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Sample records for fr01oc10r pp 60967-60999

  1. .pp .p ;n

    Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

    ... k) .' -P tí) '1: -Y £¡ P. $- ,v ;tJ- :P .r. P ,* .¿¡J :P g l;;¡. * l.ì- .v RR i). c¥ PPP -* .g ,0: R :PP lc P ;JP R:t .l;'; :P p ' p :& L. :G ;n &.' P l.). lJ: P :ç l¡) ;.\\ r, .p- oP . ...

  2. PP after PREVCOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buxbaum, Karen L.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the recommendations and implications for Planetary Protection (PP) as recomended by the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG). This study was formulated in 17 recommendations to NASA in a report Preventing the Forward Contamination of Mars (PREVCOM). Particular attention is paid to the recommendation number 5 that states "Require routine collection of phylogenetic data and require systematic archiving of environmental samples from Assembly, Test, and Launch Operations (ATLO) environments and spacecraft."

  3. Study of {psi}(2S) decays to {gamma}pp, {pi}{sup 0}pp, and {eta}pp, and search for pp threshold enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Das, S.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Shi, X.; Sun, W. M.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.

    2010-11-01

    The decays of {psi}(2S) into {gamma}pp, {pi}{sup 0}pp, and {eta}pp have been studied with the CLEO-c detector using a sample of 24.5x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events obtained from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at {radical}(s)=3686 MeV. The data show evidence for the excitation of several N{sup *} resonances in p{pi}{sup 0} and p{eta} channels in {pi}{sup 0}pp and {eta}pp decays, and f{sub 2} states in {gamma}pp decay. Branching fractions for decays of {psi}(2S) to {gamma}pp, {pi}{sup 0}pp, and {eta}pp have been determined. No evidence for pp threshold enhancements was found in the reactions {psi}(2S){yields}Xpp, where X={gamma}, {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}. We do, however, find confirming evidence for a pp threshold enhancement in J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}pp as previously reported by BES.

  4. Protein phosphatases PP2A, PP4 and PP6: mediators and regulators in development and responses to environmental cues.

    PubMed

    Lillo, Cathrine; Kataya, Amr R A; Heidari, Behzad; Creighton, Maria T; Nemie-Feyissa, Dugassa; Ginbot, Zekarias; Jonassen, Else M

    2014-12-01

    The three closely related groups of serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP2A, PP4 and PP6 are conserved throughout eukaryotes. The catalytic subunits are present in trimeric and dimeric complexes with scaffolding and regulatory subunits that control activity and confer substrate specificity to the protein phosphatases. In Arabidopsis, three scaffolding (A subunits) and 17 regulatory (B subunits) proteins form complexes with five PP2A catalytic subunits giving up to 255 possible combinations. Three SAP-domain proteins act as regulatory subunits of PP6. Based on sequence similarities with proteins in yeast and mammals, two putative PP4 regulatory subunits are recognized in Arabidopsis. Recent breakthroughs have been made concerning the functions of some of the PP2A and PP6 regulatory subunits, for example the FASS/TON2 in regulation of the cellular skeleton, B' subunits in brassinosteroid signalling and SAL proteins in regulation of auxin transport. Reverse genetics is starting to reveal also many more physiological functions of other subunits. A system with key regulatory proteins (TAP46, TIP41, PTPA, LCMT1, PME-1) is present in all eukaryotes to stabilize, activate and inactivate the catalytic subunits. In this review, we present the status of knowledge concerning physiological functions of PP2A, PP4 and PP6 in Arabidopsis, and relate these to yeast and mammals. PMID:24810976

  5. Inhibitor-1 and -2 of PP2A have preference between PP2A complexes.

    PubMed

    Hino, Hirotsugu; Takaki, Kaori; Mochida, Satoru

    2015-11-13

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) forms tens of kinds of complexes with different substrate specificity and functions by using various regulatory B subunits. But how these complexes' activities are regulated separately is not well understood. Here we showed unequal enzyme inhibition of each form by two proteinous PP2A inhibitors, I1(PP2A) and I2(PP2A). Immunoprecipitation assay using Xenopus egg extract showed that I1(PP2A) bound B″/PR48, and I2(PP2A) bound B56γ and B″/PR48 among four B subunits analyzed. Thus I1(PP2A) and I2(PP2A) seem to have B-subunit specificity. These results support the hypothesis that PP2A complexes containing common catalytic subunit are individually regulated for their separate functions in vivo. PMID:26449453

  6. Magic spot: (p) ppGpp.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Xie, Jianping

    2009-08-01

    Guanosine 5'-(tri)diphosphate, 3'-diphosphate [(p) ppGpp] is a small nucleic acid that helps bacteria survive in limited environments. Gene chip shows that (p) ppGpp is a global transcription-regulator of genes related to important bacterial metabolic processes. Therefore, more attention should be focused on the molecular mechanisms of (p) ppGpp, as it is the foundation to understanding how bacteria adapt to extreme circumstances through the stringent response. PMID:19391118

  7. Glucose-induced posttranslational activation of protein phosphatases PP2A and PP1 in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Castermans, Dries; Somers, Ils; Kriel, Johan; Louwet, Wendy; Wera, Stefaan; Versele, Matthias; Janssens, Veerle; Thevelein, Johan M

    2012-01-01

    The protein phosphatases PP2A and PP1 are major regulators of a variety of cellular processes in yeast and other eukaryotes. Here, we reveal that both enzymes are direct targets of glucose sensing. Addition of glucose to glucose-deprived yeast cells triggered rapid posttranslational activation of both PP2A and PP1. Glucose activation of PP2A is controlled by regulatory subunits Rts1, Cdc55, Rrd1 and Rrd2. It is associated with rapid carboxymethylation of the catalytic subunits, which is necessary but not sufficient for activation. Glucose activation of PP1 was fully dependent on regulatory subunits Reg1 and Shp1. Absence of Gac1, Glc8, Reg2 or Red1 partially reduced activation while Pig1 and Pig2 inhibited activation. Full activation of PP2A and PP1 was also dependent on subunits classically considered to belong to the other phosphatase. PP2A activation was dependent on PP1 subunits Reg1 and Shp1 while PP1 activation was dependent on PP2A subunit Rts1. Rts1 interacted with both Pph21 and Glc7 under different conditions and these interactions were Reg1 dependent. Reg1-Glc7 interaction is responsible for PP1 involvement in the main glucose repression pathway and we show that deletion of Shp1 also causes strong derepression of the invertase gene SUC2. Deletion of the PP2A subunits Pph21 and Pph22, Rrd1 and Rrd2, specifically enhanced the derepression level of SUC2, indicating that PP2A counteracts SUC2 derepression. Interestingly, the effect of the regulatory subunit Rts1 was consistent with its role as a subunit of both PP2A and PP1, affecting derepression and repression of SUC2, respectively. We also show that abolished phosphatase activation, except by reg1Δ, does not completely block Snf1 dephosphorylation after addition of glucose. Finally, we show that glucose activation of the cAMP-PKA (protein kinase A) pathway is required for glucose activation of both PP2A and PP1. Our results provide novel insight into the complex regulatory role of these two major protein

  8. Analysis of Vernier Scans during the PP2PP run in 2009 (pp at 100 GeV/beam)

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, A.

    2011-12-13

    At the end of RHIC's 2009 operation a dedicated run for the PP2PP experiment (part of the STAR experiment) took place from Jun 29 to Jul 06 2009. Polarized protons were accelerated to 100 GeV using ramp-file pp100-90pp2pp with a {beta}* = 22 m in IR6. Since only transverse polarization was required no rotator ramp was in use. The PP2PP experiment consists mainly of two Roman Pot detectors (one horizontal and one vertical) on either side of IR6 in the outgoing-beam arms between the Q3 and Q4 magnets. The yellow pots are in sector 5, the blue ones in sector 6. Roman Pot type detectors are installed inside the beampipe causing an accelerator safety concern. To address this concern there is a limit to the allowable total beam current in the machine while Roman Pots are enabled to move closer to the beam. This limit was set to a motion limit of 5 mm from the center of the beampipe and 50 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} beam current per ring. In order to reduce the background in the detectors, beams were scraped using the RHIC collimator system prior to moving the pots closer. This was typically repeated several times throughout a store since beam halo reforms over the course of hours.

  9. Differential regulation of single CFTR channels by PP2C, PP2A, and other phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Pato, M D; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1998-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel activity declines rapidly when excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) or human airway cells because of membrane-associated phosphatase activity. In the present study, we found that CFTR channels usually remained active in patches excised from baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing CFTR. Those patches with stable channel activity were used to investigate the regulation of CFTR by exogenous protein phosphatases (PP). Adding PP2A, PP2C, or alkaline phosphatase to excised patches reduced CFTR channel activity by > 90% but did not abolish it completely. PP2B caused weak deactivation, whereas PP1 had no detectable effect on open probability (Po). Interestingly, the time course of deactivation by PP2C was identical to that of the spontaneous rundown observed in some patches after excision. PP2C and PP2A had distinct effects on channel gating Po declined during exposure to exogenous PP2C (and during spontaneous rundown, when it was observed) without any change in mean burst duration. By contrast, deactivation by exogenous PP2A was associated with a dramatic shortening of burst duration similar to that reported previously in patches from cardiac cells during deactivation of CFTR by endogenous phosphatases. Rundown of CFTR-mediated current across intact T84 epithelial cell monolayers was insensitive to toxic levels of the PP2A inhibitor calyculin A. These results demonstrate that exogenous PP2C is a potent regulator of CFTR activity, that its effects on single-channel gating are distinct from those of PP2A but similar to those of endogenous phosphatases in CHO, BHK, and T84 epithelial cells, and that multiple protein phosphatases may be required for complete deactivation of CFTR channels. PMID:9612228

  10. Mechanical properties of PP/PA blends in addition with PP-g-MAH with different PP molecular weight and MAH content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokumitsu, Katuhisa; Nakajima, Yuki; Aoki, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    The mechanical properties and morphological changes of PP/PA6/PP-g-MAH blends were investigated. In particular, various kinds of PP-g-MAH, which have a series of different Mw of PP and MAH content, were investigated. From the tensile test results of PP/PA6 blends, although the elongation at break and yield stress can be improved by adding PP-g-MAH, modulus slightly decreased. In particular, elongation at break of PP/PA in addition with PP-g-MAH increased twentyfold from 27.0% (without PP-g-MAH) to 570%. On the basis of Charpy impact test results, the impact strength can also be improved by adding PP-g-MAH. From SEM observation, it was found that the diameter of the dispersed PA6 phase in PP matrix was getting much smaller with PP-g-MAH content. From the TEM observation, the boundary of the PA phase in PP/PA blends without PP-g-MAH compatibilizer can be observed clearly, but it becomes hard to see the boundary part of the PA phase in PP/PA blend with compatibilizer. Furthermore, when comparing the inside of the PA phase, small amount of PP phase can be observed in the PA phase of PP/PA blend with compatibilizer. Here, we defined a parameter, Comprehensive Mechanical Property Factor (CMPF), which can be calculated by multiple each mechanical property (elongation at break, yield stress, modulus and impact strength) against each maximum value, and it was found that CMPF has a good correlation with the diameter of PA6 phase. In conclusion, an optimum mechanical property of PP/PA6 can be obtained by using PP-g-MAH with Mw around 35,000 ˜ 50,000 g mol-1 and MAH content around 2.0 ˜ 3.5 %.

  11. Texturing of polypropylene (PP) with nanosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, A.; Soto, R.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Boutinguiza, M.; Quintero, F.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2016-06-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is a biocompatible and biostable polymer, showing good mechanical properties that has been recently introduced in the biomedical field for bone repairing applications; however, its poor surface properties due to its low surface energy limit their use in biomedical applications. In this work, we have studied the topographical modification of polypropylene (PP) laser textured with Nd:YVO4 nanosecond lasers emitting at λ = 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm. First, optical response of this material under these laser wavelengths was determined. The application of an absorbing coating was also studied. The influence of the laser processing parameters on the surface modification of PP was investigated by means of statistically designed experiments. Processing maps to tailor the roughness, and wettability, the main parameters affecting cell adhesion characteristics of implants, were also determined. Microhardness measurements were performed to discern the impact of laser treatment on the final mechanical properties of PP.

  12. PP/PS anisotropic stereotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Steinar; Alerini, Mathias; Ursin, Bjørn

    2010-04-01

    Stereotomography is a slope tomographic method which gives good results for background velocity model estimation in 2-D isotropic media. We develop here the extension of the method to 3-D general anisotropic media for PP and PS events. We do not take into account the issue of shear wave degeneracy. As in isotropic media, the sensitivity matrix of the inversion can be computed by paraxial ray tracing. We introduce a `constant Z stereotomography' approach, which can reduce the size of the sensitivity matrix. Based on ray perturbation theory, we give all the derivatives of stereotomography data parameters with respect to model parameters in a 3-D general anisotropic medium. These general formulas for the derivatives can also be used in other applications that rely on anisotropic ray perturbation theory. In particular, we obtain derivatives of the phase velocity with respect to position, phase angle and elastic medium parameters, all for general anisotropic media. The derivatives are expressed using the Voigt notation for the elastic medium parameters. We include a Jacobian that allows to change the model parametrization from Voigt to Thomsen parameters. Explicit expressions for the derivatives of the data are given for the case of 2-D tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media. We validate the method by single-parameter estimation of each Thomsen parameter field of a 2-D TTI synthetic model, where data are modelled by ray tracing. For each Thomsen parameter, the estimated velocity field fits well with the true velocity field.

  13. The Popularity of P&P

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffins, Paul

    2006-01-01

    "Principles and Practices" (P&P), a real estate pre-licensing class, is one of the most popular courses in adult education, because it can literally be the key to the dual American dreams: striking it rich and owning a home. One of the things that makes the P&P class unique is that it is taught in so many different venues. The classes are often…

  14. PP1-mediated dephosphorylation of phosphoproteins at mitotic exit is controlled by inhibitor-1 and PP1 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Judy Qiju; Guo, Jessie Yanxiang; Tang, Wanli; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Freel, Christopher D.; Chen, Chen; Nairn, Angus C.; Kornbluth, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Loss of Cdc2 activity following Cyclin B degradation is necessary, but not sufficient, for mitotic exit. Proteins phosphorylated by Cdc2 and downstream mitotic kinases must also be dephosphorylated. We report here that protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is the major catalyst of mitotic phosphoprotein dephosphorylation. Suppression of PP1 during early mitosis is maintained through the dual inhibition of PP1 by Cdc2 phosphorylation and the binding of Inhibitor-1 (I1), which is facilitated by PKA-mediated I1 phosphorylation. As Cdc2 levels drop following Cyclin B degradation, autodephosphorylation of PP1 at the site of Cdc2 phosphorylation (T320) allows partial PP1 activation. This promotes PP1-regulated dephosphorylation of I1 at its activating site (T35), dissociation of the I1-PP1 complex, and full PP1 activation to promote mitotic exit. Thus, Cdc2 both phosphorylates multiple mitotic substrates and inhibits their PP1-mediated dephosphorylation. PMID:19396163

  15. Regulation of PP2A by Sphingolipid Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Joshua; Ogretmen, Besim

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is a primary regulator of cellular proliferation through targeting of proliferative kinases, cell cycle regulators, and apoptosis inhibitors. It is through the regulation of these regulatory elements that gives PP2A tumor suppressor functions. In addition to mutations on the regulatory subunits, the phosphatase/tumor suppressing activity of PP2A is also inhibited in several cancer types due to overexpression or modification of the endogenous PP2A inhibitors such as SET/I2PP2A. This review focuses on the current literature regarding the interactions between the lipid signaling molecules, selectively sphingolipids, and the PP2A inhibitor SET for the regulation of PP2A, and the therapeutic potential of sphingolipids as PP2A activators for tumor suppression via targeting SET oncoprotein. PMID:25642418

  16. Alpha-, Delta- and PP-cells

    PubMed Central

    Brereton, Melissa F.; Vergari, Elisa; Zhang, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Islet non-β-cells, the α- δ- and pancreatic polypeptide cells (PP-cells), are important components of islet architecture and intercellular communication. In α-cells, glucagon is found in electron-dense granules; granule exocytosis is calcium-dependent via P/Q-type Ca2+-channels, which may be clustered at designated cell membrane sites. Somatostatin-containing δ-cells are neuron-like, creating a network for intra-islet communication. Somatostatin 1-28 and 1-14 have a short bioactive half-life, suggesting inhibitory action via paracrine signaling. PP-cells are the most infrequent islet cell type. The embryologically separate ventral pancreas anlage contains PP-rich islets that are morphologically diffuse and α-cell deficient. Tissue samples taken from the head region are unlikely to be representative of the whole pancreas. PP has anorexic effects on gastro-intestinal function and alters insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet architecture is disrupted in rodent diabetic models, diabetic primates and human Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, with an increased α-cell population and relocation of non-β-cells to central areas of the islet. In diabetes, the transdifferentiation of non-β-cells, with changes in hormone content, suggests plasticity of islet cells but cellular function may be compromised. Understanding how diabetes-related disordered islet structure influences intra-islet cellular communication could clarify how non-β-cells contribute to the control of islet function. PMID:26216135

  17. Heavy quark production in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McGaughey, P.L.; Quack, E.; Ruuskanen, P.V. |

    1995-07-01

    A systematic study of the inclusive single heavy quark and heavy-quark pair production cross sections in pp collisions is presented for RHIC and LHC energies. We compare with existing data when possible. The dependence of the rates on the renormalization and factorization scales is discussed. Predictions of the cross sections are given for two different sets of parton distribution functions.

  18. The Extragalactic Nature of PP:31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsamian, E. S.; Guichard, J.; Mujica, R.

    1994-10-01

    A discussion about the extragalactic nature of PP 31 is presented. This object has been previously classified as a Galactic cometary nebula, but a spectroscopic study reveals that it has a redshift of z = 0.0169. A comparison of some line ratios with the Veilleux & Osterbrock diagrams indicates that this object is an HII region galaxy.

  19. ISAJET: a Monte Carlo event generator for pp and anti pp interactions. Version 3

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, F.E.; Protopopescu, S.D.

    1982-09-01

    ISAJET is a Monte Carlo computer program which simulates pp and anti pp reactions at high energy. It can generate minimum bias events representative of the total inelastic cross section, high PT hadronic events, and Drell-Yan events with a virtual ..gamma.., W/sup + -/, or Z/sup 0/. It is based on perturbative QCD and phenomeno-logical models for jet fragmentation.

  20. Branching fractions for {chi}{sub cJ{yields}}pp{pi}{sup 0}, pp{eta}, and pp{omega}

    SciTech Connect

    Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Das, S.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hunt, J. M.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Ledoux, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.

    2010-07-01

    Using a sample of 25.9x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) decays acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we report branching fractions for the decays {chi}{sub cJ{yields}}pp{pi}{sup 0}, pp{eta}, and pp{omega}, with J=0, 1, 2. Our results for B({chi}{sub cJ{yields}}pp{pi}{sup 0}) and B({chi}{sub cJ{yields}}pp{eta}) are consistent with, but more precise than, previous measurements. Furthermore, we include the first measurement of B({chi}{sub cJ{yields}}pp{omega}).

  1. PP2A: The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing?

    PubMed Central

    Kiely, Maeve; Kiely, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major serine/threonine phosphatase in cells. It consists of a catalytic subunit (C), a structural subunit (A), and a regulatory/variable B-type subunit. PP2A has a critical role to play in homeostasis where its predominant function is as a phosphatase that regulates the major cell signaling pathways in cells. Changes in the assembly, activity and substrate specificity of the PP2A holoenzyme have a direct role in disease and are a major contributor to the maintenance of the transformed phenotype in cancer. We have learned a lot about how PP2A functions from specific mutations that disrupt the core assembly of PP2A and from viral proteins that target PP2A and inhibit its effect as a phosphatase. This prompted various studies revealing that restoration of PP2A activity benefits some cancer patients. However, our understanding of the mechanism of action of this is limited because of the complex nature of PP2A holoenzyme assembly and because it acts through a wide variety of signaling pathways. Information on PP2A is also conflicting as there are situations whereby inactivation of PP2A induces apoptosis in many cancer cells. In this review we discuss this relationship and we also address many of the pertinent and topical questions that relate to novel therapeutic strategies aimed at altering PP2A activity. PMID:25867001

  2. pp interactions in extended air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendi Kohara, A.; Ferreira, Erasmo; Kodama, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Applying the recently constructed analytic representation for the pp scattering amplitudes, we present a study of p-air cross sections, with comparison to the data from Extensive Air Shower (EAS) measurements. The amplitudes describe with precision all available accelerator data at ISR, SPS and LHC energies, and its theoretical basis, together with the very smooth energy dependence of parameters controlled by unitarity and dispersion relations, permit reliable extrapolation to higher energies and to asymptotic ranges. The comparison with cosmic ray data is very satisfactory in the whole pp energy interval from 1 to 100 TeV. High energy asymptotic behaviour of cross sections is investigated in view of the geometric scaling property of the amplitudes. The amplitudes predict that the proton does not behave as a black disk even at asymptotically high enegies, and we discuss possible non-trivial consequences of this fact for pA collision cross sections at higher energies.

  3. String theory on parallelizable PP-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Darius; Sheikh-Jabbari, Mohammad M.

    2003-06-01

    The most general parallelizable pp-wave backgrounds which are non-dilatonic solutions in the NS-NS sector of type IIA and IIB string theories are considered. We demonstrate that parallelizable pp-wave backgrounds are necessarily homogeneous plane-waves, and that a large class of homogeneous plane-waves are parallelizable, stating the necessary conditions. Such plane-waves can be classified according to the number of preserved supersymmetries. In type IIA, these include backgrounds preserving 16, 18, 20, 22 and 24 supercharges, while in the IIB case they preserve 16, 20, 24 or 28 supercharges. An intriguing property of parallelizable pp-wave backgrounds is that the bosonic part of these solutions are invariant under T-duality, while the number of supercharges might change under T-duality. Due to their alpha' exactness, they provide interesting backgrounds for studying string theory. Quantization of string modes, their compactification and behaviour under T-duality are studied. In addition, we consider BPS Dp-branes, and show that these Dp-branes can be classified in terms of the locations of their world volumes with respect to the background H-field.

  4. Nuclear trafficking of the human cytomegalovirus pp71 (ppUL82) tegument protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Weiping; Westgard, Elizabeth; Huang Liqun; Ward, Michael D.; Osborn, Jodi L.; Chau, Nha H.; Collins, Lindsay; Marcum, Benjamin; Koach, Margaret A.; Bibbs, Jennifer; Semmes, O. John; Kerry, Julie A.

    2008-06-20

    The human cytomegalovirus tegument protein pp71 localizes to the nucleus immediately upon infection, and functions to initiate viral gene expression. Analysis of a series of random insertion mutations revealed that sequences within the mid region (MR) of pp71 are important for localization to the nucleus. Fusion of MR sequences with eGFP revealed that amino acids 94 to 300 were sufficient to target proteins to the nucleus. Random substitution mutagenesis within this domain resulted in two double substitution mutants, pp71P203T/T223M and pp71T228M/L275Q, with a predominantly cytoplasmic localization. Disruption of nuclear targeting resulted in relocalization of the fusion proteins to a distinct perinuclear region. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we determined that threonine 223 can be phosphorylated. Mutation of this residue to a phosphomimetic amino acid resulted in abrogation of nuclear targeting. These results strongly suggest that the intracellular trafficking of pp71 is regulated by phosphorylation.

  5. Cytomegalovirus pp65 limits dissemination but is dispensable for persistence

    SciTech Connect

    Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Marshall, Emily E.; Hughes, Colette M.; Ventura, Abigail B.; Gilbride, Roxanne M.; Lewis, Matthew S.; Xu, Guangwu; Kreklywich, Craig; Whizin, Nathan; Fischer, Miranda; Legasse, Alfred W.; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Siess, Don; Camp, David G.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Kahl, Christoph; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Smith, Richard D.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    The tegument phosphoprotein pp65 (UL83) is the most abundant virion protein in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Since pp65 is immunodominant in persistently infected individuals, subunit vaccines against HCMV often include pp65 as T cell stimulatory component. Although HCMV pp65 is non-essential for viral growth in vitro it is thought to have an important role in primary and persistent infection since pp65 displays multiple immunomodulatory functions. To determine whether pp65 is required for infection and to evaluate its role in natural and vaccination-induced immunity we generated a rhesus CMV lacking both homologues, pp65a (Rh111) and pp65b (Rh112). Lack of pp65 resulted in a slight growth defect in vitro and an increase of defective particle formation. However, most pp65-deleted virions in the supernatant were phenotypically normal and proteomics analysis revealed that the ratios of the remaining viral proteins were largely unchanged. RhCMV Δpp65ab was able to persistently infect CMV-negative rhesus macaques (RM) and to super-infect RM previously infected with CMV. To determine whether T cells against pp65 are essential for protection against CMV, we challenged Δpp65ab-infected animals with RhCMV ΔUS2-11, a viral recombinant that lacks inhibitors of MHC-I antigen presentation and is thus unable to overcome CMV-specific T cell immunity. Despite a complete lack of pp65-specific T cells, Δpp65ab protected against ΔUS2-11 challenge suggesting that pp65-specific T cells are not essential for T cell immunity against CMV. Using the same approach we further demonstrate that pp65b-specific T cells, induced by heterologous prime/boost vaccination, are not sufficient to protect against ΔUS2-11 challenge. Our data provides a new approach to test the efficacy of subunit vaccine candidates and suggest that pp65 vaccines are insufficient to induce a T cell response that recapitulates the protective effect of natural infection.

  6. Cytomegalovirus pp65 limits dissemination but is dispensable for persistence

    PubMed Central

    Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Marshall, Emily E.; Hughes, Colette M.; Ventura, Abigail B.; Gilbride, Roxanne M.; Lewis, Matthew S.; Xu, Guangwu; Kreklywich, Craig; Whizin, Nathan; Fischer, Miranda; Legasse, Alfred W.; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Siess, Don; Camp, David G.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Kahl, Christoph; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Smith, Richard D.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The most abundantly produced virion protein in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the immunodominant phosphoprotein 65 (pp65), which is frequently included in CMV vaccines. Although it is nonessential for in vitro CMV growth, pp65 displays immunomodulatory functions that support a potential role in primary and/or persistent infection. To determine the contribution of pp65 to CMV infection and immunity, we generated a rhesus CMV lacking both pp65 orthologs (RhCMVΔpp65ab). While deletion of pp65ab slightly reduced growth in vitro and increased defective particle formation, the protein composition of secreted virions was largely unchanged. Interestingly, pp65 was not required for primary and persistent infection in animals. Immune responses induced by RhCMVΔpp65ab did not prevent reinfection with rhesus CMV; however, reinfection with RhCMVΔUS2-11, which lacks viral-encoded MHC-I antigen presentation inhibitors, was prevented. Unexpectedly, induction of pp65b-specific T cells alone did not protect against RhCMVΔUS2-11 challenge, suggesting that T cells targeting multiple CMV antigens are required for protection. However, pp65-specific immunity was crucial for controlling viral dissemination during primary infection, as indicated by the marked increase of RhCMVΔpp65ab genome copies in CMV-naive, but not CMV-immune, animals. Our data provide rationale for inclusion of pp65 into CMV vaccines but also demonstrate that pp65-induced T cell responses alone do not recapitulate the protective effect of natural infection. PMID:24691437

  7. The three Type 2A protein phosphatases, PP2Ac, PP4c and PP6c, are differentially regulated by Alpha4.

    PubMed

    LeNoue-Newton, Michele L; Wadzinski, Brian E; Spiller, Benjamin W

    2016-06-17

    Alpha4 is a non-canonical regulatory subunit of Type 2A protein phosphatases that interacts directly with the phosphatase catalytic subunits (PP2Ac, PP4c, and PP6c) and is upregulated in a variety of cancers. Alpha4 modulates phosphatase expression levels and activity, but the molecular mechanism of this regulation is unclear, and the extent to which the various Type 2A catalytic subunits associate with Alpha4 is also unknown. To determine the relative fractions of the Type 2A catalytic subunits associated with Alpha4, we conducted Alpha4 immunodepletion experiments in HEK293T cells and found that a significant fraction of total PP6c is associated with Alpha4, whereas a minimal fraction of total PP2Ac is associated with Alpha4. To facilitate studies of phosphatases in the presence of mutant or null Alpha4 alleles, we developed a facile and rapid method to simultaneously knockdown and rescue Alpha4 in tissue culture cells. This approach has the advantage that levels of endogenous Alpha4 are dramatically reduced by shRNA expression thereby simplifying interpretation of mutant phenotypes. We used this system to show that knockdown of Alpha4 preferentially impacts the expression of PP4c and PP6c compared to expression levels of PP2Ac. PMID:27169767

  8. Human cytomegalovirus carries serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1 and a host-cell derived PP2A.

    PubMed Central

    Michelson, S; Turowski, P; Picard, L; Goris, J; Landini, M P; Topilko, A; Hemmings, B; Bessia, C; Garcia, A; Virelizier, J L

    1996-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV), a herpesvirus, is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. When studying hyper-immediate-early events after contact between CMV virions and the cell membrane, we observed a hypophosphorylation of cellular proteins within 10 min. This can be explained in part by our finding that purified CMV contains serine/threonine protein phosphatase activities. Biochemical analyses indicate that this protein phosphatase activity has all characteristics of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A). Specifically, PP1 accounts for approximately 30% and PP2A accounts for the remaining 70% of the phosphorylase phosphatase activity found. CMV produced in astrocytoma cells stably expressing an amino-terminally tagged PP2A catalytic subunit contained tagged enzyme, thus demonstrating the cellular origin of CMV-associated PP2A. PP2A is specifically found inside the virus, associated with the nucleocapsid fraction. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of purified virus revealed the presence of the catalytic subunits of PP2A and PP1. Furthermore, the catalytic subunit of PP2A appears to be complexed to the regulatory subunits PR65 and PR55, which is also the most abundant configuration of this enzyme found in the host cells. Incubation of virus with okadaic acid before contact of CMV with cells prevented hypophosphorylation of cellular proteins, thus demonstrating the role of CMV-associated phosphatases in this phenomenon. CMV can thus transport an active enzyme from one cell to another. PMID:8627658

  9. PP-O and PP-V, Monascus pigment homologues, production, and phylogenetic analysis in Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Arai, Teppei; Kojima, Ryo; Motegi, Yoshiki; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi; Ogihara, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The production of pigments as secondary metabolites by microbes is known to vary by species and by physiological conditions within a single strain. The fungus strain Penicillium purpurogenum IAM15392 has been found to produce violet pigment (PP-V) and orange pigment (PP-O),Monascus azaphilone pigment homologues, when grown under specific culture conditions. In this study, we analysed PP-V and PP-O production capability in seven strains of P. purpurogenum in addition to strain IAM15392 under specific culture conditions. The pigment production pattern of five strains cultivated in PP-V production medium was similar to that of strain IAM15392, and all violet pigments produced by these five strains were confirmed to be PP-V. Strains that did not produce pigment were also identified. In addition, two strains cultivated in PP-O production medium produced a violet pigment identified as PP-V. The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences from the eight P. purpurogenum strains were sequenced and used to construct a neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree. PP-O and PP-V production of P. purpurogenum was shown to be related to phylogenetic placement based on rDNA ITS sequence. Based on these results, two hypotheses for the alteration of pigment production of P. purpurogenum in evolution were proposed. PMID:26615745

  10. Development and characterization of antibacterial nanocomposite fiber based on PP/PET/nanosilver compatibilized with PP-g-MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar, A.; Golshan Ebrahimi, N.

    2010-03-01

    The polypropylene (PP) /polyethylene terephthalate (PET) /Nanosilver (Ag) nanocomposite fibers were prepared for the achievement of permanent antibacterial activity to common synthetic textile. The fibers were melt-spun by co-extrusion of PP/PET with compatibilizer (PP-g-MA) as core and PP/Ag master-batches as sheath and vice versa then fiber formation was carried out through the spinneret. The effects of content PP-g-MA as compatibilizer were also investigated. The morphology and mechanical properties of uncompatibilized and compatibilized PP/PET fibers were comprehensively assessed utilizing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile test experiments. It was observed that the fibrillar distributed morphology achieved at 3.5 Wt% of PP-g-MA has a significant performance. The antibacterial activity of nanosilver in fibers was evaluated after certain contact time and calculated by percent reduction of two kinds of bacteria; Staphylococus aureus and Escherichia coli. The antibacterial efficacy of spun fibers was excellent when the masterbatch used as the sheath. The SEM micrograph of these fibers (PP/ PP-g-MA/PET)/(PP/Nanosilver) shows nearly good distribution of nanosilver particles with little aggregation. Mechanical and antibacterial properties data have also shown that the fiber has a significant performance when the master-batch used as the sheath.

  11. The extended PP1 toolkit: designed to create specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Mathieu; Peti, Wolfgang; Ragusa, Michael J.; Beullens, Monique

    2011-01-01

    Protein Ser/Thr phosphatase-1 (PP1) catalyzes the majority of eukaryotic protein dephosphorylation reactions in a highly regulated and selective manner. Recent studies have identified an unusually diversified PP1 interactome with the properties of a regulatory toolkit. PP1-interacting proteins (PIPs) function as targeting subunits, substrates and/or inhibitors. As targeting subunits, PIPs contribute to substrate selection by bringing PP1 into the vicinity of specific substrates and by modulating substrate specificity via additional substrate docking sites or blocking substrate-binding channels. Many of the nearly 200 established mammalian PIPs are predicted to be intrinsically disordered, a property that facilitates their binding to a large surface area of PP1 via multiple docking motifs. These novel insights offer perspectives for the therapeutic targeting of PP1 by interfering with the binding of PIPs or substrates. PMID:20399103

  12. Grafting copolymerization of acrylamides onto preirradiated PP films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Nho, Young Chang; Kwon, Oh Hyun; Hoffman, Allan S.

    1999-06-01

    Acrylamide (AAm), N,N-Dimethylacrylamide (DMAAm) and N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl) methacrylamide (DMAPMAAm) were grafted onto polypropylene (PP) films by preirradiation grafting respectively. The effect of irradiation dose, solvent systems and reaction time on the degree of grafting were determined. The grafted sample films were verified by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in the attenuated total reflectance mode (ATR) and the determination of water contact angle. The blood compatibility of the grafted PP films were evaluated by the determination of platelet adsorption and thrombus. The blood compatibility of grafted PP films seems better than that of original PP films.

  13. Baculovirus phosphoprotein pp31 is associated with virogenic stroma.

    PubMed Central

    Guarino, L A; Dong, W; Xu, B; Broussard, D R; Davis, R W; Jarvis, D L

    1992-01-01

    The PstI K fragment of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 31,000. To define the role of this protein (pp31) in virus infection further, it was overexpressed in bacteria and used to produce polyclonal antiserum. Radioimmunoprecipitation analysis indicated that pp31 was synthesized during both the early and late phases of virus infection, consistent with previous analyses indicating that the gene was regulated by tandem early and late promoters. Metabolic labeling of cells with carrier-free phosphate indicated that pp31 was phosphorylated. Biochemical fractionation experiments showed that pp31 was localized in the nucleus and that it was more stably associated with the nucleus at later times of infection. Immunoblot analysis of subnuclear fractions indicated that pp31 was associated predominantly with the chromatin and nuclear matrix fractions. Immunofluorescence experiments confirmed that the pp31 protein was localized in the nucleus. Nuclear staining was relatively uniform early but was more centrally nuclear later in infection. Immunoelectron microscopy indicated that the pp31 protein was a component of virogenic stroma. Southwestern (DNA-protein) blot analysis demonstrated that pp31 is a DNA-binding protein. These findings suggest a possible role for pp31 in the virus life cycle. Images PMID:1433508

  14. Displacement affinity chromatography of protein phosphatase one (PP1) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moorhead, Greg BG; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Nimick, Mhairi; De Wever, Veerle; Campbell, David G; Gourlay, Robert; Lam, Yun Wah; Lamond, Angus I

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase one (PP1) is a ubiquitously expressed, highly conserved protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates target protein serine and threonine residues. PP1 is localized to its site of action by interacting with targeting or regulatory proteins, a majority of which contains a primary docking site referred to as the RVXF/W motif. Results We demonstrate that a peptide based on the RVXF/W motif can effectively displace PP1 bound proteins from PP1 retained on the phosphatase affinity matrix microcystin-Sepharose. Subsequent co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that each identified binding protein was either a direct PP1 interactor or was in a complex that contains PP1. Our results have linked PP1 to numerous new nuclear functions and proteins, including Ki-67, Rif-1, topoisomerase IIα, several nuclear helicases, NUP153 and the TRRAP complex. Conclusion This modification of the microcystin-Sepharose technique offers an effective means of purifying novel PP1 regulatory subunits and associated proteins and provides a simple method to uncover a link between PP1 and additional cellular processes. PMID:19000314

  15. Leading neutrons from polarized pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Soffer, J.

    2008-10-13

    We calculate the cross section and single-spin azimuthal asymmetry, A{sub n}(t) for inclusive neutron production in pp collisions at forward rapidities relative to the polarized proton. Absorptive corrections to the pion pole generate a relative phase between the spin-flip and non-flip amplitudes, which leads to an appreciable spin asymmetry. However, the asymmetry observed recently in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC at very small |t|{approx}0.01 GeV{sup 2} cannot be explained by this mechanism.

  16. Autophosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase, pp125FAK, directs SH2-dependent binding of pp60src.

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, M D; Hildebrand, J D; Shannon, J D; Fox, J W; Vines, R R; Parsons, J T

    1994-01-01

    The phosphorylation of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) on tyrosine residues is a critical regulatory event that modulates catalytic activity and triggers the physical association of PTKs with Src homology 2 (SH2)-containing proteins. The integrin-linked focal adhesion kinase, pp125FAK, exhibits extracellular matrix-dependent phosphorylation on tyrosine and physically associates with two nonreceptor PTKs, pp60src and pp59fyn, via their SH2 domains. Herein, we identify Tyr-397 as the major site of tyrosine phosphorylation on pp125FAK both in vivo and in vitro. Tyrosine 397 is located at the juncture of the N-terminal and catalytic domains, a novel site for PTK autophosphorylation. Mutation of Tyr-397 to a nonphosphorylatable residue dramatically impairs the phosphorylation of pp125FAK on tyrosine in vivo and in vitro. The mutation of Tyr-397 to Phe also inhibits the formation of stable complexes with pp60src in cells expressing Src and FAK397F, suggesting that autophosphorylation of pp125FAK may regulate the association of pp125FAK with Src family kinases in vivo. The identification of Tyr-397 as a major site for FAK autophosphorylation provides one of the first examples of a cellular protein containing a high-affinity binding site for a Src family kinase SH2 domain. This finding has implications for models describing the mechanisms of action of pp125FAK, the regulation of the Src family of PTKs, and signal transduction through the integrins. Images PMID:7509446

  17. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possiblemore » effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.« less

  18. Damping of forward neutrons in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Soffer, J.

    2008-07-01

    We calculate absorptive corrections to single pion exchange in the production of leading neutrons in pp collisions. Contrary to the usual procedure of convolving the survival probability with the cross section, we apply corrections to the spin amplitudes. The nonflip amplitude turns out to be much more suppressed by absorption than the spin-flip one. We identify the projectile proton Fock state responsible for the absorptive corrections as a color octet-octet 5-quarks configuration. Calculations within two very different models, color-dipole light-cone description, and in hadronic representation, lead to rather similar absorptive corrections. We found a much stronger damping of leading neutrons than in some of previous estimates. Correspondingly, the cross section is considerably smaller than was measured at ISR. However, comparison with recent measurements by the ZEUS collaboration of neutron production in deep-inelastic scattering provides a strong motivation for challenging the normalization of the ISR data. This conjecture is also supported by preliminary data from the NA49 experiment for neutron production in pp collisions at SPS.

  19. Strangeness production in AA and pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Paolo; Satz, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Boost-invariant hadron production in high-energy collisions occurs in causally disconnected regions of finite space-time size. As a result, globally conserved quantum numbers (charge, strangeness, baryon number) are conserved locally in spatially restricted correlation clusters. Their size is determined by two time scales: the equilibration time specifying the formation of a quark-gluon plasma, and the hadronization time, specifying the onset of confinement. The expected values for these scales provide the theoretical basis for the suppression observed for strangeness production in elementary interactions ( pp , e^+e^- below LHC energies. In contrast, the space-time superposition of individual collisions in high-energy heavy-ion interactions leads to higher energy densities, resulting in much later hadronization and hence much larger hadronization volumes. This largely removes the causality constraints and results in an ideal hadronic resonance gas in full chemical equilibrium. In the present paper, we determine the collision energies needed for that; we also estimate when pp collisions reach comparable hadronization volumes and thus determine when strangeness suppression should disappear there as well.

  20. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.

  1. PR65A Phosphorylation Regulates PP2A Complex Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kotlo, Kumar; Xing, Yongna; Lather, Sonia; Grillon, Jean Michel; Johnson, Keven; Skidgel, Randal A.; Solaro, R. John; Danziger, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Serine-threonine Protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A), a member of the PPP family of phosphatases, regulates a variety of essential cellular processes, including cell-cycling, DNA replication, transcription, translation, and secondary signaling pathways. In the heart, increased PP2A activity/signaling has been linked to cardiac remodeling, contractile dysfunction and, in failure, arrythmogenicity. The core PP2A complex is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme consisting of a 36 kDa catalytic subunit (PP2Ac); a regulatory scaffold subunit of 65 kDa (PR65A or PP2Aa); and one of at least 18 associated variable regulatory proteins (B subunits) classified into 3 families. In the present study, three in vivo sites of phosphorylation in cardiac PR65A are identified (S303, T268, S314). Using HEK cells transfected with recombinant forms of PR65A with phosphomimetic (P-PR65A) and non-phosphorylated (N-PR65A) amino acid substitutions at these sites, these phosphorylations were shown to inhibit the interaction of PR65A with PP2Ac and PP2A holoenzyme signaling. Forty-seven phospho-proteins were increased in abundance in HEK cells transfected with P-PR65A versus N-PR65A by phospho-protein profiling using 2D-DIGE analysis on phospho-enriched whole cell protein extracts. Among these proteins were elongation factor 1α (EF1A), elongation factor 2, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), NADPH-dehydrogenase 1 alpha sub complex, annexin A, and PR65A. Compared to controls, failing hearts from the Dahl rat had less phosphorylated PR65A protein abundance and increased PP2A activity. Thus, PR65A phosphorylation is an in vivo mechanism for regulation of the PP2A signaling complex and increased PP2A activity in heart failure. PMID:24465463

  2. Properties of PP/MWCNT-COOH /PP composites made by melt mixing versus solution cast /melt mixing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinholds, I.; Roja, Z.; Zicans, J.; Merijs Meri, R.; Bitenieks, J.

