases of the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Saumya; Zong, Xinying; Holton, Sarah E.; Prasanth, K. V.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    Determination of neoplasia is largely dependent on the state of cell growth. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has the potential to measure differences between normal and cancerous cells. When analyzing biopsy sections using IR spectroscopy, careful analyses become important since biochemical variations may be misinterpreted due to variations in cell cycle. Processes like DNA replication, transcription and translation to produce proteins are important in determining if the cells are actively dividing but no studies on this aspect using IR spectroscopy have been conducted on isolated cell nuclei. Nuclei hold critical information about the phase of cell and its capacity to divide, but IR spectra of nuclei are often confounded by cytoplasmic signals during data acquisition from intact cells and tissues. Therefore, we sought to separate nuclear signals from cytoplasmic signals and identify spectral differences that characterize different phases of the cell cycle. Both cells and isolated nuclei were analyzed to assess the effect of the cytoplasmic background and to identify spectral changes in nuclei in different phases of cell cycle. We observed that signals of DNA could be obtained when imaging nuclei isolated from cells in different phases of cell cycle, which is in contrast to the oft-cited case in cells wherein nuclear contributions are obscured. The differences across cell cycle phases were more pronounced in nucleic acid regions of the spectra, showing that the use of nuclear spectrum can provide additional information on cellular state. These results can aid in developing computational models that extract nuclear spectra from whole cells and tissues for more accurate assessment of biochemical variations.

  11. Fourier domain OCT imaging of American cockroach nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyszkowska, Joanna; Gorczynska, Iwona; Ruminski, Daniel; Karnowski, Karol; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Stankiewicz, Maria; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    In this pilot study we demonstrate results of structural Fourier domain OCT imaging of the nervous system of Periplaneta americana L. (American cockroach). The purpose of this research is to develop an OCT apparatus enabling structural imaging of insect neural system. Secondary purpose of the presented research is to develop methods of the sample preparation and handling during the OCT imaging experiments. We have performed imaging in the abdominal nerve cord excised from the American cockroach. For this purpose we have developed a Fourier domain / spectral OCT system operating at 820 nm wavelength range.

  12. Novel single-channel color image encryption algorithm based on chaos and fractional Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nanrun; Wang, Yixian; Gong, Lihua; He, Hong; Wu, Jianhua

    2011-06-01

    A new color image encryption algorithm based on fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) and chaos is proposed. The colors of the original color image are converted to HSI (hue-saturation-intensity), and the S component is transformed by the random-phase encoding based on FrFT to obtain a new random phase. The I component is transformed by double random-phase encoding based on FrFT using the H component and the new random phase as two phase plates. Then chaos scrambling technology is used to encrypt the image, which makes the resulting image nonlinear and disorder both in spatial domain and frequency domain. Additionally, the ciphertext is not a color image but a combination of a gray image and a phase matrix, so the ciphertext has camouflage property to some extent. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness and the security of this algorithm.

  13. Fractional Fourier transform in temporal ghost imaging with classical light

    SciTech Connect

    Setaelae, Tero; Shirai, Tomohiro; Friberg, Ari T.

    2010-10-15

    We investigate temporal, second-order classical ghost imaging with long, incoherent, scalar plane-wave pulses. We prove that in rather general conditions, the intensity correlation function at the output of the setup is given by the fractional Fourier transform of the temporal object. In special cases, the correlation function is shown to reduce to the ordinary Fourier transform and the temporal image of the object. Effects influencing the visibility and the resolution are considered. This work extends certain known results on spatial ghost imaging into the time domain and could find applications in temporal tomography of pulses.

  14. Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS): Imaging and Tracking Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, D. K.; Larar, A. M.; Liu, Xu; Reisse, R. A.; Smith, W. L.; Revercomb, H. E.; Bingham, G. E.; Zollinger, L. J.; Tansock, J. J.; Huppi, Ronald J.

    2007-01-01

    The geosynchronous-imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (GIFTS) engineering demonstration unit (EDU) is an imaging infrared spectrometer designed for atmospheric soundings. It measures the infrared spectrum in two spectral bands (14.6 to 8.8 microns, 6.0 to 4.4 microns) using two 128 128 detector arrays with a spectral resolution of 0.57/cm with a scan duration of approx. 11 seconds. From a geosynchronous orbit, the instrument will have the capability of taking successive measurements of such data to scan desired regions of the globe, from which atmospheric status, cloud parameters, wind field profiles, and other derived products can be retrieved. The GIFTS EDU provides a flexible and accurate testbed for the new challenges of the emerging hyperspectral era. The EDU ground-based measurement experiment, held in Logan, Utah during September 2006, demonstrated its extensive capabilities and potential for geosynchronous and other applications (e.g., Earth observing environmental measurements). This paper addresses the experiment objectives and overall performance of the sensor system with a focus on the GIFTS EDU imaging capability and proof of the GIFTS measurement concept.

  15. Electro-Optical Imaging Fourier-Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Zhou, Hanying

    2006-01-01

    An electro-optical (E-O) imaging Fourier-transform spectrometer (IFTS), now under development, is a prototype of improved imaging spectrometers to be used for hyperspectral imaging, especially in the infrared spectral region. Unlike both imaging and non-imaging traditional Fourier-transform spectrometers, the E-O IFTS does not contain any moving parts. Elimination of the moving parts and the associated actuator mechanisms and supporting structures would increase reliability while enabling reductions in size and mass, relative to traditional Fourier-transform spectrometers that offer equivalent capabilities. Elimination of moving parts would also eliminate the vibrations caused by the motions of those parts. Figure 1 schematically depicts a traditional Fourier-transform spectrometer, wherein a critical time delay is varied by translating one the mirrors of a Michelson interferometer. The time-dependent optical output is a periodic representation of the input spectrum. Data characterizing the input spectrum are generated through fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) post-processing of the output in conjunction with the varying time delay.

  16. Fourier Power Spectrum Characteristics of Face Photographs: Attractiveness Perception Depends on Low-Level Image Properties

    PubMed Central

    Langner, Oliver; Wiese, Holger; Redies, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether low-level processed image properties that are shared by natural scenes and artworks – but not veridical face photographs – affect the perception of facial attractiveness and age. Specifically, we considered the slope of the radially averaged Fourier power spectrum in a log-log plot. This slope is a measure of the distribution of special frequency power in an image. Images of natural scenes and artworks possess – compared to face images – a relatively shallow slope (i.e., increased high spatial frequency power). Since aesthetic perception might be based on the efficient processing of images with natural scene statistics, we assumed that the perception of facial attractiveness might also be affected by these properties. We calculated Fourier slope and other beauty-associated measurements in face images and correlated them with ratings of attractiveness and age of the depicted persons (Study 1). We found that Fourier slope – in contrast to the other tested image properties – did not predict attractiveness ratings when we controlled for age. In Study 2A, we overlaid face images with random-phase patterns with different statistics. Patterns with a slope similar to those in natural scenes and artworks resulted in lower attractiveness and higher age ratings. In Studies 2B and 2C, we directly manipulated the Fourier slope of face images and found that images with shallower slopes were rated as more attractive. Additionally, attractiveness of unaltered faces was affected by the Fourier slope of a random-phase background (Study 3). Faces in front of backgrounds with statistics similar to natural scenes and faces were rated as more attractive. We conclude that facial attractiveness ratings are affected by specific image properties. An explanation might be the efficient coding hypothesis. PMID:25835539

  17. Color image encryption and decryption for twin images in fractional Fourier domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Madhusudan; Chandrashakher; Singh, Kehar

    2008-12-01

    We propose a method for the encryption of twin color images using fractional Fourier transform (FRT). The color images to be encrypted are converted into the indexed image formats before being processed through twin image encryption algorithm based on the FRT. The proposed algorithm uses one random code in the image domain and one random phase code in the FRT domain to perform double image encryption. The conversion of both the input RGB images into their indexed formats facilitates single-channel processing for each image, and is more compact and robust as compared to multichannel techniques. Different fractional orders, the random masks in image- and FRT domain are the keys to enhance the security of the proposed system. The algorithms to implement the proposed encryption and decryption schemes are discussed, and results of digital simulation are presented. We examine sensitivity of the proposed scheme against the use of unauthorized keys (e.g. incorrect fractional orders, incorrect random phase mask etc.). Robustness of the method against occlusion and noise has also been discussed.

  18. Fourier-Based Forward and Back-Projectors for Iterative Image Reconstruction

    E-print Network

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    Fourier-Based Forward and Back-Projectors for Iterative Image Reconstruction Samuel Matej, Jeffrey. Fourier-Based Projectors B. Non-Uniform Fast Fourier Transform C. Fourier-Based Iterative Reconstruction D. Fourier-based forward and back-projection methods have the potential to considerably reduce

  19. Aperture-scanning Fourier ptychography for 3D refocusing and super-resolution macroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Siyuan; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Shiradkar, Radhika; Guo, Kaikai; Ou, Xiaoze; Bian, Zichao; Xin, Huolin; Zheng, Guoan

    2014-06-01

    We report an imaging scheme, termed aperture-scanning Fourier ptychography, for 3D refocusing and super-resolution macroscopic imaging. The reported scheme scans an aperture at the Fourier plane of an optical system and acquires the corresponding intensity images of the object. The acquired images are then synthesized in the frequency domain to recover a high-resolution complex sample wavefront; no phase information is needed in the recovery process. We demonstrate two applications of the reported scheme. In the first example, we use an aperture-scanning Fourier ptychography platform to recover the complex hologram of extended objects. The recovered hologram is then digitally propagated into different planes along the optical axis to examine the 3D structure of the object. We also demonstrate a reconstruction resolution better than the detector pixel limit (i.e., pixel super-resolution). In the second example, we develop a camera-scanning Fourier ptychography platform for super-resolution macroscopic imaging. By simply scanning the camera over different positions, we bypass the diffraction limit of the photographic lens and recover a super-resolution image of an object placed at the far field. This platform's maximum achievable resolution is ultimately determined by the camera's traveling range, not the aperture size of the lens. The FP scheme reported in this work may find applications in 3D object tracking, synthetic aperture imaging, remote sensing, and optical/electron/X-ray microscopy. PMID:24921553

  20. Fourier-ring descriptor to characterize rare circulating cells from images generated using immunofluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Tegan; Kirby, Michael; Bethel, Kelly; Kolatkar, Anand; Luttgen, Madelyn; O'Hara, Stephen; Newton, Paul; Kuhn, Peter

    2015-03-01

    We address the problem of subclassification of rare circulating cells using data driven feature selection from images of candidate circulating tumor cells from patients diagnosed with breast, prostate, or lung cancer. We determine a set of low level features which can differentiate among candidate cell types. We have implemented an image representation based on concentric Fourier rings (FRDs) which allow us to exploit size variations and morphological differences among cells while being rotationally invariant. We discuss potential clinical use in the context of treatment monitoring for cancer patients with metastatic disease. PMID:25456146

  1. Pansharpening of multispectral images using filtering in Fourier domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akoguz, Alper; Kurt, Burak; Pinar, Sedef K.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, there is examined filtering based pansharpening methods which means of using several 2D FIR filters in Fourier domain which implies that the filters are applied after taking 2D Discrete Fourier Transform of both multispectral and panchromatic image and after the pansharpening process in Fourier domain, the resulting pansharpened image is obtained with an inverse 2D DFT. In addition, these methods are compared with commonly used fusion methods which are combined as modulation based and component substitution based methods. The algorithms are applied to SPOT 6 co-registered image couples that were acquired simultaneously. Couples are chosen for three different regions which are a city image (Gebze/Turkey), a forest image (Istanbul/Turkey) and an agriculture field image (Sanliurfa/Turkey) in order to analyse the methods in different regional characteristics. These methods are compared by the fusion quality assessments that have common acceptance in community. The results of these quality assessments shows the filtering based methods had the best scores among the traditional methods.

  2. Fourier magnetic imaging with nanoscale resolution and compressed sensing speed-up

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Fourier magnetic imaging with nanoscale resolution and compressed sensing speed-up using electronic optical imaging18,19. Here, we introduce an alternative technique of Fourier magnetic imaging using NV by a fast Fourier transform to yield real-space images with nanoscale resolution, wide field of view

  3. Optimal color image restoration: Wiener filter and quaternion Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Artyom M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the model of quaternion signal degradation when the signal is convoluted and an additive noise is added. The classical model of such a model leads to the solution of the optimal Wiener filter, where the optimality with respect to the mean square error. The characteristic of this filter can be found in the frequency domain by using the Fourier transform. For quaternion signals, the inverse problem is complicated by the fact that the quaternion arithmetic is not commutative. The quaternion Fourier transform does not map the convolution to the operation of multiplication. In this paper, we analyze the linear model of the signal and image degradation with an additive independent noise and the optimal filtration of the signal and images in the frequency domain and in the quaternion space.

  4. Binary-Phase Fourier Gratings for Nonuniform Array Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Crow, Robert W.; Ashley, Paul R.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a design method for a binary-phase Fourier grating that generates an array of spots with nonuniform, user-defined intensities symmetric about the zeroth order. Like the Dammann fanout grating approach, the binary-phase Fourier grating uses only two phase levels in its grating surface profile to generate the final spot array. Unlike the Dammann fanout grating approach, this method allows for the generation of nonuniform, user-defined intensities within the final fanout pattern. Restrictions governing the specification and realization of the array's individual spot intensities are discussed. Design methods used to realize the grating employ both simulated annealing and nonlinear optimization approaches to locate optimal solutions to the grating design problem. The end-use application driving this development operates in the near- to mid-infrared spectrum - allowing for higher resolution in grating specification and fabrication with respect to wavelength than may be available in visible spectrum applications. Fabrication of a grating generating a user-defined nine spot pattern is accomplished in GaAs for the near-infrared. Characterization of the grating is provided through the measurement of individual spot intensities, array uniformity, and overall efficiency. Final measurements are compared to calculated values with a discussion of the results.

  5. Fourier-domain digital holographic optical coherence imaging of living tissue

    E-print Network

    Nolte, David D.

    Fourier-domain digital holographic optical coherence imaging of living tissue Kwan Jeong,1, * John Fourier plane has advantages for diffuse targets compared with Fresnel off-axis digital holography. A digital hologram captured at the Fourier plane requires only a 2D fast Fourier transform for numerical

  6. Statistical Fourier Descriptors for Defect Image Classification Fabian Timm and Thomas Martinetz

    E-print Network

    Statistical Fourier Descriptors for Defect Image Classification Fabian Timm and Thomas Martinetz¨ubeck, Germany Abstract In many industrial applications, Fourier descriptors are commonly used when are limited to single objects. We propose a general Fourier-based approach, called statistical Fourier

  7. Mesh adaptation technique for Fourier-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Vadim Y

    2006-11-01

    A novel adaptive mesh technique in the Fourier domain is introduced for problems in fluorescence lifetime imaging. A dynamical adaptation of the three-dimensional scheme based on the finite volume formulation reduces computational time and balances the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Light propagation in the medium is modeled by the telegraph equation, while the lifetime reconstruction algorithm is derived from the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Stability and computational efficiency of the method are demonstrated by image reconstruction of two spherical fluorescent objects embedded in a tissue phantom. PMID:17153396

  8. A phase space model of Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    A new computational imaging technique, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), uses a sequence of low-resolution images captured under varied illumination to iteratively converge upon a high-resolution complex sample estimate. Here, we propose a mathematical model of FPM that explicitly connects its operation to conventional ptychography, a common procedure applied to electron and X-ray diffractive imaging. Our mathematical framework demonstrates that under ideal illumination conditions, conventional ptychography and FPM both produce datasets that are mathematically linked by a linear transformation. We hope this finding encourages the future cross-pollination of ideas between two otherwise unconnected experimental imaging procedures. In addition, the coherence state of the illumination source used by each imaging platform is critical to successful operation, yet currently not well understood. We apply our mathematical framework to demonstrate that partial coherence uniquely alters both conventional ptychography’s and FPM’s captured data, but up to a certain threshold can still lead to accurate resolution-enhanced imaging through appropriate computational post-processing. We verify this theoretical finding through simulation and experiment. PMID:24514995

  9. Ghost imaging of phase objects with classical incoherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Tomohiro; Setaelae, Tero; Friberg, Ari T.

    2011-10-15

    We describe an optical setup for performing spatial Fourier filtering in ghost imaging with classical incoherent light. This is achieved by a modification of the conventional geometry for lensless ghost imaging. It is shown on the basis of classical coherence theory that with this technique one can realize what we call phase-contrast ghost imaging to visualize pure phase objects.

  10. Fourier domain optical tool normalization for quantitative parametric image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jing; Silver, Richard M; Barnes, Bryan M; Zhou, Hui; Goasmat, Francois

    2013-09-10

    There has been much recent work in developing advanced optical metrology methods that use imaging optics for critical dimension measurements and defect detection. Sensitivity to nanometer-scale changes has been observed when measuring critical dimensions of subwavelength 20 nm features or when imaging defects below 15 nm using angle-resolved and focus-resolved optical data. However, these methods inherently involve complex imaging optics and analysis of complicated three-dimensional electromagnetic fields. This paper develops a new approach to enable the rigorous analysis of three-dimensional, through-focus, or angle-resolved optical images. We use rigorous electromagnetic simulation with enhanced Fourier optical techniques, an approach to optical tool normalization, and statistical methods to evaluate sensitivities and uncertainties in the measurement of subwavelength three-dimensional structures. PMID:24085127

  11. Imaging the sun in hard x rays using Fourier telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    For several years, solar flares have been observed with a variety of instruments confirming that tremendous amounts of energy are locally stored in the solar magnetic field and then rapidly released during the life of the flare. In concert with observations, theorists have attempted to describe the means by which these energetic events occur and evolve. Two competing theories have emerged and have stood the test of time. One theory describes the flare in terms of nonthermal, electron beam injection into a thick target while the other uses a thermal approach. Both theories provide results which are reasonably consistent with current observations; but to date, none have been able to provide conclusive evidence as to the validity of either model. Imaging on short time scales (1 s) and/or small size scales (1 arc s) should give definitive answers to these questions. In order to test whether a realistic telescope can indeed discriminate between models, we construct model sources based upon the thermal and the nonthermal models and calculate the emission as a function of time and energy in the range from 10 to 100 keV. In addition, we construct model telescopes representing both the spatial modulation collimator (SMC) and the rotating modulation collimator (RMC) techniques of observation using random photon counting statistics. With these two types of telescopes we numerically simulate the instrument response to the above two model flares to see if there are distinct x-ray signatures which may be discernable. We find that theoretical descriptions of the primary models of solar flares do indeed predict different hard x-ray signatures for 1 sec time scales and at 1-5 arc sec spatial resolution. However, these distinguishing signatures can best be observed early in the impulsive phase and from a position perpendicular to the plane of the loop. Furthermore, we find that Fourier telescopes with reasonable and currently attainable design characteristics can image these signatures and that the same sensitive areas and short temporal integration times relative to source evolution (i.e., 1 s), the RMC and the SMC will both provide about the same performance.

  12. Imaging Organ of Corti Vibration Using Fourier-Domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Niloy; Chen, Fangyi; Fridberger, Anders; Zha, Dingjun; Jacques, Steven L.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2011-11-01

    Measuring the sound stimulated vibration from various structures in the organ of Corti is important in understanding how the small vibrations are amplified and detected. In this study we examine the feasibility of using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (PSFD-OCT) to measure vibration of the cellular structures of the organ of Corti. PSFD-OCT is a low coherence interferrometry system where the interferrogram is detected as a function of wavelength. The phase of the Fourier transformation of the detected spectra contains path deference (between the sample arm and the reference arm) information of the interferometer. In PSFD-OCT this phase is measured as a function of time and thus any time dependent change in the path difference between the sample arm and the reference arm can be detected. In the experiment, we used an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig cochlea and made a surgical opening at the apical end to access the organ of Corti. By applying tones with different frequencies via the intact middle ear, we recorded the structural vibration inside the organ of Corti. Vibration amplitude and phase of different substructures were mapped on a cross-section view of the organ of Corti. Although the measurements were made at the apical turn of the cochlea, it will be possible to make vibration measurement from various turns of the cochlea. The noise floor of the system was 0.3 nm, calibrated using a piezo stack as a calibrator.

  13. Fractional Fourier transform based image multiplexing and encryption technique for four-color images using input images as keys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Madhusudan; Shakher, Chandra; Singh, Kehar

    2010-06-01

    A digital technique for multiplexing and encryption of four RGB images has been proposed using the fractional Fourier transform (FRT). The four input RGB images are first converted into their indexed image formats and subsequently multiplexed into a single image through elementary mathematical steps prior to the encryption. The encryption algorithm uses two random phase masks in the input- and the FRT domain, respectively. These random phase masks are especially designed using the input images. As the encryption is carried out through a single channel, the technique is more compact and faster as compared to the multichannel techniques. Different fractional orders, the random masks in input-, and FRT domain are the keys for decryption as well as de-multiplexing. The algorithms to implement the proposed multiplexing-, and encryption scheme are discussed, and results of digital simulation are presented. Simulation results show that the technique is free from cross-talk. The performance of the proposed technique has also been analyzed against occlusion, noise, and attacks using partial windows of the correct random phase keys. The robustness of the technique against known-, and chosen plain-text attacks has also been explained.

  14. Instrument concept of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl-Vallon, F.; Gulde, T.; Hase, F.; Kleinert, A.; Kulessa, T.; Maucher, G.; Neubert, T.; Olschewski, F.; Piesch, C.; Preusse, P.; Rongen, H.; Sartorius, C.; Schneider, H.; Schönfeld, A.; Tan, V.; Bayer, N.; Blank, J.; Dapp, R.; Ebersoldt, A.; Fischer, H.; Graf, F.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Kaufmann, M.; Kretschmer, E.; Latzko, T.; Nordmeyer, H.; Oelhaf, H.; Orphal, J.; Riese, M.; Schardt, G.; Schillings, J.; Sha, M. K.; Suminska-Ebersoldt, O.; Ungermann, J.

    2014-10-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an imaging limb emission sounder operating in the thermal infrared region. It is designed to provide measurements of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere with high spatial and high spectral resolution. The instrument consists of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer integrated into a gimbal. The assembly can be mounted in the belly pod of the German High Altitude and Long Range research aircraft (HALO) and in instrument bays of the Russian M55 Geophysica. Measurements are made in two distinct modes: the chemistry mode emphasises chemical analysis with high spectral resolution, and the dynamics mode focuses on dynamical processes of the atmosphere with very high spatial resolution. In addition, the instrument allows tomographic analyses of air volumes. The first measurement campaigns have shown compliance with key performance and operational requirements.

  15. Instrument concept of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl-Vallon, F.; Gulde, T.; Hase, F.; Kleinert, A.; Kulessa, T.; Maucher, G.; Neubert, T.; Olschewski, F.; Piesch, C.; Preusse, P.; Rongen, H.; Sartorius, C.; Schneider, H.; Schönfeld, A.; Tan, V.; Bayer, N.; Blank, J.; Dapp, R.; Ebersoldt, A.; Fischer, H.; Graf, F.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Kaufmann, M.; Kretschmer, E.; Latzko, T.; Nordmeyer, H.; Oelhaf, H.; Orphal, J.; Riese, M.; Schardt, G.; Schillings, J.; Sha, M. K.; Suminska-Ebersoldt, O.; Ungermann, J.

    2014-03-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an imaging limb emission sounder operating in the thermal infrared region. It is designed to provide measurements of the Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere with high spatial and high spectral resolution. The instrument consists of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer integrated in a gimbal. The assembly can be mounted in the belly pod of the German high altitude and long range research aircraft HALO and in instrument bays of the Russian M55 Geophysica. Measurements are made predominantly in two distinct modes: the chemistry mode emphasises chemical analysis with high spectral resolution, the dynamics mode focuses on dynamical processes of the atmosphere with very high spatial resolution. In addition the instrument allows tomographic analyses of air volumes. The first measurement campaigns have shown compliance with key performance and operational requirements.

  16. Stages: sub-Fourier dynamic shim updating using nonlinear magnetic field phase preparation.

    PubMed

    Witschey, Walter R T; Littin, Sebastian; Cocosco, Chris A; Gallichan, Daniel; Schultz, Gerrit; Weber, Hans; Welz, Anna; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity of the static magnetic field in magnetic resonance imaging may cause image artifacts and degradation in image quality. The field heterogeneity can be reduced by dynamically adjusting shim fields or dynamic shim updating, in which magnetic field homogeneity is optimized for each tomographic slice to improve image quality. A limitation of this approach is that a new magnetic field can be applied only once for each slice, otherwise image quality would improve somewhere to its detriment elsewhere in the slice. The motivation of this work is to overcome this limitation and develop a technique using nonlinear magnetic fields to dynamically shim the static magnetic field within a single Fourier-encoded volume or slice, called sub-Fourier dynamic shim updating. However, the nonlinear magnetic fields are not used as shim fields; instead, they impart a strong spatial dependence to the acquired MR signal by nonlinear phase preparation, which may be exploited to locally improve magnetic field homogeneity during acquisition. A theoretical description of the method is detailed, simulations and a proof-of-principle experiment are performed using a magnet coil with a known field geometry. The method is shown to remove artifacts associated with magnetic field homogeneity in balanced steady-state free-precession pulse sequences. We anticipate that this method will be useful to improve the quality of magnetic resonance images by removing deleterious artifacts associated with a heterogeneous static magnetic field. PMID:23440677

  17. The use of Fourier reverse transforms in crystallographic phase refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Ringrose, S.

    1997-10-08

    Often a crystallographer obtains an electron density map which shows only part of the structure. In such cases, the phasing of the trial model is poor enough that the electron density map may show peaks in some of the atomic positions, but other atomic positions are not visible. There may also be extraneous peaks present which are not due to atomic positions. A method for determination of crystal structures that have resisted solution through normal crystallographic methods has been developed. PHASER is a series of FORTRAN programs which aids in the structure solution of poorly phased electron density maps by refining the crystallographic phases. It facilitates the refinement of such poorly phased electron density maps for difficult structures which might otherwise not be solvable. The trial model, which serves as the starting point for the phase refinement, may be acquired by several routes such as direct methods or Patterson methods. Modifications are made to the reverse transform process based on several assumptions. First, the starting electron density map is modified based on the fact that physically the electron density map must be non-negative at all points. In practice a small positive cutoff is used. A reverse Fourier transform is computed based on the modified electron density map. Secondly, the authors assume that a better electron density map will result by using the observed magnitudes of the structure factors combined with the phases calculated in the reverse transform. After convergence has been reached, more atomic positions and less extraneous peaks are observed in the refined electron density map. The starting model need not be very large to achieve success with PHASER; successful phase refinement has been achieved with a starting model that consists of only 5% of the total scattering power of the full molecule. The second part of the thesis discusses three crystal structure determinations.

  18. Image registration under translation and rotation in two-dimensional planes using Fourier slice theorem.

    PubMed

    Pohit, M; Sharma, J

    2015-05-10

    Image recognition in the presence of both rotation and translation is a longstanding problem in correlation pattern recognition. Use of log polar transform gives a solution to this problem, but at a cost of losing the vital phase information from the image. The main objective of this paper is to develop an algorithm based on Fourier slice theorem for measuring the simultaneous rotation and translation of an object in a 2D plane. The algorithm is applicable for any arbitrary object shift for full 180° rotation. PMID:25967510

  19. Feasibility Demonstration of Wide-Field Fourier-Spectroscopic-Imaging in Infrared Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wei; Takuma, Takashi; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Inui, Asuka; Kagiyama, Hiroyasu; Kojima, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Ishimaru, Ichirou

    We are aiming at the realization of living-environment sensor and non-invasive blood-sugar sensor by the proposed imaging type 2-D Fourier spectroscopy. This method is based on the phase-shift interference between the object beams. As a result, even if the object beams are spatially incoherent, we can observe the phase-shift interference phenomena. In the near infrared region, we can obtain the high-contrast blood vessel image of mouse's ear in the deeper part by InGaAs camera. Furthermore, in the mid-infrared region, we have successfully measured the radiation spectroscopic-imaging with wild field of view by the infrared module, such as the house plants.

  20. Fourier-domain holographic optical coherence imaging of tumor spheroids and mouse eye

    E-print Network

    Nolte, David D.

    Fourier-domain holographic optical coherence imaging of tumor spheroids and mouse eye Kwan Jeong, Leilei Peng, John J. Turek, Michael R. Melloch, and David D. Nolte Fourier-domain holography (FDH) has the hologram in the Fourier plane significantly reduces background arising from reference light scattered from

  1. Optimized multiplexing super resolution imaging based on a Fourier ptychographic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiasong; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Yuzhen; Zuo, Chao; Feng, Shijie; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Jialin

    2015-10-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is a recently developed super-resolution technique by using angularly varying illumination and a phase retrieval algorithm to surpass the diffraction limit of the objective lens. To be specific, FP captures a set of low-resolution (LR) images under angularly varying illuminations, and combines them into one high-resolution (HR) image in the Fourier domain. However, the long capturing process becomes an obvious limitation since there are large number of images need to be acquired. Furthermore, the time can be increased several times over in order to acquire high-dynamic range images. Utilizing the multiplexing principle, we propose an optimized multiplexing FP algorithm, which is highly efficient, to shorten the exposure time of each raw image in this work. High acquisition efficiency is achieved by employing two set of optimized multiplexing patterns for bright-field and dark-field imaging respectively. Experimental results demonstrated that this method could improve the quality of reconstructed HR intensity distributions in a faster measuring process.

  2. ULTRASOUND PULSE-ECHO IMAGING USING THE SPLIT-STEP FOURIER PROPAGATOR

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, LIANJIE; QUAN, YOULI

    2007-01-31

    Ultrasonic reflection imaging has the potential to produce higher image resolution than transmission tomography, but imaging resolution and quality still need to be further improved for early cancer detection and diagnosis. We present an ultrasound reflection image reconstruction method using the split-step Fourier propagator. It is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wavenumber domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wavenumber domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the breast. We use synthetic ultrasound pulse-echo data recorded around a ring for heterogeneous, computer-generated numerical breast phantoms to study the imaging capability of the method. The phantoms are derived from an experimental breast phantom and a sound-speed tomography image of an in-vivo ultrasound breast data collected usi ng a ring array. The heterogeneous sound-speed models used for pulse-echo imaging are obtained using a computationally efficient, first-arrival-time (time-of-flight) transmission tomography method. Our studies demonstrate that reflection image reconstruction using the split-step Fourier propagator with heterogeneous sound-speed models significantly improves image quality and resolution. We also numerically verify the spatial sampling criterion of wavefields for a ring transducer array.

  3. Continued Development of a Planetary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (PIFTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes continued efforts to evaluate a breadboard of a Planetary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (PIFTS). The PIFTS breadboard was developed under prior PIDDP funding. That effort is described in the final report for NASA Grant NAG5-6248 and in two conference papers (Sromovsky et al. 2000; Revercomb et al. 2000). The PIFTS breadboard was designed for near-IR (1-5.2 micrometer imaging of planetary targets with spectral resolving powers of several hundred to several thousand, using an InSb detector array providing at least 64x64 pixels imaging detail. The major focus of the development effort was to combine existing technologies to produce a small and low power design compatible with a very low mass flyable instrument. The objective of this grant (NAG5-10729) was further characterization of the breadboard performance, including intercomparisons with the highly accurate non-imaging Advanced Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) (Revercomb et al. 1994; Best et al. 1997).

  4. Fourier optics analysis of phase-mask-based path-length-multiplexed optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yin, Biwei; Dwelle, Jordan; Wang, Bingqing; Wang, Tianyi; Feldman, Marc D; Rylander, Henry G; Milner, Thomas E

    2015-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique that constructs a depth-resolved image by measuring the optical path-length difference between broadband light backscattered from a sample and a reference surface. For many OCT sample arm optical configurations, sample illumination and backscattered light detection share a common path. When a phase mask is placed in the sample path, features in the detected signal are observed, which suggests that an analysis of a generic common path OCT imaging system is warranted. In this study, we present a Fourier optics analysis using a Fresnel diffraction approximation of an OCT system with a path-length-multiplexing element (PME) inserted in the sample arm optics. The analysis may be generalized for most phase-mask-based OCT systems. A radial-angle-diverse PME is analyzed in detail, and the point spread function, coherent transfer function, sensitivity of backscattering angular diversity detection, and signal formation in terms of sample spatial frequency are simulated and discussed. The analysis reveals important imaging features and application limitations of OCT imaging systems with a phase mask in the sample path optics. PMID:26560931

  5. Amplitude and phase fourier correlation of ``twin'' GC-spectra of fatty acids from sheep dairy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teusdea, Alin C.; Gabor, Gianina; Hilma, Elena

    2012-08-01

    Authors present the discrimination performances of amplitude and phase-only Fourier correlation over the "twin" typed GC-spectra of sheep milk and ripened cheese. Therefore, in order to assess the most robust Fourier correlation method for the "twin" GC-spectra discrimination, the correlation matrix is built up over 17 analyzed GC-spectra in both amplitude and phase domains.

  6. Image reconstruction from limited Fourier data Hsin M. Shieh

    E-print Network

    Byrne, Charles

    , and diffraction optics, can be interpreted as the problem of estimating a function from its Fourier-transform values of its Fourier transform F. Although f cannot be band limited since it has bounded support many Fourier-transform values of a function f x with bounded support region S. The variable x may

  7. Fourier-domain holographic optical coherence imaging of tumor spheroids and mouse eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kwan; Peng, Leilei; Turek, John J.; Melloch, Michael R.; Nolte, David D.

    2005-04-01

    Fourier-domain holography (FDH) has several advantages over image-domain holography for optical coherence imaging of tissue. Writing the hologram in the Fourier plane significantly reduces background arising from reference light scattered from the photorefractive holographic film. The ability to use FDH is enhanced by the use of a diffuse target, such as scattering tissue, rather than specular targets, because the broader angular distribution from diffuse targets is transformed into a relatively uniform distribution in the Fourier plane. We demonstrate significantly improved performance for Fourier-domain optical coherence imaging on rat osteogenic sarcoma tumor spheroids and mouse eye. The sensitivity is documented at -95 dB.

  8. Image encryption based on nonseparable fractional Fourier transform and chaotic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Qiwen; Yuan, Lin; Zhao, Tieyu

    2015-08-01

    In this paper an image cryptosystem is constructed by using double random phase masks and a chaotic map together with a novel transform which is similar to fractional Fourier transform and gyrator transform to some extent. The new transform is not periodic with respect to the transform order and cannot be expressed as a tensor product of two one-dimensional transforms neither in the space domain nor in the Wigner space-frequency domain. In the cryptosystem, the parameters of Arnold map, transform orders of the proposed transform and phase information serve as the main keys. The numerical simulations have demonstrated the validity and high security level of the image cryptosystem based on the proposed transform.

  9. Synthetic wavelength-based phase unwrapping in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendargo, Hansford C.; Zhao, Mingtao; Shepherd, Neal; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2009-02-01

    Phase-sensitive adjuncts to optical coherence tomography (OCT) including Doppler and polarization-sensitive implementations allow for quantitative depth-resolved measurements of sample structure and dynamics including fluid flows and orientation of birefringent structures. The development of Fourier-domain OCT (FDOCT), particularly spectrometer-based spectral-domain systems with no moving parts (spectral-domain OCT or SDOCT), have greatly enhanced the phase stability of OCT systems particularly when implemented in a common-path geometry. The latter combination has given rise to a new class of nm-scale sensitive quantitative phase microscopies we have termed spectral domain phase microscopy. However, the phase information in all of these techniques suffers from a 2? ambiguity that limits resolvable pathlength differences to less than half the source center wavelength. This is problematic for situations such as cellular imaging, Doppler velocimetry, or polarization sensitive applications where it may be necessary to monitor sample profiles, displacements, phase differences, or refractive index variations which vary rapidly in space or time. A technique previously introduced in phase shifting interferometry uses phase information from multiple wavelengths to overcome this limitation. We show that by appropriate spectral windowing of the broadband light source already used in OCT, particularly by reshaping the source spectrum about two different center wavelengths, the resulting phase variation may be cast in terms of a much longer synthetic wavelength chosen to span the phase variation of interest. We show theoretically that the optimal choice of synthetic wavelength depends upon a tradeoff between the minimum resolvable phase and the length of unambiguous phase measurement. We demonstrate this technique using a broadband source centered at 790 nm by correctly reconstructing the phase profile from a phantom sample containing multiple 2? wrapping artifacts at the center wavelength and compare our result with atomic force microscopy.

  10. High-resolution wave-theory-based ultrasound reflection imaging using the split-step fourier and globally optimized fourier finite-difference methods

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Lianjie

    2013-10-29

    Methods for enhancing ultrasonic reflection imaging are taught utilizing a split-step Fourier propagator in which the reconstruction is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wave number domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wave number domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the tissue being imaged (e.g., breast tissue). Results from various data input to the method indicate significant improvements are provided in both image quality and resolution.

  11. Fourier magnetic imaging with nanoscale resolution and compressed sensing speed-up

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Fourier magnetic imaging with nanoscale resolution and compressed sensing speed-up using electronic spins in diamond 1 Fourier Magnetic Imaging with Nanoscale Resolution and Compressed Sensing Speed of this diamond substrate is attached to a copper heat sink cooled by an air fan to further remove heat

  12. Palm-size wide-field Fourier spectroscopic imager with uncooled infrared microbolometer arrays for smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Natsumi; Suzuki, Yo; Qi, Wei; Hosono, Satsuki; Saito, Tsubasa; Ogawa, Satoshi; Sato, Shun; Fujiwara, Masaru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Tanaka, Naotaka; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    We proposed the imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy that is a near-common-path interferometer with strong robustness against mechanical vibrations. We introduced the miniature uncooled infrared microbolometer arrays for smartphone (e.g. product name: FILR ONE price: around 400USD). And we constructed the phase-shifter with the piezo impact drive mechanism (maker: Technohands.co.Ltd., stroke: 4.5mm, resolution: 0.01?m, size: 20mm, price: around 800USD). Thus, we realized the palm-size mid-infrared spectroscopic imager [size: L56mm×W69mm×H43mm weight: 500g]. And by using wide-angle lens as objective lens, the proposed method can obtain the wide-field 2- dimensional middle-infrared (wavelength: 7.5-13.5[?m]) spectroscopic imaging of radiation lights emitted from human bodies itself

  13. Imaging Fourier transform endospectroscopy for in vivo and in situ multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongming; Yuan, Jing; Fu, Ling

    2012-10-01

    We report the design and implementation of a multispectral imaging Fourier transform endospectroscopy (IFTES) system. The IFTES system employs a flexible fiber bundle catheter coupled to a home-built imaging Fourier transform spectroscope. The instrument enables the performance of non- or minimally invasive subsurface imaging and multispectral imaging at the cellular level in vivo and in situ. A maximum spectral resolution of 0.2 nm at 632.8 nm and a lateral resolution of 4.4 ?m were proved. Preliminary results of a standard resolution target, ex-vivo small animal tissue, single wavelength laser, fluorescence solution, in-vivo mouse skin, microspheres mixture, and in-vivo transgenic mouse brain were given to demonstrate the potential of the technique. PMID:23188298

  14. Spatial Phase Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Frequently, scientists grow crystals by dissolving a protein in a specific liquid solution, and then allowing that solution to evaporate. The methods used next have been, variously, invasive (adding a dye that is absorbed by the protein), destructive (crushing protein/salt-crystal mixtures and observing differences between the crushing of salt and protein), or costly and time-consuming (X-ray crystallography). In contrast to these methods, a new technology for monitoring protein growth, developed in part through NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding from Marshall Space Flight Center, is noninvasive, nondestructive, rapid, and more cost effective than X-ray analysis. The partner for this SBIR, Photon-X, Inc., of Huntsville, Alabama, developed spatial phase imaging technology that can monitor crystal growth in real time and in an automated mode. Spatial phase imaging scans for flaws quickly and produces a 3-D structured image of a crystal, showing volumetric growth analysis for future automated growth.

  15. Fourier Magnetic Imaging with Nanoscale Resolution and Compressed Sensing Speed-up using Electronic Spins in Diamond

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    1 Fourier Magnetic Imaging with Nanoscale Resolution and Compressed Sensing Speed-up using imaging.12 Here we introduce an alternative technique of Fourier magnetic imaging using NV Fourier transform to yield real-space images with nanoscale resolution, wide field-of-view (FOV

  16. Rotational-translational fourier imaging system requiring only one grid pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The sky contains many active sources that emit X-rays, gamma rays, and neutrons. Unfortunately hard X-rays, gamma rays, and neutrons cannot be imaged by conventional optics. This obstacle led to the development of Fourier imaging systems. In early approaches, multiple grid pairs were necessary in order to create rudimentary Fourier imaging systems. At least one set of grid pairs was required to provide multiple real components of a Fourier derived image, and another set was required to provide multiple imaginary components of the image. It has long been recognized that the expense associated with the physical production of the numerous grid pairs required for Fourier imaging was a drawback. Herein one grid pair (two grids), with accompanying rotation and translation, can be used if one grid has one more slit than the other grid, and if the detector is modified.

  17. Time-domain surface profile imaging via a hyperspectral Fourier transform spectrometer

    E-print Network

    the HS-FTS. © 2008 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 240.0310, 110.4234, 120.2830. The development using a hyperspectral Fourier transform spectrometer (HS-FTS). This technique measures the frequency of a hyperspectral Fourier trans- form spectrometer (HS-FTS) for surface profile imag- ing with a primary application

  18. Spectroscopic-tomography of biological membrane with high-spatial resolution by the imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Asuka; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Qi, Wei; Takuma, Takashi; Ishimaru, Ichirou

    2011-07-01

    We proposed the imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy that is the phase-shift interferometry between the objective lights. The proposed method can measure the 2D spectral image at the limited depth. Because of the imaging optical system, the 2D spectral images can be measured in high spatial resolution. And in the depth direction, we can get the spectral distribution only in the focal plane. In this report, we mention about the principle of the proposed wide field imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy. And, we obtained the spectroscopic tomography of biological tissue of mouse's ear. In the visible region, we confirmed the difference of spectral characteristics between blood vessel region and other region. In the near infrared region (?=900nm~1700nm), we can obtain the high-contrast blood vessel image of mouse's ear in the deeper part by InGaAs camera. Furthermore, in the middle infrared region(?=8?~14?m), we have successfully measured the radiation spectroscopic-imaging with wild field of view by the infrared module, such as the house plants. Additionally, we propose correction geometrical model that can convert the mechanical phase-shift value into the substantial phase difference in each oblique optical axes. We successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed correction geometrical model and can reduce the spectral error into the error range into +/-3nm using the He-Ne laser whose wavelength 632.8nm.

  19. Fourier law, phase transitions and the stationary Stefan problem

    E-print Network

    Anna De Masi; Errico Presutti; Dimitrios Tsagkarogiannis

    2010-09-23

    We study the one-dimensional stationary solutions of an integro-differential equation derived by Giacomin and Lebowitz from Kawasaki dynamics in Ising systems with Kac potentials, \\cite{GiacominLebowitz}. We construct stationary solutions with non zero current and prove the validity of the Fourier law in the thermodynamic limit showing that below the critical temperature the limit equilibrium profile has a discontinuity (which defines the position of the interface) and satisfies a stationary free boundary Stefan problem. Under-cooling and over-heating effects are also studied. We show that if metastable values are imposed at the boundaries then the mesoscopic stationary profile is no longer monotone and therefore the Fourier law is not satisfied. It regains however its validity in the thermodynamic limit where the limit profile is again monotone away from the interface.

  20. Liquid-crystal projection image depixelization by spatial phase scrambling.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Jutamulia, S; Li, N

    1996-08-10

    A technique that removes the pixel structure by scrambling the relative phases among multiple spatial spectra is described. Because of the pixel structure of the liquid-crystal-display (LCD) panel, multiple spectra are generated at the Fourier-spectrum plane (usually at the back focal plane of the imaging lens). A transparent phase mask is placed at the Fourier-spectrum plane such that each spectral order is modulated by one of the subareas of the phase mask, and the phase delay resulting from each pair of subareas is longer than the coherent length of the light source, which is approximately 1 ?m for the wideband white light sources used in most of LCD's. Such a phase-scrambling technique eliminates the coherence between different spectral orders; therefore, the reconstructed images from the multiple spectra will superimpose incoherently, and the pixel structure will not be observed in the projection image. PMID:21102876

  1. Single-Grid-Pair Fourier Telescope for Imaging in Hard-X Rays and gamma Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    This instrument, a proposed Fourier telescope for imaging in hard-x rays and gamma rays, would contain only one pair of grids made of an appropriate radiation-absorpting/ scattering material, in contradistinction to multiple pairs of such as grids in prior Fourier x- and gamma-ray telescopes. This instrument would also include a relatively coarse gridlike image detector appropriate to the radiant flux to be imaged. Notwithstanding the smaller number of grids and the relative coarseness of the imaging detector, the images produced by the proposed instrument would be of higher quality.

  2. Fourier phase-demodulation applied to strip-light 360-degrees profilometry of 3D solids; theoretical principles

    E-print Network

    Servin, Manuel; Garnica, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    360-degrees digitalization of three-dimensional (3D) solids using a projected light-strip is a well established technique. These profilometers project a light-strip over the solid under analysis while the solid is rotated a full revolution. Then a computer program typically extracts the centroid of this light-strip, and by triangulation one obtains the shape of the solid. Here instead of using intensity-based strip centroid estimation, we propose to use Fourier phase-demodulation. This 360-degrees profilometer first constructs a carrier-frequency fringe-pattern by closely adding individual light-strip images. Secondly this high-density fringe-pattern is phase-demodulated using the standard Fourier technique.

  3. Iterative reconstruction of speech from short-time Fourier transform phase and magnitude spectra

    E-print Network

    Iterative reconstruction of speech from short-time Fourier transform phase and magnitude spectra dimensional, signal reconstruction (specifically speech signals) from the magnitude spectrum and the phase magnitude spectrum, and (iii) a signal can be reconstructed to within a scale factor from its magnitude

  4. Limitations in Imaging Common Conjunctival and Corneal Pathologies with Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Hakan; Steen, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the limitations of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) in imaging common conjunctival and corneal pathology. Materials and Methods: Retrospective, single-center case series of 40 patients with conjunctival and cornea pathology. Results: Fourier-domain OCT imaged laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) flaps in detail, including its relation to other corneal structures and abnormalities. Similarly, in infectious or degenerative corneal disorders, Fourier-domain OCT successfully showed the extent of infiltration or material deposition, which appeared as hyper-reflective areas. In cases with pterygium, the underlying cornea could not be imaged. All cases of common conjunctival pathologies, such as nevus or pinguecula, were successfully imaged in detail. Nevi, scleritis, pterygium, pinguecula, and subconjunctival hemorrhage were hyper-reflective lesions, while cysts and lymphangiectasia were hyporeflective. The details of the underlying sclera were not uniformly imaged in conjunctival pathologies. Fourier-domain OCT imaged the trabeculectomy bleb in detail, whereas the details of structures of the anterior chamber angle were not routinely visualized in all cases. Conclusions: Light scatter through vascularized, densely inflamed, or thick lesions limits the imaging capabilities of Fourier-domain anterior segment OCT. PMID:25100905

  5. Experimental geometry for simultaneous beam characterization and sample imaging allowing for pink beam Fourier transform holography or coherent diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Flewett, Samuel; Eisebitt, Stefan

    2011-02-20

    One consequence of the self-amplified stimulated emission process used to generate x rays in free electron lasers (FELs) is the intrinsic shot-to-shot variance in the wavelength and temporal coherence. In order to optimize the results from diffractive imaging experiments at FEL sources, it will be advantageous to acquire a means of collecting coherence and spectral information simultaneously with the diffraction pattern from the sample we wish to study. We present a holographic mask geometry, including a grating structure, which can be used to extract both temporal and spatial coherence information alongside the sample scatter from each individual FEL shot and also allows for the real space reconstruction of the sample using either Fourier transform holography or iterative phase retrieval. PMID:21343964

  6. Fourier-domain digital holographic optical coherence imaging of living tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John J.; Nolte, David D.

    2007-08-01

    Digital holographic optical coherence imaging is a full-frame coherence-gated imaging approach that uses a CCD camera to record and reconstruct digital holograms from living tissue. Recording digital holograms at the optical Fourier plane has advantages for diffuse targets compared with Fresnel off-axis digital holography. A digital hologram captured at the Fourier plane requires only a 2D fast Fourier transform for numerical reconstruction. We have applied this technique for the depth-resolved imaging of rat osteogenic tumor multicellular spheroids and acquired cross-section images of the anterior segment and the retinal region of a mouse eye. A penetration depth of 1.4 mm for the tumor spheroids was achieved.

  7. Phase-sensitive swept source OCT imaging of the human retina with a VCSEL light source

    PubMed Central

    Choi, WooJhon; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Baumann, Bernhard; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Liu, Jonathan J.; Lu, Chen D.; Cable, Alex E.; Huang, David; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the challenges in achieving high phase stability, Doppler swept source / Fourier domain OCT has advantages of less fringe washout and faster imaging speeds compared to spectral / Fourier domain detection. This manuscript demonstrates swept source OCT with a VCSEL light source at 400kHz sweep rate for phase-sensitive Doppler imaging, measuring pulsatile total retinal blood flow with high sensitivity and phase stability. A robust, simple, and computationally efficient phase stabilization approach for phase-sensitive swept source imaging is also presented. PMID:23381430

  8. Fourier Based Imaging Method with Steered Plane Waves and Limited-Diffraction Array Beams

    E-print Network

    Lu, Jian-yu

    resolution) or incoherent superposition (reducing speckles) [1]- [2], [6]-[7]. To increase field of view waves in transmissions to increase image field of view and reduce speckle noises (see P.840 and P.850 in transmission to increase field of view and spatial Fourier domain coverage to increase image resolution [1

  9. Reducing Number of Elements of Transducer Arrays in Fourier Image ConstructionMethod

    E-print Network

    Lu, Jian-yu

    Reducing Number of Elements of Transducer Arrays in Fourier Image ConstructionMethod Jian-yu Lu- lationship between the quality of images constructed with the Founer method and the element spacing of array trans- ducers. In the study, two linear arrays were used. Effec- tive larger element spaclngs were

  10. Modified radon-Fourier transform for reflective tomography laser radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianfeng; Yan, Yi; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Liren

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents imaging result of computer simulation using a modified Radon-Fourier transform algorithm to reconstruct images from reflective tomography data. Since the signal returned is reflected off the illuminated outer surface of an opaque target, only information about the exterior of the target can be obtained, and the images reconstructed using reflective tomography techniques is an outline view of the target cross section. The projection p(r,? ) and p(r,? + 180°) contain different information about the target surface, and will lead different Fourier estimates along the same line through the origin based on the standard Fourier-Slice tomography theorem. Here, using the functional similarity between transmission tomography and reflective tomography, we add the collinear reflective projections to become corresponding transmissive projections before Fourier transform. Then the target can be reconstructed from the Fourier domain using the same operations in transmission tomography. The computer simulation result demonstrates the effectiveness of this modified algorithm to reconstruct image in reflective tomography using the diffuse reflection model (lamberts body). Future research will include the development of image reconstruction based on this modified algorithm for targets with much more complicated reflective characters.