    2015-03-01

    An approach on improvement of the properties of polypropylene / carbon nanotube (PP/CNT) composites is reported. PP blend compositions with carboxylic acid functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-COOH) at filler content 1.0 wt.% were researched. One part of the composites was manufactured by direct thermoplastic mixing PP with the filler, but the other one was made from solution casted masterbatch with the following thermoplastic mixing. An increase of mechanical properties (Young's modulus, storage modulus and tensile strength), compared to an increase of glass transition temperature indicated a reinforcement effect of CNTs on PP matrix, determined from the tensile tests and differential mechanical analysis (DMA), while the elongation was reduced, compared to PP matrix. By differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, the effect of nanofiller on the reorganization of PP crystallites was observed. A noticeable enhanced effect on increase of the crystallization temperature was indicated for masterbatch manufactured composite. An increase of thermal stability was also observed, compared to pristine PP and the composite made by direct thermoplastic mixing PP with the filler.

  3. /bar p/p collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1989-03-01

    This note encompasses a set of six lectures given at the summer school held at Campos Do Jordao in January of 1989 near Sao Paulo, Brazil. The intent of the lectures was to describe the physics of /bar p/p at CERN and Fermilab. Particular attention has been paid to making a self contained presentation to a prospective audience of graduate students. Since large Monte Carlo codes might not be available to all members of this audience, great reliance was placed on ''back of the envelope estimates.'' Emphasis was also placed on experimental data rather than theoretical speculation, since predictions for, for example, supersymmetric particle production are easily obtained by transcription of formulae already obtained. 9 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Setting the scale of the pp and pp total cross sections using AdS/QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Domokos, Sophia K.; Harvey, Jeffrey A.; Mann, Nelia

    2010-11-15

    This paper is an addendum to earlier work where we computed the Pomeron contribution to pp and pp scattering in AdS/QCD. Our model for pp scattering in the Regge regime depends on four parameters: the slope and intercept of the Pomeron trajectory {alpha}{sub c}{sup '}, {alpha}{sub c}(0), a mass scale M{sub d}, which determines a form factor entering into matrix elements of the energy-momentum tensor, and a coupling {lambda}{sub P} between the lightest spin-two glueball and the proton, which sets the overall scale of the total cross section. Here we perform a more detailed computation of {lambda}{sub P} in the Sakai-Sugimoto model by using the construction of nucleons as instantons of the dual 5D gauge theory and an effective 5D fermion description of these nucleons which has been successfully used to compute a variety of nucleon-meson couplings. We find {lambda}{sub P,SS{approx_equal}}6.38 GeV{sup -1}, which is in reasonable agreement with the value {lambda}{sub P,fit}=8.28 GeV{sup -1} determined by fitting single Pomeron exchange to data.

  5. Comparison of forward and backward pp pair knockout in 3He(e,e'pp)n

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baghdasaryan, H.; Weinstein, L. B.; Laget, J. M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Biselli, A. S.; et al

    2012-06-21

    Measuring nucleon-nucleon Short Range Correlations (SRC) has been a goal of the nuclear physics community for many years. They are an important part of the nuclear wavefunction, accounting for almost all of the high-momentum strength. They are closely related to the EMC effect. While their overall probability has been measured, measuring their momentum distributions is more difficult. In order to determine the best configuration for studying SRC momentum distributions, we measured the 3He(e,e'pp)n reaction, looking at events with high momentum protons (pp > 0.35 GeV/c) and a low momentum neutron (pn < 0.2 GeV/c). We examined two angular configurations: eithermore » both protons emitted forward or one proton emitted forward and one backward (with respect to the momentum transfer, →q). Thus, the measured relative momentum distribution of the events with one forward and one backward proton was much closer to the calculated initial-state pp relative momentum distribution, indicating that this is the preferred configuration for measuring SRC.« less

  6. ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence in epileptogenic tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleen, Jonathan K.; Valdes, Pablo A.; Harris, Brent T.; Holmes, Gregory L.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.

    2011-03-01

    Astrogliotic tissue displays markedly increased levels of ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence, making it useful for fluorescence-guided resection in glioma surgery. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and corresponding animal models, there are areas of astrogliosis that often co-localize with the epileptic focus, which can be resected to eliminate seizures in the majority of treated patients. If this epileptogenic tissue can exhibit PpIX fluorescence that is sufficiently localized, it could potentially help identify margins in epilepsy surgery. We tested the hypothesis that ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence could visually accentuate epileptogenic tissue, using an established animal model of chronic TLE. An acute dose of pilocarpine was used to induce chronic seizure activity in a rat. This rat and a normal control were given ALA, euthanized, and brains examined post-mortem for PpIX fluorescence and neuropathology. Preliminary evidence indicates increased PpIX fluorescence in areas associated with chronic epileptic changes and seizure generation in TLE, including the hippocampus and parahippocampal areas. In addition, strong PpIX fluorescence was clearly observed in layer II of the piriform cortex, a region known for epileptic reorganization and involvement in the generation of seizures in animal studies. We are further investigating whether ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence can consistently identify epileptogenic zones, which could warrant the extension of this technique to clinical studies for use as an adjuvant guidance technology in the resection of epileptic tissue.

  7. (p)ppGpp and the bacterial cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Aanisa; Harinarayanan, Rajendran

    2016-06-01

    Genes of the Rel/Spo homolog (RSH) superfamily synthesize and/or hydrolyse the modified nucleotides pppGpp/ ppGpp (collectively referred to as (p)ppGpp) and are prevalent across diverse bacteria and in plant chloroplasts. Bacteria accumulate (p)ppGpp in response to nutrient deprivation (generically called the stringent response) and elicit appropriate adaptive responses mainly through the regulation of transcription. Although at different concentrations (p)ppGpp affect the expression of distinct set of genes, the two well-characterized responses are reduction in expression of the protein synthesis machinery and increase in the expression of genes coding for amino acid biosynthesis. In Escherichia coli, the cellular (p)ppGpp level inversely correlates with the growth rate and increasing its concentration decreases the steady state growth rate in a defined growth medium. Since change in growth rate must be accompanied by changes in cell cycle parameters set through the activities of the DNA replication and cell division apparatus, (p)ppGpp could coordinate protein synthesis (cell mass increase) with these processes. Here we review the role of (p)ppGpp in bacterial cell cycle regulation. PMID:27240988

  8. The magic dance of the alarmones (p)ppGpp.

    PubMed

    Steinchen, Wieland; Bange, Gert

    2016-08-01

    The alarmones (p)ppGpp are important second messengers that orchestrate pleiotropic adaptations of bacteria and plant chloroplasts in response to starvation and stress. Here, we review our structural and mechanistic knowledge on (p)ppGpp metabolism including their synthesis, degradation and interconversion by a highly diverse set of enzymes. Increasing structural information shows how (p)ppGpp interacts with an incredibly diverse set of different targets that are essential for replication, transcription, translation, ribosome assembly and metabolism. This raises the question how the chemically rather simple (p)ppGpp is able to interact with these different targets? Structural analysis shows that the diversity of (p)ppGpp interaction with cellular targets critically relies on the conformational flexibility of the 3' and 5' phosphate moieties allowing alarmones to efficiently modulate the activity of target structures in a broad concentration range. Current approaches in the design of (p)ppGpp-analogs as future antibiotics might be aided by the comprehension of conformational flexibility exhibited by the magic dancers (p)ppGpp. PMID:27149325

  9. EMODnet Physical Parameters (EMODNet PP) Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novellino, A.; Schaap, D.; Manzella, G. M. R.; Pouliquen, S.; Gorringe, P.

    2012-04-01

    In December 2007 the European Parliament and Council adopted a common text for the Marine Strategy Framework Directive which aims to achieve environmentally healthy marine waters by 2020. This Directive includes an initiative for an overarching European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNet). During the one-year consultation phase that followed the release of the EU Green Paper on a Future Maritime Policy for the European Union, stakeholders gave an overwhelming positive response. Facilitating access to high quality marine data will resolve difficulties and stimulate an expansion of value-added public and commercial services, lay the foundations for sound governance and reduce uncertainties on human impact on the planet as well as of forecasts relating to the future state of the marine environment. Better and linked marine data will have an immediate impact on the planning of environmental policy and mitigation measures, and will also facilitate impact assessments and scientific work. The overall objectives of the EMODnet Physical Parameters (EMODNet PP) preparatory action is to provide access to archived and near real-time data on physical conditions in Europe's seas and oceans by means of a dedicated Pilot Portal and to determine how well the data meet the needs of users from industry, public authorities and scientists. The latter implicates that it is also an objective to identify data gaps and arguments why these gaps should be filled in future monitoring. This project will contribute towards the definition of an operational European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODnet). This is done done by: 1. providing through a portal: a. access to marine data from measurement stations and ferryboxes. Both near real-time and archived data of time series are to be made available. b. metadata for these data sets using EMODnet/INSPIRE standards. c. metadata maps and overviews for whole sea-basins showing the availability of data and monitoring intensity of that

  10. Effect of fiber on shear-induced crystallization of i-PP in UHMWPE/i-PP and Aramid/i-PP fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Orta, Carlos; Somani, Rajesh; Yang, Ling; Hsiao, Benjamin; Marom, Gad

    2003-03-01

    Shear-induced crystallization of the isotactic polypropylene (i-PP) matrix in fiber composites containing ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers or Aramid fibers was studied by in-situ synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) techniques. The maximum fiber content was 10 wt composite and the shearing conditions included the application of step shear with rate = 60 1/s and duration time = 5 s at 145 ^oC. The development of lamellar structures (by SAXS) and crystal orientation (by WAXS) was strongly affected by the type of fiber present. It was found that Kebab structures were more likely to develop in the presence of UHMWPE fiber than Aramid fiber. In addition, the orientation of i-PP lamellae was greater in the UHMWPE composite than that in the Aramid composite, even though the crystallization rate was similar in both systems. As the UHMWPE phase was non-crystalline at the measurement temperature (145 ^oC), our results suggest that a high degree of molecular interactions between the oriented PE chains and the surrounding iPP chains makes the molten UHMWPE phase an effective nucleating agents for iPP crystallization under shear. The epitaxial effect of Aramid fiber on the crystallization of iPP was not a dominating factor under the shear conditions.

  11. Surface treated polypropylene (PP) fibres for reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    López-Buendía, Angel M.; Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores; Climent, Verónica

    2013-12-15

    Surface treatments on a polypropylene (PP) fibre have contributed to the improvement of fibre/concrete adhesion in fibre-reinforced concrete. The treatments to the PP fibre were characterized by contact angle measurements, ATR-IR and XPS to analyse chemical alterations. The surface topography and fibre/concrete interaction were analysed by several microscopic techniques, namely optical petrographic, and scanning electron microscopy. Treatment modified the surface chemistry and topography of the fibre by introducing sodium moieties and created additional fibre surface roughness. Modifications in the fibre surface led to an increase in the adhesion properties between the treated fibres and concrete and an improvement in the mechanical properties of the fibre-reinforced concrete composite as compared to the concrete containing untreated PP fibres. Compatibility with the concrete and increased roughness and mineral surface was also improved by nucleated portlandite and ettringite mineral association anchored on the alkaline PP fibre surface, which is induced during treatment.

  12. Heavy neutrinos and the pp → lljj CMS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluza, Janusz; Jeliński, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    We show that the excess in the pp → eejj CMS data can be naturally interpreted within the Minimal Left-Right Symmetric model (MLRSM), keeping gL =gR, if CP phases and non-degenerate masses of heavy neutrinos are taken into account. As an additional benefit, a natural interpretation of the reported ratio (14 : 1) of the opposite-sign (OS) pp →l±l∓ jj to the same-sign (SS) pp →l±l± jj lepton signals is possible. Finally, a suppression of muon pairs with respect to electron pairs in the pp → lljj data is obtained, in accordance with experimental data. If the excess in the CMS data survives in the future, it would be a first clear hint towards presence of heavy neutrinos in right-handed charged currents with specific CP phases, mixing angles and masses, which will have far reaching consequences for particle physics directions.

  13. K+ Production from pp and pd Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdau, Yury

    The K+-production cross section in pn collisions is an important input parameter for model calculations of K+ production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions. Experimental data in the close-to-threshold region are not yet available and theoretical predictions give a wide scatter of numbers for the ratio of the total cross sections σ nK+/σ pK^+. K+ production from pd interaction has been investigated using the magnetic spectrometer ANKE at COSY-Jülich at proton beam momenta 2.65, 2.81 and 3.46 GeV/c. For the extraction of σ nK+/σ pK^+ from the pd data at low beam momenta, a naive phase-space approach has been used, assuming that σ dK+=σ nK^++σ pK^+. Double differential cross sections and missing mass spectra for proton-kaon correlations have also been analysed. Both methods give consistent result: σ nK+/σ pK^+ ˜3-5. During a recent beam time, experimental data have been collected at pp=3.46 GeV/c for both hydrogen and deuterium targets. A ratio σ dK+/σ pK^+≈ 2.96 × σ dπ +/σ pπ ^+ has been extracted from these data.

  14. PP composites with Hybrid Nanofillers: NTC phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Sarlin, Juha; Immonen, Kirsi

    2010-06-02

    Electric conductive plastic composites have a wide potential for commercial applications, some examples are EMI shielding housings and components in automotive industry and in consumer electronics, equipments in health care sector and fuel cell components. A phenomenon in conductive composites, especially in composites with carbon based fillers, is change of thermal induced change in conductivity as a result of morphological transitions. Usually the observed changes are practically irreversible. The phenomenon may cause increasing resistivity, usually called as 'positive temperature coefficient' (PTC) or decreasing resistivity, called 'negative temperature coefficient' (NTC), where the new morphology created by heat treatment is more favorable for electric conductivity compared to the original state. The existence of NTC is a sing of the lost potential in material design and processing. Therefore detailed information about the phenomenon gives us tools to develop high performance conductive materials. It this paper we discuss about NTC phenomenon observed in PP composites with CNT or in-situ synthesized CNT-PANi hybrid nanofiller with an amphiphilic dispersing agent. The goal of the paper is not to present a comprehensive model of this phenomenon; we present some experimental results which may be related to polymer-filler interactions. These details are a part of this complicated phenomenon.

  15. High p{sub T} jet production in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Eskola, K.J.; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Production rates of large p{sub T} jets in pp collisions at RHIC and LHC energies are studied using the next-to-leading order calculation of S. D. Ellis, Z. Zunszt and D. Soper. The computed inclusive one-jet cross sections are compared against the CERN and Fermilab jet data from p{bar p} and pp collisions. The dependence of the results on the choice of the parton distributions and renormalization/factorization scales is investigated.

  16. Managing Global Satellite Data: The GHRSST-PP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Edward M.; Vazquez, Jorge; Bingham, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This presentation examines the management of satellite data, specifically the GODAE (Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment) High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Pilot Project (GHRSST-PP). The objective of the GHRSST-PP is to produce high quality, enhanced Level 2 SST products (known as L2P) from a number of satellite infrared and microwave sources. Topics covered include data organization, access and data discovery, as well as historical continuity.

  17. Mitotic exit: Determining the PP2A dephosphorylation program.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gislene; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-08-29

    In mitotic exit, proteins that were highly phosphorylated are sequentially targeted by the phosphatase PP2A-B55, but what underlies substrate selection is unclear. In this issue, Cundell et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201606033) identify the determinants of PP2A-B55's dephosphorylation program, thereby influencing spindle disassembly, nuclear envelope reformation, and cytokinesis. PMID:27551057

  18. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7more » TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.« less

  19. PP2A Regulates HDAC4 Nuclear Import

    PubMed Central

    Paroni, Gabriela; Cernotta, Nadia; Dello Russo, Claudio; Gallinari, Paola; Pallaoro, Michele; Foti, Carmela; Talamo, Fabio; Orsatti, Laura; Steinkühler, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Different signal-regulated serine/threonine kinases phosphorylate class II histone deacetylases (HDACs) to promote nuclear export, cytosolic accumulation, and activation of gene transcription. However, little is known about mechanisms operating in the opposite direction, which, possibly through phosphatases, should promote class II HDACs nuclear entry and subsequent gene repression. Here we show that HDAC4 forms a complex with the PP2A holoenzyme Cα, Aα, B/PR55α. In vitro and in vivo binding studies demonstrate that the N-terminus of HDAC4 interacts with the catalytic subunit of PP2A. HDAC4 is dephosphorylated by PP2A and experiments using okadaic acid or RNA interference have revealed that PP2A controls HDAC4 nuclear import. Moreover, we identified serine 298 as a putative phosphorylation site important for HDAC4 nuclear import. The HDAC4 mutant mimicking phosphorylation of serine 298 is defective in nuclear import. Mutation of serine 298 to alanine partially rescues the defect in HDAC4 nuclear import observed in cells with down-regulated PP2A. These observations suggest that PP2A, via the dephosphorylation of multiple serines including the 14-3-3 binding sites and serine 298, controls HDAC4 nuclear import. PMID:18045992

  20. PP1α, PP1β and Wip-1 regulate H4S47 phosphorylation and deposition of histone H3 variant H3.3

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhiquan; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of histone H4 serine 47 (H4S47ph) is catalyzed by Pak2, a member of the p21-activated serine/threonine protein kinase (Pak) family and regulates the deposition of histone variant H3.3. However, the phosphatase(s) involved in the regulation of H4S47ph levels was unknown. Here, we show that three phosphatases (PP1α, PP1β and Wip1) regulate H4S47ph levels and H3.3 deposition. Depletion of each of the three phosphatases results in increased H4S47ph levels. Moreover, PP1α, PP1β and Wip1 bind H3-H4 in vitro and in vivo, whereas only PP1α and PP1β, but not Wip1, interact with Pak2 in vivo. These results suggest that PP1α, PP1β and Wip1 regulate the levels of H4S47ph through directly acting on H4S47ph, with PP1α and PP1β also likely regulating the activity of Pak2. Finally, depletion of PP1α, PP1β and Wip1 leads to increased H3.3 occupancy at candidate genes tested, elevated H3.3 deposition and enhanced association of H3.3 with its chaperones HIRA and Daxx. These results reveal a novel role of three phosphatases in chromatin dynamics in mammalian cells. PMID:23828041

  1. PP2 prevents isoproterenol stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianying; Lin, Yen-Chang; Hileman, Stan; Martin, Karen H; Hull, Robert; Yu, Han-Gang

    2015-02-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated the potential risks of cardiac arrhythmias (such as prolonged QT interval) using tyrosine kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy. We report here that a widely used selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinases, PP2, can inhibit and prevent isoproterenol stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity. In dissected rat sinus node, PP2 inhibited and prevented isoproterenol stimulation of spontaneous beating rate. In isolated sinus node myocytes, PP2 suppressed the hyperpolarization-activated "funny" current (If) by negatively shifting the activation curve and decelerating activation kinetics, associated with decreased cell surface expression and reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated channel 4 (HCN4) channel proteins. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells overexpressing recombinant human HCN4 channels, PP2 reversed isoproterenol stimulation of HCN4 and inhibited HCN4-573x, a cAMP-insensitive human HCN4 mutant. Isoprotenrenol had little effects on HCN4-573x. These results demonstrated that inhibition of presumably tyrosine Src kinase activity in heart by PP2 decreased and prevented the potential β-adrenergic stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity. These effects are mediated, at least partially, by a cAMP-independent attenuation of channel activity and cell surface expression of HCN4, the key channel protein that controls the heart rate. PMID:25658311

  2. Longitudinal momentum fraction XL for two high Pt protons in pp-->ppX reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhalov, D.; Heppelmann, S.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averichev, Y.; Barton, D.; Baturin, V.; Bukhtoyarova, N.; Carroll, A.; Kawabata, T.; Leksanov, A.; Makdisi, Y.; Malki, A.; Minina, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Piasetzky, E.; Schetkovsky, A.; Shimanskiy, S.; Tang, A.; Watson, J. W.; Yoshida, H.

    2000-12-01

    We present an analysis of new data from Experiment E850 at BNL. We have characterized the inclusive cross section near the endpoint for pp exclusive scattering in Hydrogen and in Carbon with incident beam energy of 6 GeV. We select events with a pair of back-to-back hadrons at large transverse momentum. These cross sections are parameterized with a form dσ/dXL˜(1-XL)p, where XL is the ratio of the longitudinal momentum of the observed pair to the total incident beam momentum. Small value of p may suggest that the number of partons participating in the reaction is large and reaction has a strong dependence on the center-of-mass energy. We also discuss nuclear effects observed in our kinematic region.

  3. Diversity in (p)ppGpp metabolism and effectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuanqing; Bittner, Alycia N; Wang, Jue D

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria produce guanosine tetraphosphate and pentaphosphate, collectively named (p)ppGpp, in response to a variety of environmental stimuli. These two remarkable molecules regulate many cellular processes, including the central dogma processes and metabolism, to ensure survival and adaptation. Work in Escherichia coli laid the foundation for understanding the molecular details of (p)ppGpp and its cellular functions. As recent studies expand to other species, it is apparent that there exists considerable variation, with respect to not only (p)ppGpp metabolism, but also to its mechanism of action. From an evolutionary standpoint, this diversification is an elegant example of how different species adapt a particular regulatory network to their diverse lifestyles. PMID:25636134

  4. Development and validation of a robust and sensitive assay for the discovery of selective inhibitors for serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1α (PPP1C) and PP5 (PPP5C).

    PubMed

    Swingle, Mark R; Honkanen, Richard E

    2014-10-01

    Protein phosphatase types 1 α (PP1α/PPP1C) and 5 (PP5/PPP5C) are members of the PPP family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases. PP1 and PP5 share a common catalytic mechanism, and several natural compounds, including okadaic acid, microcystin, and cantharidin, act as strong inhibitors of both enzymes. However, to date there have been no reports of compounds that can selectively inhibit PP1 or PP5, and specific or highly selective inhibitors for either PP1 or PP5 are greatly desired by both the research and pharmaceutical communities. Here we describe the development and optimization of a sensitive and robust (representative PP5C assay data: Z'=0.93; representative PP1Cα assay data: Z'=0.90) fluorescent phosphatase assay that can be used to simultaneously screen chemical libraries and natural product extracts for the presence of catalytic inhibitors of PP1 and PP5. PMID:25383722

  5. Development and Validation of a Robust and Sensitive Assay for the Discovery of Selective Inhibitors for Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatases PP1α (PPP1C) and PP5 (PPP5C)

    PubMed Central

    Swingle, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Protein phosphatase types 1 α (PP1α/PPP1C) and 5 (PP5/PPP5C) are members of the PPP family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases. PP1 and PP5 share a common catalytic mechanism, and several natural compounds, including okadaic acid, microcystin, and cantharidin, act as strong inhibitors of both enzymes. However, to date there have been no reports of compounds that can selectively inhibit PP1 or PP5, and specific or highly selective inhibitors for either PP1 or PP5 are greatly desired by both the research and pharmaceutical communities. Here we describe the development and optimization of a sensitive and robust (representative PP5C assay data: Z′=0.93; representative PP1Cα assay data: Z′=0.90) fluorescent phosphatase assay that can be used to simultaneously screen chemical libraries and natural product extracts for the presence of catalytic inhibitors of PP1 and PP5. PMID:25383722

  6. pp wave big bangs: Matrix strings and shrinking fuzzy spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sumit R.; Michelson, Jeremy

    2005-10-15

    We find pp wave solutions in string theory with null-like linear dilatons. These provide toy models of big bang cosmologies. We formulate matrix string theory in these backgrounds. Near the big bang 'singularity', the string theory becomes strongly coupled but the Yang-Mills description of the matrix string is weakly coupled. The presence of a second length scale allows us to focus on a specific class of non-Abelian configurations, viz. fuzzy cylinders, for a suitable regime of parameters. We show that, for a class of pp waves, fuzzy cylinders which start out big at early times dynamically shrink into usual strings at sufficiently late times.

  7. Checks of asymptotia in pp elastic scattering at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grau, Agnes; Pacetti, Simone; Pancheri, Giulia; Srivastava, Yogendra N.

    2012-07-01

    We parametrize TOTEM data for the elastic differential pp cross section at √{s}=7 TeV in terms of two exponentials with a relative phase. We employ two previously derived sum rules for pp elastic scattering amplitude in impact parameter space to check whether asymptotia has been reached at the LHC. A detailed study of the TOTEM data for the elastic differential cross section at √{s}=7 TeV is made and it is shown that, within errors, the asymptotic sum rules are satisfied at LHC. We propose to use this parametrization to study forthcoming higher energy data.

  8. 75 FR 78705 - Issuance of Exposure Drafts on Implementation Guidance on the Accounting for the Disposal of G-PP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... G-PP&E and Implementation Guidance for Estimating the Historical Cost of G-PP&E AGENCY: Federal... Guidance on the Accounting for the Disposal of G-PP&E and Implementation Guidance for Estimating...

  9. Polarized proton parameters for the 2015 PP-on-Au setup in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-08-25

    Values are given for RHIC circumference shifts due to snakes for various situations. Relevant parameters are tabulated for polarized protons (PP) in the booster and in AGS and RHIC for PP-on-Au stores.

  10. Polarized proton parameters for the 2015 PP-on-Aluminum setup in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-10-02

    Values are given for RHIC circumference shifts due to snakes for various situations. Relevant parameters are tabulated for polarized protons (PP) in the booster and in AGS and RHIC for PP-on-Aluminum stores.

  11. Cloning and Characterization of TaPP2AbB"-α, a Member of the PP2A Regulatory Subunit in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Li, Ang; Mao, Xinguo; Jing, Ruilian

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major Serine/Threonine protein phosphatase, consists of three subunits; a highly conserved structural subunit A, a catalytic subunit C, and a highly variable regulatory subunit B which determines the substrate specificity. Although the functional mechanism of PP2A in signaling transduction in Arabidopsis is known, their physiological roles in wheat remain to be characterized. In this study, we identified a novel regulatory subunit B, TaPP2AbB"-α, in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Subcellular localization indicated that TaPP2AbB"-α is located in the cell membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus. It interacts with both TaPP2Aa and TaPP2Ac. Expression pattern analyses revealed that TaPP2AbB"-α is strongly expressed in roots, and responds to NaCl, polyethylene glycol (PEG), cold and abscisic acid (ABA) stresses at the transcription level. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaPP2AbB"-α developed more lateral roots, especially when treated with mannitol or NaCl. These results suggest that TaPP2AbB"-α, in conjunction with the other two PP2A subunits, is involved in multi-stress response, and positively regulates lateral root development under osmotic stress. PMID:24709994

  12. The Cloning and Functional Characterization of Peach CONSTANS and FLOWERING LOCUS T Homologous Genes PpCO and PpFT

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Hung; Liang, Huike; Wang, Rui; Liu, Xiayan; Li, Tianhong; Qi, Yafei; Yu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Flowering is an essential stage of plant growth and development. The successful transition to flowering not only ensures the completion of plant life cycles, it also serves as the basis for the production of economically important seeds and fruits. CONSTANS (CO) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) are two genes playing critical roles in flowering time control in Arabidopsis. Through homology-based cloning and rapid-amplifications of cDNA ends (RACE), we obtained full-lengths cDNA sequences of Prunus persica CO (PpCO) and Prunus persica FT (PpFT) from peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) and investigated their functions in flowering time regulation. PpCO and PpFT showed high homologies to Arabidopsis CO and FT at DNA, mRNA and protein levels. We showed that PpCO and PpFT were nucleus-localized and both showed transcriptional activation activities in yeast cells, consistent with their potential roles as transcription activators. Moreover, we established that the over-expression of PpCO could restore the late flowering phenotype of the Arabidopsis co-2 mutant, and the late flowering defect of the Arabidopsis ft-1 mutant can be rescued by the over-expression of PpFT, suggesting functional conservations of CO and FT genes in peach and Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that PpCO and PpFT are homologous genes of CO and FT in peach and they may function in regulating plant flowering time. PMID:25905637

  13. Optical screw-wrench for interlocking 2PP-microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Zyla, G.; Ksouri, S. I.; Esen, C.; Ostendorf, A.

    2016-03-01

    Two-photon polymerization (2PP) has emerged as a powerful platform for processing three-dimensional microstructures with high resolution. Furthermore, by adding nanoparticles of different materials to the photopolymer the microstructures can be functionalized, e.g. magnetic or electric properties can be adjusted. However, to combine different functions within one microstructure or to manufacture complex microsystems, assembling techniques for multiple 2PP written building blocks are required. In this paper a qualitative approach for assembling microstructures utilizing optical forces is presented. Therefore, screw and nut shaped microstructures are produced by 2PP-technique and screwed together using a holographic optical tweezer (HOT). The interlocking structures are trapped and rotated into each other to cause connection. In this paper the used parameters and possible designs of the interlocking connection are discussed. These findings provide not only the assembling of building blocks to complex microstructures, rather different functionalized 2PP-microstructures can be combined by simply screwing them together with the use of optical forces.

  14. New results of the Borexino experiment: pp solar neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davini, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Derbin, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Misiaszek, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-07-01

    The Borexino experiment is an ultra-pure liquid scintillator detector, running at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy). Borexino has completed the real time spectroscopy of the solar neutrinos generated in the proton-proton chain in the core of the Sun. This article reviews the Borexino experiment and the first direct measurment of pp solar neutrinos.

  15. The Hyperon {Lambda}(1405) in p+p reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Siebenson, Johannes

    2011-10-21

    We present an analysis of the hyperon {Lambda}(1405) for p+p reactions at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy. The data were taken with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES). A {Lambda}(1405) signal could be reconstructed in both charged decay channels ({Lambda}(1405){yields}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}).

  16. Elevations, plan and section PP of main entrance. San Bernardino ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations, plan and section PP of main entrance. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Library Building. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 9, job no. 315. Scale 1/2 inch to the foot. No date given on sheet (probably March or April, 1927). - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  17. Visualization of the dynamic multimerization of human Cytomegalovirus pp65 in punctuate nuclear foci

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Zongqiang; Zhang Ke; Zhang Zhiping; Liu Yalan; Zhou Yafeng; Wei Hongping; Zhang Xian-En

    2009-09-30

    The phosphorylated protein pp65 of human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the predominant virion protein and the major tegument constituent. It plays important roles in HCMV infection and virion assembly. Live cell imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis showed that HCMV pp65 accumulated dynamically in punctuate nuclear foci when transiently expressed in mammalian cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging disclosed that pp65 can self-interact in its localization foci. Yeast two-hybrid assay verified that pp65 is a self-associating protein, and the N-terminal amino acids 14-22 were determined to be essential for pp65 self-association. However, these amino acids were not related to pp65 localization in the specific nuclear foci. The interaction of pp65 and ppUL97 was also studied by FRET microscopy, and the result suggested that there is another signal sequence in pp65, being the ppUL97 phosphorylation site, that is responsible for localization of pp65 in nuclear foci. These results help to understand the function of pp65 in HCMV infection and virion morphogenesis.

  18. Toughening of wood plastic composite based on X-PP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meekum, U.; Khongrit, A.

    2016-03-01

    Wood plastic composite(WPC) based on crosslinked polypropylene(X-PP)/wood flour was explored. The peroxide/silane was used as crosslinking system. The sauna incubation under moisture saturated oven was applied to accelerate the competition of the siloxy/moisture networking reaction. There were three parts of the research work; design of experiment, toughening of WPC and the effect of peroxide, silane and PP copolymer on properties of the WPC, respectively. In this published work, the toughness improvement of the composite was focused. Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and Ethylene propylene diene terpolymer(EPDM) were employed to improve impact strength via blending with x-PP matrix. Composites were compounded into pellets by co-rotational twin screw extruder and test specimens were prepared by injection molding. Sauna incubation at 105°C for 12 hrs in oven chamber was performed to accelerate the final silane condensation crosslink reaction. MFI, impact strength, flexural properties and heat deflection temperature measurement were conducted. Impact strength, HDT and flexural modulus were improved with increasing UHMWPE content, and the optimal values around 5-10 phr of UHMWPE were achieved. Addition of EPDM elastomer to the matrix blends, reduced flexural strength and modulus but increased impact strength. While incorporation of EPDM into the PP/UHMWPE blends was exhibited much higher impact strength than that of the PP/UHMWPE binary blends. Silane crosslinked through sauna treatment improved the impact strength. HDT were also much risen for the crosslinked composite comparing with the non-crosslinked one.

  19. Proteome-wide search for PP2A substrates in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Manuel; Zhurinsky, Jacob; Iglesias-Romero, Ana B; Sanchez-Romero, Maria A; Flor-Parra, Ignacio; Tomas-Gallardo, Laura; Perez-Pulido, Antonio J; Jimenez, Juan; Daga, Rafael R

    2014-06-01

    PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A) is a major phosphatase in eukaryotic cells that plays an essential role in many processes. PP2A mutations in Schizosaccharomyces pombe result in defects of cell cycle control, cytokinesis and morphogenesis. Which PP2A substrates are responsible for these changes is not known. In this work, we searched for PP2A substrates in S. pombe using two approaches, 2D-DIGE analysis of PP2A complex mutants and identification of PP2A interacting proteins. In both cases, we used MS to identify proteins of interest. In the DIGE experiment, we compared proteomes of wild-type S. pombe, deletion of pta2, the phosphoactivator of the PP2A catalytic subunit, and pab1-4, a mutant of B-type PP2A regulatory subunit. A total of 1742 protein spots were reproducibly resolved by 2D-DIGE and 51 spots demonstrated significant changes between PP2A mutants and the wild-type control. MS analysis of these spots identified 27 proteins that include key regulators of glycerol synthesis, carbon metabolism, amino acid biosyntesis, vitamin production, and protein folding. Importantly, we independently identified a subset of these proteins as PP2A binding partners by affinity precipitation, suggesting they may be direct targets of PP2A. We have validated our approach by demonstrating that phosphorylation of Gpd1, a key enzyme in glycerol biogenesis, is regulated by PP2A and that ability of cells to respond to osmotic stress by synthesizing glycerol is compromised in the PP2A mutants. Our work contributes to a better understanding of PP2A function and identifies potential PP2A substrates. PMID:24634168

  20. Targeting of protein phosphatases PP2A and PP2B to the C-terminus of the L-type calcium channel Ca v1.2.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Ginsburg, Kenneth S; Hall, Duane D; Zimmermann, Maike; Stein, Ivar S; Zhang, Mingxu; Tandan, Samvit; Hill, Joseph A; Horne, Mary C; Bers, Donald; Hell, Johannes W

    2010-12-01

    The L-type Ca(2+) channel Ca(v)1.2 forms macromolecular signaling complexes that comprise the β(2) adrenergic receptor, trimeric G(s) protein, adenylyl cyclase, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) for efficient signaling in heart and brain. The protein phosphatases PP2A and PP2B are part of this complex. PP2A counteracts increase in Ca(v)1.2 channel activity by PKA and other protein kinases, whereas PP2B can either augment or decrease Ca(v)1.2 currents in cardiomyocytes depending on the precise experimental conditions. We found that PP2A binds to two regions in the C-terminus of the central, pore-forming α(1) subunit of Ca(v)1.2: one region spans residues 1795-1818 and the other residues 1965-1971. PP2B binds immediately downstream of residue 1971. Injection of a peptide that contained residues 1965-1971 and displaced PP2A but not PP2B from endogenous Ca(v)1.2 increased basal and isoproterenol-stimulated L-type Ca(2+) currents in acutely isolated cardiomyocytes. Together with our biochemical data, these physiological results indicate that anchoring of PP2A at this site of Ca(v)1.2 in the heart negatively regulates cardiac L-type currents, likely by counterbalancing basal and stimulated phosphorylation that is mediated by PKA and possibly other kinases. PMID:21053940

  1. The PP1 binding code: a molecular-lego strategy that governs specificity.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Lesage, Bart; Görnemann, Janina; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; Bollen, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a single-domain hub protein with nearly 200 validated interactors in vertebrates. PP1-interacting proteins (PIPs) are ubiquitously expressed but show an exceptional diversity in brain, testis and white blood cells. The binding of PIPs is mainly mediated by short motifs that dock to surface grooves of PP1. Although PIPs often contain variants of the same PP1 binding motifs, they differ in the number and combination of docking sites. This molecular-lego strategy for binding to PP1 creates holoenzymes with unique properties. The PP1 binding code can be described as specific, universal, degenerate, nonexclusive and dynamic. PIPs control associated PP1 by interference with substrate recruitment or access to the active site. In addition, some PIPs have a subcellular targeting domain that promotes dephosphorylation by increasing the local concentration of PP1. The diversity of the PP1 interactome and the properties of the PP1 binding code account for the exquisite specificity of PP1 in vivo. PMID:22360570

  2. "PP2C7s", Genes Most Highly Elaborated in Photosynthetic Organisms, Reveal the Bacterial Origin and Stepwise Evolution of PPM/PP2C Protein Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kerk, David; Silver, Dylan; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B G

    2015-01-01

    Mg+2/Mn+2-dependent type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes, mediating diverse cellular signaling processes through metal ion catalyzed dephosphorylation of target proteins. We have identified a distinct PP2C sequence class ("PP2C7s") which is nearly universally distributed in Eukaryotes, and therefore apparently ancient. PP2C7s are by far most prominent and diverse in plants and green algae. Combining phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization predictions, and a distillation of publically available gene expression data, we have traced the evolutionary trajectory of this gene family in photosynthetic eukaryotes, demonstrating two major sequence assemblages featuring a succession of increasingly derived sub-clades. These display predominant expression moving from an ancestral pattern in photosynthetic tissues toward non-photosynthetic, specialized and reproductive structures. Gene co-expression network composition strongly suggests a shifting pattern of PP2C7 gene functions, including possible regulation of starch metabolism for one homologue set in Arabidopsis and rice. Distinct plant PP2C7 sub-clades demonstrate novel amino terminal protein sequences upon motif analysis, consistent with a shifting pattern of regulation of protein function. More broadly, neither the major events in PP2C sequence evolution, nor the origin of the diversity of metal binding characteristics currently observed in different PP2C lineages, are clearly understood. Identification of the PP2C7 sequence clade has allowed us to provide a better understanding of both of these issues. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparisons using Hidden Markov Models strongly suggest that PP2Cs originated in Bacteria (Group II PP2C sequences), entered Eukaryotes through the ancestral mitochondrial endosymbiosis, elaborated in Eukaryotes, then re-entered Bacteria through an inter-domain gene transfer, ultimately producing bacterial Group I PP2C sequences. A key evolutionary

  3. "PP2C7s", Genes Most Highly Elaborated in Photosynthetic Organisms, Reveal the Bacterial Origin and Stepwise Evolution of PPM/PP2C Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Kerk, David; Silver, Dylan; Uhrig, R. Glen; Moorhead, Greg B. G.

    2015-01-01

    Mg+2/Mn+2-dependent type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes, mediating diverse cellular signaling processes through metal ion catalyzed dephosphorylation of target proteins. We have identified a distinct PP2C sequence class (“PP2C7s”) which is nearly universally distributed in Eukaryotes, and therefore apparently ancient. PP2C7s are by far most prominent and diverse in plants and green algae. Combining phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization predictions, and a distillation of publically available gene expression data, we have traced the evolutionary trajectory of this gene family in photosynthetic eukaryotes, demonstrating two major sequence assemblages featuring a succession of increasingly derived sub-clades. These display predominant expression moving from an ancestral pattern in photosynthetic tissues toward non-photosynthetic, specialized and reproductive structures. Gene co-expression network composition strongly suggests a shifting pattern of PP2C7 gene functions, including possible regulation of starch metabolism for one homologue set in Arabidopsis and rice. Distinct plant PP2C7 sub-clades demonstrate novel amino terminal protein sequences upon motif analysis, consistent with a shifting pattern of regulation of protein function. More broadly, neither the major events in PP2C sequence evolution, nor the origin of the diversity of metal binding characteristics currently observed in different PP2C lineages, are clearly understood. Identification of the PP2C7 sequence clade has allowed us to provide a better understanding of both of these issues. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparisons using Hidden Markov Models strongly suggest that PP2Cs originated in Bacteria (Group II PP2C sequences), entered Eukaryotes through the ancestral mitochondrial endosymbiosis, elaborated in Eukaryotes, then re-entered Bacteria through an inter-domain gene transfer, ultimately producing bacterial Group I PP2C sequences. A key

  4. Silencing PP2A inhibitor by lenti-shRNA interference ameliorates neuropathologies and memory deficits in tg2576 mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gong-Ping; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Xin; Shi, Hai-Rong; Liu, Xing-Hua; Chai, Gao-Shang; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Peng, Cai-Xia; Hu, Juan; Li, Xia-Chun; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2013-12-01

    Deficits of protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) play a crucial role in tau hyperphosphorylation, amyloid overproduction, and synaptic suppression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), in which PP2A is inactivated by the endogenously increased inhibitory protein, namely inhibitor-2 of PP2A (I2(PP2A)). Therefore, in vivo silencing I2(PP2A) may rescue PP2A and mitigate AD neurodegeneration. By infusion of lentivirus-shRNA targeting I2(PP2A) (LV-siI2(PP2A)) into hippocampus and frontal cortex of 11-month-old tg2576 mice, we demonstrated that expression of LV-siI2(PP2A) decreased remarkably the elevated I2(PP2A) in both mRNA and protein levels. Simultaneously, the PP2A activity was restored with the mechanisms involving reduction of the inhibitory binding of I2(PP2A) to PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2AC), repression of the inhibitory Leu309-demethylation and elevation of PP2AC. Silencing I2(PP2A) induced a long-lasting attenuation of amyloidogenesis in tg2576 mice with inhibition of amyloid precursor protein hyperphosphorylation and β-secretase activity, whereas simultaneous inhibition of PP2A abolished the antiamyloidogenic effects of I2(PP2A) silencing. Finally, silencing I2(PP2A) could improve learning and memory of tg2576 mice with preservation of several memory-associated components. Our data reveal that targeting I2(PP2A) can efficiently rescue Aβ toxicities and improve the memory deficits in tg2576 mice, suggesting that I2(PP2A) could be a promising target for potential AD therapies. PMID:23922015

  5. Search for collective expansion in pp collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floris, Michele; ALICE Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Proton-proton collisions at LHC energies reach a multiplicity density comparable to nuclear collisions at lower energy. It is therefore natural to ask whether the collective bulk behavior observed in heavy-ion collisions develops already in p-p collisions. In previous experiments, the study of pt distributions of identified particles in the framework of blast wave models provided considerable insight on the collective behavior and on the freeze-out parameters of the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. These ideas have recently been applied also to p-p collisions at RHIC. The ALICE experiment, thanks to its excellent PID capabilities and pt coverage, offers an ideal test-bench for these studies at the LHC. In this work, we discuss the performance and analysis strategy of ALICE for blast wave studies and present some preliminary results on identified particle spectra, based on the data collected in the late 2009.