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING. VOL. IO. NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 1991 413 Selection of a Convolution Function for Fourier

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    Function for Fourier Inversion Using Gridding John I. Jackson, Craig H. Meyer, Dwight G. Nishimura, Member resonance imaging, Fourier inversion of data not falling on a Cartesian grid has been a prbblem. As a result with a finite kernel, then resampled on a grid pre- paratory to a fast Fourier transform. This paper compares

  12. Fourier magnetic imaging with nanoscale resolution and compressed sensing speed-up using electronic spins in diamond.

    PubMed

    Arai, K; Belthangady, C; Zhang, H; Bar-Gill, N; DeVience, S J; Cappellaro, P; Yacoby, A; Walsworth, R L

    2015-10-01

    Optically detected magnetic resonance using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond is a leading modality for nanoscale magnetic field imaging, as it provides single electron spin sensitivity, three-dimensional resolution better than 1?nm (ref. 5) and applicability to a wide range of physical and biological samples under ambient conditions. To date, however, NV-diamond magnetic imaging has been performed using 'real-space' techniques, which are either limited by optical diffraction to ?250?nm resolution or require slow, point-by-point scanning for nanoscale resolution, for example, using an atomic force microscope, magnetic tip, or super-resolution optical imaging. Here, we introduce an alternative technique of Fourier magnetic imaging using NV-diamond. In analogy with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we employ pulsed magnetic field gradients to phase-encode spatial information on NV electronic spins in wavenumber or 'k-space' followed by a fast Fourier transform to yield real-space images with nanoscale resolution, wide field of view and compressed sensing speed-up. PMID:26258549

  13. Fourier magnetic imaging with nanoscale resolution and compressed sensing speed-up using electronic spins in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, K.; Belthangady, C.; Zhang, H.; Bar-Gill, N.; Devience, S. J.; Cappellaro, P.; Yacoby, A.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2015-10-01

    Optically detected magnetic resonance using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond is a leading modality for nanoscale magnetic field imaging, as it provides single electron spin sensitivity, three-dimensional resolution better than 1?nm (ref. 5) and applicability to a wide range of physical and biological samples under ambient conditions. To date, however, NV-diamond magnetic imaging has been performed using ‘real-space’ techniques, which are either limited by optical diffraction to ˜250?nm resolution or require slow, point-by-point scanning for nanoscale resolution, for example, using an atomic force microscope, magnetic tip, or super-resolution optical imaging. Here, we introduce an alternative technique of Fourier magnetic imaging using NV-diamond. In analogy with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we employ pulsed magnetic field gradients to phase-encode spatial information on NV electronic spins in wavenumber or ‘k-space’ followed by a fast Fourier transform to yield real-space images with nanoscale resolution, wide field of view and compressed sensing speed-up.

  14. Fabrication and Testing of Binary-Phase Fourier Gratings for Nonuniform Array Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Crow, Robert W.; Ashley, Paul R.; Nelson, Tom R., Jr.; Parker, Jack H.; Beecher, Elizabeth A.

    2004-01-01

    This effort describes the fabrication and testing of binary-phase Fourier gratings designed to generate an incoherent array of output source points with nonuniform user-defined intensities, symmetric about the zeroth order. Like Dammann fanout gratings, these binary-phase Fourier gratings employ only two phase levels to generate a defined output array. Unlike Dammann fanout gratings, these gratings generate an array of nonuniform, user-defined intensities when projected into the far-field regime. The paper describes the process of design, fabrication, and testing for two different version of the binary-phase grating; one designed for a 12 micron wavelength, referred to as the Long-Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) grating, and one designed for a 5 micron wavelength, referred to as the Mid-Wavelength Infrared Grating (MWIR).

  15. Terahertz holography for imaging amplitude and phase objects.

    PubMed

    Hack, Erwin; Zolliker, Peter

    2014-06-30

    A non-monochromatic THz Quantum Cascade Laser and an uncooled micro-bolometer array detector with VGA resolution are used in a beam-splitter free holographic set-up to measure amplitude and phase objects in transmission. Phase maps of the diffraction pattern are retrieved using the Fourier transform carrier fringe method; while a Fresnel-Kirchhoff back propagation algorithm is used to reconstruct the complex object image. A lateral resolution of 280 µm and a relative phase sensitivity of about 0.5 rad are estimated from reconstructed images of a metallic Siemens star and a polypropylene test structure, respectively. Simulations corroborate the experimental results. PMID:24977861

  16. Multiple phase estimation via signal separation using a windowed Fourier transform in digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh; Rastogi, Pramod

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel method for the simultaneous estimation of multiple interference phases from a single recording of the interference field in a multi-wave digital holographic interferometry set-up. The method involves the separation of signal components from the recorded interference field based on windowed Fourier transform based filtering and amplitude discrimination criteria. The proposed method possesses the advantages offered by windowed Fourier transform based filtering such as noise robustness and a high quality reconstruction of the signal components. The performance of the method is validated with numerical and experimental examples.

  17. Spectral multiplexing and coherent-state decomposition in Fourier ptychographic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Siyuan; Shiradkar, Radhika; Nanda, Pariksheet; Zheng, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Information multiplexing is important for biomedical imaging and chemical sensing. In this paper, we report a microscopy imaging technique, termed state-multiplexed Fourier ptychography (FP), for information multiplexing and coherent-state decomposition. Similar to a typical Fourier ptychographic setting, we use an array of light sources to illuminate the sample from different incident angles and acquire corresponding low-resolution images using a monochromatic camera. In the reported technique, however, multiple light sources are lit up simultaneously for information multiplexing, and the acquired images thus represent incoherent summations of the sample transmission profiles corresponding to different coherent states. We show that, by using the state-multiplexed FP recovery routine, we can decompose the incoherent mixture of the FP acquisitions to recover a high-resolution sample image. We also show that, color-multiplexed imaging can be performed by simultaneously turning on R/G/B LEDs for data acquisition. The reported technique may provide a solution for handling the partially coherent effect of light sources used in Fourier ptychographic imaging platforms. It can also be used to replace spectral filter, gratings or other optical components for spectral multiplexing and demultiplexing. With the availability of cost-effective broadband LEDs, the reported technique may open up exciting opportunities for computational multispectral imaging. PMID:24940538

  18. Fourier Transformed Spectral Bio-imaging for Studying the Intracellular Fate of Liposomes

    E-print Network

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Fourier Transformed Spectral Bio-imaging for Studying the Intracellular Fate of Liposomes Ulrich of liposomal drug targeting systems, it is necessary to understand the mechanism of liposome uptake by the cell and to follow the intracellular fate of internalized liposomes and their contents. Methods: We applied multiple

  19. Ultra-Rapid Categorization of Fourier-Spectrum Equalized Natural Images: Macaques and Humans

    E-print Network

    Ultra-Rapid Categorization of Fourier-Spectrum Equalized Natural Images: Macaques and Humans of object from any natural scene under ultra-rapid time constraints, seem to be present in rhesus macaque feedforward magnocellular signal. Citation: Girard P, Koenig-Robert R (2011) Ultra-Rapid Categorization

  20. CaJ!'ll'eLV:L{li Compact snapshot birefringent imaging Fourier transform

    E-print Network

    Dereniak, Eustace L.

    . Merlet, M. T. Gruneisen, M. Dusek, J. G. Rarity, G. J. Bishop, J. Gonglewski, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8542a CaJ!'ll'eLV:L{li .7Ktlif1=: Compact snapshot birefringent imaging Fourier transform spectrometer for remote sensing and endoscopy Michael W. Kudenov1 , Bhaskar Banerjee2 , Victoria C. Chan2 , and Eustace L

  1. Amplified dispersive Fourier-transform imaging for ultrafast displacement sensing and barcode reading

    E-print Network

    Jalali. Bahram

    Amplified dispersive Fourier-transform imaging for ultrafast displacement sensing and barcode and, more importantly, enables fast real-time measurements. Here we describe a novel ultrafast barcode. This technique amplifies and simultaneously maps the spectrally encoded barcode into a temporal waveform

  2. Phase-image-based content-addressable holographic data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Renu; Joseph, Joby; Singh, Kehar

    2004-03-01

    We propose and demonstrate the use of phase images for content-addressable holographic data storage. Use of binary phase-based data pages with 0 and ? phase changes, produces uniform spectral distribution at the Fourier plane. The absence of strong DC component at the Fourier plane and more intensity of higher order spatial frequencies facilitate better recording of higher spatial frequencies, and improves the discrimination capability of the content-addressable memory. This improves the results of the associative recall in a holographic memory system, and can give low number of false hits even for small search arguments. The phase-modulated pixels also provide an opportunity of subtraction among data pixels leading to better discrimination between similar data pages.

  3. Image Stability Requirements For a Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, G. E.; Cantwell, G.; Robinson, R. C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Smith, W. L.

    2001-01-01

    A Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) has been selected for the NASA New Millennium Program (NMP) Earth Observing-3 (EO-3) mission. Our paper will discuss one of the key GIFTS measurement requirements, Field of View (FOV) stability, and its impact on required system performance. The GIFTS NMP mission is designed to demonstrate new and emerging sensor and data processing technologies with the goal of making revolutionary improvements in meteorological observational capability and forecasting accuracy. The GIFTS payload is a versatile imaging FTS with programmable spectral resolution and spatial scene selection that allows radiometric accuracy and atmospheric sounding precision to be traded in near real time for area coverage. The GIFTS sensor combines high sensitivity with a massively parallel spatial data collection scheme to allow high spatial resolution measurement of the Earth's atmosphere and rapid broad area coverage. An objective of the GIFTS mission is to demonstrate the advantages of high spatial resolution (4 km ground sample distance - gsd) on temperature and water vapor retrieval by allowing sampling in broken cloud regions. This small gsd, combined with the relatively long scan time required (approximately 10 s) to collect high resolution spectra from geostationary (GEO) orbit, may require extremely good pointing control. This paper discusses the analysis of this requirement.

  4. Fourier spectrum and phases for a signal in a finite interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmont, Gérard; Dorville, Nicolas; Sahraoui, Fouad; Rezeau, Laurence

    2015-04-01

    When investigating the physics of turbulent media, as the solar wind or the magnetosheath plasmas, obtaining accurate Fourier spectra and phases is a crucial issue. For the different fields, the spectra allow in particular verifying whether one or several power laws can be determined in different frequency ranges. Accurate phases are necessary as well for all the "higher order statistics" studies in Fourier space, the coherence ones and for the polarization studies. Unfortunately, the Fourier analysis is not unique for a finite time interval of duration T: the frequencies lower than 1/T have a large influence on the result, which can hardly be controlled. This unknown "trend" has in particular the effect of introducing jumps at the edges of the interval, for the function under study itself, as well as for all its derivatives. The Fourier transform obtained directly by FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) is generally much influenced by these effects and cannot be used without care for wide band signals. The interference between the jumps and the signal itself provide in particular characteristic "hairs" on the spectrum, which are clearly visible on it with df?1/T. These fluctuations are usually eliminated by smoothing the spectrum, or by averaging several successive spectra. Nevertheless, such treatments introduce uncertainties on the spectral laws (the phases being anyway completely lost). Windowing is also a method currently used to suppress or decrease the jumps, but it modifies the signal (the windowed trend has a spectrum, which is convolved with the searched one) and the phases are generally much altered. Here, we present a new data processing technique to circumvent these difficulties. It takes advantage of the fact that the signal is generally not unknown out of the interval under study: the complete signal is tapered to this interval of interest thanks to a new window function, sharp but not square. This window function is chosen such that the spectrum obtained can be deconvolved almost exactly, through a minimization procedure based on the -weak- hypothesis that it is smooth at the scale of a few successive spectral points. Then, a later step allows reconstructing the phases. Tests with synthetic data and first applications to Cluster data are presented, which demonstrate the capability of the method to better estimate the Fourier spectra.

  5. Single-channel color image encryption based on iterative fractional Fourier transform and chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Liansheng; Gao, Bo

    2013-06-01

    A single-channel color image encryption is proposed based on iterative fractional Fourier transform and two-coupled logistic map. Firstly, a gray scale image is constituted with three channels of the color image, and permuted by a sequence of chaotic pairs which is generated by two-coupled logistic map. Firstly, the permutation image is decomposed into three components again. Secondly, the first two components are encrypted into a single one based on iterative fractional Fourier transform. Similarly, the interim image and third component are encrypted into the final gray scale ciphertext with stationary white noise distribution, which has camouflage property to some extent. In the process of encryption and description, chaotic permutation makes the resulting image nonlinear and disorder both in spatial domain and frequency domain, and the proposed iterative fractional Fourier transform algorithm has faster convergent speed. Additionally, the encryption scheme enlarges the key space of the cryptosystem. Simulation results and security analysis verify the feasibility and effectiveness of this method.

  6. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy. PMID:26334858

  7. The Phase Derivative Around Zeros of the Short-Time Fourier Transform

    E-print Network

    Balazs, Peter; Jaillet, Florent; Søndergaard, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The phase of the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) is sometimes considered difficult to interpret. However, the phase information is important for improved analysis and processing. The phase derivative, in particular, is essential for the reassignment method or the phase vocoder algorithm. In order to understand the phase derivative of the STFT more thoroughly, we describe an interesting phenomenon, a recurring pattern in the neighborhood of zeros. Contrary to the possible expectation of an arbitrary behavior, the phase derivative always shows a singularity with the same characteristic shape with a negative and a positive peak of infinite height at these points. We show this behavior in a numerical investigation, present a simple explicit analytic example and then do a complete analytical treatment. For this we present several intermediate results about the regularity of the STFT for Schwartz windows, which are of independent interest.

  8. Instrumental phase-based method for Fourier transform spectrometer measurements processing

    SciTech Connect

    Saggin, Bortolino; Scaccabarozzi, Diego; Tarabini, Marco

    2011-04-20

    Phase correction is a critical procedure for most space-borne Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs) whose accuracy (owing to often poor signal-to-noise ratio, SNR) can be jeopardized from many uncontrollable environmental conditions. This work considers the phase correction in an FTS working under significant temperature change during the measurement and affected by mechanical disturbances. The implemented method is based on the identification of an instrumental phase that is dependent on the interferometer temperature and on the extraction of a linear phase component through a least-squares approach. The use of an instrumental phase parameterized with the interferometer temperature eases the determination of the linear phase that can be extracted using only a narrow spectral region selected to be immune from disturbances. The procedure, in this way, is made robust against phase errors arising from instrumental effects, a key feature to reduce the disturbances through spectra averaging. The method was specifically developed for the Mars IR Mapper spectrometer, that was designed for operation onboard a rover on the Mars surface; the validation was performed using ground and in-flight measurements of the Fourier transform IR spectrometer planetary Fourier spectrometer, onboard the MarsExpress mission. The symmetrization has been exploited also for the spectra calibration, highlighting the issues deriving from the cases of relevant beamsplitter emission. The applicability of this procedure to other instruments is conditional to the presence in the spectra of at least one spectral region with a large SNR along with a negligible (or known) beamsplitter emission. For the PFS instrument, the processing of data with relevant beamsplitter emission has been performed exploiting the absorption carbon dioxide bands present in Martian spectra.

  9. Instrumental phase-based method for Fourier transform spectrometer measurements processing.

    PubMed

    Saggin, Bortolino; Scaccabarozzi, Diego; Tarabini, Marco

    2011-04-20

    Phase correction is a critical procedure for most space-borne Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs) whose accuracy (owing to often poor signal-to-noise ratio, SNR) can be jeopardized from many uncontrollable environmental conditions. This work considers the phase correction in an FTS working under significant temperature change during the measurement and affected by mechanical disturbances. The implemented method is based on the identification of an instrumental phase that is dependent on the interferometer temperature and on the extraction of a linear phase component through a least-squares approach. The use of an instrumental phase parameterized with the interferometer temperature eases the determination of the linear phase that can be extracted using only a narrow spectral region selected to be immune from disturbances. The procedure, in this way, is made robust against phase errors arising from instrumental effects, a key feature to reduce the disturbances through spectra averaging. The method was specifically developed for the Mars IR Mapper spectrometer, that was designed for operation onboard a rover on the Mars surface; the validation was performed using ground and in-flight measurements of the Fourier transform IR spectrometer planetary Fourier spectrometer, onboard the MarsExpress mission. The symmetrization has been exploited also for the spectra calibration, highlighting the issues deriving from the cases of relevant beamsplitter emission. The applicability of this procedure to other instruments is conditional to the presence in the spectra of at least one spectral region with a large SNR along with a negligible (or known) beamsplitter emission. For the PFS instrument, the processing of data with relevant beamsplitter emission has been performed exploiting the absorption carbon dioxide bands present in Martian spectra. PMID:21509063

  10. A compact Fourier transform imaging spectrometer employing a variable gap Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, Paul G.; Akagi, Jason; Bingham, Adam L.; Hinrichs, John L.; Knobbe, Edward T.

    2014-05-01

    Fourier transform spectroscopy is a widely employed method for obtaining visible and infrared spectral imagery, with applications ranging from the desktop to remote sensing. Most fielded Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) employ the Michelson interferometer and measure the spectrum encoded in a time-varying signal imposed by the source spectrum interaction with the interferometer. A second, less widely used form of FTS is the spatial FTS, where the spectrum is encoded in a pattern sampled by a detector array. Recently we described using a Fabry-Perot interferometer, with a deliberately wedged gap geometry and engineered surface reflectivities, to produce an imaging spatial FTS. The Fabry-Perot interferometer can be much lighter and more compact than a conventional interferometer configuration, thereby making them suitable for portable and handheld applications. This approach is suitable for use over many spectral regimes of interest, including visible and infrared regions. Primary efforts to date have focused on development and demonstration of long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral imagers. The LWIR version of the miniaturized Fabry-Perot has been shown to be effective for various applications including spectral imaging-based chemical detection. The compact LWIR spectral imager employs uncooled optics and a microbolometer camera; a handheld version is envisioned for future development. Recent advancements associated with the spatial Fourier Transform imaging spectrometer system are described.

  11. Digital watermarking algorithm research of color images based on quaternion Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Mali; Wang, Weijiang; Zhao, Zhen

    2013-10-01

    A watermarking algorithm of color images based on the quaternion Fourier Transform (QFFT) and improved quantization index algorithm (QIM) is proposed in this paper. The original image is transformed by QFFT, the watermark image is processed by compression and quantization coding, and then the processed watermark image is embedded into the components of the transformed original image. It achieves embedding and blind extraction of the watermark image. The experimental results show that the watermarking algorithm based on the improved QIM algorithm with distortion compensation achieves a good tradeoff between invisibility and robustness, and better robustness for the attacks of Gaussian noises, salt and pepper noises, JPEG compression, cropping, filtering and image enhancement than the traditional QIM algorithm.

  12. Fourier-based linear systems description of free-breathing pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaldi, D. P. I.; Svenningsen, S.; Cunningham, I. A.; Parraga, G.

    2015-03-01

    Fourier-decomposition of free-breathing pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging (FDMRI) was recently piloted as a way to provide rapid quantitative pulmonary maps of ventilation and perfusion without the use of exogenous contrast agents. This method exploits fast pulmonary MRI acquisition of free-breathing proton (1H) pulmonary images and non-rigid registration to compensate for changes in position and shape of the thorax associated with breathing. In this way, ventilation imaging using conventional MRI systems can be undertaken but there has been no systematic evaluation of fundamental image quality measurements based on linear systems theory. We investigated the performance of free-breathing pulmonary ventilation imaging using a Fourier-based linear system description of each operation required to generate FDMRI ventilation maps. Twelve subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchiectasis underwent pulmonary function tests and MRI. Non-rigid registration was used to co-register the temporal series of pulmonary images. Pulmonary voxel intensities were aligned along a time axis and discrete Fourier transforms were performed on the periodic signal intensity pattern to generate frequency spectra. We determined the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the FDMRI ventilation maps using a conventional approach (SNRC) and using the Fourier-based description (SNRF). Mean SNR was 4.7 ± 1.3 for subjects with bronchiectasis and 3.4 ± 1.8, for COPD subjects (p>.05). SNRF was significantly different than SNRC (p<.01). SNRF was approximately 50% of SNRC suggesting that the linear system model well-estimates the current approach.

  13. Fourier-domain mode delay measurement for multimode fibers using phase detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chan-Young; Ahn, Tae-Jung

    2015-06-01

    We have proposed a powerful method based on a phase detection reflectometric technique to solve the difficulty of the small signal discrimination in the amplitude-detection method for differential modal delay measurement of multimode optical fibers (MMFs). The phase is radically shifted to ? at the time delay positions among the excited modes even when the amplitudes of the peaks cannot be distinguished with the noise level. The modal dispersion of the MMF under test can be simply determined by choosing the time delay in the last phase shift in the Fourier domain. In addition, we confirmed that the phase-sensitive interferometric measurement does not need to scramble the excited modes in the fiber. We subsequently conclude that a portable modal dispersion or mode analysis equipment can be developed by using the phase-detection intermodal interferometric technique proposed here.

  14. Correlating Fourier phase information with real-space higher order statistics in CMB data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modest, H. I.; Räth, C.; Banday, A. J.; Górski, K. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2014-06-01

    We present a heuristic study on the correlations between harmonic space phase information and higher-order statistics. Using the spherical full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background as an example, we demonstrate that known phase correlations at large spatial scales can gradually be diminished when subtracting a suitable best-fit (Bianchi-)template map of a given strength. The weaker phase correlations are attended by a vanishing signature of anisotropy when measuring the Minkowski functionals and scaling indices in real space with the aid of surrogate maps being free of phase correlations. Those investigations can open a new road to a better understanding of signatures of non-Gaussianities in complex spatial structures, especially by elucidating the meaning of Fourier phase correlations and their influence on higher-order statistics.

  15. Parameter estimation of optical fringes with quadratic phase using the fractional Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming-Feng; Zhang, Feng; Tao, Ran; Ni, Guo-Qiang; Bai, Ting-Zhu; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2015-11-01

    Optical fringes with a quadratic phase are often encountered in optical metrology. Parameter estimation of such fringes plays an important role in interferometric measurements. A novel method is proposed for accurate and direct parameter estimation using the fractional Fourier transform (FRFT), even in the presence of noise and obstacles. We take Newton's rings fringe patterns and electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) interferograms as classic examples of optical fringes that have a quadratic phase and present simulation and experimental results demonstrating the performance of the proposed method.

  16. Fourier spectrum and phases for a signal in a finite interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorville, N.; Belmont, G.; Sahraoui, F.; Rezeau, L.

    2014-12-01

    When investigating the physics of turbulent media, as the solar wind or the magnetosheath plasmas, obtaining accurate Fourier spectra and phases is a crucial issue. For the different fields, the spectra allow in particular verifying whether one or several power laws can be determined in different frequency ranges. Accurate phases are necessary as well for all the "higher order statistics" studies in Fourier space, the coherence ones and for the polarization studies. Unfortunately, the Fourier analysis is not unique for a finite time interval of duration T: the frequencies lower than 1/T have a large influence on the result, which can hardly be controlled. This unknown "trend" has in particular the effect of superposing jumps at the edges of the interval, for the function under study itself, as well as for all its derivatives. The Fourier transform obtained directly by FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) is generally much influenced by these effects and cannot be used without care for wide band signals. The interferences between the jumps and the signal itself also provide "hairs" on the spectrum, which are clearly visible fluctuations with df?1/T. These fluctuations are usually eliminated by smoothing the spectrum, or by averaging several successive spectra. Nevertheless, such smoothing introduces uncertainties on the spectral laws and it makes the phases lost. Windowing is also a method currently used to suppress the jumps, but it modifies the signal (the windowed trend has a spectrum, which is convolved with the searched one) and the phases are also lost to a large extent. Here, we present a new data processing technique to circumvent these difficulties. It takes advantage of the fact that the signal is generally not unknown out of the interval under study: the complete signal is tapered to this interval of interest thanks to a new kind of window, sharp but not square. This kind of window is such that the spectrum obtained can then be deconvolved almost exactly, through a minimization procedure based on the -weak- hypothesis that it is smooth at the scale of a few successive spectral points. Then, a later step allows reconstructing the phases. Tests with synthetic data are presented, that demonstrate the efficiency of the method, and first results from Cluster data are also shown.

  17. Mid-infrared imaging Fourier transform spectrometry for high power fiber laser irradiated fiberglass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, R. I.; Gross, K. C.; Perram, G. P.

    2012-03-01

    New measurement techniques to study continuous wave (CW) laser-material interactions are emerging with the ability to monitor the evolving, spatial distribution of the state of the surface-gas boundary layer. A qualitative analysis of gas phase combustion plumes above the surface of laser irradiated fiberglass composites is developed from fast framing hyperspectral imagery observations. An imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) operating in the mid-infrared (MWIR) with high framing rate has recently been developed at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) in collaboration with Telops Inc. A 320 x 256 indium antimonide (InSb) focal plane array with spectral response from 1.5 - 5.5 ?m is mated with a Michelson interferometer to achieve spectral resolutions as high as 0.25 cm-1. The very fast 16- tap InSb array frames at 1.9 kHz for the full 320 x 256 frame size. The single pixel field of view of 0.3 mrad provides a spatial resolution of 1 mm at the minimum focal distance of 3 m. Painted and unpainted fiberglass composites are irradiated with a 1064 nm CW Nd:YAG laser for 60 s at 100 W in air at atmospheric pressure. Selective emission in the region of 2100 - 3200 cm-1 is readily evident and is used to develop a time-dependent spatial map of both temperature and plume constituents. The time evolution of gas phase combustion products such as CO and CO2 molecules are monitored, with a spectral resolution of 2 cm-1. High-speed imagery is obtained using a low-pass filter for the interferograms, illustrating significant turbulent behavior during laser irradiation. Spatial brightness temperature maps exceed 600 K. Spatial variation in the ratio of [CO2]/[CO] indicates an interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous kinetics.

  18. Fourier transform holography with high harmonic spectra for attosecond imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gareth O; Gonzalez, A I; Künzel, S; Li, L; Lozano, M; Oliva, E; Iwan, B; Daboussi, S; Boutu, W; Merdji, H; Fajardo, M; Zeitoun, Ph

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a method of using a Fourier holographic technique to utilize attosecond soft x-ray pulses to image nanometer-scale objects. A discrete frequency comb of laser-generated high-order harmonics, yielding a train of attosecond pulses, has been used to record spatially and spectrally resolved images. The individual wavelengths were also combined to form a single image, albeit with lower spatial resolution, demonstrating the applicability of the method to using isolated attosecond pulses with continuous bandwidths. PMID:26125403

  19. A non-linear preprocessing for opto-digital image encryption using multiple-parameter discrete fractional Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoug, Seif Eddine; Bouguezel, Saad

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel opto-digital image encryption technique is proposed by introducing a new non-linear preprocessing and using the multiple-parameter discrete fractional Fourier transform (MPDFrFT). The non-linear preprocessing is performed digitally on the input image in the spatial domain using a piecewise linear chaotic map (PLCM) coupled with the bitwise exclusive OR (XOR). The resulting image is multiplied by a random phase mask before applying the MPDFrFT to whiten the image. Then, a chaotic permutation is performed on the output of the MPDFrFT using another PLCM different from the one used in the spatial domain. Finally, another MPDFrFT is applied to obtain the encrypted image. The parameters of the PLCMs together with the multiple fractional orders of the MPDFrFTs constitute the secret key for the proposed cryptosystem. Computer simulation results and security analysis are presented to show the robustness of the proposed opto-digital image encryption technique and the great importance of the new non-linear preprocessing introduced to enhance the security of the cryptosystem and overcome the problem of linearity encountered in the existing permutation-based opto-digital image encryption schemes.

  20. A Bayesian approach to Fourier Synthesis inverse problem with application in SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sha; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we propose a Bayesian approach to the ill-posed inverse problem of Fourier synthesis (FS) which consists in reconstructing a function from partial knowledge of its Fourier Transform (FT) with application in SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imaging. The function to be estimated represents an image of the observed scene. Considering this observed scene is mainly composed of point sources, we propose to use a Generalized Gaussian (GG) prior model, and then the Maximum A posterior (MAP) estimator as the desired solution. In particular, we are interested in bi-static case of spotlight-mode SAR data. In a first step, we consider real valued reflectivities but we account for the complex value of the measured data. The relation between the Fourier transform of the measured data and the unknown scene reflectivity is modeled by a 2D spatial FT. The inverse problem becomes then a FS and depending on the geometry of the data acquisition, only the set of locations in the Fourier space are different. We give a detailed modeling of the data acquisition process that we simulated, then apply the proposed method on those synthetic data to measure its performances compared to some other classical methods. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the method on experimental SAR data obtained in a collaborative work by ONERA.

  1. X-ray Phase Imaging Microscopy with Two-Dimensional Knife-Edge Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaeho; Park, Yong-Sung

    2012-04-01

    A novel scheme of X-ray differential phase imaging was implemented with an array source and a two-dimensional Foucault knife-edge (2DFK). A pinhole array lens was employed to manipulate the X-ray beam on the Fourier space. An emerging biaxial scanning procedure was also demonstrated with the periodic 2DFK. The differential phase images (DPIs) of the midrib in a leaf of a rose bush were visualized to verify the phase imaging of biological specimens by the proposed method. It also has features of depicting multiple-stack phase images, and rendering morphological DPIs, because it acquires pure phase information.

  2. PHASE CORRELATION METHOD FOR THE ALIGNMENT OF TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Druckmueller, M.

    2009-12-01

    A modified phase correlation method, based on Fourier transform, which enables the alignment of solar coronal images taken during the total solar eclipses, is presented. The method enables the measurement of translation, rotation, and scaling factor between two images. With the application of this technique, pairs of images with different exposure times, different brightness scale, such as linear for CCD and nonlinear for images taken with photographic film, and even images from different emission lines can be aligned with sub-pixel precision.

  3. Identification of Earthquake Induced Damage Areas Using Fourier Transform and SPOT HRVIR Pan Images

    PubMed Central

    Sertel, Elif

    2009-01-01

    A devastating earthquake with a magnitude of Mw 7.4 occurred on the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) of Turkey on August 17, 1999 at 00:01:39 UTC (3:01 a.m. local time). The aim of this study is to propose a new approach to automatically identify earthquake induced damage areas which can provide valuable information to support emergency response and recovery assessment procedures. This research was conducted in the Adapazari inner city, covering a 3 × 3 km area, where 11,373 buildings collapsed as a result of the earthquake. SPOT high resolution visible infrared (HRVIR) Pan images obtained before (25 June 1999) and after (4 October 1999) the earthquake were used in the study. Five steps were employed to conduct the research and these are: (i) geometric and radiometric correction of satellite images, (ii) Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of pre- and post-earthquake images and filtering the images in frequency domain, (iii) generating difference image using Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT) pre- and post- earthquake images, (iv) application of level slicing to difference image to identify the earthquake-induced damages, (v) accuracy assessment of the method using ground truth obtained from a 1/5,000 scale damage map. The total accuracy obtained in the research is 80.19 %, illustrating that the proposed method can be successfully used to automatically identify earthquake-induced damage areas. PMID:22573966

  4. Novel all-reflective Fourier transform imaging spectrometer based on Fresnel double-mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Liao, Ningfang; Liang, Minyong; Lin, Yu; Luo, Yongdao; Cui, Deqi

    2007-11-01

    In order to develop new technology during the spaceborne remote sensing mission, we introduce a novel all-reflective Fourier Transform Imaging Spectrometer(FTIS) based on Fresenel Double Mirror (FDM). Using all reflective parts, the system can work in visible and infrared waveband. Besides, the novel optical configuration which is involved can lead to the characters of the high spatial, spectral resolution and large field of view. The basic performance of the system was analyzed based on the test results.

  5. A Fourier transform telescope for sub-arcsecond imaging of X-rays and gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Hurford, G. J.; Prince, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a Fourier transform telescope designed to image solar flare X-rays and gamma rays at energies up to 1 MeV with arcsec resolution. The imaging technique makes use of a bigrid collimator divided into a number of smaller areas called subcollimators. The grids in each subcollimator consist of a set of linear apertures so configured that each subcollimator provides a measurement of a single Fourier component of the angular distribution of the source. The imaging concept is therefore a mathematical analog to aperture synthesis in radio astronomy. For X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, this approach has significant advantages in terms of relaxed requirements for astronomy, this approach has significant advantages in terms of relaxed requirements for position sensitivity in the detector and for control of grid alignment in the large scale telescope structure. The concept of the Fourier transform telescope will be illustrated with numerical parameters of a version now under study for the Pinhole/Occulter Facility.

  6. Mapping agroecological zones and time lag in vegetation growth by means of Fourier analysis of time series of NDVI images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menenti, M.; Azzali, S.; Verhoef, W.; Van Swol, R.

    1993-01-01

    Examples are presented of applications of a fast Fourier transform algorithm to analyze time series of images of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index values. The results obtained for a case study on Zambia indicated that differences in vegetation development among map units of an existing agroclimatic map were not significant, while reliable differences were observed among the map units obtained using the Fourier analysis.

  7. Evaluation of Fourier transform coefficients for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis from diffuse optical tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montejo, Ludguier D.; Jia, Jingfei; Kim, Hyun K.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2013-03-01

    We apply the Fourier Transform to absorption and scattering coefficient images of proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints and evaluate the performance of these coefficients as classifiers using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. We find 25 features that yield a Youden index over 0.7, 3 features that yield a Youden index over 0.8, and 1 feature that yields a Youden index over 0.9 (90.0% sensitivity and 100% specificity). In general, scattering coefficient images yield better one-dimensional classifiers compared to absorption coefficient images. Using features derived from scattering coefficient images we obtain an average Youden index of 0.58 +/- 0.16, and an average Youden index of 0.45 +/- 0.15 when using features from absorption coefficient images.

  8. High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    DOEpatents

    Olivier, Scot S. (Livermore, CA); Werner, John S. (Davis, CA); Zawadzki, Robert J. (Sacramento, CA); Laut, Sophie P. (Pasedena, CA); Jones, Steven M. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-09-07

    This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

  9. Imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy of the boundary layer plume from laser irradiated polymers and carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Roberto I.

    The high-energy laser (HEL) lethality community needs for enhanced laser weapons systems requires a better understanding of a wide variety of emerging threats. In order to reduce the dimensionality of laser-materials interaction it is necessary to develop novel predictive capabilities of these events. The objective is to better understand the fundamentals of laser lethality testing by developing empirical models from hyperspectral imagery, enabling a robust library of experiments for vulnerability assessments. Emissive plumes from laser irradiated fiberglass reinforced polymers (FRP), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and porous graphite targets were investigated primarily using a mid-wave infrared (MWIR) imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Polymer and graphite targets were irradiated with a continuous wave (cw) fiber lasers. Data was acquired with a spectral resolution of 2 cm-1 and spatial resolution as high as 0.52 mm2 per pixel. Strong emission from H2O, CO, CO2 and hydrocarbons were observed in the MWIR between 1900-4000 cm-1. A single-layer radiative transfer model was developed to estimate spatial maps of temperature and column densities of CO and CO2 from the hyperspectral imagery of the boundary layer plume. The spectral model was used to compute the absorption cross sections of CO and CO2, using spectral line parameters from the high temperature extension of the HITRAN. Also, spatial maps of gas-phase temperature and methyl methacrylate (MMA) concentration were developed from laser irradiated carbon black-pigmented PMMA at irradiances of 4-22 W/cm2. Global kinetics interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous combustion kinetics are shown from experimental observations at high spatial resolutions. Overall the boundary layer profile at steady-state is consistent with CO being mainly produced at the surface by heterogeneous reactions followed by a rapid homogeneous combustion in the boundary layer towards buoyancy.

  10. Fourier synthesis image reconstruction by use of one-dimensional position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Makishima, Kazuo; Okada, Yuu; Negoro, Hitoshi; Terada, Yukikatsu; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oda, Minoru

    2003-07-10

    An improvement of Fourier synthesis optics for hard x-ray imaging is described, and the basic performance of the new optics is confirmed through numerical simulations. The original concept of the Fourier synthesis imager utilizes nonposition-sensitive hard x-ray detectors coupled to individual bigrid modulation collimators. The improved concept employs a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector (such as a CdTe strip detector) instead of the second grid layer of each bigrid modulation collimator. This improves the imaging performance in several respects over the original design. One performance improvement is a two-fold increase in the average transmission, from 1/4 to 1/2. The second merit is that both the sine and cosine components can be derived from a single grid-detector module, and hence the number of imaging modules can be halved. Furthermore, it provides information along the depth direction simultaneously. This in turn enables a three-dimensional imaging hard x-ray microscope for medical diagnostics, incorporating radioactive tracers. A conceptual design of such a microscope is presented, designed to provide a field of view of 4 mm and a spatial resolution of 400 microm. PMID:12856730

  11. In-vivo human corneal nerve imaging using Fourier-domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Eom, Tae Joong; Hwang, Ho Sik

    2015-03-01

    We have imaged human corneal nerve bundles by using real-time Fourier-domain OCT (FD-OCT). Corneal nerves contribute to the maintenance of healthy ocular surface owing to their trophic influences on the corneal epithelium. The FD-OCT system was based on a swept laser of a 50 kHz sweeping rate and 1.31 ?m center wavelength. At the area including sclera, limbus, and cornea, we could successfully get the in-vivo tomograms of the corneal nerve bundles. The scan range was 5 x 5mm. In this study, the A-scan images in each B-scan were realigned to have a flat air-surface boundary in the final B-scan image. With this effort, we could align corneal nerve bundle in a same depth and get the 3D image showing the branched and threadlike corneal nerve bundles.

  12. MightySat II.1 Fourier-transform hyperspectral imager payload performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, Leonard J.; Sellar, R. Glenn; Rafert, J. Bruce

    1995-12-01

    Using a new microsat called MightySat II as a platform, Kestrel Corporation is designing and building the first Fourier transform hyperspectral imager (FTHSI) to be operated from a spacecraft. This payload will also be the first to fly on the Phillips Laboratory MightySat II spacecraft series, a new, innovative approach, to affordable space testing of high risk, high payoff technologies. Performance enhancements offered by the Fourier transform approach have shown it to be one of the more promising spaceborne hyperspectral concepts. Simulations of the payload's performance have shown that the instrument is capable of separating a wide range of subtle spectral differences. Variations in the return from the Georges Bank and shoals are discernible and various types of coastal grasses (sea oats and spartina) can be isolated against a sand background.

  13. Imaging solar flares in hard X-rays using Fourier telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W.; Davis, John M.; Emslie, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    The sun emits hard X-rays (above 10 keV) during solar flares. Imaging hard X-ray sources on the sun with spatial resolutions on the order of 1-5 arcsec and integration times of 1 sec will provide greater insight into the energy release processes during a solar flare. In these events, tremendous amounts of energy stored in the solar magnetic field are rapidly released leading to emission across the electromagnetic spectrum. Two Fourier telescope designs, a spatial modulation collimator and a rotating modulation collimator, were developed to image the full sun in hard X-rays (10-100 keV) in an end-to-end simulation. Emission profiles were derived for two hard X-ray solar flare models taken from the current solar theoretical literature and used as brightness distributions for the telescope simulations. Both our telescope models, tailored to image solar sources, were found to perform equally well, thus offering the designer significant flexibility in developing systems for space-based platforms. Given sufficient sensitive areas, Fourier telescopes are promising concepts for imaging solar hard X-rays.

  14. The New Physical Optics Notebook: Tutorials in Fourier Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, George O.; And Others

    This is a textbook of Fourier optics for the classroom or self-study. Major topics included in the 38 chapters are: Huygens' principle and Fourier transforms; image formation; optical coherence theory; coherent imaging; image analysis; coherent noise; interferometry; holography; communication theory techniques; analog optical computing; phase

  15. Imaging phased telescope array study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The problems encountered in obtaining a wide field-of-view with large, space-based direct imaging phased telescope arrays were considered. After defining some of the critical systems issues, previous relevant work in the literature was reviewed and summarized. An extensive list was made of potential error sources and the error sources were categorized in the form of an error budget tree including optical design errors, optical fabrication errors, assembly and alignment errors, and environmental errors. After choosing a top level image quality requirment as a goal, a preliminary tops-down error budget allocation was performed; then, based upon engineering experience, detailed analysis, or data from the literature, a bottoms-up error budget reallocation was performed in an attempt to achieve an equitable distribution of difficulty in satisfying the various allocations. This exercise provided a realistic allocation for residual off-axis optical design errors in the presence of state-of-the-art optical fabrication and alignment errors. Three different computational techniques were developed for computing the image degradation of phased telescope arrays due to aberrations of the individual telescopes. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses were then performed for a variety of subaperture configurations and telescope design parameters in an attempt to determine how the off-axis performance of a phased telescope array varies as the telescopes are scaled up in size. The Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL) multipurpose telescope testbed (MMTT) configuration was analyzed in detail with regard to image degradation due to field curvature and distortion of the individual telescopes as they are scaled up in size.

  16. Analysis of the Advantages and Limitations of Stationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecken, Brian P.; Kleinman, Randall R.

    2004-01-01

    New developments in infrared sensor technology have potentially made possible a new space-based system which can measure far-infrared radiation at lower costs (mass, power and expense). The Stationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SIFTS) proposed by NASA Langley Research Center, makes use of new detector array technology. A mathematical model which simulates resolution and spectral range relationships has been developed for analyzing the utility of such a radically new approach to spectroscopy. Calculations with this forward model emulate the effects of a detector array on the ability to retrieve accurate spectral features. Initial computations indicate significant attenuation at high wavenumbers.

  17. Functional imaging of hemodynamic stimulus response in the rat retina with ultrahigh-speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Baumann, Bernhard; Clermont, Allen C.; Feener, Edward P.; Boas, David A.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-03-01

    Measuring retinal hemodynamics in response to flicker stimulus is important for investigating pathophysiology in small animal models of diabetic retinopathy, because a reduction in the hyperemic response is thought to be one of the earliest changes in diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we investigated functional imaging of retinal hemodynamics in response to flicker stimulus in the rat retina using an ultrahigh speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT system at 840nm with an axial scan rate of 244kHz. At 244kHz the nominal axial velocity range that could be measured without phase wrapping was +/-37.7mm/s. Pulsatile total retinal arterial blood flow as a function of time was measured using an en face Doppler approach where a 200?m × 200?m area centered at the central retinal artery was repeatedly raster scanned at a volume acquisition rate of 55Hz. Three-dimensional capillary imaging was performed using speckle decorrelation which has minimal angle dependency compared to other angiography techniques based on OCT phase information. During OCT imaging, a flicker stimulus could be applied to the retina synchronously by inserting a dichroic mirror in the imaging interface. An acute transient increase in total retinal blood flow could be detected. At the capillary level, an increase in the degree of speckle decorrelation in capillary OCT angiography images could also be observed, which indicates an increase in the velocity of blood at the capillary level. This method promises to be useful for the investigation of small animal models of ocular diseases.

  18. Fourier transform infared spectroscopic imaging for the identification of concealed drug residue particles and fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Camilla; Chan, K. L. Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    Conventional FTIR spectroscopy and microscopy has been widely used in forensic science. New opportunities exist to obtain rapid chemical images and to enhance the sensitivity of detection of trace materials using attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled with a focal-plane array (FPA) detector. In this work, the sensitivity of ATR-FTIR spectroscopic imaging using three different kinds of ATR crystals (Ge coupled with an infrared microscope, ZnSe and diamond) and resulting in three different optical arrangements for the detection of model drug particles is discussed. Model systems of ibuprofen and paracetamol particles having a size below 32 micrometers have been prepared by sieving. The sensitivity level in the three different approaches has been compared and it has been found that both micro and macro-ATR imaging methods have proven to be a promising techniques for the identification of concealed drug particles. To demonstrate the power and applicability of FTIR chemical imaging to forensic research, various examples are discussed. This includes investigation of the changes of chemical nature of latent fingerprint residue under controlled conditions of humidity and temperature studied by ATR-FTIR imaging. This study demonstrates the potential of spectroscopic imaging for visualizing the chemical changes of fingerprints.

  19. Slit Function Measurement of An Imaging Spectrograph Using Fourier Transform Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Hongwoo; Swimyard, Bruce; Jakobsen, Peter; Moseley, Harvey; Greenhouse, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of a spectrograph slit function is necessary to interpret the unresolved lines in an observed spectrum. A theoretical slit function can be calculated from the sizes of the entrance slit, the detector aperture when it functions as an exit slit, the dispersion characteristic of the disperser, and the point spread function of the spectrograph. A measured slit function is preferred to the theoretical one for the correct interpretation of the spectral data. In a scanning spectrometer with a single exit slit, the slit function is easily measured. In a fixed grating/or disperser spectrograph, illuminating the entrance slit with a near monochromatic light from a pre-monochrmator or a tunable laser and varying the wavelength of the incident light can measure the slit function. Even though the latter technique had been used successfully for the slit function measurements, it had been very laborious and it would be prohibitive to an imaging spectrograph or a multi-object spectrograph that has a large field of view. We explore an alternative technique that is manageable for the measurements. In the proposed technique, the imaging spectrograph is used as a detector of a Fourier transform spectrometer. This method can be applied not only to an IR spectrograph but also has a potential to a visible/UV spectrograph including a wedge filter spectrograph. This technique will require a blackbody source of known temperature and a bolometer to characterize the interferometer part of the Fourier Transform spectrometer. This pa?er will describe the alternative slit function measurement technique using a Fourier transform spectrometer.

  20. Measurement of the mid-infrared Fourier spectroscopic imaging of whole human face by portable apparatus (size: 50*50 mm, weight: 200 g)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wei; Suzuki, Yo; Fujiwara, Masaru; Saito, Tsubasa; Suzuki, Satoru; Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K.; Wada, Kenji; Nishiyama, Akira; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2014-11-01

    In the daily living space, measurement of the biological-substance distributions such as sebum can be realized by the proposed method of imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy. This method has the strong robustness for mechanical vibrations. So, the spectrometer (size: 50*50mm, weight: 200g) can be produced without anti-vibration mechanism. Moreover, the phase shifter is a core part of the spectrometer, and it is constructed by the low-price bimorph type actuator which is depending on the vibration control of the piezoceramic in proposed method. It is appropriate as the actuator of the phase shifter from the evaluation results of the actuator straightness and position accuracy in the midinfrared region. As we know, the Fourier spectroscopy has a high light utilization efficiency. Therefore, the low price microbolometer can be used as the imaging sensor. So, the low-price (10,000 U.S. dollars), compact and high portability spectrometer can be produced. Furthermore, the much higher position accuracy in the short wavelength region is requested as we know, the phase shift correction method has been proposed. In this paper, high performance evaluations of the portable spectroscopy apparatus have been discussed by using the CO2 laser spectroscopy results in the midinfrared region. Then, the phase shift correction method was explained. At the end, we demonstrated the feasibility of the mid-infrared imaging of whole human faces without active illuminations.

  1. Temperature measurement of an axisymmetric flame using phase shift holographic interferometry with fast Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieng, S. M.; Lai, W. Z.

    Because of the importance of the temperature scalar measurements in combination diagonostics, application of phase shift holographic interferometry to temperature measurement of an axisymmetrically premixed flame was experimentally investigated. The test apparatus is an axisymmetric Bunsen burner. Propane of 99 percent purity is used as the gaseous fuel. A fast Fourier transform, a more efficient and accurate approach for Abel inversion, is used for reconstructed the axisymmetric temperature field from the interferometric data. The temperature distribution is compared with the thermocouple-measured values. The comparison shows that the proposed technique is satisfactory. The result errors are analyzed in detail. It is shown that this technique overcomes most of the earlier problems and limitations detrimental to the conventional holographic interferometry.

  2. Hybrid-dual-fourier tomographic algorithm for a fast three-dimensionial optical image reconstruction in turbid media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Cai, Wei (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A reconstruction technique for reducing computation burden in the 3D image processes, wherein the reconstruction procedure comprises an inverse and a forward model. The inverse model uses a hybrid dual Fourier algorithm that combines a 2D Fourier inversion with a 1D matrix inversion to thereby provide high-speed inverse computations. The inverse algorithm uses a hybrid transfer to provide fast Fourier inversion for data of multiple sources and multiple detectors. The forward model is based on an analytical cumulant solution of a radiative transfer equation. The accurate analytical form of the solution to the radiative transfer equation provides an efficient formalism for fast computation of the forward model.

  3. Design of an airborne Fourier transform visible hyperspectral imaging system for light aircraft environmental remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, Leonard John, III; Butler, Eugene W.; Rafert, Bruce; Sellar, R. Glenn

    1995-06-01

    Kestrel Corporation and the Florida Institute of Technology have designed, and are now manufacturing, a Fourier transform visible hyperspectral imager system for use in a single engine light aircraft. The system is composed of a Sagnac-based interferometer optical subsystem, a data management system, and an aircraft attitude and current position sybsystem. The system is designed to have better than 5 nm spectral resolution at 450 nm, operates over the 440 nm to 1150 nm spectral band and has a 2D spatial resolution of 0.8 mrad. An internal calibration source is recorded with every frame of data to retain radiometric accuracy. The entire system fits into a Cessna 206 and uses a conventional downward looking view port located in the baggage compartment. During operation, data are collected at a rate of 15 Mbytes per second and stored direct to a disk array. Data storage has been sized to accommodate 56 minutes of observations. Designed for environmental mapping, this Fourier transform imager has uses in emergency response and military operations.