  6. Using anti pp annihilation to find exotic mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    Present data suggests that a number of mesons have been found which cannot be accommodated in standard anti qq multiplets. Theory suggests that such exotic mesons should exist in the spectrum of Quantum Chromodynamics, but provides little guide to their properties. It is argued that a high luminosity, low energy anti pp machine would be a powerful tool with which to search for such exotics.

  7. Prompt photon production in p-p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleymans, J.; Quack, E.; Redlich, K.

    1995-07-01

    A systematic study of the inclusive photon cross-section in p-p collisions is presented. The dependence of the {gamma} rates on the renormalization and factorization scales is discussed. A comparison is made with experimental data for centre-of-mass energies ranging from 23 GeV to 1.8 TeV. Predictions of the cross-sections are given for two different sets of structure functions for RHIC and LHC energies.

  8. Results from Vernier scans during the RHIC 2008 PP Run

    SciTech Connect

    Drees,A.; D Ottavio, T.

    2009-05-04

    Using the vernier scan or Van der Meer scan technique, where one beam is swept stepwise across the other while measuring the collision rate as a function of beam displacement, the transverse beam profiles, the luminosity and the effective cross section of the detector in question can be measured. This report briefly recalls the vernier scan method and presents results from the 100 GeV 2008 RHIC polarized proton (pp) run.

  9. Polarization Processes of Nanocomposite Silicate-EVA and PP Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, Gian Carlo; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Testa, Luigi; Motori, Antonio; Saccani, Andrea; Patuelli, Francesca

    Recent works indicate that polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-vinylacetate (EVA) filled by nanosilicates may present low content of space charge and high electric strength. Investigations are being made to explain nanocomposite behaviour and characterize their electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. In this paper, the results of broad-band dielectric spectroscopy performed on EVA and PP filled by layered nanosized silicates are reported. Isochronal and isothermal curves of complex permittivity, as well as activation energies of the relaxation processes, are presented and discussed. Nanostructuration gives rise to substantial changes in the polarisation and dielectric loss behaviour. While the relaxation process of EVA, associated with glass transition of the material amorphous phase, results unchanged from base to nanostructured material, nanocomposites EVA and PP have shown the rise of a new process at higher temperatures respect to the typical host material processes, as well as a different distribution of relaxation processes. Changes in space charge accumulation in relation to the effectiveness of the purification process performed upon nanostructured materials are also reported: while the dispersion of the clean clays leads to a reduction of the space charge, especially at high fields, an unclean filler gives rise to significant homo-charge accumulation and interfacial polarisation phenomena.

  10. Generation IV PR and PP Methods and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bari,R.A.

    2008-10-13

    This paper presents an evaluation methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) of Generation IV nuclear energy systems (NESs). For a proposed NES design, the methodology defines a set of challenges, analyzes system response to these challenges, and assesses outcomes. The challenges to the NES are the threats posed by potential actors (proliferant States or sub-national adversaries). The characteristics of Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate the response of the system and determine its resistance against proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and terrorism threats. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of six measures for PR and three measures for PP, which are the high-level PR&PP characteristics of the NES. The methodology is organized to allow evaluations to be performed at the earliest stages of system design and to become more detailed and more representative as design progresses. Uncertainty of results are recognized and incorporated into the evaluation at all stages. The results are intended for three types of users: system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders. Particular current relevant activities will be discussed in this regard. The methodology has been illustrated in a series of demonstration and case studies and these will be summarized in the paper.

  11. Cardiomyocyte specific deletion of PP2A causes cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Fang, Chao; Xu, Di; Xu, Yidan; Fu, Heling; Li, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common pathological alteration in heart disease, which has been reported to be connected with serine/threonine protein phosphatases that control the dephosphorylation of a variety of cardiac proteins. Herein, we generated protein phosphatase type 2A knockout expressing a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase protein fused to two mutant estrogen-receptor ligand-binding domains (MerCreMer) under the control of the a-myosin heavy chain promoter. Cardiac function of mice was determined by echocardiography. Decrease in PP2A activity leads to increased cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis. Loss of PP2ACα leads to the heart failure, including the changes of EF, FS, LV, ANP and BNP. On the molecular level, knockout mice shows increased expression of B55a and B56e at 60 days after tamoxifen injection. Additionally, the regulation of the Akt/GSK3β/β-catenin pathway is severely disturbed in knockout mice. In conclusion, cardiomyocyte specific deletion of PP2A gene causes the cardiac hypertrophy. We will use the knockout mice to generate a type of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy mouse model with myocardial fibrosis. PMID:27186301

  12. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase type 5 (PP5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, Mark R.; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Honkanen, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) is a member of the PPP-gene family of protein phosphatases that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues and is highly conserved among eukaryotes. PP5 associates with several proteins that affect signal transduction networks, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90)-heterocomplex, the CDC16 and CDC27 subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex, elF2alpha kinase, the A subunit of PP2A, the G12-alpha / G13-alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and DNA-PK. The catalytic domain of PP5 (PP5c) shares 35-45% sequence identity with the catalytic domains of other PPP-phosphatases, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), -2B / calcineurin (PP2B), -4 (PP4), -6 (PP6), and -7 (PP7). Like PP1, PP2A and PP4, PP5 is also sensitive to inhibition by okadaic acid, microcystin, cantharidin, tautomycin, and calyculin A. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. From this structure we propose a mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif. The structure of PP5c provides a possible structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  13. An altered form of pp60/sup c-src/ is expressed primarily in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Le Beau, J.M.; Wiestler, O.D.; Walter, G.

    1987-11-01

    The expression of two forms of pp60/sup c-scr/, pp60 and pp60/sup +/, was measured in the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system. Both forms were expressed in the CNS, whereas only pp60 was primarily detected in the peripheral nervous system. Our findings suggest that pp60/sup +/ may play a role in events important to the CNS.

  14. PP2A regulates kinetochore-microtubule attachment during meiosis I in oocyte.

    PubMed

    Tang, An; Shi, Peiliang; Song, Anying; Zou, Dayuan; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Pengyu; Huang, Zan; Wang, Qinghua; Lin, Zhaoyu; Gao, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    Studies using in vitro cultured oocytes have indicated that the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major serine/threonine protein phosphatase, participates in multiple steps of meiosis. Details of oocyte maturation regulation by PP2A remain unclear and an in vivo model can provide more convincing information. Here, we inactivated PP2A by mutating genes encoding for its catalytic subunits (PP2Acs) in mouse oocytes. We found that eliminating both PP2Acs caused female infertility. Oocytes lacking PP2Acs failed to complete 1(st) meiotic division due to chromosome misalignment and abnormal spindle assembly. In mitosis, PP2A counteracts Aurora kinase B/C (AurkB/C) to facilitate correct kinetochore-microtubule (KT-MT) attachment. In meiosis I in oocyte, we found that PP2Ac deficiency destabilized KT-MT attachments. Chemical inhibition of AurkB/C in PP2Ac-null oocytes partly restored the formation of lateral/merotelic KT-MT attachments but not correct KT-MT attachments. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PP2Acs are essential for chromosome alignments and regulate the formation of correct KT-MT attachments in meiosis I in oocytes. PMID:27096707

  15. Molecular Mimicry Regulates ABA Signaling by SnRK2 Kinases and PP2C Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Soon, Fen-Fen; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; West, Graham M.; Kovach, Amanda; Tan, M.H. Eileen; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; He, Yuanzheng; Xu, Yong; Chalmers, Michael J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Zhang, Huiming; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Cutler, Sean; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Griffin, Patrick R.; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2014-10-02

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential hormone for plants to survive environmental stresses. At the center of the ABA signaling network is a subfamily of type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs), which form exclusive interactions with ABA receptors and subfamily 2 Snfl-related kinase (SnRK2s). Here, we report a SnRK2-PP2C complex structure, which reveals marked similarity in PP2C recognition by SnRK2 and ABA receptors. In the complex, the kinase activation loop docks into the active site of PP2C, while the conserved ABA-sensing tryptophan of PP2C inserts into the kinase catalytic cleft, thus mimicking receptor-PP2C interactions. These structural results provide a simple mechanism that directly couples ABA binding to SnRK2 kinase activation and highlight a new paradigm of kinase-phosphatase regulation through mutual packing of their catalytic sites.

  16. Recent functional insights into the role of (p)ppGpp in bacterial physiology

    PubMed Central

    Hauryliuk, Vasili; Atkinson, Gemma C.; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.; Tenson, Tanel; Gerdes, Kenn

    2015-01-01

    The alarmone (p)ppGpp is involved in regulating growth and several different stress responses in bacteria. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of (p)ppGpp metabolism and (p)ppGpp-mediated regulation. In this Review, we summarize these recent insights, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms governing the activity of the RelA/SpoT Homologue (RSH) proteins, which are key players that regulate the cellular leves of (p)ppGpp, the structural basis of transcriptional regulation by (p)ppGpp and the role of (p)ppGpp in GTP metabolism and in the emergence of bacterial persisters. PMID:25853779

  17. ppGpp couples transcription to DNA repair in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Epshtein, Vitaly; Benjamin, Bradley; Proshkin, Sergey; Mironov, Alexander; Cashel, Michael; Nudler, Evgeny

    2016-05-20

    The small molecule alarmone (p)ppGpp mediates bacterial adaptation to nutrient deprivation by altering the initiation properties of RNA polymerase (RNAP). ppGpp is generated in Escherichia coli by two related enzymes, RelA and SpoT. We show that ppGpp is robustly, but transiently, induced in response to DNA damage and is required for efficient nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER). This explains why relA-spoT-deficient cells are sensitive to diverse genotoxic agents and ultraviolet radiation, whereas ppGpp induction renders them more resistant to such challenges. The mechanism of DNA protection by ppGpp involves promotion of UvrD-mediated RNAP backtracking. By rendering RNAP backtracking-prone, ppGpp couples transcription to DNA repair and prompts transitions between repair and recovery states. PMID:27199428

  18. Features of the pp60v-src carboxyl terminus that are required for transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Yaciuk, P; Shalloway, D

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of the biological and biochemical activities of pp60recombinant-src proteins encoded by 12 carboxyl-terminal mutants showed that a wide family of alternate src carboxyl termini permit complete transforming and kinase activities. src proteins having carboxyl termini which are up to 10 amino acids longer than that of pp60c-src (17 amino acids longer than that of pp60v-src) still permit transformation. Transformation-positive mutations preserve leucine-516, a residue which is highly conserved in protein-tyrosine kinase sequences; removal causes in vivo protein instability. Successive deletion mutants show that this residue is at the boundary of a region required for kinase activity. pp60src which is truncated just outside this point still transforms cells and binds both pp50 and pp90 cellular proteins. Images PMID:3097514

  19. Updating Boer-Mulders functions from unpolarized pd and pp Drell-Yan data

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan

    2010-02-01

    We extract the Boer-Mulders functions for the proton by combining the unpolarized pd and pp Drell-Yan data measured by the E866/NuSea Collaboration by the assumption that the cos2{phi} asymmetry is from the Boer-Mulders functions. Using the extracted Boer-Mulders functions, we present the predictions for the cos2{phi} asymmetries in future pp experiments at J-PARC and pp experiments at PANDA and PAX.

  20. Probing the Inner Core with P'P'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, E. A.; Irving, J. C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Geophysical observations of the inner core today improve our understanding not just of the processes occurring in the core at the present, but also those that have occurred in the past. As the inner core freezes it may record clues as to the state of the Earth at the time of growth, although the texture of the inner core may also be modified through post-solidification mechanisms. The seismic structure of the inner core is not simple; the dominant pattern is one of anisotropic and isotropic differences between the Eastern and Western 'hemispheres' of the inner core. Additionally, there is evidence for an innermost inner core, layering of the uppermost inner core, and possibly super-rotation of the inner core relative to the mantle. Most body wave studies of inner core structure use PKP-PKIKP differential travel times to constrain velocity variations within the inner core. However, body wave studies are inherently limited by the geometry of fixed sources and stations, and thus there are some areas of the inner core that are relatively under-sampled, even in today's data-rich world. Here, we examine the differential travel times of the different branches of P'P' (PKIKPPKIKP and PKPPKP), comparing the arrival time of inner core sensitive branch, P'P'df, with the arrival times of branches that only reach the outer core. By using P'P' we are able to exploit alternative ray geometries and sample different regions of the inner core to those areas accessible to studies which utilize PKIKP. We use both linear and non-linear stacking methods to make observations of small amplitude P'P' phases. These measurements match the broad scale hemispherical pattern of anisotropy in the inner core.

  1. The GridPP DIRAC project: Implementation of a multi-VO DIRAC service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, D.; Colling, D.; Currie, R.; Fayer, S.; Huffman, A.; Martyniak, J.; Rand, D.; Richards, A.

    2015-12-01

    The GridPP consortium provides computing support to many high energy physics projects in the UK. As part of this GridPP offers access to a large amount of highly distributed resources across the UK for multiple collaborations. The userbase supported by GridPP includes hundreds of users spanning multiple virtual organisations with many different computing requirements. In order to provide a common interface to these distributed a centralised DIRAC instance has been setup at Imperial College London. This paper describes the experiences learnt from deploying this DIRAC instance and the modifications that have made to support the GridPP use case.

  2. Effect of blend ratio of PP/kapok blend nonwoven fabrics on oil sorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Hee; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Do-Hyung; Shin, Min-Seung; Jung, Young-Jin; Lee, Dong-Jin; Kim, Han-Do

    2013-01-01

    More research and development on novel oil sorbent materials is needed to protect the environmental pollution. New nonwoven fabrics (pads) of polypropylene (PP)/kapok blends (blend ratio: 100/0, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75 and 10/90) were prepared by needle punching process at a fixed (optimized) condition (punch density: 50 punches/cm2 and depth: 4mm). This study focused on the effect of blend ratio of PP/kapok nonwoven fabrics on oil sorption capacities to find the best blend ratio having the highest synergy effect. The PP/kapok blend (50/50) sample has the lowest bulk density and showed the best oil absorption capacity. The oil sorption capacity of PP/kapok blend (50/50) nonwoven fabric for kerosene/soybean oil [21.09/27.01 (g oil/g sorbent)] was 1.5-2 times higher than those of commercial PP pad oil sorbents. The highest synergy effect of PP/kapok blend (50/50) was ascribed to the lowest bulk density of PP/kapok blend (50/50), which might be due to the highest morphologically incompatibility between PP fibre and kapok. These results suggest that the PP/kapok blend (50/50) having the highest synergy effect has a high potential as a new high-performance oil sorbent material. PMID:24617076

  3. The Structural Basis for Tight Control of PP2A Methylation and Function by LCMT-1

    SciTech Connect

    V Stanevich; L Jiang; K Satyshur; Y Li; P Jeffrey; Z Li; P Menden; M Semmelhack; Y Xing

    2011-12-31

    Proper formation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) holoenzymes is essential for the fitness of all eukaryotic cells. Carboxyl methylation of the PP2A catalytic subunit plays a critical role in regulating holoenzyme assembly; methylation is catalyzed by PP2A-specific methyltransferase LCMT-1, an enzyme required for cell survival. We determined crystal structures of human LCMT-1 in isolation and in complex with PP2A stabilized by a cofactor mimic. The structures show that the LCMT-1 active-site pocket recognizes the carboxyl terminus of PP2A, and, interestingly, the PP2A active site makes extensive contacts to LCMT-1. We demonstrated that activation of the PP2A active site stimulates methylation, suggesting a mechanism for efficient conversion of activated PP2A into substrate-specific holoenzymes, thus minimizing unregulated phosphatase activity or formation of inactive holoenzymes. A dominant-negative LCMT-1 mutant attenuates the cell cycle without causing cell death, likely by inhibiting uncontrolled phosphatase activity. Our studies suggested mechanisms of LCMT-1 in tight control of PP2A function, important for the cell cycle and cell survival.

  4. The Structural Basis for Tight Control of PP2A Methylation and Function by LCMT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Stanevich, Vitali; Jiang, Li; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Li, Yongfeng; Jeffrey, Philip D.; Li, Zhu; Menden, Patrick; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Xing, Yongna

    2012-05-29

    Proper formation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) holoenzymes is essential for the fitness of all eukaryotic cells. Carboxyl methylation of the PP2A catalytic subunit plays a critical role in regulating holoenzyme assembly; methylation is catalyzed by PP2A-specific methyltransferase LCMT-1, an enzyme required for cell survival. We determined crystal structures of human LCMT-1 in isolation and in complex with PP2A stabilized by a cofactor mimic. The structures show that the LCMT-1 active-site pocket recognizes the carboxyl terminus of PP2A, and, interestingly, the PP2A active site makes extensive contacts to LCMT-1. We demonstrated that activation of the PP2A active site stimulates methylation, suggesting a mechanism for efficient conversion of activated PP2A into substrate-specific holoenzymes, thus minimizing unregulated phosphatase activity or formation of inactive holoenzymes. A dominant-negative LCMT-1 mutant attenuates the cell cycle without causing cell death, likely by inhibiting uncontrolled phosphatase activity. Our studies suggested mechanisms of LCMT-1 in tight control of PP2A function, important for the cell cycle and cell survival.

  5. Search for universal extra dimensions in pp collisions.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Aoki, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atkins, S; Atramentov, O; Augsten, K; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-Guerra, G A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goryachev, V N; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jamin, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padilla, M; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tschann-Grimm, K; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2012-03-30

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb(-1), collected by the D0 detector at a pp center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R(-1)>260 GeV in a minimal UED model. PMID:22540694

  6. Inclusive jet production in pp(macro) collisions.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B; Abdesselam, A; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Alves, G A; Amos, N; Anderson, E W; Baarmand, M M; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, T C; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Boehnlein, A; Bojko, N I; Borcherding, F; Brandt, A; Breedon, R; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, D; Casilum, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Chung, M; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Cochran, J; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Cummings, M A; Cutts, D; Davis, G A; Davis, K; De, K; Del Signore, K; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Di Loreto, G; Doulas, S; Draper, P; Ducros, Y; Dudko, L V; Duensing, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fahland, T; Feher, S; Fein, D; Ferbel, T; Fisk, H E; Fisyak, Y; Flattum, E; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M; Frame, K C; Fuess, S; Gallas, E; Galyaev, A N; Gao, M; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gilmartin, R; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Gómez, G; Goncharov, P I; González Solís, J L; Gordon, H; Goss, L T; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graf, N; Graham, G; Grannis, P D; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Grinstein, S; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Gupta, A; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Hahn, K S; Hall, R E; Hanlet, P; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Heuring, T; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoftun, J S; Hou, S; Huang, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jaffré, M; Jerger, S A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Karmgard, D; Kim, S K; Klima, B; Klopfenstein, C; Knuteson, B; Ko, W; Kohli, J M; Kostritskiy, A V; Kotcher, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovsky, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G; Leflat, A; Leggett, C; Lehner, F; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Lundstedt, C; Luo, C; Maciel, A K; Madaras, R J; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Martin, R D; Mauritz, K M; May, B; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McDonald, J; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Meng, X C; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mishra, C S; Mokhov, N; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M; da Motta, H; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Negroni, S; Norman, D; Nunnemann, T; Oesch, L; Oguri, V; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Pan, L J; Papageorgiou, K; Para, A; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Paterno, M; Patwa, A; Pawlik, B; Perkins, J; Peters, M; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piekarz, H; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quintas, P Z; Raja, R; Rajagopalan, S; Ramberg, E; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rha, J; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rockwell, T; Roco, M; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rutherfoord, J; Santoro, A; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Sen, N; Shabalina, E; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Singh, H; Singh, J B; Sirotenko, V; Slattery, P; Smith, E; Smith, R P; Snihur, R; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Sorín, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbrück, G; Stephens, R W; Stichelbaut, F; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thompson, J; Toback, D; Tripathi, S M; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; van Gemmeren, P; Vaniev, V; Van Kooten, R; Varelas, N; Volkov, A A; Vorobiev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, H; Wang, Z M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; White, J T; Whiteson, D; Wightman, J A; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Wirjawan, J V; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Yamada, R; Yamin, P; Yasuda, T; Yip, K; Youssef, S; Yu, J; Yu, Z; Zanabria, M; Zheng, H; Zhou, Z; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2001-02-26

    We report a new measurement of the pseudorapidity (eta) and transverse-energy ( E(T)) dependence of the inclusive jet production cross section in pp(macro) collisions at square root of s = 1.8 TeV using 95 pb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The differential cross section d(2)sigma/(dE(T)d eta) is presented up to eta = 3, significantly extending previous measurements. The results are in good overall agreement with next-to-leading order predictions from QCD and indicate a preference for certain parton distribution functions. PMID:11290229

  7. Nonminimally coupled gravitational and electromagnetic fields: pp-wave solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dereli, Tekin; Sert, Oezcan

    2011-03-15

    We give the Lagrangian formulation of a generic nonminimally extended Einstein-Maxwell theory with an action that is linear in the curvature and quadratic in the electromagnetic field. We derive the coupled field equations by a first-order variational principle using the method of Lagrange multipliers. We look for solutions describing plane-fronted Einstein-Maxwell waves with parallel rays. We give a family of exact pp-wave solutions associated with a partially massless spin-2 photon and a partially massive spin-2 graviton.

  8. Gamma radiation induced degradation in PE-PP block copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, H. R.; Sreepad, H. R.; Ahmed, Khaleel; Govindaiah, T. N.

    2012-06-01

    In the present investigation, effect of gamma irradiation on the PP-PE block copolymer has been studied. The polymer has been subjected to gamma irradiation from 100 to 500 Mrad dosages. Characterization of the polymer using XRD and FTIR was done both before irradiation and after irradiation in each step. Effect of irradiation on the electrical properties of the material has also been studied. FTIR study shows that the sample loses C - C stretching mode of vibration but gains C=C stretching mode of vibration after irradiation. Present investigation clearly indicates that though the electrical conductivity increases in the material, it undergoes degradation and shows brittleness due to irradiation.

  9. Gamma radiation induced degradation in PE-PP block copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, H. R.; Sreepad, H. R.; Ahmed, Khaleel; Govindaiah, T. N.

    2012-06-05

    In the present investigation, effect of gamma irradiation on the PP-PE block copolymer has been studied. The polymer has been subjected to gamma irradiation from 100 to 500 Mrad dosages. Characterization of the polymer using XRD and FTIR was done both before irradiation and after irradiation in each step. Effect of irradiation on the electrical properties of the material has also been studied. FTIR study shows that the sample loses C - C stretching mode of vibration but gains C=C stretching mode of vibration after irradiation. Present investigation clearly indicates that though the electrical conductivity increases in the material, it undergoes degradation and shows brittleness due to irradiation.

  10. Influence of successive plasma treatments on PP foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, T.; Morent, R.; De Geyter, N.; Leys, C.

    2011-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) foil is treated with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma operating in helium at medium pressure. The influence of exposure to the atmosphere between successive treatments is studied by varying the exposure time. Each PP sample is treated with subsequent treatment steps of 5 s. Between two treatment steps, different procedures are applied: 1) the sample remains in the discharge chamber at medium pressure (under helium atmosphere) for a certain time before it is treated again or 2) the pressure is increased to atmospheric pressure, so the sample remains exposed to atmospheric air for a certain time and afterwards the system is pumped down again to medium pressure before it undergoes a successive helium plasma treatment. The treated samples are analysed using contact angle measurements. The results show that exposure to the atmosphere between two treatment steps leads to a lower contact angle. The longer the exposure time, the lower the contact angle becomes. Another experiment showed that the treatment effect could be gradually removed by applying several short plasma treatments of 1 s to saturated samples. With every short treatment step, the contact angle becomes higher. It is believed that this is due to etching of the surface. In the near future, both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis on some selected samples are planned to elucidate the chemical and/or physical nature of the observed phenomena.

  11. N* production from pp and p-barp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Cao Xu; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2011-10-21

    With an effective Lagrangian approach, we give a full analysis on the NN{yields}NN{pi}{pi} and pp{yields}pn{pi}{sup +} reactions for proton beam energy from 1 to 1.5 GeV. The results are very consistent with the experiment data from CELSIUS, KEK, COSY, and so on. Based on these results, we consider the N-barN{yields}N-barN{pi}{pi} and p-barp{yields}p-barn{pi}{sup +} for proton beam energy up to 4 GeV. Compare to the pp collisions, there are many benefits to study N* resonances in these two reactions. And for the high proton beam energy up to 15 GeV, we consider some new resonances with hidden charm which are definitely beyond three constituent quarks model in the p-barp{yields}p-barpJ/{psi} and p-barp{yields}p-barp{eta}{sub c}, where there are very nice places to find these new N{sub cc}-bar*. The predicted results about p-barp collisions can be looked for at the forthcoming PANDA/FAIR experiments.

  12. PHAPI/pp32 Suppresses Tumorigenesis by Stimulating Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wei; da Graca, Li S.; Shao, Yufang; Yin, Qian; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Xuejun

    2009-01-01

    PHAPI/pp32 is a tumor suppressor whose expression is altered in various human cancers. Although PHAPI possesses multiple biochemical activities, the molecular basis for its tumor-suppressive function has remained obscure. Recently we identified PHAPI as an apoptotic enhancer that stimulates apoptosome-mediated caspase activation. In this study, we defined the structural requirement for its activity to stimulate caspase activation using a series of truncation mutants of PHAPI. Further, utilizing these mutants, we provide evidence to support the model that the apoptotic activity of PHAPI is required for its tumor-suppressive capability. Consistently, pp32R1, a close homolog of PHAPI and yet an oncoprotein, is not able to stimulate caspase activation. A highly discrete region between these two proteins localizes to an essential caspase activation motif of PHAPI. Additionally, PHAPI is predominantly a nuclear protein, and it can translocate to the cytoplasm during apoptosis. Disruption of the nuclear localization signal of PHAPI caused a modest decrease of its tumor-suppressive function, indicating that nuclear localization of PHAPI contributes to, but is not essential for, tumor suppression. PMID:19121999

  13. Delayed Amyloid Plaque Deposition and Behavioral Deficits in Outcrossed AβPP/PS1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Brian A.; Kerrisk, Meghan E.; Kaufman, Adam C.; Nygaard, Haakon B.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative dementia characterized by amyloid plaque accumulation, synapse/dendrite loss, and cognitive impairment. Transgenic mice expressing mutant forms of amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) recapitulate several aspects of this disease and provide a useful model system for studying elements of AD progression. AβPP/PS1 mice have been previously shown to exhibit behavioral deficits and amyloid plaque deposition between 4–9 months of age. We crossed AβPP/PS1 animals with mice of a mixed genetic background (C57BL/6 × 129/SvJ) and investigated the development of AD-like features in the resulting outcrossed mice. The onset of memory-based behavioral impairment is delayed considerably in outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice relative to inbred mice on a C57BL/6 background. While inbred AβPP/PS1 mice develop deficits in radial-arm water maze performance and novel object recognition as early as 8 months, outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice do not display defects until 18 months. Within the forebrain, we find that inbred AβPP/PS1 mice have significantly higher amyloid plaque burden at 12 months than outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice of the same age. Surprisingly, inbred AβPP/PS1 mice at 8 months have low plaque burden suggesting that plaque burden alone cannot explain the accompanying behavioral deficits. Analysis of AβPP processing revealed that elevated levels of soluble Aβ correlate with the degree of behavioral impairment in both strains. Taken together, these findings suggest that animal behavior, amyloid plaque deposition, and AβPP processing are sensitive to genetic differences between mouse strains. PMID:23047754

  14. pp{yields}p{Lambda}K{sup +} reaction in search for the K{sup -}pp state - quest for a kaonic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Ken; Kienle, Paul; Maggiora, Marco; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    2011-10-21

    The dibaryonic kaonic nuclear bound state, K{sup -}pp is searched by studying an exclusive p+p{yields}p+{Lambda}+K{sup +} process at several beam energies. A signature of the K{sup -}pp is explored in a p+p{yields}X({identical_to}K{sup -}pp)+K{sup +} reaction that follows a decay of the X into p+{Lambda}. We found in a missing-mass {Delta}M(K{sup +}) spectrum and a {Lambda}p invariant-mass M({Lambda}p) spectrum of DISTO data at 2.85 GeV a resonance with M = 2267 MeV/c{sup 2} and {Gamma} = 118 MeV. Those events are found to be associated with a mono energetic kaon. We investigate this resonance as a candidate of the K{sup -}pp further also with a different beam energies.

  15. M-theory on pp-waves with a holomorphic superpotential and its matrix description

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nakwoo

    2008-11-23

    We study relationships between a new class of inhomogeneous pp-waves in D = 11 supergravity and Matrix models with a generic superpotential. One can consider supermembrane in the pp-wave background and obtain the interacting matrix model via discretizing the membrane worldvolume.

  16. Targeting Inhibitors of the Tumor Suppressor PP2A for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Amy S.; Allen-Petersen, Brittany; Daniel, Colin J.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhiping; Rodriguez, Sarah; Impey, Soren; Oddo, Jessica; Vitek, Michael P.; Lopez, Charles; Christensen, Dale J.; Sheppard, Brett; Sears, Rosalie C.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease that is usually diagnosed in the advanced stages when few effective therapies are available. Given the aggressive clinical course of this disease and lack of good treatment options, the development of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of pancreatic cancer is of the upmost importance. Several pathways shown to contribute to pancreatic cancer progression are negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Here, the endogenous inhibitors of PP2A, SET (also known as I2PP2A) and Cancerous Inhibitor of PP2A (CIP2A), were shown to be overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer, contributing to decreased PP2A activity, and overexpression and stabilization of the oncoprotein c-Myc, a key PP2A target. Knockdown of SET or CIP2A increases PP2A activity, increases c-Myc degradation, and decreases the tumorigenic potential of pancreatic cancer cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, treatment with a novel SET inhibitor, OP449, pharmacologically recapitulates the phenotypes and significantly reduces proliferation and tumorigenic potential of several pancreatic cancer cell lines, with an accompanying attenuation of cell growth and survival signaling. Furthermore, primary cells from pancreatic cancer patients were sensitive to OP449 treatment, indicating that PP2A regulated pathways are highly relevant to this deadly disease. PMID:24667985

  17. The tumor suppressor PP2A Abeta regulates the RalA GTPase.

    PubMed

    Sablina, Anna A; Chen, Wen; Arroyo, Jason D; Corral, Laura; Hector, Melissa; Bulmer, Sara E; DeCaprio, James A; Hahn, William C

    2007-06-01

    The serine-threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a heterotrimeric enzyme family that regulates numerous signaling pathways. Biallelic mutations of the structural PP2A Abeta subunit occur in several types of human tumors; however, the functional consequences of these cancer-associated PP2A Abeta mutations in cell transformation remain undefined. Here we show that suppression of PP2A Abeta expression permits immortalized human cells to achieve a tumorigenic state. Cancer-associated Abeta mutants fail to reverse tumorigenic phenotype induced by PP2A Abeta suppression, indicating that these mutants function as null alleles. Wild-type PP2A Abeta but not cancer-derived Abeta mutants form a complex with the small GTPase RalA. PP2A Abeta-containing complexes dephosphorylate RalA at Ser183 and Ser194, inactivating RalA and abolishing its transforming function. These observations identify PP2A Abeta as a tumor suppressor gene that transforms immortalized human cells by regulating the function of RalA. PMID:17540176

  18. Evaluation of PpIX formation in Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia I (CIN) using widefield fluorescence images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Inada, Natalia M.; Fortunato, Thereza C.; Lombardi, Welington; da Silva, Eduardo V.; Vollet Filho, José D.; Kurachi, Cristina; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-03-01

    Optical techniques has been described as auxiliary technology for screening of neoplasia because shows the potential for tissues differentiation in real-time and it is a noninvasive detection and safe. However, only endogenous fluorophores presents the lesion may be insufficient and needed of the administration of the fluorophores synthesized, such as, precursor molecule of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) induced by 5- aminolevulinic acid and your derivatives. Topical application of methylaminolevulinate (MAL), induces formation of the endogenous photosensitizer, PpIX in tissues where carcinogenesis has begun. The PpIX tend to accumulate in premalignant and malignant tissues and the illumination with light with appropriate wavelength beginning to excitation of PpIX fluorescence, which helps to localize PpIX-rich areas and identify potentially malignant tissues. The aim of the study is to evaluate the production of PpIX in the cervix with CIN I through of the fluorescence images captured after 1 hour of cream application. It was possible to visualize PpIX fluorescence in cervix and it was possible to observe the selectivity in fluorescence in squamous-columnar junction, which a pre-cancerous condition (CIN) and usually is localized. Through the image processing it was possible to quantify the increase of red fluorescence. For the CIN I the increase of red fluorescence was approximately of 4 times indicating a good PpIX formation.

  19. Synaptic NMDA receptor stimulation activates PP1 by inhibiting its phosphorylation by Cdk5

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hailong; Sun, Lu; Siddoway, Benjamin A.; Petralia, Ronald S.; Yang, Hongtian; Gu, Hua; Nairn, Angus C.

    2013-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein phosphatase protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is known to play an important role in learning and memory by mediating local and downstream aspects of synaptic signaling, but how PP1 activity is controlled in different forms of synaptic plasticity remains unknown. We find that synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor stimulation in neurons leads to activation of PP1 through a mechanism involving inhibitory phosphorylation at Thr320 by Cdk5. Synaptic stimulation led to proteasome-dependent degradation of the Cdk5 regulator p35, inactivation of Cdk5, and increased auto-dephosphorylation of Thr320 of PP1. We also found that neither inhibitor-1 nor calcineurin were involved in the control of PP1 activity in response to synaptic NMDA receptor stimulation. Rather, the PP1 regulatory protein, inhibitor-2, formed a complex with PP1 that was controlled by synaptic stimulation. Finally, we found that inhibitor-2 was critical for the induction of long-term depression in primary neurons. Our work fills a major gap regarding the regulation of PP1 in synaptic plasticity. PMID:24189275

  20. Evidence for CP violation in B+ → ppK+ decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, Rf; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-10-01

    Three-body B+ → ppK+ and B(+) → ppπ(+) decays are studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1) collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. Evidence of CP violation in the B(+) → ppK(+) decay is found in regions of the phase space, representing the first measurement of this kind for a final state containing baryons. Measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry of the light meson in the pp rest frame yield A(FB)(ppK(+),m(pp)<2.85 GeV/c(2)) = 0.495 ± 0.012 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst) and A(FB)(ppπ(+),m(pp) <2.85 GeV/c(2)) = -0.409 ± 0.033 (stat) ± 0.006 (syst). In addition, the branching fraction of the decay B(+) → Λ(1520)p is measured to be B(B(+) → Λ(1520)p) = (3.15 ± 0.48 (stat) ± 0.07 (syst) ± 0.26 (BF)) × 10(-7), where BF denotes the uncertainty on secondary branching fractions. PMID:25325630

  1. Suggested Involvement of PP1/PP2A Activity and De Novo Gene Expression in Anhydrobiotic Survival in a Tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini, by Chemical Genetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Koyuki; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Upon desiccation, some tardigrades enter an ametabolic dehydrated state called anhydrobiosis and can survive a desiccated environment in this state. For successful transition to anhydrobiosis, some anhydrobiotic tardigrades require pre-incubation under high humidity conditions, a process called preconditioning, prior to exposure to severe desiccation. Although tardigrades are thought to prepare for transition to anhydrobiosis during preconditioning, the molecular mechanisms governing such processes remain unknown. In this study, we used chemical genetic approaches to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of anhydrobiosis in the anhydrobiotic tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini. We first demonstrated that inhibition of transcription or translation drastically impaired anhydrobiotic survival, suggesting that de novo gene expression is required for successful transition to anhydrobiosis in this tardigrade. We then screened 81 chemicals and identified 5 chemicals that significantly impaired anhydrobiotic survival after severe desiccation, in contrast to little or no effect on survival after high humidity exposure only. In particular, cantharidic acid, a selective inhibitor of protein phosphatase (PP) 1 and PP2A, exhibited the most profound inhibitory effects. Another PP1/PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, also significantly and specifically impaired anhydrobiotic survival, suggesting that PP1/PP2A activity plays an important role for anhydrobiosis in this species. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of the required activities of signaling molecules for desiccation tolerance in tardigrades. The identified inhibitory chemicals could provide novel clues to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms underlying anhydrobiosis in tardigrades. PMID:26690982

  2. PP2A inhibition results in hepatic insulin resistance despite Akt2 activation.

    PubMed

    Galbo, Thomas; Perry, Rachel J; Nishimura, Erica; Samuel, Varman T; Quistorff, Bjørn; Shulman, Gerald I

    2013-10-01

    In the liver, insulin suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis by activating Akt, which inactivates the key gluconeogenic transcription factor FoxO1 (Forkhead Box O1). Recent studies have implicated hyperactivity of the Akt phosphatase Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and impaired Akt signaling as a molecular defect underlying insulin resistance. We therefore hypothesized that PP2A inhibition would enhance insulin-stimulated Akt activity and decrease glucose production. PP2A inhibitors increased hepatic Akt phosphorylation and inhibited FoxO1in vitro and in vivo, and suppressed gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes. Paradoxically, PP2A inhibition exacerbated insulin resistance in vivo. This was explained by phosphorylation of both hepatic glycogen synthase (GS) (inactivation) and phosphorylase (activation) resulting in impairment of glycogen storage. Our findings underline the significance of GS and Phosphorylase as hepatic PP2A substrates and importance of glycogen metabolism in acute plasma glucose regulation. PMID:24150286

  3. Rheological and thermal properties of PP-based WPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, V.; Mollica, F.; El Kissi, N.

    2014-05-01

    Wood Plastic Composite (WPC) has attracted great interest in outdoor building products for the reduced cost and the possibility of using recycled materials. Nevertheless the material shows two problems: the large viscosity due to the presence of high concentrations of filler and the degradation of cellulose during processing The aim of this work was to investigate the rheological and thermal properties of WPC. The material used for the experiments was a commercial PP-based WPC compound, with different concentrations of natural fibers (30, 50, 70% wt.). The thermal properties were studied to check for degradation of natural fibers during the subsequent rheological tests. Analyzing the storage and loss moduli and the complex viscosity curves obtained using a parallel plate rheometer it was possible to observe some features related to the viscoelastic nature of the composite.

  4. Dynamic mechanical characterization of CNT-PP nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mandal, A; Singh, S P; Prasad, R

    2016-03-01

    In this study, molecular dynamic simulations were used to carry out a dynamic mechanical analysis of polymer nanocomposites (PNC) containing polypropylene (PP) and various volume fractions of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). After assembling the composite unit cell, relaxation studies were performed by loading the specimen to a predetermined strain under quasistatic loading and then sustaining the strain while allowing the material to relax. Nano level readjustments of the polymer chains took place during this process, reducing the overall stress levels in the specimen. Free volumes and small voids permitted chain mobility around the carbon nanotubes. By fitting a standard relaxation curve, the nano relaxation parameters of the PNCs were deduced. Relaxation studies were also conducted at different equilibrium temperatures. Using the time temperature transformation relation, a master curve was generated for the nanocomposite with 1.0% SWCNTs in order to obtain results over an extended period of time. PMID:26920022

  5. Probing color coherence effects in pp collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Gonzalez, J. Suarez; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Dildick, S.; Garcia, G.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Manganote, E. J. Tonelli; Pereira, A. Vilela; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Lagana, C.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Montoya, C. A. Carrillo; Sierra, L. F. Chaparro; Gomez, J. P.; Moreno, B. Gomez; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Tikvica, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bluj, M.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. 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H.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Martschei, D.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Ntomari, E.; Topsis-giotis, I.; Gouskos, L.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. 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K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; del Arbol, P. Martinez Ruiz; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; Favaro, C.; Rikova, M. Ivova; Kilminster, B.; Mejias, B. Millan; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. 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I.; Yücel, M.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Ilic, J.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Bryer, A. Guneratne; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Acosta, M. Vazquez; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Felcini, M.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Takasugi, E.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Shrinivas, A.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Villalba, R. Magaña; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Kcira, D.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Lopez, E. Luiggi; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Outschoorn, V. I. Martinez; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Ratnikova, N.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Lacroix, F.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Suarez, R. Gonzalez; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Wan, Z.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Alagoz, E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Belknap, D. A.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2014-06-01

    A study of color coherence effects in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 is presented. The data used in the analysis were collected in 2010 with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb. Events are selected that contain at least three jets and where the two jets with the largest transverse momentum exhibit a back-to-back topology. The measured angular correlation between the second- and third-leading jet is shown to be sensitive to color coherence effects, and is compared to the predictions of Monte Carlo models with various implementations of color coherence. None of the models describe the data satisfactorily.

  6. delta. sigma/sub L//(pp) and jet physics

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    We show that there is a positive contribution to ..delta..sigma/sub L/(pp; s) = sigma /sub tot/(p(+)p(+); s) /minus/ sigma/sub tot/(p(+)p(/minus/); s) (where the +- refer to proton helicities) associated with the pointlike scattering of fundamental constituents. Simple arguments imply that this positive contribution would, at very high s, be larger in absolute value than the negative contribution to ..delta..sigma/sub L/ predicted from the exchange of the A/sub 1/ reggeon, and furthermore may provide important insight into the shape of the spin weighted quark and gluon distributions. Measurements of ..delta..sigma/sub L/ in the energy range ..sqrt..s = 18 /minus/ 30 GeV also should help clarify theoretical ideas associated with the observations of ''minijets'' and could aid in the prediction of event structure at future high energy colliders. 24 refs. 6 figs.

  7. {phi} meson production in pp annihilation at rest

    SciTech Connect

    Srisuphaphon, S.; Yan, Y.; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.

    2011-10-01

    Apparent channel-dependent violations of the Okubo-Zwieg-Iizuka (OZI) rule in nucleon-antinucleon annihilation reactions in the presence of an intrinsic strangeness component in the nucleon are discussed. Admixture of ss quark pairs in the nucleon wave function enables the direct coupling to the {phi}-meson in the annihilation channel without violating the OZI rule. Three forms are considered in this work for the strangeness content of the proton wave function, namely, the uud cluster with a ss sea-quark component, kaon-hyperon clusters based on a simple chiral quark model, and the pentaquark picture uudss. Nonrelativistic quark model calculations reveal that the strangeness magnetic moment {mu}{sub s} and the strangeness contribution to the proton spin {sigma}{sub s} from the first two models are consistent with recent experimental data, where {mu}{sub s} and {sigma}{sub s} are negative. For the third model, the uuds subsystem with the configurations [31]{sub FS}[211]{sub F}[22]{sub S} and [31]{sub FS}[31]{sub F}[22]{sub S} leads to negative values of {mu}{sub s} and {sigma}{sub s}. With effective quark line diagrams incorporating the {sup 3}P{sub 0} model, we give estimates for the branching ratios of the annihilation reactions at rest pp{yields}{phi}X (X={pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, {rho}{sup 0}, {omega}). Results for the branching ratios of {phi}X production from atomic pp s-wave states are for the first and third model found to be strongly channel dependent, in good agreement with measured rates.