  4. Modeling the viscoplastic micromechanical response of two-phase materials using fast Fourier transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Lebensohn, Ricardo A; Lee, Sukbin; Rollett, Anthony D

    2009-01-01

    A viscoplastic approach using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method for obtaining local mechanical response is utilized to study microstructure-property relationships in composite materials. Specifically, three-dimensional, two-phase digital materials containing isotropically coarsened particles surrounded by a matrix phase, generated through a Kinetic Monte Carlo Potts model for Ostwald ripening, are used as instantiations in order to calculate the stress and strain rate fields under uniaxial tension. The effects of the morphology of the matrix phase, the volume fraction and the contiguity of particles, and the polycrystallinity of matrix phase, on the stress and strain rate fields under uniaxial tension are examined. It is found that the first moments of the stress and strain rate fields have a different dependence on the particle volume fraction and the particle contiguity from their second moments. The average stresses and average strain rates of both phases and of the overall composite have rather simple relationships with the particle volume fraction whereas their standard deviations vary strongly, especially when the particle volume fraction is high, and the contiguity of particles has a noticeable effect on the mechanical response. It is also found that the shape of stress distribution in the BCC hard particle phase evolves as the volume fraction of particles in the composite varies, such that it agrees with the stress field in the BCC polycrystal as the volume of particles approaches unity. Finally, it is observed that the stress and strain rate fields in the microstructures with a polycrystalline matrix are less sensitive to changes in volume fraction and contiguity of particles.

  5. High-precision and fast computation of Jacobi-Fourier moments for image description.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Bello, C; Toxqui-Quitl, C; Padilla-Vivanco, A; Báez-Rojas, J J

    2014-01-01

    A high-precision and fast algorithm for computation of Jacobi-Fourier moments (JFMs) is presented. A fast recursive method is developed for the radial polynomials that occur in the kernel function of the JFMs. The proposed method is numerically stable and very fast in comparison with the conventional direct method. Moreover, the algorithm is suitable for computation of the JFMs of the highest orders. The JFMs are generic expressions to generate orthogonal moments changing the parameters ? and ? of Jacobi polynomials. The quality of the description of the proposed method with ? and ? parameters known is studied. Also, a search is performed of the best parameters, ? and ?, which significantly improves the quality of the reconstructed image and recognition. Experiments are performed on standard test images with various sets of JFMs to prove the superiority of the proposed method in comparison with the direct method. Furthermore, the proposed method is compared with other existing methods in terms of speed and accuracy. PMID:24561947

  6. Real-time Fourier transform spectrometry for fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Buican, T.N.

    1990-01-01

    We present a Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer that is suitable for real-time spectral analysis in fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry. The instrument consists of a novel type of interferometer that can be modulated at frequencies of up to 100 kHz and has a high light throughput; and a dedicated, parallel array processor for the real-time computation of spectral parameters. The data acquisition array processor can be programmed by a host computer to perform any desired linear transform on the interferogram and can thus separate contributions from multiple fluorescence microscopy. The integration of a flow cytometer and a spectral imaging fluorescence microscope is discussed, and the concepts of direct and reversed virtual sorting'' are introduced. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  7. A Novel Gradient Projection Approach for Fourier-Based Image Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Bonettini, S.; Prato, M.

    2010-09-30

    This work deals with the ill-posed inverse problem of reconstructing a two-dimensional image of an unknown object starting from sparse and nonuniform measurements of its Fourier Transform. In particular, if we consider a priori information about the target image (e.g., the nonnegativity of the pixels), this inverse problem can be reformulated as a constrained optimization problem, in which the stationary points of the objective function can be viewed as the solutions of a deconvolution problem with a suitable kernel. We propose a fast and effective gradient-projection iterative algorithm to provide regularized solutions of such a deconvolution problem by early stopping the iterations. Preliminary results on a real-world application in astronomy are presented.

  8. A Visible, Spatially-Modulated Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SMIFTS) for Astronomical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafert, J. B.; Holbert, E. T.; Rusk, E. T.; Durham, S. E.; Caudill, E.; Keating, D.; Newby, H.

    1992-12-01

    We have constructed several visible, Spatially-Modulated Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers (SMIFTS) for spatially resolved spectral imaging in the visible wavelength region based on work by several authors including Yoshihara and Kitade (1967), Okamoto et al. (1984), Barnes (1985) and Smith and Schempp (1991). Our spectrometers require no moving parts, are compact and enjoy a number of advantages over the other spectral data collection technologies. The unique combination of characteristics define an important niche for astronomical, remote sensing, and reconnaissance spectral data acquisition. Our SMIFTS simultaneously acquires hundreds or thousands of spectral bands for hundreds or thousands of spectral channesl. This type of sensor has been called a "hyperspectral" sensor to emphasize the major quantitative difference between this type of sensor and multispectral imagers which collect only a few spectral bands. The SMIFTS consists of input optics (a telescope), a field limiting aperture, a beamsplitter which divides the input beam into two paths, two mirrors which redirect the split beams through the same path, a collimating lens which forms the interferogram of the input aperture on the detector plane, and a cylindrical imaging lens. Thus on the detector array one axis contains spatial information and the other axis contains the spectral information for each point of the spatial axis. The result of this arrangement is that each row of the detector array contains the interferogram of the corresponding point on the aperture or slit. This slit can be fixed upon the target, or the slit can be scanned across the target to build up a second axis of spatial information resulting in a data set with four dimensions: two spatial, one spectral, and one temporal. We present sample data for both astronomical and remote sensing applications taken with the Malabar SMIFTS. Barnes, T.H. "Photodiode Array Fourier Transform Spectrometer with Improved Dynamic Range", Appl. Opt, 24, 3702, (1985)

  9. Sub-pixel spatial resolution wavefront phase imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Mooney, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A phase imaging method for an optical wavefront acquires a plurality of phase images of the optical wavefront using a phase imager. Each phase image is unique and is shifted with respect to another of the phase images by a known/controlled amount that is less than the size of the phase imager's pixels. The phase images are then combined to generate a single high-spatial resolution phase image of the optical wavefront.

  10. Real-time three-dimensional Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography video image guided microsurgeries

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin U.; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Kang; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Cha, Jaepyeong; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald; Gehlbach, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. The authors describe the development of an ultrafast three-dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging system that provides real-time intraoperative video images of the surgical site to assist surgeons during microsurgical procedures. This system is based on a full-range complex conjugate free Fourier-domain OCT (FD-OCT). The system was built in a CPU-GPU heterogeneous computing architecture capable of video OCT image processing. The system displays at a maximum speed of 10??volume/s for an image volume size of 160×80×1024 (X×Y×Z) pixels. We have used this system to visualize and guide two prototypical microsurgical maneuvers: microvascular anastomosis of the rat femoral artery and ultramicrovascular isolation of the retinal arterioles of the bovine retina. Our preliminary experiments using 3D-OCT-guided microvascular anastomosis showed optimal visualization of the rat femoral artery (diameter<0.8??mm), instruments, and suture material. Real-time intraoperative guidance helped facilitate precise suture placement due to optimized views of the vessel wall during anastomosis. Using the bovine retina as a model system, we have performed “ultra microvascular” feasibility studies by guiding handheld surgical micro-instruments to isolate retinal arterioles (diameter?0.1??mm). Isolation of the microvessels was confirmed by successfully passing a suture beneath the vessel in the 3D imaging environment. PMID:23224164

  11. Ultra-Rapid Categorization of Fourier-Spectrum Equalized Natural Images: Macaques and Humans Perform Similarly

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Pascal; Koenig-Robert, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Background Comparative studies of cognitive processes find similarities between humans and apes but also monkeys. Even high-level processes, like the ability to categorize classes of object from any natural scene under ultra-rapid time constraints, seem to be present in rhesus macaque monkeys (despite a smaller brain and the lack of language and a cultural background). An interesting and still open question concerns the degree to which the same images are treated with the same efficacy by humans and monkeys when a low level cue, the spatial frequency content, is controlled. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a set of natural images equalized in Fourier spectrum and asked whether it is still possible to categorize them as containing an animal and at what speed. One rhesus macaque monkey performed a forced-choice saccadic task with a good accuracy (67.5% and 76% for new and familiar images respectively) although performance was lower than with non-equalized images. Importantly, the minimum reaction time was still very fast (100 ms). We compared the performances of human subjects with the same setup and the same set of (new) images. Overall mean performance of humans was also lower than with original images (64% correct) but the minimum reaction time was still short (140 ms). Conclusion Performances on individual images (% correct but not reaction times) for both humans and the monkey were significantly correlated suggesting that both species use similar features to perform the task. A similar advantage for full-face images was seen for both species. The results also suggest that local low spatial frequency information could be important, a finding that fits the theory that fast categorization relies on a rapid feedforward magnocellular signal. PMID:21326600

  12. Proposal of AAA-battery-size one-shot ATR Fourier spectroscopic imager for on-site analysis: Simultaneous measurement of multi-components with high accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Satsuki; Qi, Wei; Sato, Shun; Suzuki, Yo; Fujiwara, Masaru; Hiramatsu, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satoru; Abeygunawardhana, P. K. W.; Wada, Kenji; Nishiyama, Akira; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    For simultaneous measurement of multi-components on-site like factories, the ultra-compact (diameter: 9[mm], length: 45[mm], weight: 200[g]) one-shot ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) Fourier spectroscopic imager was proposed. Because the proposed one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imaging is based on spatial-phase-shift interferometer, interferograms could be obtained with simple optical configurations. We introduced the transmission-type relativeinclined phase-shifter, that was constructed with a cuboid prism and a wedge prism, onto the optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected optical systems. And also, small light-sources and cameras in the mid-infrared light region, whose size are several millimeter on a side, are essential components for the ultra-compact spectroscopic configuration. We selected the Graphite light source (light source area: 1.7×1.7[mm], maker: Hawkeye technologies) whose radiation factor was high. Fortunately, in these days we could apply the cost-effective 2-dimensional light receiving device for smartphone (e.g. product name: LEPTON, maker: FLIR, price: around 400USD). In the case of alcoholic drinks factory, conventionally workers measure glucose and ethanol concentrations by bringing liquid solution back to laboratories every day. The high portable spectroscopy will make it possible to measure multi-components simultaneously on manufacturing scene. But we found experimentally that absorption spectrum of glucose and water and ethanol were overlapped each other in near infrared light region. But for mid-infrared light region, we could distinguish specific absorption peaks of glucose (@10.5[?m]) and ethanol (@11.5[?m]) independently from water absorption. We obtained standard curve between absorption (@9.6[?m]) and ethanol concentration with high correlation coefficient 0.98 successfully by ATR imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy (wavelength resolution: 0.057[?m]) with the graphite light source (maker: Hawkeye technologies, type: IR-75).

  13. MEMS-Based Handheld Fourier Domain Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography for Intraoperative Microvascular Anastomosis Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Furtmüller, Georg J.; Tong, Dedi; Zhu, Shan; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of a miniature handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT) imager for real time intraoperative vascular patency evaluation in the setting of super-microsurgical vessel anastomosis. Methods A novel handheld imager Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography based on a 1.3-µm central wavelength swept source for extravascular imaging was developed. The imager was minimized through the adoption of a 2.4-mm diameter microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanning mirror, additionally a 12.7-mm diameter lens system was designed and combined with the MEMS mirror to achieve a small form factor that optimize functionality as a handheld extravascular OCT imager. To evaluate in-vivo applicability, super-microsurgical vessel anastomosis was performed in a mouse femoral vessel cut and repair model employing conventional interrupted suture technique as well as a novel non-suture cuff technique. Vascular anastomosis patency after clinically successful repair was evaluated using the novel handheld OCT imager. Results With an adjustable lateral image field of view up to 1.5 mm by 1.5 mm, high-resolution simultaneous structural and flow imaging of the blood vessels were successfully acquired for BALB/C mouse after orthotopic hind limb transplantation using a non-suture cuff technique and BALB/C mouse after femoral artery anastomosis using a suture technique. We experimentally quantify the axial and lateral resolution of the OCT to be 12.6 µm in air and 17.5 µm respectively. The OCT has a sensitivity of 84 dB and sensitivity roll-off of 5.7 dB/mm over an imaging range of 5 mm. Imaging with a frame rate of 36 Hz for an image size of 1000(lateral)×512(axial) pixels using a 50,000 A-lines per second swept source was achieved. Quantitative vessel lumen patency, lumen narrowing and thrombosis analysis were performed based on acquired structure and Doppler images. Conclusions A miniature handheld OCT imager that can be used for intraoperative evaluation of microvascular anastomosis was successfully demonstrated. PMID:25474742

  14. A Fourier-based compressed sensing technique for accelerated CT image reconstruction using first-order methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kihwan; Li, Ruijiang; Nam, Haewon; Xing, Lei

    2014-06-01

    As a solution to iterative CT image reconstruction, first-order methods are prominent for the large-scale capability and the fast convergence rate {O}(1/k^2). In practice, the CT system matrix with a large condition number may lead to slow convergence speed despite the theoretically promising upper bound. The aim of this study is to develop a Fourier-based scaling technique to enhance the convergence speed of first-order methods applied to CT image reconstruction. Instead of working in the projection domain, we transform the projection data and construct a data fidelity model in Fourier space. Inspired by the filtered backprojection formalism, the data are appropriately weighted in Fourier space. We formulate an optimization problem based on weighted least-squares in the Fourier space and total-variation (TV) regularization in image space for parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam CT geometry. To achieve the maximum computational speed, the optimization problem is solved using a fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm with backtracking line search and GPU implementation of projection/backprojection. The performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated through a series of digital simulation and experimental phantom studies. The results are compared with the existing TV regularized techniques based on statistics-based weighted least-squares as well as basic algebraic reconstruction technique. The proposed Fourier-based compressed sensing (CS) method significantly improves both the image quality and the convergence rate compared to the existing CS techniques.

  15. Long-distance super-resolution imaging assisted by enhanced spatial Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Tang, Heng-He; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2015-09-01

    A new gradient-index (GRIN) lens that can realize enhanced spatial Fourier transform (FT) over optically long distances is demonstrated. By using an anisotropic GRIN metamaterial with hyperbolic dispersion, evanescent wave in free space can be transformed into propagating wave in the metamaterial and then focused outside due to negative-refraction. Both the results based on the ray tracing and the finite element simulation show that the spatial frequency bandwidth of the spatial FT can be extended to 2.7k(0) (k(0) is the wave vector in free space). Furthermore, assisted by the enhanced spatial FT, a new long-distance (in the optical far-field region) super-resolution imaging scheme is also proposed and the super resolved capability of ?/5 (? is the wavelength in free space) is verified. The work may provide technical support for designing new-type high-speed microscopes with long working distances. PMID:26368459

  16. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging parameters describing acid phosphate substitution in biologic hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Spevak, Lyudmila; Flach, Carol R; Hunter, Tracey; Mendelsohn, Richard; Boskey, Adele

    2013-05-01

    Acid phosphate substitution into mineralized tissues is an important determinant of their mechanical properties and their response to treatment. This study identifies and validates Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI) spectral parameters that provide information on the acid phosphate (HPO4) substitution into hydroxyapatite in developing mineralized tissues. Curve fitting and Fourier self-deconvolution were used to identify subband positions in model compounds (with and without HPO4). The intensity of subbands at 1127 and 1110 cm(-1) correlated with the acid phosphate content in these models. Peak height ratios of these subbands to the ?3 vibration at 1096 cm(-1) found in stoichiometric apatite were evaluated in the model compounds and mixtures thereof. FTIRI spectra of bones and teeth at different developmental ages were analyzed using these spectral parameters. Factor analysis (a chemometric technique) was also conducted on the tissue samples and resulted in factor loadings with spectral features corresponding to the HPO4 vibrations described above. Images of both factor correlation coefficients and the peak height ratios 1127/1096 and 1112/1096 cm(-1) demonstrated higher acid phosphate content in younger vs. more mature regions in the same specimen. Maps of the distribution of acid phosphate content will be useful for characterizing the extent of new bone formation, the areas of potential decreased strength, and the effects of therapies such as those used in metabolic bone diseases (osteoporosis, chronic kidney disease) on mineral composition. Because of the wider range of values obtained with the 1127/1096 cm(-1) parameter compared to the 1110/1096 cm(-1) parameter and the smaller scatter in the slope, it is suggested that this ratio should be the parameter of choice. PMID:23380987

  17. Correction for Eddy Current-Induced Echo-Shifting Effect in Partial-Fourier Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Song, Allen W.; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2015-01-01

    In most diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies, images are acquired with either a partial-Fourier or a parallel partial-Fourier echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence, in order to shorten the echo time and increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, eddy currents induced by the diffusion-sensitizing gradients can often lead to a shift of the echo in k-space, resulting in three distinct types of artifacts in partial-Fourier DTI. Here, we present an improved DTI acquisition and reconstruction scheme, capable of generating high-quality and high-SNR DTI data without eddy current-induced artifacts. This new scheme consists of three components, respectively, addressing the three distinct types of artifacts. First, a k-space energy-anchored DTI sequence is designed to recover eddy current-induced signal loss (i.e., Type 1 artifact). Second, a multischeme partial-Fourier reconstruction is used to eliminate artificial signal elevation (i.e., Type 2 artifact) associated with the conventional partial-Fourier reconstruction. Third, a signal intensity correction is applied to remove artificial signal modulations due to eddy current-induced erroneous T2?-weighting (i.e., Type 3 artifact). These systematic improvements will greatly increase the consistency and accuracy of DTI measurements, expanding the utility of DTI in translational applications where quantitative robustness is much needed. PMID:26413505

  18. Research on fast Fourier transforms algorithm of huge remote sensing image technology with GPU and partitioning technology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue; Li, Xue-You; Li, Jia-Guo; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Li; Yang, Jan; Du, Quan-Ye

    2014-02-01

    Fast Fourier transforms (FFT) is a basic approach to remote sensing image processing. With the improvement of capacity of remote sensing image capture with the features of hyperspectrum, high spatial resolution and high temporal resolution, how to use FFT technology to efficiently process huge remote sensing image becomes the critical step and research hot spot of current image processing technology. FFT algorithm, one of the basic algorithms of image processing, can be used for stripe noise removal, image compression, image registration, etc. in processing remote sensing image. CUFFT function library is the FFT algorithm library based on CPU and FFTW. FFTW is a FFT algorithm developed based on CPU in PC platform, and is currently the fastest CPU based FFT algorithm function library. However there is a common problem that once the available memory or memory is less than the capacity of image, there will be out of memory or memory overflow when using the above two methods to realize image FFT arithmetic. To address this problem, a CPU and partitioning technology based Huge Remote Fast Fourier Transform (HRFFT) algorithm is proposed in this paper. By improving the FFT algorithm in CUFFT function library, the problem of out of memory and memory overflow is solved. Moreover, this method is proved rational by experiment combined with the CCD image of HJ-1A satellite. When applied to practical image processing, it improves effect of the image processing, speeds up the processing, which saves the time of computation and achieves sound result. PMID:24822428

  19. Mathematical Investigation of Gamma Ray and Neutron Absorption Grid Patterns for Homeland Defense Related Fourier Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccio, Dona

    2003-01-01

    Terrorist suitcase nuclear devices typically using converted Soviet tactical nuclear warheads contain several kilograms of plutonium. This quantity of plutonium emits a significant number of gamma rays and neutrons as it undergoes radioactive decay. These gamma rays and neutrons normally penetrate ordinary matter to a significant distance. Unfortunately this penetrating quality of the radiation makes imaging with classical optics impractical. However, this radiation signature emitted by the nuclear source may be sufficient to be imaged from low-flying aerial platforms carrying Fourier imaging systems. The Fourier imaging system uses a pair of co-aligned absorption grids to measure a selected range of spatial frequencies from an object. These grids typically measure the spatial frequency in only one direction at a time. A grid pair that looks in all directions simultaneously would be an improvement over existing technology. A number of grid pairs governed by various parameters were investigated to solve this problem. By examining numerous configurations, it became apparent that an appropriate spiral pattern could be made to work. A set of equations was found to describe a grid pattern that produces straight fringes. Straight fringes represent a Fourier transform of a point source at infinity. An inverse Fourier transform of this fringe pattern would provide an accurate image (location and intensity) of a point source.

  20. 3D imaging of dental hard tissues with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yueli L.; Yang, Yi; Ma, Jing; Yan, Jun; Shou, Yuanxin; Wang, Tianheng; Ramesh, Aruna; Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Quing

    2011-03-01

    A fiber optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe is used for three dimensional dental imaging. The probe has a lightweight miniaturized design with a size of a pen to facilitate clinic in vivo diagnostics. The probe is interfaced with a swept-source / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography at 20K axial scanning rate. The tooth samples were scanned from occlusal, buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal orientations. Three dimensional imaging covers tooth surface area up to 10 mm x 10 mm with a depth about 5 mm, where a majority of caries affection occurs. OCT image provides better resolution and contrast compared to gold standard dental radiography (X-ray). In particular, the technology is well suited for occlusal caries detection. This is complementary to X-ray as occlusal caries affection is difficult to be detected due to the X-ray projectile scan geometry. The 3D topology of occlusal surface as well as the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) surface inside the tooth can be visualized. The lesion area appears with much stronger back scattering signal intensity.

  1. Localization of polyhydroxybutyrate in sugarcane using Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy and multivariate imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lupoi, Jason S.; Smith-Moritz, Andreia; Singh, Seema; McQualter, Richard; Scheller, Henrik V.; Simmons, Blake A.; Henry, Robert J.

    2015-07-10

    Background: Slow-degrading, fossil fuel-derived plastics can have deleterious effects on the environment, especially marine ecosystems. The production of bio-based, biodegradable plastics from or in plants can assist in supplanting those manufactured using fossil fuels. Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is one such biodegradable polyester that has been evaluated as a possible candidate for relinquishing the use of environmentally harmful plastics. Results: PHB, possessing similar properties to polyesters produced from non-renewable sources, has been previously engineered in sugarcane, thereby creating a high-value co-product in addition to the high biomass yield. This manuscript illustrates the coupling of a Fourier-transform infrared microspectrometer, equipped with a focalmore »plane array (FPA) detector, with multivariate imaging to successfully identify and localize PHB aggregates. Principal component analysis imaging facilitated the mining of the abundant quantity of spectral data acquired using the FPA for distinct PHB vibrational modes. PHB was measured in the chloroplasts of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, acquiescent with previously evaluated plant samples. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the power of IR microspectroscopy to rapidly image plant sections to provide a snapshot of the chemical composition of the cell. While PHB was localized in sugarcane, this method is readily transferable to other value-added co-products in different plants.« less

  2. Localization of polyhydroxybutyrate in sugarcane using Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy and multivariate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lupoi, Jason S.; Smith-Moritz, Andreia; Singh, Seema; McQualter, Richard; Scheller, Henrik V.; Simmons, Blake A.; Henry, Robert J.

    2015-07-10

    Background: Slow-degrading, fossil fuel-derived plastics can have deleterious effects on the environment, especially marine ecosystems. The production of bio-based, biodegradable plastics from or in plants can assist in supplanting those manufactured using fossil fuels. Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is one such biodegradable polyester that has been evaluated as a possible candidate for relinquishing the use of environmentally harmful plastics. Results: PHB, possessing similar properties to polyesters produced from non-renewable sources, has been previously engineered in sugarcane, thereby creating a high-value co-product in addition to the high biomass yield. This manuscript illustrates the coupling of a Fourier-transform infrared microspectrometer, equipped with a focal plane array (FPA) detector, with multivariate imaging to successfully identify and localize PHB aggregates. Principal component analysis imaging facilitated the mining of the abundant quantity of spectral data acquired using the FPA for distinct PHB vibrational modes. PHB was measured in the chloroplasts of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, acquiescent with previously evaluated plant samples. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the power of IR microspectroscopy to rapidly image plant sections to provide a snapshot of the chemical composition of the cell. While PHB was localized in sugarcane, this method is readily transferable to other value-added co-products in different plants.

  3. Fast Imaging Detector Readout Circuits with In-Pixel ADCs for Fourier Transform Imaging Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rider, D.; Blavier, J-F.; Cunningham, T.; Hancock, B.; Key, R.; Pannell, Z.; Sander, S.; Seshadri, S.; Sun, C.; Wrigley, C.

    2011-01-01

    Focal plane arrays (FPAs) with high frame rates and many pixels benefit several upcoming Earth science missions including GEO-CAPE, GACM, and ACE by enabling broader spatial coverage and higher spectral resolution. FPAs for the PanFTS, a high spatial resolution Fourier transform spectrometer and a candidate instrument for the GEO-CAPE mission are the focus of the developments reported here, but this FPA technology has the potential to enable a variety of future measurements and instruments. The ESTO ACT Program funded the developed of a fast readout integrated circuit (ROIC) based on an innovative in-pixel analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC features 60 ?m pixels, a 14-bit ADC in each pixel and operates at a continuous frame rate of 14 kHz consuming only 1.1 W of power. The ROIC outputs digitized data completely eliminating the bulky, power consuming signal chains needed by conventional FPAs. The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC has been fabricated in CMOS and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The current version is designed to be hybridized with PIN photodiode arrays via indium bump bonding for light detection in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. However, the ROIC design incorporates a small photodiode in each cell to permit detailed characterization of the ROICperformance without the need for hybridization. We will describe the essential features of the ROIC design and present results of ROIC performance measurements.

  4. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani Smith, Stephanie; Hwang, Margaret; Rau, Christoph; Fishman, Andrew J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2011-03-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  5. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Hwang, M.; Rau, C.; Fishman, A.; Lee, W.; Richter, C.

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  6. Symmetric Phase-Only Filtering in Particle-Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wemet, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Symmetrical phase-only filtering (SPOF) can be exploited to obtain substantial improvements in the results of data processing in particle-image velocimetry (PIV). In comparison with traditional PIV data processing, SPOF PIV data processing yields narrower and larger amplitude correlation peaks, thereby providing more-accurate velocity estimates. The higher signal-to-noise ratios associated with the higher amplitude correlation peaks afford greater robustness and reliability of processing. SPOF also affords superior performance in the presence of surface flare light and/or background light. SPOF algorithms can readily be incorporated into pre-existing algorithms used to process digitized image data in PIV, without significantly increasing processing times. A summary of PIV and traditional PIV data processing is prerequisite to a meaningful description of SPOF PIV processing. In PIV, a pulsed laser is used to illuminate a substantially planar region of a flowing fluid in which particles are entrained. An electronic camera records digital images of the particles at two instants of time. The components of velocity of the fluid in the illuminated plane can be obtained by determining the displacements of particles between the two illumination pulses. The objective in PIV data processing is to compute the particle displacements from the digital image data. In traditional PIV data processing, to which the present innovation applies, the two images are divided into a grid of subregions and the displacements determined from cross-correlations between the corresponding sub-regions in the first and second images. The cross-correlation process begins with the calculation of the Fourier transforms (or fast Fourier transforms) of the subregion portions of the images. The Fourier transforms from the corresponding subregions are multiplied, and this product is inverse Fourier transformed, yielding the cross-correlation intensity distribution. The average displacement of the particles across a subregion results in a displacement of the correlation peak from the center of the correlation plane. The velocity is then computed from the displacement of the correlation peak and the time between the recording of the two images. The process as described thus far is performed for all the subregions. The resulting set of velocities in grid cells amounts to a velocity vector map of the flow field recorded on the image plane. In traditional PIV processing, surface flare light and bright background light give rise to a large, broad correlation peak, at the center of the correlation plane, that can overwhelm the true particle- displacement correlation peak. This has made it necessary to resort to tedious image-masking and background-subtraction procedures to recover the relatively small amplitude particle-displacement correlation peak. SPOF is a variant of phase-only filtering (POF), which, in turn, is a variant of matched spatial filtering (MSF). In MSF, one projects a first image (denoted the input image) onto a second image (denoted the filter) as part of a computation to determine how much and what part of the filter is present in the input image. MSF is equivalent to cross-correlation. In POF, the frequency-domain content of the MSF filter is modified to produce a unitamplitude (phase-only) object. POF is implemented by normalizing the Fourier transform of the filter by its magnitude. The advantage of POFs is that they yield correlation peaks that are sharper and have higher signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained through traditional MSF. In the SPOF, these benefits of POF can be extended to PIV data processing. The SPOF yields even better performance than the POF approach, which is uniquely applicable to PIV type image data. In SPOF as now applied to PIV data processing, a subregion of the first image is treated as the input image and the corresponding subregion of the second image is treated as the filter. The Fourier transforms from both the firs and second- image subregions are normalized by the square roots of their respective magnitudes.

  7. Compact snapshot birefringent imaging Fourier transform spectrometer for remote sensing and endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudenov, Michael W.; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Chan, Victoria C.; Dereniak, Eustace L.

    2012-09-01

    The design and implementation of a compact multiple-image Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) is presented. Based on the multiple-image FTS originally developed by A. Hirai, the presented device offers significant advantages over his original implementation. Namely, its birefringent nature results in a common-path interferometer which makes the spectrometer insensitive to vibration. Furthermore, it enables the potential of making the instrument ultra-compact, thereby improving the portability of the sensor. The theory of the birefringent FTS is provided, followed by details of its specific embodiment. A laboratory proof of concept of the sensor, designed and developed at the Optical Detection Lab, is also presented. Spectral measurements of laboratory sources are provided, including measurements of light-emitting diodes and gas-discharge lamps. These spectra are verified against a calibrated Ocean Optics USB2000 spectrometer. Other data were collected outdoors and of a rat esophagus, demonstrating the sensor's ability to resolve spectral signatures in both standard outdoor lighting and environmental conditions, as well as in fluorescence spectroscopy.

  8. Development of imaging Fourier-transform spectroscopy for the characterization of turbulent jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, Jacob L.

    Recent advances in computational models to simulate turbulent, reactive flow fields have outpaced the ability to collect highly constraining data---throughout the entire flow field---for validating and improving such models. In particular, the ability to quantify in three dimensions both the mean scalar fields (i.e. temperature & species concentrations) and their respective fluctuation statistics via hyperspectral imaging would be a game-changing advancement in combustion diagnostics, with high impact in both validation and improvement efforts for computational combustion models. This research effort establishes imaging Fourier- transform spectrometry (IFTS) as a valuable tool (which complements laser diagnostics) for the study of turbulent combustion. Specifically, this effort (1) demonstrates that IFTS can be used to quantitatively measure spatially resolved spectra from a canonical turbulent flame; (2) establishes the utility of quantile spectra in first-ever quantitative comparisons between measured and modeled turbulent radiation interaction (TRI); (3) develops a simple onion-peeling-like spectral inversion methodology suitable for estimating radial scalar distributions in axisymmetric, optically-thick flames; (4) builds understanding of quantile spectra and demonstrates proof of concept for their use in estimating scalar fluctuation statistics.

  9. Performance evaluation of the Herschel/SPIRE imaging Fourier transform spectrometer through ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Locke D.; Naylor, David A.; Swinyard, Bruce M.

    2010-06-01

    The Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) is one of three scientific instruments onboard the European Space Agency (ESA)'s Herschel Space Observatory. Herschel was successfully launched on 14 May 2009; routine science observations commenced in late 2009. Medium resolution spectroscopy with SPIRE is accomplished via an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (IFTS) of the Mach-Zehnder configuration. Although pre-launch performance verification and calibration measurements were conducted with the SPIRE instrument mounted in an evacuated cryostat at cryogenic temperatures, it was not possible to simulate fully the expected in-flight conditions. This paper compares the performance of the SPIRE IFTS, as measured during ground-based tests, with theoretical simulations. In turn, these results are used to provide an estimate of the in-flight instrument performance. This paper includes a discussion of key aspects of the SPIRE IFTS including the spectrometer dual-input compensation scheme, instrument line shape and the overall instrument sensitivity. As a case study, the derived instrument performance is used to investigate SPIRE's utility in observing astronomical line emission from the starburst galaxy M82.

  10. The study of a single BGC823 cell using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Qi, Zeming; Wang, Shengyi; Liu, Gang; Gao, Helong; Tian, Yangchao

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate gastric cancer at cellular and sub-cellular level, a single human gastric adenocarcinoma BGC823 cell was studied by an infrared microscope equipped with a focal plane array (FPA) detector. The spectra showed difference between the nucleus and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the BGC823 cell. The peak of v asPO 2- was shifted to a higher wavenumber at the nucleus compared with that at the ER. The height ratios of 2954 cm -1/2922 cm -1 (CH 3/CH 2) and 1088 cm -1/1539 cm -1 (DNA/amide II) of the nucleus were significantly higher than those of the ER. Furthermore, chemical images reveal the intensity distributions of lipids, proteins and DNA of the single BGC823 cell, and the intense absorptions of proteins and DNA were observed in the nuclear region of the cell while the intense absorption of lipids was found in the ER region of the cell. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopic imaging result indicates the study of the single gastric cancer cell at sub-cellular level can be beneficial for knowing gastric cancer more which will be of great importance for the study and diagnosis of gastric cancer. The result also suggests that FPA is a useful tool in the study of a single cell and may be a powerful tool for study and diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  11. Evaluation of the uncertainty of phase-difference measurements in (quasi-)Fourier transform digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doval, Ángel F.; Trillo, Cristina; López Vázquez, José Carlos; Fernández, José L.

    2015-08-01

    Estimation of the uncertainty is an essential requisite for high-end measurement systems. In this communication we derive an expression to evaluate the standard uncertainty of the phase-difference measurements resulting from Fourier and quasi-Fourier transform digital holographic interferometry. We apply the law of propagation of uncertainty, as defined in the "Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement" (GUM), to the digital reconstruction of two holograms by Fourier transformation and to the subsequent calculation of the phase change between the holographic reconstructions. The resulting expression allows the evaluation of the uncertainty of the phase difference at every pixel in the reconstruction plane in terms of the measured hologram brightness values and their uncertainty at the whole of the pixels of the original digital holograms. This expression is simplified by assuming a linear dependence between the uncertainty and the local value of the original holograms; in that case, the local uncertainty of the phase difference can be evaluated from the local complex values of the reconstructed holograms. We assess the behavior of the method by comparing the predicted standard uncertainty with the sample variance obtained from experiments conducted under repeatability conditions, and found a good correlation between both quantities. This experimental procedure can be also used to calibrate the parameters of the linear function relating the uncertainty with the local value of the digital holograms, for a given set of operational conditions of the acquisition device.

  12. Robust phase sensitive inversion recovery imaging 

    E-print Network

    Garach, Ravindra Mahendrakumar

    2005-11-01

    - echo sequence on a 15 Tesla MR scanner (a) Real image; (b) Magnitude reconstruction; (c) PSIR image. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 60 33 Phase sensitive reconstruction of data acquired using a fast spin- echo sequence on a 15 Tesla MR scanner (a) Real... of data acquired using a fast spin- echo sequence on a 15 Tesla MR scanner (a) Real image; (b) Magnitude reconstruction; (c) PSIR image reconstructed with in- verted polarity. This example demonstrates the problem of global polarity determination...

  13. Null test fourier domain alignment technique for phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick (5239 Miles Ave., Apt. A, Oakland, CA 94618); Goldberg, Kenneth Alan (1622 Oxford St., #5t, Berkeley, CA 94709)

    2000-01-01

    Alignment technique for calibrating a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer involves three independent steps where the first two steps independently align the image points and pinholes in rotation and separation to a fixed reference coordinate system, e.g, CCD. Once the two sub-elements have been properly aligned to the reference in two parameters (separation and orientation), the third step is to align the two sub-element coordinate systems to each other in the two remaining parameters (x,y) using standard methods of locating the pinholes relative to some easy to find reference point.

  14. Nonlinear phase interaction between nonstationary signals: a comparison study of methods based on Hilbert-Huang and Fourier transforms.

    PubMed

    Lo, Men-Tzung; Novak, Vera; Peng, C-K; Liu, Yanhui; Hu, Kun

    2009-06-01

    Phase interactions among signals of physical and physiological systems can provide useful information about the underlying control mechanisms of the systems. Physical and biological recordings are often noisy and exhibit nonstationarities that can affect the estimation of phase interactions. We systematically studied effects of nonstationarities on two phase analyses including (i) the widely used transfer function analysis (TFA) that is based on Fourier decomposition and (ii) the recently proposed multimodal pressure flow (MMPF) analysis that is based on Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT)-an advanced nonlinear decomposition algorithm. We considered three types of nonstationarities that are often presented in physical and physiological signals: (i) missing segments of data, (ii) linear and step-function trends embedded in data, and (iii) multiple chaotic oscillatory components at different frequencies in data. By generating two coupled oscillatory signals with an assigned phase shift, we quantify the change in the estimated phase shift after imposing artificial nonstationarities into the oscillatory signals. We found that all three types of nonstationarities affect the performances of the Fourier-based and the HHT-based phase analyses, introducing bias and random errors in the estimation of the phase shift between two oscillatory signals. We also provided examples of nonstationarities in real physiological data (cerebral blood flow and blood pressure) and showed how nonstationarities can complicate result interpretation. Furthermore, we propose certain strategies that can be implemented in the TFA and the MMPF methods to reduce the effects of nonstationarities, thus improving the performances of the two methods. PMID:19658541

  15. Genetic Algorithm Phase Retrieval for the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jaime; Rakoczy, John; Steincamp, James

    2003-01-01

    Phase retrieval requires calculation of the real-valued phase of the pupil fimction from the image intensity distribution and characteristics of an optical system. Genetic 'algorithms were used to solve two one-dimensional phase retrieval problem. A GA successfully estimated the coefficients of a polynomial expansion of the phase when the number of coefficients was correctly specified. A GA also successfully estimated the multiple p h e s of a segmented optical system analogous to the seven-mirror Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) testbed located at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. The SIBOA testbed was developed to investigate phase retrieval techniques. Tiphilt and piston motions of the mirrors accomplish phase corrections. A constant phase over each mirror can be achieved by an independent tip/tilt correction: the phase Conection term can then be factored out of the Discrete Fourier Tranform (DFT), greatly reducing computations.

  16. New Course Announcement ECE500: Fourier Optics for Engineers

    E-print Network

    , spatial frequency, linear systems and transforms, Fourier transform in rectangular and cylindrical gratings, applications to optical biosensors, spatial light modulators and phase-space engineering of optical beams. Elements of imaging theory and microscopy, aberration theory, coherent and incoherent

  17. Study of key technology of ghost imaging via compressive sensing for a phase object based on phase-shifting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leihong, Zhang; Dong, Liang; Bei, Li; Zilan, Pan; Dawei, Zhang; Xiuhua, Ma

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the algorithm of compressing sensing is used to improve the imaging resolution and realize ghost imaging via compressive sensing for a phase object based on the theoretical analysis of the lensless Fourier imaging of the algorithm of ghost imaging based on phase-shifting digital holography. The algorithm of ghost imaging via compressive sensing based on phase-shifting digital holography uses the bucket detector to measure the total light intensity of the interference and the four-step phase-shifting method is used to obtain the total light intensity of differential interference light. The experimental platform is built based on the software simulation, and the experimental results show that the algorithm of ghost imaging via compressive sensing based on phase-shifting digital holography can obtain the high-resolution phase distribution figure of the phase object. With the same sampling times, the phase clarity of the phase distribution figure obtained by the algorithm of ghost imaging via compressive sensing based on phase-shifting digital holography is higher than that obtained by the algorithm of ghost imaging based on phase-shift digital holography. In this article, this study further extends the application range of ghost imaging and obtains the phase distribution of the phase object.

  18. Balloon Demonstrator Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer for the Measurement of Methane and Carbon Dioxide over the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaziri Z., Zahra; McElroy, Charles T.; Feng, Keh-Harng; Moeini, Omid; Walker, Kaley A.; Martin, Randall; Grandmont, Frederic J.

    2015-04-01

    Arctic climate is changing more rapidly than expected. Multi-year ice is melting and opening the way for shipping and exploration activity for natural resources which in turn increases air pollution. Observing greenhouse gases on a global scale is essential to monitor climate change, especially in the Arctic. Several space missions monitor trace gasses but are in low-earth, sun synchronous orbits and do not have a 24/7 view of northern latitudes. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA), along with other Canadian government departments, is proposing the Polar Communications and Weather (PCW) satellite to provide weather, communication and atmospheric composition information over the Arctic. The use of two satellites in out-of-phase highly elliptical three-apogee orbits with an apogee at ~40,000 km over the Arctic, will provide continuous quasi-geostationary viewing of the northern latitudes. The planned meteorological instrument for the PCW mission is a 21-channel spectral imager with UV, visible, NIR and MIR channels, similar to MODIS and ABI, capable of measuring several different trace gasses. This paper will focus on the development of an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) to be flown on a high-altitude balloon to demonstrate the capacity to monitor methane and carbon dioxide in the Arctic as part of the PHEOS-WCA (Polar Highly Elliptical Orbit Science - Weather, Climate and Air quality) instrument suit; a science complement to the PCW mission. Funding through the CSA Flights for the Advancement of Science and Technology (FAST) program is in place to develop the demonstrator IFTS to show that measurements of methane and carbon dioxide can be collected from space in the 1.6 µm band. The characteristics of the instrument and plans for the balloon flight will be discussed and details of the PCW mission and PHEOS-WCA component will be presented. The authors acknowledge support of the PHEOS-WCA science team.

  19. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging of cardiac tissue to detect collagen deposition after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cheheltani, Rabee; Rosano, Jenna M.; Wang, Bin; Sabri, Abdel Karim; Pleshko, Nancy; Kiani, Mohammad F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Myocardial infarction often leads to an increase in deposition of fibrillar collagen. Detection and characterization of this cardiac fibrosis is of great interest to investigators and clinicians. Motivated by the significant limitations of conventional staining techniques to visualize collagen deposition in cardiac tissue sections, we have developed a Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) methodology for collagen assessment. The infrared absorbance band centered at 1338??cm?1, which arises from collagen amino acid side chain vibrations, was used to map collagen deposition across heart tissue sections of a rat model of myocardial infarction, and was compared to conventional staining techniques. Comparison of the size of the collagen scar in heart tissue sections as measured with this methodology and that of trichrome staining showed a strong correlation (R=0.93). A Pearson correlation model between local intensity values in FT-IRIS and immuno-histochemical staining of collagen type I also showed a strong correlation (R=0.86). We demonstrate that FT-IRIS methodology can be utilized to visualize cardiac collagen deposition. In addition, given that vibrational spectroscopic data on proteins reflect molecular features, it also has the potential to provide additional information about the molecular structure of cardiac extracellular matrix proteins and their alterations. PMID:22612137

  20. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging of cardiac tissue to detect collagen deposition after myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheheltani, Rabee; Rosano, Jenna M.; Wang, Bin; Sabri, Abdel Karim; Pleshko, Nancy; Kiani, Mohammad F.

    2012-05-01

    Myocardial infarction often leads to an increase in deposition of fibrillar collagen. Detection and characterization of this cardiac fibrosis is of great interest to investigators and clinicians. Motivated by the significant limitations of conventional staining techniques to visualize collagen deposition in cardiac tissue sections, we have developed a Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) methodology for collagen assessment. The infrared absorbance band centered at 1338 cm-1, which arises from collagen amino acid side chain vibrations, was used to map collagen deposition across heart tissue sections of a rat model of myocardial infarction, and was compared to conventional staining techniques. Comparison of the size of the collagen scar in heart tissue sections as measured with this methodology and that of trichrome staining showed a strong correlation (R=0.93). A Pearson correlation model between local intensity values in FT-IRIS and immuno-histochemical staining of collagen type I also showed a strong correlation (R=0.86). We demonstrate that FT-IRIS methodology can be utilized to visualize cardiac collagen deposition. In addition, given that vibrational spectroscopic data on proteins reflect molecular features, it also has the potential to provide additional information about the molecular structure of cardiac extracellular matrix proteins and their alterations.

  1. A new phase difference measurement algorithm for extreme frequency signals based on discrete time Fourier transform with negative frequency contribution.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ting'ao; Tu, Yaqing; Li, Ming; Zhang, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    For the ultralow frequency signals or adjacent Nyquist frequency signals, which widely exist in vibration engineering domain, the traditional discrete time Fourier transform (DTFT) algorithms show poor performance for phase difference measurement. To improve the accuracy of phase difference measurement for these extreme frequency signals, the phase difference measurement error of DTFT algorithm is analyzed, which indicates that the negative frequency contribution is the main cause of the bias. By considering the negative frequency contribution, a new phase difference measurement algorithm for extreme frequency signals is proposed based on DTFT, and the new formulas for phase difference calculation with different windows are derived in detail. The new algorithm has stronger inhibition of spectrum leakage and has a higher accuracy than traditional DTFT algorithms. Simulation and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better performance than the other DTFT algorithms. PMID:25638119

  2. Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Infrared Fiber Optic Probe Spectroscopy Identify Collagen Type in Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hanifi, Arash; McCarthy, Helen; Roberts, Sally; Pleshko, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage and mechanically inferior fibrocartilage consisting of mixed collagen types are frequently found together in repairing articular cartilage. The present study seeks to develop methodology to identify collagen type and other tissue components using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral evaluation of matrix composition in combination with multivariate analyses. FTIR spectra of the primary molecular components of repair cartilage, types I and II collagen, and aggrecan, were used to develop multivariate spectral models for discrimination of the matrix components of the tissues of interest. Infrared imaging data were collected from bovine bone, tendon, normal cartilage, meniscus and human repair cartilage tissues, and composition predicted using partial least squares analyses. Histology and immunohistochemistry results were used as standards for validation. Infrared fiber optic probe spectral data were also obtained from meniscus (a tissue with mixed collagen types) to evaluate the potential of this method for identification of collagen type in a minimally-invasive clinical application. Concentration profiles of the tissue components obtained from multivariate analysis were in excellent agreement with histology and immunohistochemistry results. Bone and tendon showed a uniform distribution of predominantly type I collagen through the tissue. Normal cartilage showed a distribution of type II collagen and proteoglycan similar to the known composition, while in repair cartilage, the spectral distribution of both types I and II collagen were similar to that observed via immunohistochemistry. Using the probe, the outer and inner regions of the meniscus were shown to be primarily composed of type I and II collagen, respectively, in accordance with immunohistochemistry data. In summary, multivariate analysis of infrared spectra can indeed be used to differentiate collagen type I and type II, even in the presence of proteoglycan, in connective tissues, using both imaging and fiber optic methodology. This has great potential for clinical in situ applications for monitoring tissue repair. PMID:23717662

  3. Fuzzy Logic Classification of Imaging Laser Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. McJunkin; Jill R. Scott

    2008-06-01

    The fuzzy logic method is applied to classification of mass spectra obtained with an imaging internal source Fourier transform mass spectrometer (I2LD-FTMS). Traditionally, an operator uses the relative abundance of ions with specific mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios to categorize spectra. An operator does this by comparing the spectrum of m/z versus abundance of an unknown sample against a library of spectra from known samples. Automated positioning and acquisition allow the I2LD-FTMS to acquire data from very large grids, which would require classification of up to 3600 spectra per hour to keep pace with the acquisition. The tedious job of classifying numerous spectra generated in an I2LD-FTMS imaging application can be replaced by a fuzzy rule base if the cues an operator uses can be encapsulated. Appropriate methods for assigning fuzzy membership values for inputs (e.g., mass spectrum abundances) and choice of fuzzy inference operators to translate linguistic antecedent into confidence values for the consequence (or in this case the classification) is followed by using the maximum confidence and a necessary minimum threshold for making a crisp decision. This paper also describes a method for gathering statistics on ions, which are not currently used in the rule base, but which may be candidates for making the rule base more accurate and complete or to form new rule bases based on data obtained from known samples. A spatial method for classifying spectra with low membership values, based on neighboring sample classifications, is also presented.

  4. Multifocus image fusion using phase congruency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Kun; Li, Qiaoqiao; Teng, Jicai; Wang, Mingying; Shi, Jinhui

    2015-05-01

    We address the problem of fusing multifocus images based on the phase congruency (PC). PC provides a sharpness feature of a natural image. The focus measure (FM) is identified as strong PC near a distinctive image feature evaluated by the complex Gabor wavelet. The PC is more robust against noise than other FMs. The fusion image is obtained by a new fusion rule (FR), and the focused region is selected by the FR from one of the input images. Experimental results show that the proposed fusion scheme achieves the fusion performance of the state-of-the-art methods in terms of visual quality and quantitative evaluations.

  5. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  6. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  7. Phase imaging in brain using SWIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, Lauri Juhani; Garwood, Michael; Gröhn, Olli; Corum, Curtis Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The majority of MRI phase imaging is based on gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequences. This work studies phase contrast behavior due to small off-resonance frequency offsets in brain using SWIFT, a FID-based sequence with nearly zero acquisition delay. 1D simulations and a phantom study were conducted to describe the behavior of phase accumulation in SWIFT. Imaging experiments of known brain phase contrast properties were conducted in a perfused rat brain comparing GRE and SWIFT. Additionally, a human brain sample was imaged. It is demonstrated how SWIFT phase is orientation dependent and correlates well with GRE, linking SWIFT phase to similar off-resonance sources as GRE. The acquisition time is shown to be analogous to TE for phase accumulation time. Using experiments with and without a magnetization transfer preparation, the likely effect of myelin water pool contribution is seen as a phase increase for all acquisition times. Due to the phase accumulation during acquisition, SWIFT phase contrast can be sensitized to small frequency differences between white and gray matter using low acquisition bandwidths.

  8. Spectral modulation interferometry for quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ruibo; Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a spectral-domain interferometric technique, termed spectral modulation interferometry (SMI), and present its application to high-sensitivity, high-speed, and speckle-free quantitative phase imaging. In SMI, one-dimensional complex field of an object is interferometrically modulated onto a broadband spectrum. Full-field phase and intensity images are obtained by scanning along the orthogonal direction. SMI integrates the high sensitivity of spectral-domain interferometry with the high speed of spectral modulation to quantify fast phase dynamics, and its dispersive and confocal nature eliminates laser speckles. The principle and implementation of SMI are discussed. Its performance is evaluated using static and dynamic objects. PMID:25780737

  9. Design, operation and applications of a visible-light confocal scanning Fourier transform Raman microscope for volumetric Raman spectrochemical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenan, Colin John Herbert

    A new type of confocal Raman microscope called a Fourier transform confocal Raman microscope (FT-CRM) was designed, built and characterized with respect to its spatio-spectral imaging properties. Several different applications of the FT-CRM are presented that take advantage of its unique spectral and spatial imaging characteristics. The instrument combines focused illumination with spatially-filtered detection in a confocal optical configuration to collect photons scattered from a diffraction-limited volume in the sample (typically [<]5×10-18/ m3) and reject photons from outside that region. The molecular vibrational information encoded in the inelastic, or Raman, spectral component of light scattered from the confocal volume is measured with a visible light Fourier transform Raman spectrometer. By scanning the sample relative to the confocal volume, a volumetric Raman spectrochemical image of the sample can be constructed. Raman scattering is an inherently inefficient process; hence an optimal radius pinhole must be found that balances the FT-CRM optical throughput against the microscope spatial resolution and image contrast. Detailed experimental measurements mapped out the FT-CRM spatial response (axial and lateral), optical throughput and image signal-to-background and signal-to-noise ratios as a function of pinhole radius. Excellent agreement was found between these measurements and the predictions of a theoretical microscope model also developed as part of this thesis. Several applications of the FT-CRM included volumetric compositional imaging of three-dimensional chemically inhomogeneous materials such as cellulose and polyester fibers in water or two immiscible optically- similar liquids, water and trichloroehthylene, in a porous quartz sandstone matrix. The potential of the FT- CRM for non-invasive spectrochemical detection and imaging through a turbid tissue-like medium was demonstrated and a new spectral estimator, Fast Orthogonal Search, was evaluated to replace the discrete Fourier transform to improve the microscope performance.