  8. 78 FR 19194 - P&P Computers, 2531 West Maryland Avenue, Tampa, FL 33629; Order Denying Export Privileges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... being that of August 15, 2012 (77 FR 49699 (August 16, 2012)), has continued the Regulations in effect... Bureau of Industry and Security P&P Computers, 2531 West Maryland Avenue, Tampa, FL 33629; Order Denying... Division, P&P Computers (``P&P'') was convicted of violating the International Emergency Economic...

  9. Fabrication of borassus fruit lignocellulose fiber/PP composites and comparison with jute, sisal and coir fibers.

    PubMed

    Sudhakara, P; Jagadeesh, Dani; Wang, YiQi; Prasad, C Venkata; Devi, A P Kamala; Balakrishnan, G; Kim, B S; Song, J I

    2013-10-15

    Novel composites based on borassus fruit fine fiber (BFF) and polypropylene (PP) were fabricated with variable fiber composition (5, 10, 15 and 20 wt%) by injection molding. Maleated PP (MAPP) was also used as compatibilizer at 5 wt% for effective fiber-matrix adhesion. FTIR analysis confirms the evidence of a chemical bonding between the fiber and polymeric matrix through esterification in presence of MAPP. The tensile and flexural properties were found to increase with 15 and 10 wt% fiber loadings respectively, and decreased thereafter. Coir, jute and sisal fiber composites were also fabricated with 15 wt% fiber loading under the same conditions as used for BFF/PP composites. It was found that the mechanical properties of BFF (15 wt%)/PP composites were equivalent to jute/PP, sisal/PP and superior to coir/PP composites. Jute/PP and sisal/PP composites showed higher water absorption than BFF/PP and coir/PP composites. These results have demonstrated that the BFF/PP composites can also be an alternative material for composites applications. PMID:23987440

  10. Drosophila Uri, a PP1α binding protein, is essential for viability, maintenance of DNA integrity and normal transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Jasmin; Vissi, Emese; Gross, Sascha; Szoor, Balazs; Rudenko, Andrey; Alphey, Luke; White-Cooper, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is involved in diverse cellular processes, and is targeted to substrates via interaction with many different protein binding partners. PP1 catalytic subunits (PP1c) fall into PP1α and PP1β subfamilies based on sequence analysis, however very few PP1c binding proteins have been demonstrated to discriminate between PP1α and PP1β. Results URI (unconventional prefoldin RPB5 interactor) is a conserved molecular chaperone implicated in a variety of cellular processes, including the transcriptional response to nutrient signalling and maintenance of DNA integrity. We show that Drosophila Uri binds PP1α with much higher affinity than PP1β, and that this ability to discriminate between PP1c forms is conserved to humans. Most Uri is cytoplasmic, however we found some protein associated with active RNAPII on chromatin. We generated a uri loss of function allele, and show that uri is essential for viability in Drosophila. uri mutants have transcriptional defects, reduced cell viability and differentiation in the germline, and accumulate DNA damage in their nuclei. Conclusion Uri is the first PP1α specific binding protein to be described in Drosophila. Uri protein plays a role in transcriptional regulation. Activity of uri is required to maintain DNA integrity and cell survival in normal development. PMID:18412953

  11. The Bacterial Alarmone (p)ppGpp Activates the Type III Secretion System in Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Ancona, Veronica; Lee, Jae Hoon; Chatnaparat, Tiyakhon; Oh, Jinrok; Hong, Jong-In

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) type III secretion system (T3SS) is a key pathogenicity factor in Erwinia amylovora. Previous studies have demonstrated that the T3SS in E. amylovora is transcriptionally regulated by a sigma factor cascade. In this study, the role of the bacterial alarmone ppGpp in activating the T3SS and virulence of E. amylovora was investigated using ppGpp mutants generated by Red recombinase cloning. The virulence of a ppGpp-deficient mutant (ppGpp0) as well as a dksA mutant of E. amylovora was completely impaired, and bacterial growth was significantly reduced, suggesting that ppGpp is required for full virulence of E. amylovora. Expression of T3SS genes was greatly downregulated in the ppGpp0 and dksA mutants. Western blotting showed that accumulations of the HrpA protein in the ppGpp0 and dksA mutants were about 10 and 4%, respectively, of that in the wild-type strain. Furthermore, higher levels of ppGpp resulted in a reduced cell size of E. amylovora. Moreover, serine hydroxamate and α-methylglucoside, which induce amino acid and carbon starvation, respectively, activated hrpA and hrpL promoter activities in hrp-inducing minimal medium. These results demonstrated that ppGpp and DksA play central roles in E. amylovora virulence and indicated that E. amylovora utilizes ppGpp as an internal messenger to sense environmental/nutritional stimuli for regulation of the T3SS and virulence. IMPORTANCE The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a key pathogenicity factor in Gram-negative bacteria. Fully elucidating how the T3SS is activated is crucial for comprehensively understanding the function of the T3SS, bacterial pathogenesis, and survival under stress conditions. In this study, we present the first evidence that the bacterial alarmone ppGpp-mediated stringent response activates the T3SS through a sigma factor cascade, indicating that ppGpp acts as an internal messenger to sense environmental/nutritional stimuli for

  12. The Src family kinase inhibitors PP2 and PP1 block TGF-beta1-mediated cellular responses by direct and differential inhibition of type I and type II TGF-beta receptors.

    PubMed

    Ungefroren, Hendrik; Sebens, Susanne; Groth, Stephanie; Gieseler, Frank; Fändrich, Fred

    2011-05-01

    Both the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src and the receptors for transforming growth factor (TGF)-β (TβRI, TβRII) play major roles during tumorigenesis by regulating cell growth, migration/invasion and metastasis. The common Src family kinase inhibitors PP2 and PP1 effectively block Src activity in vitro and in vivo, however, they may exert non-specific effects on other kinases. In this study, we have evaluated PP2 and PP1 for their ability to inhibit TGFβ1-mediated responses in the TGF-β-responsive pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line Panc1. We show that PP2 and PP1 but not the more specific Src inhibitor SU6656 effectively relieved TGF-b1-induced growth arrest and p21(WAF1) induction, while basal growth was enhanced by PP2 and PP1, and suppressed by SU6656. PP2 and PP1 but not SU6656 also suppressed TGF-β1-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as evidenced by their ability to inhibit downregulation of the epithelial marker E-cadherin, and upregulation of the EMT-associated transcription factor Slug. Likewise, PP2 and PP1 but not SU6656 effectively blocked TGF-β1-induced activation of Smad2 and p38 MAPK and partially suppressed Smad activation and transcriptional activity on TGF-β/Smad-responsive reporters of a kinase-active TβRI mutant ectopically expressed in Panc1 cells. Interestingly, PP2 and PP1 strongly inhibited recombinant TβRI in an in vitro kinase assay, with PP1 being more potent and PP2 being nearly as potent as the established TβRI inhibitor SB431542. PP2 but not PP1 also weakly inhibited the TβRII kinase. Together, these data provide evidence that PP2 and PP1 are powerful inhibitors of TβR function that can block TGF-β/Smad signaling in a Src-unrelated fashion. Both agents may be useful as dual TGF-β/Src inhibitors in experimental therapeutics of late stage metastatic disease. PMID:21395548

  13. Measurement of the ratio of differential cross sections σ(pp̄→Z+b jet)/σ(pp̄→Z+jet) in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.

    2013-05-28

    We measure the ratio of cross sections, σ(pp̄→Z+b jet)/σ(pp̄→Z+jet), for associated production of a Z boson with at least one jet. The ratio is also measured as a function of the Z boson transverse momentum, jet transverse momentum, jet pseudorapidity, and the azimuthal angle between the Z boson with respect to the highest pT b tagged jet. These measurements use data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of Fermilab’s Tevatron pp̄ Collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb⁻¹. The results are compared to predictions from next-to-leading order calculations and various Monte Carlo event generators.

  14. Measurement of the ratio of differential cross sections σ(pp̄→Z+b jet)/σ(pp̄→Z+jet) in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; et al

    2013-05-28

    We measure the ratio of cross sections, σ(pp̄→Z+b jet)/σ(pp̄→Z+jet), for associated production of a Z boson with at least one jet. The ratio is also measured as a function of the Z boson transverse momentum, jet transverse momentum, jet pseudorapidity, and the azimuthal angle between the Z boson with respect to the highest pT b tagged jet. These measurements use data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of Fermilab’s Tevatron pp̄ Collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb⁻¹. The results are compared to predictions from next-to-leading order calculationsmore » and various Monte Carlo event generators.« less

  15. Cytosolic ppGpp accumulation induces retarded plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yuta; Masuda, Shinji

    2016-02-01

    In bacteria a second messenger, guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp), synthesized upon nutrient starvation, controls many gene expressions and enzyme activities, which is necessary for growth under changeable environments. Recent studies have shown that ppGpp synthase and hydrolase are also conserved in eukaryotes, although their functions are not well understood. We recently showed that ppGpp-overaccumulation in Arabidopsis chloroplasts results in robust growth under nutrient-limited conditions, demonstrating that the bacterial-like stringent response at least functions in plastids. To test if ppGpp also functions in the cytosol, we constructed the transgenic Arabidopsis expressing Bacillus subtilis ppGpp synthase gene yjbM. Upon induction of the gene, the mutant synthesizes ∼10-20-fold higher levels of ppGpp, and its fresh weight was reduced to ˜80% that of the wild type. These results indicate that cytosolic ppGpp negatively regulates plant growth and development. PMID:26825398

  16. A Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector targets plant PP1c isoforms that promote late blight disease.

    PubMed

    Boevink, Petra C; Wang, Xiaodan; McLellan, Hazel; He, Qin; Naqvi, Shaista; Armstrong, Miles R; Zhang, Wei; Hein, Ingo; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Tian, Zhendong; Birch, Paul R J

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogens deliver effectors to alter host processes. Knowledge of how effectors target and manipulate host proteins is critical to understand crop disease. Here, we show that in planta expression of the RXLR effector Pi04314 enhances leaf colonization by Phytophthora infestans via activity in the host nucleus and attenuates induction of jasmonic and salicylic acid-responsive genes. Pi04314 interacts with three host protein phosphatase 1 catalytic (PP1c) isoforms, causing their re-localization from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Re-localization of PP1c-1 also occurs during infection and is dependent on an R/KVxF motif in the effector. Silencing the PP1c isoforms or overexpression of a phosphatase-dead PP1c-1 mutant attenuates infection, demonstrating that host PP1c activity is required for disease. Moreover, expression of PP1c-1mut abolishes enhanced leaf colonization mediated by in planta Pi04314 expression. We argue that PP1c isoforms are susceptibility factors forming holoenzymes with Pi04314 to promote late blight disease. PMID:26822079

  17. Cytosolic ppGpp accumulation induces retarded plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Yuta; Masuda, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In bacteria a second messenger, guanosine 5′-diphosphate 3′-diphosphate (ppGpp), synthesized upon nutrient starvation, controls many gene expressions and enzyme activities, which is necessary for growth under changeable environments. Recent studies have shown that ppGpp synthase and hydrolase are also conserved in eukaryotes, although their functions are not well understood. We recently showed that ppGpp-overaccumulation in Arabidopsis chloroplasts results in robust growth under nutrient-limited conditions, demonstrating that the bacterial-like stringent response at least functions in plastids. To test if ppGpp also functions in the cytosol, we constructed the transgenic Arabidopsis expressing Bacillus subtilis ppGpp synthase gene yjbM. Upon induction of the gene, the mutant synthesizes ∼10–20-fold higher levels of ppGpp, and its fresh weight was reduced to ˜80% that of the wild type. These results indicate that cytosolic ppGpp negatively regulates plant growth and development. PMID:26825398

  18. Ongoing advances in quantitative PpIX fluorescence guided intracranial tumor resection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Jonathan D.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Bravo, Jaime J.; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2016-03-01

    Aminolevulinc-acid induced protoporphyrin IX (ALA-PpIX) is being investigated as a biomarker to guide neurosurgical resection of brain tumors. ALA-PpIX fluorescence can be observed visually in the surgical field; however, raw fluorescence emissions can be distorted by factors other than the fluorophore concentration. Specifically, fluorescence emissions are mixed with autofluorescence and attenuated by background absorption and scattering properties of the tissue. Recent work at Dartmouth has developed advanced fluorescence detection approaches that return quantitative assessments of PpIX concentration, which are independent of background optical properties. The quantitative fluorescence imaging (qFI) approach has increased sensitivity to residual disease within the resection cavity at the end of surgery that was not visible to the naked eye through the operating microscope. This presentation outlines clinical observations made during an ongoing investigation of ALA-PpIX based guidance of tumor resection. PpIX fluorescence measurements made in a wide-field hyperspectral imaging approach are co-registered with point-assessment using a fiber optic probe. Data show variations in the measured PpIX accumulation among different clinical tumor grades (i.e. high grade glioma, low grade glioma), types (i.e. primary tumors. metastases) and normal structures of interest (e.g. normal cortex, hippocampus). These results highlight the contrast enhancement and underscore the potential clinical benefit offered from quantitative measurements of PpIX concentration during resection of intracranial tumors.

  19. Identification and functional characterization of a PP1-binding site in BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Lih-Ching

    2007-01-01

    The phosphorylation state of the tumor suppressor protein BRCA1 is tightly associated with its functions including cell cycle control and DNA repair. Protein kinases involved in the DNA damage checkpoint control, such as ATM, ATR, and hCds1/Chk2, have been shown to phosphorylate and activate BRCA1 upon DNA damage. We reported previously that protein phosphatase 1α(PP1α) interacts with and dephosphorylates hCds1/Chk2-phosphorylated BRCA1. This study demonstrates the identification of a PP1-binding motif 898KVTF901 in BRCA1. Mutation or deletion of critical residues in this PP1-binding motif substantially reduces the interaction between BRCA1 and PP1α. PP1α can also dephosphorylate ATM and ATR phosphorylation sites in BRCA1 and may serve as a general regulator for BRCA1 phosphorylation. Unlike wild-type BRCA1, expression of the PP1 non-binding mutant BRCA1 protein in BRCA1-deficient cells failed to enhance survival after DNA damage. Taken together, these results suggest that interaction with PP1α is important for BRCA1 function. PMID:17603999

  20. (p)ppGpp synthetases regulate the pathogenesis of zoonotic Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiawen; Zhang, Tengfei; Su, Zhipeng; Li, Lu; Wang, Dong; Xiao, Ran; Teng, Muye; Tan, Meifang; Zhou, Rui

    2016-10-01

    (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is one of the main adaption mechanism in bacteria, and the ability to adapt to environment is linked to the pathogenesis of bacterial pathogens. In the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis, there are two (p)ppGpp synthetases, RelA and RelQ. To investigate the regulatory functions of (p)ppGpp/(p)ppGpp synthetases on the pathogenesis of S. suis, the phenotypes of the [(p)ppGpp(0)] mutant ΔrelAΔrelQ and its parental strain were compared. Light and electron microscopy observation showed that the mutant strain had a longer chain-length than its parental strain. Disruption of relA and relQ led to decreased adhesive and invasive ability to HEp-2 cells, and increased sensitivity to the blood killing and phagocytosis. Mouse infection experiments showed that the mutant strain was attenuated and easier to be cleaned up in vivo. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the expressions of virulence related genes involving in morphology and virulence were down-regulated in the mutant strain. Our study demonstrated that the (p)ppGpp synthetases or (p)ppGpp can regulate the pathogenesis of this important zoonotic pathogen. PMID:27524648

  1. A Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector targets plant PP1c isoforms that promote late blight disease

    PubMed Central

    Boevink, Petra C.; Wang, Xiaodan; McLellan, Hazel; He, Qin; Naqvi, Shaista; Armstrong, Miles R.; Zhang, Wei; Hein, Ingo; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Tian, Zhendong; Birch, Paul R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogens deliver effectors to alter host processes. Knowledge of how effectors target and manipulate host proteins is critical to understand crop disease. Here, we show that in planta expression of the RXLR effector Pi04314 enhances leaf colonization by Phytophthora infestans via activity in the host nucleus and attenuates induction of jasmonic and salicylic acid-responsive genes. Pi04314 interacts with three host protein phosphatase 1 catalytic (PP1c) isoforms, causing their re-localization from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Re-localization of PP1c-1 also occurs during infection and is dependent on an R/KVxF motif in the effector. Silencing the PP1c isoforms or overexpression of a phosphatase-dead PP1c-1 mutant attenuates infection, demonstrating that host PP1c activity is required for disease. Moreover, expression of PP1c–1mut abolishes enhanced leaf colonization mediated by in planta Pi04314 expression. We argue that PP1c isoforms are susceptibility factors forming holoenzymes with Pi04314 to promote late blight disease. PMID:26822079

  2. PP2ARts1 is a master regulator of pathways that control cell size

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Jessica; Dephoure, Noah; MacDonough, Tracy; Yu, Yaxin; Parnell, Emily J.; Mooring, Meghan; Gygi, Steven P.; Stillman, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Cell size checkpoints ensure that passage through G1 and mitosis occurs only when sufficient growth has occurred. The mechanisms by which these checkpoints work are largely unknown. PP2A associated with the Rts1 regulatory subunit (PP2ARts1) is required for cell size control in budding yeast, but the relevant targets are unknown. In this paper, we used quantitative proteome-wide mass spectrometry to identify proteins controlled by PP2ARts1. This revealed that PP2ARts1 controls the two key checkpoint pathways thought to regulate the cell cycle in response to cell growth. To investigate the role of PP2ARts1 in these pathways, we focused on the Ace2 transcription factor, which is thought to delay cell cycle entry by repressing transcription of the G1 cyclin CLN3. Diverse experiments suggest that PP2ARts1 promotes cell cycle entry by inhibiting the repressor functions of Ace2. We hypothesize that control of Ace2 by PP2ARts1 plays a role in mechanisms that link G1 cyclin accumulation to cell growth. PMID:24493588

  3. Role of PP1 in the regulation of Ca cycling in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaou, Persoulla; Kranias, Evangelia G.

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 protein phosphatase (PP1) is a critical regulator of several cellular processes. In the heart, it mediates restoration of contractility to basal levels by dephosphorylating key phospho-proteins, after beta-adrenergic stimulation. PP1 is a holoenzyme consisting of its catalytic and regulatory subunits. The regulatory proteins anchor the catalytic subunit to desired subcellular locations, define substrate specificity and modulate catalytic activity. At the level of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), PP1 is regulated by two endogenous inhibitors, Inhibitor-1 (I-1) and Inhibitor-2 (I-2), which modulate its activity according to cellular conditions. In addition, the striated muscle-specific glycogen-targeting subunit, GM/RGL, targets PP1 to the SR vicinity. Regulation of PP1 activity is highly important in maintaining proper cardiac function under physiological conditions. In fact, aberrant Ca handling and depressed contractility, observed in human and experimental heart failure, have been at least partly attributed to increases in the catalytic activity of PP1, mediated by impaired regulation via its endogenous inhibitors. Importantly, increases in the level and activity of I-1 and I-2 in animal models have been successful in ameliorating the cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in heart failure, suggesting that PP1 inhibition may be a plausible therapeutic strategy to alleviate the detrimental manifestations of heart failure. PMID:19273294

  4. Alarmone (p)ppGpp regulates the transition from pathogenicity to mutualism in Photorhabdus luminescens.

    PubMed

    Bager, Ragnhild; Roghanian, Mohammad; Gerdes, Kenn; Clarke, David J

    2016-05-01

    The enteric gamma-proteobacterium Photorhabdus luminescens kills a wide range of insects, whilst also maintaining a mutualistic relationship with soil nematodes from the family Heterorhabditis. Pathogenicity is associated with bacterial exponential growth, whilst mutualism is associated with post-exponential (stationary) phase. During post-exponential growth, P. luminescens also elaborates an extensive secondary metabolism, including production of bioluminescence, antibiotics and pigment. However, the regulatory network that controls the expression of this secondary metabolism is not well understood. The stringent response is a well-described global regulatory system in bacteria and mediated by the alarmone (p)ppGpp. In this study, we disrupted the genes relA and spoT, encoding the two predicted (p)ppGpp synthases of P. luminescens TTO1, and we showed that (p)ppGpp is required for secondary metabolism. Moreover, we found the (p)ppGpp is not required for pathogenicity of P. luminescens, but is required for bacterial survival within the insect cadaver. Finally, we showed that (p)ppGpp is required for P. luminescens to support normal nematode growth and development. Therefore, the regulatory network that controls the transition from pathogenicity to mutualism in P. luminescens requires (p)ppGpp. This is the first report outlining a role for (p)ppGpp in controlling the outcome of an interaction between a bacteria and its host. PMID:26845750

  5. Structure of elastic p-p scattering at low and high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz; Moravcsick, Michael J.; Goldstein, Gary R.

    1985-02-01

    It is observed that p-p elastic scattering at 90° between 0.3 and 1.0 GeV is described by planar-transverse amplitude of which two are equal in magnitude and one is about three times larger in magnitude. This feature, extrapolated to much higher energies, is used to predict p-p polarization quantities, in part by itself, in part in combination with the extension of another, previously observed feature of planar-transverse amplitudes. Comparison with existing data is favorable. Predictions are then made for other, yet unmeasured but readily measurable polarization quantities for p-p elastic scattering.

  6. Imaging the proton via hard exclusive production in diffractive pp scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Hyde; Leonid Frankfurt; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-05-21

    We discuss the prospects for probing Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) via exclusive production of a high-mass system (H = heavy quarkonium, di-photon, di-jet, Higgs boson) in diffractive pp scattering, pp -> p + H + p. In such processes the interplay of hard and soft interactions gives rise to a diffraction pattern in the final-state proton transverse momenta, which is sensitive to the transverse spatial distribution of partons in the colliding protons. We comment on the plans for diffractive pp measurements at RHIC and LHC. Such studies could complement future measurements of GPDs in hard exclusive ep scattering (JLab, COMPASS, EIC).

  7. PP: A graphics post-processor for the EQ6 reaction path code

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, H.W.

    1994-09-01

    The PP code is a graphics post-processor and plotting program for EQ6, a popular reaction-path code. PP runs on personal computers, allocates memory dynamically, and can handle very large reaction path runs. Plots of simple variable groups, such as fluid and solid phase composition, can be obtained with as few as two keystrokes. Navigation through the list of reaction path variables is simple and efficient. Graphics files can be exported for inclusion in word processing documents and spreadsheets, and experimental data may be imported and superposed on the reaction path runs. The EQ6 thermodynamic database can be searched from within PP, to simplify interpretation of complex plots.

  8. BacPP: a web-based tool for Gram-negative bacterial promoter prediction.

    PubMed

    de Avila E Silva, S; Notari, D L; Neis, F A; Ribeiro, H G; Echeverrigaray, S

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial Promoter Prediction (BacPP) is a tool used to predict given sequences as promoters of Gram-negative bacteria according to the σ factor that recognizes it. The first version of BacPP was implemented in Python language in a desktop version without a friendly interface. For this reason, a web version of BacPP is now available with the purpose of improving its usability and availability. The present paper describes the implementation of the web version of this tool, focusing on its software architecture and user functionalities. The software is available at www.bacpp.bioinfoucs.com/home. PMID:27173187

  9. Two AAA family peroxins, PpPex1p and PpPex6p, interact with each other in an ATP-dependent manner and are associated with different subcellular membranous structures distinct from peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Faber, K N; Heyman, J A; Subramani, S

    1998-02-01

    Two peroxins of the AAA family, PpPex1p and PpPex6p, are required for peroxisome biogenesis in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Cells from the corresponding deletion strains (Pp delta pex1 and Pp delta pex6) contain only small vesicular remnants of peroxisomes, the bulk of peroxisomal matrix proteins is mislocalized to the cytosol, and these cells cannot grow in peroxisome-requiring media (J. A. Heyman, E. Monosov, and S. Subramani, J. Cell Biol. 127:1259-1273, 1994; A. P. Spong and S. Subramani, J. Cell Biol. 123:535-548, 1993). We demonstrate that PpPex1p and PpPex6p interact in an ATP-dependent manner. Genetically, the interaction was observed in a suppressor screen with a strain harboring a temperature-sensitive allele of PpPEX1 and in the yeast two-hybrid system. Biochemially, these proteins were coimmunoprecipitated with antibodies raised against either of the proteins, but only in the presence of ATP. The protein complex formed under these conditions was 320 to 400 kDa in size, consistent with the formation of a heterodimeric PpPex1p-PpPex6p complex. Subcellular fractionation revealed PpPex1p and PpPex6p to be predominantly associated with membranous subcellular structures distinct from peroxisomes. Based on their behavior in subcellular fractionation experiments including flotation gradients and on the fact that these structures are also present in a Pp delta pex3 strain in which no morphologically detectable peroxisomal remnants have been observed, we propose that these structures are small vesicles. The identification of vesicle-associated peroxins is novel and implies a role for these vesicles in peroxisome biogenesis. We discuss the possible role of the ATP-dependent interaction between PpPex1p and PpPex6p in regulating peroxisome biogenesis events. PMID:9447990

  10. Activation of the Tumor Suppressor PP2A Emerges as a Potential Therapeutic Strategy for Treating Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cristóbal, Ion; González-Alonso, Paula; Daoud, Lina; Solano, Esther; Torrejón, Blanca; Manso, Rebeca; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Rojo, Federico; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a tumor suppressor complex that has recently been reported as a novel and highly relevant molecular target in prostate cancer (PCa). However, its potential therapeutic value remains to be fully clarified. We treated PC-3 and LNCaP cell lines with the PP2A activators forskolin and FTY720 alone or combined with the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid. We examined PP2A activity, cell growth, prostasphere formation, levels of PP2A phosphorylation, CIP2A and SET expression, and AKT and ERK activation. Interestingly, both forskolin and FTY720 dephosphorylated and activated PP2A, impairing proliferation and prostasphere formation and inducing changes in AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, FTY720 led to reduced CIP2A levels. Treatment with okadaic acid impaired PP2A activation thus demonstrating the antitumoral PP2A-dependent mechanism of action of both forskolin and FTY720. Levels of PP2A phosphorylation together with SET and CIP2A protein expression were studied in 24 PCa patients and both were associated with high Gleason scores and presence of metastatic disease. Altogether, our results suggest that PP2A inhibition could be involved in PCa progression, and the use of PP2A-activating drugs might represent a novel alternative therapeutic strategy for treating PCa patients. PMID:26023836

  11. The anti-esophageal cancer cell activity by a novel tyrosine/phosphoinositide kinase inhibitor PP121

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yi; Zhou, Yajuan; Cheng, Long; Hu, Desheng; Zhou, Xiaoyi; Wang, Zhaohua; Xie, Conghua; Zhou, Fuxiang

    2015-09-11

    Here we explored the potential effect of PP121, a novel dual inhibitor of tyrosine and phosphoinositide kinases, against human esophageal cancer cells. We showed that PP121 exerted potent cytotoxic effect in primary (patient-derived) and established (Eca-109, TE-1 and TE-3 lines) esophageal cancer cells, possibly through activating caspase-3-dependnent apoptosis. PP121 was, however, non-cytotoxic to the normal human esophageal epithelial cells (EECs). At the molecular level, we showed that PP121 blocked Akt-mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) activation in esophageal cancer cells, which was restored by introducing a constitutively-active Akt (CA-Akt). Yet, CA-Akt only partly inhibited cytotoxicity by PP121 in Eca-109 cells. Importantly, we showed that PP121 inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling activation in esophageal cancer cells, which appeared independent of Akt-mTOR blockage. In vivo, oral administration of PP121 remarkably inhibited Eca-109 xenograft growth in nude mice, and significantly improved mice survival. Further, the immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot assays analyzing xenografted tumors showed that PP121 inhibited Akt-mTOR and NFκB activations in vivo. Together, we demonstrate that PP121 potently inhibits esophageal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, possibly through concurrently inhibiting Akt-mTOR and NFκB signalings. - Highlights: • PP121 is cytotoxic against primary and established esophageal cancer cells. • PP121 induces caspase-3-dependnent apoptosis in esophageal cancer cells. • PP121 blocks Akt-mTOR activation in esophageal cancer cells. • PP121 inhibits NFκB activation, independent of Akt-mTOR blockage. • PP121 inhibits Eca-109 xenograft growth and Akt-mTOR/NFκB activation in vivo.

  12. Positive Regulation of TRAF6-Dependent Innate Immune Responses by Protein Phosphatase PP1-γ

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chih-yuan; Nguyen, Quy T.; Maestre, Ana M.; Mulder, Lubbertus C. F.; Secundino, Ismael; De Jesus, Paul D.; König, Renate; Simon, Viviana; Nizet, Victor; MacLeod, Graham; Varmuza, Susannah; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Chanda, Sumit K.

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune sensors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) differentially utilize adaptor proteins and additional molecular mediators to ensure robust and precise immune responses to pathogen challenge. Through a gain-of-function genetic screen, we identified the gamma catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1-γ) as a positive regulator of MyD88-dependent proinflammatory innate immune activation. PP1-γ physically interacts with the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAF6, and enhances the activity of TRAF6 towards itself and substrates such as IKKγ, whereas enzymatically inactive PP1-γ represses these events. Importantly, these activities were found to be critical for cellular innate responses to pathogen challenge and microbial clearance in both mouse macrophages and human monocyte lines. These data indicate that PP1-γ phosphatase activity regulates overall TRAF6 E3 ubiquitin ligase function and promotes NF-κB-mediated innate signaling responses. PMID:24586659

  13. PP2A Phosphatase as a Regulator of ROS Signaling in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rahikainen, Moona; Pascual, Jesús; Alegre, Sara; Durian, Guido; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) carry out vital functions in determining appropriate stress reactions in plants, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the sensing, signaling and response to ROS as signaling molecules are not yet fully understood. Recent studies have underscored the role of Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in ROS-dependent responses involved in light acclimation and pathogenesis responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic studies have demonstrated that trimeric PP2A phosphatases control metabolic changes and cell death elicited by intracellular and extracellular ROS signals. Associated with this, PP2A subunits contribute to transcriptional and post-translational regulation of pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes. This review highlights the emerging role of PP2A phosphatases in the regulatory ROS signaling networks in plants. PMID:26950157

  14. Intrinsic fluctuations of the proton saturation momentum scale in high multiplicity p+p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, Larry; Tribedy, Prithwish

    2015-11-02

    High multiplicity events in p+p collisions are studied using the theory of the Color Glass Condensate. Here, we show that intrinsic fluctuations of the proton saturation momentum scale are needed in addition to the sub-nucleonic color charge fluctuations to explain the very high multiplicity tail of distributions in p+p collisions. It is presumed that the origin of such intrinsic fluctuations is non-perturbative in nature. Classical Yang Mills simulations using the IP-Glasma model are performed to make quantitative estimations. Furthermore, we find that fluctuations as large as O(1) of the average values of the saturation momentum scale can lead to rare high multiplicity events seen in p+p data at RHIC and LHC energies. Using the available data on multiplicity distributions we try to constrain the distribution of the proton saturation momentum scale and make predictions for the multiplicity distribution in 13 TeV p+p collisions.

  15. PP2A Phosphatase as a Regulator of ROS Signaling in Plants.

    PubMed

    Rahikainen, Moona; Pascual, Jesús; Alegre, Sara; Durian, Guido; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) carry out vital functions in determining appropriate stress reactions in plants, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the sensing, signaling and response to ROS as signaling molecules are not yet fully understood. Recent studies have underscored the role of Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in ROS-dependent responses involved in light acclimation and pathogenesis responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic studies have demonstrated that trimeric PP2A phosphatases control metabolic changes and cell death elicited by intracellular and extracellular ROS signals. Associated with this, PP2A subunits contribute to transcriptional and post-translational regulation of pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes. This review highlights the emerging role of PP2A phosphatases in the regulatory ROS signaling networks in plants. PMID:26950157

  16. Eccentricity Fluctuations Make Flow Measurable in High Multiplicity p-p Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2010-03-12

    Elliptic flow is a hallmark of collectivity in hadronic collisions. Its measurement relies on analysis techniques which require high event multiplicity and so far can only be applied to heavy ion collisions. Here, we delineate the conditions under which elliptic flow becomes measurable in the samples of high-multiplicity (dN{sub ch}/dy>=50) p-p collisions, which will soon be collected at the LHC. We observe that fluctuations in the p-p interaction region can result in a sizable spatial eccentricity even for the most central p-p collisions. Under relatively mild assumptions on the nature of such fluctuations and on the eccentricity scaling of elliptic flow, we find that the resulting elliptic flow signal in high-multiplicity p-p collisions at the LHC becomes measurable with standard techniques.

  17. Facile Method to Fabricate Highly Thermally Conductive Graphite/PP Composite with Network Structures.

    PubMed

    Feng, Changping; Ni, Haiying; Chen, Jun; Yang, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Thermally conductive polymer composites have aroused significant academic and industrial interest for several decades. Herein, we report a novel fabrication method of graphite/polypropylene (PP) composites with high thermal conductivity in which graphite flakes construct a continuous thermally conductive network. The thermal conductivity coefficient of the graphite/PP composites is markedly improved to be 5.4 W/mK at a graphite loading of 21.2 vol %. Such a great improvement of the thermal conductivity is ascribed to the occurrence of orientations of crystalline graphite flakes with large particles around PP resin particles and the formation of a perfect thermally conductive network. The model of Hashin-Shtrikman (HS) is adopted to interpret the outstanding thermally conductive property of the graphite/PP composites. This work provides a guideline for the easy fabrication of thermally conductive composites with network structures. PMID:27391206

  18. Structure of the GcpE (IspG)-MEcPP complex from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Rekittke, Ingo; Jomaa, Hassan; Ermler, Ulrich

    2012-09-21

    Isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis occurs through the mevalonate or the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway, used i.e., by humans and by many human pathogens, respectively. In the MEP pathway, 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclo-diphosphate (MEcPP) is converted to (E)-1-hydroxy-2-methyl-but-2-enyl-4-diphosphate (HMBPP) by the iron-sulfur cluster enzyme HMBPP synthase (GcpE). The presented X-ray structure of the GcpE-MEcPP complex from Thermus thermophilus at 1.55Å resolution provides valuable information about the catalytic mechanism and for rational inhibitor design. MEcPP binding inside the TIM-barrel funnel induces a 60° rotation of the [4Fe-4S] cluster containing domain onto the TIM-barrel entrance. The apical iron of the [4Fe-4S] cluster ligates with the C3 oxygen atom of MEcPP. PMID:22967895

  19. Structure in pp elastic polarisation and pomeron-flip

    SciTech Connect

    Kamran, M.

    1980-06-01

    An investigation of pp (and np) elastic polarisations in the region 10 less than or equal to p/sub lab/ less than or equal to 300 GeV/c and absolute value of t less than or equal to 0.9 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ is carried out using the Regge pole model with phenomenologically parameterized residues. In an attempt to reproduce the polarisation structure for absolute value of t less than or equal to 0.5 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ and p/sub lab/ greater than or equal to 45 GeV/c a Pomeron-flip contribution is included. It is shown that a Pomeron-flip contribution, although yielding a good overall chi/sup 2//pt for a fit to the data, cannot reproduce the polarisation zero observed in the aforementioned (p/sub lab/,t) region (we use ..cap alpha../sub p/ = 0.23). It is however found that if one invokes an Odderon-flip contribution the polarisation structure can be easily reproduced. The Odderon is the odd-signatured partner of the Pomeron and has isospin one. Its existence has been recently invoked in order to account for the disturbing energy dependence of the np CEX data.

  20. Beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1982-08-01

    One model for beam growth due to the beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators is that it is due to the presence of non-linear forces generated by the fields produced by the beam plus some radomizing effect like noise, or a tune modulation. According to this model, to limit beam-beam effects, one should try to limit the size of the non-linear forces and the sources of noise or tune modulation. This model can also be used to compare the severity of beam-beam effects in two situations by comparing the size of the non-linear forces. In this paper, this approach will be used to study three problems: to compare the effects of beam-beam non-linear resonances in the ISR with those in ISABELLE; to estimate the strength of a spectrometer magnet that may be placed at one of the beam crossing points, without appreciably increasing the beam-beam effects; and to compare the beam-beam interaction for colliding beam accelerators with different crossing-angles and different ..beta../sub x/ and ..beta../sub y/ at the crossing points.

  1. Role of (p)ppGpp in Biofilm Formation by Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, José A.; Wickström, Claes; Sedgley, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis strain OG1RF and its (p)ppGpp-deficient ΔrelA, ΔrelQ, and ΔrelA ΔrelQ mutants were grown in biofilms and evaluated for growth profiles, biofilm morphology, cell viability, and proteolytic activity. E. faecalis lacking (p)ppGpp had a diminished capacity to sustain biofilm formation over an extended period of time and expressed abundant proteolytic activity. PMID:22179256

  2. Crystallinity-based product design: Utilizing the polymorphism of isotactic PP homo- and copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahleitner, Markus; Mileva, Daniela; Androsch, René; Gloger, Dietrich; Tranchida, Davide; Sandholzer, Martina; Doshev, Petar

    2015-12-01

    The polymorphism of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) in combination with the strong response of this polymer to nucleation can be utilized for expanding the application range of this versatile polymer. Based on three "case studies" related to β-iPP pressure pipes, ethylene-propylene (EP) random copolymers for thin-wall injection molding and sterilization resistance of cast films we demonstrate ways of combining polymer composition, nucleation and process settings to achieve the desired application performance.

  3. Placental Protein 13 (PP13) - A Placental Immunoregulatory Galectin Protecting Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nándor Gábor; Balogh, Andrea; Romero, Roberto; Kárpáti, Eva; Erez, Offer; Szilágyi, András; Kovalszky, Ilona; Sammar, Marei; Gizurarson, Sveinbjorn; Matkó, János; Závodszky, Péter; Papp, Zoltán; Meiri, Hamutal

    2014-01-01

    Galectins are glycan-binding proteins that regulate innate and adaptive immune responses, and some confer maternal-fetal immune tolerance in eutherian mammals. A chromosome 19 cluster of galectins has emerged in anthropoid primates, species with deep placentation and long gestation. Three of the five human cluster galectins are solely expressed in the placenta, where they may confer additional immunoregulatory functions to enable deep placentation. One of these is galectin-13, also known as Placental Protein 13 (PP13). It has a "jelly-roll" fold, carbohydrate-recognition domain and sugar-binding preference resembling other mammalian galectins. PP13 is predominantly expressed by the syncytiotrophoblast and released from the placenta into the maternal circulation. Its ability to induce apoptosis of activated T cells in vitro, and to divert and kill T cells as well as macrophages in the maternal decidua in situ, suggests important immune functions. Indeed, mutations in the promoter and an exon of LGALS13 presumably leading to altered or non-functional protein expression are associated with a higher frequency of preeclampsia and other obstetrical syndromes, which involve immune dysregulation. Moreover, decreased placental expression of PP13 and its low concentrations in first trimester maternal sera are associated with elevated risk of preeclampsia. Indeed, PP13 turned to be a good early biomarker to assess maternal risk for the subsequent development of pregnancy complications caused by impaired placentation. Due to the ischemic placental stress in preterm preeclampsia, there is increased trophoblastic shedding of PP13 immunopositive microvesicles starting in the second trimester, which leads to high maternal blood PP13 concentrations. Our meta-analysis suggests that this phenomenon may enable the potential use of PP13 in directing patient management near to or at the time of delivery. Recent findings on the beneficial effects of PP13 on decreasing blood pressure due

  4. Placental Protein 13 (PP13) – A Placental Immunoregulatory Galectin Protecting Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Than, Nándor Gábor; Balogh, Andrea; Romero, Roberto; Kárpáti, Éva; Erez, Offer; Szilágyi, András; Kovalszky, Ilona; Sammar, Marei; Gizurarson, Sveinbjorn; Matkó, János; Závodszky, Péter; Papp, Zoltán; Meiri, Hamutal

    2014-01-01

    Galectins are glycan-binding proteins that regulate innate and adaptive immune responses, and some confer maternal-fetal immune tolerance in eutherian mammals. A chromosome 19 cluster of galectins has emerged in anthropoid primates, species with deep placentation and long gestation. Three of the five human cluster galectins are solely expressed in the placenta, where they may confer additional immunoregulatory functions to enable deep placentation. One of these is galectin-13, also known as Placental Protein 13 (PP13). It has a “jelly-roll” fold, carbohydrate-recognition domain and sugar-binding preference resembling other mammalian galectins. PP13 is predominantly expressed by the syncytiotrophoblast and released from the placenta into the maternal circulation. Its ability to induce apoptosis of activated T cells in vitro, and to divert and kill T cells as well as macrophages in the maternal decidua in situ, suggests important immune functions. Indeed, mutations in the promoter and an exon of LGALS13 presumably leading to altered or non-functional protein expression are associated with a higher frequency of preeclampsia and other obstetrical syndromes, which involve immune dysregulation. Moreover, decreased placental expression of PP13 and its low concentrations in first trimester maternal sera are associated with elevated risk of preeclampsia. Indeed, PP13 turned to be a good early biomarker to assess maternal risk for the subsequent development of pregnancy complications caused by impaired placentation. Due to the ischemic placental stress in preterm preeclampsia, there is increased trophoblastic shedding of PP13 immunopositive microvesicles starting in the second trimester, which leads to high maternal blood PP13 concentrations. Our meta-analysis suggests that this phenomenon may enable the potential use of PP13 in directing patient management near to or at the time of delivery. Recent findings on the beneficial effects of PP13 on decreasing blood pressure

  5. Evaluation of ALA-induced PpIX as a photosensitizer for PDT in cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucroy, Michael D.; Edwards, Benjamin F.; Peavy, George M.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Griffey, Stephen M.; Madewell, Bruce R.

    1998-07-01

    Given exogenously, ALA defeats intrinsic regulatory feedback mechanisms allowing intracellular accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a highly efficient photosensitizer. In vivo, PpIX synthesis in neoplastic mammary tissues averages 20-fold higher than in normal mammary tissues. PpIX is retained intracellularly, unlike perivascular localization of other photosensitizers, and it is then cleared quickly from the body. In vitro, ALA induced PpIX production in our laboratory in 6 cell lines tested, including an established feline kidney cell line and dermal fibroblasts from primary skin biopsy explant, resulting in photosensitization. Fluorescent microscopy confirmed PpIX production in skin adnexae following ALA administration in a normal cat. To evaluate toxicity, three cats were treated with a single i.v. dose of ALA (either 100, 200, of 400 mg/kg) and followed for 7 days. Cats receiving 100 or 200 mg/kg ALA i.v. had elevated liver enzymes and bilirubin within 24 hours. Histopathology revealed hydropic changes in the liver and renal fibrosis. The cat receiving 400 mg/kg ALA intravenously had cutaneous flush, bradycardia and apnea associated with ALA administration; within 24 hours the cat was lethargic, anorectic and icteric. ALT, AST and bilirubin concentrations had increased significantly. At necropsy the liver had a prominent lobular pattern; histopathology revealed severe periportal hepatitis and splenic necrosis. Systemically administered ALA induces PpIX production, but toxicity may preclude its clinical application in the cat. PpIX levels seem to be more time dependent than those dependent at these three ALA doses and they are well beyond the saturation point for adequate PpIX conversion. The literature is scant regarding toxicity associated with parenteral administration of ALA.

  6. Activation of Protein Serine/Threonine Phosphatase PP2Cα Efficiently Prevents Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Yang, Zhengyi; Yu, Liang; Hu, Lihong; Shen, Xu

    2010-01-01

    Background Over-activation of TGFβ signaling pathway and uncontrolled cell proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play pivotal roles in liver fibrogenesis, while the protein serine/threonine phosphatase PP2Cα was reported to negatively regulate TGFβ signaling pathway and cell cycle. Our study aimed to investigate the role of PP2Cα in liver fibrogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings The effects of PP2Cα activation on liver fibrosis were investigated in human HSCs and primary rat HSCs in vitro using western blotting, real-time PCR, nuclear translocation, cell viability and cell cycle analyses. The antifibrogenic effects in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced mice in vivo were assessed using biochemical, histological and immunohistochemical analyses. The results demonstrated that activation of PP2Cα by overexpression or the new discovered small molecular activator NPLC0393 terminated TGFβ-Smad3 and TGFβ-p38 signaling pathways, induced cell cycle arrest in HSCs and decreased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, collagen deposition and hepatic hydroxyproline (HYP) level in CCl4- and BDL-induced mice. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggested that PP2Cα activation might be an attractive new strategy for treating liver fibrosis while the small molecular activator NPLC0393 might represent a lead compound for antifibrogenic drug development. Moreover, our study might provide the first evidence for the role of PP2C family members in the fibrotic disease. PMID:21151953

  7. Evidence for CP Violation in B+→pp ¯K+ Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    Three-body B+→pp ¯K+ and B+→pp ¯π+ decays are studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. Evidence of CP violation in the B+→pp ¯K+ decay is found in regions of the phase space, representing the first measurement of this kind for a final state containing baryons. Measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry of the light meson in the pp ¯ rest frame yield AFB(pp ¯K+,mpp ¯<2.85 GeV/c2)=0.495±0.012 (stat)±0.007 (syst) and AFB(pp ¯π+,mpp ¯<2.85 GeV/c2)=-0.409±0.033 (stat)±0.006 (syst). In addition, the branching fraction of the decay B+→Λ ¯(1520)p is measured to be Bbold" (B+→Λ ¯(1520)pbold" )=bold" (3.15±0.48 (stat)±0.07 (syst)±0.26 (BF)bold" )×10-7, where BF denotes the uncertainty on secondary branching fractions.

  8. Cardioprotective and β-adrenoceptor antagonistic activity of a newly synthesized aryloxypropanolamine derivative PP-36

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Lokesh K; Bansal, Jyotika; Piplani, Poonam; Bodhankar, SL; Veeranjaneyulu, A

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the cardioprotective effects and pharmacological characterization of newly synthesized β-adrenoreceptor antagonists 3-(3-tert-butylamino-2-hydroxypropoxy)-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (PP-36) in the rat model of coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion. Pre-ischemic administration (20 minutes before coronary occlusion) of PP-36 showed cardioprotective effects against ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. PP-36 (6 mg kg−1) significantly reduced arrhythmia score (6.33 ± 0.55, P < 0.05), infarct size/left ventricle size (38.9 ± 3.2, P < 0.05) and no mortality compared to vehicle-treated control group (14.17 ± 1.83, 44.9 ± 4.6 and 17% respectively). In-vitro studies in rat isolated right atria, guinea-pig trachea and rat distal colon preparations, were carried out to investigate the potency of PP-36 towards different β-adrenoceptor subtypes. pA2/pKB values of PP-36 for β1-β2-and β3-adrenoceptors were 6.904 ± 0.190, 6.44 ± 0.129 and 5.773 ± 0.129, respectively. In conclusion, PP-36 is a β-adrenoceptor antagonist possessing potent anti-arrhythmic and cardioprotective effects against ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

  9. The catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in PP2Cα

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chang; Tang, Jun-Yi; Xu, Yun-Fei; Xiao, Peng; Liu, Hong-Da; Wang, Hao-An; Wang, Wen-Bo; Meng, Fan-Guo; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2015-02-01

    PP2C family phosphatases (the type 2C family of protein phosphatases; or metal-dependent phosphatase, PPM) constitute an important class of signaling enzymes that regulate many fundamental life activities. All PP2C family members have a conserved binuclear metal ion active center that is essential for their catalysis. However, the catalytic role of each metal ion during catalysis remains elusive. In this study, we discovered that mutations in the structurally buried D38 residue of PP2Cα (PPM1A) redefined the water-mediated hydrogen network in the active site and selectively disrupted M2 metal ion binding. Using the D38A and D38K mutations of PP2Cα as specific tools in combination with enzymology analysis, our results demonstrated that the M2 metal ion determines the rate-limiting step of substrate hydrolysis, participates in dianion substrate binding and stabilizes the leaving group after P-O bond cleavage. The newly characterized catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in this family not only provides insight into how the binuclear metal centers of the PP2C phosphatases are organized for efficient catalysis but also helps increase our understanding of the function and substrate specificity of PP2C family members.

  10. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals that PP4 dephosphorylates KAP-1 impacting the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Goodarzi, Aaron A; Adelmant, Guillaume O; Pan, Yunfeng; Jeggo, Penelope A; Marto, Jarrod A; Chowdhury, Dipanjan

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphatase PP4C has been implicated in the DNA damage response (DDR), but its substrates in DDR remain largely unknown. We devised a novel proteomic strategy for systematic identification of proteins dephosphorylated by PP4C and identified KRAB-domain-associated protein 1 (KAP-1) as a substrate. Ionizing radiation leads to phosphorylation of KAP-1 at S824 (via ATM) and at S473 (via CHK2). A PP4C/R3β complex interacts with KAP-1 and silencing this complex leads to persistence of phospho-S824 and phospho-S473. We identify a new role for KAP-1 in DDR by showing that phosphorylation of S473 impacts the G2/M checkpoint. Depletion of PP4R3β or expression of the phosphomimetic KAP-1 S473 mutant (S473D) leads to a prolonged G2/M checkpoint. Phosphorylation of S824 is necessary for repair of heterochromatic DNA lesions and similar to cells expressing phosphomimetic KAP-1 S824 mutant (S824D), or PP4R3β-silenced cells, display prolonged relaxation of chromatin with release of chromatin remodelling protein CHD3. Our results define a new role for PP4-mediated dephosphorylation in the DDR, including the regulation of a previously undescribed function of KAP-1 in checkpoint response. PMID:22491012

  11. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine-threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias. PMID:27611305

  12. The catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in PP2Cα.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chang; Tang, Jun-yi; Xu, Yun-fei; Xiao, Peng; Liu, Hong-da; Wang, Hao-an; Wang, Wen-bo; Meng, Fan-guo; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-peng

    2015-01-01

    PP2C family phosphatases (the type 2C family of protein phosphatases; or metal-dependent phosphatase, PPM) constitute an important class of signaling enzymes that regulate many fundamental life activities. All PP2C family members have a conserved binuclear metal ion active center that is essential for their catalysis. However, the catalytic role of each metal ion during catalysis remains elusive. In this study, we discovered that mutations in the structurally buried D38 residue of PP2Cα (PPM1A) redefined the water-mediated hydrogen network in the active site and selectively disrupted M2 metal ion binding. Using the D38A and D38K mutations of PP2Cα as specific tools in combination with enzymology analysis, our results demonstrated that the M2 metal ion determines the rate-limiting step of substrate hydrolysis, participates in dianion substrate binding and stabilizes the leaving group after P-O bond cleavage. The newly characterized catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in this family not only provides insight into how the binuclear metal centers of the PP2C phosphatases are organized for efficient catalysis but also helps increase our understanding of the function and substrate specificity of PP2C family members. PMID:25708299

  13. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine–threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias. PMID:27611305

  14. Three-body calculations for the K ‑ pp system within potential models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kezerashvili, R. Ya; Tsiklauri, S. M.; Filikhin, I.; Suslov, V. M.; Vlahovic, B.

    2016-06-01

    We present three-body nonrelativistic calculations within the framework of a potential model for the kaonic cluster K ‑ pp using two methods: the method of hyperspherical harmonics in the momentum representation and the method of Faddeev equations in configuration space. To perform numerical calculations, different NN and antikaon–nucleon interactions are applied. The results of the calculations for the ground-state energy for the K ‑ pp system obtained by both methods are in reasonable agreement. Although the ground-state energy is not sensitive to the pp interaction, it shows very strong dependence on the K ‑ p potential. We show that the dominant clustering of the {K}-{pp} system in the configuration Λ (1405) + p allows us to calculate the binding energy to good accuracy within a simple cluster approach for the differential Faddeev equations. The theoretical discrepancies in the binding energy and width for the K ‑ pp system related to the different pp and K ‑ p interactions are addressed.

  15. Asymmetrical distribution of δ and PP cells in human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Barbieux, Charlotte; Parnaud, Géraldine; Lavallard, Vanessa; Brioudes, Estelle; Meyer, Jérémy; Alibashe Ahmed, Mohamed; Berishvili, Ekaterine; Berney, Thierry; Bosco, Domenico

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the location of PP and δ cells in relation to the vascularization within human pancreatic islets. To this end, pancreas sections were analysed by immunofluorescence using antibodies against endocrine islet and endothelial cells. Staining in different islet areas corresponding to islet cells adjacent or not to peripheral or central vascular channels was quantified by computerized morphometry. As results, α, PP and δ cells were preferentially found adjacent to vessels. In contrast to α cells, which were evenly distributed between islet periphery and intraislet vascular channels, PP and δ cells had asymmetric and opposite distributions: PP staining was higher and somatostatin staining was lower in the islet periphery than in the area around intraislet vascular channels. Additionally, frequencies of PP and δ cells were negatively correlated in the islets. No difference was observed between islets from the head and the tail of the pancreas, and from type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic donors. In conclusion, the distribution of δ cells differs from that of PP cells in human islets, suggesting that vessels at the periphery and at the centre of islets drain different hormonal cocktails. PMID:26931137

  16. The melt-recrystallization behavior of highly oriented α-iPP fibers embedded in a HIPS matrix.

    PubMed

    Ye, Liwei; Li, Huihui; Qiu, Zhaobin; Yan, Shouke

    2015-03-21

    The melt-recrystallization behavior of α-iPP fibers embedded in an amorphous HIPS matrix has been studied by means of optical microscopy. The amorphous HIPS serving as a supporter of iPP fibers does not become involved in the nucleation and crystallization process of the molten highly oriented iPP fibers. It also does not provide any birefringence under the optical microscope with crossed polarizers. This enables the study of orientation-induced β-iPP crystallization through a control of the melting status of the fibers. Through melting the fibers at different temperatures above 175 °C and subsequent recrystallization, some β-iPP crystals were always produced. The content of the β-iPP crystal depends strongly on the melting temperature and melting time of the iPP fibers. It was confirmed that melting the iPP fibers at relatively lower temperature, e.g. 176 °C, less amount of β-iPP crystals were observed. The content of β-iPP crystal enhances first with increasing melting temperature and then decreases with further increase of the fiber melting temperature. The β-iPP crystallization is found to be most favorable upon melting the fibers at 178 °C for 2 min. This demonstrates the requirement of a certain chain or chain segment orientation for generating β-iPP crystallization on the one hand, while higher orientation of the iPP chains or chain segments encourages the growth of iPP crystals in the α-form on the other hand. This has been further confirmed by varying the melting time of the fiber at different temperatures, since relaxation of the iPP molecular chains at a fixed temperature is time dependent. Moreover, the complete transformation of α-iPP fibers in some local places into β-iPP crystals implies that the αβ-transition may not be required for the orientation-induced β-iPP crystallization. PMID:25708675

  17. Characterization of Phlebotomus papatasi Peritrophins, and the Role of PpPer1 in Leishmania major Survival in its Natural Vector

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V.; Sharma, Narinder K.; Robles-Murguia, Maricela; Ramalho-Ortigao, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    The peritrophic matrix (PM) plays a key role in compartmentalization of the blood meal and as barrier to pathogens in many disease vectors. To establish an infection in sand flies, Leishmania must escape from the endoperitrophic space to prevent excretion with remnants of the blood meal digestion. In spite of the role played regarding Leishmania survival, little is known about sand fly PM molecular components and structural organization. We characterized three peritrophins (PpPer1, PpPer2, and PpPer3) from Phlebotomus papatasi. PpPer1 and PpPer2 display, respectively, four and one chitin-binding domains (CBDs). PpPer3 on the other hand has two CBDs, one mucin-like domain, and a putative domain with hallmarks of a CBD, but with changes in key amino acids. Temporal and spatial expression analyses show that PpPer1 is expressed specifically in the female midgut after blood feeding. PpPer2 and PpPer3 mRNAs were constitutively expressed in midgut and hindgut, with PpPer3 also being expressed in Malpighian tubules. PpPer2 was the only gene expressed in developmental stages. Interestingly, PpPer1 and PpPer3 expression are regulated by Le. major infection. Recombinant PpPer1, PpPer2 and PpPer3 were obtained and shown to display similar biochemical profiles as the native; we also show that PpPer1 and PpPer2 are able to bind chitin. Knockdown of PpPer1 led to a 44% reduction in protein, which in spite of producing an effect on the percentage of infected sand flies, resulted in a 39% increase of parasite load at 48 h. Our data suggest that PpPer1 is a component for the P. papatasi PM and likely involved in the PM role as barrier against Le. major infection. PMID:23516661

  18. Involvement of I2PP2A in the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau and its reversal by Memantine.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Muhammad Omar; Khatoon, Sabiha; Iqbal, Inge-Grundke; Iqbal, Khalid

    2006-07-10

    The activity of protein phosphatase (PP)-2A, which regulates tau phosphorylation, is compromised in Alzheimer disease brain. Here we show that the transient transfection of PC12 cells with inhibitor-2 (I2PP2A) of PP2A causes abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau at Ser396/Ser404 and Ser262/Ser356. This hyperphosphorylation of tau is observed only when a sub-cellular shift of I2PP2A takes place from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and is accompanied by cleavage of I2PP2A into a 20 kDa fragment. Memantine, an un-competitive inhibitor of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, inhibits this abnormal phosphorylation of tau and cell death and prevents the I2PP2A-induced inhibition of PP2A activity in vitro. These findings demonstrate novel mechanisms by which I2PP2A regulates the intracellular activity of PP2A and phosphorylation of tau, and by which Memantine modulates PP2A signaling and inhibits neurofibrillary degeneration. PMID:16806196

  19. A PP1-binding motif present in BRCA1 plays a role in its DNA repair function

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Young-Mi; Pace, Serena M.; Allen, Susan R.; Deng, Chu-Xia; Hsu, Lih-Ching

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1α (PP1α) regulates phosphorylation of BRCA1, which contains a PP1-binding motif 898KVTF901. Mutation of this motif greatly reduces the interaction between BRCA1 and PP1α. Here we show that mutation of the PP1-binding motif abolishes the ability of BRCA1 to enhance survival of Brca1-deficient mouse mammary tumor cells after DNA damage. The Rad51 focus formation and comet assays revealed that the DNA repair function of BRCA1 was impaired when the PP1-binding motif was mutated. Analysis of subnuclear localization of GFP-tagged BRCA1 demonstrated that mutation of the PP1-binding motif affected BRCA1 redistribution in response to DNA damage. BRCA1 is required for the formation of Rad51 subnuclear foci after DNA damage. Mutation of the PP1-binding motif in BRCA1 also affected recruitment of Rad51 to sites of DNA damage. Consistent with these findings, knockdown of PP1α in BRCA1-proficient cells by small interfering RNA also significantly reduced Rad51 focus formation induced by DNA damage. Further analysis indicated that mutation of the PP1-binding motif compromised BRCA1 activities in homologous recombination. Altogether, our data implicate that interaction with PP1α is important for BRCA1 function in DNA repair. PMID:18953404

  20. Effect of PE on the structural evolution of iPP : analysis of a series of iPP-PE copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenneti, Kishore; Tso, Chung; Li, Christopher

    2005-03-01

    The three different morphological forms of isotactic polypropylene (iPP), namely alpha, beta, and gamma, are well established. Alpha is the most common crystal phase while beta is metastable. The gamma form of iPP often exists as the minor component, intermixed with the alpha phase, during crystallization of copolymers at atmospheric pressures. A series of iPP-Polyethylene (PE) copolymers with varying percentages of PE have been investigated. Thermal and x-ray analysis reveal that as the PE content increases from 0 to 5 percent, gamma became the dominant phase. Single crystal morphology of the iPP-PE copolymers have been studied using TEM, SEM and AFM. The signature of alpha phase, the cross-hatch morphology, was observed in all the samples. Gamma single crystals were clearly observed like a ribbon shape and the center of the ribbon consisted of alpha lath. Fractal-like growth was also observed, presumably due to the thermal degradation of the polymer.

  1. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy pp and pp¯ collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2015-06-22

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energymore » $pp$ and $$p\\bar p $$ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $1/p_T^n$ at high $p_T$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $p_T$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $p_T$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $p_T$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $$p \\bar p$$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Lastly, because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $$p\\bar p$$ collisions.« less

  2. Joint Use of PP and PS AVOA Data to Estimate Fluid Indicator in Vertically Fractured Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, B.; Sen, M. K.; Gu, H.

    2015-12-01

    The existence of fractures induces anisotropy in medium. This anisotropy might be a comprehensive result of fractures' properties, such as the direction, spacing, apertures, intensity, microstructure, fluid infill, and so on. Among these properties, the preferential orientation of fracture networks makes the medium azimuthally anisotropic with respect to seismic wave propagation. To the medium containing a set of vertical fractures, the tangential weakness does not vary with the fluid content, however on which the normal weakness shows great dependence. Based on the theory of linear slip model and the sensitivity to fracture weakness of PP- and PS-reflection coefficients which can be derived by a Born formula, we did both the PP-AVOA and PS-AVOA numerical experiment and also the joint inversion of fluid indicator. Results show that when the fractures have low saturation of gas, the fluid indicator estimated from PP-AVOA data is precise enough; when gas saturation goes up to 70%, joint inversion can help to improve the poor quality of PP-AVOA data inversion. Under high gas-saturated case, both PP inversion and joint inversion are sensitive to the errors in g, where g is the square of the ratio of S- and P- wave velocity in the unfractured medium. This dependency can be reduced by adding a different weight to PP and PS data during the inversion.Based on the result of numerical experiment, we processed field data in Sichuan Basin in China. The inversion result is consistent with the well interpretation. The first column in figure represents the PP- and PS-reflectivity computed by matrix method(Fryer and Frazer,1984). The second column is the result of Born linearized method. In the last column, upper one shows the estimated fluid indicator in different gas saturation case and the below one consider the effect of error in g on the inversion results.

  3. Role of (p)ppGpp in Viability and Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae S8.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Xie, Fang; Zhang, Yanhe; Bossé, Janine T; Langford, Paul R; Wang, Chunlai

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium and the cause of porcine pleuropneumonia. When the bacterium encounters nutritional starvation, the relA-dependent (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is activated. The modified nucleotides guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine 5'-triphosphate 3'-diphosphate (pppGpp) are known to be signaling molecules in other prokaryotes. Here, to investigate the role of (p)ppGpp in A. pleuropneumoniae, we created a mutant A. pleuropneumoniae strain, S8ΔrelA, which lacks the (p)ppGpp-synthesizing enzyme RelA, and investigated its phenotype in vitro. S8ΔrelA did not survive after stationary phase (starvation condition) and grew exclusively as non-extended cells. Compared to the wild-type (WT) strain, the S8ΔrelA mutant had an increased ability to form a biofilm. Transcriptional profiles of early stationary phase cultures revealed that a total of 405 bacterial genes were differentially expressed (including 380 up-regulated and 25 down-regulated genes) in S8ΔrelA as compared with the WT strain. Most of the up-regulated genes are involved in ribosomal structure and biogenesis, amino acid transport and metabolism, translation cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis. The data indicate that (p)ppGpp coordinates the growth, viability, morphology, biofilm formation and metabolic ability of A. pleuropneumoniae in starvation conditions. Furthermore, S8ΔrelA could not use certain sugars nor produce urease which has been associated with the virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, suggesting that (p)ppGpp may directly or indirectly affect the pathogenesis of A. pleuropneumoniae during the infection process. In summary, (p)ppGpp signaling represents an essential component of the regulatory network governing stress adaptation and virulence in A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:26509499

  4. Role of (p)ppGpp in Viability and Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae S8

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Xie, Fang; Zhang, Yanhe; Bossé, Janine T.; Langford, Paul R.; Wang, Chunlai

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium and the cause of porcine pleuropneumonia. When the bacterium encounters nutritional starvation, the relA-dependent (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is activated. The modified nucleotides guanosine 5’-diphosphate 3’-diphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine 5’-triphosphate 3’-diphosphate (pppGpp) are known to be signaling molecules in other prokaryotes. Here, to investigate the role of (p)ppGpp in A. pleuropneumoniae, we created a mutant A. pleuropneumoniae strain, S8ΔrelA, which lacks the (p)ppGpp-synthesizing enzyme RelA, and investigated its phenotype in vitro. S8ΔrelA did not survive after stationary phase (starvation condition) and grew exclusively as non-extended cells. Compared to the wild-type (WT) strain, the S8ΔrelA mutant had an increased ability to form a biofilm. Transcriptional profiles of early stationary phase cultures revealed that a total of 405 bacterial genes were differentially expressed (including 380 up-regulated and 25 down-regulated genes) in S8ΔrelA as compared with the WT strain. Most of the up-regulated genes are involved in ribosomal structure and biogenesis, amino acid transport and metabolism, translation cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis. The data indicate that (p)ppGpp coordinates the growth, viability, morphology, biofilm formation and metabolic ability of A. pleuropneumoniae in starvation conditions. Furthermore, S8ΔrelA could not use certain sugars nor produce urease which has been associated with the virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, suggesting that (p)ppGpp may directly or indirectly affect the pathogenesis of A. pleuropneumoniae during the infection process. In summary, (p)ppGpp signaling represents an essential component of the regulatory network governing stress adaptation and virulence in A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:26509499

  5. Greatwall dephosphorylation and inactivation upon mitotic exit is triggered by PP1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sheng; Vigneron, Suzanne; Robert, Perle; Strub, Jean Marc; Cianferani, Sara; Castro, Anna; Lorca, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Entry into mitosis is induced by the activation of cyclin-B-Cdk1 and Greatwall (Gwl; also known as MASTL in mammals) kinases. Cyclin-B-Cdk1 phosphorylates mitotic substrates, whereas Gwl activation promotes the phosphorylation of the small proteins Arpp19 and ENSA. Phosphorylated Arpp19 and/or ENSA bind to and inhibit PP2A comprising the B55 subunit (PP2A-B55; B55 is also known as PPP2R2A), the phosphatase responsible for cyclin-B-Cdk1 substrate dephosphorylation, allowing the stable phosphorylation of mitotic proteins. Upon mitotic exit, cyclin-B-Cdk1 and Gwl kinases are inactivated, and mitotic substrates are dephosphorylated. Here, we have identified protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) as the phosphatase involved in the dephosphorylation of the activating site (Ser875) of Gwl. Depletion of PP1 from meioticXenopusegg extracts maintains phosphorylation of Ser875, as well as the full activity of this kinase, resulting in a block of meiotic and mitotic exit. By contrast, preventing the reactivation of PP2A-B55 through the addition of a hyperactive Gwl mutant (GwlK72M) mainly affected Gwl dephosphorylation on Thr194, resulting in partial inactivation of Gwl and in the incomplete exit from mitosis or meiosis. We also show that when PP2A-B55 is fully reactivated by depleting Arpp19, this protein phosphatase is able to dephosphorylate both activating sites, even in the absence of PP1. PMID:26906418

  6. The anti-esophageal cancer cell activity by a novel tyrosine/phosphoinositide kinase inhibitor PP121.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yi; Zhou, Yajuan; Cheng, Long; Hu, Desheng; Zhou, Xiaoyi; Wang, Zhaohua; Xie, Conghua; Zhou, Fuxiang

    2015-09-11

    Here we explored the potential effect of PP121, a novel dual inhibitor of tyrosine and phosphoinositide kinases, against human esophageal cancer cells. We showed that PP121 exerted potent cytotoxic effect in primary (patient-derived) and established (Eca-109, TE-1 and TE-3 lines) esophageal cancer cells, possibly through activating caspase-3-dependnent apoptosis. PP121 was, however, non-cytotoxic to the normal human esophageal epithelial cells (EECs). At the molecular level, we showed that PP121 blocked Akt-mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) activation in esophageal cancer cells, which was restored by introducing a constitutively-active Akt (CA-Akt). Yet, CA-Akt only partly inhibited cytotoxicity by PP121 in Eca-109 cells. Importantly, we showed that PP121 inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling activation in esophageal cancer cells, which appeared independent of Akt-mTOR blockage. In vivo, oral administration of PP121 remarkably inhibited Eca-109 xenograft growth in nude mice, and significantly improved mice survival. Further, the immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot assays analyzing xenografted tumors showed that PP121 inhibited Akt-mTOR and NFκB activations in vivo. Together, we demonstrate that PP121 potently inhibits esophageal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, possibly through concurrently inhibiting Akt-mTOR and NFκB signalings. PMID:26235881

  7. SUMOylation of the Transcriptional Corepressor KAP1 is Regulated by the Serine and Threonine Phosphatase PP1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Lin, H. Helen; Chen, Hanqing; Xu, Xingzhi; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Ann, David K.

    2012-01-01

    KRAB domain–associated protein 1 (KAP1, also known as TIF1β) is a universal transcriptional corepressor that is susceptible to phosphorylation at Ser824 by ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and to modification by small ubiquitin-like modifying (SUMO) proteins. Here, we found that whereas protein phosphatase 1α (PP1α) directly interacted with KAP1 under unstressed conditions, PP1β interacted with KAP1 under conditions of genotoxic stress. Changes in the abundance of PP1α or PP1β led to a differential inverse-coregulation of the phosphorylation and SUMOylation states of KAP1 under basal conditions and in response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Chromatin immunoprecipitation and re-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that PP1α and PP1β were recruited to KAP1 with different kinetics before and after the induction of DNA DSBs, which provided a mechanistic basis for the switch in the dephosphorylation and SUMOylation states of KAP1. PP1β-stimulated SUMOylation of KAP1 occurred by mechanisms that were dependent and independent of the phosphorylation status of Ser824. We posit a mechanism whereby the combined actions of PP1α and PP1β dynamically cause dephosphorylation of KAP1 Ser824 and assure the SUMOylation of KAP1 to counter the effect of ATM, thereby regulating the transcription of KAP1 target genes in unstressed and stressed cells. PMID:20424263

  8. Preparation of EPR/silica filler by a co-irradiation method forming PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jun; Dang, Shuaiying; Huang, Zhijuan; Xu, Yongshen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to prepare ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR)/silica filler by co-irradiation method forming polypropylene (PP)/EPR/silica nanocomposites. The grafting of maleic anhydride (MAH) on EPR was first studied by co-irradiation in the micro-suspension without any chemical initiator, and the effects of MAH concentration and the total co-irradiation dose on the graft degree of MAH were investigated. Then PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites were successfully prepared by blending of PP matrix and EPR/silica filler, which was obtained by co-irradiation using a mixture of EPR/MAH microsuspension in xylene and tetraethoxysilane/KH560 sol in formic acid. FTIR and SEM results showed that the reactions between MAH on EPR chains and KH560 surrounding silica particles were adopted to form the EPR/silica filler with strong bonding and well silica dispersion. Mechanical properties of PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites with different silica contents and the comparisons with PP, PP/EPR and PP/silica films were studied. The rigid silica particles were trapped in EPR shell and well dispersed in PP/EPR/silica nanocomposites with good compatibility and strong interfacial adhesion, achieving overall improvements in stiffness, strength and toughness compared with pure PP.

  9. Fabrication of PP-g-PEGMA-g-heparin and its hemocompatibility: From protein adsorption to anticoagulant tendency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Jiang, Wei; shi, Qiang; Zhao, Jie; Yin, Jinghua; Stagnaro, Paola

    2012-05-01

    We described a two-step process to fabricate the heparinized polypropylene (PP) film using cyanuric chloride (CC) as a trifunctional reagent and poly (ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) as a spacer. The modified PP films were characterized by attenuated total reflectance FT-IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; the content of PEGMA and heparin were determined by gravimetric method and a toluidine blue assay, respectively. For the PP-g-PEGMA films, it was found that small size protein BSA tended to adsorb on the surface of low molecular weight monomer grafted PP, whereas big spindle-shaped fibrinogen tended to adsorb on the surface of high molecular weight monomer grafted PP. We gave a definition of anti-protein adsorptive factor r with two model proteins, albumin and fibrinogen. The results by platelet adhesion and plasma recalcification time (PRT) experiments indicated that the factor r could be used to quantitatively evaluate the anticoagulant tendency of PP-g-PEGMA modified films. For the PP-g-PEGMA-g-heparin modified films, the surface was proved to have a high bioactivity by the adsorption of AT III assay and very low platelet adhesion. It indicated that immobilization of heparin on the PP film with PEGMA as a spacer was an effective way to improve the hemocompatibility of PP.

  10. Mechanism of PP2A-mediated IKKβ dephosphorylation: a systems biological approach

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Johannes; Barisic, Sandra; Schumann, Eva; Allgöwer, Frank; Sawodny, Oliver; Sauter, Thomas; Kulms, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    Background Biological effects of nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) can differ tremendously depending on the cellular context. For example, NFκB induced by interleukin-1 (IL-1) is converted from an inhibitor of death receptor induced apoptosis into a promoter of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVB)-induced apoptosis. This conversion requires prolonged NFκB activation and is facilitated by IL-1 + UVB-induced abrogation of the negative feedback loop for NFκB, involving a lack of inhibitor of κB (IκBα) protein reappearance. Permanent activation of the upstream kinase IKKβ results from UVB-induced inhibition of the catalytic subunit of Ser-Thr phosphatase PP2A (PP2Ac), leading to immediate phosphorylation and degradation of newly synthesized IκBα. Results To investigate the mechanism underlying the general PP2A-mediated tuning of IKKβ phosphorylation upon IL-1 stimulation, we have developed a strictly reduced mathematical model based on ordinary differential equations which includes the essential processes concerning the IL-1 receptor, IKKβ and PP2A. Combining experimental and modelling approaches we demonstrate that constitutively active, but not post-stimulation activated PP2A, tunes out IKKβ phosphorylation thus allowing for IκBα resynthesis in response to IL-1. Identifiability analysis and determination of confidence intervals reveal that the model allows reliable predictions regarding the dynamics of PP2A deactivation and IKKβ phosphorylation. Additionally, scenario analysis is used to scrutinize several hypotheses regarding the mode of UVB-induced PP2Ac inhibition. The model suggests that down regulation of PP2Ac activity, which results in prevention of IκBα reappearance, is not a direct UVB action but requires instrumentality. Conclusion The model developed here can be used as a reliable building block of larger NFκB models and offers comprehensive simplification potential for future modeling of NFκB signaling. It gives more insight into the newly discovered

  11. Inhibition of cdc2 activation by INH/PP2A.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T H; Turck, C; Kirschner, M W

    1994-01-01

    INH, a type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A), negatively regulates entry into M phase and the cyclin B-dependent activation of cdc2 in Xenopus extracts. INH appears to be central to the mechanism of the trigger for mitotic initiation, as it prevents the premature activation of cdc2. We first show that INH is a conventional form of PP2A with a B alpha regulatory subunit. We next explore the mechanism by which it inhibits cdc2 activation by examining the effect of purified PP2A on the reaction pathways controlling cdc2 activity. Our results suggest that although PP2A inhibits the switch in tyrosine kinase and tyrosine phosphatase activities accompanying mitosis, this switch is a consequence of the inhibition of some other rate-limiting event. In the preactivation phase, PP2A inhibits the pathway leading to T161 phosphorylation, suggesting that this activity may be one of the rate-limiting events for transition. However, our results also suggest that the accumulation of active cdc2/cyclin complexes during the lag is only one of the events required for triggering entry into mitosis. Images PMID:8049524

  12. The therapeutic effects of SET/I2PP2A inhibitors on canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Enjoji, Shuhei; Yabe, Ryotaro; Fujiwara, Nobuyuki; Tsuji, Shunya; Vitek, Michael P; Mizuno, Takuya; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Usui, Tatsuya; Ohama, Takashi; Sato, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    Canine melanoma is one of the most important diseases in small animal medicine. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a well conserved serine/threonine phosphatase, plays a critical role as a tumor suppressor. SET/I2PP2A is an endogenous inhibitor for PP2A, which directly binds to PP2A and suppresses its phosphatase activity. Elevated SET protein levels have been reported to exacerbate human tumor progression. The role of SET in canine melanoma, however, has not been understood. Here, we investigated the potential therapeutic role for SET inhibitors in canine melanoma. The expression of SET protein was observed in 6 canine melanoma cell lines. We used CMeC-1 cells (primary origin) and CMeC-2 cells (metastatic origin) to generate cell lines stably expressing SET-targeting shRNAs. Knockdown of SET expression in CMeC-2, but not in CMeC-1, leads to decreased cell proliferation, invasion and colony formation. Phosphorylation level of p70 S6 kinase was decreased by SET knockdown in CMeC-2, suggesting the involvement of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin)/p70 S6 kinase signaling. The SET inhibitors, OP449 and FTY720, more effectively killed CMeC-2 than CMeC-1. We observed PP2A activation in CMeC-2 treated with OP449 and FTY720. These results demonstrated the potential therapeutic application of SET inhibitors for canine melanoma. PMID:26062569

  13. Inhibition of PP2A by LIS1 increases HIV-1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Epie, Nicolas; Ammosova, Tatyana; Turner, Willie; Nekhai, Sergei

    2006-01-01

    Background Lissencephaly is a severe brain malformation in part caused by mutations in the LIS1 gene. LIS1 interacts with microtubule-associated proteins, and enhances transport of microtubule fragments. Previously we showed that LIS1 interacts with HIV-1 Tat protein and that this interaction was mediated by WD40 domains of LIS1. In the present study, we analyze the effect of LIS1 on Tat-mediated transcription of HIV-1 LTR. Results Tat-mediated HIV-1 transcription was upregulated in 293 cells transfected with LIS1 expression vector. The WD5 but not the N-terminal domain of LIS1 increases Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcription. The effect of LIS1 was similar to the effect of okadaic acid, an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). We then analyzed the effect of LIS1 on the activity of PP2A in vitro. We show that LIS1 and its isolated WD5 domain but not the N-terminal domain of LIS1 blocks PP2A activity. Conclusion Our results show that inhibition of PP2A by LIS1 induces HIV-1 transcription. Our results also point to a possibility that LIS1 might function in the cells as a yet unrecognized regulatory subunit of PP2A. PMID:17018134

  14. Holographic optical tweezers: microassembling of shape-complementary 2PP building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksouri, Sarah Isabelle; Mattern, Manuel; Köhler, Jannis; Aumann, Andreas; Zyla, Gordon; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Based on an ongoing trend in miniaturization and due to the increased complexity in MEMS-technology new methods of assembly need to be developed. Recent developments show that particularly optical forces are suitable to meet the requirements. The unique advantages of optical tweezers (OT) are attractive due to their contactless and precise manipulation forces. Spherical as well as non-spherical shaped pre-forms can already be assembled arbitrarily by using appropriate beam profiles generated by a spatial light modulator (SLM), resulting in a so called holographic optical tweezer (HOT) setup. For the fabrication of shape-complementary pre-forms, a two-photon-polymerization (2PP) process is implemented. The purpose of the process combination of 2PP and HOT is the development of an optical microprocessing platform for assembling arbitrary building blocks. Here, the optimization of the 2PP and HOT processes is described in order to allow the fabrication and 3D assembling of interlocking components. Results include the analysis of the dependence of low and high qualities of 2PP microstructures and their manufacturing accuracy for further HOT assembling processes. Besides, the applied detachable interlocking connections of the 2PP building blocks are visualized by an application example. In the long-term a full optical assembly method without applying any mechanical forces can thus be realized.

  15. DksA and ppGpp Directly Regulate Transcription of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Justin J.; Durfee, Tim; Gourse, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    The components of the Escherichia coli flagella apparatus are synthesized in a three-level transcriptional cascade activated by the master regulator FlhDC. The cascade coordinates the synthesis rates of a large number of gene products with each other and with nutritional conditions. Recent genome-wide studies have reported that flagellar transcription is altered in cells lacking the transcription regulators DksA or ppGpp, but some or all reported effects could be indirect, and some are contradictory. We report here that the activities of promoters at all three levels of the cascade are much higher in strains lacking dksA, resulting in overproduction of flagellin and hyperflagellated cells. In vitro, DksA/ppGpp inhibits the flhDC promoter and the σ70-dependent fliA promoter transcribing the gene for σ28. However, DksA and ppGpp do not affect the σ28-dependent fliA promoter or the σ28-dependent fliC promoter in vitro, suggesting that the dramatic effects on expression of those genes in vivo are mediated indirectly through direct effects of DksA/ppGpp on FlhDC and σ28 expression. We conclude that DksA/ppGpp inhibits expression of the flagellar cascade during stationary phase and following starvation, thereby coordinating flagella and ribosome assembly and preventing expenditure of scarce energy resources on synthesis of two of the cell’s largest macromolecular complexes. PMID:19889089

  16. PP1 initiates the dephosphorylation of MASTL, triggering mitotic exit and bistability in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Samuel; Fey, Dirk; McCloy, Rachael A.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.; Payne, Richard J.; Daly, Roger J.; James, David E.; Caldon, C. Elizabeth; Watkins, D. Neil; Croucher, David R.; Burgess, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entry into mitosis is driven by the phosphorylation of thousands of substrates, under the master control of Cdk1. During entry into mitosis, Cdk1, in collaboration with MASTL kinase, represses the activity of the major mitotic protein phosphatases, PP1 and PP2A, thereby ensuring mitotic substrates remain phosphorylated. For cells to complete and exit mitosis, these phosphorylation events must be removed, and hence, phosphatase activity must be reactivated. This reactivation of phosphatase activity presumably requires the inhibition of MASTL; however, it is not currently understood what deactivates MASTL and how this is achieved. In this study, we identified that PP1 is associated with, and capable of partially dephosphorylating and deactivating, MASTL during mitotic exit. Using mathematical modelling, we were able to confirm that deactivation of MASTL is essential for mitotic exit. Furthermore, small decreases in Cdk1 activity during metaphase are sufficient to initiate the reactivation of PP1, which in turn partially deactivates MASTL to release inhibition of PP2A and, hence, create a feedback loop. This feedback loop drives complete deactivation of MASTL, ensuring a strong switch-like activation of phosphatase activity during mitotic exit. PMID:26872783

  17. Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) Is a Post-Translational Regulator of the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Schmutz, Isabelle; Wendt, Sabrina; Schnell, Anna; Kramer, Achim; Mansuy, Isabelle M.; Albrecht, Urs

    2011-01-01

    Circadian clocks coordinate the timing of important biological processes. Interconnected transcriptional and post-translational feedback loops based on a set of clock genes generate and maintain these rhythms with a period of about 24 hours. Many clock proteins undergo circadian cycles of post-translational modifications. Among these modifications, protein phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating activity, stability and intracellular localization of clock components. Several protein kinases were characterized as regulators of the circadian clock. However, the function of protein phosphatases, which balance phosphorylation events, in the mammalian clock mechanism is less well understood. Here, we identify protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) as regulator of period and light-induced resetting of the mammalian circadian clock. Down-regulation of PP1 activity in cells by RNA interference and in vivo by expression of a specific inhibitor in the brain of mice tended to lengthen circadian period. Moreover, reduction of PP1 activity in the brain altered light-mediated clock resetting behavior in mice, enhancing the phase shifts in either direction. At the molecular level, diminished PP1 activity increased nuclear accumulation of the clock component PER2 in neurons. Hence, PP1, may reduce PER2 phosphorylation thereby influencing nuclear localization of this protein. This may at least partially influence period and phase shifting properties of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:21712997

  18. Degradation of Trichloroethylene by Methanol-Grown Cultures of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b PP358

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, M. W.; Speitel, G. E.; Georgiou, G.

    1996-01-01

    A soluble methane monooxygenase-constitutive mutant strain of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, strain PP358, was grown with methanol as the carbon source, and the kinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation were determined. PP358 exhibited high TCE degradation rates under both oxygen- and carbon-limiting conditions. The optimal pseudo first-order rate constant for TCE was comparable to the values measured for cells grown with methane. We found that growth under oxygen-limiting conditions results in increased accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate, which in turn correlates with higher transformation capacities for TCE. It was also shown that methanol inhibits TCE degradation only at high concentrations. Thus, methanol-grown cultures of PP358 represent an efficient system for the biodegradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons. PMID:16535263

  19. Quantitative comparison of measurement methods for the evaluation of micro- and nanostructures written with 2PP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnisch, Emely Marie; König, Niels; Schmitt, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Two-Photon Polymerization (2PP) has become an established process for fabricating individual micro-and nanostructures nearly in the last two decades. Its high degree of freedom opened up novel possibilities for a large range of applications like functional structures for cell growth, photonic crystals, nanoantennas, diffractive optical elements and lab-on-a-chip structures (just to name a few). Since the measurement of structures written with 2PP is always very time consuming, we present a comparison between white light interferometry (WLI) and confocal microscopy (CM) which were used for measuring structures written with 2PP. By performing a GageRR analysis with both metrology devices, we calculated the process tolerance one has to accept when measuring these structures with WLI or CM.