  10. Synchronous Phase-Resolving Flash Range Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Hancock, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus, now undergoing development, for range imaging based on measurement of the round-trip phase delay of a pulsed laser beam is described. The apparatus would operate in a staring mode. A pulsed laser would illuminate a target. Laser light reflected from the target would be imaged on a verylarge- scale integrated (VLSI)-circuit image detector, each pixel of which would contain a photodetector and a phase-measuring circuit. The round-trip travel time for the reflected laser light incident on each pixel, and thus the distance to the portion of the target imaged in that pixel, would be measured in terms of the phase difference between (1) the photodetector output pulse and (2) a local-oscillator signal that would have a frequency between 10 and 20 MHz and that would be synchronized with the laser-pulse-triggering signal.

  11. Spatial-phase code-division multiple-access system with multiplexed Fourier holography switching for reconfigurable optical interconnection.

    PubMed

    Takasago, K; Takekawa, M; Shirakawa, A; Kannari, F

    2000-05-10

    A new, to our knowledge, space-variant optical interconnection system based on a spatial-phase code-division multiple-access technique with multiplexed Fourier holography is described. In this technique a signal beam is spread over wide spatial frequencies by an M-sequence pseudorandom phase code. At a receiver side a selected signal beam is properly decoded, and at the same time its spatial pattern is shaped with a Fourier hologram, which is recorded by light that is encoded with the same M-sequence phase mask as the desired signal beam and by light whose spatial beam pattern is shaped to a signal routing pattern. Using the multiplexed holography, we can simultaneously route multisignal flows into individually specified receiver elements. The routing pattern can also be varied by means of switching the encoding phase code or replacing the hologram. We demonstrated a proof-of-principle experiment with a doubly multiplexed hologram that enables simultaneous routing of two signal beams. Using a numerical model, we showed that the proposed scheme can manage more than 250 routing patterns for one signal flow with one multiplexed hologram at a signal-to-noise ratio of ~5. PMID:18345134

  12. FPGA-based multi-channel fluorescence lifetime analysis of Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-09-22

    We report a fast non-iterative lifetime data analysis method for the Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping confocal FLIM (Fm-FLIM) system [Opt. Express 22, 10221 (2014)]. The new method, named R-method, allows fast multi-channel lifetime image analysis in the system's FPGA data processing board. Experimental tests proved that the performance of the R-method is equivalent to that of single-exponential iterative fitting, and its sensitivity is well suited for time-lapse FLIM-FRET imaging of live cells, for example cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level imaging with GFP-Epac-mCherry sensors. With the R-method and its FPGA implementation, multi-channel lifetime images can now be generated in real time on the multi-channel frequency-sweeping FLIM system, and live readout of FRET sensors can be performed during time-lapse imaging. PMID:25321778

  13. From regular text to artistic writing and artworks: Fourier statistics of images with low and high aesthetic appeal

    PubMed Central

    Melmer, Tamara; Amirshahi, Seyed A.; Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The spatial characteristics of letters and their influence on readability and letter identification have been intensely studied during the last decades. There have been few studies, however, on statistical image properties that reflect more global aspects of text, for example properties that may relate to its aesthetic appeal. It has been shown that natural scenes and a large variety of visual artworks possess a scale-invariant Fourier power spectrum that falls off linearly with increasing frequency in log-log plots. We asked whether images of text share this property. As expected, the Fourier spectrum of images of regular typed or handwritten text is highly anisotropic, i.e., the spectral image properties in vertical, horizontal, and oblique orientations differ. Moreover, the spatial frequency spectra of text images are not scale-invariant in any direction. The decline is shallower in the low-frequency part of the spectrum for text than for aesthetic artworks, whereas, in the high-frequency part, it is steeper. These results indicate that, in general, images of regular text contain less global structure (low spatial frequencies) relative to fine detail (high spatial frequencies) than images of aesthetics artworks. Moreover, we studied images of text with artistic claim (ornate print and calligraphy) and ornamental art. For some measures, these images assume average values intermediate between regular text and aesthetic artworks. Finally, to answer the question of whether the statistical properties measured by us are universal amongst humans or are subject to intercultural differences, we compared images from three different cultural backgrounds (Western, East Asian, and Arabic). Results for different categories (regular text, aesthetic writing, ornamental art, and fine art) were similar across cultures. PMID:23554592

  14. Phase congruency assesses hyperspectral image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiaopeng; Zhong, Cheng

    2012-10-01

    Blind image quality assessment (QA) is a tough task especially for hyperspectral imagery which is degraded by noise, distortion, defocus, and other complex factors. Subjective hyperspectral imagery QA methods are basically measured the degradation of image from human perceptual visual quality. As the most important image quality measurement features, noise and blur, determined the image quality greatly, are employed to predict the objective hyperspectral imagery quality of each band. We demonstrate a novel no-reference hyperspectral imagery QA model based on phase congruency (PC), which is a dimensionless quantity and provides an absolute measure of the significance of feature point. First, Log Gabor wavelet is used to calculate the phase congruency of frequencies of each band image. The relationship between noise and PC can be derived from above transformation under the assumption that noise is additive. Second, PC focus measure evaluation model is proposed to evaluate blur caused by different amounts of defocus. The ratio and mean factors of edge blur level and noise is defined to assess the quality of each band image. This image QA method obtains excellent correlation with subjective image quality score without any reference. Finally, the PC information is utilized to improve the quality of some bands images.

  15. Pulsatile microvascular blood flow imaging by short-time Fourier transform analysis of ultrafast laser holographic interferometry

    E-print Network

    Puyo, L; Rancillac, A; Simonutti, M; Paques, M; Sahel, J A; Fink, M; Atlan, M

    2015-01-01

    We report on wide-field imaging of pulsatile microvascular blood flow in the exposed cerebral cortex of a mouse by holographic interferometry. We recorded interferograms of laser light backscattered by the tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam with a 50 kHz framerate camera. Videos of local Doppler contrasts were rendered numerically by Fresnel transformation and short-time Fourier transform analysis. This approach enabled instantaneous imaging of pulsatile blood flow contrasts in superficial blood vessels over 256 x 256 pixels with a spatial resolution of 10 microns and a temporal resolution of 20 ms.

  16. Measurement of fluid rotation, dilation, and displacement in particle image velocimetry using a Fourier-Mellin cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarra, Matthew N.; Charonko, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2015-03-01

    Traditional particle image velocimetry (PIV) uses discrete Cartesian cross correlations (CCs) to estimate the displacements of groups of tracer particles within small subregions of sequentially captured images. However, these CCs fail in regions with large velocity gradients or high rates of rotation. In this paper, we propose a new PIV correlation method based on the Fourier-Mellin transformation (FMT) that enables direct measurement of the rotation and dilation of particle image patterns. In previously unresolvable regions of large rotation, our algorithm significantly improves the velocity estimates compared to traditional correlations by aligning the rotated and stretched particle patterns prior to performing Cartesian correlations to estimate their displacements. Our algorithm, which we term Fourier-Mellin correlation (FMC), reliably measures particle pattern displacement between pairs of interrogation regions with up to ±180° of angular misalignment, compared to 6-8° for traditional correlations, and dilation/compression factors of 0.5-2.0, compared to 0.9-1.1 for a single iteration of traditional correlations. We apply our FMC algorithm to synthetic computer-generated PIV images with known velocity and vorticity fields, and to an experimentally measured flow field. Our results show that combining FMC with discrete window offset (DWO) or iterative image deformation (IID) algorithms decreases the mean and variance of displacement and vorticity errors compared to traditional correlations, and that FMC accelerates the convergence of IID.

  17. Deformation measurement of carbon fiber reinforced plastics using phase-shifting scanning electron microscope Moiré method after Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinghua; Ri, Shien; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2015-07-01

    The deformation distributions of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) under a three-point bending load were nondestructively investigated using the phase shifting scanning electron microscope (SEM) moiré method. The complex fast Fourier transform (FFT) and the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) were used to filter the useless moiré fringes in the case of bidirectional moiré fringes. The SEM moiré fringes under different magnifications and the deformation results measured by the direct, complex FFT- and the DFT- phase shifting moiré methods as well as the moiré fringe centering method were compared and analyzed. Experiments demonstrate that the deformation measurement is a bit influenced by the useless moiré fringes in the phase shifting moiré methods and complex FFT processing works better for nondense moiré fringes. The relative strain changes gradually and the specimen grating pitch increases gradually from top to bottom along the loading direction, suggesting that the real compressive strain is greater in the upper side. The micro/nano-scale deformation distribution characteristic is helpful for better understanding of the mechanical properties of the CFRP specimen.

  18. Phase Imaging using Focusing Polycapillary Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Sajid

    The interaction of X rays in diagnostic energy range with soft tissues can be described by Compton scattering and by the complex refractive index, which together characterize the attenuation properties of the tissue and the phase imparted to X rays passing through it. Many soft tissues exhibit extremely similar attenuation, so that their discrimination using conventional radiography, which generates contrast in an image through differential attenuation, is challenging. However, these tissues will impart phase differences significantly greater than attenuation differences to the X rays passing through them, so that phase-contrast imaging techniques can enable their discrimination. A major limitation to the widespread adoption of phase-contrast techniques is that phase contrast requires significant spatial coherence of the X-ray beam, which in turn requires specialized sources. For tabletop sources, this often requires a small (usually in the range of 10-50 micron) X-ray source. In this work, polycapillary optics were employed to create a small secondary source from a large spot rotating anode. Polycapillary optics consist of arrays of small hollow glass tubes through which X rays can be guided by total internal reflection from the tube walls. By tapering the tubes to guide the X rays to a point, they can be focused to a small spot which can be used as a secondary source. The polycapillary optic was first aligned with the X-ray source. The spot size was measured using a computed radiography image plate. Images were taken at a variety of optic-to-object and object-to-detector distances and phase-contrast edge enhancement was observed. Conventional absorption images were also acquired at a small object-to detector distances for comparison. Background division was performed to remove strong non-uniformity due to the optics. Differential phase contrast reconstruction demonstrates promising preliminary results. This manuscript is divided into six chapters. The second chapter describes the limitations of conventional imaging methods and benefits of the phase imaging. Chapter three covers different types of X-ray photon interactions with matter. Chapter four describes the experimental set-up and different types of images acquired along with their analysis. Chapter five summarizes the findings in this project and describes future work as well.

  19. Image Display and Manipulation System (IDAMS) program documentation, Appendixes A-D. [including routines, convolution filtering, image expansion, and fast Fourier transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, R. W.; White, R. A.; Szczur, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    The IDAMS Processor is a package of task routines and support software that performs convolution filtering, image expansion, fast Fourier transformation, and other operations on a digital image tape. A unique task control card for that program, together with any necessary parameter cards, selects each processing technique to be applied to the input image. A variable number of tasks can be selected for execution by including the proper task and parameter cards in the input deck. An executive maintains control of the run; it initiates execution of each task in turn and handles any necessary error processing.

  20. High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopic Imaging of Human Tissue Sections towards Improving Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Peter L.; Davidson, Bennett; Akkina, Sanjeev; Guzman, Grace; Setty, Suman; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Walsh, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging approach to obtain detailed images that have associated biochemical information. FT-IR imaging of tissue is based on the principle that different regions of the mid-infrared are absorbed by different chemical bonds (e.g., C=O, C-H, N-H) within cells or tissue that can then be related to the presence and composition of biomolecules (e.g., lipids, DNA, glycogen, protein, collagen). In an FT-IR image, every pixel within the image comprises an entire Infrared (IR) spectrum that can give information on the biochemical status of the cells that can then be exploited for cell-type or disease-type classification. In this paper, we show: how to obtain IR images from human tissues using an FT-IR system, how to modify existing instrumentation to allow for high-definition imaging capabilities, and how to visualize FT-IR images. We then present some applications of FT-IR for pathology using the liver and kidney as examples. FT-IR imaging holds exciting applications in providing a novel route to obtain biochemical information from cells and tissue in an entirely label-free non-perturbing route towards giving new insight into biomolecular changes as part of disease processes. Additionally, this biochemical information can potentially allow for objective and automated analysis of certain aspects of disease diagnosis. PMID:25650759

  1. Fast Fourier demodulation Yuval Carmona)

    E-print Network

    Ribak, Erez

    Fast Fourier demodulation Yuval Carmona) and Erez N. Ribakb) Department of Physics, Technion, Haifa present a fast Fourier demodulation method for calculating the distortion in a repetitive pattern in Fourier space. After demodulation, we are left with the Fourier transform of the sought phase information

  2. A Panchromatic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer for the NASA Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yen-Hung; Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Rider, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design and development of the Panchromatic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (PanFTS) for the NASA Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) Mission. The PanFTS instrument will advance the understanding of the global climate and atmospheric chemistry by measuring spectrally resolved outgoing thermal and reflected solar radiation. With continuous spectral coverage from the near-ultraviolet through the thermal infrared, this instrument is designed to measure pollutants, greenhouse gases, and aerosols as called for by the U.S. National Research Council Decadal Survey; Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond1. The PanFTS instrument is a hybrid instrument based on spectrometers like the Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer (TES) that measures thermal emission, and those like the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) that measure scattered solar radiation. Simultaneous measurements over the broad spectral range from IR to UV is accomplished by a two sided interferometer with separate optical trains and detectors for the ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectral domains. This allows each side of the instrument to be independently optimized for its respective spectral domain. The overall interferometer design is compact because the two sides share a single high precision cryogenic optical path difference mechanism (OPDM) and metrology laser as well as a number of other instrument systems including the line-of-sight pointing mirror, the data management system, thermal control system, electrical system, and the mechanical structure. The PanFTS breadboard instrument has been tested in the laboratory and demonstrated the basic functionality for simultaneous measurements in the visible and infrared. It is set to begin operations in the field at the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) observatory on Mt. Wilson measuring the atmospheric chemistry across the Los Angeles basin. Development has begun on a flight size PanFTS engineering model (EM) that addresses all critical scaling issues and demonstrates operation over the full spectral range of the flight instrument which will show the PanFTS instrument design is mature.

  3. Imaging IR spectrometer, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradie, Jonathan; Lewis, Ralph; Lundeen, Thomas; Wang, Shu-I

    1990-01-01

    The development is examined of a prototype multi-channel infrared imaging spectrometer. The design, construction and preliminary performance is described. This instrument is intended for use with JPL Table Mountain telescope as well as the 88 inch UH telescope on Mauna Kea. The instrument is capable of sampling simultaneously the spectral region of 0.9 to 2.6 um at an average spectral resolution of 1 percent using a cooled (77 K) optical bench, a concave holographic grating and a special order sorting filter to allow the acquisition of the full spectral range on a 128 x 128 HgCdTe infrared detector array. The field of view of the spectrometer is 0.5 arcsec/pixel in mapping mode and designed to be 5 arcsec/pixel in spot mode. The innovative optical design has resulted in a small, transportable spectrometer, capable of remote operation. Commercial applications of this spectrometer design include remote sensing from both space and aircraft platforms as well as groundbased astronomical observations.

  4. Amplified Dispersive Fourier-Transform Imaging for Ultrafast Displacement Sensing and Barcode Reading

    E-print Network

    Goda, Keisuke; Jalali, Bahram

    2008-01-01

    Dispersive Fourier transformation is a powerful technique in which the spectrum of an optical pulse is mapped into a time-domain waveform using chromatic dispersion. It replaces a diffraction grating and detector array with a dispersive fiber and single photodetector. This simplifies the system and, more importantly, enables fast real-time measurements. Here we describe a novel ultrafast barcode reader and displacement sensor that employs internally-amplified dispersive Fourier transformation. This technique amplifies and simultaneously maps the spectrally encoded barcode into a temporal waveform. It achieves a record acquisition speed of 25 MHz -- four orders of magnitude faster than the current state-of-the-art.

  5. A Synthetic Quadrature Phase Detector/Demodulator for Fourier Transform Transform Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel

    2008-01-01

    A method is developed to demodulate (velocity correct) Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data that is taken with an analog to digital converter that digitizes equally spaced in time. This method makes it possible to use simple low cost, high resolution audio digitizers to record high quality data without the need for an event timer or quadrature laser hardware, and makes it possible to use a metrology laser of any wavelength. The reduced parts count and simplicity implementation makes it an attractive alternative in space based applications when compared to previous methods such as the Brault algorithm.

  6. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Erin Miller

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  7. Phase-Scrambler Plate Spreads Point Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Oliver J.; Arild, Tor

    1992-01-01

    Array of small prisms retrofit to imaging lens. Phase-scrambler plate essentially planar array of small prisms partitioning aperture of lens into many subapertures, and prism at each subaperture designed to divert relatively large diffraction spot formed by that subaperture to different, specific point on focal plane.

  8. Phase object imaging inside the airy disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tychinsky, Vladimir P.

    1991-03-01

    The possibility of phase objects superresoluton imaging is theoretically justifieth The measurements with CPM " AIRYSCAN" showed the reality of O structures observations when the Airy disc di ameter i s 0 86 j. . m SUMMARY It has been known that the amount of information contained in the image of any object is mostly determined by the number of points measured i ndependentl y or by spati al resol uti on of the system. From the classic theory of the optical systems it follows that for noncoherent sources the -spatial resolution is limited by the aperture dd 6LX/N. A. ( Rayleigh criterion where X is wave length NA numerical aperture. ) The use of this criterion is equivalent tO the statement that any object inside the Airy disc of radius d that is the difraction image of a point is practical ly unresolved. However at the coherent illumination the intensity distribution in the image plane depends also upon the phase iq (r) of the wave scattered by the object and this is the basis of the Zernike method of phasecontrast microscopy differential interference contrast (DIC) and computer phase microscopy ( CPM ). In theoretical foundation of these methods there was no doubt in the correctness of Rayleigh criterion since the phase information is derived out of intensity distribution and as we know there were no experiments that disproved this

  9. Digitizing Images for Curriculum 21: Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D.

    Although visual databases exist for the study of art, architecture, geography, health care, and other areas, readily accessible sources of quality images are not available for engineering faculty interested in developing multimedia modules or for student projects. Presented here is a brief review of Phase I of the Engineering Visual Database…

  10. Evaluation of Fourier Transform Coefficients for The Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis From Diffuse Optical Tomography Images

    E-print Network

    Hielscher, Andreas

    Evaluation of Fourier Transform Coefficients for The Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis From Diffuse: Diffuse Optical Tomography, Computer-Aided Diagnosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis 1. INTRODUCTION Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder that affects 0.5-1.0% of adults in industrialized countries

  11. Micro-Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (Micro ATR FT-IR) Spectroscopic Imaging with Variable Angles of Incidence.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Tomasz P; Vichi, Alessandra; Baranska, Malgorzata; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2015-10-01

    The control of the angle of incidence in attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy allows for the probing of the sample at different depths of penetration of the evanescent wave. This approach has been recently coupled with macro-imaging capability using a diamond ATR accessory. In this paper, the design of optical apertures for the micro-germanium (Ge) ATR objective is presented for an FT-IR spectroscopic imaging microscope, allowing measurements with different angles of incidence. This approach provides the possibility of three-dimensional (3D) profiling in micro-ATR FT-IR imaging mode. The proof of principle results for measurements of polymer laminate samples at different angles of incidence confirm that controlling the depth of penetration is possible using a Ge ATR objective with added apertures. PMID:26449810

  12. Applications of Fourier Domain Mode Locked lasers for optical coherence tomography imaging

    E-print Network

    Adler, Desmond Christopher, 1978-

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a micrometer-resolution imaging technique that produces cross-sectional images of sample microstructure by measuring the amplitude and echo time delay of backscattered light. OCT imaging ...

  13. An examination of the sequence of intersecting lines using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Bojko, Katherine; Roux, Claude; Reedy, Brian J

    2008-11-01

    In this study, the potential of attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectral imaging as a technique to determine the sequence of line crossings was examined. The technique was successful in determining the sequence of heterogeneous line intersections produced using ballpoint pens and laser printers. By imaging at characteristic frequencies, it was possible to form spectral images showing the spatial distribution of the materials. By examining the spectral images from the inks, it was possible to determine whether the ink was above or below the toner. In blind testing, ATR-FTIR spectral imaging results were directly compared to those obtained by eight experienced forensic document examiners using methods regularly employed in casework. ATR-FTIR spectral imaging was shown to achieve a 100% success rate in the blind tests, whereas some incorrect sequence determinations were made by the forensic document examiners when using traditional techniques. The technique was unable to image ink-jet printing, gel pens, roller ball pens, and felt-tip pens, and was also unable to determine the sequence of intersecting ballpoint pen lines. PMID:18624894

  14. Ultrahigh-speed imaging of the rat retina using ultrahigh-resolution spectral/Fourier domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jonathan J.; Potsaid, Benjamin; Chen, Yueli; Gorczynska, Iwona; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-02-01

    We performed OCT imaging of the rat retina at 70,000 axial scans per second with ~3 ?m axial resolution. Three-dimensional OCT (3D-OCT) data sets of the rat retina were acquired. The high speed and high density data sets enable improved en face visualization by reducing eye motion artifacts and improve Doppler OCT measurements. Minimal motion artifacts were visible and the OCT fundus images offer more precise registration of individual OCT images to retinal fundus features. Projection OCT fundus images show features such as the nerve fiber layer, retinal capillary networks and choroidal vasculature. Doppler OCT images and quantitative measurements show pulsatility in retinal blood vessels. Doppler OCT provides noninvasive in vivo quantitative measurements of retinal blood flow properties and may benefit studies of diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. Ultrahigh speed imaging using ultrahigh resolution spectral / Fourier domain OCT promises to enable novel protocols for measuring small animal retinal structure and retinal blood flow. This non-invasive imaging technology is a promising tool for monitoring disease progression in rat and mouse models to assess ocular disease pathogenesis and response to treatment.

  15. A general theory of interference fringes in x-ray phase grating imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng E-mail: liu@ou.edu; Liu, Hong E-mail: liu@ou.edu

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The authors note that the concept of the Talbot self-image distance in x-ray phase grating interferometry is indeed not well defined for polychromatic x-rays, because both the grating phase shift and the fractional Talbot distances are all x-ray wavelength-dependent. For x-ray interferometry optimization, there is a need for a quantitative theory that is able to predict if a good intensity modulation is attainable at a given grating-to-detector distance. In this work, the authors set out to meet this need. Methods: In order to apply Fourier analysis directly to the intensity fringe patterns of two-dimensional and one-dimensional phase grating interferometers, the authors start their derivation from a general phase space theory of x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Unlike previous Fourier analyses, the authors evolved the Wigner distribution to obtain closed-form expressions of the Fourier coefficients of the intensity fringes for any grating-to-detector distance, even if it is not a fractional Talbot distance. Results: The developed theory determines the visibility of any diffraction order as a function of the grating-to-detector distance, the phase shift of the grating, and the x-ray spectrum. The authors demonstrate that the visibilities of diffraction orders can serve as the indicators of the underlying interference intensity modulation. Applying the theory to the conventional and inverse geometry configurations of single-grating interferometers, the authors demonstrated that the proposed theory provides a quantitative tool for the grating interferometer optimization with or without the Talbot-distance constraints. Conclusions: In this work, the authors developed a novel theory of the interference intensity fringes in phase grating x-ray interferometry. This theory provides a quantitative tool in design optimization of phase grating x-ray interferometers.

  16. Nonlinear optical measurements using a 4f coherent imaging system with phase objects

    SciTech Connect

    Boudebs, G.; Cherukulappurath, S.

    2004-05-01

    We report a one-laser-shot measurement technique using a phase object at the entry of a 4f coherent imaging system to characterize the value of the nonlinear refractive index of materials placed in the Fourier plane of the setup. Experimental and simulated images are presented here in order to validate our approach. We show that the use of a quarter-wavelength dephasing object maximizes the transmission variations in the detected image. We show also that the use of phase objects increases significantly the sensitivity of the measurement compared to top-hat beams (by a factor of 6). Moreover, by adding this type of object at the entry of our imaging system it is possible to determine the sign of the refractive nonlinearity.

  17. Quantitative phase imaging through scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollárová, Vera; Colláková, Jana; Dostál, Zbynek; Slabý, Tomas; Veselý, Pavel; Chmelík, Radim

    2015-03-01

    Coherence-controlled holographic microscope (CCHM) is an off-axis holographic system. It enables observation of a sample and its quantitative phase imaging with coherent as well as with incoherent illumination. The spatial and temporal coherence can be modified and thus also the quality and type of the image information. The coherent illumination provides numerical refocusing in wide depth range similarly to a classic coherent-light digital holographic microscopy (HM). Incoherent-light HM is characterized by a high quality, coherence-noise-free imaging with up to twice higher resolution compared to coherent illumination. Owing to an independent, free of sample reference arm of the CCHM the low spatial light coherence induces coherence-gating effect. This makes possible to observe specimen also through scattering media. We have described theoretically and simulated numerically imaging of a two dimensional object through a scattering layer by CCHM using the linear systems theory. We have investigated both strongly and weakly scattering media characterized by different amount of ballistic and diffuse light. The influence of a scattering layer on the quality of a phase signal is discussed for both types of the scattering media. A strong dependence of the imaging process on the light coherence is demonstrated. The theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are supported by experimental data gained with model samples, as well as real biologic objects particularly then by time-lapse observations of live cells reactions to substances producing optically turbid emulsion.

  18. Improved Fourier-transform profilometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Xianfu; Chen Wenjing; Su Xianyu

    2007-02-10

    An improved optical geometry of the projected-fringe profilometry technique, in which the exit pupil of the projecting lens and the entrance pupil of the imaging lens are neither at the same height above the reference plane nor coplanar, is discussed and used in Fourier-transform profilometry. Furthermore, an improved fringe-pattern description and phase-height mapping formula based on the improved geometrical generalization is deduced. Employing the new optical geometry, it is easier for us to obtain the full-field fringe by moving either the projector or the imaging device. Therefore the new method offers a flexible way to obtain reliable height distribution of a measured object.

  19. Semiclassical TEM image formation in phase space.

    PubMed

    Lubk, Axel; Röder, Falk

    2015-04-01

    Current developments in TEM such as high-resolution imaging at low acceleration voltages and large fields of view, the ever larger capabilities of hardware aberration correction and the systematic shaping of electron beams require accurate descriptions of TEM imaging in terms of wave optics. Since full quantum mechanic solutions have not yet been established for, e.g., the theory of aberrations, we are exploring semiclassical image formation in the TEM from the perspective of quantum mechanical phase space, here. Firstly, we use two well-known semiclassical approximations, Miller's semiclassical algebra and the frozen Gaussian method, for describing the wave optical generalization of arbitrary geometric aberrations, including nonisoplanatic and slope aberrations. Secondly, we demonstrate that the Wigner function representation of phase space is well suited to also describe incoherent aberrations as well as the ramifications of partial coherence due to the emission process at the electron source. We identify a close relationship between classical phase space and Wigner function distortions due to aberrations as well as classical brightness and quantum mechanical purity. PMID:25579179

  20. High-speed Fourier domain Optical Coherence Tomography for structural and functional imaging of the retina

    E-print Network

    Srinivasan, Vivek Jay

    2008-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an emerging optical biomedical imaging technology that enables cross-sectional imaging of scattering tissue with high sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. In conventional OCT, the ...

  1. Microsolvation of reactive systems in the gas phase via Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Carolyn Sue

    Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy has been used to study a number of reactive systems, with the primary goal of probing the effects of solvent on a molecule or a weakly bound acid-base system at the small cluster level. Because these systems are particularly sensitive to their first, nearest neighbors, the studies focus on examining structural changes and electronic rearrangement that occurs with the addition of a single solvent molecule, or microsolvent. The structural effects of microsolvation were examined on two prototypical acid-base systems. The first sought to ascertain the effect of microsolvent polarity by microsolvating HCN-SO3 with Ar and CO, forming the complexes HCN-SO3···Ar and HCN-SO 3···CO. Dipole moments and ab initio calculations also are reported. The second examined the effect of microsolvation on the primary hydrogen bond distance of (CH3)3N···HF, by adding a single HF molecule, forming the complex (CH3) 3N···HF···HF. The Stark effect was measured on a series of hydrogen halide complexes. These systems are prototypical complexes with which to study proton transfer across a hydrogen bond. The resulting dipole moments are discussed in terms of the degree of proton transfer. The dipole moment also was determined for the H2SO4···H 2O complex, which provides an important model system for understanding rates of binary homogeneous nucleation, and a series of ab initio calculations were performed in support of the results. Finally, the microwave spectrum of the radical complex OH-H2O was observed and analyzed using a two-state model which accounts for nuclear motion on the 2A' and 2A" potential surfaces. The results provide insights into the effects of the partial quenching of orbital angular momentum.

  2. Scanning hard x-ray differential phase contrast imaging with a double wedge absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Mukaide, Taihei; Takada, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Noma, Takashi; Iida, Atsuo

    2009-03-15

    Two-directional differential phase contrast images were measured using an x-ray microbeam and a double wedge absorber. The wedge absorber converts the displacement of an x-ray beam that is refracted by an object into change of x-ray intensity. The double wedge absorber made it possible to detect values of two-directional refraction angle with {mu}rad sensitivity simultaneously. By Fourier integration of two-directional phase gradients calculated from the refraction angle instead of line integration of one-directional phase gradients, we obtained a quantitative phase map without artifacts even when only a part of the boundaries of the object were in the field of view. One of the characteristics of this technique is flexibility in a sensitivity of the phase gradient. By changing of shape or material of the wedge absorber, it is comparatively easy to control the detection limit of the refraction angle.

  3. Quantum Phase Imaging using Spatial Entanglement

    E-print Network

    Chien-Hung Lu; Matthew Reichert; Xiaohang Sun; Jason W. Fleischer

    2015-09-03

    Entangled photons have the remarkable ability to be more sensitive to signal and less sensitive to noise than classical light. Joint photons can sample an object collectively, resulting in faster phase accumulation and higher spatial resolution, while common components of noise can be subtracted. Even more, they can accomplish this while physically separate, due to the nonlocal properties of quantum mechanics. Indeed, nearly all quantum optics experiments rely on this separation, using individual point detectors that are scanned to measure coincidence counts and correlations. Scanning, however, is tedious, time consuming, and ill-suited for imaging. Moreover, the separation of beam paths adds complexity to the system while reducing the number of photons available for sampling, and the multiplicity of detectors does not scale well for greater numbers of photons and higher orders of entanglement. We bypass all of these problems here by directly imaging collinear photon pairs with an electron-multiplying CCD camera. We show explicitly the benefits of quantum nonlocality by engineering the spatial entanglement of the illuminating photons and introduce a new method of correlation measurement by converting time-domain coincidence counting into spatial-domain detection of selected pixels. We show that classical transport-of-intensity methods are applicable in the quantum domain and experimentally demonstrate nearly optimal (Heisenberg-limited) phase measurement for the given quantum illumination. The methods show the power of direct imaging and hold much potential for more general types of quantum information processing and control.

  4. In situ permeation study of drug through the stratum corneum using attenuated total reflectance [corrected] Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Andanson, Jean-Michel; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2009-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of the most chemically specific analytical methods that gives information about composition, structure, and interactions in a material. IR spectroscopy has been successfully applied to study the permeation of xenobiotics through the skin. Combining IR spectroscopy with an IR array detector led to the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging, which generates chemical information from different areas of a sample at the microscopic level. This is particularly important for heterogeneous samples, such as skin. Attenuated total reflectance [corrected] (ATR)-FTIR imaging has been applied to measure, in situ, the diffusion of benzyl nicotinate (BN) through the outer layer of human skin [stratum corneum (SC)]. In vitro experiments have demonstrated the heterogeneous distribution of SC surface lipids before the penetration of a saturated solution of BN. Image analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between the distribution of lipids and drugs, while ethanol appeared to be homogenously distributed in the SC. These results show the ability of ATR-FTIR imaging to measure simultaneously the affinities of drug and solvent to the lipid-rich and lipid-poor skin domains, respectively, during permeation. This information may be useful in better understanding drug-diffusion pathways through the SC. PMID:19566304

  5. Multicontrast x-ray computed tomography imaging using Talbot-Lau interferometry without phase stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Li Ke; Qi Zhihua; Chen Guanghong

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that multicontrast computed tomography (CT) imaging can be performed using a Talbot-Lau interferometer without phase stepping, thus allowing for an acquisition scheme like that used for standard absorption CT. Methods: Rather than using phase stepping to extract refraction, small-angle scattering (SAS), and absorption signals, the two gratings of a Talbot-Lau interferometer were rotated slightly to generate a moire pattern on the detector. A Fourier analysis of the moire pattern was performed to obtain separate projection images of each of the three contrast signals, all from the same single-shot of x-ray exposure. After the signals were extracted from the detector data for all view angles, image reconstruction was performed to obtain absorption, refraction, and SAS CT images. A physical phantom was scanned to validate the proposed data acquisition method. The results were compared with a phantom scan using the standard phase stepping approach. Results: The reconstruction of each contrast mechanism produced the expected results. Signal levels and contrasts match those obtained using the phase stepping technique. Conclusions: Absorption, refraction, and SAS CT imaging can be achieved using the Talbot-Lau interferometer without the additional overhead of long scan time and phase stepping.

  6. Droplet characteristic measurement in Fourier interferometry imaging and behavior at the rainbow angle.

    PubMed

    Briard, Paul; Saengkaew, Sawitree; Wu, Xuecheng; Meunier-Guttin-Cluzel, Siegfried; Chen, Linghong; Cen, Kefa; Gréhan, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the possibility of measuring the three-dimensional (3D) relative locations and diameters of a set of spherical particles and discusses the behavior of the light recorded around the rainbow angle, an essential step toward refractive index measurements. When a set of particles is illuminated by a pulsed incident wave, the particles act as spherical light wave sources. When the pulse duration is short enough to fix the particle location (typically about 10 ns), interference fringes between these different spherical waves can be recorded. The Fourier transform of the fringes divides the complex fringe systems into a series of spots, with each spot characterizing the interference between a pair of particles. The analyses of these spots (in position and shape) potentially allow the measurement of particle characteristics (3D relative position, particle diameter, and particle refractive index value). PMID:23292412

  7. Self-starting, self-regulating Fourier domain mode locked fiber laser for OCT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Murari, Kartikeya; Mavadia, Jessica; Xi, Jiefeng; Li, Xingde

    2011-01-01

    We present a Fourier domain mode locking (FDML) fiber laser with a feedback loop allowing automatic startup without a priori knowledge of the fundamental drive frequency. The feedback can also regulate the drive frequency making the source robust against environmental variations. A control system samples the energy of the light traversing the FDML cavity and uses a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) to drive the tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter in order to maximize that energy. We demonstrate a prototype self-starting, self-regulating FDML operating at 40 kHz with a full width tuning range of 140 nm around 1305 nm and a power output of ~40 mW. The laser starts up with no operator intervention in less than 5 seconds and exhibits improved spectral stability over a conventional FDML source. In OCT applications the source achieved over 120 dB detection sensitivity and an ~8.9-µm axial resolution. PMID:21750775

  8. PHASED ARRAY FEED CALIBRATION, BEAMFORMING, AND IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, Jonathan; Elmer, Michael; Waldron, Jacob; Jones, David; Stemmons, Alan; Jeffs, Brian D.; Warnick, Karl F.; Richard Fisher, J.; Norrod, Roger D.

    2010-03-15

    Phased array feeds (PAFs) for reflector antennas offer the potential for increased reflector field of view and faster survey speeds. To address some of the development challenges that remain for scientifically useful PAFs, including calibration and beamforming algorithms, sensitivity optimization, and demonstration of wide field of view imaging, we report experimental results from a 19 element room temperature L-band PAF mounted on the Green Bank 20 Meter Telescope. Formed beams achieved an aperture efficiency of 69% and a system noise temperature of 66 K. Radio camera images of several sky regions are presented. We investigate the noise performance and sensitivity of the system as a function of elevation angle with statistically optimal beamforming and demonstrate cancelation of radio frequency interference sources with adaptive spatial filtering.

  9. Discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilages by Fourier transform infrared imaging and partial least squares-discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue-Xi; Yin, Jian-Hua; Mao, Zhi-Hua; Xia, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) combined with chemometrics algorithm has strong potential to obtain complex chemical information from biology tissues. FTIRI and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to differentiate healthy and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilages for the first time. A PLS model was built on the calibration matrix of spectra that was randomly selected from the FTIRI spectral datasets of healthy and lesioned cartilage. Leave-one-out cross-validation was performed in the PLS model, and the fitting coefficient between actual and predicted categorical values of the calibration matrix reached 0.95. In the calibration and prediction matrices, the successful identifying percentages of healthy and lesioned cartilage spectra were 100% and 90.24%, respectively. These results demonstrated that FTIRI combined with PLS-DA could provide a promising approach for the categorical identification of healthy and OA cartilage specimens.

  10. Proteoglycan concentrations in healthy and diseased articular cartilage by Fourier transform infrared imaging and principal component regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jianhua; Xia, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) combining with principal component regression (PCR) analysis were used to determine the reduction of proteoglycan (PG) in articular cartilage after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A number of canine knee cartilage sections were harvested from the meniscus-covered and meniscus-uncovered medial tibial locations from the control joints, the ACL joints at three time points after the surgery, and their contralateral joints. The PG loss in the ACL cartilage was related positively to the durations after the surgery. The PG loss in the contralateral knees was less than that of the ACL knees. The PG loss in the meniscus-covered cartilage was less than that of the meniscus-uncovered tissue in both ACL and contralateral knees. The quantitative mapping of PG loss could monitor the disease progression and repair processes in arthritis.

  11. PITH ESTIMATION ON ROUGH LOG END IMAGES USING LOCAL FOURIER SPECTRUM ANALYSIS

    E-print Network

    Uhl, Andreas

    ends are pre- dominantly performed manually by visually inspecting logs. However, images of log ends of distortions caused by sawing or dust and the annual ring borders are slightly emphasized. Pith estimation

  12. Ground-Based Measurement Experiment and First Results with Geosynchronous-Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer Engineering Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Bingham, Gail E.; Huppi, Ronald J.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Zollinger, Lori J.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Tansock, Joseph J.; Reisse, Robert A.; Hooker, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    The geosynchronous-imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (GIFTS) engineering demonstration unit (EDU) is an imaging infrared spectrometer designed for atmospheric soundings. It measures the infrared spectrum in two spectral bands (14.6 to 8.8 microns, 6.0 to 4.4 microns) using two 128 x 128 detector arrays with a spectral resolution of 0.57 cm(exp -1) with a scan duration of approximately 11 seconds. From a geosynchronous orbit, the instrument will have the capability of taking successive measurements of such data to scan desired regions of the globe, from which atmospheric status, cloud parameters, wind field profiles, and other derived products can be retrieved. The GIFTS EDU provides a flexible and accurate testbed for the new challenges of the emerging hyperspectral era. The EDU ground-based measurement experiment, held in Logan, Utah during September 2006, demonstrated its extensive capabilities and potential for geosynchronous and other applications (e.g., Earth observing environmental measurements). This paper addresses the experiment objectives and overall performance of the sensor system with a focus on the GIFTS EDU imaging capability and proof of the GIFTS measurement concept.

  13. Quantitative Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of the Ocular Anterior Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, Ryan Palmer

    Clinical imaging within ophthalmology has had transformative effects on ocular health over the last century. Imaging has guided clinicians in their pharmaceutical and surgical treatments of macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataracts and numerous other pathologies. Many of the imaging techniques currently used are photography based and are limited to imaging the surface of ocular structures. This limitation forces clinicians to make assumptions about the underlying tissue which may reduce the efficacy of their diagnoses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality that has been widely adopted within the field of ophthalmology in the last 15 years. As an optical imaging technique, OCT utilizes low-coherence interferometry to produce micron-scale three-dimensional datasets of a tissue's structure. Much of the human body consists of tissues that significantly scatter and attenuate optical signals limiting the imaging depth of OCT in those tissues to only 1-2mm. However, the ocular anterior segment is unique among human tissue in that it is primarily transparent or translucent. This allows for relatively deep imaging of tissue structure with OCT and is no longer limited by the optical scattering properties of the tissue. This goal of this work is to develop methods utilizing OCT that offer the potential to reduce the assumptions made by clinicians in their evaluations of their patients' ocular anterior segments. We achieved this by first developing a method to reduce the effects of patient motion during OCT volume acquisitions allowing for accurate, three dimensional measurements of corneal shape. Having accurate corneal shape measurements then allowed us to determine corneal spherical and astigmatic refractive contribution in a given individual. This was then validated in a clinical study that showed OCT better measured refractive change due to surgery than other clinical devices. Additionally, a method was developed to combine the clinical evaluation of the iridocorneal angle through gonioscopy with OCT.

  14. Two-dimensional wave-number spectral analysis techniques for phase contrast imaging turbulence imaging data on large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, C. A.; Tanaka, K.; Vyacheslavov, L.; Sanin, A.; Kawahata, K.

    2015-09-01

    An analysis method for unfolding the spatially resolved wave-number spectrum and phase velocity from the 2D CO2 laser phase contrast imaging system on the large helical device is described. This is based on the magnetic shear technique which identifies propagation direction from 2D spatial Fourier analysis of images detected by a 6 × 8 detector array. Because the strongest modes have wave-number at the lower end of the instrumental k range, high resolution spectral techniques are necessary to clearly resolve the propagation direction and hence the spatial distribution of fluctuations along the probing laser beam. Multiple-spatial point cross-correlation averaging is applied before calculating the spatial power spectrum. Different methods are compared, and it is found that the maximum entropy method (MEM) gives best results. The possible generation of artifacts from the over-narrowing of spectra are investigated and found not to be a significant problem. The spatial resolution ?? (normalized radius) around the peak wave-number, for conventional Fourier analysis, is ˜0.5, making physical interpretation difficult, while for MEM, ?? ˜ 0.1.

  15. Two-dimensional wave-number spectral analysis techniques for phase contrast imaging turbulence imaging data on large helical device.

    PubMed

    Michael, C A; Tanaka, K; Vyacheslavov, L; Sanin, A; Kawahata, K

    2015-09-01

    An analysis method for unfolding the spatially resolved wave-number spectrum and phase velocity from the 2D CO2 laser phase contrast imaging system on the large helical device is described. This is based on the magnetic shear technique which identifies propagation direction from 2D spatial Fourier analysis of images detected by a 6 × 8 detector array. Because the strongest modes have wave-number at the lower end of the instrumental k range, high resolution spectral techniques are necessary to clearly resolve the propagation direction and hence the spatial distribution of fluctuations along the probing laser beam. Multiple-spatial point cross-correlation averaging is applied before calculating the spatial power spectrum. Different methods are compared, and it is found that the maximum entropy method (MEM) gives best results. The possible generation of artifacts from the over-narrowing of spectra are investigated and found not to be a significant problem. The spatial resolution ?? (normalized radius) around the peak wave-number, for conventional Fourier analysis, is ?0.5, making physical interpretation difficult, while for MEM, ?? ? 0.1. PMID:26429439

  16. Demonstration of Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) Performance for Planetary and Geostationary Earth Observing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revercomb, Henry E.; Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; Fry, Patrick M.; Best, Fred A.; LaPorte, Daniel D.

    2001-01-01

    The combination of massively parallel spatial sampling and accurate spectral radiometry offered by imaging FTS makes it extremely attractive for earth and planetary remote sensing. We constructed a breadboard instrument to help assess the potential for planetary applications of small imaging FTS instruments in the 1 - 5 micrometer range. The results also support definition of the NASA Geostationary Imaging FTS (GIFTS) instrument that will make key meteorological and climate observations from geostationary earth orbit. The Planetary Imaging FTS (PIFTS) breadboard is based on a custom miniaturized Bomen interferometer that uses corner cube reflectors, a wishbone pivoting voice-coil delay scan mechanism, and a laser diode metrology system. The interferometer optical output is measured by a commercial infrared camera procured from Santa Barbara Focalplane. It uses an InSb 128x128 detector array that covers the entire FOV of the instrument when coupled with a 25 mm focal length commercial camera lens. With appropriate lenses and cold filters the instrument can be used from the visible to 5 micrometers. The delay scan is continuous, but slow, covering the maximum range of +/- 0.4 cm in 37.56 sec at a rate of 500 image frames per second. Image exposures are timed to be centered around predicted zero crossings. The design allows for prediction algorithms that account for the most recent fringe rate so that timing jitter produced by scan speed variations can be minimized. Response to a fixed source is linear with exposure time nearly to the point of saturation. Linearity with respect to input variations was demonstrated to within 0.16% using a 3-point blackbody calibration. Imaging of external complex scenes was carried out at low and high spectral resolution. These require full complex calibration to remove background contributions that vary dramatically over the instrument FOV. Testing is continuing to demonstrate the precise radiometric accuracy and noise characteristics.

  17. Analysis of hyper-spectral data derived from an imaging Fourier transform: A statistical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, S.K.; Clark, G.A.; Fields, D.J.

    1996-01-10

    Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) using optical sensors are increasingly being used in various branches of science. Typically, a FTS generates a three-dimensional data cube with two spatial dimensions and one frequency/wavelength dimension. The number of frequency dimensions in such data cubes is generally very large, often in the hundreds, making data analytical procedures extremely complex. In the present report, the problem is viewed from a statistical perspective. A set of procedures based on the high degree of inter-channel correlation structure often present in such hyper-spectral data, has been identified and applied to an example data set of dimension 100 x 128 x 128 comprising 128 spectral bands. It is shown that in this case, the special eigen-structure of the correlation matrix has allowed the authors to extract just a few linear combinations of the channels (the significant principal vectors) that effectively contain almost all of the spectral information contained in the data set analyzed. This in turn, enables them to segment the objects in the given spatial frame using, in a parsimonious yet highly effective way, most of the information contained in the data set.

  18. Calculation and correction of piston phase aberration in synthesis imaging

    E-print Network

    Greenaway, Alan

    - tions [5], where single large apertures are not practicable. In synthesis imaging each collectorCalculation and correction of piston phase aberration in synthesis imaging Richard J. Eastwood,1 aperture array using a system of linear equations in terms of the aperture phases as well as object phase

  19. Phase Retrieval Using a Genetic Algorithm on the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jaime R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center s Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) Testbed was developed to test phase retrieval algorithms and hardware techniques. Individuals working with the facility developed the idea of implementing phase retrieval by breaking the determination of the tip/tilt of each mirror apart from the piston motion (or translation) of each mirror. Presented in this report is an algorithm that determines the optimal phase correction associated only with the piston motion of the mirrors. A description of the Phase Retrieval problem is first presented. The Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) Testbeb is then described. A Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) is necessary to transfer the incoming wavefront (or estimate of phase error) into the spatial frequency domain to compare it with the image. A method for reducing the DFT to seven scalar/matrix multiplications is presented. A genetic algorithm is then used to search for the phase error. The results of this new algorithm on a test problem are presented.

  20. Ruthenium trisbipyridine as a candidate for gas-phase spectroscopic studies in a Fourier transform mass spectrometer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scott, Jill R.; Ham, Jason E.; Durham, Bill; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    Metal polypyridines are excellent candidates for gas-phase optical experiments where their intrinsic properties can be studied without complications due to the presence of solvent. The fluorescence lifetimes of [Ru(bpy)3]1+trapped in an optical detection cell within a Fourier transform mass spectrometer were obtained using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization to generate the ions with either 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) or sinapinic acid (SA) as matrix. All transients acquired, whether using DHB or SA for ion generation, were best described as approximately exponential decays. The rate constant for transients derived using DHB as matrix was 4×107s?1, while the rate constant using SA was 1×107s?1. Somemore »suggestions of multiple exponential decay were evident although limited by the quality of the signals. Photodissociation experiments revealed that [Ru(bpy)3]1+generated using DHB can decompose to [Ru(bpy)2]1+, whereas ions generated using SA showed no decomposition. Comparison of the mass spectra with the fluorescence lifetimes illustrates the promise of incorporating optical detection with trapped ion mass spectrometry techniques.« less

  1. Fourier domain design of microgrid imaging polarimeters with improved spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Keigo; LeMaster, Daniel A.

    2014-05-01

    Microgrid polarimetric imagers sacrifice spatial resolution for sensitivity to states of linear polarization. We have recently shown that a 2 × 4 microgrid analyzer pattern sacrifices less spatial resolution than the conventional 2× 2 case without compromising polarization sensitivity. In this paper, we discuss the design strategy that uncovered the spatial resolution benefits of the 2 × 4 array.

  2. High-resolution imaging of the human retina with a Fourier deconvolution technique

    E-print Network

    Dainty, Chris

    - cording the retinal images. The laser produces a spot size on the retina, where the diameter of the beam-front aberration obtained with a Shack­Hartmann wave-front sensor. In addition to noise reduction by averaging Primot et al.3 showed that there is a system- atic bias in the estimation of the computed speckle trans

  3. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy for Identification and Quantification of Organic Functional Groups in Aqueous Phase Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, K.; Ruthenburg, T. C.; Smith, J.; Anastasio, C.; Dillner, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere influence visibility, climate, and human health. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from chemical reactions in the atmosphere constitute a portion of total organic particle mass. Most research on SOA has focused on gas phase reactions; however, reactions taking place in cloud and fog drops may be significant. One group of water-soluble compounds that participate in these reactions is phenols. Phenols, emitted from biomass burning, react in the aqueous phase to form low-volatility SOA products. The products formed from these reactions are currently poorly characterized. In order to characterize laboratory-generated samples, we are developing an attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR) technique to identify and quantify organic functional groups in SOA. Aqueous SOA is made in the laboratory by illuminating solutions of phenolic compounds with an oxidant. The illuminated solution is then blown to dryness in order to determine the mass of SOA produced. The dry SOA is reconstituted in water and drops of this solution are placed onto a single-reflection ATR accessory. In order to identify and quantify functional groups in the complex SOA samples, it is necessary to calibrate with compounds and mixtures of compounds containing bond types similar to those found in the laboratory-generated SOA. Initially, focus has been placed on multiple peaks located in the region between 1800 cm-1 and 800 cm-1, including peaks for C=O and C-O. We distinguish between characteristic absorbances to begin determining the organic functional group composition of the SOA samples. This ATR-FTIR technique complements information from mass spectrometry measurements and allows us to quantify organic mass for non-volatile SOA products.

  4. Investigating the biochemical progression of liver disease through fibrosis, cirrhosis, dysplasia, and hepatocellular carcinoma using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedhar, Hari; Pant, Mamta; Ronquillo, Nemencio R.; Davidson, Bennett; Nguyen, Peter; Chennuri, Rohini; Choi, Jacqueline; Herrera, Joaquin A.; Hinojosa, Ana C.; Jin, Ming; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Guzman, Grace; Walsh, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of primary hepatic carcinoma. HCC ranks the fourth most prevalent malignant tumor and the third leading cause of cancer related death in the world. Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in the context of chronic liver disease and its evolution is characterized by progression through intermediate stages to advanced disease and possibly even death. The primary sequence of hepatocarcinogenesis includes the development of cirrhosis, followed by dysplasia, and hepatocellular carcinoma.1 We addressed the utility of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging, both as a diagnostic tool of the different stages of the disease and to gain insight into the biochemical process associated with disease progression. Tissue microarrays were obtained from the University of Illinois at Chicago tissue bank consisting of liver explants from 12 transplant patients. Tissue core biopsies were obtained from each explant targeting regions of normal, liver cell dysplasia including large cell change and small cell change, and hepatocellular carcinoma. We obtained FT-IR images of these tissues using a modified FT-IR system with high definition capabilities. Firstly, a supervised spectral classifier was built to discriminate between normal and cancerous hepatocytes. Secondly, an expanded classifier was built to discriminate small cell and large cell changes in liver disease. With the emerging advances in FT-IR instrumentation and computation there is a strong drive to develop this technology as a powerful adjunct to current histopathology approaches to improve disease diagnosis and prognosis.

  5. Vacuum compatible sample positioning device for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Aizikov, Konstantin; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Smith, Donald F.; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Chargin, David A.; Ivanov, Sergei; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2011-05-15

    The high mass accuracy and resolving power of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FT-ICR MS) make them ideal mass detectors for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), promising to provide unmatched molecular resolution capabilities. The intrinsic low tolerance of FT-ICR MS to RF interference, however, along with typically vertical positioning of the sample, and MSI acquisition speed requirements present numerous engineering challenges in creating robotics capable of achieving the spatial resolution to match. This work discusses a two-dimensional positioning stage designed to address these issues. The stage is capable of operating in {approx}1 x 10{sup -8} mbar vacuum. The range of motion is set to 100 mm x 100 mm to accommodate large samples, while the positioning accuracy is demonstrated to be less than 0.4 micron in both directions under vertical load over the entire range. This device was integrated into three different matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) FT-ICR instruments and showed no detectable RF noise. The ''oversampling'' MALDI-MSI experiments, under which the sample is completely ablated at each position, followed by the target movement of the distance smaller than the laser beam, conducted on the custom-built 7T FT-ICR MS demonstrate the stability and positional accuracy of the stage robotics which delivers high spatial resolution mass spectral images at a fraction of the laser spot diameter.

  6. Real-time measurement of alveolar size and population using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Andrew F.T.; Buckley, Genevieve A.; Paganin, David M.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Kitchen, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    Herein a propagation-based phase contrast x-ray imaging technique for measuring particle size and number is presented. This is achieved with an algorithm that utilizes the Fourier space signature of the speckle pattern associated with the images of particles. We validate this algorithm using soda-lime glass particles, demonstrating its effectiveness on random and non-randomly packed particles. This technique is then applied to characterise lung alveoli, which are difficult to measure dynamically in vivo with current imaging modalities due to inadequate temporal resolution and/or depth of penetration and field-of-view. We obtain an important result in that our algorithm is able to measure changes in alveolar size on the micron scale during ventilation and shows the presence of alveolar recruitment/de-recruitment in newborn rabbit kittens. This technique will be useful for ventilation management and lung diagnostic procedures. PMID:25426328

  7. Phase noise analysis of two wavelength coherent imaging system.

    PubMed

    Dapore, Benjamin R; Rabb, David J; Haus, Joseph W

    2013-12-16

    Two wavelength coherent imaging is a digital holographic technique that offers several advantages over conventional coherent imaging. One of the most significant advantages is the ability to extract 3D target information from the phase contrast image at a known difference frequency. However, phase noise detracts from the accuracy at which the target can be faithfully identified. We therefore describe a method for relating phase noise to the correlation of the image planes corresponding to each wavelength, among other parameters. The prediction of the phase noise spectrum of a scene will aid in determining our ability to reconstruct the target. PMID:24514640

  8. Analysis and measurement of the modulation transfer function of harmonic shear wave induced phase encoding imaging

    PubMed Central

    McAleavey, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Shear wave induced phase encoding (SWIPE) imaging generates ultrasound backscatter images of tissue-like elastic materials by using traveling shear waves to encode the lateral position of the scatters in the phase of the received echo. In contrast to conventional ultrasound B-scan imaging, SWIPE offers the potential advantages of image formation without beam focusing or steering from a single transducer element, lateral resolution independent of aperture size, and the potential to achieve relatively high lateral resolution with low frequency ultrasound. Here a Fourier series description of the phase modulated echo signal is developed, demonstrating that echo harmonics at multiples of the shear wave frequency reveal target k-space data at identical multiples of the shear wavenumber. Modulation transfer functions of SWIPE imaging systems are calculated for maximum shear wave acceleration and maximum shear constraints, and compared with a conventionally focused aperture. The relative signal-to-noise ratio of the SWIPE method versus a conventionally focused aperture is found through these calculations. Reconstructions of wire targets in a gelatin phantom using 1 and 3.5?MHz ultrasound and a cylindrical shear wave source are presented, generated from the fundamental and second harmonic of the shear wave modulation frequency, demonstrating weak dependence of lateral resolution with ultrasound frequency. PMID:24815265

  9. Sparsity-assisted solution to the twin image problem in phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Charu; Mohan, Baranidharan; Khare, Kedar

    2015-11-01

    The problem of iterative phase retrieval from Fourier transform magnitude data for complex-valued objects is known to suffer from the twin image problem. In particular, when the object support is centrosymmetric, the iterative solution often stagnates such that the resultant complex image contains the features of both the desired solution and its inverted and complex-conjugated replica. In this work we make an important observation that the ideal solution without the twin image is typically more sparse in some suitable transform domain as compared to the stagnated solution. We further show that introducing a sparsity-enhancing step in the iterative algorithm can address the twin image problem without the need to change the object support throughout the iterative process even when the object support is centrosymmetric. In a simulation study, we use binary and gray-scale pure phase objects and illustrate the effectiveness of the sparsity-assisted phase recovery in the context of the twin image problem. PMID:26560905

  10. Effect of noise on modulation amplitude and phase in frequency-domain diffusive imaging.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongyel; Kupinski, Matthew A

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of noise on frequency-domain heterodyne and/or homodyne measurements of intensity-modulated beams propagating through diffusive media, such as a photon density wave. We assumed that the attenuated amplitude and delayed phase are estimated by taking the Fourier transform of the noisy, modulated output data. We show that the estimated amplitude and phase are biased when the number of output photons is small. We also show that the use of image intensifiers for photon amplification in heterodyne or homodyne measurements increases the amount of biases. Especially, it turns out that the biased estimation is independent of AC-dependent noise in sinusoidal heterodyne or homodyne outputs. Finally, the developed theory indicates that the previously known variance model of modulation amplitude and phase is not valid in low light situations. Monte-Carlo simulations with varied numbers of input photons verify our theoretical trends of the bias. PMID:22352660

  11. Quantitative phase imaging in flows with high resolution holographic diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Desse, Jean-Michel; Picart, Pascal; Olchewsky, François

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes quantitative phase imaging by using a high resolution holographic grating for generating a four-wave shearing interferogram. The high-resolution holographic grating is designed in a "kite" configuration so as to avoid parasitic mixing of diffraction orders. The selection of six diffraction orders in the Fourier spectrum of the interferogram allows reconstructing phase gradients along specific directions. The spectral analysis yields the useful parameters of the reconstruction process. The derivative axes are exactly determined whatever the experimental configurations of the holographic grating. The integration of the derivative yields the phase and the optical thickness. Demonstration of the proposed approach is carried out for the case of the analysis of the supersonic flow of a small vertical jet, 5.56mm in diameter. The experimental results compared with those obtained with digital holography exhibit a very good agreement. PMID:26368468

  12. Effect of noise on modulation amplitude and phase in frequency-domain diffusive imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We theoretically investigate the effect of noise on frequency-domain heterodyne and/or homodyne measurements of intensity-modulated beams propagating through diffusive media, such as a photon density wave. We assumed that the attenuated amplitude and delayed phase are estimated by taking the Fourier transform of the noisy, modulated output data. We show that the estimated amplitude and phase are biased when the number of output photons is small. We also show that the use of image intensifiers for photon amplification in heterodyne or homodyne measurements increases the amount of biases. Especially, it turns out that the biased estimation is independent of AC-dependent noise in sinusoidal heterodyne or homodyne outputs. Finally, the developed theory indicates that the previously known variance model of modulation amplitude and phase is not valid in low light situations. Monte-Carlo simulations with varied numbers of input photons verify our theoretical trends of the bias. PMID:22352660

  13. Full wave front reconstruction in the Fourier domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribak, E. N.; Carmon, Y.; Talmi, A.; Glazer, O.; Srour, O.; Zon, N.

    2006-06-01

    Recently we developed and tested different algorithms for wave front reconstruction from dense Hartmann-Shack patterns. All depend on the recognition of a main frequency in the patterns, whose distortion from wave aberrations can be construed as slight phase changes in the pattern. An alternative description of these aberrations is a slight frequency change in Fourier domain. The slopes can thus be found by demodulation in either the image or the Fourier domain. These slopes can then be integrated in the Fourier domain again for the wave front itself. For smooth slopes both demodulation and integration can be performed in the Fourier domain. In addition, commands for the adaptive optics loop can be taken directly in the Fourier domain, saving on processing time. We modeled and tested these algorithms thoroughly in simulation and in laboratory experiments on two separate adaptive optics systems.

  14. Calculation and correction of piston phase aberration in synthesis imaging.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Richard J; Johnson, Anne Marie; Greenaway, Alan H

    2009-01-01

    The principle of redundant spacings calibration has previously been described for the purpose of calibrating piston phase aberration affecting elements of a dilute aperture array using a system of linear equations in terms of the aperture phases as well as object phase information. Here we develop matrices for the correction of piston phase aberration by use of image sharpness and also by phase retrieval. These are both presented in wavefront sensor formulation in order to draw analogy between the approaches. We then discuss solution ambiguity affecting both methods and describe array design criteria to prevent such ambiguity. The problem of increased image aliasing under image sharpness correction is also highlighted. PMID:19109617

  15. Toward Fourier interferometry fluorescence excitation/emission imaging of malignant cells combined with photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohen, Elli; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Berry, John P.; Ozkutuk, Nuri; Ornek, Ceren; Monti, Marco; Leblanc, Roger M.; Schachtschabel, Dietrich O.; Haroon, Sumaira

    2003-10-01

    Dual excitation fluorescence imaging has been used as a first step towards multi-wavelength excitation/emission fluorescence spectral imaging. Target cells are transformed keratinocytes, and other osteosarcoma, human breast and color cancer cells. Mitochondrial membrane potential probes, e.g. TMRM (tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester), Mitotracker Green (Molecular Probes, Inc., Eugene OR,USA; a recently synthesized mitochondrial oxygen probe, [PRE,P1"- pyrene butyl)-2-rhodamine ester] allow dual excitation in the UV plus in teh blue-green spectral regions. Also, using the natural endogenous probe NAD(P)H, preliminary results indicate mitochondrial responses to metabolic challenges (e.g. glucose addition), plus changes in mitochonrial distribution and morphology. In terms of application to biomedicine (for diagnostiscs, prognostsics and drug trials) three parameters have been selected in addition to the natural probe NAD(P)H, i.e. vital fluorescence probing of mitochondria, lysosomes and Golgi apparatus. It is hoped that such a multiparameter approach will allow malignant cell characterization and grading. A new area being introduced is the use of similar methodology for biotechnical applications such as the study of the hydrogen-producing alga Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, and possible agricultural applications, such as Saccharomyces yeast for oenology. Complementation by Photoacoustic Microscopy is also contemplated, to study the internal conversion component which follows the excitation by photons.

  16. Color image encryption based on color blend and chaos permutation in the reality-preserving multiple-parameter fractional Fourier transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel color image encryption method by using Color Blend (CB) and Chaos Permutation (CP) operations in the reality-preserving multiple-parameter fractional Fourier transform (RPMPFRFT) domain. The original color image is first exchanged and mixed randomly from the standard red-green-blue (RGB) color space to R?G?B? color space by rotating the color cube with a random angle matrix. Then RPMPFRFT is employed for changing the pixel values of color image, three components of the scrambled RGB color space are converted by RPMPFRFT with three different transform pairs, respectively. Comparing to the complex output transform, the RPMPFRFT transform ensures that the output is real which can save storage space of image and convenient for transmission in practical applications. To further enhance the security of the encryption system, the output of the former steps is scrambled by juxtaposition of sections of the image in the reality-preserving multiple-parameter fractional Fourier domains and the alignment of sections is determined by two coupled chaotic logistic maps. The parameters in the Color Blend, Chaos Permutation and the RPMPFRFT transform are regarded as the key in the encryption algorithm. The proposed color image encryption can also be applied to encrypt three gray images by transforming the gray images into three RGB color components of a specially constructed color image. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is feasible, secure, sensitive to keys and robust to noise attack and data loss.

  17. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging (Image of Erin Miller, Ph.D.)

    E-print Network

    checkpoint scanner with package running through, showing the X- ray imaging; package disappears leavingTranscript Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging 1 TRANSCRIPT (Image of Erin Miller, Ph.D.) Erin A. Miller Contrast X-Ray Imaging; we're hoping to use it for enhanced explosives detection. (Images of empty airport

  18. Fast Fourier Demodulation Yuval Carmona,b

    E-print Network

    Ribak, Erez

    Fast Fourier Demodulation Yuval Carmona,b and Erez N. Ribaka a Department of Physics, Technion a fast Fourier demodulation method for calculating the distortion in a repetitive pattern. The technique in Fourier space. After demodulation we are left with the Fourier transform of the sought phase information

  19. Dynamics of the mitochondrial reticulum in live cells using Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy and digital video microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Margineantu, D; Capaldi, R A; Marcus, A H

    2000-01-01

    We report detailed studies of the dynamics of the mitochondrial reticulum in live cells using two independent experimental techniques: Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy and digital video fluorescence microscopy. When both methods are used to study the same system, it is possible to directly compare measurements of preaveraged statistical dynamical quantities with their microscopic counterparts. This approach allows the underlying mechanism of the observed rates to be determined. Our results indicate that the dynamics of the reticulum structure is composed of two independent contributions, each important on very different time and length scales. During short time intervals (1-15 sec), local regions of the reticulum primarily undergo constrained thermally activated motion. During long time intervals (>15 sec), local regions of the reticulum undergo long-range "jump" motions that are associated with the action of cytoskeletal filaments. Although the frequency of the jumps depend on the physiological state of the cells, the average jump distance ( approximately 0.8 microm) is unaffected by metabolic activity. During short time intervals, the dynamics appear to be spatially heterogeneous, whereas the cumulative effect of the infrequent jumps leads to the appearance of diffusive motion in the limit of long time intervals. PMID:11023889

  20. Computational phase imaging based on intensity transport

    E-print Network

    Waller, Laura A. (Laura Ann)

    2010-01-01

    Light is a wave, having both an amplitude and a phase. However, optical frequencies are too high to allow direct detection of phase; thus, our eyes and cameras see only real values - intensity. Phase carries important ...

  1. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-10-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%;. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats.

  2. Radiometric Modeling and Calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS)Ground Based Measurement Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere s thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The GIFTS calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, enhancing the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is applied to data collected during the GIFTS Ground Based Measurement (GBM) experiment, together with simultaneous observations by the accurately calibrated AERI (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer), both simultaneously zenith viewing the sky through the same external scene mirror at ten-minute intervals throughout a cloudless day at Logan Utah on September 13, 2006. The accurately calibrated GIFTS radiances are produced using the first four PC scores in the GIFTS-AERI regression model. Temperature and moisture profiles retrieved from the PC-calibrated GIFTS radiances are verified against radiosonde measurements collected throughout the GIFTS sky measurement period. Using the GIFTS GBM calibration model, we compute the calibrated radiances from data collected during the moon tracking and viewing experiment events. From which, we derive the lunar surface temperature and emissivity associated with the moon viewing measurements.

  3. Image quality and dose efficiency of high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging: phantom studies.

    PubMed

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to perform an image quality comparison of high energy phase sensitive imaging with low energy conventional imaging at similar radiation doses. The comparison was performed with the following phantoms: American College of Radiology (ACR), contrast-detail (CD), acrylic edge and tissue-equivalent. Visual comparison of the phantom images indicated comparable or improved image quality for all phantoms. Quantitative comparisons were performed through ACR and CD observer studies, both of which indicated higher image quality in the high energy phase sensitive images. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of high energy phase sensitive imaging to overcome existing challenges with the clinical implementation of phase contrast imaging and improve the image quality for a similar radiation dose as compared to conventional imaging near typical mammography energies. In addition, the results illustrate the capability of phase sensitive imaging to sustain the image quality improvement at high x-ray energies and for breast simulating phantoms, both of which indicate the potential to benefit fields such as mammography. Future studies will continue to investigate the potential for dose reduction and image quality improvement provided by high energy phase sensitive imaging. PMID:24865208

  4. Magnetic field induced differential neutron phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Walter, P.; Keil, S.; Manke, I.

    2007-12-17

    Besides the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating an object, induced phase changes have been utilized to provide contrast in neutron and x-ray imaging. In analogy to differential phase contrast imaging of bulk samples, the refraction of neutrons by magnetic fields yields image contrast. Here, it will be reported how double crystal setups can provide quantitative tomographic images of magnetic fields. The use of magnetic air prisms adequate to split the neutron spin states enables a distinction of field induced phase shifts and these introduced by interaction with matter.

  5. Phase contrast portal imaging for image-guided microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kondoh, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy is a unique treatment technique used to destroy tumors without severely affecting circumjacent healthy tissue. We applied a phase contrast technique to portal imaging in preclinical microbeam radiation therapy experiments. Phase contrast portal imaging is expected to enable us to obtain higherresolution X-ray images at therapeutic X-ray energies compared to conventional portal imaging. Frontal view images of a mouse head sample were acquired in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast images depicted edge-enhanced fine structures of the parietal bones surrounding the cerebrum. The phase contrast technique is expected to be effective in bony-landmark-based verification for image-guided radiation therapy.

  6. High resolution imaging Fourier transform spectrometer with no moving components for the measurement of atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, H.

    2014-12-01

    A high resolution Static Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer, SIFTS, with no moving parts has been developed for the detection of atmospheric gases. The instrument has been shown to have high spectral resolution (4 cm-1) and temporal resolution (10kHz) resolution in both the mid and near infrared and moderate spectral resolution (14cm-1) in the visible. This instrument has been developed for the remote sensing and in-situ measurements of atmospheric gases. It has been identified that due to the low mass and compact size of the instrument system, that the SIFTS could be deployed as a remote sensing instrument onboard a Earth Observation satellite or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), or conversely as a radiosonde instrument for in-situ measurements of atmospheric gases. The technique is based on a static optical configuration whereby light is split into two paths and made to recombine along a focal plane producing an interference pattern. The spectral information is returned using a detector array to digitally capture the interferogram which can then be processed into a spectrum by applying a Fourier transform. As there are no moving components, the speed of measurement is determined by the frame rate of the detector array. Thus, this instrument has a temporal advantage over common Michelson FTIR instruments. Using a high speed Toshiba CCD line array, sensitive over the spectral region of 400 - 1100nm, spectra have been recorded at a rate of one every 100 microseconds. Using an uncooled microbolometer infrared detector array, sensitive over the spectral region of 2 to 15?m, the gases NH3, O3 and CH4 have been used to demonstrate the sensitivity of the SIFTS instrument. It has been shown that the Signal to Noise of the SIFTSMIR is >1200 using an integration time of 77msec. The novel optical design has reduced the optics to only 3 optical components, and the detector array, to generate and measure the interferogram. The experimental performance of the SIFTS instrument has verified the theoretical models, and it has been shown that the spectral resolution in both the Visible and MIR instruments is 4cm-1 and 14cm-1 respectively.

  7. Multichannel far-infrared phase imaging for fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.E.; Neikirk, D.P.; Tong, P.P.; Rutledge, D.B.; Luhmann N.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A 20-channel far-infrared imaging interferometer system has been used to obtain single-shot density profiles in the UCLA Microtor tokamak. This system differs from conventional multichannel interferometers in that the phase distribution produced by the plasma is imaged onto a single, monolithic, integrated microbolometer linear detector array and provides significantly more channels than previous far-infrared interferometers. The system has been demonstrated to provide diffraction-limited phase images of dielectric targets.

  8. Broadband Phase Retrieval for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    A focus-diverse phase-retrieval algorithm has been shown to perform adequately for the purpose of image-based wavefront sensing when (1) broadband light (typically spanning the visible spectrum) is used in forming the images by use of an optical system under test and (2) the assumption of monochromaticity is applied to the broadband image data. Heretofore, it had been assumed that in order to obtain adequate performance, it is necessary to use narrowband or monochromatic light. Some background information, including definitions of terms and a brief description of pertinent aspects of image-based phase retrieval, is prerequisite to a meaningful summary of the present development. Phase retrieval is a general term used in optics to denote estimation of optical imperfections or aberrations of an optical system under test. The term image-based wavefront sensing refers to a general class of algorithms that recover optical phase information, and phase-retrieval algorithms constitute a subset of this class. In phase retrieval, one utilizes the measured response of the optical system under test to produce a phase estimate. The optical response of the system is defined as the image of a point-source object, which could be a star or a laboratory point source. The phase-retrieval problem is characterized as image-based in the sense that a charge-coupled-device camera, preferably of scientific imaging quality, is used to collect image data where the optical system would normally form an image. In a variant of phase retrieval, denoted phase-diverse phase retrieval [which can include focus-diverse phase retrieval (in which various defocus planes are used)], an additional known aberration (or an equivalent diversity function) is superimposed as an aid in estimating unknown aberrations by use of an image-based wavefront-sensing algorithm. Image-based phase-retrieval differs from such other wavefront-sensing methods, such as interferometry, shearing interferometry, curvature wavefront sensing, and Shack-Hartmann sensing, all of which entail disadvantages in comparison with image-based methods. The main disadvantages of these non-image based methods are complexity of test equipment and the need for a wavefront reference.

  9. Phase-sensitive fluorescent imaging with coherent reconstruction

    E-print Network

    Field, Jeffrey J; Bartels, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    Optical imaging plays a critical role in advancing our understanding of three dimensional dynamics of biological systems. Coherent imaging (CI) methods exploit spatial phase information, encoded through propagation of coherent signal light emerging from a specimen, to extract a three-dimensional representation of the object from a single high-speed measurement. Until now, CI methods could not be applied to incoherent light, severely limiting their ability to image the most powerful biological probes available - fluorescent molecules - with sufficient speed and volume to observe important processes, such as neural processing in live specimens. We introduce a new imaging technique that transfers the spatial propagation phase of coherent illumination light to incoherent fluorescent light emission. The transfer of propagation phase allows CI techniques to be applied to fluorescent light imaging, and leads to large increases in imaging speed and depth of field. With this advance, biological imaging of fluorescent ...

  10. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization: Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Progress report, February 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Freiser, B.S.

    1993-09-01

    This report focuses on progress in seven areas: (1) Gas-Phase Reactions of Fe(Benzyne){sup +} with Simple Alkyl Halides; (2) Photodissociation and Collision-Induced Dissociation of Molecular Ions From Methylphenol and Chloromethylphenol; (3) Isotopomer Differentiation Using Metal Ion Chemical Ionization Reagents; (4) Multiple Excitation Collisional Activation (MECA) in Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry; (5) Chemistry of Fe{sup +}-Arene Ions with Halobenzenes; (6) Gas-Phase Photodissociaton Study of Ag(Benzene){sup +} and Ag(Toluene){sup +}; and (7) Reactivity of Ti{sup 2+} and V{sup 2+} with Small Alkanes.

  11. Image region duplication detection based on circular window expansion and phase correlation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hong; Yu, Tianshu; Xu, Mengjia; Cui, Wencheng

    2012-10-10

    Region duplication forgery is one of the tampering techniques that are frequently used, where a part of an image is copied and pasted into another part of the same image. In this paper, a phase correlation method based on polar expansion and adaptive band limitation is proposed for region duplication forgery detection. Our method starts by calculating the Fourier transform of the polar expansion on overlapping windows pair, and then an adaptive band limitation procedure is implemented to obtain a correlation matrix in which the peak is effectively enhanced. After estimating the rotation angle of the forgery region, a searching algorithm in the sense of seed filling is executed to display the whole duplicated region. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can detect duplicated region with high accuracy and robustness to rotation, illumination adjustment, blur and JPEG compression while rotation angle is estimated precisely for further calculation. PMID:22658742

  12. Effect of coherence loss in differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2014-03-01

    Coherence property of x-rays is critical in the grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging because it is the physical foundation that makes any form of phase contrast imaging possible. Loss of coherence is an important experimental issue, which results in increased image noise and reduced object contrast in DPC images and DPC cone beam CT (DPC-CBCT) reconstructions. In this study, experimental results are investigated to characterize the visibility loss (a measurement of coherence loss) in several different applications, including different-sized phantom imaging, specimen imaging and small animal imaging. Key measurements include coherence loss (relative intensity changes in the area of interest in phase-stepping images), contrast and noise level in retrieved DPC images, and contrast and noise level in reconstructed DPC-CBCT images. The influence of size and composition of imaged object (uniform object, bones, skin hairs, tissues, and etc) will be quantified. The same investigation is also applied for moiré pattern-based DPC-CBCT imaging with the same exposure dose. A theoretical model is established to relate coherence loss, noise level in phase stepping images (or moiré images), and the contrast and noise in the retrieved DPC images. Experiment results show that uniform objects lead to a small coherence loss even when the attenuation is higher, while objects with large amount of small structures result in huge coherence loss even when the attenuation is small. The theoretical model predicts the noise level in retrieved DPC images, and it also suggests a minimum dose required for DPC imaging to compensate for coherence loss.

  13. High-speed parallel phase-shifting digital holography system using special-purpose computer for image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-05-01

    We report a high-speed parallel phase-shifting digital holography system using a special-purpose computer for image reconstruction. Parallel phase-shifting digital holography is a technique capable of single-shot phase-shifting interferometry. This technique records information of multiple phase-shifted holograms required for calculation of phase-shifting interferometry with a single shot by using space-division multiplexing. This technique needs image-reconstruction process for a huge amount of recorded holograms. In particular, it takes a long time to calculate light propagation based on fast Fourier transform in the process and to obtain a motion picture of a dynamically and fast moving object. Then we designed a special-purpose computer for accelerating the image-reconstruction process of parallel phase-shifting digital holography. We developed a special-purpose computer consisting of VC707 evaluation kit (Xilinx Inc.) which is a field programmable gate array board. We also recorded holograms consisting of 128 × 128 pixels at a frame rate of 180,000 frames per second by the constructed parallel phase-shifting digital holography system. By applying the developed computer to the recorded holograms, we confirmed that the designed computer can accelerate the calculation of image-reconstruction process of parallel phase-shifting digital holography ~50 times faster than a CPU.

  14. Comparison of retinal thickness by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and OCT retinal image analysis software segmentation analysis derived from Stratus optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tátrai, Erika; Ranganathan, Sudarshan; Ferencz, Mária; Debuc, Delia Cabrera; Somfai, Gábor Márk

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To compare thickness measurements between Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) and time-domain OCT images analyzed with a custom-built OCT retinal image analysis software (OCTRIMA). Methods: Macular mapping (MM) by StratusOCT and MM5 and MM6 scanning protocols by an RTVue-100 FD-OCT device are performed on 11 subjects with no retinal pathology. Retinal thickness (RT) and the thickness of the ganglion cell complex (GCC) obtained with the MM6 protocol are compared for each early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS)-like region with corresponding results obtained with OCTRIMA. RT results are compared by analysis of variance with Dunnett post hoc test, while GCC results are compared by paired t-test. Results: A high correlation is obtained for the RT between OCTRIMA and MM5 and MM6 protocols. In all regions, the StratusOCT provide the lowest RT values (mean difference 43 +/- 8 ?m compared to OCTRIMA, and 42 +/- 14 ?m compared to RTVue MM6). All RTVue GCC measurements were significantly thicker (mean difference between 6 and 12 ?m) than the GCC measurements of OCTRIMA. Conclusion: High correspondence of RT measurements is obtained not only for RT but also for the segmentation of intraretinal layers between FD-OCT and StratusOCT-derived OCTRIMA analysis. However, a correction factor is required to compensate for OCT-specific differences to make measurements more comparable to any available OCT device.

  15. Interpretation of electron holographic phase images and defocused bright-field images of nanocarbon field emitters

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Interpretation of electron holographic phase images and defocused bright-field images of nanocarbon, Lyngby, Denmark filippo_ubaldi@yahoo.it Keywords: electron holography, Fresnel imaging, electrostatic field, image simulation Electron holography is well suited to the investigation of electric and magnetic

  16. Phase-retrieval ghost imaging of complex-valued objects

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Wenlin; Han Shensheng

    2010-08-15

    An imaging approach, based on ghost imaging, is reported to recover a pure-phase object or a complex-valued object. Our analytical results, which are backed up by numerical simulations, demonstrate that both the complex-valued object and its amplitude-dependent part can be separately and nonlocally reconstructed using this approach. Both effects influencing the quality of reconstructed images and methods to further improve the imaging quality are also discussed.

  17. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-05

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  18. Implementation of an all-optical image compression architecture based on Fourier transform which will be the core principle in the realisation of the DCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Falou, Ayman; Alkholidi, Abdulsalam

    2005-06-01

    Image compression aims to reduce the number of information size required to represent an image by reducing redundancies and non pertinent information so as to reduce the space in memory as well as in the medium of transmission, which will be able to plan to treat processes in real time. The compression of the data is currently the very active research object in the world. The purpose of this research is to improve quality of these compressed images and to reduce the time necessary for this operation, by developing a new techniques of compressions, like those based on optics for example. Indeed, it has been known for a long time that the coherent optics, thanks to treating parallel inherent and characteristic a convergent lens to carry out the Fourier Transform, could reduce the treatment times. In order to use the optical properties, we have developed an all-optical compression architecture based on the JPEG standards. This method is based on Fourier Transform which will be the core principle in the realisation of the DCT. After validation of our method by simulations, we will present, in this communication, its optical implementation. An all optical set-up with a convergent lens for the Fourier transform and an EASLM modulator for the opto-electronic interface have been used.

  19. Proc of the 16th Int. Conf. on Pattern Recognition, vol. III, pp. 521-524, Quebec City, Canada, August 2002. Content-based Image Retrieval Using Fourier Descriptors on a Logo Database

    E-print Network

    Samet, Hanan

    , August 2002. Content-based Image Retrieval Using Fourier Descriptors on a Logo Database£ Andre Folkers that is based on the use of Fourier descriptors. These abstractions are used in a system to lo- cate logos their effective- ness by querying a database of logos obtained from the US patent office (e.g., Figure 2(c

  20. Reversible ischemia in severe stress Tc-99m-Sestamibi perfusion defects: Assessment with gated tomographic polar map Fourier amplitude and amplitude/perfusion ratio images and correlation with resting images

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Taillon, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    Reversible ischemia in myocardial segments with severe hypoperfusion ({le}50% of normal activity) on stress Tc-99m-Sestamibi (MIBI) images was assessed with ECG-gated tomographic (GSPECT) indices of myocardial thickening, as reflected by an increase in regional count density during systole. GSPECT bullseye plots were generated for each of 8 frames acquired after stress MIBI injection in 39 patients with coronary artery disease and at least one severe perfusion defect on summed SPECT images. Using first harmonic Fourier amplitude (AMP) and AMP to perfusion ratio (APR) images, regional myocardial systolic thickening was assessed using a 5-segment model, scored 0 to 3, for absent, minimal, mildly reduced or normal thickening. These data were regionally compared with defect reversibility assessed using a separate-day or a preceding same-day resting MIBI injection images, in which these segments were scored from 0 to 3 for absent, minimal, partial or complete defect reversibility. Of 91 severe stress defects, 16 showed absent, 18 minimal, 43 partial, and 14 complete reversibility on resting images. Both AMP and APR scores were in statistically significant agreement (p=.0218 and .0006) with resting image reversibility grades, with 79% (p=.0324) and 86% (p=.0001) agreement on the presence of reversibility on resting imaging, respectively. AMP correctly identified 89% of the reversibility defects on rest images, while the APR identified 99% (p=.0248 vs. AMP). On analysis of segment scores, the AMP slightly underestimated the degree of rest image reversibility (p=.0235), while APR images indicated more reversibility thin did resting images (p=.0092). In conclusion, GSPECT MIBI bullseye Fourier AMP images correlate well with the pattern of reversibility on resting MIBI in severe stress perfusion defects. When indexed for the degree of hypoperfusion, the Fourier images depict a greater degree of defect reversibility than resting MIBI images.

  1. Imaging with a rectangular phase grating applied to displacement metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Yoichi; Oka, Toru; Nakashima, Toshiro; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2006-03-10

    We achieved displacement metrology with a high-amplitude signal by using a rectangular phase grating as the pupil in a grating imaging system. The imaging phenomenon with a pupil transmission grating that has a bilevel profile with a 50% duty ratio is discussed on the basis of the optical transfer function. By optimizing the imaging condition, we obtained high-contrast images with high light power under a magnified or demagnified imaging system. The amplitude of the signal in the displacement measurement was four times higher than that of the conventional grating imaging system with amplitude gratings.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF AMBIENT PM2.5 AEROSOL AT A SOUTHEASTERN US SITE: FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED ANALYSIS OR PARTICLE PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a field study in the summer of 2000 in the Research Triangle Park (RTP), aerosol samples were collected using a five stage cascade impactor and subsequently analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The impaction surfaces were stainless steel disks....

  3. Adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mark William; Wick, David Victor

    2004-11-01

    The combination of phase diversity and adaptive optics offers great flexibility. Phase diverse images can be used to diagnose aberrations and then provide feedback control to the optics to correct the aberrations. Alternatively, phase diversity can be used to partially compensate for aberrations during post-detection image processing. The adaptive optic can produce simple defocus or more complex types of phase diversity. This report presents an analysis, based on numerical simulations, of the efficiency of different modes of phase diversity with respect to compensating for specific aberrations during post-processing. It also comments on the efficiency of post-processing versus direct aberration correction. The construction of a bench top optical system that uses a membrane mirror as an active optic is described. The results of characterization tests performed on the bench top optical system are presented. The work described in this report was conducted to explore the use of adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

  4. Non-Fourier Motion in The Fourier Spectrum Steven S. Beauchemin

    E-print Network

    Beauchemin, Steven S.

    Non-Fourier Motion in The Fourier Spectrum Steven S. Beauchemin GRASP Laboratory Department, image motion analysis in the fre- quency domain is performed according to the Motion From Fourier Coe- Fourier motion. This type of motion includes phenom- ena relevant to motion analysis such as translucency

  5. An improved windowed Fourier transform filter algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ran; Li, Xinglong; Sun, Ping

    2015-11-01

    In order to reduce the speckle noise in fringe patterns obtained by Electric Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI), an improved windowed Fourier transform filter algorithm was proposed. The amplitude maximum of the fringe frequency scanned across a given window is set as the filtering criterion, which the optimum frequency image is obtained and the threshold window is not set in the window Fourier filter algorithm. The proposed algorithm is used to filter the fringe patterns obtained by ESPI. Experiment results show that the proposed algorithm has a better performance in reducing the speckle noise and has a high precision in phase calculation. The proposed algorithm can be used to filter other image as a low-pass filter.

  6. Fourier Analysis and Autocorrelation Function Applied to Periodical Nanostructures

    E-print Network

    Rockett, Angus

    Fourier Analysis and Autocorrelation Function Applied to Periodical Nanostructures E. Cruz Microscopy (AFM) Image Fast Fourier Transformation Autocorrelation Function(AC) Angular Distribution] Fourier Analysis: analytical and geometrical aspects, Bray William O ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, 1994

  7. Simultaneous birefringence imaging and depth phase resolved measurement using a Fourier domain OCT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones-R., Manuel de J.; De La Torre-Ibarra, Manuel H.; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando; Pedroza-G., Jesús

    2015-05-01

    A low cost optical coherence tomography (OCT) system to measure simultaneously the birefringence and the internal deformation of a porcine cornea is proposed. The optical system uses polarized light to recover simultaneously the s and p polarization states while a couple of cameras record a fringe pattern that serves to reconstruct the internal structure of the cornea. The p and s interference signals are registered separately in each 2D CMOS array which generates in a single shot an entire B-scan, a feature that allows the tracking of non-repeatable deformations. A birefringence map is generated within the tissue when the p and s polarization states are combined. The experiments were conducted on a cornea that is deformed using a hydro static pressure rig which introduces mechanical micro deformations on it, and the results show concomitantly the micro structure of the cornea, its birefringence and the mechanical micro deformation.

  8. Ultrahigh speed 1050nm swept source / Fourier domain OCT retinal and anterior segment imaging at 100,000 to 400,000 axial scans per second

    PubMed Central

    Potsaid, Benjamin; Baumann, Bernhard; Huang, David; Barry, Scott; Cable, Alex E.; Schuman, Joel S.; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate ultrahigh speed swept source/Fourier domain ophthalmic OCT imaging using a short cavity swept laser at 100,000–400,000 axial scan rates. Several design configurations illustrate tradeoffs in imaging speed, sensitivity, axial resolution, and imaging depth. Variable rate A/D optical clocking is used to acquire linear-in-k OCT fringe data at 100kHz axial scan rate with 5.3um axial resolution in tissue. Fixed rate sampling at 1 GSPS achieves a 7.5mm imaging range in tissue with 6.0um axial resolution at 100kHz axial scan rate. A 200kHz axial scan rate with 5.3um axial resolution over 4mm imaging range is achieved by buffering the laser sweep. Dual spot OCT using two parallel interferometers achieves 400kHz axial scan rate, almost 2X faster than previous 1050nm ophthalmic results and 20X faster than current commercial instruments. Superior sensitivity roll-off performance is shown. Imaging is demonstrated in the human retina and anterior segment. Wide field 12×12mm data sets include the macula and optic nerve head. Small area, high density imaging shows individual cone photoreceptors. The 7.5mm imaging range configuration can show the cornea, iris, and anterior lens in a single image. These improvements in imaging speed and depth range provide important advantages for ophthalmic imaging. The ability to rapidly acquire 3D-OCT data over a wide field of view promises to simplify examination protocols. The ability to image fine structures can provide detailed information on focal pathologies. The large imaging range and improved image penetration at 1050nm wavelengths promises to improve performance for instrumentation which images both the retina and anterior eye. These advantages suggest that swept source OCT at 1050nm wavelengths will play an important role in future ophthalmic instrumentation. PMID:20940894

  9. Characterization of skin abnormalities in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging and Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Canuto, H C; Fishbein, K W; Huang, A; Doty, S B; Herbert, R A; Peckham, J; Pleshko, N; Spencer, R G

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of the skin phenotype in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) typically involves biochemical measurements, such as histologic or biochemical assessment of the collagen produced from biopsy-derived dermal fibroblasts. As an alternative, the current study utilized non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy and optical spectroscopy to define biophysical characteristics of skin in an animal model of OI. MRI of skin harvested from control, homozygous oim/oim and heterozygous oim/+ mice demonstrated several differences in anatomic and biophysical properties. Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) was used to interpret observed MRI signal characteristics in terms of chemical composition. Differences between wild-type and OI mouse skin included the appearance of a collagen-depleted lower dermal layer containing prominent hair follicles in the oim/oim mice, accounting for 55% of skin thickness in these. The MRI magnetization transfer rate was lower by 50% in this layer as compared to the upper dermis, consistent with lower collagen content. The MRI transverse relaxation time, T2, was greater by 30% in the dermis of the oim/oim mice compared to controls, consistent with a more highly hydrated collagen network. Similarly, an FT-IRIS-defined measure of collagen integrity was 30% lower in the oim/oim mice. We conclude that characterization of phenotypic differences between the skin of OI and wild-type mice by MRI and FT-IRIS is feasible, and that these techniques provide powerful complementary approaches for the analysis of the skin phenotype in animal models of disease. PMID:21845737

  10. High-speed imaging of retinal pathology using ultrahigh-resolution spectral/Fourier domain optical coherence tomography in the ophthalmology clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Tony; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Srinivasan, Vivek; Duker, Jay; Schuman, Joel S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2005-04-01

    An ultrahigh resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of performing high speed imaging in the ophthalmology clinic has been developed. An OCT system using spectral/Fourier domain enables high speed imaging rates of up to 25,000 axial scans (A-scan) per second. Using a low threshold femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser light source, which can generate bandwidths of ~125 nm at 800 nm, cross-sectional imaging of the retina with ~3 ?m axial resolution is possible. High speed imaging has been performed in the ophthalmology clinic on patients with various retinal pathologies using the ultrahigh resolution spectral domain OCT system. High pixel density OCT images containing 1024 pixels and 2048 transverse lines (A-scans) can be acquired in 0.08 seconds, which represents a ~100 fold improvement in imaging speed over previously reported time-domain ultrahigh resolution OCT systems. High speed imaging also enables three dimensional scanning and mapping of intraretinal architectural morphology with unprecedented resolution. High speed ultrahigh resolution OCT is a powerful tool for visualizing retinal pathologies, especially those involving the details of the photoreceptor segments; it will enable three-dimensional retinal imaging and the rendering of image information from volumetric data, and it has the potential to improve the early diagnosis of retinal diseases.

  11. Fourier Transform Near Infrared Microspectroscopy, Infrared Chemical Imaging, High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Microspectroscopy Detection of Single Cancer Cells and Single Viral Particles

    E-print Network

    Baianu,I C; Hofmann, N E; Korban, S S; Lozano, P; You, T

    2004-01-01

    Single Cancer Cells from Human tumors are being detected and imaged by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Near Infrared (FT-NIR)Hyperspectral Imaging and Fluorescence Correlation Microspectroscopy. The first FT-NIR chemical, microscopic images of biological systems approaching one micron resolution are here reported. Chemical images obtained by FT-NIR and FT-IR Microspectroscopy are also presented for oil in soybean seeds and somatic embryos under physiological conditions. FT-NIR spectra of oil and proteins were obtained for volumes as small as two cubic microns. Related, HR-NMR analyses of oil contents in somatic embryos as well as 99% accurate calibrations are also presented here with nanoliter precision. Such high-resolution, 400 MHz H-1 NMR analyses allowed the selection of mutagenized embryos with higher oil content (e.g. >~20%) compared to the average levels in non-mutagenized control embryos. Moreover, developmental changes in single soybean seeds and/or somatic embryos may be monito...

  12. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  13. Triple-phase bone image abnormalities in Lyme arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.J.; Dadparvar, S.; Slizofski, W.J.; Glab, L.B.; Burger, M. )

    1989-10-01

    Arthritis is a frequent manifestation of Lyme disease. Limited triple-phase Tc-99m MDP bone imaging of the wrists and hands with delayed whole-body images was performed in a patient with Lyme arthritis. This demonstrated abnormal joint uptake in the wrists and hands in all three phases, with increased activity seen in other affected joints on delayed whole-body images. These findings are nonspecific and have been previously described in a variety of rheumatologic conditions, but not in Lyme disease. Lyme disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of articular and periarticular bone scan abnormalities.

  14. Phase 2 N01 Program - Cancer Imaging Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Phase 2 N01 Program is a CTEP-CIP collaboration includes 7 contractors, most of whom consist of multi-institutional consortia, and includes a total of 22 NCI-designated Cancer Centers. These sites carry out early clinical trials with CTEP and CIP-held IND agents, with an emphasis on phase 2 trials, but including phase 1 trials as well. These trials include the evaluation of novel imaging agents and methods to enhance the evaluation of novel therapeutics.

  15. Evaluation of Early Osteochondral Defect Repair in a Rabbit Model Utilizing Fourier Transform–Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Quantitative T2 Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minwook; Foo, Li F.; Uggen, Christopher; Lyman, Steven; Ryaby, James T.; Moynihan, Daniel P.; Grande, Daniel Anthony; Potter, Hollis G.

    2010-01-01

    Context Evaluation of the morphology and matrix composition of repair cartilage is a critical step toward understanding the natural history of cartilage repair and efficacy of potential therapeutics. In the current study, short-term articular cartilage repair (3 and 6 weeks) was evaluated in a rabbit osteochondral defect model treated with thrombin peptide (TP-508) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), quantitative T2 mapping, and Fourier transform–infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS). Methods Three-mm-diameter osteochondral defects were made in the rabbit trochlear groove and filled with either TP-508 plus poly-lactoglycolidic acid microspheres or poly-lactoglycolidic acid microspheres alone (placebo). Repair tissue and adjacent normal cartilage were evaluated at 3 and 6 weeks postdefect creation. Intact knees were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging for repair morphology, and with quantitative T2 mapping to assess collagen orientation. Histological sections were evaluated by FT-IRIS for parameters that reflect collagen quantity and quality, as well as proteoglycan (PG) content. Results and Conclusion There was no significant difference in volume of repair tissue at either time point. At 6 weeks, placebo repair tissue demonstrated longer T2 values (p?

  16. Multivariate analysis of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopic data to confirm phase partitioning in methacrylate-based dentin adhesive.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qiang; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Abedin, Farhana; Laurence, Jennifer S; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-12-01

    Water is ubiquitous in the mouths of healthy individuals and is a major interfering factor in the development of a durable seal between the tooth and composite restoration. Water leads to the formation of a variety of defects in dentin adhesives; these defects undermine the tooth-composite bond. Our group recently analyzed phase partitioning of dentin adhesives using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The concentration measurements provided by HPLC offered a more thorough representation of current adhesive performance and elucidated directions to be taken for further improvement. The sample preparation and instrument analysis using HPLC are, however, time-consuming and labor-intensive. The objective of this work was to develop a methodology for rapid, reliable, and accurate quantitative analysis of near-equilibrium phase partitioning in adhesives exposed to conditions simulating the wet oral environment. Analysis by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy in combination with multivariate statistical methods, including partial least squares (PLS) regression and principal component regression (PCR), were used for multivariate calibration to quantify the compositions in separated phases. Excellent predictions were achieved when either the hydrophobic-rich phase or the hydrophilic-rich phase mixtures were analyzed. These results indicate that FT-IR spectroscopy has excellent potential as a rapid method of detection and quantification of dentin adhesives that experience phase separation under conditions that simulate the wet oral environment. PMID:24359662

  17. Perceptual and statistical analysis of cardiac phase and amplitude images.

    PubMed

    Houston, A; Craig, A

    1991-01-01

    A perceptual experiment was conducted using cardiac phase and amplitude images. Estimates of statistical parameters were derived from the images and the diagnostic potential of human and statistical decisions compared. Five methods were used to generate the images from 75 gated cardiac studies, 39 of which were classified as pathological. The images were presented to 12 observers experienced in nuclear medicine. The observers rated the images using a five-category scale based on their confidence of an abnormality presenting. Circular and linear statistics were used to analyse phase and amplitude image data, respectively. Estimates of mean, standard deviation (SD), skewness, kurtosis and the first term of the spatial correlation function were evaluated in the region of the left ventricle. A receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed on both sets of data and the human and statistical decisions compared. For phase images, circular SD was shown to discriminate better between normal and abnormal than experienced observers, but no single statistic discriminated as well as the human observer for amplitude images. PMID:1936047

  18. Cell-sensitive phase contrast microscopy imaging by multiple exposures.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhaozheng; Su, Hang; Ker, Elmer; Li, Mingzhong; Li, Haohan

    2015-10-01

    We propose a novel way of imaging live cells in a Petri dish by the phase contrast microscope. By taking multiple exposures of phase contrast microscopy images on the same cell dish, we estimate a cell-sensitive camera response function which responds to cells' irradiance signals but generates a constant on non-cell background signal. The result of this new microscopy imaging is visually superior quality, which reveals the appearance details of cells and suppresses background noise near zero. Using the cell-sensitive microscopy imaging, cells' original irradiance signals are restored from all exposures and the irradiance signals on non-cell background regions are restored as a uniform constant (i.e., the imaging system is sensitive to cells only but insensitive to non-cell background). The restored irradiance signals greatly facilitate the cell segmentation by simple thresholding. The experimental results validate that high quality cell segmentation can be achieved by our approach. PMID:25977155

  19. Self-imaging of transparent objects and structures in focusing of spatially phase-modulated laser radiation into a weakly absorbing medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bubis, E L

    2011-06-30

    Self-imaging of transparent objects and structures in focusing of a spatially phase-modulated laser beam into an extended weakly absorbing medium is described. The laser power level that is necessary for effective imaging corresponds to the illuminating beam power when thermal self-defocusing starts evolving in the medium. The effect can be described in terms of the ideology of Zernike's classical phase-contrast method. Edge enhancement in visualised images of transparent objects is experimentally demonstrated. Self-imaging of a microscopic object in the form of transparent letters and long-lived refractive-index fluctuations in liquid glycerol is shown. Due to the adaptivity of the process under consideration, unlike the classical case, self-imaging occurs also in the situations where a beam is displaced (undergoes random walk) as a whole in the Fourier plane, for example, in the presence of thermal flows. (image processing)

  20. Phase imaging from defocus information in a light field

    E-print Network

    Davis, Quintin Tyrell

    2012-01-01

    Optical microscopy is without a doubt an essential component of life science research, but many objects of interest in biology are transparent. Chemical or immunological dyes, which can often be toxic, fluorescent transgenes, which require a protocol for transformation of exogenous DNA, and phase contrast, which inextricably combines phase information with amplitude, all serve to increase the contrast of transparent objects. Transparent objects of non-uniform refractive index and/or thickness are phase objects and phase can be extracted from defocus information above and below the object. The light microscopist will recognize this in that object contrast can vary as the stage is moved around an object's focal plane. This phase information can be quantitatively retrieved from a set of defocused images, but this has the disadvantage of decreasing temporal resolution, as the microscope stage has to be moved between image captures. By incorporating additional optics in the form of an array of pinholes or microlen...