  20. Effects of layer-multiplying and interface on the content of β-transcrystallization in PP

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Fan; Li, Jiang E-mail: nic7702@scu.edu.cn; Guo, Shaoyun E-mail: nic7702@scu.edu.cn

    2015-05-22

    The alternating multilayered polypropylene (PP layer)/β-nucleating agent filled-polypropylene (β-PP layer) were prepared through layer-multiplying extrusion combined with an assembly of layer-multiplying elements (LM Es). The content of β-crystal was firstly evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), which indicated that the relative amount of the β-crystal increased from 38.67% to 81.22% with the increase of layer numbers from 2-layer to 128-layer. It was well consistent with the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD). The morphology observation of β-crystal by polarizing microscope (POM) revealed that the closely packed nuclei in the interface could induce numerous β-transcrystallization in pure PP layer due to the confinement effect. The non-isothermal crystallization kinetic analysis via Mozhishen’s methods manifested that the crystallization rate was greatly enhanced by the augment of the layered interface.

  1. Tensor Correlations Measured in 3He(e,e'pp)n

    SciTech Connect

    Baghdasaryan, H; Weinstein, L B; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, K P; Amarian, M; Anghinolfi, M; Avakian, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Bookwalter, C; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Boltmann, S; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; DeVita, R; DeSanctis, E; Deur, A; Dey, B; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Eugenio, P; Fegan, S; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Gohn, W; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hyde, C E; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Konczykowski, P; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Kvaltine, N D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McAndrew, J; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrison, B; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nepali, C; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Protopopescu, D; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Salgado, C; Schumacher, R A; Seraydaryan, H; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tedeschi, D J; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2010-11-01

    We have measured the 3He(e,e'pp)n reaction at an incident energy of 4.7 GeV over a wide kinematic range. We identified spectator correlated pp and pn nucleon pairs by using kinematic cuts and measured their relative and total momentum distributions. This is the first measurement of the ratio of pp to pn pairs as a function of pair total momentum ptot. For pair relative momenta between 0.3 and 0.5 GeV/c, the ratio is very small at low ptot and rises to approximately 0.5 at large ptot. This shows the dominance of tensor over central correlations at this relative momentum.

  2. PP2A as a master regulator of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarchak, Nathan; Xing, Yongna

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays a critical multi-faceted role in the regulation of the cell cycle. It is known to dephosphorylate over 300 substrates involved in the cell cycle, regulating almost all major pathways and cell cycle checkpoints. PP2A is involved in such diverse processes by the formation of structurally distinct families of holoenzymes, which are regulated spatially and temporally by specific regulators. Here, we review the involvement of PP2A in the regulation of three cell signaling pathways: wnt, mTOR and MAP kinase, as well as the G1→S transition, DNA synthesis and mitotic initiation. These processes are all crucial for proper cell survival and proliferation and are often deregulated in cancer and other diseases. PMID:26906453

  3. On the majority carrier collection in p+pn+ and n+pp+ silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. N.; Kotnala, R. K.; Jain, G. C.

    The spectral responses of a few bifacial n+pp+ silicon solar cells of different thicknesses were measured to investigate the possibility of majority carrier collection in n+pp+ back surface field (BSF) and p+pn+ front surface field (FSF) silicon solar cells. It has been found out that under low level conditions, any appreciable collection of photogenerated majority carriers has to be field aided. Therefore, under low level conditions, a substantial contribution of hole collection to the photocurrent density of a p+pn+ or n+pp+ cell may come from the p+ or p region provided not only the concentration of photogenerated holes in that region is substantially large but there also exists an aiding built in electric field due to an impurity gradient. For high level conditions, however, holes can be collected from the uniformly doped p-base region with or without the help of an aiding electric field.

  4. GridPP - Preparing for LHC Run 2 and the Wider Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    This paper elaborates upon the operational status and directions within the UK Computing for Particle Physics (GridPP) project as it approaches LHC Run 2. It details the pressures that have been gradually reshaping the deployed hardware and middleware environments at GridPP sites - from the increasing adoption of larger multicore nodes to the move towards alternative batch systems and cloud alternatives - as well as changes being driven by funding considerations. The paper highlights work being done with non-LHC communities and describes some of the early outcomes of adopting a generic DIRAC based job submission and management framework. The paper presents results from an analysis of how GridPP effort is distributed across various deployment and operations tasks and how this may be used to target further improvements in efficiency.

  5. PP2A as a master regulator of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wlodarchak, Nathan; Xing, Yongna

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays a critical multi-faceted role in the regulation of the cell cycle. It is known to dephosphorylate over 300 substrates involved in the cell cycle, regulating almost all major pathways and cell cycle checkpoints. PP2A is involved in such diverse processes by the formation of structurally distinct families of holoenzymes, which are regulated spatially and temporally by specific regulators. Here, we review the involvement of PP2A in the regulation of three cell signaling pathways: wnt, mTOR and MAP kinase, as well as the G1→S transition, DNA synthesis and mitotic initiation. These processes are all crucial for proper cell survival and proliferation and are often deregulated in cancer and other diseases. PMID:26906453

  6. Tensor Correlations Measured in He3(e,e'pp)n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, H.; Weinstein, L. B.; Laget, J. M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amarian, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Berman, B. L.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; de Vita, R.; de Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fegan, S.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hyde, C. E.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Konczykowski, P.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McAndrew, J.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moriya, K.; Morrison, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nepali, C.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2010-11-01

    We have measured the He3(e,e'pp)n reaction at an incident energy of 4.7 GeV over a wide kinematic range. We identified spectator correlated pp and pn nucleon pairs by using kinematic cuts and measured their relative and total momentum distributions. This is the first measurement of the ratio of pp to pn pairs as a function of pair total momentum ptot. For pair relative momenta between 0.3 and 0.5GeV/c, the ratio is very small at low ptot and rises to approximately 0.5 at large ptot. This shows the dominance of tensor over central correlations at this relative momentum.

  7. Tensor Correlations Measured in {sup 3}He(e,e{sup '}pp)n

    SciTech Connect

    Baghdasaryan, H.; Weinstein, L. B.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amarian, M.; Bennett, R. P.; Bueltmann, S.; Dodge, G. E.; Hyde, C. E.; Klein, A.; Kuhn, S. E.; Mayer, M.; Nepali, C.; Seraydaryan, H.; Laget, J. M.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Deur, A.; Gyurjyan, V.; Kubarovsky, V.; Nadel-Turonski, P.

    2010-11-26

    We have measured the {sup 3}He(e,e{sup '}pp)n reaction at an incident energy of 4.7 GeV over a wide kinematic range. We identified spectator correlated pp and pn nucleon pairs by using kinematic cuts and measured their relative and total momentum distributions. This is the first measurement of the ratio of pp to pn pairs as a function of pair total momentum p{sub tot}. For pair relative momenta between 0.3 and 0.5 GeV/c, the ratio is very small at low p{sub tot} and rises to approximately 0.5 at large p{sub tot}. This shows the dominance of tensor over central correlations at this relative momentum.

  8. DksA and (p)ppGpp Have Unique and Overlapping Contributions to Haemophilus ducreyi Pathogenesis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Concerta L.; Zhang, Xinjun; Fortney, Kate R.; Ellinger, Sheila; Johnson, Paula; Baker, Beth; Liu, Yunlong; Janowicz, Diane M.; Katz, Barry P.; Munson, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response is important for bacterial survival in nutrient limiting conditions. For maximal effect, (p)ppGpp interacts with the cofactor DksA, which stabilizes (p)ppGpp's interaction with RNA polymerase. We previously demonstrated that (p)ppGpp was required for the virulence of Haemophilus ducreyi in humans. Here, we constructed an H. ducreyi dksA mutant and showed it was also partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. To understand the roles of (p)ppGpp and DksA in gene regulation in H. ducreyi, we defined genes potentially altered by (p)ppGpp and DksA deficiency using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). In bacteria collected at stationary phase, lack of (p)ppGpp and DksA altered expression of 28% and 17% of H. ducreyi open reading frames, respectively, including genes involved in transcription, translation, and metabolism. There was significant overlap in genes differentially expressed in the (p)ppGpp mutant relative to the dksA mutant. Loss of (p)ppGpp or DksA resulted in the dysregulation of several known virulence determinants. Deletion of dksA downregulated lspB and rendered the organism less resistant to phagocytosis and increased its sensitivity to oxidative stress. Both mutants had reduced ability to attach to human foreskin fibroblasts; the defect correlated with reduced expression of the Flp adhesin proteins in the (p)ppGpp mutant but not in the dksA mutant, suggesting that DksA regulates the expression of an unknown cofactor(s) required for Flp-mediated adherence. We conclude that both (p)ppGpp and DksA serve as major regulators of H. ducreyi gene expression in stationary phase and have both overlapping and unique contributions to pathogenesis. PMID:26056381

  9. Solution Structure of the Pseudomonas putida protein PpPutA45 and its DNA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Halouska, Steven; Zhou, Yuzhen; Becker, Donald F.; Powers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Proline utilization A (PutA) is a membrane associated multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate in a two step process. In certain Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas putida, PutA also acts as an auto repressor in the cytoplasm when an insufficient concentration of proline is available. Here the N-terminal residues 1–45 of PutA from P. putida (PpPutA45), are shown to be responsible for DNA binding and dimerization. The solution structure of PpPutA45 was determined using NMR methods, where the protein is shown to be a symmetrical homodimer (12 kDa) consisting of two ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) structures. DNA sequence recognition by PpPutA45 was determined using DNA gel mobility shift assays and NMR chemical shift perturbations. PpPutA45 was shown to bind a 14 base-pair DNA oligomer (5′-GCGGTTGCACCTTT-3′). A model of the PpPutA45-DNA oligomer complex was generated using Haddock 2.1. The antiparallel β-sheet that results from PpPutA45 dimerization serves as the DNA recognition binding site by inserting into the DNA major groove. The dimeric core of four α-helices provides a structural scaffold for the β-sheet from which residues Thr5, Gly7, and Lys9 make sequence specific contacts with the DNA. The structural model implies flexibility of Lys9 which can either make hydrogen bond contacts with guanine or thymine. The high sequence and structure conservation of the PutA RHH domain suggest interdomain interactions play an important role in the evolution of the protein. PMID:18767154

  10. PP2A inhibition overcomes acquired resistance to HER2 targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HER2 targeted therapies including trastuzumab and more recently lapatinib have significantly improved the prognosis for HER2 positive breast cancer patients. However, resistance to these agents is a significant clinical problem. Although several mechanisms have been proposed for resistance to trastuzumab, the mechanisms of lapatinib resistance remain largely unknown. In this study we generated new models of acquired resistance to HER2 targeted therapy and investigated mechanisms of resistance using phospho-proteomic profiling. Results Long-term continuous exposure of SKBR3 cells to low dose lapatinib established a cell line, SKBR3-L, which is resistant to both lapatinib and trastuzumab. Phospho-proteomic profiling and immunoblotting revealed significant alterations in phospho-proteins involved in key signaling pathways and molecular events. In particular, phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which inactivates eEF2, was significantly decreased in SKBR3-L cells compared to the parental SKBR3 cells. SKBR3-L cells exhibited significantly increased activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a phosphatase that dephosphorylates eEF2. SKBR3-L cells showed increased sensitivity to PP2A inhibition, with okadaic acid, compared to SKBR3 cells. PP2A inhibition significantly enhanced response to lapatinib in both the SKBR3 and SKBR3-L cells. Furthermore, treatment of SKBR3 parental cells with the PP2A activator, FTY720, decreased sensitivity to lapatinib. The alteration in eEF2 phosphorylation, PP2A activity and sensitivity to okadaic acid were also observed in a second HER2 positive cell line model of acquired lapatinib resistance, HCC1954-L. Conclusions Our data suggests that decreased eEF2 phosphorylation, mediated by increased PP2A activity, contributes to resistance to HER2 inhibition and may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in HER2 positive breast cancer which is resistant to HER2 targeted therapies. PMID:24958351

  11. A Role for PP1/NIPP1 in Steering Migration of Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Granados, Cristina; Prescott, Alan R.; Van Dessel, Nele; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Arocena, Miguel; Klaska, Izabela P.; Görnemann, Janina; Beullens, Monique; Bollen, Mathieu; Forrester, John V.; McCaig, Colin D.

    2012-01-01

    Electrical gradients are present in many developing and regenerating tissues and around tumours. Mimicking endogenous electric fields in vitro has profound effects on the behaviour of many cell types. Intriguingly, specific cell types migrate cathodally, others anodally and some polarise with their long axis perpendicular to the electric vector. These striking phenomena are likely to have in vivo relevance since one of the determining factors during cancer metastasis is the ability to switch between attractive and repulsive migration in response to extracellular guidance stimuli. We present evidence that the cervical cancer cell line HeLa migrates cathodally in a direct current electric field of physiological intensity, while the strongly metastatic prostate cancer cell line PC-3-M migrates anodally. Notably, genetic disruption of protein serine/threonine phosphatase-1 (PP1) and its regulator NIPP1 decrease directional migration in these cell lines. Conversely, the inducible expression of NIPP1 switched the directional response of HeLa cells from cathodal to slightly anodal in a PP1-dependent manner. Remarkably, induction of a hyperactive PP1/NIPP1 holoenzyme, further shifted directional migration towards the anode. We show that PP1 association with NIPP1 upregulates signalling by the GTPase Cdc42 and demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of Cdc42 in cells overexpressing NIPP1 recovered cathodal migration. Taken together, we provide the first evidence for regulation of directional cell migration by NIPP1. In addition, we identify PP1/NIPP1 as a novel molecular compass that controls directed cell migration via upregulation of Cdc42 signalling and suggest a way by which PP1/NIPP1 may contribute to the migratory properties of cancer cells. PMID:22815811

  12. Phosphorylation of eIF2α triggered by mTORC1 inhibition and PP6C activation is required for autophagy and is aberrant in PP6C-mutated melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wengrod, Jordan; Wang, Ding; Weiss, Sarah; Zhong, Hua; Osman, Iman; Gardner, Lawrence B

    2015-03-10

    Amino acid deprivation promotes the inhibition of the kinase complex mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) and activation of the kinase GCN2 (general control nonrepressed 2). Signaling pathways downstream of both kinases have been thought to independently induce autophagy. We showed that these two amino acid-sensing systems are linked. We showed that pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 led to activation of GCN2 and phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) in a mechanism dependent on the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6C). Autophagy induced by pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 required PP6C, GCN2, and eIF2α phosphorylation. Although some of the PP6C mutants found in melanoma did not form a strong complex with PP6 regulatory subunits and were rapidly degraded, these mutants paradoxically stabilized PP6C encoded by the wild-type allele and increased eIF2α phosphorylation. Furthermore, these PP6C mutations were associated with increased autophagy in vitro and in human melanoma samples. Thus, these data showed that GCN2 activation and phosphorylation of eIF2α in response to mTORC1 inhibition are necessary for autophagy. Additionally, we described a role for PP6C in this process and provided a mechanism for PP6C mutations associated with melanoma. PMID:25759478

  13. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase- and Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-binding Domains of the Alpha4 Protein Are Both Required for Alpha4 to Inhibit PP2A Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    LeNoue-Newton, Michele; Watkins, Guy R.; Zou, Ping; Germane, Katherine L.; McCorvey, Lisa R.; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Spiller, Benjamin W.

    2012-04-30

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including post-translational modifications and association with regulatory proteins. Alpha4 is one such regulatory protein that binds the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) and protects it from polyubiquitination and degradation. Alpha4 is a multidomain protein with a C-terminal domain that binds Mid1, a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, and an N-terminal domain containing the PP2Ac-binding site. In this work, we present the structure of the N-terminal domain of mammalian Alpha4 determined by x-ray crystallography and use double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy to show that it is a flexible tetratricopeptide repeat-like protein. Structurally, Alpha4 differs from its yeast homolog, Tap42, in two important ways: (1) the position of the helix containing the PP2Ac-binding residues is in a more open conformation, showing flexibility in this region; and (2) Alpha4 contains a ubiquitin-interacting motif. The effects of wild-type and mutant Alpha4 on PP2Ac ubiquitination and stability were examined in mammalian cells by performing tandem ubiquitin-binding entity precipitations and cycloheximide chase experiments. Our results reveal that both the C-terminal Mid1-binding domain and the PP2Ac-binding determinants are required for Alpha4-mediated protection of PP2Ac from polyubiquitination and degradation.

  14. Detailed comparison of the pp →π+ pn and pp →π+ d reactions at 951 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Bary, M.; Budzanowski, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Ernst, J.; Hawranek, P.; Hinterberger, F.; Jha, V.; Kilian, K.; Kliczewski, S.; Kirillov, D.; Kolev, D.; Kravcikova, M.; Kutsarova, T.; Lesiak, M.; Lieb, J.; Machner, H.; Magiera, A.; Maier, R.; Martinska, G.; Nedev, S.; Niskanen, J.; Piskunov, N.; Prasuhn, D.; Protić, D.; von Rossen, P.; Roy, B. J.; Sitnik, I.; Siudak, R.; Smiechowicz, M.; Tsenov, R.; Ulicny, M.; Urban, J.; Vankova, G.; Wilkin, C.; GEM Collaboration

    2005-03-01

    The positively charged pions produced in proton-proton collisions at a beam momentum of 1640 MeV/c were measured in the forward direction with a high resolution magnetic spectrograph. The missing mass distribution shows the bound state (deuteron) clearly separated from the pn continuum. Despite the very good resolution, there is no evidence for any significant production of the pn system in the spin-singlet state. However, the σ (pp →π+ pn) / σ (pp →π+ d) cross section ratio is about twice as large as that predicted from S-wave final-state-interaction theory and it is suggested that this is due to D-state effects in the pn system.

  15. Proton/pion ratios and radial flow in pp and peripheral heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuautle, E.; Paić, G.

    2006-09-01

    The production of baryon and mesons in the RHIC heavy-ion experiments has received a lot of attention lately. Although not widely known, the pp data measured concurrently with heavy ion collisions do not find a convincing explanation in terms of simple models. We present the results of an afterburner to Pythia and Hijing event generators, simulating radial flow which seems to qualitatively explain the experimental results when applied to the pp collision data from RHIC at 200 GeV center-of-mass energy.

  16. Proton/pion ratios and radial flow in pp and peripheral heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cuautle, E.; Paic, G.

    2006-09-25

    The production of baryon and mesons in the RHIC heavy-ion experiments has received a lot of attention lately. Although not widely known, the pp data measured concurrently with heavy ion collisions do not find a convincing explanation in terms of simple models. We present the results of an afterburner to Pythia and Hijing event generators, simulating radial flow which seems to qualitatively explain the experimental results when applied to the pp collision data from RHIC at 200 GeV center-of-mass energy.

  17. Measurement of Solar pp-neutrino flux with Borexino: results and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, O. Yu; Agostini, M.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, O.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Semenov, D.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-02-01

    Measurement of the Solar pp-neutrino flux completed the measurement of Solar neutrino fluxes from the pp-chain of reactions in Borexino experiment. The result is in agreement with the prediction of the Standard Solar Model and the MSW/LMA oscillation scenario. A comparison of the total neutrino flux from the Sun with Solar luminosity in photons provides a test of the stability of the Sun on the 105 years time scale, and sets a strong limit on the power production by the unknown energy sources in the Sun.

  18. Two-Nucleon Momentum Distributions Measured in 3He(e,e'pp)n

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Niyazov; L.B. Weinstein; et al

    2004-02-01

    We have measured the 3He(e,e'pp)n reaction at 2.2 GeV over a wide kinematic range. The kinetic energy distribution for ''fast'' nucleons (p > 250 MeV/c) peaks where two nucleons each have 20% or less, and the third nucleon has most of the transferred energy. These fast pp and pn pairs are back-to-back with little momentum along the three-momentum transfer, indicating that they are spectators. Experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that we have measured distorted two-nucleon momentum distributions by striking the third nucleon and detecting the spectator correlated pair.

  19. Functional barrier in two-layer recycled PP films for food packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarfato, P.; Di Maio, L.; Milana, M. R.; Feliciani, R.; Denaro, M.; Incarnato, L.

    2014-05-01

    A preliminary study on bi-layer virgin/contaminated polypropylene co-extruded films was performed in order to evaluate the possibility to realize an effective functional barrier in PP-based multi-layer systems. In particular, the specific migration in 10% v/v aqueous ethanol of two surrogate contaminants (phenyl-cyclohexane and benzophenone) contained in the contaminated layer across the PP functional barrier was measured at different times and the results were compared with those obtained from a contaminated mono-layer polypropylene film. Moreover, the thermal and mechanical performances of the produced films were investigated.

  20. Energy dependence of the transverse momentum distributions of charged particles in pp collisions measured by ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. A.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, K.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deppman, A.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; D Erasmo, G.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goerlich, L.; Gomez, R.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.

    2013-12-01

    Differential cross sections of charged particles in inelastic pp collisions as a function of p T have been measured at at the LHC. The p T spectra are compared to NLO-pQCD calculations. Though the differential cross section for an individual cannot be described by NLO-pQCD, the relative increase of cross section with is in agreement with NLO-pQCD. Based on these measurements and observations, procedures are discussed to construct pp reference spectra at up to p T=50 GeV/ c as required for the calculation of the nuclear modification factor in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions.

  1. First real-time detection of solar pp neutrinos by Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, M.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Kayser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablëv, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-07-01

    Solar neutrinos have been pivotal to the discovery of neutrino flavour oscillations and are a unique tool to probe the reactions that keep the Sun shine. Although most of solar neutrino components have been directly measured, the neutrinos emitted by the keystone pp reaction, in which two protons fuse to make a deuteron, have so far eluded direct detection. The Borexino experiment, an ultra-pure liquid scintillator detector running at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy, has now filled the gap, providing the first direct real time measurement of pp neutrinos and of the solar neutrino luminosity.

  2. D Production in p-p and d-Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.; Liu, Ming X.; McGaughey, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    This is an extension of our previous work on J/Ψ, Ψ'(2 S), Υ(n S) production in p-p and A-A collisions to the production of D+(cbar {d}),Do(cbar {u}), with the main new aspect being the fragmentation probability, D_{c rightarrow cbar {q}}, which has been calculated almost two decades ago. The rapidity cross sections for D+(cbar {d}),Do(cbar {u}) production from both p-p and d-AU collisions is estimated.

  3. Two-nucleon momentum distributions measured in 3He(e,e'pp)n.

    PubMed

    Niyazov, R A; Weinstein, L B; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Bertozzi, W; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cetina, C; Chen, S; Ciciani, L; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; Dashyan, N; DeVita, R; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Eckhause, M; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Gavalian, G; Gilad, S; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ingram, W; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kelley, J H; Kellie, J; Khandaker, M; Kim, D H; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, M S; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kuang, Y; Kuhn, S E; Kuhn, J; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Li, Ji; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McLauchlan, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Nelson, S O; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Sabourov, K; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Shafi, A; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zhang, B

    2004-02-01

    We have measured the 3He(e,e'pp)n reaction at 2.2 GeV over a wide kinematic range. The kinetic energy distribution for "fast" nucleons (p>250 MeV/c) peaks where two nucleons each have 20% or less, and the third nucleon has most of the transferred energy. These fast pp and pn pairs are back to back with little momentum along the three-momentum transfer, indicating that they are spectators. Calculations by Sargsian and by Laget also indicate that we have measured distorted two-nucleon momentum distributions by striking one nucleon and detecting the spectator correlated pair. PMID:14995301

  4. Off-shell effects for the reaction pp{yields}{pi}d at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Locher, M.P.; Lu, Y.

    1995-08-01

    The reaction pp {yields} {pi}d is studied in a relativistic meson rescattering model. For 1.3 < T{sub p} < 2.4 GeV, the differential cross section and the asymmetry are calculated and compared to experiment. The model introduces simple form factors for the leading {pi}N partial waves, which depend on the virtuality of the exchanged {pi} and {rho} mesons. All remaining input is derived from experimental constraints. The data can be described by energy-independent form factors. The asymmetries are sensitive to pp distortion factors and further details of the model. A paper describing our results was published.

  5. The Tegument Protein pp65 of Human Cytomegalovirus Acts as an Optional Scaffold Protein That Optimizes Protein Uploading into Viral Particles

    PubMed Central

    Reyda, Sabine; Tenzer, Stefan; Navarro, Pedro; Gebauer, Wolfgang; Saur, Michael; Krauter, Steffi; Büscher, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms that lead to the tegumentation of herpesviral particles are only poorly defined. The phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) is the most abundant constituent of the virion tegument of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). It is, however, nonessential for virion formation. This seeming discrepancy has not met with a satisfactory explanation regarding the role of pp65 in HCMV particle morphogenesis. Here, we addressed the question of how the overall tegument composition of the HCMV virion depended on pp65 and how the lack of pp65 influenced the packaging of particular tegument proteins. To investigate this, we analyzed the proteomes of pp65-positive (pp65pos) and pp65-negative (pp65neg) virions by label-free quantitative mass spectrometry and determined the relative abundances of tegument proteins. Surprisingly, only pUL35 was elevated in pp65neg virions. As the abundance of pUL35 in the HCMV tegument is low, it is unlikely that it replaced pp65 as a structural component in pp65neg virions. A subset of proteins, including the third most abundant tegument protein, pUL25, as well as pUL43, pUL45, and pUL71, were reduced in pp65neg or pp65low virions, indicating that the packaging of these proteins was related to pp65. The levels of tegument components, like pp28 and the capsid-associated tegument proteins pp150, pUL48, and pUL47, were unaffected by the lack of pp65. Our analyses demonstrate that deletion of pp65 is not compensated for by other viral proteins in the process of virion tegumentation. The results are concordant with a model of pp65 serving as an optional scaffold protein that facilitates protein upload into the outer tegument of HCMV particles. IMPORTANCE The assembly of the tegument of herpesviruses is only poorly understood. Particular proteins, like HCMV pp65, are abundant tegument constituents. pp65 is thus considered to play a major role in tegument assembly in the process of virion morphogenesis. We show here that deletion of the pp65 gene leads to

  6. Directed evolution of nitrilase PpL19 from Pseudomonas psychrotolerans L19 and identification of enantiocomplementary mutants toward mandelonitrile.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huihui; Wang, Hualei; Gao, Wenyuan; Chen, Lifeng; Wu, Kai; Wei, Dongzhi

    2015-12-25

    Nitrilase PpL19 from Pseudomonas psychrotolerans L19 can hydrolyze racemic mandelonitrile to (S)-mandelic acid with an enantiomeric excess (ee) value of 52.7%. In this study, random mutagenesis combined with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to identify the key residues responsible for nitrilase enantioselectivity. Five enzyme mutants exhibiting distinct selectivity were generated and four "hot spots" (M113, R128, A136, and I168) responsible for enantioselectivity toward mandelonitrile were identified and characterized. Furthermore, through saturation mutagenesis, positions 113 and 128 were confirmed to substantially influence the enantioselectivity of PpL19, and certain replacements of the methionine at position 113, in particular, were found to reverse the enantioselectivity of PpL19 from S- to R-selectivity. Two other single mutants of the enzyme, PpL19-A136Y and -I168Y, also showed reversed selectivity and preferentially produced (R)-mandelic acid (ee values: 66.7% and 74.3%, respectively). By combining the beneficial mutations, two enantiocomplementary nitrilase mutants, PpL19-LH and PpL19-GYY, were created, which exhibited high S- and R-selectivity toward mandelonitrile, respectively: PpL19-LH showed the highest S-selectivity toward mandelonitrile ever reported (91.1% ee), and, notably, the PpL19-GYY mutant was identified to be highly R-selective (90.1% ee) and thus an unexpected enantiocomplementary mutant for mandelonitrile. PMID:26577409

  7. Preparation and characterization of ZnO-deposited DBD plasma-treated PP packaging film with antibacterial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisoonsin, Sutida; Pornsunthorntawee, Orathai; Rujiravanit, Ratana

    2013-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-deposited polypropylene (PP) packaging film was prepared with the aid of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma treatment. The surface hydrophilicity of PP film was found to increase after the DBD plasma treatment due to the presence of oxygen-containing functional groups on the DBD plasma-treated PP surface. Although the surface roughness of the DBD plasma-treated PP film gradually increased with increasing plasma treatment time, the DBD plasma treatment insignificantly affected the mechanical properties of the PP film. The DBD plasma treatment time was found to be optimized at 10 s. The DBD plasma-treated PP film was further immersed in an aqueous zinc nitrate (Zn(NO3)2) solution at different concentrations before being converted to ZnO particles with the use of a 2.5 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, followed by sonication. The highest amount of ZnO deposited on the DBD plasma-treated PP surface was about 0.26 wt.% at the optimum Zn(NO3)2 concentration of 0.5 M. The ZnO-deposited DBD plasma-treated PP film showed good antibacterial activities against gram-positive Staphylococcus auerus and gram-negative Escherichia coli.

  8. The magic spot: identification of the binding site for ppGpp on E. coli RNA polymerase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite more than 40 years of study of the global regulatory nucleotide ppGpp ("magic spot") in Escherichia coli, its target site on RNA polymerase (RNAP), and therefore its mechanism of action, is unknown. We report here a binding site for ppGpp on E. coli RNAP, identified by crosslinking, protease...

  9. Greatwall-phosphorylated Endosulfine is both an inhibitor and a substrate of PP2A-B55 heterotrimers

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Byron C; Filter, Joshua J; Blake-Hodek, Kristina A; Wadzinski, Brian E; Fuda, Nicholas J; Shalloway, David; Goldberg, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    During M phase, Endosulfine (Endos) family proteins are phosphorylated by Greatwall kinase (Gwl), and the resultant pEndos inhibits the phosphatase PP2A-B55, which would otherwise prematurely reverse many CDK-driven phosphorylations. We show here that PP2A-B55 is the enzyme responsible for dephosphorylating pEndos during M phase exit. The kinetic parameters for PP2A-B55’s action on pEndos are orders of magnitude lower than those for CDK-phosphorylated substrates, suggesting a simple model for PP2A-B55 regulation that we call inhibition by unfair competition. As the name suggests, during M phase PP2A-B55’s attention is diverted to pEndos, which binds much more avidly and is dephosphorylated more slowly than other substrates. When Gwl is inactivated during the M phase-to-interphase transition, the dynamic balance changes: pEndos dephosphorylated by PP2A-B55 cannot be replaced, so the phosphatase can refocus its attention on CDK-phosphorylated substrates. This mechanism explains simultaneously how PP2A-B55 and Gwl together regulate pEndos, and how pEndos controls PP2A-B55. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01695.001 PMID:24618897

  10. Similar and Divergent Effects of ppGpp and DksA Deficiencies on Transcription in Escherichia coli▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Åberg, Anna; Fernández-Vázquez, Jorge; Cabrer-Panes, Juan David; Sánchez, Alex; Balsalobre, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The concerted action of ppGpp and DksA in transcription has been widely documented. In disparity with this model, phenotypic studies showed that ppGpp and DksA might also have independent and opposing roles in gene expression in Escherichia coli. In this study we used a transcriptomic approach to compare the global transcriptional patterns of gene expression in strains deficient in ppGpp (ppGpp0) and/or DksA (ΔdksA). Approximately 6 and 7% of all genes were significantly affected by more than twofold in ppGpp- and DksA-deficient strains, respectively, increasing to 13% of all genes in the ppGpp0 ΔdksA strain. Although the data indicate that most of the affected genes were copositively or conegatively regulated by ppGpp and DksA, some genes that were independently and/or differentially regulated by the two factors were found. The large functional group of chemotaxis and flagellum synthesis genes were notably differentially affected, with all genes being upregulated in the DksA-deficient strain but 60% of them being downregulated in the ppGpp-deficient strain. Revealingly, mutations in the antipausing Gre factors suppress the upregulation observed in the DksA-deficient strain, emphasizing the importance of the secondary channel of the RNA polymerase for regulation and fine-tuning of gene expression in E. coli. PMID:19251846

  11. The First Measurement of the Elastic pp-scattering Spin Parameters at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bueltmann, S.; Chiang, I. H.; Chrien, R. E.; Drees, A.; Gill, R. L.; Guryn, W.; Landgraf, J.; Ljubicic, T. A.; Lynn, D.; Pearson, C.; Pile, P.; Rusek, A.; Sakitt, M.; Tepikian, S.; Yip, K.; Chwastowski, J.; Pawlik, B.; Haguenauer, M.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Nurushev, S. B.

    2007-06-13

    Elastic scattering of polarized protons in the range of very small momentum transferred was studied for the first time at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV in the experiment pp2pp at RHIC. This article presents the single spin asymmetry A{sub N} and the double spin asymmetries A{sub NN} and A{sub SS} measured in this experiment.

  12. Quantitative proteomics reveals novel protein interaction partners of PP2A catalytic subunit in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Damacharla, Divyasri; Ma, Danjun; Qi, Yue; Tagett, Rebecca; Draghici, Sorin; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu; Yi, Zhengping

    2016-03-15

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the major serine/threonine phosphatases. We hypothesize that PP2A regulates signaling cascades in pancreatic β-cells in the context of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and tandem mass spectrometry, we globally identified the protein interaction partners of the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) in insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cells. Among the 514 identified PP2Ac interaction partners, 476 were novel. This represents the first global view of PP2Ac protein-protein interactions caused by hyperglycemic conditions. Additionally, numerous PP2Ac partners were found involved in a variety of signaling pathways in the β-cell function, such as insulin secretion. Our data suggest that PP2A interacts with various signaling proteins necessary for physiological insulin secretion as well as signaling proteins known to regulate cell dysfunction and apoptosis in the pancreatic β-cells. PMID:26780722

  13. Subsurface PpIX imaging in vivo with ultrasound-guided tomographic spectroscopy: reconstruction vs. born-normalized data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Brendan P.; D'Souza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Maytin, Edward; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    Aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX)-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective treatment for skin cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Topically applied ALA promotes PpIX production preferentially in tumors, and many strategies have been developed to increase PpIX distribution and PDT treatment efficacy at depths > 1mm is not fully understood. While surface imaging techniques provide useful diagnosis, dosimetry, and efficacy information for superficial tumors, these methods cannot interrogate deeper tumors to provide in situ insight into spatial PpIX distributions. We have developed an ultrasound-guided, white-light-informed, tomographics spectroscopy system for the spatial measurement of subsurface PpIX. Detailed imaging system specifications, methodology, and optical-phantom-based characterization will be presented separately. Here we evaluate preliminary in vivo results using both full tomographic reconstruction and by plotting individual tomographic source-detector pair data against US images.

  14. The upcycling of post-industrial PP/PET waste streams through in-situ microfibrillar preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Delva, Laurens Ragaert, Kim Cardon, Ludwig

    2015-12-17

    Post-industrial plastic waste streams can be re-used as secondary material streams for polymer processing by extrusion or injection moulding. One of the major commercially available waste stream contains polypropylene (PP) contaminated with polyesters (mostly polyethylene tereftalate - PET). An important practical hurdle for the direct implementation of this waste stream is the immiscibility of PP and PET in the melt, which leads to segregation within the polymer structure and adversely affects the reproducibility and mechanical properties of the manufactured parts. It has been indicated in literature that the creation of PET microfibrils in the PP matrix could undo these drawbacks and upcycle the PP/PET combination. Within the current research, a commercially available virgin PP/PET was evaluated for the microfibrillar preparation. The mechanical (tensile and impact) properties, thermal properties and morphology of the composites were characterized at different stages of the microfibrillar preparation.

  15. The upcycling of post-industrial PP/PET waste streams through in-situ microfibrillar preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delva, Laurens; Ragaert, Kim; Cardon, Ludwig

    2015-12-01

    Post-industrial plastic waste streams can be re-used as secondary material streams for polymer processing by extrusion or injection moulding. One of the major commercially available waste stream contains polypropylene (PP) contaminated with polyesters (mostly polyethylene tereftalate - PET). An important practical hurdle for the direct implementation of this waste stream is the immiscibility of PP and PET in the melt, which leads to segregation within the polymer structure and adversely affects the reproducibility and mechanical properties of the manufactured parts. It has been indicated in literature that the creation of PET microfibrils in the PP matrix could undo these drawbacks and upcycle the PP/PET combination. Within the current research, a commercially available virgin PP/PET was evaluated for the microfibrillar preparation. The mechanical (tensile and impact) properties, thermal properties and morphology of the composites were characterized at different stages of the microfibrillar preparation.

  16. Influence of PP-g-MA compatibilizer characteristics on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced polypropylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Zhuo

    Glass fiber (GF) reinforced polypropylene (PP) has become a common composite material used for various applications. Previous reports indicated that grafting ratio and molecular weight (MW) of znaleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (PP-g-MA) are the two most significant factors affecting the mechanical properties of PP/PP-g-MA/GF composites, but the combined effect of these two factors remains controversial. The study of the importance of MA grafting ratio and MW is continued in this work using PPIPP-g MA/GF composites containing various grades and concentrations of PP-g MA compatibilizer. First, MFR and FT1R analyses were performed to characterize the physical and chemical properties- of each PP-g-MA resin. Then, premixed PP and PP-g-MA blend were compounded with GF via twin screw extrusion, with the compounds injection molded into tensile, flexural and Izod impact specimens (all ASTM standard) for mechanical properties testing. Generally speaking, at a given GF content, higher compatibilizer concentrations led to higher tensile, flexural and notched Izod impact strength up to an optimum MA concentrations above which these properties tended to level off PP-g-MA resins with higher grafting ratio were more efficient compatibilizers as indicated by improved tensile, flexural and impact properties at lower PP-g-MA contents. In addition, MW was expected to affect properties as well, with too high and too 16w MW values leading to reduced reinforcement. While the optimum MW values for tensile and impact strength were still not clear based on present results, the estimated optimum weight average MW for maximum flexural strength was 90,000 +/- 1,400 g/mol.

  17. Phosphatase PP4 Negatively Regulates Type I IFN Production and Antiviral Innate Immunity by Dephosphorylating and Deactivating TBK1.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Zhenzhen; Cao, Hao; Xie, Xuefeng; Yang, Linshan; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yihan; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; Liu, Xingguang

    2015-10-15

    The effective recognition of viral infection and subsequent type I IFN production is essential for the host antiviral innate immune responses. The phosphorylation and activation of kinase TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) plays crucial roles in the production of type I IFN mediated by TLR and retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors. Type I IFN expression must be tightly regulated to prevent the development of immunopathological disorders. However, how the activated TBK1 is negatively regulated by phosphatases remains poorly understood. In this study, we identified a previously unknown role of protein phosphatase (PP)4 by acting as a TBK1 phosphatase. PP4 expression was upregulated in macrophages infected with RNA virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Sendai virus in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of PP4C, the catalytic subunit of PP4, significantly increased type I IFN production in macrophages and dentritic cells triggered by TLR3/4 ligands, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Sendai virus, and thus inhibited virus replication. Similar results were also found in peritoneal macrophages with PP4C silencing in vivo and i.p. infection of RNA virus. Accordingly, ectopic expression of PP4C inhibited virus-induced type I IFN production and promoted virus replication. However, overexpression of a phosphatase-dead PP4C mutant abolished the inhibitory effects of wild-type PP4C on type I IFN production. Mechanistically, PP4 directly bound TBK1 upon virus infection, then dephosphorylated TBK1 at Ser(172) and inhibited TBK1 activation, and subsequently restrained IFN regulatory factor 3 activation, resulting in suppressed production of type I IFN and IFN-stimulated genes. Thus, serine/threonine phosphatase PP4 functions as a novel feedback negative regulator of RNA virus-triggered innate immunity. PMID:26363053

  18. Expression of the moss PpLEA4-20 gene in rice enhances membrane protection and client proteins stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Deng, Dandan; Chen, Xi; Wu, Baomei; Hu, Ke; Qiu, Tianhang; Cui, Suxia; Huang, Fang

    2015-05-01

    Green vegetative tissues of the moss Physcomitrella patens possess a powerful ability to tolerate severe drought stress. Proteomics analysis have revealed that a large number of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins were key players in the drought tolerance of the photosynthetic tissues. PpLEA4-20, a member of the moss LEA protein family, was selected for further function study using an ectopic expression method in rice. Through molecular identification via PCR, southern blotting and TAIL-PCR, we demonstrated that the PpLEA4-20 gene was transformed and inserted into a non-encoded region in chromosome 4 of rice and expressed stably in transgenic rice. Unexpectedly, PpLEA4-20 protein emerged as two high-expressed spots on 2-D gels generated from transgenic rice, suggesting that PpLEA4-20 proteins are complete compatible and might be modified in rice. Both growth and physiological analysis showed that seedlings of transgenic PpLEA4-20 rice displayed altered phenotypes and tolerance to salt. In addition, electrolyte leakage was reduced in transgenic PpLEA4-20 compared to wild type under stress conditions. Anti-aggregation analysis found that the PpLEA4-20 protein expressed in rice remained soluble at high temperature and in addition to some native proteins from transgenic PpLEA4-20 rice. Based on Nano LC MS/MS analysis, we identified several proteins from transgenic PpLEA4-20 rice of increased heat-stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of PpLEA4-20 in salt tolerance and stabilization of client proteins. PMID:25791479

  19. MS_RHII-RSD, a Dual-Function RNase HII-(p)ppGpp Synthetase from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Murdeshwar, Maya S.