  1. Robustness of phase retrieval methods in x-ray phase contrast imaging: A comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The robustness of the phase retrieval methods is of critical importance for limiting and reducing radiation doses involved in x-ray phase contrast imaging. This work is to compare the robustness of two phase retrieval methods by analyzing the phase maps retrieved from the experimental images of a phantom. Methods: Two phase retrieval methods were compared. One method is based on the transport of intensity equation (TIE) for phase contrast projections, and the TIE-based method is the most commonly used method for phase retrieval in the literature. The other is the recently developed attenuation-partition based (AP-based) phase retrieval method. The authors applied these two methods to experimental projection images of an air-bubble wrap phantom for retrieving the phase map of the bubble wrap. The retrieved phase maps obtained by using the two methods are compared. Results: In the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the TIE-based method, no bubble is recognizable, hence, this method failed completely for phase retrieval from these bubble wrap images. Even with the help of the Tikhonov regularization, the bubbles are still hardly visible and buried in the cluttered background in the retrieved phase map. The retrieved phase values with this method are grossly erroneous. In contrast, in the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the AP-based method, the bubbles are clearly recovered. The retrieved phase values with the AP-based method are reasonably close to the estimate based on the thickness-based measurement. The authors traced these stark performance differences of the two methods to their different techniques employed to deal with the singularity problem involved in the phase retrievals. Conclusions: This comparison shows that the conventional TIE-based phase retrieval method, regardless if Tikhonov regularization is used or not, is unstable against the noise in the wrap's projection images, while the AP-based phase retrieval method is shown in these experiments to be superior to the TIE-based method for the robustness in performing the phase retrieval.

  2. Fourier Transform Heterodyne Techniques Applied To Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubscher, B. E.; Cooke, B. J.; Edwards, B. C.

    1998-12-01

    Fourier Transform Heterodyne (FTH) is a detection process capable of directly imaging the transverse amplitude and phase of coherent electromagnetic fields. Based on coherent detection principles governing conventional heterodyned systems, Fourier Transform Heterodyne (FTH) incorporates transverse spatial encoding of the local oscillator for image capture. Appropriate selection of spatial encoding functions (basis set) allows image retrieval by way of classic Fourier manipulations. Of practical interest: 1) Imaging is accomplished on a single element detector/sensor requiring no additional scanning or moving components. 2) Because detection is governed by heterodyne principles, near quantum limited performance is achievable. 3) The concept is general with the applicable electromagnetic spectrum encompassing the RF through optical. Although FTH is currently in its infancy, we believe this technique will provide new tools and concepts important to the development of future astronomical systems. For example: 1) An FTH-based optical or infrared interferometer (whether ground-based or space-based) can operate in direct analogy to VLBI radio astronomy systems. 2) FTH may be capable of measuring the atmospheric distortions of a target star to guide adaptive optical correction systems. 3) FTH may be used to determine the adjustments required to align a deployed structure in space and can remove aberrations from slight residual misalignments during operation. The work to be presented will include a brief introduction of the underlying principles governing FTH imaging, followed by cursory description of a simple proof-of-concept experiment carried out using a HeNe laser, a 69 element spatial phase modulator, and a 36 term Zernike basis set. Finally, astronomical applications will be discussed.

  3. A cascaded iterative Fourier transform algorithm for optical security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Situ, Guohai; Zhang, Jingjuan

    A cascaded iterative Fourier transform (CIFT) algorithm is presented for optical security applications. Two phase-masks are designed and located in the input and the Fourier domains of a 4-f correlator respectively, in order to implement the optical encryption or authenticity verification. Compared with previous methods, the proposed algorithm employs an improved searching strategy: modifying the phase-distributions of both masks synchronously as well as enlarging the searching space. Computer simulations show that the algorithm results in much faster convergence and better image quality for the recovered image. Each of these masks is assigned to different person. Therefore, the decrypted image can be obtained only when all these masks are under authorization. This key-assignment strategy may reduce the risk of being intruded.

  4. Fourier Duality as a Quantization Principle \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Fourier Duality as a Quantization Principle \\Lambda R. Aldrovandi y and L.A. Saeger z Instituto de­Wigner prescription for quantization on Euclidean phase spaces makes essential use of Fourier duality. The extension background for the implementation of Fourier duality on general locally compact groups. Kac algebras

  5. Overlapped Fourier coding for optical aberration removal

    PubMed Central

    Horstmeyer, Roarke; Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    We present an imaging procedure that simultaneously optimizes a camera’s resolution and retrieves a sample’s phase over a sequence of snapshots. The technique, termed overlapped Fourier coding (OFC), first digitally pans a small aperture across a camera’s pupil plane with a spatial light modulator. At each aperture location, a unique image is acquired. The OFC algorithm then fuses these low-resolution images into a full-resolution estimate of the complex optical field incident upon the detector. Simultaneously, the algorithm utilizes redundancies within the acquired dataset to computationally estimate and remove unknown optical aberrations and system misalignments via simulated annealing. The result is an imaging system that can computationally overcome its optical imperfections to offer enhanced resolution, at the expense of taking multiple snapshots over time. PMID:25321982

  6. Blind image noise assessment based on local phase coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Yanyun; Gao, Jiaobo; Jiao, Mingyin

    2015-05-01

    Remote Sensing Image can be degraded by a variety of causes during acquisition, transmission, compression, storage and reconstruction. Noise is one of the most important degradation factors. Quantifying its impact on the image may be useful for applications such as improving the acquisition system and thus the quality of the produced images. Objective Image Quality Measure (IQA) methods can be classified by whether a reference image, representing the original signal exists. In the case of remote sensing, the ideal un-degraded image is not available. No-reference (NR) method is required to blindly assess the image quality. In this paper, a new no-reference algorithm is proposed to quantify noise based on local phase coherence (LPC). This algorithm assumes that the input image is contaminated by additive zero mean Gaussian noise. Firstly, a LPC map of degraded image is constructed and the image edge is extracted by modifying the noise threshold. Secondly, the edge is removed from the LPC map. Then, the noise level can be quantified by the remaining noise information and little "residual" information of the LPC map. Experiment results show that the proposed algorithm correlates well with subjective quality evaluations and has high estimation accuracy especially for Gaussian noise-infected images.

  7. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arjun S.; Mandal, Pratiti; Zhang, Yongjie; Litster, Shawn

    2015-05-01

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.

  8. First principles multielectron mixed quantum/classical simulations in the condensed phase. I. An efficient Fourier-grid method for solving the many-electron problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, William J.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2010-04-01

    We introduce an efficient multielectron first-principles based electronic structure method, the two-electron Fourier-grid (2EFG) approach, that is particularly suited for use in mixed quantum/classical simulations of condensed-phase systems. The 2EFG method directly solves for the six-dimensional wave function of a two-electron Hamiltonian in a Fourier-grid representation such that the effects of electron correlation and exchange are treated exactly for both the ground and excited states. Due to the simplicity of a Fourier-grid representation, the 2EFG is readily parallelizable and we discuss its computational implementation in a distributed-memory parallel environment. We show our method is highly efficient, being able to find two-electron wave functions in ˜20 s on a modern desktop computer for a calculation this is equivalent to full configuration interaction (FCI) in a basis of 17 million Slater determinants. We benchmark the accuracy of the 2EFG by applying it to two electronic structure test problems: the harmonium atom and the sodium dimer. We find that even with a modest grid basis size, our method converges to the analytically exact solutions of harmonium in both the weakly and strongly correlated electron regimes. Our method also reproduces the low-lying potential energy curves of the sodium dimer to a similar level of accuracy as a valence CI calculation, thus demonstrating its applicability to molecular systems. In the following paper [W. J. Glover, R. E. Larsen, and B. J. Schwartz, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 144102 (2010)], we use the 2EFG method to explore the nature of the electronic states that comprise the charge-transfer-to-solvent absorption band of sodium anions in liquid tetrahydrofuran.

  9. Phase-contrast latent image metrology for microlithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Euisik; Allison, Robert W., Jr.; Kovacs, Ronald P.; Dai, Changhong

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes a new technical approach to IC lithography characterization by using phase-contrast latent image metrology. Latent images of exposed, undeveloped photoresist observed by the dielectric discontinuity microscope (DDM) can be used for rapid, accurate, and optimal characterization of microlithography processes. Typically, the latent image can not be observed by standard bright-field microscopy. The DDM provides a phase contrast image, in which any optical path difference is changed to contrast enhancement of the image; therefore, the photochemical transformation of photoresist due to exposure (optical thickness change) can be easily observed. A distinctive latent image of an I-line stepper has been observed down to 0.6 micrometers feature size, while that of E-beam direct writing down to 0.2 micrometers . The 660 nm viewing wavelength does not damage the photoresist during observation. Line width variation has been measured as a function of exposure energy and shows strong relationship between latent images and fully developed photoresist images. Contrast of a latent image has been compared as a function of exposure energy and defocus for various line/space patterns, respectively. From these experiments, the optimal exposure energy and depth of focus (DOF) can be decided along with corresponding development procedure. This is critical for rapid and accurate submicron lithography optimization because latent image calibration can eliminate secondary effects resulting from post exposure development processing and can also exclude laborious and time-consuming SEM inspection which are routinely performed in a typical lithography calibration. Digital signal processing software has been implemented in the DDM video images with on-line CD measurement capability. Measuring an average contrast on a specific window region along with other image process functions allows fully quantitative evaluation of the microlithography.

  10. Single-shot phase imaging with a coded aperture.

    PubMed

    Horisaki, Ryoichi; Ogura, Yusuke; Aino, Masahiko; Tanida, Jun

    2014-11-15

    We present a method of quantitatively acquiring a large complex field, containing not only amplitude information but also phase information, based on single-shot phase imaging with a coded aperture (SPICA). In SPICA, the propagating field from an object illuminated by partially coherent visible light is sieved by a coded mask, and the sieved field propagates to an image sensor, where it is captured. The sieved field is recovered from the single captured intensity image via a phase retrieval algorithm with an amplitude support constraint using the mask pattern, and then the object's complex field is reconstructed from the recovered sieved field by an algorithm employing a sparsity constraint based on compressive sensing. The system model and the theoretical bounds of SPICA are derived. We also verified the concept with numerical demonstrations. PMID:25490495

  11. Transformation of light double cones in the human retina: the origin of trichromatism, of 4D-spatiotemporal vision, and of patchwise 4D Fourier transformation in Talbot imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    1997-09-01

    The interpretation of the 'inverted' retina of primates as an 'optoretina' (a light cones transforming diffractive cellular 3D-phase grating) integrates the functional, structural, and oscillatory aspects of a cortical layer. It is therefore relevant to consider prenatal developments as a basis of the macro- and micro-geometry of the inner eye. This geometry becomes relevant for the postnatal trichromatic synchrony organization (TSO) as well as the adaptive levels of human vision. It is shown that the functional performances, the trichromatism in photopic vision, the monocular spatiotemporal 3D- and 4D-motion detection, as well as the Fourier optical image transformation with extraction of invariances all become possible. To transform light cones into reciprocal gratings especially the spectral phase conditions in the eikonal of the geometrical optical imaging before the retinal 3D-grating become relevant first, then in the von Laue resp. reciprocal von Laue equation for 3D-grating optics inside the grating and finally in the periodicity of Talbot-2/Fresnel-planes in the near-field behind the grating. It is becoming possible to technically realize -- at least in some specific aspects -- such a cortical optoretina sensor element with its typical hexagonal-concentric structure which leads to these visual functions.

  12. Accelerated nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging through phase multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Moores, B. A.; Eichler, A. Takahashi, H.; Navaretti, P.; Degen, C. L.; Tao, Y.

    2015-05-25

    We report a method for accelerated nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance imaging by detecting several signals in parallel. Our technique relies on phase multiplexing, where the signals from different nuclear spin ensembles are encoded in the phase of an ultrasensitive magnetic detector. We demonstrate this technique by simultaneously acquiring statistically polarized spin signals from two different nuclear species ({sup 1}H, {sup 19}F) and from up to six spatial locations in a nanowire test sample using a magnetic resonance force microscope. We obtain one-dimensional imaging resolution better than 5?nm, and subnanometer positional accuracy.

  13. Dynamic quantitative phase imaging for biological objects using a pixelated phase mask

    PubMed Central

    Creath, Katherine; Goldstein, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes research in developing a dynamic quantitative phase imaging microscope providing instantaneous measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without labels or contrast agents. It utilizes a pixelated phase mask enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns derived using the polarization properties of light to track dynamic motions and morphological changes. Optical path difference (OPD) and optical thickness (OT) data are obtained from phase images. Two different processing routines are presented to remove background surface shape to enable quantification of changes in cell position and volume over time. Data from a number of different moving biological organisms and cell cultures are presented. PMID:23162725

  14. Quantitative phase imaging by three-wavelength digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Christopher J; Bingham, Philip R; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Paquit, Vincent C

    2008-01-01

    Three-wavelength digital holography is applied to obtain surface height measurements over several microns of range, while simultaneously maintaining the low noise precision of the single wavelength phase measurement. The precision is preserved by the use of intermediate synthetic wavelength steps generated from the three wavelengths and the use of hierarchical optical phase unwrapping. As the complex wave-front of each wavelength can be captured simultaneously in one digital image, real-time performance is achievable.

  15. Assessment of material blending distribution for electrospun nanofiber membrane by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy and image cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunthornvarabhas, Jackapon; Thumanu, Kanjana; Limpirat, Wanwisa; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Piyachomkwan, Kuakoon; Sriroth, Klanarong

    2014-09-01

    Electrospun nanofibers between starch and polyethylene oxide were successfully prepared to be used as a template for wound healing application. Material blending ratios and fabrication conditions were optimized to determine the ability to control material spatial for further development. A fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) mapping system and purposed modified image clustering analysis were adopted to evaluate the material homogeneity of a sheet of homogeneous composite nanofibers. The fabrication conditions and material blending ratios both have an influence on the material distribution and optimum points were observed from this technique. This study showed the possibility of using a quick and non-destructive technique and a modified image cluster analysis technique to evaluate the homogeneity of the electrospun nanofiber sheet.

  16. Statistics & Probability Letters 77 (2007) 447454 Statistical interpretation of the importance of phase information

    E-print Network

    Huo, Xiaoming

    2007-01-01

    . The main result shows that under random magnitudes, the DC component of the inverse Fourier transform, the magnitudes and the phases of the Fourier transform are playing different roles in the reconstruction compute their 2-D Fourier transforms FðA� and FðB�. Based on FðA� and FðB�, two image reconstructions

  17. Quantitative radiography of magnetic fields using neutron spin phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Piegsa, F M; van den Brandt, B; Hautle, P; Kohlbrecher, J; Konter, J A

    2009-04-10

    We report on a novel neutron radiography technique that uses the Ramsey principle, a method similar to neutron spin echo. For the first time quantitative imaging measurements of magnetic objects and fields could be performed. The strength of the spin-dependent magnetic interaction is detected by a change in the Larmor precession frequency of the neutron spins. Hence, one obtains in addition to the normal attenuation radiography image a so-called neutron spin phase image, which provides a two-dimensional projection of the magnetic field integrated over the neutron flight path. PMID:19392450

  18. Single-image phase retrieval using an edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup.

    PubMed

    Diemoz, Paul C; Vittoria, Fabio A; Hagen, Charlotte K; Endrizzi, Marco; Coan, Paola; Brun, Emmanuel; Wagner, Ulrich H; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K; Bravin, Alberto; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    A method is proposed which enables the retrieval of the thickness or of the projected electron density of a sample from a single input image acquired with an edge illumination phase-contrast imaging setup. The method assumes the case of a quasi-homogeneous sample, i.e. a sample with a constant ratio between the real and imaginary parts of its complex refractive index. Compared with current methods based on combining two edge illumination images acquired in different configurations of the setup, this new approach presents advantages in terms of simplicity of acquisition procedure and shorter data collection time, which are very important especially for applications such as computed tomography and dynamical imaging. Furthermore, the fact that phase information is directly extracted, instead of its derivative, can enable a simpler image interpretation and be beneficial for subsequent processing such as segmentation. The method is first theoretically derived and its conditions of applicability defined. Quantitative accuracy in the case of homogeneous objects as well as enhanced image quality for the imaging of complex biological samples are demonstrated through experiments at two synchrotron radiation facilities. The large range of applicability, the robustness against noise and the need for only one input image suggest a high potential for investigations in various research subjects. PMID:26134813

  19. Single-image phase retrieval using an edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup

    PubMed Central

    Diemoz, Paul C.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Coan, Paola; Brun, Emmanuel; Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K.; Bravin, Alberto; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed which enables the retrieval of the thickness or of the projected electron density of a sample from a single input image acquired with an edge illumination phase-contrast imaging setup. The method assumes the case of a quasi-homogeneous sample, i.e. a sample with a constant ratio between the real and imaginary parts of its complex refractive index. Compared with current methods based on combining two edge illumination images acquired in different configurations of the setup, this new approach presents advantages in terms of simplicity of acquisition procedure and shorter data collection time, which are very important especially for applications such as computed tomography and dynamical imaging. Furthermore, the fact that phase information is directly extracted, instead of its derivative, can enable a simpler image interpretation and be beneficial for subsequent processing such as segmentation. The method is first theoretically derived and its conditions of applicability defined. Quantitative accuracy in the case of homogeneous objects as well as enhanced image quality for the imaging of complex biological samples are demonstrated through experiments at two synchrotron radiation facilities. The large range of applicability, the robustness against noise and the need for only one input image suggest a high potential for investigations in various research subjects. PMID:26134813

  20. Phase relief imaging with confocal laser scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Tong; Xie, Hao; Ding, Yichen; Xi, Peng

    2013-02-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has become one of the most important biomedical research tools today due to its noninvasive and 3-D abilities. It enables imaging in living tissue with better resolution and contrast, and plays a growing role among microscopic techniques utilized for investigating numerous biological problems. In some cases, the sample was phase-sensitive, thus we introduce a novel method named laser oblique scanning optical microscopy (LOSOM) which could obtain a relief image in transparent sample directly. Through the LOSOM system, mouse kidney and HeLa cells sample were imaged and 10x, 20x and 40x magnify objective imaging results were realized respectively. Also, we compared the variation of pinhole size versus imaging result. One major parameters of LOSOM is the distance between fluorescence medium and the sample. Previously, this distance was set to 1.2 mm, which is the thickness of the slide. The experiment result showed that decreasing d can increase the signal level for LOSOM phase-relief imaging. We have also demonstrated the application of LOSOM in absorption imaging modality, when the specimen is non-transparent.

  1. Structured illumination diffraction phase microscopy for broadband, sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is an established technique that allows sub-diffraction resolution imaging by heterodyning high sample frequencies into the system’s passband via structured illumination. However, until now, SIM has been typically used to achieve sub-diffraction resolution for intensity-based imaging. Here, we present a novel optical setup that uses structured illumination with a broadband-light source to obtain noise-reduced, sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative-phase (QPM) imaging of cells. We compare this with a previous work for sub-diffraction QPM imaging via SIM that used a laser source, and was thus still corrupted by coherent noise. PMID:24562266

  2. Two dimensional vibrations of the guinea pig apex organ of Corti measured in vivo using phase sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Zhang, Yuan; Petrie, Tracy; Fridberger, Anders; Ren, Tianying; Wang, Ruikang; Jacques, Steven L.; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we measure the in vivo apical-turn vibrations of the guinea pig organ of Corti in both axial and radial directions using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography. The apical turn in guinea pig cochlea has best frequencies around 100 - 500 Hz which are relevant for human speech. Prior measurements of vibrations in the guinea pig apex involved opening the otic capsule, which has been questioned on the basis of the resulting changes to cochlear hydrodynamics. Here this limitation is overcome by measuring the vibrations through bone without opening the otic capsule. Furthermore, we have significantly reduced the surgery needed to access the guinea pig apex in the axial direction by introducing a miniature mirror inside the bulla. The method and preliminary data are discussed in this article.

  3. Fourier Transform-Based Continuous Phase-Plate Design Technique: A High-Pass Phase-Plate Design as an Application for OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Marozas, J.A.

    2007-01-24

    A technique capable of calculating near-field, continuous-phase diffractive optics (or phase plates) without phase dislocations and with optional far-field, speckle-spectrum control is introduced. The design technique improves upon a standard phase-retrieval method by adding convergence enhancements, phase continuity control, and far-field, speckle-spectrum control. The convergence enhancements improve the algorithm’s efficiency. Phase continuity control eliminates phase dislocations and mitigates damaging retroreflections and transmissions. Specifying an optional constraint controls the far-field speckle-spectrum. Application of these phase plates on the OMEGA and National Ignition Facility laser systems would produce well-controlled far-field spot shapes. High-pass phase plate designs are compared to designs where the far-field spectrum is not controlled.

  4. LOW COST IMAGER FOR POLLUTANT GAS LEAK DETECTION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    An inexpensive imaging Instrument to quickly locate leaks of methane and other greenhouse and VOC gases would reduce the cost and effort expended by industry to comply with EPA regulations. In Phase I, of this WBIR program, a new gas leak visualization camera was demonstrated...

  5. Phase Retrieval Using Estimation Methods For Intensity Correlation Imaging 

    E-print Network

    Young, Brian T.

    2010-10-12

    Spot Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2. Tracking Extra-solar Planets . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 III EARTH IMAGING APPLICATIONS : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 40 A. Focal Plane Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 B. Phase... of the conjugate gradient method : : : : : : : : : : : : 55 viii LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 NASA?s Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF), an example of a sparse, interferometric remote sensing platform : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 2 2 The James Webb and Hubble...

  6. Geometrically Decoupled Phased Array Coils for Mouse Imaging 

    E-print Network

    Bhatia, Sahil

    2010-07-14

    . In this work five different coils for mouse imaging at 200MHz are presented: a 16 leg trombone design quadrature birdcage coil and four geometrically decoupled volume phased array coils. The first mouse array coil is a two saddle quadrature coil with a...

  7. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOEpatents

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  8. Drive frequency dependent phase imaging in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bo Huifeng; Kan Yi; Lu Xiaomei; Liu Yunfei; Peng Song; Wang Xiaofei; Cai Wei; Xue Ruoshi; Zhu Jinsong

    2010-08-15

    The drive frequency dependent piezoresponse (PR) phase signal in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals is studied by piezoresponse force microscopy. It is clearly shown that the local and nonlocal electrostatic forces have a great contribution to the PR phase signal. The significant PR phase difference of the antiparallel domains are observed at the contact resonances, which is related to the electrostatic dominated electromechanical interactions of the cantilever and tip-sample system. Moreover, the modulation voltage induced frequency shift at higher eigenmodes could be attributed to the change of indention force depending on the modulation amplitude with a piezoelectric origin. The PR phase of the silicon wafer is also measured for comparison. It is certificated that the electrostatic interactions are universal in voltage modulated scanning probe microscopy and could be extended to other phase imaging techniques.

  9. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Lewis, Rob A.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-19

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 {mu}m), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  10. Clinical study in phase- contrast mammography: image-quality analysis.

    PubMed

    Longo, Renata; Tonutti, Maura; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Quai, Elisa; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Castelli, Edoardo; Tromba, Giuliana; Cova, Maria A

    2014-03-01

    The first clinical study of phase-contrast mammography (PCM) with synchrotron radiation was carried out at the Synchrotron Radiation for Medical Physics beamline of the Elettra synchrotron radiation facility in Trieste (Italy) in 2006-2009. The study involved 71 patients with unresolved breast abnormalities after conventional digital mammography and ultrasonography exams carried out at the Radiology Department of Trieste University Hospital. These cases were referred for mammography at the synchrotron radiation facility, with images acquired using a propagation-based phase-contrast imaging technique. To investigate the contribution of phase-contrast effects to the image quality, two experienced radiologists specialized in mammography assessed the visibility of breast abnormalities and of breast glandular structures. The images acquired at the hospital and at the synchrotron radiation facility were compared and graded according to a relative seven-grade visual scoring system. The statistical analysis highlighted that PCM with synchrotron radiation depicts normal structures and abnormal findings with higher image quality with respect to conventional digital mammography. PMID:24470410

  11. Fourier Series and Integrals Fourier Series

    E-print Network

    Mehta, Pankaj

    Fourier Series and Integrals Fourier Series Let f(x) be a piecewise linear function on [-L, L(x) can be expanded in a Fourier series f(x) = a0 2 + n=1 an cos nx L + bn sin nx L , (1a) or schematic form of the Fourier series is f(x) = n (an^cn + bn^sn). (2) This emphasizes that the Fourier

  12. Three-dimensional intracellular optical coherence phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Helderman, Frank; Haslam, Bryan; de Boer, Johannes F; de Groot, Mattijs

    2013-02-15

    Quantitative phase imaging has many applications for label-free studies of the nanoscale structure and dynamics of cells and tissues. It has been demonstrated that optical coherence phase microscopy (OCPM) can provide quantitative phase information with very high sensitivity. The excellent phase stability of OCPM is obtained by use of a reflection from the microscope cover glass as a local reference field. For detailed intracellular studies a large numerical aperture (N.A.) objective is needed in order to obtain the required resolution. Unfortunately, this also means that the depth of field becomes too small to obtain sufficient power from the cover glass when the beam is focused into the sample. To address this issue, we designed a setup with a dual-beam sample arm. One beam with a large diameter (filling the 1.2 N.A. water immersion objective) enabled high-resolution imaging. A second beam with a small diameter (underfilling the same objective) had a larger depth of field and could detect the cover glass used as a local phase reference. The phase stability of the setup was quantified by monitoring the front and back of a cover glass. The standard deviation of the phase difference was 0.021 rad, corresponding to an optical path displacement of 0.9 nm. The lateral and axial dimensions of the confocal point spread function were 0.42 and 0.84 ?m, respectively. This makes our dual-beam setup ideal for three-dimensional intracellular phase imaging. PMID:23455092

  13. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  14. Partially coherent phase imaging with simultaneous source recovery

    PubMed Central

    Jingshan, Zhong; Tian, Lei; Dauwels, Justin; Waller, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method for phase retrieval that uses partially coherent illumination created by any arbitrary source shape in Köhler geometry. Using a stack of defocused intensity images, we recover not only the phase and amplitude of the sample, but also an estimate of the unknown source shape, which describes the spatial coherence of the illumination. Our algorithm uses a Kalman filtering approach which is fast, accurate and robust to noise. The method is experimentally simple and flexible, so should find use in optical, electron, X-ray and other phase imaging systems which employ partially coherent light. We provide an experimental demonstration in an optical microscope with various condenser apertures. PMID:25657890

  15. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1?mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization.

  16. 3D quantitative phase imaging of neural networks using WDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Liu, S. C.; Iyer, Raj; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    White-light diffraction tomography (WDT) is a recently developed 3D imaging technique based on a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). The technique has achieved a sub-micron resolution in all three directions with high sensitivity granted by the low-coherence of a white-light source. Demonstrations of the technique on single cell imaging have been presented previously; however, imaging on any larger sample, including a cluster of cells, has not been demonstrated using the technique. Neurons in an animal body form a highly complex and spatially organized 3D structure, which can be characterized by neuronal networks or circuits. Currently, the most common method of studying the 3D structure of neuron networks is by using a confocal fluorescence microscope, which requires fluorescence tagging with either transient membrane dyes or after fixation of the cells. Therefore, studies on neurons are often limited to samples that are chemically treated and/or dead. WDT presents a solution for imaging live neuron networks with a high spatial and temporal resolution, because it is a 3D imaging method that is label-free and non-invasive. Using this method, a mouse or rat hippocampal neuron culture and a mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron culture have been imaged in order to see the extension of processes between the cells in 3D. Furthermore, the tomogram is compared with a confocal fluorescence image in order to investigate the 3D structure at synapses.

  17. Optimum defocus planes selection method for transport of intensity phase imaging based on phase transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiasong; Zhang, Yuzhen; Zuo, Chao; Chen, Qian

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, medical, biological and scientific fields have been benefited from phase information, which can reveal the hidden features of various objects. By solving the transport of intensity equation (TIE), the phase distribution of an object can be obtained from a series of intensity measurements. Assuming the solving process is correct, the reconstruction accuracy is depending on the distances between planes, the number of planes, and the level of noise. Increasing the number of planes or utilizing multi-frame de-noise algorithm could improve the reconstruction accuracy certainly, but neither of them is a time-efficient strategy. In this work, an optimum defocus planes selection (OPS) method is proposed for reconstructing high quality phase information by solving the transport of intensity equation. It is shown that the difference image between two symmetrical separated, lager defocused planes contains a lot of lower frequency components of the phase distribution and the higher frequency components can be easily observed in the difference image between two nearly focused planes. Based on the phase transfer function (PTF), our method estimate a more accurate frequency spectrum of the object phase distribution, which is combined with different frequency components from the stack of through-focus intensity images. Both the simulation and experimental results demonstrate that this optimum defocus planes selection method can give a computationally efficient and noise-robust phase reconstruction with higher accuracy and fewer defocus planes.

  18. Characterization of genuine and fake artesunate anti-malarial tablets using Fourier transform infrared imaging and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy through blister packs.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Camilla; Eliasson, Charlotte; Macleod, Neil A; Newton, Paul N; Matousek, Pavel; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2007-11-01

    In support of the efforts to combat the illegal sale and distribution of counterfeit anti-malarial drugs, we evaluated a new analytical approach for the characterization and fast screening of fake and genuine artesunate tablets using a combination of Raman spectroscopy, Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) and Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) imaging. Vibrational spectroscopy provided chemically specific information on the composition of the tablets; the complementary nature of Raman scattering and FTIR imaging allowed the characterization of both the overall and surface composition of the tablets. The depth-resolving power of the SORS approach provided chemically specific information on the overall composition of the tablets, non-invasively, through a variety of packaging types. Spatial imaging of the tablet surface (using ATR-FTIR) identified the location of domains of excipients and active ingredients with high sensitivity and enhanced spatial resolution. The advantages provided by a combination of SORS and ATR-FTIR imaging in this context confirm its potential for inclusion in the analytical protocol for forensic investigation of counterfeit medicines. PMID:17879090

  19. Ultrahigh-speed optical coherence tomography imaging and visualization of the embryonic avian heart using a buffered Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, M. W.; Adler, D. C.; Gargesha, M.; Huber, R.; Rothenberg, F.; Belding, J.; Watanabe, M.; Wilson, D. L.; Fujimoto, J. G.; Rollins, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic avian heart is an important model for studying cardiac developmental biology. The mechanisms that govern the development of a four-chambered heart from a peristaltic heart tube are largely unknown due in part to a lack of adequate imaging technology. Due to the small size and rapid motion of the living embryonic avian heart, an imaging system with high spatial and temporal resolution is required to study these models. Here, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using a buffered Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser is applied for ultrahigh-speed non-invasive imaging of embryonic quail hearts at 100,000 axial scans per second. The high scan rate enables the acquisition of high temporal resolution 2D datasets (195 frames per second or 5.12 ms between frames) and 3D datasets (10 volumes per second). Spatio-temporal details of cardiac motion not resolvable using previous OCT technology are analyzed. Visualization and measurement techniques are developed to non-invasively observe and quantify cardiac motion throughout the brief period of systole (less than 50 msec) and diastole. This marks the first time that the preseptated embryonic avian heart has been imaged in 4D without the aid of gating and the first time it has been viewed in cross section during looping with extremely high temporal resolution, enabling the observation of morphological dynamics of the beating heart during systole. PMID:19546930

  20. Bright-field quantitative phase microscopy (BFQPM) for accurate phase imaging using conventional microscopy hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Micah; Gaylord, Thomas K.

    2015-03-01

    Most quantitative phase microscopy methods require the use of custom-built or modified microscopic configurations which are not typically available to most bio/pathologists. There are, however, phase retrieval algorithms which utilize defocused bright-field images as input data and are therefore implementable in existing laboratory environments. Among these, deterministic methods such as those based on inverting the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) or a phase contrast transfer function (PCTF) are particularly attractive due to their compatibility with Köhler illuminated systems and numerical simplicity. Recently, a new method has been proposed, called multi-filter phase imaging with partially coherent light (MFPI-PC), which alleviates the inherent noise/resolution trade-off in solving the TIE by utilizing a large number of defocused bright-field images spaced equally about the focal plane. Despite greatly improving the state-ofthe- art, the method has many shortcomings including the impracticality of high-speed acquisition, inefficient sampling, and attenuated response at high frequencies due to aperture effects. In this report, we present a new method, called bright-field quantitative phase microscopy (BFQPM), which efficiently utilizes a small number of defocused bright-field images and recovers frequencies out to the partially coherent diffraction limit. The method is based on a noiseminimized inversion of a PCTF derived for each finite defocus distance. We present simulation results which indicate nanoscale optical path length sensitivity and improved performance over MFPI-PC. We also provide experimental results imaging live bovine mesenchymal stem cells at sub-second temporal resolution. In all, BFQPM enables fast and accurate phase imaging with unprecedented spatial resolution using widely available bright-field microscopy hardware.

  1. FOURIER TRANSFORM METHODS IN GEOPHYSICS David Sandwell, January, 2013

    E-print Network

    Sandwell, David T.

    1 FOURIER TRANSFORM METHODS IN GEOPHYSICS David Sandwell, January, 2013 1. Fourier Transforms Fourier transform are use in many areas of geophysics such as image processing, time series analysis, and antenna design. Here we focus on the use of fourier transforms for solving linear partial differential

  2. Off-axis interferometric phase microscopy with tripled imaging area.

    PubMed

    Frenklach, Irena; Girshovitz, Pinhas; Shaked, Natan T

    2014-03-15

    We present an interferometric approach, referred to as interferometry with tripled-imaging area (ITIA), for tripling the quantitative information that can be collected in a single camera exposure while using off-axis interferometric imaging. ITIA enables optical multiplexing of three off-axis interferograms onto a single camera sensor without changing the imaging-system characteristics, such as magnification and spatial resolution, or losing temporal resolution (no scanning is involved). This approach is useful for many applications in which interferometric and holographic imaging are used. Our experimental demonstrations include quantitative phase microscopy of a transparent U.S. Air Force 1951 test target, thin diatom shells, and live human cancer cells. PMID:24690829

  3. Discrete Fourier Transform in a Complex Vector Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An image-based phase retrieval technique has been developed that can be used on board a space based iterative transformation system. Image-based wavefront sensing is computationally demanding due to the floating-point nature of the process. The discrete Fourier transform (DFT) calculation is presented in "diagonal" form. By diagonal we mean that a transformation of basis is introduced by an application of the similarity transform of linear algebra. The current method exploits the diagonal structure of the DFT in a special way, particularly when parts of the calculation do not have to be repeated at each iteration to converge to an acceptable solution in order to focus an image.

  4. Motionless electromagnetic phase stepping versus mechanical phase stepping in x-ray phase-contrast imaging with a compact source.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A; Bennett, Eric E; Foster, Barbara A; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-04-21

    X-ray phase contrast imaging based on grating interferometers detects the refractive index distribution of an object without relying on radiation attenuation, thereby having the potential for reduced radiation absorption. These techniques belong to the broader category of optical wavefront measurement, which requires stepping the phase of the interference pattern to obtain a pixel-wise map of the phase distortion of the wavefront. While phase stepping traditionally involves mechanical scanning of a grating or mirror, we developed electromagnetic phase stepping (EPS) for imaging with compact sources to obviate the need for mechanical movement. In EPS a solenoid coil is placed outside the x-ray tube to shift its focal spot with a magnetic field, causing a relative movement between the projection of the sample and the interference pattern in the image. Here we present two embodiments of this method. We verified experimentally that electromagnetic and mechanical phase stepping give the same results and attain the same signal-to-noise ratios under the same radiation dose. We found that the relative changes of interference fringe visibility were within 3.0% when the x-ray focal spot was shifted by up to 1.0 mm in either direction. We conclude that when using x-ray tube sources, EPS is an effective means of phase stepping without the need for mechanical movement. PMID:25803511

  5. Absorption-Mode Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: the Effects of Apodization and Phasing on Modified Protein Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yulin; Li, Huilin; Wills, Rebecca H.; Perez-Hurtado, Pilar; Yu, Xiang; Kilgour, David. P. A.; Barrow, Mark P.; Lin, Cheng; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    The method of phasing broadband FT-ICR spectra allows plotting the spectra in the absorption-mode; this new approach significantly improves the quality of the data at no extra cost. Herein, an internal calibration method for calculating the phase function has been developed, and successfully applied to the top-down spectra of modified proteins, where the peak intensities vary by >100×. The result shows that the use of absorption-mode spectra allows more peaks to be discerned within the recorded data, and this can reveal much greater information about the protein and modifications under investigation. In addition, noise and harmonic peaks can be assigned immediately in the absorption-mode. PMID:23568027

  6. Lab 7: Fourier analysis and synthesis Fourier series (periodic phenomena)

    E-print Network

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    Lab 7: Fourier analysis and synthesis · Fourier series (periodic phenomena) · Fourier transform (aperiodic phenomena) · Fast Fourier transform (FFT) The Fourier Transform and its Applications Brad G A powerful analytic tool that has many applications.... #12;Applications of Fourier analysis Periodic

  7. Parallel phase-sensitive three-dimensional imaging camera

    DOEpatents

    Smithpeter, Colin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hoover, Eddie R. (Sandia Park, NM); Pain, Bedabrata (Los Angeles, CA); Hancock, Bruce R. (Altadena, CA); Nellums, Robert O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-09-25

    An apparatus is disclosed for generating a three-dimensional (3-D) image of a scene illuminated by a pulsed light source (e.g. a laser or light-emitting diode). The apparatus, referred to as a phase-sensitive 3-D imaging camera utilizes a two-dimensional (2-D) array of photodetectors to receive light that is reflected or scattered from the scene and processes an electrical output signal from each photodetector in the 2-D array in parallel using multiple modulators, each having inputs of the photodetector output signal and a reference signal, with the reference signal provided to each modulator having a different phase delay. The output from each modulator is provided to a computational unit which can be used to generate intensity and range information for use in generating a 3-D image of the scene. The 3-D camera is capable of generating a 3-D image using a single pulse of light, or alternately can be used to generate subsequent 3-D images with each additional pulse of light.

  8. Image fusion scheme for differential phase contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Clavijo, C. A.; Roessl, E.; van Stevendaal, U.; Koehler, T.; Hauser, N.; Stampanoni, M.

    2013-07-01

    Latest progresses in breast imaging using differential phase contrast technique pose the question how to fuse multiple information (yielded by the absorption, differential phase, and scattering signals) into a single, but more informative image for clinical diagnosis and evaluation. In this work, we propose an image fusion scheme based on the multiple-resolution (MR) framework. The three signals are first transformed into multiple bands presenting information at different frequency and then a two-step processing follows: section 3.2 an intra-band processing enhances the local signal-to-noise ratio using a novel noise estimation method and context modeling; section 3.3 an inter-band processing weights each band by considering their characteristics and contributions, as well as suppressing the global noise level. The fused image, which looks similar to conventional mammogram but with significantly enhanced detail features, is then reconstructed by inverse transform. This fused image is compatible with clinical settings and enables the radiologists to use their years of diagnosis experiences in mammography.

  9. A grating-based single-shot x-ray phase contrast and diffraction method for in vivo imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Eric E.; Kopace, Rael; Stein, Ashley F.; Wen Han

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a single-shot version of the grating-based phase contrast x-ray imaging method and demonstrate its capability of in vivo animal imaging. Here, the authors describe the principle and experimental results. They show the source of artifacts in the phase contrast signal and optimal designs that minimize them. They also discuss its current limitations and ways to overcome them. Methods: A single lead grid was inserted midway between an x-ray tube and an x-ray camera in the planar radiography setting. The grid acted as a transmission grating and cast periodic dark fringes on the camera. The camera had sufficient spatial resolution to resolve the fringes. Refraction and diffraction in the imaged object manifested as position shifts and amplitude attenuation of the fringes, respectively. In order to quantify these changes precisely without imposing a fixed geometric relationship between the camera pixel array and the fringes, a spatial harmonic method in the Fourier domain was developed. The level of the differential phase (refraction) contrast as a function of hardware specifications and device geometry was derived and used to guide the optimal placement of the grid and object. Both ex vivo and in vivo images of rodent extremities were collected to demonstrate the capability of the method. The exposure time using a 50 W tube was 28 s. Results: Differential phase contrast images of glass beads acquired at various grid and object positions confirmed theoretical predictions of how phase contrast and extraneous artifacts vary with the device geometry. In anesthetized rats, a single exposure yielded artifact-free images of absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction. Differential phase contrast was strongest at bone-soft tissue interfaces, while diffraction was strongest in bone. Conclusions: The spatial harmonic method allowed us to obtain absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction images, all from a single raw image and is feasible in live animals. Because the sensitivity of the method scales with the density of the gratings, custom microfabricated gratings should be superior to off-the-shelf lead grids.

  10. Fourier transform spectral imaging microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy for the detection of indoor common contaminants on the surface of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lutin, Anna; Bulatov, Valery; Jadwat, Yusuf; Wood, Neil H; Feller, Liviu; Schechter, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Endosteal dental implants are used routinely with high success rates to rehabilitate the integrity of the dentition. However if implant surfaces become contaminated by foreign material, osseointegration may not occur and the dental implant will fail because of the lack of mechanical stability. Detection and characterization of dental implant surface contaminants is a difficult task. In this article we investigate the application of several spectral microscopy methods to detect airborne contaminants on dental implant surfaces. We found that Fourier Transform Spectral Imaging Microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy provided the most useful information. Some implants possess weak and homogeneous auto-fluorescence and are best analyzed using FT-SIM methods, while others are Raman inactive and can be analyzed using scanning Raman microscopy. PMID:25618702

  11. Measurement of wave-front aberration in a small telescope remote imaging system using scene-based wave-front sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, Lisa A; Bauman, Brian J

    2015-03-31

    Reference-free compensated imaging makes an estimation of the Fourier phase of a series of images of a target. The Fourier magnitude of the series of images is obtained by dividing the power spectral density of the series of images by an estimate of the power spectral density of atmospheric turbulence from a series of scene based wave front sensor (SBWFS) measurements of the target. A high-resolution image of the target is recovered from the Fourier phase and the Fourier magnitude.

  12. Resolution enhancement in phase imaging by using modulated illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we show how resolution enhancement in digital holographic microscopy (DHM) and reference-less phase retrieval approach is obtained by using modulated illuminations. The modulated illuminations, including structured illumination and speckle illumination, are generated by a spatial light modulator and used to illuminate the sample. The holograms or diffraction patterns of the object wave under these illuminations are recorded, from which the phase is reconstructed accordingly. The resolution of the reconstructed image has been improved, when the spectrum of object waves along different illuminations are synthesized.

  13. Structural and functional imaging of the human and small animal eyes using ultrahigh speed Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    E-print Network

    Choi, Woo Jhon

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging technique that allows the three-dimensional structure of biological tissue to be visualized with micrometer resolution. In ophthalmology OCT has the ...

  14. Dithranol as a Matrix for Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Imaging on a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Le, Cuong H.; Han, Jun; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) determines the spatial localization and distribution patterns of compounds on the surface of a tissue section, mainly using MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization)-based analytical techniques. New matrices for small-molecule MSI, which can improve the analysis of low-molecular weight (MW) compounds, are needed. These matrices should provide increased analyte signals while decreasing MALDI background signals. In addition, the use of ultrahigh-resolution instruments, such as Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometers, has the ability to resolve analyte signals from matrix signals, and this can partially overcome many problems associated with the background originating from the MALDI matrix. The reduction in the intensities of the metastable matrix clusters by FTICR MS can also help to overcome some of the interferences associated with matrix peaks on other instruments. High-resolution instruments such as the FTICR mass spectrometers are advantageous as they can produce distribution patterns of many compounds simultaneously while still providing confidence in chemical identifications. Dithranol (DT; 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroanthracen-9-one) has previously been reported as a MALDI matrix for tissue imaging. In this work, a protocol for the use of DT for MALDI imaging of endogenous lipids from the surfaces of mammalian tissue sections, by positive-ion MALDI-MS, on an ultrahigh-resolution hybrid quadrupole FTICR instrument has been provided. PMID:24300588

  15. Geophysical imaging with backpropagation and zeroth-order phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A. ); King, W.C. )

    1990-05-01

    A promising technique for high resolution geophysical imaging has been proposed which is based on the inversion of an exact solution to the reduced wave equation. The method is known as backpropagation because it propagates a received waveform back into the host formation mapping wavespeed variations. The implementation of backpropagation is complicated by the fact that it requires a complete characterization of the wave source and the wave propagation properties of a homogeneous host medium. The imaging procedure can be simplified by utilizing a zeroth-order phase approximation which allows implementation with first arrival times. Numerical experiments and a field study suggests that this approach is a practical means for high resolution subsurface imaging.

  16. Fourier analysis of the imaging characteristics of a CMOS active pixel detector for mammography by using a linearization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jong Chul; Yun, Seungman; Youn, Hanbean; Kam, Soohwa; Cho, Seungryong; Achterkirchen, Thorsten G.; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-09-01

    Active pixel design using the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process is a compelling solution for use in X-ray imaging detectors because of its excellent electronic noise characteristics. We have investigated the imaging performance of a CMOS active pixel photodiode array coupled to a granular phosphor through a fiber-optic faceplate for mammographic applications. The imaging performance included the modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Because we observed a nonlinear detector response at low exposures, we used the linearization method for the analysis of the DQE. The linearization method uses the images obtained at detector input, which are converted from those obtained at detector output by using the inverse of the detector response. Compared to the conventional method, the linearization method provided almost the same MTF and a slightly lower normalized NPS. However, the difference between the DQE results obtained by using the two methods was significant. We claim that the conventional DQE analysis of a detector having a nonlinear response characteristic can yield wrong results. Under the standard mammographic imaging condition, we obtained a DQE performance that was competitive with the performances of conventional flat-panel mammography detectors. We believe that the CMOS detector investigated in this study can be successfully used for mammography.

  17. Improvement of the image quality of random phase-free holography using an iterative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Kakue, Takashi; Endo, Yutaka; Hirayama, Ryuji; Hiyama, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Satoki; Nagahama, Yuki; Sano, Marie; Oikawa, Minoru; Sugie, Takashige; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-11-01

    Our proposed method of random phase-free holography using virtual convergence light can obtain large reconstructed images exceeding the size of the hologram, without the assistance of random phase. The reconstructed images have low-speckle noise in the amplitude and phase-only holograms (kinoforms); however, in low-resolution holograms, we obtain a degraded image quality compared to the original image. We propose an iterative random phase-free method with virtual convergence light to address this problem.

  18. LORENTZ PHASE IMAGING AND IN-SITU LORENTZ MICROSCOPY OF PATTERNED CO-ARRAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding magnetic structures and properties of patterned and ordinary magnetic films at nanometer length-scale is the area of immense technological and fundamental scientific importance. The key feature to such success is the ability to achieve visual quantitative information on domain configurations with a maximum ''magnetic'' resolution. Several methods have been developed to meet these demands (Kerr and Faraday effects, differential phase contrast microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, SEMPA etc.). In particular, the modern off-axis electron holography allows retrieval of the electron-wave phase shifts down to 2{pi}/N (with typical N = 10-20, approaching in the limit N {approx} 100) in TEM equipped with field emission gun, which is already successfully employed for studies of magnetic materials at nanometer scale. However, it remains technically demanding, sensitive to noise and needs highly coherent electron sources. As possible alternative we developed a new method of Lorentz phase microscopy [1,2] based on the Fourier solution [3] of magnetic transport-of-intensity (MTIE) equation. This approach has certain advantages, since it is less sensitive to noise and does not need high coherence of the source required by the holography. In addition, it can be realized in any TEM without basic hardware changes. Our approach considers the electron-wave refraction in magnetic materials (magnetic refraction) and became possible due to general progress in understanding of noninterferometric phase retrieval [4-6] dealing with optical refraction. This approach can also be treated as further development of Fresnel microscopy, used so far for imaging of in-situ magnetization process in magnetic materials studied by TEM. Figs. 1-3 show some examples of what kind information can be retrieved from the conventional Fresnel images using the new approach. Most of these results can be compared with electron-holographic data. Using this approach we can shed more light on fine details of in-situ magnetization process in magnetic materials and films studied by TEM. As an example, Fig.4 illustrates the evolution of domain configurations in 25-nm thick Co-elements patterned on silicon nitride membrane as function of applied field, ranging from +70 to -70 Oe. The Lorentz phase microscopy allows better understanding the role of magnetization ripple (41 Oe) in nucleation of reverse domains (28 Oe), or vortex formation (-4.4 Oe) followed by the reverse domains expansion and final annihilation of domain walls (41/-41 Oe) at the sample edges. It is believed that due to technical simplicity the Lorentz phase microscopy will find more applications in the nearest future.

  19. Phase-unwrapping algorithm for images with high noise content based on a local histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses, Jaime; Gharbi, Tijani; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    We present a robust algorithm of phase unwrapping that was designed for use on phase images with high noise content. We proceed with the algorithm by first identifying regions with continuous phase values placed between fringe boundaries in an image and then phase shifting the regions with respect to one another by multiples of 2pi to unwrap the phase. Image pixels are segmented between interfringe and fringe boundary areas by use of a local histogram of a wrapped phase. The algorithm has been used successfully to unwrap phase images generated in a three-dimensional shape measurement for noninvasive quantification of human skin structure in dermatology, cosmetology, and plastic surgery.