    2012-01-01

    In the noninfectious soil saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis, intracellular levels of the stress alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate and guanosine pentaphosphate, together termed (p)ppGpp, are regulated by the enzyme RelMsm. This enzyme consists of a single, bifunctional polypeptide chain that is capable of both synthesizing and hydrolyzing (p)ppGpp. The relMsm knockout strain of M. smegmatis (ΔrelMsm) is expected to show a (p)ppGpp null [(p)ppGpp0] phenotype. Contrary to this expectation, the strain is capable of synthesizing (p)ppGpp in vivo. In this study, we identify and functionally characterize the open reading frame (ORF), MSMEG_5849, that encodes a second functional (p)ppGpp synthetase in M. smegmatis. In addition to (p)ppGpp synthesis, the 567-amino-acid-long protein encoded by this gene is capable of hydrolyzing RNA·DNA hybrids and bears similarity to the conventional RNase HII enzymes. We have classified this protein as actRelMsm in accordance with the recent nomenclature proposed and have named it MS_RHII-RSD, indicating the two enzymatic activities present [RHII, RNase HII domain, originally identified as domain of unknown function 429 (DUF429), and RSD, RelA_SpoT nucleotidyl transferase domain, the SYNTH domain responsible for (p)ppGpp synthesis activity]. MS_RHII-RSD is expressed and is constitutively active in vivo and behaves like a monofunctional (p)ppGpp synthetase in vitro. The occurrence of the RNase HII and (p)ppGpp synthetase domains together on the same polypeptide chain is suggestive of an in vivo role for this novel protein as a link connecting the essential life processes of DNA replication, repair, and transcription to the highly conserved stress survival pathway, the stringent response. PMID:22636779

  20. Cytoplasmic Retention of Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibitor 2 (I2PP2A) Induces Alzheimer-like Abnormal Hyperphosphorylation of Tau*

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Wei, Jianshe; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Fei; Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau leads to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, a hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD), and related tauopathies. The phosphorylation of Tau is regulated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), which in turn is modulated by endogenous inhibitor 2 (I2PP2A). In AD brain, I2PP2A is translocated from neuronal nucleus to cytoplasm, where it inhibits PP2A activity and promotes abnormal phosphorylation of Tau. Here we describe the identification of a potential nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminal region of I2PP2A containing a conserved basic motif, 179RKR181, which is sufficient for directing its nuclear localization. The current study further presents an inducible cell model (Tet-Off system) of AD-type abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau by expressing I2PP2A in which the NLS was inactivated by 179RKR181 → AAA along with 168KR169 → AA mutations. In this model, the mutant NLS (mNLS)-I2PP2A (I2PP2AAA-AAA) was retained in the cell cytoplasm, where it physically interacted with PP2A and inhibited its activity. Inhibition of PP2A was associated with the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau, which resulted in microtubule network instability and neurite outgrowth impairment. Expression of mNLS-I2PP2A activated CAMKII and GSK-3β, which are Tau kinases regulated by PP2A. The immunoprecipitation experiments showed the direct interaction of I2PP2A with PP2A and GSK-3β but not with CAMKII. Thus, the cell model provides insights into the nature of the potential NLS and the mechanistic relationship between I2PP2A-induced inhibition of PP2A and hyperphosphorylation of Tau that can be utilized to develop drugs preventing Tau pathology. PMID:25128526

  1. Crystal structures and mutagenesis of PPP-family ser/thr protein phosphatases elucidate the selectivity of cantharidin and novel norcantharidin-based inhibitors of PP5C.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Debasish; Swingle, Mark R; Salter, Edward A; Wood, Eric; D'Arcy, Brandon; Zivanov, Catherine; Abney, Kevin; Musiyenko, Alla; Rusin, Scott F; Kettenbach, Arminja; Yet, Larry; Schroeder, Chad E; Golden, Jennifer E; Dunham, Wade H; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Banerjee, Surajit; Forbes, David; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Honkanen, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Cantharidin is a natural toxin and an active constituent in a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat tumors. Cantharidin acts as a semi-selective inhibitor of PPP-family ser/thr protein phosphatases. Despite sharing a common catalytic mechanism and marked structural similarity with PP1C, PP2AC and PP5C, human PP4C was found to be insensitive to the inhibitory activity of cantharidin. To explore the molecular basis for this selectivity, we synthesized and tested novel C5/C6-derivatives designed from quantum-based modeling of the interactions revealed in the co-crystal structures of PP5C in complex with cantharidin. Structure-activity relationship studies and analysis of high-resolution (1.25Å) PP5C-inhibitor co-crystal structures reveal close contacts between the inhibitor bridgehead oxygen and both a catalytic metal ion and a non-catalytic phenylalanine residue, the latter of which is substituted by tryptophan in PP4C. Quantum chemistry calculations predicted that steric clashes with the bulkier tryptophan side chain in PP4C would force all cantharidin-based inhibitors into an unfavorable binding mode, disrupting the strong coordination of active site metal ions observed in the PP5C co-crystal structures, thereby rendering PP4C insensitive to the inhibitors. This prediction was confirmed by inhibition studies employing native human PP4C. Mutation of PP5C (F446W) and PP1C (F257W), to mimic the PP4C active site, resulted in markedly suppressed sensitivity to cantharidin. These observations provide insight into the structural basis for the natural selectivity of cantharidin and provide an avenue for PP4C deselection. The novel crystal structures also provide insight into interactions that provide increased selectivity of the C5/C6 modifications for PP5C versus other PPP-family phosphatases. PMID:27002182

  2. Induction of the C-terminal proteolytic cleavage of AβPP by statins.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Olivier; Zhang, Qiang; John, Varghese; Bredesen, Dale E

    2011-01-01

    Statins are drugs commonly used to inhibit cholesterol synthesis, with the goal of reducing vascular diseases such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Statins have also been suggested as a therapeutic option for Alzheimer's disease (AD), although their benefit in AD remains controversial. We have previously shown that the intracellular C-terminal cleavage of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) is a major contributor to the neuronal toxicity seen in AD, and that this cleavage can be induced by amyloid-β. We now report that certain brain permeable statins are also able to induce the C-terminal cleavage of AβPP and associated cell death, whereas other statins do not. This statin effect on AβPP exceeded the effects of all other FDA-approved drugs in a library composed of these compounds, suggesting that this effect on AβPP cleavage is unique to a subset of the statins. Furthermore, the greatest effect occurred with cerivastatin, which has previously been shown to be the statin associated with the greatest risk of rhabdomyolysis. These results may have implications for the choice of which statins to evaluate in AD therapeutic trials; furthermore, the results may inform statin choice in individuals who are at high risk for the development of AD, such as those with an apolipoprotein E ε4 allele. PMID:21422530

  3. EVENT STRUCTURE AT RHIC FROM P-P TO AU-AU.

    SciTech Connect

    TRAINOR,T.A.

    2004-03-15

    Several correlation analysis techniques are applied to p-p and Au-Au collisions at RHIC. Strong large-momentum-scale correlations are observed which can be related to local charge and momentum conservation during hadronization and to minijet (minimum-bias parton fragment) correlations.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Carbaryl-Degrading Soil Isolate Pseudomonas sp. Strain C5pp

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Vikas D.; Jangir, Pramod Kumar; Phale, Prashant S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of carbaryl-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain C5pp. Genes encoding salicylate and gentisate metabolism, large amounts of oxygenase, nitrogen metabolism, and heavy metal tolerance were identified. The sequence will provide further insight into the biochemical and evolutionary aspects of carbaryl degradation. PMID:27284139

  5. Exclusive production of pp¯π+π- in photon-photon collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Avery, R.E.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barker, A.R.; Barnett, B.A.; Bauer, D.A.; Bay, A.; Bobbink, G.J.; Buchanan, C.D.; Buijs, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chao, H.-Y.; Chun, S.-B.; Clark, A.R.; Cowan, G.D.; Crane, D.A.; Dahl, O.I.; Daoudi, M.; Derby, K.A.; Eastman, J.J.; Eberhard, P.H.; Edberg, T.K.; Eisner, A.M.; Erne, F.C.; Fairfield, K.H.; Hauptman, J.M.; Hofmann, W.; Hylen, J.; Kamae, T.; Kaye, H.S.; Kenney, R.W.; Khacheryan, S.; Kofler, R.R.; Langeveld, W.G.J.; Layter, J.G.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Loken, S.C.; Lynch, G.R.; Madaras, R.J.; Magnuson, B.D.; Masek, G.E.; Mathis, L.G.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Miller, E.S.; Moses, W.; Nygren, D.R.; Oddone, P.J.; Paar, H.P.; Park, S.K.; Pellett, D.E.; Pripstein, M.; Ronan, M.T.; Ross, R.R.; Rouse, F.R.; Schwitkis, K.A.; Sens, J.C.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.C.; Smith, J.R.; Steinmen, J.S.; Stephens, R.W.; Stevenson, M.L.; Stork, D.H.; Strauss, M.G.; Sullivan, M.K.; Takahashi, T.; Toutouchi, S.; van Tyen, R.; Vernon, W.; Wagner, W.; Wang, E.M.; Wang, Y.-X.; Wenzel, W.A.; Wolf, Z.R.; Yamamoto, H.; Yellin, S.J.; Zeitlin, C.

    1989-11-01

    We report a measurement of the e+e--->e+e-pp¯π+π- process with the TPC/Two-Gamma facility at the PEP e+e- storage ring at SLAC. Forty-five pp¯π+π- events were identified in data corresponding to an integrated e+e- luminosity of 142 pb-1. The cross section for γγ-->pp¯π+π- is given both as a function of the γγ center-of-mass energy Wγγ, with Wγγ between 2.5 and 5.5 GeV, and as a function of the invariant mass squared q2 of one of the photons, with -q2<7 GeV2. This cross section falls much less rapidly with Wγγ than does the cross section for a similar process, γγ-->pp¯. No Δ0Δ¯ 0 production is observed, and only a small fraction of the events at low Wγγ is consistent with γγ-->Δ++Δ¯ --, Δ++p¯π-, or Δ¯ --π+. In an expanded search through the same data, four events compatible with either ΛΛ¯ (Λ-->pπ-) or Σ0Λ¯ (Σ0-->Λγ) production were found.

  6. A functional genomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana PP2C clade D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the reference dicot plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the PP2C family of P-protein phosphatases includes the products of 80 genes that have been separated into 10 multi-protein clades plus six singletons. Clade D includes the products of nine genes distributed among 3 chromosomes (PPD1, At3g12620; PPD2...

  7. The Arabidopsis Protein Phosphatase PP2C38 Negatively Regulates the Central Immune Kinase BIK1.

    PubMed

    Couto, Daniel; Niebergall, Roda; Liang, Xiangxiu; Bücherl, Christoph A; Sklenar, Jan; Macho, Alberto P; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Derbyshire, Paul; Altenbach, Denise; Maclean, Dan; Robatzek, Silke; Uhrig, Joachim; Menke, Frank; Zhou, Jian-Min; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Plants recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) via cell surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to PRR-triggered immunity (PTI). The Arabidopsis cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 is a downstream substrate of several PRR complexes. How plant PTI is negatively regulated is not fully understood. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase PP2C38 as a negative regulator of BIK1 activity and BIK1-mediated immunity. PP2C38 dynamically associates with BIK1, as well as with the PRRs FLS2 and EFR, but not with the co-receptor BAK1. PP2C38 regulates PAMP-induced BIK1 phosphorylation and impairs the phosphorylation of the NADPH oxidase RBOHD by BIK1, leading to reduced oxidative burst and stomatal immunity. Upon PAMP perception, PP2C38 is phosphorylated on serine 77 and dissociates from the FLS2/EFR-BIK1 complexes, enabling full BIK1 activation. Together with our recent work on the control of BIK1 turnover, this study reveals another important regulatory mechanism of this central immune component. PMID:27494702

  8. Measurement of the. pi. d. -->. pp reaction at T/sub. pi. / = 65 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ottermann, C.R.; Boschitz, E.T.; Gyles, W.; List, W.; Tacik, R.; Mango, S.; Konter, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Smith, G.R.

    1986-05-01

    The vector analyzing power iT/sub 11/ has been measured for the ..pi..d..-->..pp reaction at an incident pion energy of 65 MeV, using a vector polarized deuteron target. The data are compared with predictions from coupled channels, Faddeev, and perturbation theory calculations.

  9. Anti-biofilm activity of Pseudoalteromonas flavipulchra SktPp1 against Serratia marcescens SMJ-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Faiq; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the anti-biofilm activity of Pseudoalteromonas flavipulchra SktPp1 crude extract against the biofilm producer, Serratia marcescens. The crude extract of P. flavipulchra SktPp1 was extracted with ethyl acetate. The sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), 0.1 mg/ml, has been used in this study. The anti-biofilm activity of P. flavipulchra SktPp1 crude extract was assessed against the biofilm of S. marcescens using the crystal violet assay. The growth curve has been used as the indicator of the effect of crude extracts to bacterial growth. The sub-MIC crude extract was tested against two of S. marcescens virulence factors, including the swarming ability and production of prodigiosin using the swarming assay and prodigiosin assay. The growth curves of S. marcescens indicated that the sub-MIC concentration of crude extract did not affect the growth of S. marcescens. The production of prodigiosin was reduced by 44%. The diameter of the swarming area was reduced from 8.7 cm to 0.8 cm. The sub-MIC crude extract inhibits 26.9% of the biofilm production in S. marcescens. This crude extract lost its activity at 50°C and above. In conclusion, crude extract of P. flavipulchra SktPp1 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens SMJ-11 biofilm formation.

  10. Intrinsic fluctuations of the proton saturation momentum scale in high multiplicity p+p collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McLerran, Larry; Tribedy, Prithwish

    2015-11-02

    High multiplicity events in p+p collisions are studied using the theory of the Color Glass Condensate. Here, we show that intrinsic fluctuations of the proton saturation momentum scale are needed in addition to the sub-nucleonic color charge fluctuations to explain the very high multiplicity tail of distributions in p+p collisions. It is presumed that the origin of such intrinsic fluctuations is non-perturbative in nature. Classical Yang Mills simulations using the IP-Glasma model are performed to make quantitative estimations. Furthermore, we find that fluctuations as large as O(1) of the average values of the saturation momentum scale can lead to raremore » high multiplicity events seen in p+p data at RHIC and LHC energies. Using the available data on multiplicity distributions we try to constrain the distribution of the proton saturation momentum scale and make predictions for the multiplicity distribution in 13 TeV p+p collisions.« less

  11. Elastic pp Scattering at LHC Energies in Various Multi-Pomeron Exchange Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Ivan; Shabelski, Yuli

    2012-10-01

    We consider the data for elastic pp scattering in the framework of Regge theory in various models of multiple Pomeron exchanges: quasi-eikonal approach and two-channel approach. The results of the model calculations are compared with the experimental data presented by the TOTEM collaboration.

  12. Double P-P Plots for Comparing Differences between Two Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Samuel A.

    2006-01-01

    This article suggests a graphic technique that uses P-P plots to show the extent to which two groups differ on two variables. It can be used even if the variables are measured in completely different, noncomparable units. The comparison is symmetric with respect to the variables and the groups. It reflects the differences between the groups over…

  13. Capping motifs stabilize the leucine-rich repeat protein PP32 and rigidify adjacent repeats.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thuy P; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2014-06-01

    Capping motifs are found to flank most β-strand-containing repeat proteins. To better understand the roles of these capping motifs in organizing structure and stability, we carried out folding and solution NMR studies on the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of PP32, which is composed of five tandem LRR, capped by α-helical and β-hairpin motifs on the N- and C-termini. We were able to purify PP32 constructs lacking either cap and containing destabilizing substitutions. Removing the C-cap results in complete unfolding of PP32. Removing the N-cap has a much less severe effect, decreasing stability but retaining much of its secondary structure. In contrast, the dynamics and tertiary structure of the first two repeats are significantly perturbed, based on (1)H-(15)N relaxation studies, chemical shift perturbations, and residual dipolar couplings. However, more distal repeats (3 to C-cap) retain their native tertiary structure. In this regard, the N-cap drives the folding of adjacent repeats from what appears to be a molten-globule-like state. This interpretation is supported by extensive analysis using core packing substitutions in the full-length and N-cap-truncated PP32. This work highlights the importance of caps to the stability and structural integrity of β-strand-containing LRR proteins, and emphasizes the different contributions of the N- and C-terminal caps. PMID:24659532

  14. Designed abscisic acid analogs as antagonists of PYL-PP2C receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Jun; Okamoto, Masanori; Akiyama, Tomonori; Muto, Takuya; Yajima, Shunsuke; Sue, Masayuki; Seo, Mitsunori; Kanno, Yuri; Kamo, Tsunashi; Endo, Akira; Nambara, Eiji; Hirai, Nobuhiro; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Cutler, Sean R; Todoroki, Yasushi

    2014-06-01

    The plant stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is critical for several abiotic stress responses. ABA signaling is normally repressed by group-A protein phosphatases 2C (PP2Cs), but stress-induced ABA binds Arabidopsis PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYL) receptors, which then bind and inhibit PP2Cs. X-ray structures of several receptor-ABA complexes revealed a tunnel above ABA's 3' ring CH that opens at the PP2C binding interface. Here, ABA analogs with sufficiently long 3' alkyl chains were predicted to traverse this tunnel and block PYL-PP2C interactions. To test this, a series of 3'-alkylsulfanyl ABAs were synthesized with different alkyl chain lengths. Physiological, biochemical and structural analyses revealed that a six-carbon alkyl substitution produced a potent ABA antagonist that was sufficiently active to block multiple stress-induced ABA responses in vivo. This study provides a new approach for the design of ABA analogs, and the results validated structure-based design for this target class. PMID:24792952

  15. The Arabidopsis Protein Phosphatase PP2C38 Negatively Regulates the Central Immune Kinase BIK1

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangxiu; Bücherl, Christoph A.; Sklenar, Jan; Macho, Alberto P.; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Derbyshire, Paul; Altenbach, Denise; Robatzek, Silke; Uhrig, Joachim; Menke, Frank; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Plants recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) via cell surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to PRR-triggered immunity (PTI). The Arabidopsis cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 is a downstream substrate of several PRR complexes. How plant PTI is negatively regulated is not fully understood. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase PP2C38 as a negative regulator of BIK1 activity and BIK1-mediated immunity. PP2C38 dynamically associates with BIK1, as well as with the PRRs FLS2 and EFR, but not with the co-receptor BAK1. PP2C38 regulates PAMP-induced BIK1 phosphorylation and impairs the phosphorylation of the NADPH oxidase RBOHD by BIK1, leading to reduced oxidative burst and stomatal immunity. Upon PAMP perception, PP2C38 is phosphorylated on serine 77 and dissociates from the FLS2/EFR-BIK1 complexes, enabling full BIK1 activation. Together with our recent work on the control of BIK1 turnover, this study reveals another important regulatory mechanism of this central immune component. PMID:27494702

  16. D-meson production in 800-GeV/c pp interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, R.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Bhat, P. C.; Bosetti, P.; Bromberg, C.; Canough, G. E.; Coffin, T.; Dershem, T. O.; Dixon, R. L.; Fenker, H. C.; Ganguli, S. N.; Gensch, U.; Girtler, P.; Goshaw, A. T.; Grard, F.; Gurtu, A.; Hamilton, C.; Henri, V. P.; Hernandez, J. J.; Hrubec, J.; Iori, M.; Jones, L. W.; Kuhn, D.; Knauss, D.; Leedom, I. D.; Legros, P.; Lemonne, J.; Leutz, H.; Liu, X.; Malhotra, P. K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mendez, G. E.; Miller, R.; Naumann, T.; Nguyen, A.; Nowak, H.; Pilette, P.; Poirier, J.; Poppleton, A.; Raghavan, R.; Rasner, K.; Reucroft, S.; Robertson, W. J.; Roe, B. P.; Roth, A.; Senko, M.; Struczinski, W.; Subramanian, A.; Touboul, M. C.; Vonck, B.; Voyvodic, L.; Waters, J. W.; Weber, M. F.; Webster, M. S.; Zabounidis, C.

    1988-11-01

    We report on a study of the inclusive production properties of D/D¯ mesons in pp collisions at 800 GeV/c and compare our results to measurements made at lower energies and to the expectations of the QCD fusion model.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Carbaryl-Degrading Soil Isolate Pseudomonas sp. Strain C5pp.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Vikas D; Jangir, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh; Phale, Prashant S

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of carbaryl-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain C5pp. Genes encoding salicylate and gentisate metabolism, large amounts of oxygenase, nitrogen metabolism, and heavy metal tolerance were identified. The sequence will provide further insight into the biochemical and evolutionary aspects of carbaryl degradation. PMID:27284139

  18. Direct and Indirect Targeting of PP2A by Conserved Bacterial Type-III Effector Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lin; Ham, Jong Hyun; Hage, Rosemary; Zhao, Wanying; Soto-Hernández, Jaricelis; Lee, Sang Yeol; Paek, Seung-Mann; Kim, Min Gab; Boone, Charles; Coplin, David L.; Mackey, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial AvrE-family Type-III effector proteins (T3Es) contribute significantly to the virulence of plant-pathogenic species of Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Ralstonia, Erwinia, Dickeya and Pectobacterium, with hosts ranging from monocots to dicots. However, the mode of action of AvrE-family T3Es remains enigmatic, due in large part to their toxicity when expressed in plant or yeast cells. To search for targets of WtsE, an AvrE-family T3E from the maize pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, we employed a yeast-two-hybrid screen with non-lethal fragments of WtsE and a synthetic genetic array with full-length WtsE. Together these screens indicate that WtsE targets maize protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) heterotrimeric enzyme complexes via direct interaction with B’ regulatory subunits. AvrE1, another AvrE-family T3E from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (Pto DC3000), associates with specific PP2A B’ subunit proteins from its susceptible host Arabidopsis that are homologous to the maize B’ subunits shown to interact with WtsE. Additionally, AvrE1 was observed to associate with the WtsE-interacting maize proteins, indicating that PP2A B’ subunits are likely conserved targets of AvrE-family T3Es. Notably, the ability of AvrE1 to promote bacterial growth and/or suppress callose deposition was compromised in Arabidopsis plants with mutations of PP2A genes. Also, chemical inhibition of PP2A activity blocked the virulence activity of both WtsE and AvrE1 in planta. The function of HopM1, a Pto DC3000 T3E that is functionally redundant to AvrE1, was also impaired in specific PP2A mutant lines, although no direct interaction with B’ subunits was observed. These results indicate that sub-component specific PP2A complexes are targeted by bacterial T3Es, including direct targeting by members of the widely conserved AvrE-family. PMID:27191168

  19. Direct and Indirect Targeting of PP2A by Conserved Bacterial Type-III Effector Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lin; Ham, Jong Hyun; Hage, Rosemary; Zhao, Wanying; Soto-Hernández, Jaricelis; Lee, Sang Yeol; Paek, Seung-Mann; Kim, Min Gab; Boone, Charles; Coplin, David L; Mackey, David

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial AvrE-family Type-III effector proteins (T3Es) contribute significantly to the virulence of plant-pathogenic species of Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Ralstonia, Erwinia, Dickeya and Pectobacterium, with hosts ranging from monocots to dicots. However, the mode of action of AvrE-family T3Es remains enigmatic, due in large part to their toxicity when expressed in plant or yeast cells. To search for targets of WtsE, an AvrE-family T3E from the maize pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, we employed a yeast-two-hybrid screen with non-lethal fragments of WtsE and a synthetic genetic array with full-length WtsE. Together these screens indicate that WtsE targets maize protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) heterotrimeric enzyme complexes via direct interaction with B' regulatory subunits. AvrE1, another AvrE-family T3E from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (Pto DC3000), associates with specific PP2A B' subunit proteins from its susceptible host Arabidopsis that are homologous to the maize B' subunits shown to interact with WtsE. Additionally, AvrE1 was observed to associate with the WtsE-interacting maize proteins, indicating that PP2A B' subunits are likely conserved targets of AvrE-family T3Es. Notably, the ability of AvrE1 to promote bacterial growth and/or suppress callose deposition was compromised in Arabidopsis plants with mutations of PP2A genes. Also, chemical inhibition of PP2A activity blocked the virulence activity of both WtsE and AvrE1 in planta. The function of HopM1, a Pto DC3000 T3E that is functionally redundant to AvrE1, was also impaired in specific PP2A mutant lines, although no direct interaction with B' subunits was observed. These results indicate that sub-component specific PP2A complexes are targeted by bacterial T3Es, including direct targeting by members of the widely conserved AvrE-family. PMID:27191168

  20. Specific Targeting of Caspase-9/PP2A Interaction as Potential New Anti-Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Arrouss, Issam; Nemati, Fariba; Roncal, Fernando; Wislez, Marie; Dorgham, Karim; Vallerand, David; Rabbe, Nathalie; Karboul, Narjesse; Carlotti, Françoise; Bravo, Jeronimo; Mazier, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Purpose PP2A is a serine/threonine phosphatase critical to physiological processes, including apoptosis. Cell penetrating peptides are molecules that can translocate into cells without causing membrane damage. Our goal was to develop cell-penetrating fusion peptides specifically designed to disrupt the caspase-9/PP2A interaction and evaluate their therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design We generated a peptide containing a penetrating sequence associated to the interaction motif between human caspase-9 and PP2A (DPT-C9h), in order to target their association. Using tumour cell lines, primary human cells and primary human breast cancer (BC) xenografts, we investigated the capacity of DPT-C9h to provoke apoptosis in vitro and inhibition of tumour growth (TGI) in vivo. DPT-C9h was intraperitonealy administered at doses from 1 to 25 mg/kg/day for 5 weeks. Relative Tumour Volume (RTV) was calculated. Results We demonstrated that DPT-C9h specifically target caspase-9/PP2A interaction in vitro and in vivo and induced caspase-9-dependent apoptosis in cancer cell lines. DPT-C9h also induced significant TGI in BC xenografts models. The mouse-specific peptide DPT-C9 also induced TGI in lung (K-Ras model) and breast cancer (PyMT) models. DPT-C9h has a specific effect on transformed B cells isolated from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients without any effect on primary healthy cells. Finally, neither toxicity nor immunogenic responses were observed. Conclusion Using the cell-penetrating peptides blocking caspase-9/PP2A interactions, we have demonstrated that DPT-C9h had a strong therapeutic effect in vitro and in vivo in mouse models of tumour progression. PMID:23637769

  1. Effects of topography on upper mantle discontinuities for array detections of PP precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Lessing, S.; Rost, S.; Vanacore, E. A.; Schmerr, N. C.

    2014-12-01

    PP underside reflections off upper mantle discontinuities are frequently used to map discontinuity topography, impedance contrasts and to interpret these with respect to thermal and/or mineralogical variations. While the seismic discontinuities at 410 km and 660 km depth should be a global feature, several events show no detections or reduced amplitudes of the precursors. In this study, we investigate effects of topography on upper mantle discontinuities on array detections of PP precursors. Using the 2.5-D axisymmetric finite difference technique PSVaxi, we compute P-SV synthetic seismograms for two-dimensional model geometries with correct 3-D geometrical spreading. Retaining dominant periods of ~ 2 s, we investigate Gaussian-shaped upward or downward deflections of the 660 km discontinuity with varying lateral dimensions. Furthermore, we investigate effects of double discontinuities at ~660 km depth which are due to phase transformations in the non-olivine component of the mantle at subduction zone temperatures. Analyses of travel residuals indicate that topography of downward deflections of discontinuities is underestimated by 10 to 20 km while upward deflections are recovered within 10 km. Amplitude measurements show focussing and defocussing of PP precursor amplitudes by 60-70%. Reduced amplitudes of PP precursors are close or below the average noise level at seismic arrays and could result in non-detections. Double discontinuities at 660 km depth are recovered for lateral dimensions larger than 10° and if the two discontinuities are separated by at least 20 km. The observed effects in synthetic seismograms raise caution for interpretation of PP precursors in terms of impedance contrasts as well as thermal and mineralogical variations in the mantle.

  2. SCF E3 ligase PP2-B11 plays a positive role in response to salt stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Fengjuan; Wang, Chunyan; Huang, Jinguang; Yang, Guodong; Wu, Changai; Zheng, Chengchao

    2015-01-01

    Skp1–Cullin–F-box (SCF) E3 ligases are essential to the post-translational regulation of many important factors involved in cellular signal transduction. In this study, we identified an F-box protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtPP2-B11, which was remarkably induced with increased duration of salt treatment in terms of both transcript and protein levels. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtPP2-B11 exhibited obvious tolerance to high salinity, whereas the RNA interference line was more sensitive to salt stress than wild-type plants. Isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification analysis revealed that 4311 differentially expressed proteins were regulated by AtPP2-B11 under salt stress. AtPP2-B11 could upregulate the expression of annexin1 (AnnAt1) and function as a molecular link between salt stress and reactive oxygen species accumulation in Arabidopsis. Moreover, AtPP2-B11 influenced the expression of Na+ homeostasis genes under salt stress, and the AtPP2-B11 overexpressing lines exhibited lower Na+ accumulation. These results suggest that AtPP2-B11 functions as a positive regulator in response to salt stress in Arabidopsis. PMID:26041321

  3. A pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex modulates androgen receptor-mediated transcription and associates with components of the splicing machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Adegbola, Onikepe; Pasternack, Gary R. . E-mail: gpastern@jhmi.edu

    2005-08-26

    We have previously shown pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein interact. pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein are nuclear receptor transcriptional coregulators: the retinoblastoma protein is a coactivator for androgen receptor, the major regulator of prostate cancer growth, while pp32, which is highly expressed in prostate cancer, is a corepressor of the estrogen receptor. We now show pp32 increases androgen receptor-mediated transcription and the retinoblastoma protein modulates this activity. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identify members of the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex as PSF and nonO/p54nrb, proteins implicated in coordinate regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and splicing. We show that the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex is modulated during TPA-induced K562 differentiation. Present evidence suggests that nuclear receptors assemble multiprotein complexes to coordinately regulate transcription and mRNA processing. Our results suggest that pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein may be part of a multiprotein complex that coordinately regulates nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and mRNA processing.

  4. Overexpression of HDAC1 induces cellular senescence by Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Jian-Ying; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 induces Sp1 deacetylation and raises Sp1/p300 complex formation to bind to PP2Ac promoter. {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 strongly inhibits the phosphorylation of pRb through up-regulation of PP2A. {yields} Overexpressed HDAC1 restrains cell proliferaction and induces cell senescence though a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway. -- Abstract: Senescence is associated with decreased activities of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular division, which can result in deterioration of cellular functions. Herein, we report that the growth and division of tumor cells were significantly repressed by overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 with the Tet-off induced system or transient transfection. In addition, HDAC1 overexpression led to senescence through both an accumulation of hypophosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and an increase in the protein level of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). HDAC1 overexpression also increased the level of Sp1 deacetylation and elevated the interaction between Sp1 and p300, and subsequently that Sp1/p300 complex bound to the promoter of PP2Ac, thus leading to induction of PP2Ac expression. Similar results were obtained in the HDAC1-Tet-off stable clone. Taken together, these results indicate that HDAC1 overexpression restrained cell proliferation and induced premature senescence in cervical cancer cells through a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway.

  5. Changes in Carboxy Methylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase PP2A Are Associated with Epididymal Sperm Maturation and Motility.

    PubMed

    Dudiki, Tejasvi; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Ferrara, John K; Kline, Douglas W; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm contain the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1γ2 and PP2A. The role of sperm PP1γ2 is relatively well studied. Here we confirm the presence of PP2A in sperm and show that it undergoes marked changes in methylation (leucine 309), tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine 307) and catalytic activity during epididymal sperm maturation. Spermatozoa isolated from proximal caput, distal caput and caudal regions of the epididymis contain equal immuno-reactive amounts of PP2A. Using demethyl sensitive antibodies we show that PP2A is methylated at its carboxy terminus in sperm from the distal caput and caudal regions but not in sperm from the proximal caput region of the epididymis. The methylation status of PP2A was confirmed by isolation of PP2A with microcystin agarose followed by alkali treatment, which causes hydrolysis of protein carboxy methyl esters. Tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm PP2A varied inversely with methylation. That is, PP2A was tyrosine phosphorylated when it was demethylated but not when methylated. PP2A demethylation and its reciprocal tyrosine phosphorylation were also affected by treatment of sperm with L-homocysteine and adenosine, which are known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine, a feedback inhibitor of methyltransferases. Catalytic activity of PP2A declined during epididymal sperm maturation. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid or by incubation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa with L-homocysteine and adenosine resulted in increase of sperm motility parameters including percent motility, velocity, and lateral head amplitude. Demethylation or pharmacological inhibition of PP2A also leads to an increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Our results show for the first time that changes in PP2A activity due to methylation and tyrosine phosphorylation occur in sperm and that these changes may play an important role in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:26569399

  6. Changes in Carboxy Methylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase PP2A Are Associated with Epididymal Sperm Maturation and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Dudiki, Tejasvi; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Ferrara, John K.; Kline, Douglas W.; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm contain the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1γ2 and PP2A. The role of sperm PP1γ2 is relatively well studied. Here we confirm the presence of PP2A in sperm and show that it undergoes marked changes in methylation (leucine 309), tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine 307) and catalytic activity during epididymal sperm maturation. Spermatozoa isolated from proximal caput, distal caput and caudal regions of the epididymis contain equal immuno-reactive amounts of PP2A. Using demethyl sensitive antibodies we show that PP2A is methylated at its carboxy terminus in sperm from the distal caput and caudal regions but not in sperm from the proximal caput region of the epididymis. The methylation status of PP2A was confirmed by isolation of PP2A with microcystin agarose followed by alkali treatment, which causes hydrolysis of protein carboxy methyl esters. Tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm PP2A varied inversely with methylation. That is, PP2A was tyrosine phosphorylated when it was demethylated but not when methylated. PP2A demethylation and its reciprocal tyrosine phosphorylation were also affected by treatment of sperm with L-homocysteine and adenosine, which are known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine, a feedback inhibitor of methyltransferases. Catalytic activity of PP2A declined during epididymal sperm maturation. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid or by incubation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa with L-homocysteine and adenosine resulted in increase of sperm motility parameters including percent motility, velocity, and lateral head amplitude. Demethylation or pharmacological inhibition of PP2A also leads to an increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Our results show for the first time that changes in PP2A activity due to methylation and tyrosine phosphorylation occur in sperm and that these changes may play an important role in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:26569399

  7. Inflammatory stimuli promote growth and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through NF-κB pathway dependent repression of PP2Ac.

    PubMed

    Tao, Min; Liu, Lu; Shen, Meng; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gong, Fei-Ran; Zhou, Binhua P; Wu, Yadi; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Kai; Shen, Bairong; Wu, Meng-Yao; Shou, Liu-Mei; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that inflammatory stimulation represses protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a well-known tumor suppressor. However, whether PP2A repression participates in pancreatic cancer progression has not been verified. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and macrophage-conditioned medium (MCM) to establish in vitro inflammation models, and investigated whether inflammatory stimuli affect pancreatic cancer cell growth and invasion PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac)-dependently. Via nude mouse models of orthotopic tumor xenografts and dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC)-induced chronic pancreatitis, we evaluated the effect of an inflammatory microenvironment on PP2Ac expression in vivo. We cloned the PP2Acα and PP2Acβ isoform promoters to investigate the PP2Ac transcriptional regulation mechanisms. MCM accelerated pancreatic cancer cell growth; MCM and LPS promoted cell invasion. DBTC promoted xenograft growth and metastasis, induced tumor-associated macrophage infiltration, promoted angiogenesis, activated the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway, and repressed PP2Ac expression. In vitro, LPS and MCM downregulated PP2Ac mRNA and protein. PP2Acα overexpression attenuated JNK, ERK, PKC, and IKK phosphorylation, and impaired LPS/MCM-stimulated cell invasion and MCM-promoted cell growth. LPS and MCM activated the NF-κB pathway in vitro. LPS and MCM induced IKK and IκB phosphorylation, leading to p65/RelA nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation. Overexpression of the dominant negative forms of IKKα attenuated LPS and MCM downregulation of PP2Ac, suggesting inflammatory stimuli repress PP2Ac expression NF-κB pathway-dependently. Luciferase reporter gene assay verified that LPS and MCM downregulated PP2Ac transcription through an NF-κB-dependent pathway. Our study presents a new mechanism in inflammation-driven cancer progression through NF-κB pathway-dependent PP2Ac repression. PMID:26761431

  8. (p)ppGpp, a Small Nucleotide Regulator, Directs the Metabolic Fate of Glucose in Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Raskin, David M.; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2015-01-01

    When V. cholerae encounters nutritional stress, it activates (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response. The genes relA and relV are involved in the production of (p)ppGpp, whereas the spoT gene encodes an enzyme that hydrolyzes it. Herein, we show that the bacterial capability to produce (p)ppGpp plays an essential role in glucose metabolism. The V. cholerae mutants defective in (p)ppGpp production (i.e. ΔrelAΔrelV and ΔrelAΔrelVΔspoT mutants) lost their viability because of uncontrolled production of organic acids, when grown with extra glucose. In contrast, the ΔrelAΔspoT mutant, a (p)ppGpp overproducer strain, exhibited better growth in the presence of the same glucose concentration. An RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that transcriptions of genes consisting of an operon for acetoin biosynthesis were markedly elevated in N16961, a seventh pandemic O1 strain, but not in its (p)ppGpp0 mutant during glucose-stimulated growth. Transposon insertion in acetoin biosynthesis gene cluster resulted in glucose-induced loss of viability of the ΔrelAΔspoT mutant, further suggesting the crucial role of acetoin production in balanced growth under glucose-rich environments. Additional deletion of the aphA gene, encoding a negative regulator for acetoin production, failed to rescue the (p)ppGpp0 mutant from the defective glucose-mediated growth, suggesting that (p)ppGpp-mediated acetoin production occurs independent of the presence of AphA. Overall, our results reveal that (p)ppGpp, in addition to its well known role as a stringent response mediator, positively regulates acetoin production that contributes to the successful glucose metabolism and consequently the proliferation of V. cholerae cells under a glucose-rich environment, a condition that may mimic the human intestine. PMID:25882848

  9. PPP1R42, a PP1 binding protein, regulates centrosome dynamics in ARPE-19 cells

    PubMed Central

    DeVaul, Nicole; Wang, Rong; Sperry, Ann O.

    2013-01-01

    Background The centrosome is the primary site for microtubule nucleation in cells and orchestrates reorganization of the microtubule cytoskeleton during the cell cycle. The activities of the centrosome must be closely aligned with progression of the cell cycle; misregulation of centrosome separation and duplication is a hallmark of cancer. In a subset of cells, including the developing spermatid, the centrosome becomes specialized to form the basal body thereby supporting growth of the axoneme in morphogenesis of cilia and flagella, structures critical for signaling and motility. Mammalian spermatogenesis is an excellent model system to investigate the transformations in cellular architecture that accompany these changes including formation of the flagellum. We have previously identified a leucine rich repeat protein (PPP1R42) that contains a protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) binding site and translocates from the apical nucleus to the centrosome at the base of the flagellum during spermiogenesis. In this manuscript we examine localization and function of PPP1R42 in a ciliated epithelial cell model as a first step in understanding the role of this protein in centrosome function and flagellar formation. Results We demonstrate that PPP1R42 localizes to the basal body in ARPE-19 retinal epithelial cells. Colocalization and co-immunoprecipitation experiments further show that PPP1R42 interacts with γ-tubulin. Inhibition of PPP1R42 with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) causes accumulation of centrosomes indicating premature centrosome separation. Importantly, the activity of two signaling molecules that regulate centrosome separation, PP1 phosphatase and NEK2 kinase, changes when PPP1R42 is inhibited: PP1 activity is reduced with a corresponding increase in NEK2 activity. Conclusions We have identified a role for the PP1-binding protein, PPP1R42, in centrosome separation in ciliated ARPE-19 cells. Our finding that inhibition of PPP1R42 expression increases the number of

  10. PP2A inhibition determines poor outcome and doxorubicin resistance in early breast cancer and its activation shows promising therapeutic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zazo, Sandra; Arpí, Oriol; Menéndez, Silvia; Manso, Rebeca; Lluch, Ana; Eroles, Pilar; Rovira, Ana; Albanell, Joan; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Rojo, Federico

    2015-01-01

    The protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a key tumor suppressor which has emerged as a novel molecular target in some human cancers. Here, we show that PP2A inhibition is a common event in breast cancer and identified PP2A phosphorylation and deregulation SET and CIP2A as molecular contributing mechanisms to inactivate PP2A. Interestingly, restoration of PP2A activity after FTY720 treatment reduced cell growth, induced apoptosis and decreased AKT and ERK activation. Moreover, FTY720 led to PP2A activation then enhancing doxorubicin-induced antitumor effects both in vitro and in vivo. PP2A inhibition (CPscore: PP2A phosphorylation and/or CIP2A overexpression) was detected in 27% of cases (62/230), and associated with grade (p = 0.017), relapse (p < 0.001), negative estrogen (p < 0.001) and progesterone receptor expression (p < 0.001), HER2-positive tumors (p = 0.049), Ki-67 expression (p < 0.001), and higher AKT (p < 0.001) and ERK (p < 0.001) phosphorylation. Moreover, PP2A inhibition determined shorter overall (p = 0.006) and event-free survival (p = 0.003), and multivariate analysis confirmed its independent prognostic impact. Altogether, our results indicate that PP2A is frequently inactivated in breast cancer and determines worse outcome, and its restoration using PP2A activators represents an alternative therapeutic strategy in this disease. PMID:25726524

  11. Facile fabrication of CuPp-TiO2 mesoporous composite: An excellent and robust heterostructure photocatalyst for 4-nitrophenol degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mi-Mi; Wang, Chen; Li, Jun; Yuan, Lin; Sun, Wan-Jun

    2015-07-01

    An excellent mesoporous CuPp-TiO2 photocatalyst was prepared by the self-assemble of TiO2 with metalloporphyrin-copper(II) following a solvothermal treatment. The c-CuPp-TiO2 was obtained by calcinating CuPp-TiO2 at 450 °C to investigate the effect of CuPp on photocatalytic activity. The SEM images indicate that CuPp-TiO2 is microspheres with mean diameter of 29.01 nm. The TEM images reveal that there exists the heterojunction structure in CuPp-TiO2, which improved catalytic activity of CuPp-TiO2 obviously. Additionally, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm curves show high superficial area and the mesoporous structure of CuPp-TiO2. The experiment of photodegradation 4-nitrophenol indicate that the CuPp-TiO2 reveals superior photocatalytic activity and wonderful cycling performance with the photocatalytic efficiency of 86.69% even after six cycles. The Cu(II) porphyrins in the CuPp-TiO2 can act as a small-band-gap semiconductor to absorb visible light, prolonging the separation time of electron-hole. On the basis of above properties, the CuPp-TiO2 is prominent photocatalyst.

  12. Tensor hypercontracted ppRPA: Reducing the cost of the particle-particle random phase approximation from O(r 6) to O(r 4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenvi, Neil; van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, interest in the random-phase approximation (RPA) has grown rapidly. At the same time, tensor hypercontraction has emerged as an intriguing method to reduce the computational cost of electronic structure algorithms. In this paper, we combine the particle-particle random phase approximation with tensor hypercontraction to produce the tensor-hypercontracted particle-particle RPA (THC-ppRPA) algorithm. Unlike previous implementations of ppRPA which scale as O(r6), the THC-ppRPA algorithm scales asymptotically as only O(r4), albeit with a much larger prefactor than the traditional algorithm. We apply THC-ppRPA to several model systems and show that it yields the same results as traditional ppRPA to within mH accuracy. Our method opens the door to the development of post-Kohn Sham functionals based on ppRPA without the excessive asymptotic cost of traditional ppRPA implementations.