  20. MIXTURE OF COMPETITIVE LINEAR MODELS FOR PHASED-ARRAY MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    MIXTURE OF COMPETITIVE LINEAR MODELS FOR PHASED-ARRAY MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING£ Deniz Erdogmus-array magnetic resonance imaging is an important contem- porary research field in terms of the expected clinical. INTRODUCTION Magnetic resonance image (MRI) image reconstruction with phased-array coils is being widely

  1. Performance of a long-wave infrared Fourier Transform imaging spectrometer using a corner-cube Michelson interferometer and an uncooled microbolometer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Wu, Jianghui; Meng, Hemin; Gao, Jiaobo; Fan, Zhe; Zhang, Mingxuan; Li, Yu; Li, Jianjun

    2015-10-01

    Interference imaging spectroscopy is the advanced subject among the infrared remote sensing, and it has become an important technique to detect spatial information and spectral information of targets. It has the advantages of high flux, high spectral resolution and high spatial resolution that can be used for detecting more details of the spectral and spatial information. Based on a Michelson interferometer with its mirrors replaced by corner-cubes, principles of a hand-held, static, long-wave infrared Fourier Transform(FT) imaging spectrometer using an uncooled microbolometer array are introduced. Because in such FT-based spectral imager, the interferogram is acquired over the whole field of the camera while the scene of interest scans the path difference range, vignetting should be strongly limited while keep the size of the interferometer as small as possible. Interferometer size is given and interferential light path is verified through TracePro software. First results of field and laboratory measurements using the spectral imager are presented. Remotely obtained spectrums collected with this instrument and with those of high precise Michelson spectrometer are compared, and the measured values turned out to be closely corresponded. The results, in turn, verified the feasibility of the systematic working mode. The resulting system tested here provides datacubes of up to 640×480 pixels over the 7.7~13?m spectral range, this wavelength range reveals important information about scenes such as gas or landmine detection, and the instrument has a spectral resolution of about 8cm-1 that fulfils the requirement for most targeted applications. Examples of sky and buildings detection are shown.

  2. Dynamic phase differences based on quantitative phase imaging for the objective evaluation of cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Krizova, Aneta; Collakova, Jana; Dostal, Zbynek; Kvasnica, Lukas; Uhlirova, Hana; Zikmund, Tomas; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) brought innovation to noninvasive observation of live cell dynamics seen as cell behavior. Unlike the Zernike phase contrast or differential interference contrast, QPI provides quantitative information about cell dry mass distribution. We used such data for objective evaluation of live cell behavioral dynamics by the advanced method of dynamic phase differences (DPDs). The DPDs method is considered a rational instrument offered by QPI. By subtracting the antecedent from the subsequent image in a time-lapse series, only the changes in mass distribution in the cell are detected. The result is either visualized as a two dimensional color-coded projection of these two states of the cell or as a time dependence of changes quantified in picograms. Then in a series of time-lapse recordings, the chain of cell mass distribution changes that would otherwise escape attention is revealed. Consequently, new salient features of live cell behavior should emerge. Construction of the DPDs method and results exhibiting the approach are presented. Advantage of the DPDs application is demonstrated on cells exposed to an osmotic challenge. For time-lapse acquisition of quantitative phase images, the recently developed coherence-controlled holographic microscope was employed. PMID:26340954

  3. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO® UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  4. Fourier transform-infrared studies of thin H2SO4/H2O films: Formation, water uptake, and solid-liquid phase changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middlebrook, Ann M.; Iraci, Laura T.; Mcneill, Laurie S.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Saastad, Ole W.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Hanson, David R.

    1993-01-01

    Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to examine films representative of stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols. Thin films of sulfuric acid were formed in situ by the condensed phase reaction of SO3 with H2O. FTIR spectra show that the sulfuric acid films absorb water while cooling in the presence of water vapor. Using stratospheric water pressures, the most dilute solutions observed were greater than 40 wt % before simultaneous ice formation and sulfuric acid freezing occurred. FTIR spectra also revealed that the sulfuric acid films crystallized mainly as sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT). Crystallization occurred either when the composition was about 60 wt% H2SO4 or after ice formed on the films at temperatures 1-4 K below the ice frost point. Finally, we determined that the melting point for SAT depended on the background water pressure and was 216-219 K in the presence of 4 x 10(exp -4) Torr H2O. Our results suggest that once frozen, sulfuric acid aerosols in the stratosphere are likely to melt at these temperatures, 30 K colder than previously thought.

  5. Polarization sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography with continuous polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanari, M.; Yasuno, Y.; Makita, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Hori, Y.; Itoh, M.; Yatagai, T.

    2006-02-01

    Polarization sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (PS-FD-OCT) using fiber components with continuous polarization modulation is demonstrated. The incident polarized light is modulated by electro-optic modulator (EO modulator) synchronized with lateral B-scanning. By the incident polarization modulation and the polarization sensitive spectrometer, the depth-resolved Jones matrix image of biological sample can be measured. This method uses both polarization modulation method and Fourier transform method. In this paper, the algorithm is described and the phase retardation image of chicken breast muscle is measured.

  6. SAR image construction from periodically gapped phase-history data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Erik G.; Li, Jianwei J.

    2002-08-01

    It is known that high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging can be cast as a spectral analysis problem, and consequently a number of sophisticated spectral estimation methods have been applied to SAR imaging. These method include the classical Capon method and the closely related Amplitude and Phase Estimation (APES) algorithm. In this paper, we show how Capon and APES can be extended to deal with spectral analysis of periodically gapped (PG) data, i.e. data where samples are missing in a periodic fashion. This problem is highly relevant for SAR imaging with angular diversity since in that case the measured phase-history data matrix contains missing columns. Our extension of Capon and APES is based on a transform that maps a one-dimensional (1D) periodically gapped time-series into a uniformly sampled two-dimensional (2D) data set. We show that the stationarity properties of the 1D signal are left unchanged by the transformation, and as a result the conventional 2D Capon and APES methods can be applied to the transformed data. An associated inverse transform is used to extract the 1D spectral estimate from the 2D one. The new method is computationally and conceptually non-intricate and it does not involve any interpolation of the missing data. Despite its striking simplicity, numerical results indicate that the new method can be a promising tool for SAR imaging with angular diversity as well as for time-series analysis. In SAR applications, the new method may be particularly suitable for accurate imaging of a small region of interest.

  7. Troubleshooting Arterial-Phase MR Images of Gadoxetate Disodium-Enhanced Liver

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jimi; Yeh, Benjamin M.; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Kyoung Won; Wu, En-Haw; Wang, Z. Jane; Zhao, Li-qin; Chang, Wei Chou

    2015-01-01

    Gadoxetate disodium is a widely used magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent for liver MR imaging, and it provides both dynamic and hepatobiliary phase images. However, acquiring optimal arterial phase images at liver MR using gadoxetate disodium is more challenging than using conventional extracellular MR contrast agent because of the small volume administered, the gadolinium content of the agent, and the common occurrence of transient severe motion. In this article, we identify the challenges in obtaining high-quality arterial-phase images of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced liver MR imaging and present strategies for optimizing arterial-phase imaging based on the thorough review of recent research in this field. PMID:26576109

  8. Phase and fluorescence imaging by combination of digital holographic microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Xiangyu; Nitta, Kouichi; Matoba, Osamu; Xia, Peng; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2015-04-01

    Hybrid digital holographic microscopy that combines fluorescence microscopy and digital holographic microscopy into a single system for biological applications is proposed. In the proposed system, a phase image and a fluorescence image can be obtained simultaneously by selecting the different wavelengths of the fluorescent light and the phase measurement. Especially for biological applications, the cell structure can be obtained by the phase imaging based on digital holography and nucleus of the cell can be obtained by the fluorescence imaging. The measurement of fluorescence beads and egera densa presented the feasibility of simultaneous detection of both a phase image and a fluorescence image.

  9. RESTORATION OF WEAK PHASE-CONTRAST IMAGES RECORDED WITH A HIGH DEGREE OF DEFOCUS: THE"TWIN IMAGE" PROBLEM ASSOCIATED WITH CTF CORRECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2008-03-28

    Relatively large values of objective-lens defocus must normally be used to produce detectable levels of image contrast for unstained biological specimens, which are generally weak phase objects. As a result, a subsequent restoration operation must be used to correct for oscillations in the contrast transfer function (CTF) at higher resolution. Currently used methods of CTF-correction assume the ideal case in which Friedel mates in the scattered wave have contributed pairs of Fourier components that overlap with one another in the image plane. This"ideal" situation may be only poorly satisfied, or not satisfied at all, as the particle size gets smaller, the defocus value gets larger, and the resolution gets higher. We have therefore investigated whether currently used methods of CTF correction are also effective in restoring the single-sideband image information that becomes displaced (delocalized) by half (or more) the diameter of a particle of finite size. Computer simulations are used to show that restoration either by"phase flipping" or by multiplying by the CTF recovers only about half of the delocalized information. The other half of the delocalized information goes into a doubly defocused"twin" image of the type produced during optical reconstruction of an in-line hologram. Restoration with a Wiener filter is effective in recovering the delocalized information only when the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is orders of magnitude higher than that which exists in low-dose images of biological specimens, in which case the Wiener filter approaches division by the CTF (i.e. the formal inverse). For realistic values of the S/N, however, the"twin image" problem seenwith a Wiener filter is very similar to that seen when either phase flipping or multiplying by the CTF are used for restoration. The results of these simulations suggest that CTF correction is a poor alternative to using a Zernike-type phase plate when imaging biological specimens, in which case the images can be recorded in a close-to-focus condition, and delocalization of high-resolution information is thus minimized.

  10. Fourier Series Autumn 2006

    E-print Network

    Wehlau, David

    Math 421 Fourier Series Autumn 2006 Text: Fourier Series, by Rajendra Bhatia, Math. Assoc. of America, 2005. Topics Covered: ­ Ch. 1, Fourier series and the heat equation ­ Ch. 2, Convergence of Fourier series ­ Ch. 3, Sine and cosine series, arbitrary pe- riods, sin(x)/x, Gibbs's phenomenon ­ Ch. 4

  11. Effect of subaperture beamforming on phase coherence imaging.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    High-frame-rate echocardiography using unfocused transmit beams and parallel receive beamforming is a promising method for evaluation of cardiac function, such as imaging of rapid propagation of vibration of the heart wall resulting from electrical stimulation of the myocardium. In this technique, high temporal resolution is realized at the expense of spatial resolution and contrast. The phase coherence factor has been developed to improve spatial resolution and contrast in ultrasonography. It evaluates the variance in phases of echo signals received by individual transducer elements after delay compensation, as in the conventional delay-andsum beamforming process. However, the phase coherence factor suppresses speckle echoes because phases of speckle echoes fluctuate as a result of interference of echoes. In the present study, the receiving aperture was divided into several subapertures, and conventional delay-and-sum beamforming was performed with respect to each subaperture to suppress echoes from scatterers except for that at a focal point. After subaperture beamforming, the phase coherence factor was obtained from beamformed RF signals from respective subapertures. By means of this procedure, undesirable echoes, which can interfere with the echo from a focal point, can be suppressed by subaperture beamforming, and the suppression of the phase coherence factor resulting from phase fluctuation caused by such interference can be avoided. In the present study, the effect of subaperture beamforming in high-frame-rate echocardiography with the phase coherence factor was evaluated using a phantom. By applying subaperture beamforming, the average intensity of speckle echoes from a diffuse scattering medium was significantly higher (-39.9 dB) than that obtained without subaperture beamforming (-48.7 dB). As for spatial resolution, the width at half-maximum of the lateral echo amplitude profile obtained without the phase coherence factor was 1.06 mm. By using the phase coherence factor, spatial resolution was improved significantly, and subaperture beamforming achieved a better spatial resolution of 0.75 mm than that of 0.78 mm obtained without subaperture beamforming. PMID:25389157

  12. Three-dimensional quantitative phase imaging via tomographic deconvolution phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Micah H; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2015-11-01

    The field of three-dimensional quantitative phase imaging (3D QPI) is expanding rapidly with applications in biological, medical, and industrial research, development, diagnostics, and metrology. Much of this research has centered on developing optical diffraction tomography (ODT) for biomedical applications. In addition to technical difficulties associated with coherent noise, ODT is not congruous with optical microscopy utilizing partially coherent light, which is used in most biomedical laboratories. Thus, ODT solutions have, for the most part, been limited to customized optomechanical systems which would be relatively expensive to implement on a wide scale. In the present work, a new phase reconstruction method, called tomographic deconvolution phase microscopy (TDPM), is described which makes use of commercial microscopy hardware in realizing 3D QPI. TDPM is analogous to methods used in deconvolution microscopy which improve spatial resolution and 3D-localization accuracy of fluorescence micrographs by combining multiple through-focal scans which are deconvolved by the system point spread function. TDPM is based on the 3D weak object transfer function theory which is shown here to be capable of imaging "nonweak" phase objects with large phase excursions. TDPM requires no phase unwrapping and recovers the entire object spectrum via object rotation, mitigating the need to fill in the "missing cone" of spatial frequencies algorithmically as in limited-angle ODT. In the present work, TDPM is demonstrated using optical fibers, including single-mode, polarization-maintaining, and photonic-crystal fibers as well as an azimuthally varying CO2-laser-induced long-period fiber grating period as test phase objects. PMID:26560576

  13. Performance validation of phase diversity image reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Gandorfer, A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2011-05-01

    We present a performance study of a phase diversity (PD) image reconstruction algorithm based on artificial solar images obtained from MHD simulations and on seeing-free data obtained with the SuFI instrument on the Sunrise balloon borne observatory. The artificial data were altered by applying different levels of degradation with synthesised wavefront errors and noise. The PD algorithm was modified by changing the number of fitted polynomials, the shape of the pupil and the applied noise filter. The obtained reconstructions are evaluated by means of the resulting rms intensity contrast and by the conspicuousness of appearing artifacts. The results show that PD is a robust method which consistently recovers the initial unaffected image contents. The efficiency of the reconstruction is, however, strongly dependent on the number of used fitting polynomials and the noise level of the images. If the maximum number of fitted polynomials is higher than 21, artifacts have to be accepted and for noise levels higher than 10-3 the commonly used noise filtering techniques are not able to avoid amplification of spurious structures.

  14. Dose and detectability improvements with high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging in comparison to low energy conventional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Yan, Aimin; Ghani, Muhammad; Li, Yuhua; Fajardo, Laurie; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential benefits of using high energy x-rays for phase sensitive breast imaging through a comparison with conventional mammography imaging. We compared images of a contrast-detail (CD) phantom acquired on a prototype phase sensitive x-ray imaging system with images acquired on a commercial flat panel digital mammography unit. The phase contrast images were acquired using a micro-focus x-ray source with a 50 ?m focal spot at 120 kVp and 4.5 mAs, with a magnification factor of 2.46 and a 50 ?m pixel pitch. A phase attenuation duality (PAD)-based phase retrieval algorithm that requires only a single phase contrast image was applied. Conventional digital mammography images were acquired at 27 kVp, 131 mAs and 28 kVp, 54 mAs. For the same radiation dose, both the observer study and SNR/FOM comparisons indicated a large improvement by the phase retrieved image as compared to the clinical system for the larger disk sizes, but the improvement was not enough to detect the smallest disks. Compared to the double dose image acquired with the clinical system, the observer study also indicated that the phase retrieved image provided improved detection capabilities for all disk sizes except the smallest disks. Thus the SNR improvement provided by phase contrast imaging is not yet enough to offset the noise reduction provided by the clinical system at the doubled dose level. However, the potential demonstrated by this study for high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging to improve lesion detection and reduce radiation dose in mammography warrants further investigation of this technique. PMID:24732108

  15. Dose and detectability improvements with high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging in comparison to low energy conventional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan Wong, Molly; Yan, Aimin; Ghani, Muhammad; Li, Yuhua; Fajardo, Laurie; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential benefits of using high energy x-rays for phase sensitive breast imaging through a comparison with conventional mammography imaging. We compared images of a contrast-detail phantom acquired on a prototype phase sensitive x-ray imaging system with images acquired on a commercial flat panel digital mammography unit. The phase contrast images were acquired using a micro-focus x-ray source with a 50 µm focal spot at 120 kVp and 4.5 mAs, with a magnification factor of 2.46 and a 50 µm pixel pitch. A phase attenuation duality-based phase retrieval algorithm that requires only a single phase contrast image was applied. Conventional digital mammography images were acquired at 27 kVp, 131 mAs and 28 kVp, 54 mAs. For the same radiation dose, both the observer study and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)/figure of merit comparisons indicated a large improvement by the phase retrieved image as compared to the clinical system for the larger disc sizes, but the improvement was not enough to detect the smallest discs. Compared to the double dose image acquired with the clinical system, the observer study also indicated that the phase retrieved image provided improved detection capabilities for all disc sizes except the smallest discs. Thus the SNR improvement provided by phase contrast imaging is not yet enough to offset the noise reduction provided by the clinical system at the doubled dose level. However, the potential demonstrated by this study for high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging to improve lesion detection and reduce radiation dose in mammography warrants further investigation of this technique.

  16. Development of a synthetic phase contrast imaging diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, J. C.; Lin, L.; Porkolab, M.

    2010-06-01

    A "synthetic diagnostic" has been developed to calculate the expected experimental response of phase contrast imaging (PCI), a scattering diagnostic used to measure density fluctuations in laboratory plasmas, to a tokamak discharge modeled with the GYRO nonlinear gyrokinetic code [J. Candy and R. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The synthetic PCI includes the spatial response of the experimental diagnostic, primarily implemented as a line integral of plasma density along the beam path, and the minimum and maximum wavenumber response resulting from the detection scheme. The synthetic PCI can be used for comparisons between GYRO and experiment as well as studies of the PCI response.

  17. Development of a synthetic phase contrast imaging diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Rost, J. C.; Lin, L.; Porkolab, M.

    2010-06-15

    A ''synthetic diagnostic'' has been developed to calculate the expected experimental response of phase contrast imaging (PCI), a scattering diagnostic used to measure density fluctuations in laboratory plasmas, to a tokamak discharge modeled with the GYRO nonlinear gyrokinetic code [J. Candy and R. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The synthetic PCI includes the spatial response of the experimental diagnostic, primarily implemented as a line integral of plasma density along the beam path, and the minimum and maximum wavenumber response resulting from the detection scheme. The synthetic PCI can be used for comparisons between GYRO and experiment as well as studies of the PCI response.

  18. Nuclear dynamics in metastatic cells studied by quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Silvia; Kandel, Mikhail; Sridharan, Shamira; Monroy, Freddy; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We used a new quantitative high spatiotemporal resolution phase imaging tool to explore the nuclear structure and dynamics of individual cells. We used a novel analysis tool to quantify the diffusion outside and inside the nucleus of live cells. We also obtained information about the nuclear spatio temporal mass density in metastatic cells. The results indicate that in the cytoplasm, the intracellular transport is mainly active (direct, deterministic), while inside the nucleus it is both active and passive (diffusive, random). We calculated the standard deviation of velocities in active transport and the diffusion coefficient for passive transport.

  19. Tomographic imaging of three-phase flow experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Wellington, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    The medical x-ray computerized tomography (CT) scanner has proved to be a useful tool for studies of fluid flow in porous media, with particular applications in reservoir engineering and enhanced oil recovery. This paper explains how CT is used to measure the volume fraction of pore space occupied by up to three discrete phases, such as oil, water, and gas. The image processing system, x-ray transparent high-pressure flow equipment, choice of fluid dopants, and x-ray energies are described for scanning of core flood experiments. Examples are given of tertiary miscible carbon dioxide displacements in Berea sandstone.

  20. 3D Cardiac microvessels embolization imaging based on X-ray phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The treatment of microcirculatory impairment will have great impact if it can be applied to myocardial infarction (MI) patients. The problem is how to study these tiny structures and microphenomenon in heart. Methods We investigated the visualization of cardiac microvessels embolization by the mean of X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI), which is a recently emerged imaging technique. Using the information of X-ray phase shift, it is sensitive to weak absorbing materials. Two MI SD rats were used as the microvessel embolization samples. MI was surgically induced by ligating left anterior descending artery. Imaging was performed 24 hours post-infarct, with barium sulfate as contrast agent. Results The coronary arteries were visualized with smooth walls and clear edges. The ligated vessels, with the diameter of about three hundred microns, can be clearly distinguished and there were no distal blood flow downstream from these branches. The results indicate that phase contrast imaging can directly demonstrate the distribution of microvessels, and estimate the area of MI. The infarct location was in good agreement with pathological analyses of the models. Conclusions The advantage of our method is directly observing and evaluating microvessel embolization which simplifies the procedure of diagnoses. Moreover, it is helpful for predicting the prognosis in MI and judging if angiogenesis happens. PMID:24886327

  1. Computational methods for microfluidic microscopy and phase-space imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegard, Nicolas Christian Richard

    Modern optical devices are made by assembling separate components such as lenses, objectives, and cameras. Traditionally, each part is optimized separately, even though the trade-offs typically limit the performance of the system overall. This component-based approach is particularly unfit to solve the new challenges brought by modern biology: 3D imaging, in vivo environments, and high sample throughput. In the first part of this thesis, we introduce a general method to design integrated optical systems. The laws of wave propagation, the performance of available technology, as well as other design parameters are combined as constraints into a single optimization problem. The solution provides qualitative design rules to improve optical systems as well as quantitative task-specific methods to minimize loss of information. Our results have applications in optical data storage, holography, and microscopy. The second part of this dissertation presents a direct application. We propose a more efficient design for wide-field microscopy with coherent light, based on double transmission through the sample. Historically, speckle noise and aberrations caused by undesired interferences have made coherent illumination unpopular for imaging. We were able to dramatically reduce speckle noise and unwanted interferences using optimized holographic wavefront reconstruction. The resulting microscope not only yields clear coherent images with low aberration---even in thick samples---but also increases contrast and enables optical filtering and in-depth sectioning. In the third part, we develop new imaging techniques that better respond to the needs of modern biology research through implementing optical design optimization. Using a 4D phase-space distribution, we first represent the state and propagation of incoherent light. We then introduce an additional degree of freedom by putting samples in motion in a microfluidic channel, increasing image diversity. From there, we develop a design that is minimally invasive yet optimizes the transfer of information from sample to detector. This optimization best responds to the desired imaging application. We present three microfluidic devices which can all be implemented as a compact add-on device for commercial microscopes. The first is a flow-scanning structured illumination microfluidic microscopy device demonstrating enhanced resolution in 2D. The second is a method for 3D deconvolution microscopy with a tilted channel to acquire and deconvolve gradually defocused images. Finally, we demonstrate optical projection microscopic tomography with simultaneous phase and intensity imaging capabilities in 3D by combining flow-scanning and optical acquisition in phase space. Experimental results utilize yeast cells as well as live C.elegans.. In the fourth part, we show that optical system optimization also has non-imaging applications such as solar cell engineering. Instead of looking for an optical setup that maximizes the transfer of information, we implement inexpensive surface wrinkles and folds in the layered structure of organic solar cells and optimize their surface density. This strategy enhances light trapping and further improves the electric conversion of solar energy.

  2. Understanding the Phase Contrast Optics to Restore Artifact-free Microscopy Images for Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaozheng; Kanade, Takeo; Chen, Mei

    2012-01-01

    Phase contrast, a noninvasive microscopy imaging technique, is widely used to capture time-lapse images to monitor the behavior of transparent cells without staining or altering them. Due to the optical principle, phase contrast microscopy images contain artifacts such as the halo and shade-off that hinder image segmentation, a critical step in automated microscopy image analysis. Rather than treating phase contrast microscopy images as general natural images and applying generic image processing techniques on them, we propose to study the optical properties of the phase contrast microscope to model its image formation process. The phase contrast imaging system can be approximated by a linear imaging model. Based on this model and input image properties, we formulate a regularized quadratic cost function to restore artifact-free phase contrast images that directly correspond to the specimen's optical path length. With artifacts removed, high quality segmentation can be achieved by simply thresholding the restored images. The imaging model and restoration method are quantitatively evaluated on microscopy image sequences with thousands of cells captured over several days. We also demonstrate that accurate restoration lays the foundation for high performance in cell detection and tracking. PMID:22386070

  3. Demonstration of magnetic field imaging in a permalloy film with neutron spin phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, H.; Yamazaki, Dai; Ebisawa, Toru; Maruyama, Ryuji; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Tasaki, Seiji; Hino, Masahiro; Matsubayashi, Masahito

    2011-04-01

    Recently, the neutron spin phase contrast (NSPC) imaging technique was performed using a neutron spin interferometer (NSI). An NSI enables us to measure the Larmor-precession of the neutron spin caused by the magnetic field in a magnetic object and provides magnetic field images in the object. We tried to visualize the magnetic field in a permalloy film with a varying external stress using an NSPC, for which the decay of the saturation magnetic field and the increment of the leak field with increasing stress were observed.

  4. Color image authentication scheme via multispectral photon-counting double random phase encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Inkyu

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of a color image authentication scheme via multispectral photon-counting (MPCI) double random phase encoding (DRPE). The MPCI makes image sparse distributed and DRPE lets image be stationary white noise which make intruder attacks difficult. In this method, the original RGB image is down-sampled into Bayer image and then be encrypted with DRPE. The encrypted image is photon-counted and transmitted on internet channel. For image authentication, the decrypted Bayer image is interpolated into RBC image with demosaicing algorithm. Experimental results show that the decrypted image is not visually recognized under low light level but can be verified with nonlinear correlation algorithm.

  5. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-02-18

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  6. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-02-01

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  7. Level 2 processing for the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: derivation and validation of temperature and trace gas volume mixing ratios from calibrated dynamics mode spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungermann, J.; Blank, J.; Dick, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Giez, A.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Jurkat, T.; Kaufmann, M.; Kaufmann, S.; Kleinert, A.; Krämer, M.; Latzko, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Olchewski, F.; Preusse, P.; Rolf, C.; Schillings, J.; Suminska-Ebersoldt, O.; Tan, V.; Thomas, N.; Voigt, C.; Zahn, A.; Zöger, M.; Riese, M.

    2015-06-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an airborne infrared limb imager combining a two-dimensional infrared detector with a Fourier transform spectrometer. It was operated aboard the new German Gulfstream G550 High Altitude LOng Range (HALO) research aircraft during the Transport And Composition in the upper Troposphere/lowermost Stratosphere (TACTS) and Earth System Model Validation (ESMVAL) campaigns in summer 2012. This paper describes the retrieval of temperature and trace gas (H2O, O3, HNO3) volume mixing ratios from GLORIA dynamics mode spectra that are spectrally sampled every 0.625 cm-1. A total of 26 integrated spectral windows are employed in a joint fit to retrieve seven targets using consecutively a fast and an accurate tabulated radiative transfer model. Typical diagnostic quantities are provided including effects of uncertainties in the calibration and horizontal resolution along the line of sight. Simultaneous in situ observations by the Basic Halo Measurement and Sensor System (BAHAMAS), the Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH), an ozone detector named Fairo, and the Atmospheric chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (AIMS) allow a validation of retrieved values for three flights in the upper troposphere/lowermost stratosphere region spanning polar and sub-tropical latitudes. A high correlation is achieved between the remote sensing and the in situ trace gas data, and discrepancies can to a large extent be attributed to differences in the probed air masses caused by different sampling characteristics of the instruments. This 1-D processing of GLORIA dynamics mode spectra provides the basis for future tomographic inversions from circular and linear flight paths to better understand selected dynamical processes of the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere.

  8. Level 2 processing for the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: derivation and validation of temperature and trace gas volume mixing ratios from calibrated dynamics mode spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungermann, J.; Blank, J.; Dick, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Giez, A.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Jurkat, T.; Kaufmann, M.; Kaufmann, S.; Kleinert, A.; Krämer, M.; Latzko, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Olchewski, F.; Preusse, P.; Rolf, C.; Schillings, J.; Suminska-Ebersoldt, O.; Tan, V.; Thomas, N.; Voigt, C.; Zahn, A.; Zöger, M.; Riese, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an airborne infrared limb-imager combining a two-dimensional infrared detector with a Fourier transform spectrometer. It was operated aboard the new German Gulfstream G550 research aircraft HALO during the Transport And Composition in the upper Troposphere/lowermost Stratosphere (TACTS) and Earth System Model Validation (ESMVAL) campaigns in summer 2012. This paper describes the retrieval of temperature and trace gas (H2O, O3, HNO3) volume mixing ratios from GLORIA dynamics mode spectra. 26 integrated spectral windows are employed in a joint fit to retrieve seven targets using consecutively a fast and an accurate tabulated radiative transfer model. Typical diagnostic quantities are provided including effects of uncertainties in the calibration and horizontal resolution along the line-of-sight. Simultaneous in-situ observations by the BAsic HALO Measurement And Sensor System (BAHAMAS), the Fast In-Situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH), FAIRO, and the Atmospheric chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (AIMS) allow a validation of retrieved values for three flights in the upper troposphere/lowermost stratosphere region spanning polar and sub-tropical latitudes. A high correlation is achieved between the remote sensing and the in-situ trace gas data, and discrepancies can to a large fraction be attributed to differences in the probed air masses caused by different sampling characteristics of the instruments. This 1-D processing of GLORIA dynamics mode spectra provides the basis for future tomographic inversions from circular and linear flight paths to better understand selected dynamical processes of the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere.

  9. Application of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging to the study of effects of age and dietary L-arginine on aortic lesion composition in cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Francesca; Cremers, Stephanie G; Weinberg, Peter D; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2009-08-01

    Diet-induced atherosclerotic lesions in the descending thoracic segment of rabbit aorta were analysed ex vivo by micro-attenuated total reflection (ATR)-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging. The distribution and chemical character of lipid deposits within the arterial wall near intercostal branch ostia were assessed in histological sections from immature and mature rabbits fed cholesterol with or without l-arginine supplements. Previous studies have shown that both these properties change with age in cholesterol-fed rabbits, putatively owing to changes in the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) from l-arginine. Immature animals developed lesions at the downstream margin of the branch ostium, whereas lipid deposition was observed at the lateral margins in mature animals. Dietary l-arginine supplements had beneficial effects in mature rabbit aorta, with overall disappearance of the plaques; on the other hand, they caused only a slight decrease of the lipid load in lesions at the downstream margin of the ostium in immature rabbits. ATR-FTIR imaging enabled differences in the lipid to protein density ratio of atherosclerotic lesions caused by age and diet to be visualized. Lipid deposits in immature rabbits showed higher relative absorbance values of their characteristic spectral bands compared with those in immature l-arginine-fed rabbits and mature rabbits. The multivariate methods of principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA) were employed, and relevant chemical and structural information were obtained. Two distinct protein constituents of the intima-media layer at different locations of the wall were identified using the method of FA. This approach provides a valuable means of investigating the structure and chemistry of complex heterogeneous systems. It has potential for in vivo diagnosis of pathology. PMID:18986964

  10. Major translocation of calcium upon epidermal barrier insult: imaging and quantification via FLIM/Fourier vector analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Susana; Barry, Nicholas P.; Kirschner, Nina; Meyer, Wilfried; Mauro, Theodora M.; Moll, Ingrid; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Calcium controls an array of key events in keratinocytes and epidermis: localized changes in Ca2+ concentrations and their regulation are therefore especially important to assess when observing epidermal barrier homeostasis and repair, neonatal barrier establishment, in differentiation, signaling, cell adhesion, and in various pathological states. Yet, tissue- and cellular Ca2+ concentrations in physiologic and diseased states are only partially known, and difficult to measure. Prior observations on the Ca2+ distribution in skin were based on Ca2+ precipitation followed by electron microscopy, or proton-induced X-ray emission. Neither cellular and/or subcellular localization could be determined through these approaches. In cells in vitro, fluorescent dyes have been used extensively for ratiometric measurements of static and dynamic Ca2+ concentrations, also assessing organelle Ca2+ concentrations. For lack of better methods, these findings together build the basis for the current view of the role of Ca2+ in epidermis, their limitations notwithstanding. Here we report a method using Calcium Green 5N as the calcium sensor and the phasor-plot approach to separate raw lifetime components. Thus, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) enables us to quantitatively assess and visualize dynamic changes of Ca2+ at light-microscopic resolution in ex vivo biopsies of unfixed epidermis, in close to in vivo conditions. Comparing undisturbed epidermis with epidermis following a barrier insult revealed major shifts, and more importantly, a mobilization of high amounts of Ca2+ shortly following barrier disruption, from intracellular stores. These results partially contradict the conventional view, where barrier insults abrogate a Ca2+ gradient towards the stratum granulosum. Ca2+ FLIM overcomes prior limitations in the observation of epidermal Ca2+ dynamics, and will allow further insights into basic epidermal physiology. PMID:21193994

  11. Fast Fourier transform telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Tegmark, Max; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2009-04-15

    We propose an all-digital telescope for 21 cm tomography, which combines key advantages of both single dishes and interferometers. The electric field is digitized by antennas on a rectangular grid, after which a series of fast Fourier transforms recovers simultaneous multifrequency images of up to half the sky. Thanks to Moore's law, the bandwidth up to which this is feasible has now reached about 1 GHz, and will likely continue doubling every couple of years. The main advantages over a single dish telescope are cost and orders of magnitude larger field-of-view, translating into dramatically better sensitivity for large-area surveys. The key advantages over traditional interferometers are cost (the correlator computational cost for an N-element array scales as Nlog{sub 2}N rather than N{sup 2}) and a compact synthesized beam. We argue that 21 cm tomography could be an ideal first application of a very large fast Fourier transform telescope, which would provide both massive sensitivity improvements per dollar and mitigate the off-beam point source foreground problem with its clean beam. Another potentially interesting application is cosmic microwave background polarization.

  12. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.; Vandergraft, J.; Blohm, M.; Porter, D.

    1993-08-01

    A geophysical data fusion methodology is under development to combine data from complementary geophysical sensors and incorporate geophysical understanding to obtain three dimensional images of the subsurface. The research reported here is the first phase of a three phase project. The project focuses on the characterization of thin clay lenses (aquitards) in a highly stratified sand and clay coastal geology to depths of up to 300 feet. The sensor suite used in this work includes time-domain electromagnetic induction (TDEM) and near surface seismic techniques. During this first phase of the project, enhancements to the acquisition and processing of TDEM data were studied, by use of simulated data, to assess improvements for the detection of thin clay layers. Secondly, studies were made of the use of compressional wave and shear wave seismic reflection data by using state-of-the-art high frequency vibrator technology. Finally, a newly developed processing technique, called ``data fusion,`` was implemented to process the geophysical data, and to incorporate a mathematical model of the subsurface strata. Examples are given of the results when applied to real seismic data collected at Hanford, WA, and for simulated data based on the geology of the Savannah River Site.

  13. Phase-aware projection model for steganalysis of JPEG images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Vojt?ch; Fridrich, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    State-of-the-art JPEG steganographic algorithms, such as J-UNIWARD, are currently better detected in the spatial domain rather than the JPEG domain. Rich models built from pixel residuals seem to better capture the impact of embedding than features constructed as co-occurrences of quantized JPEG coefficients. However, when steganalyzing JPEG steganographic algorithms in the spatial domain, the pixels' statistical properties vary because of the underlying 8 × 8 pixel grid imposed by the compression. In order to detect JPEG steganography more accurately, we split the statistics of noise residuals based on their phase w.r.t. the 8 × 8 grid. Because of the heterogeneity of pixels in a decompressed image, it also makes sense to keep the kernel size of pixel predictors small as larger kernels mix up qualitatively different statistics more, losing thus on the detection power. Based on these observations, we propose a novel feature set called PHase Aware pRojection Model (PHARM) in which residuals obtained using a small number of small-support kernels are represented using first-order statistics of their random projections as in the projection spatial rich model PSRM. The benefit of making the features "phase-aware" is shown experimentally on selected modern JPEG steganographic algorithms with the biggest improvement seen for J-UNIWARD. Additionally, the PHARM feature vector can be computed at a fraction of computational costs of existing projection rich models.

  14. USING PHASE AND MAGNITUDE INFORMATION OF THE COMPLEX DIRECTIONAL FILTER BANK FOR TEXTURE IMAGE RETRIEVAL

    E-print Network

    Oraintara, Soontorn

    USING PHASE AND MAGNITUDE INFORMATION OF THE COMPLEX DIRECTIONAL FILTER BANK FOR TEXTURE IMAGE, Fontainebleau, 77305 France ABSTRACT This paper discusses how to utilize both magnitude and phase in- formation images. This paper discusses how magnitude and phase information of the complex directional lter bank

  15. Recovery of image distorted by turbulent atmosphere using phase-conjugate image generated by difference frequency generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Xingquan; Hong, Pengda; Ding, Yujie J.

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate dynamic recovery of blurred images caused by atmospheric turbulence. In particular, using a phase-conjugate wave generated by a second-order nonlinear crystal or composite, we restore the original quality of the image after the optical radiation forming the image propagates through the turbulent atmosphere. One of the key elements for our experiment is a rotating phase plate being placed in the beam path for simulating turbulent atmosphere. Using the nonlinear composite, we demonstrate that the image recovery is insensitive to the polarization of the optical radiation forming the image.

  16. Simultaneous acquisition of dual analyser-based phase contrast X-ray images for small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Marcus J; Pavlov, Konstantin M; Hooper, Stuart B; Vine, David J; Siu, Karen K W; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L L; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; Lewis, Rob A

    2008-12-01

    Analyser-based phase contrast X-ray imaging can provide high-contrast images of biological tissues with exquisite sensitivity to the boundaries between tissues. The phase and absorption information can be extracted by processing multiple images acquired at different analyser orientations. Recording both the transmitted and diffracted beams from a thin Laue analyser crystal can make phase retrieval possible for dynamic systems by allowing full field imaging. This technique was used to image the thorax of a mechanically ventilated newborn rabbit pup using a 25 keV beam from the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The diffracted image was produced from the (111) planes of a 50 mm x 40 mm, 100 microm thick Si analyser crystal in the Laue geometry. The beam and analyser were large enough to image the entire chest, making it possible to observe changes in anatomy with high contrast and spatial resolution. PMID:18599236

  17. Shading For Fourier Volume Rendering Alireza Entezari1

    E-print Network

    Möller, Torsten

    Shading For Fourier Volume Rendering Alireza Entezari1 , Randy Scoggins2 , Torsten Möller1 , Raghu into Fourier Volume Rendering (FVR). The lack of adequate illumination has been one of the impediments on the rendered image and document speed and accuracy improve- ments. Keywords: Fourier Volume Rendering, Shading

  18. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    FTIR - 1 Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy FTIR DETERMINATION OF MTBE IN GASOLINE AND ETHANOL IN VODKA AND MOUTHWASH Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;FTIR - 2 Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

  19. Numerical simulation of phase images and depth reconstruction in pulsed phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Valle, Saul; Peters, Kara

    2015-11-01

    In this work we apply the finite element (FE) method to simulate the results of pulsed phase thermography experiments on laminated composite plates. Specifically, the goal is to simulate the phase component of reflected thermal waves and therefore verify the calculation of defect depth through the identification of the defect blind frequency. The calculation of phase components requires a higher spatial and temporal resolution than that of the calculation of the reflected temperature. An FE modeling strategy is presented, including the estimation of the defect thermal properties, which in this case is represented as a foam insert impregnated with epoxy resin. A comparison of meshing strategies using tetrahedral and hexahedral elements reveals that temperature errors in the tetrahedral results are amplified in the calculation of phase images and blind frequencies. Finally, we investigate the linearity of the measured diffusion length (based on the blind frequency) as a function of defect depth. The simulations demonstrate a nonlinear relationship between the defect depth and diffusion length, calculated from the blind frequency, consistent with previous experimental observations.

  20. Comparison of two x-ray phase-contrast imaging methods with a microfocus source

    E-print Network

    and implementation of a compact low-dose diffraction enhanced medical imaging system," Acad. Radiol. 16(8), 911-animal imaging: high-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation," Med. Phys. 40(2), 021909 (2013). 12. D

  1. Image quality comparison of high-energy phase contrast x-ray images with low-energy conventional images: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Molly; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2010-02-01

    A significant challenge in the field of mammography that has yet to be overcome involves providing adequate image quality for detection and diagnosis, while minimizing the radiation dose to the patient. An emerging x-ray technology, high energy phase contrast imaging holds the potential to reduce the patient dose without compromising the image quality, which would benefit the early detection of breast cancer. The purpose of this preliminary study was to compare the image quality of high energy phase contrast images to conventional x-ray images at typical mammography energies. The experimental settings were selected to provide similar entrance exposures for the high and low energy images. Several phantoms were utilized in this study to provide a comprehensive image quality comparison, in an effort to investigate the clinical potential of high energy phase contrast imaging. An ACR phantom was utilized for quantitative comparison through an observer study, while a new tissue-equivalent phantom was utilized for a qualitative investigation. Finally, an acrylic-edge phantom was employed to provide an illustration of the edge enhancement in the phase contrast images as compared to the conventional images. The results from the multi-faceted comparison indicate the potential of high energy phase contrast imaging to provide comparable image quality at a similar or decreased patient dose.

  2. Direct Imaging Searches with the Apodizing Phase Plate Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenworthy, M.; Meshkat, T.; Otten, , G.; Codona, J.

    2014-03-01

    The sensitivity of direct imaging searches for extrasolar planets is limited by the presence of diffraction rings from the primary star. Coronagraphs are angular filters that minimise these diffraction structures whilst allowing light from faint companions to shine through. The Apodizing Phase Plate (APP; Kenworthy 2007) coronagraph is a simple pupil plane optic that suppresses diffraction over a 180 degree region around each star simultaneously, providing easy beam switching observations and requiring no time consuming optical alignment at the telescope. We will present our results on using the APP at the Very Large Telescope in surveys for extrasolar planets around A/F and debris disk hosting stars in the L' band (3.8 microns) in the Southern Hemisphere, where we reach a contrast of 12 magnitudes at 0.5 arcseconds (Meshkat 2013). In Leiden, we are also developing the next generation of broadband achromatic coronagraphs that can simultaneously image both sides of the star using Vector APPs (Snik 2012, Otten 2012). Recent laboratory results showing the potential of this technology for future ELTs will also be presented.

  3. Three-dimensional Fourier domain optical coherence tomography in vivo imaging of alveolar tissue in the intact thorax using the parietal pleura as a window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Sven; Knels, Lilla; Schnabel, Christian; Koch, Thea; Koch, Edmund

    2010-01-01

    In vivo determination of 3-D and dynamic geometries of alveolar structures with adequate resolution is essential for developing numerical models of the lung. A thorax window is prepared in anesthetized rabbits by removal of muscle tissue between the third and fourth rib without harming the parietal pleura. The transparent parietal pleura allows contact-free imaging by intravital microscopy (IVM) and 3-D optical coherence tomography (3-D OCT). We demonstrate that dislocation of the lung surface is small enough to observe identical regions in the expiratory and inspiratory plateau phase, and that OCT in this animal model is suitable for generating 3-D geometry of in vivo lung parenchyma. To our knowledge, we present a novel thorax window preparation technique for 3-D imaging of alveolar dynamics for the first time. The 3-D datasets of the fine structure of the lung beneath the pleura could provide a basis for the development of 3-D numerical models of the lung.

  4. Quantitative phase imaging applied to laser damage detection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Douti, Dam-Bé L; Chrayteh, Mhamad; Aknoun, Sherazade; Doualle, Thomas; Hecquet, Christophe; Monneret, Serge; Gallais, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    We investigate phase imaging as a measurement method for laser damage detection and analysis of laser-induced modification of optical materials. Experiments have been conducted with a wavefront sensor based on lateral shearing interferometry associated with a high-magnification optical microscope. The system has been used for the in-line observation of optical thin films and bulk samples, laser irradiated in two different conditions: 500 fs pulses at 343 and 1030 nm, and millisecond to second irradiation with a CO2 laser at 10.6 ?m. We investigate the measurement of the laser-induced damage threshold of optical material by detection and phase changes and show that the technique realizes high sensitivity with different optical path measurements lower than 1 nm. Additionally, the quantitative information on the refractive index or surface modification of the samples under test that is provided by the system has been compared to classical metrology instruments used for laser damage or laser ablation characterization (an atomic force microscope, a differential interference contrast microscope, and an optical surface profiler). An accurate in-line measurement of the morphology of laser-ablated sites, from few nanometers to hundred microns in depth, is shown. PMID:26479612

  5. Evaluation of microbubble contrast agents for dynamic imaging with x-ray phase contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, T. P.; Endrizzi, M.; Everdell, N.; Rigon, L.; Arfelli, F.; Menk, R. H.; Stride, E.; Olivo, A.

    2015-07-01

    X-rays are commonly used as a means to image the inside of objects opaque to visible light, as their short wavelength allows penetration through matter and the formation of high spatial resolution images. This physical effect has found particular importance in medicine where x-ray based imaging is routinely used as a diagnostic tool. Increasingly, however, imaging modalities that provide functional as well as morphological information are required. In this study the potential to use x-ray phase based imaging as a functional modality through the use of microbubbles that can be targeted to specific biological processes is explored. We show that the concentration of a microbubble suspension can be monitored quantitatively whilst in flow using x-ray phase contrast imaging. This could provide the basis for a dynamic imaging technique that combines the tissue penetration, spatial resolution, and high contrast of x-ray phase based imaging with the functional information offered by targeted imaging modalities.

  6. Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging Microspectroscopy and Tissue-Level Mechanical Testing Reveal Intraspecies Variation in Mouse Bone Mineral and Matrix Composition

    PubMed Central

    Courtland, Hayden-William; Nasser, Philip; Goldstone, Andrew B.; Spevak, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L.; Jepsen, Karl J.

    2009-01-01

    Fracture susceptibility is heritable and dependent upon bone morphology and quality. However, studies of bone quality are typically overshadowed by emphasis on bone geometry and bone mineral density. Given that differences in mineral and matrix composition exist in a variety of species, we hypothesized that genetic variation in bone quality and tissue-level mechanical properties would also exist within species. Sixteen-week-old female A/J, C57BL/6J (B6), and C3H/HeJ (C3H) inbred mouse femora were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared imaging and tissue-level mechanical testing for variation in mineral composition, mineral maturity, collagen cross-link ratio, and tissue-level mechanical properties. A/J femora had an increased mineral-to-matrix ratio compared to B6. The C3H mineral-to-matrix ratio was intermediate of A/J and B6. C3H femora had reduced acid phosphate and carbonate levels and an increased collagen cross-link ratio compared to A/J and B6. Modulus values paralleled mineral-to-matrix values, with A/J femora being the most stiff, B6 being the least stiff, and C3H having intermediate stiffness. In addition, work-to-failure varied among the strains, with the highly mineralized and brittle A/J femora performing the least amount of work-to-failure. Inbred mice are therefore able to differentially modulate the composition of their bone mineral and the maturity of their bone matrix in conjunction with tissue-level mechanical properties. These results suggest that specific combinations of bone quality and morphological traits are genetically regulated such that mechanically functional bones can be constructed in different ways. PMID:18855037

  7. Imaging phase objects with square-root, Foucault, and Hoffman real filters: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Arkadiusz; Nowicki, Slawomir; Buczynski, Ryszard; Kowalczyk, Marek; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2003-10-01

    Methods of imaging phase objects are considered. First the square-root filter is inferred from a definition of fractional-order derivatives given in terms of the integration of a fractional order called the Riemann-Liouville integral. Then we present a comparison of the performance of three frequency-domain real filters: square root, Foucault, and Hoffman. The phase-object imaging method is useful as a phase-shift measurement technique under the condition that the output image intensity is a known function of object phase. For the square-root filter it is the first derivative of the object phase function. The Foucault filter, in spite of its position, gives output image intensities expressed by Hilbert transforms. The output image intensity obtained with the Hoffman filter is not expressed by an analytical formula. The performance of the filters in a 4f imaging system with coherent illumination is simulated by use of VirtualLab 1.0 software.

  8. 4D STEM: High efficiency phase contrast imaging using a fast pixelated detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Jones, L.; Ryll, H.; Simson, M.; Soltau, H.; Kondo, Y.; Sagawa, R.; Banba, H.; MacLaren, I.; Nellist, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    Phase contrast imaging is widely used for imaging beam sensitive and weak phase objects in electron microscopy. In this work we demonstrate the achievement of high efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using the pnCCD, a fast direct electron pixelated detector, which records the diffraction patterns at every probe position with a speed of 1000 to 4000 frames per second, forming a 4D STEM dataset simultaneously with the incoherent Z-contrast imaging. Ptychographic phase reconstruction has been applied and the obtained complex transmission function reveals the phase of the specimen. The results using GaN and Ti, Nd- doped BiFeO3 show that this imaging mode is especially powerful for imaging light elements in the presence of much heavier elements.

  9. Sparse Auto-Calibration for Radar Coincidence Imaging with Gain-Phase Errors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongqiang; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Radar coincidence imaging (RCI) is a high-resolution staring imaging technique without the limitation of relative motion between target and radar. The sparsity-driven approaches are commonly used in RCI, while the prior knowledge of imaging models needs to be known accurately. However, as one of the major model errors, the gain-phase error exists generally, and may cause inaccuracies of the model and defocus the image. In the present report, the sparse auto-calibration method is proposed to compensate the gain-phase error in RCI. The method can determine the gain-phase error as part of the imaging process. It uses an iterative algorithm, which cycles through steps of target reconstruction and gain-phase error estimation, where orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) and Newton's method are used, respectively. Simulation results show that the proposed method can improve the imaging quality significantly and estimate the gain-phase error accurately. PMID:26528981

  10. Quantitative photothermal phase imaging of red blood cells using digital holographic photothermal microscope.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Srivathsan; Chen, George C K; Lin, Zhiping; Ng, Beng Koon

    2015-05-10

    Photothermal microscopy (PTM), a noninvasive pump-probe high-resolution microscopy, has been applied as a bioimaging tool in many biomedical studies. PTM utilizes a conventional phase contrast microscope to obtain highly resolved photothermal images. However, phase information cannot be extracted from these photothermal images, as they are not quantitative. Moreover, the problem of halos inherent in conventional phase contrast microscopy needs to be tackled. Hence, a digital holographic photothermal microscopy technique is proposed as a solution to obtain quantitative phase images. The proposed technique is demonstrated by extracting phase values of red blood cells from their photothermal images. These phase values can potentially be used to determine the temperature distribution of the photothermal images, which is an important study in live cell monitoring applications. PMID:25967505

  11. Limitations imposed by specimen phase gradients on the design of grating based x-ray phase contrast imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, Peter R. T.; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2010-07-10

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is a very promising technique that may lead to significant advancements in a variety of fields, perhaps most notably, medical imaging. The radiation physics group at University College London is currently developing an x-ray phase contrast imaging technique that works with laboratory x-ray sources. This system essentially measures the degree to which photons are refracted by regions of an imaged object. The amount of refraction that may be expected to be encountered in practice impacts strongly upon the design of the imaging system. In this paper, we derive an approximate expression between the properties of archetypal imaged objects encountered in practice and the resulting distribution of refracted photons. This is used to derive constraints governing the design of the system.

  12. Understanding brownout using dual-phase particle image velocimetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydney, Anish Joshua

    To better understand the development of brownout dust clouds generated by rotor- craft, the dual-phase flow environment produced by one- and two-bladed laboratory-scale rotors operating over a mobile sediment bed were studied. Three size ranges of characterized glass microspheres were used to represent the sediment particles. Time-resolved flow visualization, particle image velocimetry, and particle tracking velocimetry were used to make the flow measurements. The high imaging rate of these systems allowed the time-history of the rotor wake interactions with the sediment bed to be documented, providing a better understanding of the transient processes and mechanisms that lead to the uplift of sediment and the formation of dust clouds near a rotor in ground effect operation. In particular, the fluid dynamics of the blade tip vortices near the bed were examined in detail, which were shown to have a primary influence on the mobilization of sediment. In general, the near-wall measurements documented at least five fundamental uplift and sediment transport mechanisms below the rotor: 1. Creep, 2. Modified saltation and saltation bombardment, 3. Vortex induced trapping, 4. Reingestion bombardment (local and global), and 5. Secondary suspension. In addition, a further mechanism related to the local unsteady pressure field induced by the convecting wake vortices was hypothesized to contribute to the uplift of sediment. The highest sediment entrainment levels occurred within the wake impingement zone, mainly from the erosion aspects of the tip vortices on the bed. Once entrained, significant quantities of sediment were intermittently trapped in the vortex-induced upwash field. Secondary sediment suspension was found to be more prevalent with the two-bladed rotor because of the propensity for merging of adjacent blade tip vortices and the resulting higher upwash velocities. The trapping of suspended sediment particles into the vortex flow was shown to cause recirculation of the particles back onto the sediment bed, thereby ejecting more sediment through bombardment mechanisms.

  13. Explicit Fourier wavefield operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, R. J.; Margrave, G. F.

    2006-04-01

    Explicit wavefield extrapolators are based on direct analytic mathematical formulae that express the output as an extrapolation operator acting on the input, while implicit methods usually require the calculation of the numerical inverse of a matrix to obtain the output. Typically, explicit methods are faster than implicit methods, and they often give more insight into the physics of the wave propagation, but they often suffer from instability. Four different explicit extrapolators based on Fourier theory are presented and analysed. They are: PS (ordinary phase shift), GPSPI (generalized phase shift plus interpolation), NSPS (non-stationary phase shift) and SNPS (symmetric non-stationary phase shift). A formal proof is given that NSPS in a direction orthogonal to the velocity gradient is the mathematical adjoint process to GPSPI in the opposite direction. This motivates the construction of SNPS that combines NSPS and GPSPI in a symmetric fashion. This symmetry (under interchange of input and output lateral coordinates) is required by reciprocity arguments. PS and SNPS are symmetric while NSPS and GPSPI are not. A numerical stability study using SVD (singular value decomposition) shows that all of these extrapolators can become unstable for strong lateral velocity gradients. Unstable operators allow amplitudes to grow non-physically in a recursion. Stability is enhanced by introducing a small (~3 per cent) imaginary component to the velocities. This causes a numerical attenuation that tends to stabilize the operators but does not address the cause of the instability. For the velocity model studied (a very challenging case) GPSPI and NSPS have exactly the same instability while SNPS is always more stable. Instability manifests in a complicated way as a function of extrapolation step size, frequency, velocity gradient, and strength of numerical attenuation. The SNPS operator can be stabilized over a wide range of conditions with considerably less attenuation than is required for NSPS or GPSPI.

  14. Broadband stimulated Raman scattering with Fourier-transform detection.

    PubMed

    Réhault, Julien; Crisafi, Francesco; Kumar, Vikas; Ciardi, Gustavo; Marangoni, Marco; Cerullo, Giulio; Polli, Dario

    2015-09-21

    We propose a new approach to broadband Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) spectroscopy and microscopy based on time-domain Fourier transform (FT) detection of the stimulated Raman gain (SRG) spectrum. We generate two phase-locked replicas of the Stokes pulse after the sample using a passive birefringent interferometer and measure by the FT technique both the Stokes and the SRG spectra. Our approach blends the very high sensitivity of single-channel lock-in balanced detection with the spectral coverage and resolution afforded by FT spectroscopy. We demonstrate our method by measuring the SRG spectra of different compounds and performing broadband SRS imaging on inorganic blends. PMID:26406721

  15. IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION FROM PHASED-ARRAY MRI DATA BASED ON MULTICHANNEL BLIND DECONVOLUTION

    E-print Network

    Chen, Rong-Rong

    IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION FROM PHASED-ARRAY MRI DATA BASED ON MULTICHANNEL BLIND DECONVOLUTION Huajun sensitivity functions. A new framework based on multichannel blind deconvolution (MBD) is developed for joint deconvolution, regularization, image restoration 1. INTRODUCTION MRI using phased array coils [1] have emerged

  16. Real-time coherent phased array image synthesis and atmospheric compensation testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiker, Jeffrey J.; Miller, Nicholas J.; Whiteley, Matthew R.

    2012-06-01

    Developments in imaging technology for aircraft-based systems are moving in the direction of sparse, dis- tributed aperture arrays which are conformal to the shape of the air vehicle. These modular arrays can provide resolution capabilities similar to large monolithic telescope apertures without the associated weight and required aircraft structural modications. A key challenge of such a system is to accomplish the imaging function without requiring an elaborate optical relay system to bring the receive channels together on a single focal plane array (FPA). To overcome this challenge, phased array imaging systems rely on coherent imaging through holographic detection of the complex optical eld such as spatial-heterodyne imaging, which requires a digital processor to synthesize the combined imagery. This approach also allows atmospheric compensation to be included digitally in the image synthesis processing thereby eliminating any latencies due to phase modulation hardware in the subaperture module. To support testing of phased array imaging systems, we have constructed a GPU-based image processor capable of real-time (1 kHz) image synthesis including low-order atmospheric compensation. Using this processor and the IMAGE testbed at UD/LOCI, we demonstrate the eectiveness of our processor and phasing algorithm during scaled testing of a Hex-7 aperture array. We show image synthesis and compensa- tion results from laboratory testing where atmospheric turbulence eects have been induced with phase wheels at varying positions along the propagation path.

  17. Retrofit implementation of Zernike phase plate imaging for cryo-TEM

    PubMed Central

    Marko, Michael; Leith, ArDean; Hsieh, Chyongere; Danev, Radostin

    2011-01-01

    In-focus phase-plate imaging is particularly beneficial for cryo-TEM because it offers a substantial overall increase in image contrast, without an electron dose penalty, and it simplifies image interpretation. We show how phase-plate cryo-TEM can be implemented with an appropriate existing TEM, and provide a basic practical introduction to use of thin-film (carbon) phase plates. We point out potential pitfalls of phase-plate operation, and discuss solutions. We provide information on evaluating a particular TEM for its suitability. PMID:21272647

  18. Three-dimensional phase-contrast imaging of single floating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Ishimaru, Ichirou; Yasokawa, Toshiki; Ishizaki, Katsumi; Kuriyama, Shigeki; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nakai, Seiji; Takegawa, Kaoru; Tanaka, Naotaka

    2006-12-11

    A three-dimensional phase-contrast imaging technique that does not involve fluorescent labeling has been developed for observing floating cells. In this method, a single floating cell is made to rotate and images are acquired at several orientations of the cell using a phase-contrast microscope. From these two-dimensional phase-contrast images, three-dimensional cross-sectional images are obtained using the conventional computed tomography algorithm. This proposed method enabled successful rotation of a floating cell (a breast cancer cell line) and reconstruction of three-dimensional phase-contrast images. In these reconstructed three-dimensional images, the distribution of cell organelles is obtained and the cell nucleus is clearly distinguishable.

  19. Process for rapid detection of fratricidal defects on optics using Linescan Phase Differential Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ravizza, F L; Nostrand, M C; Kegelmeyer, L M; Hawley, R A; Johnson, M A

    2009-11-05

    Phase-defects on optics used in high-power lasers can cause light intensification leading to laser-induced damage of downstream optics. We introduce Linescan Phase Differential Imaging (LPDI), a large-area dark-field imaging technique able to identify phase-defects in the bulk or surface of large-aperture optics with a 67 second scan-time. Potential phase-defects in the LPDI images are indentified by an image analysis code and measured with a Phase Shifting Diffraction Interferometer (PSDI). The PSDI data is used to calculate the defects potential for downstream damage using an empirical laser-damage model that incorporates a laser propagation code. A ray tracing model of LPDI was developed to enhance our understanding of its phase-defect detection mechanism and reveal limitations.

  20. Journal of Power Sources 160 (2006) 10171025 Gas-phase particle image velocimetry (PIV) for application

    E-print Network

    Mench, Matthew M.

    2006-01-01

    Journal of Power Sources 160 (2006) 1017­1025 Gas-phase particle image velocimetry (PIV fields have been measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in representative geometries, including in operational cells. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Particle image velocimetry; PIV; Flow

  1. Color-coded LED microscopy for multi-contrast and quantitative phase-gradient imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Uihan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-contrast microscope based on color-coded illumination and computation. A programmable three-color light-emitting diode (LED) array illuminates a specimen, in which each color corresponds to a different illumination angle. A single color image sensor records light transmitted through the specimen, and images at each color channel are then separated and utilized to obtain bright-field, dark-field, and differential phase contrast (DPC) images simultaneously. Quantitative phase imaging is also achieved based on DPC images acquired with two different LED illumination patterns. The multi-contrast and quantitative phase imaging capabilities of our method are demonstrated by presenting images of various transparent biological samples. PMID:26713205

  2. Color-coded LED microscopy for multi-contrast and quantitative phase-gradient imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Uihan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-12-01

    We present a multi-contrast microscope based on color-coded illumination and computation. A programmable three-color light-emitting diode (LED) array illuminates a specimen, in which each color corresponds to a different illumination angle. A single color image sensor records light transmitted through the specimen, and images at each color channel are then separated and utilized to obtain bright-field, dark-field, and differential phase contrast (DPC) images simultaneously. Quantitative phase imaging is also achieved based on DPC images acquired with two different LED illumination patterns. The multi-contrast and quantitative phase imaging capabilities of our method are demonstrated by presenting images of various transparent biological samples. PMID:26713205

  3. Fourier Series Operating Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnow, Milton L.

    1961-01-01

    This report presents a computer program for multiplying, adding, differentiating, integrating, "barring" and scalarly multiplying "literal" Fourier series as such, and for extracting the coefficients of specified terms.

  4. Optical Flow and Phase Portrait Methods for Environmental Satellite Image Sequences

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Issac

    Optical Flow and Phase Portrait Methods for Environmental Satellite Image Sequences Isaac COHEN deals with the interpretation of the obtained displacement field. We use a phase portrait model polynomial phase portrait models for characterizing salient flow features. This new framework is used

  5. Phase-field Modeling of Microstructures Rapid Image-Based Calculation

    E-print Network

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Phase-field Modeling of Microstructures and Rapid Image-Based Calculation of Stress-Strain Curve Third International Symposium on Phase-field Method (PFM-2014), The Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel and Engineering Toshiyuki Koyama #12;Phase-field method (Direct calculation of microstructure morphologies

  6. SLM-based off-axis Fourier filtering in microscopy with white light illumination.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Ruth; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2012-07-01

    In various microscopy applications spatial light modulators (SLMs) are used as programmable Fourier filters to realize different optical contrast enhancement methods. It is often advantageous to use the SLM in off-axis configuration, where the filtered image wave is sent into the first diffraction order of a blazed grating superposed to the phase mask on the SLM. Because of dispersion this approach is, however, typically limited to spectrally narrowband illumination. Here we suggest a method involving a grating for pre-compensation, which allows one to use spectrally broadband (even thermal) light in SLM-based Fourier filtering. The proposed approach is demonstrated by multicolor imaging of amplitude and phase objects, such as a resolution target, onion epidermal cells and human epithelial cheek cells. PMID:22772234

  7. H-ATLAS: PACS imaging for the Science Demonstration Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibar, Edo; Ivison, R. J.; Cava, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Buttiglione, S.; Temi, P.; Frayer, D.; Fritz, J.; Leeuw, L.; Baes, M.; Rigby, E.; Verma, A.; Serjeant, S.; Müller, T.; Auld, R.; Dariush, A.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Maddox, S.; Panuzzo, P.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Smith, D.; de Zotti, G.; Vaccari, M.; Hopwood, R.; Cooray, A.; Burgarella, D.; Jarvis, M.

    2010-11-01

    We describe the reduction of data taken with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory in the Science Demonstration Phase of the Herschel-ATLAS (H-ATLAS) survey, specifically data obtained for a 4 × 4 deg2 region using Herschel's fast-scan (60arcsecs-1) parallel mode. We describe in detail a pipeline for data reduction using customized procedures within HIPE from data retrieval to the production of science-quality images. We found that the standard procedure for removing cosmic ray glitches also removed parts of bright sources and so implemented an effective two-stage process to minimize these problems. The pronounced 1/f noise is removed from the timelines using 3.4- and 2.5-arcmin boxcar high-pass filters at 100 and 160?m. Empirical measurements of the point spread function (PSF) are used to determine the encircled energy fraction as a function of aperture size. For the 100- and 160-?m bands, the effective PSFs are ~9 and ~13arcsec (FWHM), and the 90-per cent encircled energy radii are 13 and 18arcsec. Astrometric accuracy is good to <~2arcsec. The noise in the final maps is correlated between neighbouring pixels and rather higher than advertised prior to launch. For a pair of cross-scans, the 5? point-source sensitivities are 125-165mJy for 9-13 arcsec radius apertures at 100?m and 150-240mJy for 13-18 arcsec radius apertures at 160?m.

  8. Wavelets and Fourier Transforms, WISM453 Part 1: Fourier Theory

    E-print Network

    Sleijpen, Gerard

    Wavelets and Fourier Transforms, WISM453 Part 1: Fourier Theory G.L.G. Sleijpen Department of Mathematics Utrecht University August 18, 2008 1 #12;i Preface Fourier Theory belongs to the basic who works in such a field should feel comfortable with Fourier transforms. But Fourier The- ory also

  9. ContentsContents2424Fourier 1. The Fourier transform

    E-print Network

    Vickers, James

    ContentsContents2424Fourier transforms 1. The Fourier transform 2. Properties of the Fourier Transform 3. Some Special Fourier Transform Pairs Learning outcomes needs doing Time allocation You mathematical topics this time may vary considerably. 1 #12;The Fourier Transform 24.1 Introduction

  10. Fourier plane filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, D. S.; Aldrich, R. E.; Krol, F. T.

    1972-01-01

    An electrically addressed liquid crystal Fourier plane filter capable of real time optical image processing is described. The filter consists of two parts: a wedge filter having forty 9 deg segments and a ring filter having twenty concentric rings in a one inch diameter active area. Transmission of the filter in the off (transparent) state exceeds fifty percent. By using polarizing optics, contrast as high as 10,000:1 can be achieved at voltages compatible with FET switching technology. A phenomenological model for the dynamic scattering is presented for this special case. The filter is designed to be operated from a computer and is addressed by a seven bit binary word which includes an on or off command and selects any one of the twenty rings or twenty wedge pairs. The overall system uses addressable latches so that once an element is in a specified state, it will remain there until a change of state command is received. The drive for the liquid crystal filter is ? 30 V peak at 30 Hz to 70 Hz. These parameters give a rise time for the scattering of 20 msec and a decay time of 80 to 100 msec.

  11. Phase-preserving beam expander for biomedical X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Mercedes; Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Gomez, Ariel; Chapman, Dean

    2015-01-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source are used by many researchers to capture phase-based imaging data. These experiments have so far been limited by the small vertical beam size, requiring vertical scanning of biological samples in order to image their full vertical extent. Previous work has been carried out to develop a bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator for use at these beamlines. However, the first attempts exhibited significant distortion in the diffraction plane, increasing the beam divergence and eliminating the usefulness of the monochromator for phase-related imaging techniques. Recent work has been carried out to more carefully match the polychromatic and geometric focal lengths in a so-called ‘magic condition’ that preserves the divergence of the beam and enables full-field phase-based imaging techniques. The new experimental parameters, namely asymmetry and Bragg angles, were evaluated by analysing knife-edge and in-line phase images to determine the effect on beam divergence in both vertical and horizontal directions, using the flat Bragg double-crystal monochromator at the beamline as a baseline. The results show that by using the magic condition, the difference between the two monochromator types is less than 10% in the diffraction plane. Phase fringes visible in test images of a biological sample demonstrate that this difference is small enough to enable in-line phase imaging, despite operating at a sub-optimal energy for the wafer and asymmetry angle that was used. PMID:25931100

  12. Phase II trials in heart failure: The role of cardiovascular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sanjiv J.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Lang, Roberto M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of new therapies for heart failure (HF), especially acute HF, has proven to be quite challenging; and therapies evaluated in HF have greatly outnumbered treatments that are eventually successful in obtaining regulatory approval. Thus, the development of therapies for HF remains a vexing problem for pharmaceutical and device companies, clinical trialists, and health care professionals. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the phase II HF clinical trial, in which the goal is to determine whether an investigational agent should move forward to a phase III trial. Recent advancements in noninvasive cardiovascular imaging have allowed a new era of comprehensive phenotyping of cardiac structure and function in phase II HF trials. Besides using imaging parameters to predict success of subsequent phase III outcome studies, it is essential to also use imaging in phase II HF trials in a way that increases understanding of drug or device mechanism. Determination of the patients who would benefit most from a particular drug or device could decrease heterogeneity of phase III trial participants and lead to more successful HF clinical trials. In this review, we outline advantages and disadvantages of imaging various aspects of cardiac structure and function that are potential targets for therapy in HF, compare and contrast imaging modalities, provide practical advice for the use of cardiovascular imaging in drug development, and conclude with some novel uses of cardiac imaging in phase II HF trials. PMID:21742085

  13. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A; Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography. PMID:26315891

  14. High-Speed X-ray Phase Imaging with Grating Interferometer and White Synchrotron Light

    SciTech Connect

    Momose, Atsushi; Yashiro, Wataru; Huang, Shaohua; Kuwabara, Hiroaki; Kawabata, Katsuyuki

    2010-06-23

    Taking advantage of the fact that an X-ray Talbot interferometer functions with X-rays of a broad energy band width, high-speed X-ray phase imaging and tomography have been achieved by using white synchrotron light. An X-ray phase tomogram could be measured with a 0.25 s exposure. Furthermore, a series of X-ray phase tomograms, in other words, a four-dimensional X-ray phase tomogram, could be reconstructed with a tomogram frame rate of 25.5 fps. This achievement advances X-ray phase imaging/tomography from a technique for static imaging to one for dynamic imaging of weakly absorbing objects.

  15. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A.; Harmon, Katherine J.; Bennett, Eric E.; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A.; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-08-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography.

  16. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A.; Harmon, Katherine J.; Bennett, Eric E.; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A.; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography. PMID:26315891

  17. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2003-03-01

    This paper gives a short account of some key elements in the life of Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768-1830), specifically his relation to Napoleon Bonaparte. The mathematical approach to Fourier series and the original scepticism by French mathematicians are briefly illustrated.

  18. Fourier Series Optimization Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    This note discusses the introduction of Fourier series as an immediate application of optimization of a function of more than one variable. Specifically, it is shown how the study of Fourier series can be motivated to enrich a multivariable calculus class. This is done through discovery learning and use of technology wherein students build the…

  19. Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. Methods: The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Results: Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. Conclusions: The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  20. Recent developments on techniques for differential phase imaging at the medical beamline of ELETTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfelli, F.; Pelliccia, D.; Cedola, A.; Astolfo, A.; Bukreeva, I.; Cardarelli, P.; Dreossi, D.; Lagomarsino, S.; Longo, R.; Rigon, L.; Sodini, N.; Menk, R. H.

    2013-06-01

    Over the last decade different phase contrast approaches have been exploited at the medical beamline SYRMEP of the synchrotron radiation facility Elettra in Trieste, Italy. In particular special focus has been drawn to analyzer based imaging and the associated imaging theory and processing. Analyzer based Imaging (ABI) and Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) techniques have been successfully applied in several biomedical applications. Recently it has been suggested to translate the acquired knowledge in this field towards a Thomson Backscattering Source (TBS), which is presently under development at the Frascati National Laboratories of INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) in Rome, Italy. Such source is capable of producing intense and quasi-monochromatic hard X-ray beams. For the technical implementation of biomedical phase imaging at the TBS a grating interferometer for differential phase contrast imaging has been designed and successfully tested at SYRMEP beamline.

  1. Phase Sensitive Cueing for 3D Objects in Overhead Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D

    2005-02-04

    Locating specific 3D objects in overhead images is an important problem in many remote sensing applications. 3D objects may contain either one connected component or multiple disconnected components. Solutions must accommodate images acquired with diverse sensors at various times of the day, in various seasons of the year, or under various weather conditions. Moreover, the physical manifestation of a 3D object with fixed physical dimensions in an overhead image is highly dependent on object physical dimensions, object position/orientation, image spatial resolution, and imaging geometry (e.g., obliqueness). This paper describes a two-stage computer-assisted approach for locating 3D objects in overhead images. In the matching stage, the computer matches models of 3D objects to overhead images. The strongest degree of match over all object orientations is computed at each pixel. Unambiguous local maxima in the degree of match as a function of pixel location are then found. In the cueing stage, the computer sorts image thumbnails in descending order of figure-of-merit and presents them to human analysts for visual inspection and interpretation. The figure-of-merit associated with an image thumbnail is computed from the degrees of match to a 3D object model associated with unambiguous local maxima that lie within the thumbnail. This form of computer assistance is invaluable when most of the relevant thumbnails are highly ranked, and the amount of inspection time needed is much less for the highly ranked thumbnails than for images as a whole.

  2. High-speed quantitative interferometric microscopy based phase imaging cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Sun, Nan; Yan, Keding; Liu, Fei; Wang, Shouyu

    2014-11-01

    The paper proposed a simple large scale bio-sample phase detecting equipment called gravity driven phase detecting cytometer, which is based on quantitative interferometric microscopy to realize flowing red blood cells phase distribution detection. The method has advantages on high throughput phase detecting and statistical analysis with high detecting speed and in real-time. The statistical characteristics of red blood cells are useful for biological analysis and disease detection. We believe this method is shedding more light on quantitatively measurement of the phase distribution of bio-samples.

  3. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

  4. Non-interferometer Phase-differential Imaging Method with a Single Telescope Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    Non-interferometer phase-differential imaging method for direct imaging of the astronomical objects will be presented. The feasibility of non-interferometry method to retrieve the phase differential images of the astronomical objects is demonstrated in the laboratory experiments exploiting the two-dimensional Foucault knife-edge filtering method which is installed on a single telescope. The experiment setup is essentially analogous to the Schlieren imaging apparatus that can be taken images using an incoherent light source. The fractional derivation filtering by the two-dimensional knife-edge filter is developed in order to acquire the phase information of the object. The intensities of filtering images by the 2D knife-edge at several points along the optical axis of the telescope are substituted in the transport-intensity equation to obtain phase-differential images of the astronomical objects. Then the phase-differential images are obtained by two image intensities taken along the optical axis. In our experiment, a mono-directional scanning scheme of the 2DFK was exploited to reduce number of scan as well as increase the spatial resolution of images. An illuminated light out of a bundle of optical fibers as an artificial astronomical object is used our laboratory based experiment. The light from the each optical fibers in the fiber bundle that intensities have exiguously different or barely visible are represented the brightness of the astronomical objects. The experiment result, the phase contrast images, shows that barely identified object from an intensity based image has rendered almost equivalent contrast as the bright object. It represents that our proposed method can be recovered from phase difference of the object light that could not be identified from the intensity of objects brightness. The proposed method has a feature of render phase-differential images as well as compensates atmospheric turbulence with the setup mounting on a single-telescope. The presentation will be described the scheme of the non-interferometer phase-differential imaging and the image recovery process for the astronomical applications.

  5. Increasing the darkfield contrast-to-noise ratio using a deconvolution-based information retrieval algorithm in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Pelzer, Georg; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Zang, Andrea; Durst, Jürgen; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

    2013-07-29

    A novel information retrieval algorithm for X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging based on the deconvolution of the object and the reference phase stepping curve (PSC) as proposed by Modregger et al. was investigated in this paper. We applied the method for the first time on data obtained with a polychromatic spectrum and compared the results to those, received by applying the commonly used method, based on a Fourier analysis. We confirmed the expectation, that both methods deliver the same results for the absorption and the differential phase image. For the darkfield image, a mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) increase by a factor of 1.17 using the new method was found. Furthermore, the dose saving potential was estimated for the deconvolution method experimentally. It is found, that for the conventional method a dose which is higher by a factor of 1.66 is needed to obtain a similar CNR value compared to the novel method. A further analysis of the data revealed, that the improvement in CNR and dose efficiency is due to the superior background noise properties of the deconvolution method, but at the cost of comparability between measurements at different applied dose values, as the mean value becomes dependent on the photon statistics used. PMID:23938672

  6. Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography imaging of the tissue motion within the organ of Corti at a subnanometer scale: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruikang K.; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2010-09-01

    Hearing loss can mean severe impairment to the quality of life. However, the biomechanical mechanisms of how the hearing organ, i.e., the organ of Corti (OC), responds to sound are still elusive, largely because there is currently no means available to image the 3-D motion characteristics of the OC. We present a novel use of the phase-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) to characterize the motion of cellular compartments within the OC at a subnanometer scale. The PSOCT system operates at 1310 nm with a spatial resolution of ~16 ?m and an imaging speed of 47,000 A-lines/s. The phase changes of the spectral interferograms induced by the localized tissue motion are used to quantify the vibration magnitude. Fourier transform analysis of the phase changes improves the system sensitivity to sense minute vibrations smaller than 1 nm. We demonstrate that the PSOCT system is feasible to image the meaningful vibration of cellular compartments within the OC with an unprecedented sensitivity down to ~0.5 A?.

  7. Analysis of moire fringes by Wiener filtering: An extension to the Fourier method

    SciTech Connect

    Harasse, Sebastien; Yashiro, Wataru; Momose, Atsushi

    2012-07-31

    In X-ray Talbot interferometry, tilting the phase grating with respect to the absorption grating results in the formation of spatial fringes. The analysis of this moire pattern, classically performed by the Fourier method, allows the extraction of the sample phase shift information from a single image. In this context, an extension to the Fourier method is proposed. The filter used to extract the fringe information is chosen optimally in the least-squares sense, given models for the zeroth and first order modes, noise and the modulation transfer function. The latter is obtained by measuring the detector response to moire fringes with increasing frequencies. The obtained Wiener filter allows a better reconstruction of the phase information at all fringe frequencies, compared to the usual box or gaussian filters. This is demonstrated quantitatively by experiments using synchrotron radiation.

  8. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-31

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  9. Digital image profilers for detecting faint sources which have bright companions, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Elena; Flint, Graham

    1991-01-01

    A breadboard image profiling system developed for the first phase of this project demonstrated the potential for detecting extremely faint optical sources in the presence of light companions. Experimental data derived from laboratory testing of the device supports the theory that image profilers of this type may approach the theoretical limit imposed by photon statistics. The objective of Phase 2 of this program is the development of a ground-based multichannel image profiling system capable of detecting faint stellar objects slightly displaced from brighter stars. We have finalized the multichannel image profiling system and attempted three field tests.

  10. Microscopy imaging and quantitative phase contrast mapping in turbid microfluidic channels by digital holography.

    PubMed

    Paturzo, Melania; Finizio, Andrea; Memmolo, Pasquale; Puglisi, Roberto; Balduzzi, Donatella; Galli, Andrea; Ferraro, Pietro

    2012-09-01

    We show that sharp imaging and quantitative phase-contrast microcopy is possible in microfluidics in flowing turbid media by digital holography. In fact, in flowing liquids with suspended colloidal particles, clear vision is hindered and cannot be recovered by any other microscopic imaging technique. On the contrary, using digital holography, clear imaging is possible thanks to the Doppler frequency shift experienced by the photons scattered by the flowing colloidal particles, which do not contribute to the interference process, i.e. the recorded hologram. The method is illustrated and imaging results are demonstrated for pure phase objects, i.e. biological cells in microfluidic channels. PMID:22740323

  11. A study to analyze six band multispectral images and fabricate a Fourier transform detector. [optical data processing - aerial photography/forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, R. G.; Walsh, J. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An automatic Fourier transform diffraction pattern sampling system, used to investigate techniques for forestry classification of six band multispectral aerial photography is presented. Photographs and diagrams of the design, development and fabrication of a hybrid optical-digital Fourier transform detector are shown. The detector was designed around a concentric ring fiber optic array. This array was formed from many optical fibers which were sorted into concentric rings about a single fiber. All the fibers in each ring were collected into a bundle and terminated into a single photodetector. An optical/digital interface unit consisting of a high level multiplexer, and an analog-to-digital amplifier was also constructed and is described.

  12. LOW COST IMAGER FOR POLLUTANT GAS LEAK DETECTION - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Infrared (IR) imaging is the best method for detecting leaks of pollutant gases, but current technology based on cooled IR imagers is far too expensive ($75,000 to $150,000) for everyday field use by those who need it to meet regulatory limits—electric and petrochemical ...

  13. A Short Biography of Joseph Fourier and Historical Development of Fourier Series and Fourier Transforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with a brief biographical sketch of Joseph Fourier, his first celebrated work on analytical theory of heat, his first great discovery of Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Included is a historical development of Fourier series and Fourier transforms with their properties, importance and applications. Special emphasis is made…

  14. Claude Sabbah FOURIER TRANSFORMATION AND

    E-print Network

    Sabbah, Claude

    Claude Sabbah FOURIER TRANSFORMATION AND STOKES STRUCTURES CHICAGO, MAY 2012 WORK IN PROGRESS, 2013 #12;FOURIER TRANSFORMATION AND STOKES STRUCTURES CHICAGO, MAY 2012 WORK IN PROGRESS (VERSION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1. Fourier transformation: some analogies between arithmetic and complex algebraic geometry

  15. High speed moire based phase retrieval method for quantitative phase imaging of thin objects without phase unwrapping or aberration compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouyu; Yan, Keding; Xue, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Phase retrieval composed of phase extracting and unwrapping is of great significance in different occasions, such as fringe projection based profilometry, quantitative interferometric microscopy and moire detections. Compared to phase extracting, phase unwrapping occupies most time consuming in phase retrieval, and it becomes an obstacle to realize real time measurements. In order to increase the calculation efficiency of phase retrieval as well as simplify its procedures, here, a high speed moire based phase retrieval method is proposed which is capable of calculating quantitative phase distributions without phase unwrapping or aberration compensation. We demonstrate the capability of the presented phase retrieval method by both theoretical analysis and experiments. It is believed that the proposed method will be useful in real time phase observations and measurements.

  16. Communication: SHG-detected circular dichroism imaging using orthogonal phase-locked laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Jeremy W; Liu, Xiaoying; Nealey, Paul F; Vaia, Richard A; Cerullo, Giulio; Knappenberger, Kenneth L

    2015-04-21

    We demonstrate a novel method for second harmonic generation-detected circular dichroism (CD) imaging based on the use of phase-locked, temporally delayed femtosecond laser pulses. The polarization state of the fundamental wave was controllably changed over 2? rad by using a birefringent delay line, which provided attosecond inter-pulse delays for orthogonal phase-locked replicas; the achievable phase stability was 14 as. By introducing either a positive or negative delay of ?667 as, we induced a ±?/2 phase shift between the orthogonally polarized pulses, resulting in left circularly polarized or right circularly polarized light. CD imaging performance using the pulse sequence was compared to results obtained for plasmonic nanoantennas using a rotating quarter-wave plate. The pulse sequence is expected to simplify polarization-resolved optical imaging by reducing experimental artifacts and decreasing image acquisition times. This method can be easily extended to other CD spectroscopy measurements. PMID:25903859

  17. Quantitative phase imaging through scattering media by means of coherence-controlled holographic microscope.

    PubMed

    Kollarova, Vera; Collakova, Jana; Dostal, Zbynek; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-11-01

    A coherence-controlled holographic microscope (CCHM) enables quantitative phase imaging with coherent as well as incoherent illumination. The low spatially coherent light induces a coherence gating effect, which makes observation of samples possible also through scattering media. The paper describes theoretically and simulates numerically imaging of a two-dimensional object through a static scattering layer by means of CCHM, with the main focus on the quantitative phase imaging quality. The authors have investigated both strongly and weakly scattering media characterized by different amounts of ballistic and diffuse light. It is demonstrated that the phase information can be revealed also for the case of the static, strongly scattering layer. The dependence of the quality of imaging process on the spatial light coherence is demonstrated. The theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are supported by experimental data gained with a model phase object, as well as living carcinoma cells treated in an optically turbid emulsion. PMID:26244853

  18. Single-shot multiwavelength phase unwrapping using a single reference beam and a monochromatic image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahara, Tatsuki; Kaku, Toru; Arai, Yasuhiko

    2015-06-01

    We propose single-shot multiwavelength phase unwrapping using a single reference beam and a monochromatic image sensor. A single beam containing multiple wavelengths passes through a reference arm and acts as reference waves. Multiple-wavelength information is multiplexed in the space domain on the monochromatic image sensor and is separated in the spatial frequency domain by utilizing the spatial frequency difference of interference fringes at multiple wavelengths. From a single hologram, multiwavelength phase unwrapping is conducted and an unwrapped phase image is obtained. Both transmission and reflective single-shot multiwavelength digital holography systems using a monochromatic image sensor can be constructed with a simple optical setup employing the proposed technique. Single-shot multiwavelength phase unwrapping by the proposed technique is numerically simulated and experimentally demonstrated.

  19. Capabilities and limitations of Phase Contrast Imaging techniques with X-rays and neutrons

    E-print Network

    Damato, Antonio Leonardo

    2009-01-01

    Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) was studied with the goal of understanding its relevance and its requirements. Current literature does not provide insight on the effect of a relaxation in coherence requirements on the PCI ...

  20. Quantitative phase contrast imaging of THz electric fields in a dielectric waveguide

    E-print Network

    Wu, Qiang

    We apply phase contrast imaging to enable, sharply focused visualization of terahertz waves in electro-optic media. The approach allows quantitative characterization of THz waves in the 60 GHz – 4.5 THz frequency range in ...

  1. Highly Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Fourth Gradient Channel for Compensation of RF Phase Patterns 

    E-print Network

    Bosshard, John 1983-

    2012-08-20

    A fourth gradient channel was implemented to provide slice dependent RF coil phase compensation for arrays in dual-sided or "sandwich" configurations. The use of highly parallel arrays for single echo acquisition magnetic resonance imaging allows...

  2. Phase-based regional oxygen metabolism in magnetic resonance imaging at high field

    E-print Network

    Fan, Audrey Peiwen

    2010-01-01

    Venous oxygen saturation (Yv) in cerebral veins and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO?) are important indicators for brain function and disease. Phase-susceptibility measurements in magnetic resonance imaging ...

  3. Nanometer-level alignment using interferometric-spatial-phase-imaging (ISPI) during silicon nanowire growth

    E-print Network

    Srisungsitthisunti, Pornsak

    We describe a method of detecting nanometer-level gap and tip/tilt alignment between a focusing zone plate mask and a silicon substrate using interferometric-spatial-phase-imaging (ISPI). The zone plate mask is used to ...

  4. X-ray phase-contrast imaging with an Inverse Compton Scattering source

    SciTech Connect

    Endrizzi, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Oliva, P.; Golosio, B.; Delogu, P.; Stefanini, A.; Gureyev, T. E.; Bottigli, U.

    2010-07-23

    Single-shot in-line phase-contrast imaging with the Inverse Compton Scattering X-ray source available at ATF (Accelerator Test Facility) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is experimentally demonstrated. Phase-contrast images of polymer wires are obtained with a single X-ray pulse whose time length is about 1 picosecond. The edge-enhancement effect is clearly visible in the images and simulations show a quantitative agreement with experimental data. A phase-retrieval step in the image processing leads to a accurate estimation of the projected thickness of our samples. Finally, a single-shot image of a wasp is presented as an example of a biological sample.

  5. Analytical reconstructions of intensity modulated x-ray phase-contrast imaging of human scale phantoms.

    PubMed

    W?odarczyk, Bart?omiej; Pietrzak, Jakub

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents analytical approach to modeling of a full planar and volumetric acquisition system with image reconstructions originated from partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale using graphics processor units. The model is based on x-ray tracing and wave optics methods to develop a numerical framework for predicting the performance of a preclinical phase-contrast imaging system of a human-scaled phantom. In this study, experimental images of simple numerical phantoms and high resolution anthropomorphic phantoms of head and thorax based on non-uniform rational b-spline shapes (NURBS) prove the correctness of the model. Presented results can be used to simulate the performance of partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging system on various preclinical applications. PMID:26600991

  6. Interferometric hard x-ray phase contrast imaging at 204 nm grating period

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Han; Gomella, Andrew A.; Miao, Houxun; Lynch, Susanna K.; Wolfe, Douglas E.; Xiao Xianghui; Liu Chian; Morgan, Nicole

    2013-01-15

    We report on hard x-ray phase contrast imaging experiments using a grating interferometer of approximately 1/10th the grating period achieved in previous studies. We designed the gratings as a staircase array of multilayer stacks which are fabricated in a single thin film deposition process. We performed the experiments at 19 keV x-ray energy and 0.8 {mu}m pixel resolution. The small grating period resulted in clear separation of different diffraction orders and multiple images on the detector. A slitted beam was used to remove overlap of the images from the different diffraction orders. The phase contrast images showed detailed features as small as 10 {mu}m, and demonstrated the feasibility of high resolution x-ray phase contrast imaging with nanometer scale gratings.

  7. High-speed hard x-ray phase-enhanced imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.-K.; Fezzaa, K.; Wang, J.; X-Ray Science Division

    2007-01-01

    Conventional x-ray imaging relies on the differences in the absorption of the sample to provide image contrast. With the small source sizes and large source-sample distances at synchrotrons, an additional mechanism, phase contrast, can come into play. Phase effects, which include refraction and diffraction, can greatly enhance the image contrast. Phase contrast is particularly useful in cases where the absorption contrast is weak. Added to this, the high x-ray flux available at synchrotrons allows for unprecedented high-speed and high-resolution x-ray imaging. We demonstrate that high quality time resolved images with sub-microsecond temporal and micrometer spatial resolutions are feasible. The range of energy spectrum (5-150 keV) available at the Advanced Photon Source allows us to study a wide range of samples, from soft tissues to high-Z materials. We will present preliminary results from the steel automobile fuel injectors and liquid air sprays.

  8. Analytical reconstructions of intensity modulated x-ray phase-contrast imaging of human scale phantoms

    PubMed Central

    W?odarczyk, Bart?omiej; Pietrzak, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents analytical approach to modeling of a full planar and volumetric acquisition system with image reconstructions originated from partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale using graphics processor units. The model is based on x-ray tracing and wave optics methods to develop a numerical framework for predicting the performance of a preclinical phase-contrast imaging system of a human-scaled phantom. In this study, experimental images of simple numerical phantoms and high resolution anthropomorphic phantoms of head and thorax based on non-uniform rational b-spline shapes (NURBS) prove the correctness of the model. Presented results can be used to simulate the performance of partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging system on various preclinical applications. PMID:26600991

  9. Fast X-ray Digital Imager for High-Speed Phase-Contrast X-ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneyama, Akio; Takeda, Tohoru; Wu, Jin; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Hirai, Yasuharu

    2007-03-01

    A fast X-ray digital imager was developed to perform high-speed phase-contrast X-ray imaging. The imager consists of a scintillator, a transferring optical fiber, and a high-speed interlined charge-coupled device (CCD) based camera. The field of view of the imager was 50× 33 mm2 with 4008× 2650 pixels, and the maximum frame rate was 1.6 frame/s. The performance tests of the imager were performed using synchrotron radiation, and the results showed that the detection efficiency was 100% and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was 0.6 for 10 cycle/mm. We also performed the feasibility tests of high-speed phase-contrast computed tomography with an imaging system fitted with an X-ray interferometer and the imager. A clear three-dimensional image of a rat kidney was obtained with a 10-min measurement period. The density resolution was also found to be approximately 1.7 mg/cm3.

  10. Deconvolution by finite-size-source effects of x-ray phase-contrast images

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, Liberato; Scattarella, Francesco; Tangaro, Sabina; Pelliccia, Daniele; Giannini, Cinzia; Bottigli, Ubaldo; Bellotti, Roberto

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: In the hard x-ray region, the cross sections for the phase shift of low-Z elements are about 1000 times larger than the absorption ones. As a consequence, phase contrast is detectable even when absorption contrast is minimal or absent. Therefore, phase-contrast imaging could become a valid alternative to absorption contrast without delivering high dose to tissue/human body parts. Methods: To enhance the quality of phase-contrast images without increasing the dose, a possible approach could be the partial deconvolution of the finite source size effects by experimental phase-contrast images. The deconvolution procedure, the authors propose, employs the acquisition of two images on a suitable well-known test sample, one in contact and the other in phase-contrast conditions. Both acquired images are used along with a simulated phase-contrast image (obtained from the test sample in ideal conditions of pointlike source illumination) to correctly retrieve the experimental source distribution function. This information allows a generic experimental phase-contrast image, acquired in the same conditions, to be partially deconvolved by finite source size effects. Results: The performed experimental tests indicate that deconvolved images are equivalent to those which would be obtained with a source 40% smaller than the actual size. In turn, this finding is equivalent to an increase of the ''effective'' lateral spatial coherence length. The corresponding quality improvement of the phase-contrast imaging is directly deducible by the presence of many Fresnel fringes, much better visible with respect to the original experimental phase-contrast images. Conclusions: The use of a test standard sample, always possible in every experimental setup, to partially deconvolve the finite-size-source blurring effects shows that higher quality phase-contrast images could be readily available, making easier diagnoses and tissue/sample analyses. The method could give, in the future, the possibility to further lower the delivered dose to patients, organs, and tissues when compact room-sized and brilliant microfocus x-ray sources will be available for clinical applications in hospitals.

  11. Compression of periodic images for faster phase retrieval

    E-print Network

    Ribak, Erez

    the requirement to maintain the integrity of the original phase data. © 2010 Optical Society of America OCIS codes of a small source through a Hartmann­ Shack (HS) sensor is a grid of light spots, separated by dark areas the destinations is chosen so as to conserve the HS phases. For example, let us assume that we wish to compress

  12. Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging Signatures for Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; White, Timothy A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Seifert, Allen; Flynn, Michael J.

    2011-06-13

    Gratings-based phase contrast imaging is a promising new radiographic technique providing three distinct contrast mechanisms, absorption, phase, and scatter, using a conventional x-ray tube source. We investigate the signatures available in these three contrast mechanisms with particular attention towards potential homeland security applications. We find that the scatter mode in particular is sensitive to textured materials, enabling lowered detection limits than absorption for materials such as powders. We investigate the length scales to which our imaging system is sensitive.

  13. Combined mixed approach algorithm for in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, Liberato; Scattarella, Francesco; Giannini, Cinzia; Tangaro, Sabina; Rigon, Luigi; Longo, Renata; Bellotti, Roberto

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In the past decade, phase-contrast imaging (PCI) has been applied to study different kinds of tissues and human body parts, with an increased improvement of the image quality with respect to simple absorption radiography. A technique closely related to PCI is phase-retrieval imaging (PRI). Indeed, PCI is an imaging modality thought to enhance the total contrast of the images through the phase shift introduced by the object (human body part); PRI is a mathematical technique to extract the quantitative phase-shift map from PCI. A new phase-retrieval algorithm for the in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging is here proposed. Methods: The proposed algorithm is based on a mixed transfer-function and transport-of-intensity approach (MA) and it requires, at most, an initial approximate estimate of the average phase shift introduced by the object as prior knowledge. The accuracy in the initial estimate determines the convergence speed of the algorithm. The proposed algorithm retrieves both the object phase and its complex conjugate in a combined MA (CMA). Results: Although slightly less computationally effective with respect to other mixed-approach algorithms, as two phases have to be retrieved, the results obtained by the CMA on simulated data have shown that the obtained reconstructed phase maps are characterized by particularly low normalized mean square errors. The authors have also tested the CMA on noisy experimental phase-contrast data obtained by a suitable weakly absorbing sample consisting of a grid of submillimetric nylon fibers as well as on a strongly absorbing object made of a 0.03 mm thick lead x-ray resolution star pattern. The CMA has shown a good efficiency in recovering phase information, also in presence of noisy data, characterized by peak-to-peak signal-to-noise ratios down to a few dBs, showing the possibility to enhance with phase radiography the signal-to-noise ratio for features in the submillimetric scale with respect to the attenuation-based imaging. Conclusions: It has been shown that phase-retrieved radiographies can be used both to have quantitative phase information about soft tissues, complementary to the attenuation information, and to enhance the visibility of details inside soft tissues, with higher efficiency with respect to phase radiography.

  14. Compressive optical image encryption with two-step-only quadrature phase-shifting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Li, Hongbing; Li, Jiaosheng; Pan, Yangyang; Li, Rong

    2015-06-01

    An image encryption method which combines two-step-only quadrature phase-shifting digital holography with compressive sensing (CS) has been proposed in the fully optical domain. An object image is firstly encrypted to two on-axis quadrature-phase holograms using the two random phase masks in the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Then, the two encrypted images are highly compressed to a one-dimensional signal using the single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in the optical domain. At the receiving terminal, the two compressive encrypted holograms are exactly reconstructed from much less than the Nyquist sampling number of observations by solving an optimization problem, and the original image can be decrypted with only two reconstructed holograms and the correct keys. This method largely decreases holograms data volume for the current optical image encryption system, and it is also suitable for some special optical imaging cases such as different wavelengths imaging and weak light imaging. Numerical simulation is performed to demonstrate the feasibility and validity of this novel image encryption method.

  15. Retrieval of Cloud Phase and Crystal Habit from Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Data

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2005-07-22

    A method of retrieving cloud phase and the dominant ice crystal habit from radiances measured by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has been developed. The retrieval method takes advantage of the differences in the phase function of various particle shapes as a function of scattering angle. Three case studies are presented which illustrate the retrieval method. A comparison with semi-coincident in situ observations for one case study indicates that the retrieved crystal habits are consistent with the observations.

  16. Actinic imaging and evaluation of phase structures on EUV lithography masks

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth; Huh, Sungmin

    2010-09-28

    The authors describe the implementation of a phase-retrieval algorithm to reconstruct phase and complex amplitude of structures on EUV lithography masks. Many native defects commonly found on EUV reticles are difficult to detect and review accurately because they have a strong phase component. Understanding the complex amplitude of mask features is essential for predictive modeling of defect printability and defect repair. Besides printing in a stepper, the most accurate way to characterize such defects is with actinic inspection, performed at the design, EUV wavelength. Phase defect and phase structures show a distinct through-focus behavior that enables qualitative evaluation of the object phase from two or more high-resolution intensity measurements. For the first time, phase of structures and defects on EUV masks were quantitatively reconstructed based on aerial image measurements, using a modified version of a phase-retrieval algorithm developed to test optical phase shifting reticles.

  17. Phase-Sensitive Coherence and the Classical-Quantum Boundary in Ghost Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Hardy, Nicholas D.; Venkatraman, Dheera; Wong, Franco N. C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The theory of partial coherence has a long and storied history in classical statistical optics. the vast majority of this work addresses fields that are statistically stationary in time, hence their complex envelopes only have phase-insensitive correlations. The quantum optics of squeezed-state generation, however, depends on nonlinear interactions producing baseband field operators with phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive correlations. Utilizing quantum light to enhance imaging has been a topic of considerable current interest, much of it involving biphotons, i.e., streams of entangled-photon pairs. Biphotons have been employed for quantum versions of optical coherence tomography, ghost imaging, holography, and lithography. However, their seemingly quantum features have been mimicked with classical-sate light, questioning wherein lies the classical-quantum boundary. We have shown, for the case of Gaussian-state light, that this boundary is intimately connected to the theory of phase-sensitive partial coherence. Here we present that theory, contrasting it with the familiar case of phase-insensitive partial coherence, and use it to elucidate the classical-quantum boundary of ghost imaging. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that classical phase-sensitive light produces ghost imaging most closely mimicking those obtained in biphotons, and we derived the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of a standoff-sensing ghost imager, taking into account target-induced speckle.

  18. Application of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared imaging and tape-stripping to investigate the three-dimensional distribution of exogenous chemicals and the molecular organization in Stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Boncheva, Mila; Tay, Feng H; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2008-01-01

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging combined with tape-stripping is an advantageous approach to map the depth penetration and lateral distribution of topically applied chemicals in Stratum corneum (SC) and the conformational order of SC lipids. Tape-stripping progressively removes layers of SC, and chemical imaging provides spatially resolved information on the chemical composition of both the newly exposed SC surface and of the tapes used for stripping. The procedure is rapid, minimally invasive, and does not necessitate cross-sectioning of the skin. This approach offers a simple and direct way to determine the distribution of exogenous volatile and non-volatile chemicals in SC as a function of the chemical composition of the formulation and time, and the conformational order of SC lipids in native and topically treated skin. The procedure described here is well suited to address questions of relevance for the areas of drug delivery, dermatology, and skin care. PMID:19123656

  19. Three dimensional imaging of gold-nanoparticles tagged samples using phase retrieval with two focus planes

    PubMed Central

    Ilovitsh, Tali; Ilovitsh, Asaf; Weiss, Aryeh; Meir, Rinat; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-01-01

    Optical sectioning microscopy can provide highly detailed three dimensional (3D) images of biological samples. However, it requires acquisition of many images per volume, and is therefore time consuming, and may not be suitable for live cell 3D imaging. We propose the use of the modified Gerchberg-Saxton phase retrieval algorithm to enable full 3D imaging of gold-particle tagged samples using only two images. The reconstructed field is free space propagated to all other focus planes using post processing, and the 2D z-stack is merged to create a 3D image of the sample with high fidelity. Because we propose to apply the phase retrieving on nano particles, the regular ambiguities typical to the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm, are eliminated. The proposed concept is presented and validated both on simulated data as well as experimentally. PMID:26498517

  20. CO2-based in-line phase contrast imaging of small intestine in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Li, Wei-Xia; Huang, Wei; Yan, Fuhua; Chai, Wei-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of CO2 single contrast in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI) for pre-clinical small intestine investigation. The absorption and phase contrast images of CO2 gas production were attained and compared. A further increase in image contrast was observed in PCI. Compared with CO2-based absorption contrast imaging (ACI), CO2-based PCI significantly enhanced the detection of mucosal microstructures, such as pits and folds. The CO2-based PCI could provide sufficient image contrast for clearly showing the intestinal mucosa in living mice without using barium. We concluded that CO2-based PCI might be a novel and promising imaging method for future studies of gastrointestinal disorders.