  13. Adaptation of HepG2 cells to a steady-state reduction in the content of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Boylan, Joan M.; Salomon, Arthur R.; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2015-07-15

    Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is a ubiquitous Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in an array of cellular processes. To assess the potential of PP6 as a therapeutic target in liver disorders, we attenuated expression of the PP6 catalytic subunit in HepG2 cells using lentiviral-transduced shRNA. Two PP6 knock-down (PP6KD) cell lines (90% reduction of PP6-C protein content) were studied in depth. Both proliferated at a rate similar to control cells. However, flow cytometry indicated G2/M cell cycle arrest that was accounted for by a shift of the cells from a diploid to tetraploid state. PP6KD cells did not show an increase in apoptosis, nor did they exhibit reduced viability in the presence of bleomycin or taxol. Gene expression analysis by microarray showed attenuated anti-inflammatory signaling. Genes associated with DNA replication were downregulated. Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic analysis yielded 80 phosphopeptides representing 56 proteins that were significantly affected by a stable reduction in PP6-C. Proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA damage repair and pre-mRNA splicing were overrepresented among these. PP6KD cells showed intact mTOR signaling. Our studies demonstrated involvement of PP6 in a diverse set of biological pathways and an adaptive response that may limit the effectiveness of targeting PP6 in liver disorders. - Highlights: • Lentiviral-transduced shRNA was used to generate a stable knockdown of PP6 in HepG2 cells. • Cells adapted to reduced PP6; cell proliferation was unaffected, and cell survival was normal. • However, PP6 knockdown was associated with a transition to a tetraploid state. • Genomic profiling showed downregulated anti-inflammatory signaling and DNA replication. • Phosphoproteomic profiling showed changes in proteins associated with DNA replication and repair.

  14. Phase Inversion of EPDM/PP Blends: Effect of Viscosity Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Ana Vera; Antunes, Carla Filipa; van Duin, Martin

    2011-07-01

    EPDM/PP blends and TPVs with and without crosslinking, respectively, were prepared, in a batch mixer, using three different EPDM rubbers. EPDM/PP based TPVs were dynamic vulcanised using the resol/SnCl2 system. Samples were collected along the time in order to get information on the morphology evolution and crosslinking density during dynamic vulcanisation. The morphology was studied by SEM and the crosslink density by gel content. In the case of low viscosity EPDMs, crosslinking of the EPDM phase was retarded due to its low crosslinking efficiency. This delay on crosslinking reaction enables the observation of the various stages of the morphological mechanism that takes place during dynamic vulcanisation. It could be observed that phase inversion takes place via lamellar mechanism. More detailed insight on phase inversion mechanism during dynamic vulcanisation was accomplished.

  15. Assessment of ALA-induced PpIX production in porcine skin pretreated with microneedles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Phamilla Gracielli Sousa; Campos de Menezes, Priscila Fernanda; Fujita, Alessandra Keiko Lima; Escobar, André; Barboza de Nardi, Andrigo; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S

    2015-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for skin treatments of premalignant and cancer lesions and recognized as a non-invasive technique that combines tissue photosensitization and subsequent exposure to light to induce cell death. However, it is limited to the treatment of superficial lesions, mainly due to the low cream penetration. Therefore, the improvement of transdermal distribution of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is needed. In this study, the kinetics and homogeneity of production of ALA-induced PpIX after the skin pre-treatment with microneedles rollers of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mm length were investigated. An improvement in homogeneity and production of PpIX was shown in a porcine model. Widefield fluorescence imaging three hours after the topical application of ALA-cream in the combined treatment with microeedles rollers. PMID:25319567

  16. Extraction of {gamma} from charmless hadronic B {yields} PP decays using SU(3) flavor symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Suprun, Denis A.

    2006-07-11

    The decays of B mesons to a pair of charmless pseudoscalar mesons (PP decays) have been analyzed within the framework of flavor SU(3) symmetry and quark-diagrammatic topological approach. Flavor symmetry breaking is taken into account in tree (T) amplitudes through ratios of decay constants fK and f{pi}; exact SU(3) is assumed elsewhere. Acceptable fits to B {yields} PP branching ratios and CP asymmetries are obtained with tree, color-suppressed and QCD penguin amplitudes. Singlet penguin amplitude was introduced to describe decay amplitudes of the modes with {eta} and {eta}' mesons in the final state. Electroweak penguin amplitudes were expressed in terms of the corresponding tree-level diagrams. Values of the weak phase {gamma} were found to be consistent with the current indirect bounds from other analyses of CKM parameters.

  17. Measurement and analysis of the pp→ppγ reaction at 310 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A.; Haberzettl, H.; Nakayama, K.; Wilkin, C.

    2011-05-01

    The pp→ppγ reaction has been studied at a beam energy of 310 MeV by detecting both final protons at the PROMICE-WASA facility and identifying the photon through the resulting missing-mass peak. The photon angular distribution in the center-of-mass system and those of the proton-proton relative momentum with respect to the beam direction and to that of the recoil photon were determined reliably up to a final pp excitation energy of Epp~30 MeV. Except for very small Epp values, the behavior of these distributions with excitation energy is well reproduced by a new refined model of the hard bremsstrahlung process. The model reproduces absolutely the total cross section and its energy dependence to within the experimental and theoretical uncertainties.

  18. Study of ω-meson production in pp collisions at ANKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsov, S.; Büscher, M.; Hartmann, M.; Hejny, V.; Kacharava, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Khoukaz, A.; Koptev, V.; Kulessa, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lehmann, I.; Leontyev, V.; Macharashvili, G.; Maeda, Y.; Mersmann, T.; Merzliakov, S.; Mikirtytchyants, S.; Mussgiller, A.; Oellers, D.; Ohm, H.; Rathmann, F.; Schleichert, R.; Seyfarth, H.; Ströher, H.; Trusov, S.; Valdau, Yu.; Wüstner, P.; Yaschenko, S.; Wilkin, C.

    2007-01-01

    The production of ω-mesons in the ppppω reaction has been investigated with the COSY-ANKE spectrometer for excess energies of 60 and 92MeV by detecting the two final protons and reconstructing their missing mass. The large physical background was subtracted using an event-by-event transformation of the proton momenta between the two energies. Differential distributions and total cross-sections were obtained after careful studies of possible systematic uncertainties in the overall ANKE acceptance. The results are compared with the predictions of theoretical models. Combined with data on the φ-meson, a more refined estimate is made of the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule violation in the φ/ω production ratio.

  19. RESEARCH NOTE FROM COLLABORATION: GridPP: development of the UK computing Grid for particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grid PP Collaboration; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Lowe, L. S.; Tan, C. L. A.; Watkins, P. M.; Bailey, D. S.; Barrass, T. A.; Brook, N. H.; Croft, R. J. H.; Kelly, M. P.; Mackay, C. K.; Metson, S.; Maroney, O. J. E.; Newbold, D. M.; Wilson, F. F.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Bly, M.; Brew, C.; Burke, S.; Byrom, R.; Coles, J.; Cornwall, L. A.; Djaoui, A.; Field, L.; Fisher, S. M.; Folkes, G. T.; Geddes, N. I.; Gordon, J. C.; Hicks, S. J. C.; Jensen, J. G.; Johnson, G.; Kant, D.; Kelsey, D. P.; Kuznetsov, G.; Leake, J.; Middleton, R. P.; Patrick, G. N.; Prassas, G.; Saunders, B. J.; Ross, D.; Sansum, R. A.; Shah, T.; Strong, B.; Synge, O.; Tam, R.; Thorpe, M.; Traylen, S.; Wheeler, J. F.; White, N. G. H.; Wilson, A. J.; Antcheva, I.; Artiaga, E.; Beringer, J.; Bird, I. G.; Casey, J.; Cass, A. J.; Chytracek, R.; Gallas Torreira, M. V.; Generowicz, J.; Girone, M.; Govi, G.; Harris, F.; Heikkurinen, M.; Horvath, A.; Knezo, E.; Litmaath, M.; Lubeck, M.; Moscicki, J.; Neilson, I.; Poinsignon, E.; Pokorski, W.; Ribon, A.; Sekera, Z.; Smith, D. H.; Tomlin, W. L.; van Eldik, J. E.; Wojcieszuk, J.; Brochu, F. M.; Das, S.; Harrison, K.; Hayes, M.; Hill, J. C.; Lester, C. G.; Palmer, M. J.; Parker, M. A.; Nelson, M.; Whalley, M. R.; Glover, E. W. N.; Anderson, P.; Clark, P. J.; Earl, A. D.; Holt, A.; Jackson, A.; Joo, B.; Kenway, R. D.; Maynard, C. M.; Perry, J.; Smith, L.; Thorn, S.; Trew, A. S.; Bell, W. H.; Burgon-Lyon, M.; Cameron, D. G.; Doyle, A. T.; Flavell, A.; Hanlon, S. J.; Martin, D. J.; McCance, G.; Millar, A. P.; Nicholson, C.; Paterson, S. K.; Pickford, A.; Soler, P.; Speirs, F.; St. Denis, R.; Thompson, A. S.; Britton, D.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.; Egede, U.; Georgiou, K.; Lewis, P.; MacEvoy, B.; Marr, S.; Martyniak, J.; Tallini, H.; Wakefield, S.; Walker, R.; Bertram, I. A.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Evans, D.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Jones, R. W. L.; Love, P.; Downing, S.; George, M. P.; Irving, A. C.; McNeile, C.; Sroczynski, Z.; Tobin, M.; Washbrook, A. J.; Barlow, R. J.; Dallison, S.; Fairey, G.; Forti, A.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Jones, M. A. S.; Kaushal, S.; Marshall, R.; McNab, A.; Salih, S.; Werner, J. C.; Bartsch, V.; Cioffi, C.; Gronbech, P.; Harnew, N.; Harris, J. F.; Huffman, B. T.; Leslie, M.; McArthur, I.; Newman, R.; Soroko, A.; Stokes-Rees, I.; Stonjek, S.; Tseng, J.; Waters, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Arter, T. R.; Cordenonsi, R. A.; Datta, A. S.; Hartin, T.; Lloyd, S. L.; Martin, A. J.; Pearce, S. E.; Williams, C. J.; Gardner, M.; George, S.; Green, B. J.; Johal, S.; Rybkine, G.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Hodgson, P.; Robinson, M.; Tovey, D. R.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Allton, C. R.; Armour, W.; Clarke, P.; Mealor, P.; Waters, D.; Waugh, B.; West, B.

    2006-01-01

    The GridPP Collaboration is building a UK computing Grid for particle physics, as part of the international effort towards computing for the Large Hadron Collider. The project, funded by the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC), began in September 2001 and completed its first phase 3 years later. GridPP is a collaboration of approximately 100 researchers in 19 UK university particle physics groups, the Council for the Central Laboratory of the Research Councils and CERN, reflecting the strategic importance of the project. In collaboration with other European and US efforts, the first phase of the project demonstrated the feasibility of developing, deploying and operating a Grid-based computing system to meet the UK needs of the Large Hadron Collider experiments. This note describes the work undertaken to achieve this goal.

  20. IK-guided PP2A suppresses Aurora B activity in the interphase of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunyi; Jeong, Ae Lee; Park, Jeong Su; Han, Sora; Jang, Chang-Young; Kim, Keun Il; Kim, Yonghwan; Park, Jong Hoon; Lim, Jong-Seok; Lee, Myung Sok; Yang, Young

    2016-09-01

    Aurora B activation is triggered at the mitotic entry and required for proper microtubule-kinetochore attachment at mitotic phase. Therefore, Aurora B should be in inactive form in interphase to prevent aberrant cell cycle progression. However, it is unclear how the inactivation of Aurora B is sustained during interphase. In this study, we find that IK depletion-induced mitotic arrest leads to G2 arrest by Aurora B inhibition, indicating that IK depletion enhances Aurora B activation before mitotic entry. IK binds to Aurora B, and colocalizes on the nuclear foci during interphase. Our data further show that IK inhibits Aurora B activation through recruiting PP2A into IK and Aurora B complex. It is thus believed that IK, as a scaffold protein, guides PP2A into Aurora B to suppress its activity in interphase until mitotic entry. PMID:26906715

  1. Influence of porous PTFE/LDPE/PP composite electret in skin ultrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Liang, Y. Y.; Cui, L. L.; Hou, X. M.; Tang, Y.; Ye, X. T.; Yang, Y. J.; Song, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    Corona charging and heat melting method were used to prepare porous PTFE electret and porous PTFE/LDPE/PP composite electret, respectively. After 0.5, 1, 1.5, 3 and 4 hour's action of fluorescein sodium (FINa) and -300V porous PTFE/LDPE/PP composite electret on the excised abdominal skin of rat, the skin structure was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy, respectively, to probe the mechanism of electret on transdermal drug delivery. The results indicated that negative electret could increase the transdermal delivery of FINa due to its effect on changing the organized structure of stratum corneum, enlarging the hair follicles, which may be the mechanism of electret in enhancing transdermal drug delivery.

  2. Universal geometrical scaling in pp, pA and AA collisions and saturation of gluons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, C.; Moscoso, A.; Pajares, C.

    2014-07-01

    It is shown that by defining a suitable saturation momentum Qs, the pT distributions of pp and AA collisions for any centrality and energy depend only on τ = pT2/Qs2 for pT < Qs. The corresponding τ-lines present small differences for τ < 1 for different projectiles, targets and centralities. For τ < 1, the higher the energy or the larger the size of the participant nuclei, the larger suppression the respective spectra present. The integrated spectrum gives a fraction of the hard multiplicity in the range from 9 % for pp at 0.9 TeV to 2 % for Pb-Pb central collisions at 2.76 TeV.

  3. Anisotropic injection molding of strontium ferrite powder using a PP/PEG binder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Jeung, W. Y.

    2001-05-01

    In this study, new binder system for anisotropic injection molding of Sr-ferrite was developed and a process for injection molding of Sr-ferrite was optimized. The developed binder system is composed of 30 vol% PP, 60 vol% PEG-20 000 and 10 vol% PEG-4000. The extraction by water was applied to remove the major binder components PEGs and the minor binder component, PP, was subsequently burned out in air. Behaviors of extraction and thermal debinding with time and debinding atmosphere and variations of the magnetic properties with sintering temperature were studied. The sintered magnets made by PIM process showed residual carbon content of 230 ppm and a maximum energy product of 4.2 MGOe.

  4. Interpretation of a carbonate reservoir using P-P and P-SV seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.L.M.; Stewart, R.R.; Lawton, D.C.; Harrison, M.P.; Szata, K.J.

    1994-12-31

    Two orthogonal three-component seismic lines were acquired by Unocal Canada Ltd., in January, 1987, over the Nisku Lousana Field in central Alberta. The purpose of the survey was to investigate a Late Devonian Nisku patch reef though to be separated from the Nisku shelf to the east by an anhydrite basin. The data are of good quality and major events were correlated between P-P and P-SV sections of both lines using offset synthetic seismograms. Interpretation of P-P and P-SV sections show time interval, V{sub p}/V{sub s}, and amplitude variations in the zone of interest. A change in lithology from anhydrite to dolomite, increased porosity, and small quantities of gas could be contributing to the observed decrease in V{sub p}/V{sub s} in an interval containing the reservoir.

  5. Gluon saturation and energy dependence of hadron multiplicity in pp and AA collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Eugene; Rezaeian, Amir H.

    2011-06-01

    The recent results in {radical}(s)=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) reported by the ALICE collaboration shows that the power-law energy-dependence of charged hadron multiplicity in Pb+Pb collisions is significantly different from p+p collisions. We show that this different energy-dependence can be explained by inclusion of a strong angular-ordering in the gluon-decay cascade within the color glass condensate (or gluon saturation) approach. This effect is more important in nucleus-nucleus collisions where the saturation scale is larger than 1 GeV. Our prescription gives a good description of the LHC data both in p+p and Pb+Pb collisions.

  6. Color reconnection: a fundamental ingredient of the hadronisation in p-p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuautle, E.; Iga, S.; Ortiz, A.; Paić, G.

    2016-07-01

    At the LHC very interesting similarities among different colliding systems (p-p, p-Pb and Pb-Pb) where observed in the multiplicity evolution of the transverse momentum spectra. This has prompted a number of analyses that have explained the results in terms of collective hydrodynamic flow. The explanation in terms of hydrodynamics has recognized problems with the smallness of the interaction volume in the systems created in p-p and p- Pb collisions. On the other hand, some event generators based on QCD produce a reasonable qualitative, and sometimes quantitative, agreement with the data. Those results can be achieved introducing in the hadronisation model the so-called color reconnection which produces flowlike patterns via boosted strings. In this work we present the behavior of the various color reconnection (CR) schemes compared to those without the CR case for different center-of-mass energies at the LHC (0.9, 7 and 13 TeV).

  7. Testing hydrodynamic descriptions of p+p collisions at √{s}=7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habich, M.; Miller, G. A.; Romatschke, P.; Xiang, W.

    2016-07-01

    In high-energy collisions of heavy ions, experimental findings of collective flow are customarily associated with the presence of a thermalized medium expanding according to the laws of hydrodynamics. Recently, the ATLAS, CMS, and ALICE experiments found signals of the same type and magnitude in ultrarelativistic proton-proton collisions. In this study, the state-of-the-art hydrodynamic model SONIC is used to simulate the systems created in p+p collisions. By varying the size of the second-order transport coefficients, the range of applicability of hydrodynamics itself to the systems created in p+p collisions is quantified. It is found that hydrodynamics can give quantitatively reliable results for the particle spectra and the elliptic momentum anisotropy coefficient v_2. Using a simple geometric model of the proton based on the elastic form factor leads to results of similar type and magnitude to those found in experiment when allowing for a small bulk viscosity coefficient.

  8. Void Probability Enhanced Multiplicity Distribution of Produced Hadrons in p-p Collision at Lhc Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S.; Chan, A. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2012-08-01

    This paper studies the multiplicity distribution of hadrons produced in p-p collisions at 0.9 and 2.36 TeV using ALICE as a detector. The multiplicity distribution exhibits enhanced void probability. They are also found to satisfy the void probability scaling. The scaling of χ with \\bar n\\bar k2 is studied using the generalized hypergeometric model. The variation of the parameter "a" of the hyper geometric model with energy and type of events is also studied. The parameter "a" distinguishes between various theoretical models, e.g. Lorentz/Catalan, negative binomial, geometric distribution etc. Finally a comparison is made with the p--\\bar p collisions at 200, 546 and 900 GeV. It is observed both for p-p and p--\\bar p data, the value of "a" decreases with increase in collision energy and approach towards the upper bound or the NB model of the void probability scaling.

  9. Use of Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) in the Characterization of EPDM/PP Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelescu, Maria Daniela; Airinei, Anton; Grigoras, Cristian; Niculescu-Aron, Ileana-Gabriela

    2010-12-01

    New polyolefinic thermoplastic elastomers based on the ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) and polypropylene (PP) containing an EPDM elastomer of the last generation (Nordel NDR 47130), obtained by polymerization in the gaseous phase with metallocene catalysis, were prepared and characterized. The melting and crystallization behavior of these blends was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. It is observed that the melting temperature, crystallization temperature, and crystallinity degree increase with an increase of PP loading. The influence of the blend composition on the physico-mechanical characteristics was discussed using statistical processing of the experimental data. Two compatibilizing procedures were utilized to improve the physico-mechanical characteristics of the samples: an addition method using different compatibilizing agents and dynamical vulcanization with three types of crosslinking systems. Significant improvements of the tensile strength and tear strength were noted by dynamic crosslinking, and the best results were obtained using a crosslinking system based on phenolic resin and tin chloride.

  10. Neutral meson production in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Borissov, Alexander; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    The first measurements of the invariant differential cross sections of inclusive {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} meson production with ALICE are presented for pp collisions at {radical}(s) = 0.9 and 7 TeV. Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD calculations overestimate the data at {radical}(s) = 7TeV, but are consistent with the {pi}{sup 0} spectrum at {radical}(s) = 0.9TeV and with the measured {pi}{sup 0}/{eta} cross section ratio at {radical}(s) = 7TeV. The nuclear modification factors (R{sub AA}) of {pi}{sup 0} production at different centralities show a strong suppression with respect to pp collisions.

  11. Computing posterior probabilities for score-based alignments using ppALIGN.

    PubMed

    Wolfsheimer, Stefan; Hartmann, Alexander; Rabus, Ralf; Nuel, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Score-based pairwise alignments are widely used in bioinformatics in particular with molecular database search tools, such as the BLAST family. Due to sophisticated heuristics, such algorithms are usually fast but the underlying scoring model unfortunately lacks a statistical description of the reliability of the reported alignments. In particular, close to gaps, in low-score or low-complexity regions, a huge number of alternative alignments arise which results in a decrease of the certainty of the alignment. ppALIGN is a software package that uses hidden Markov Model techniques to compute position-wise reliability of score-based pairwise alignments of DNA or protein sequences. The design of the model allows for a direct connection between the scoring function and the parameters of the probabilistic model. For this reason it is suitable to analyze the outcomes of popular score based aligners and search tools without having to choose a complicated set of parameters. By contrast, our program only requires the classical score parameters (the scoring function and gap costs). The package comes along with a library written in C++, a standalone program for user defined alignments (ppALIGN) and another program (ppBLAST) which can process a complete result set of BLAST. The main algorithms essentially exhibit a linear time complexity (in the alignment lengths), and they are hence suitable for on-line computations. We have also included alternative decoding algorithms to provide alternative alignments. ppALIGN is a fast program/library that helps detect and quantify questionable regions in pairwise alignments. Due to its structure, the input/output interface it can to be connected to other post-processing tools. Empirically, we illustrate its usefulness in terms of correctly predicted reliable regions for sequences generated using the ROSE model for sequence evolution, and identify sensor-specific regions in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Aromatoleum aromaticum. PMID

  12. Generalized parton distributions and rapidity gap survival in exclusive diffractive pp scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, L.; Hyde, C. E.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2007-03-01

    We study rapidity gap survival (RGS) in the production of high-mass systems (H=dijet, heavy quarkonium, Higgs boson) in double-gap exclusive diffractive pp scattering, pp{yields}p+(gap)+H+(gap)+p. Our approach is based on the idea that hard and soft interactions are approximately independent because they proceed over widely different time and distance scales. We implement this idea in a partonic description of proton structure, which allows for a model-independent treatment of the interplay of hard and soft interactions. The high-mass system is produced in a hard scattering process with exchange of two gluons between the protons, whose amplitude is calculable in terms of the gluon generalized parton distribution (GPD), measured in exclusive ep scattering. The hard scattering process is modified by soft spectator interactions, which we calculate neglecting correlations between hard and soft interactions (independent interaction approximation). We obtain an analytic expression for the RGS probability in terms of the phenomenological pp elastic scattering amplitude, without reference to the eikonal approximation. Contributions from inelastic intermediate states are suppressed. The onset of the black-disk limit in pp scattering at TeV energies strongly suppresses diffraction at small impact parameters and is the main factor in determining the RGS probability. Correlations between hard and soft interactions (e.g. due to scattering from the long-range pion field of the proton or due to possible short-range transverse correlations between partons) further decrease the RGS probability. We also investigate the dependence of the diffractive cross section on the transverse momenta of the final-state protons ('diffraction pattern'). By measuring this dependence one can perform detailed tests of the interplay of hard and soft interactions and even extract information about the gluon GPD in the proton. Such studies appear to be feasible with the planned forward detectors at the

  13. Injection molding of iPP samples in controlled conditions and resulting morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessa, Nino; De Santis, Felice; Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Injection molded parts are driven down in size and weight especially for electronic applications. In this work, an investigation was carried out on the process of injection molding of thin iPP samples and on the morphology of these parts. Melt flow in the mold cavity was analyzed and described with a mathematical model. Influence of mold temperature and injection pressure was analyzed. Samples orientation was studied using optical microscopy.

  14. Dijet azimuthal decorrelations in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hartl, C; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kiesenhofer, W; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Benucci, L; Cerny, K; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Beauceron, S; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Devroede, O; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Hreus, T; Marage, P E; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Adler, V; Costantini, S; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Mccartin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Ceard, L; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; De Jesus Damiao, D; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Dias, F A; Dias, M A F; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Marinho, F; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dyulendarova, M; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xu, M; Yang, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhang, L; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Cabrera, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Assran, Y; Mahmoud, M A; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Wyslouch, B; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Greder, S; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Mikami, Y; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Baty, C; Beaupere, N; Bedjidian, M; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Boumediene, D; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Falkiewicz, A; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Xiao, H; Megrelidze, L; Roinishvili, V; Lomidze, D; Anagnostou, G; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Mohr, N; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Ata, M; Bender, W; Erdmann, M; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Klimkovich, T; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Magass, C; Masetti, G; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Heydhausen, D; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Rennefeld, J; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Thomas, M; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M

    2011-03-25

    Measurements of dijet azimuthal decorrelations in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV using the CMS detector at the CERN LHC are presented. The analysis is based on an inclusive dijet event sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 pb⁻¹. The results are compared to predictions from perturbative QCD calculations and various Monte Carlo event generators. The dijet azimuthal distributions are found to be sensitive to initial-state gluon radiation. PMID:21517306

  15. Generalized parton distributions and rapidity gap survival in exclusive diffractive pp scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Leonid Frankfurt; Charles Hyde-Wright; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-03-01

    We propose a new approach to the problem of rapidity gap survival (RGS) in the production of high-mass systems (H = dijet, heavy quarkonium, Higgs boson) in double-gap exclusive diffractive pp scattering, pp-->p + (gap) + H + (gap) + p. It is based on the idea that hard and soft interactions proceed over widely different time- and distance scales and are thus approximately independent. The high-mass system is produced in a hard scattering process with exchange of two gluons between the protons. Its amplitude is calculable in terms of the gluon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in the protons, which can be measured in J= production in exclusive ep scattering. The hard scattering process is modified by soft spectator interactions, which we calculate in a model-independent way in terms of the pp elastic scattering amplitude. Contributions from inelastic intermediate states are suppressed. A simple geometric picture of the interplay of hard and soft interactions in diffraction is obtained. The onset of the black-disk limit in pp scattering at TeV energies strongly suppresses diffraction at small impact parameters and is the main factor in determining the RGS probability. Correlations between hard and soft interactions (e.g. due to scattering from the long-range pion field of the proton, or due to possible short-range transverse correlations between partons) further decrease the RGS probability. We also investigate the dependence of the diffractive cross section on the transverse momenta of the final-state protons (''diffraction pattern''). By measuring this dependence one can perform detailed tests of the interplay of hard and soft interactions, and even extract information about the gluon GPD in the proton. Such studies appear to be feasible with the planned forward detectors at the LHC.

  16. Cannabis-based medicine reduces multiple pathological processes in AβPP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Aso, Ester; Sánchez-Pla, Alexandre; Vegas-Lozano, Esteban; Maldonado, Rafael; Ferrer, Isidro

    2015-01-01

    Several recent findings suggest that targeting the endogenous cannabinoid system can be considered as a potential therapeutic approach to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study supports this hypothesis demonstrating that delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or cannabidiol (CBD) botanical extracts, as well as the combination of both natural cannabinoids, which are the components of an already approved cannabis-based medicine, preserved memory in AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice when chronically administered during the early symptomatic stage. Moreover, THC + CBD reduced learning impairment in AβPP/PS1 mice. A significant decrease in soluble Aβ42 peptide levels and a change in plaques composition were also observed in THC + CBD-treated AβPP/PS1 mice, suggesting a cannabinoid-induced reduction in the harmful effect of the most toxic form of the Aβ peptide. Among the mechanisms related with these positive cognitive effects, the anti-inflammatory properties of cannabinoids may also play a relevant role. Here we observed reduced astrogliosis, microgliosis, and inflammatory-related molecules in treated AβPP/PS1 mice, which were more marked after treatment with THC + CBD than with either THC or CBD. Moreover, other cannabinoid-induced effects were uncovered by a genome-wide gene expression study. Thus, we have identified the redox protein thioredoxin 2 and the signaling protein Wnt16 as significant substrates for the THC + CBD-induced effects in our AD model. In summary, the present findings show that the combination of THC and CBD exhibits a better therapeutic profile than each cannabis component alone and support the consideration of a cannabis-based medicine as potential therapy against AD. PMID:25125475

  17. Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of dijet azimuthal decorrelations in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV using the CMS detector at the CERN LHC are presented. The analysis is based on an inclusive dijet event sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 inverse picobarns. The results are compared to predictions from perturbative QCD calculations and various Monte Carlo event generators. The dijet azimuthal distributions are found to be sensitive to initial-state gluon radiation.

  18. First measurement of pp neutrinos in real time in the Borexino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosteiro, Pablo

    2014-09-01

    The Sun is fueled by a series of nuclear reactions that produce the energy that makes it shine. Neutrinos (nu) produced by these nuclear reactions exit the Sun and reach Earth within minutes, providing us with key information about what goes on at the core of our star. For over twenty years since the first detection of solar neutrinos in the late 1960's, an apparent deficit in their detection rate was known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Today, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect is the accepted mechanism by which neutrinos oscillate inside the Sun, arriving at Earth as a mixture of nue, numu and nutau, the latter two of which were invisible to early detectors. Several experiments have now confirmed the observation of neutrino oscillations. These experiments, when their results are combined together, have demonstrated that neutrino oscillations are well described by the Large Mixing Angle (LMA) solution of the MSW effect. This thesis presents the first measurement of pp neutrinos in the Borexino detector, which is another validation of the LMA-MSW model of neutrino oscillations. In addition, it is one more step towards the completion of the spectroscopy of pp chain neutrinos in Borexino, leaving only the extremely faint hep neutrinos undetected. This advance validates the experiment itself and its previous results. This is, furthermore, the first direct real-time measurement of pp neutrinos. We find a pp neutrino detection rate of 143+/-16 (stat)+/-10 (syst) cpd/100 t in the Borexino experiment, which translates, according to the LMA-MSW model, to (6.42+/-0.85)x1010 cm -2 s-1. We also report on a measurement of neutrons in a dedicated system within the Borexino detector, which resulted in an improved understanding of neutron rates in liquid scintillator detectors at Gran Sasso depths. This result is crucial to the development of novel direct dark matter detection experiments.

  19. Whole-Genome Sequence of Rummeliibacillus stabekisii Strain PP9 Isolated from Antarctic Soil.

    PubMed

    da Mota, Fábio Faria; Vollú, Renata Estebanez; Jurelevicius, Diogo; Seldin, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    The whole genome of Rummeliibacillus stabekisii PP9, isolated from a soil sample from Antarctica, consists of a circular chromosome of 3,412,092 bp and a circular plasmid of 8,647 bp, with 3,244 protein-coding genes, 12 copies of the 16S-23S-5S rRNA operon, 101 tRNA genes, and 6 noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). PMID:27231360

  20. Whole-Genome Sequence of Rummeliibacillus stabekisii Strain PP9 Isolated from Antarctic Soil

    PubMed Central

    da Mota, Fábio Faria; Vollú, Renata Estebanez; Jurelevicius, Diogo

    2016-01-01

    The whole genome of Rummeliibacillus stabekisii PP9, isolated from a soil sample from Antarctica, consists of a circular chromosome of 3,412,092 bp and a circular plasmid of 8,647 bp, with 3,244 protein-coding genes, 12 copies of the 16S-23S-5S rRNA operon, 101 tRNA genes, and 6 noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). PMID:27231360

  1. Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Eroe, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Fruehwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Haensel, S.; Hartl, C.; Hoch, M.; Hoermann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kasieczka, G.; Kiesenhofer, W.

    2011-03-25

    Measurements of dijet azimuthal decorrelations in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV using the CMS detector at the CERN LHC are presented. The analysis is based on an inclusive dijet event sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 pb{sup -1}. The results are compared to predictions from perturbative QCD calculations and various Monte Carlo event generators. The dijet azimuthal distributions are found to be sensitive to initial-state gluon radiation.

  2. Bose-Einstein correlations in pp and PbPb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    We report on the results of identical pion femtoscopy at the LHC. The Bose-Einstein correlation analysis was performed on the large-statistics ALICE p+p at sqrt{s}= 0.9 TeV and 7 TeV datasets collected during 2010 LHC running and the first Pb+Pb dataset at sqrt{s_NN}= 2.76 TeV. Detailed pion femtoscopy studies in heavy-ion collisions have shown that emission region sizes ("HBT radii") decrease with increasing pair momentum, which is understood as a manifestation of the collective behavior of matter. 3D radii were also found to universally scale with event multiplicity. In p+p collisions at 7 TeV one measures multiplicities which are comparable with those registered in peripheral AuAu and CuCu collisions at RHIC, so direct comparisons and tests of scaling laws are now possible. We show the results of double-differential 3D pion HBT analysis, as a function of multiplicity and pair momentum. The results for two collision energies are compared to results obtained in the heavy-ion collisions at similar multiplicity and p+p collisions at lower energy. We identify the relevant scaling variables for the femtoscopic radii and discuss the similarities and differences to results from heavy-ions. The observed trends give insight into the soft particle production mechanism in p+p collisions and suggest that a self-interacting collective system may be created in sufficiently high multiplicity events. First results for the central Pb+Pb collisions are also shown. A significant increase of the reaction zone volume and lifetime in comparison to RHIC is observed. Signatures of collective hydrodynamics-like behavior of the system are also apparent, and are compared to model predictions.

  3. On the potential role of the Collins effect in A_N in pp --> pion X

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmino, Mauro; Boglione, Mariaelena; D'Alesio, Umberto; Leader, Elliot; Melis, Stefano; Murgia, Francesco; Prokudin, Alexey

    2013-10-01

    Transverse single spin asymmetries in pp --> pion X processes, while on a quite firm ground experimentally, are still a much debated phenomenological issue. We consider them in a transverse momentum dependent factorization scheme. After revisiting a previous result, we give new estimates of the Collins contribution by adopting the latest information on the Collins and transversity functions, as extracted from SIDIS and e+e- data.

  4. Direct experimental reconstruction of the pp elastic scattering matrix at 579 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aprile, E.; Eisenegger, C.; Hausammann, R.; Heer, E.; Hess, R.; Lechanoine-Leluc, C.; Leo, W.R.; Morenzoni, S.; Onel, Y.; Rapin, D.; Mango, S.

    1981-04-20

    We have made, for the first time, a direct reconstruction of the pp elastic scattering matrix at 579 MeV from a series of experiments performed with a polarized beam line. Fifteen observables consisting of the polarization, two-spin correlation and transfer parameters, and three-spin parameters were measured at seven angles between 66/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/ center of mass. The experimental results and reconstructed amplitudes are presented and compared to a phase-shift analysis.

  5. Injection molding of iPP samples in controlled conditions and resulting morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Sessa, Nino De Santis, Felice Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-17

    Injection molded parts are driven down in size and weight especially for electronic applications. In this work, an investigation was carried out on the process of injection molding of thin iPP samples and on the morphology of these parts. Melt flow in the mold cavity was analyzed and described with a mathematical model. Influence of mold temperature and injection pressure was analyzed. Samples orientation was studied using optical microscopy.

  6. Biochemical studies on Francisella tularensis RelA in (p)ppGpp biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Rachael C; Batten, Laura E; Wells, Neil J; Oyston, Petra C F; Roach, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response is induced by nutrient deprivation and is mediated by enzymes of the RSH (RelA/SpoT homologue; RelA, (p)ppGpp synthetase I; SpoT, (p)ppGpp synthetase II) superfamily that control concentrations of the 'alarmones' (p)ppGpp (guanosine penta- or tetra-phosphate). This regulatory pathway is present in the vast majority of pathogens and has been proposed as a potential anti-bacterial target. Current understanding of RelA-mediated responses is based on biochemical studies using Escherichia coli as a model. In comparison, the Francisella tularensis RelA sequence contains a truncated regulatory C-terminal region and an unusual synthetase motif (EXSD). Biochemical analysis of F. tularensis RelA showed the similarities and differences of this enzyme compared with the model RelA from Escherichia coli. Purification of the enzyme yielded a stable dimer capable of reaching concentrations of 10 mg/ml. In contrast with other enzymes from the RelA/SpoT homologue superfamily, activity assays with F. tularensis RelA demonstrate a high degree of specificity for GTP as a pyrophosphate acceptor, with no measurable turnover for GDP. Steady state kinetic analysis of F. tularensis RelA gave saturation activity curves that best fitted a sigmoidal function. This kinetic profile can result from allosteric regulation and further measurements with potential allosteric regulators demonstrated activation by ppGpp (5',3'-dibisphosphate guanosine) with an EC50 of 60±1.9 μM. Activation of F. tularensis RelA by stalled ribosomal complexes formed with ribosomes purified from E. coli MRE600 was observed, but interestingly, significantly weaker activation with ribosomes isolated from Francisella philomiragia. PMID:26450927

  7. Biochemical studies on Francisella tularensis RelA in (p)ppGpp biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Rachael C.; Batten, Laura E.; Wells, Neil J.; Oyston, Petra C.F.; Roach, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response is induced by nutrient deprivation and is mediated by enzymes of the RSH (RelA/SpoT homologue; RelA, (p)ppGpp synthetase I; SpoT, (p)ppGpp synthetase II) superfamily that control concentrations of the ‘alarmones’ (p)ppGpp (guanosine penta- or tetra-phosphate). This regulatory pathway is present in the vast majority of pathogens and has been proposed as a potential anti-bacterial target. Current understanding of RelA-mediated responses is based on biochemical studies using Escherichia coli as a model. In comparison, the Francisella tularensis RelA sequence contains a truncated regulatory C-terminal region and an unusual synthetase motif (EXSD). Biochemical analysis of F. tularensis RelA showed the similarities and differences of this enzyme compared with the model RelA from Escherichia coli. Purification of the enzyme yielded a stable dimer capable of reaching concentrations of 10 mg/ml. In contrast with other enzymes from the RelA/SpoT homologue superfamily, activity assays with F. tularensis RelA demonstrate a high degree of specificity for GTP as a pyrophosphate acceptor, with no measurable turnover for GDP. Steady state kinetic analysis of F. tularensis RelA gave saturation activity curves that best fitted a sigmoidal function. This kinetic profile can result from allosteric regulation and further measurements with potential allosteric regulators demonstrated activation by ppGpp (5′,3′-dibisphosphate guanosine) with an EC50 of 60±1.9 μM. Activation of F. tularensis RelA by stalled ribosomal complexes formed with ribosomes purified from E. coli MRE600 was observed, but interestingly, significantly weaker activation with ribosomes isolated from Francisella philomiragia. PMID:26450927

  8. P(P bar)P elastic scattering and cosmic ray data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    FAZAL-E-ALEEM; Saleem, M.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the total cross section for pp elastic scattering at cosmic ray energies, as well as the total cross section, the slope parameter b(s,t) and the differential cross section for small momentum transfer at ISR and collider energies for p(p)p elastic scattering can be simultaneously fitted by using a simple Regge pole model. The results of this theory is discussed in detail.

  9. Micro(mi) RNA-34a targets protein phosphatase (PP)1γ to regulate DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yuko; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) triggers widespread changes in gene expression, mediated partly by alterations in micro(mi) RNA levels, whose nature and significance remain uncertain. Here, we report that miR-34a, which is upregulated during the DDR, modulates the expression of protein phosphatase 1γ (PP1γ) to regulate cellular tolerance to DNA damage. Multiple bio-informatic algorithms predict that miR-34a targets the PP1CCC gene encoding PP1γ protein. Ionising radiation (IR) decreases cellular expression of PP1γ in a dose-dependent manner. An miR-34a-mimic reduces cellular PP1γ protein. Conversely, an miR-34a inhibitor antagonizes IR-induced decreases in PP1γ protein expression. A wild-type (but not mutant) miR-34a seed match sequence from the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of PP1CCC when transplanted to a luciferase reporter gene makes it responsive to an miR-34a-mimic. Thus, miR-34a upregulation during the DDR targets the 3′ UTR of PP1CCC to decrease PP1γ protein expression. PP1γ is known to antagonize DDR signaling via the ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase. Interestingly, we find that cells exposed to DNA damage become more sensitive – in an miR-34a-dependent manner – to a second challenge with damage. Increased sensitivity to the second challenge is marked by enhanced phosphorylation of ATM and p53, increased γH2AX formation, and increased cell death. Increased sensitivity can be partly recapitulated by a miR-34a-mimic, or antagonized by an miR-34a-inhibitor. Thus, our findings suggest a model in which damage-induced miR-34a induction reduces PP1γ expression and enhances ATM signaling to decrease tolerance to repeated genotoxic challenges. This mechanism has implications for tumor suppression and the response of cancers to therapeutic radiation. PMID:26111201

  10. Monitoring ALA-induced PpIX photodynamic therapy in the rat esophagus using fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kruijt, Bastiaan; de Bruijn, Henriette S; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angelique; de Bruin, Ron W F; Sterenborg, Henricus J C M; Amelink, Arjen; Robinson, Dominic J

    2008-01-01

    The presence of phased protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) bleach kinetics has been shown to correlate with esophageal response to 5-aminolevulinic acid-based photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) in animal models. Here we confirm the existence of phased PpIX photobleaching by increasing the temporal resolution of the fluorescence measurements using the therapeutic illumination and long wavelength fluorescence detection. Furthermore fluorescence differential pathlength spectroscopy (FDPS) was incorporated to provide information on the effects of PpIX and tissue oxygenation distribution on the PpIX bleach kinetics during illumination. ALA at a dose of 200 mg kg(-1) was orally administered to 15 rats, five rats served as control animals. PDT was performed at an in situ measured fluence rate of 75 mW cm(-2) using a total fluence of 54 J cm(-2). Forty-eight hours after PDT the esophagus was excised and histologically examined for PDT-induced damage. Fluence rate and PpIX photobleaching at 705 nm were monitored during therapeutic illumination with the same isotropic probe. A new method, FDPS, was used for superficial measurement on saturation, blood volume, scattering characteristics and PpIX fluorescence. Results showed two-phased PpIX photobleaching that was not related to a (systematic) change in esophageal oxygenation but was associated with an increase in average blood volume. PpIX fluorescence photobleaching measured using FDPS, in which fluorescence signals are only acquired from the superficial layers of the esophagus, showed lower rates of photobleaching and no distinct phases. No clear correlation between two-phased photobleaching and histologic tissue response was found. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring fluence rate, PpIX fluorescence and FDPS during PDT in the esophagus. We conclude that the spatial distribution of PpIX significantly influences the kinetics of photobleaching and that there is a complex interrelationship between the distribution of PpIX and

  11. PRG-1 Regulates Synaptic Plasticity via Intracellular PP2A/β1-Integrin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingfeng; Huai, Jisen; Endle, Heiko; Schlüter, Leslie; Fan, Wei; Li, Yunbo; Richers, Sebastian; Yurugi, Hajime; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Ji, Haichao; Cheng, Hong; Rister, Benjamin; Horta, Guilherme; Baumgart, Jan; Berger, Hendrik; Laube, Gregor; Schmitt, Ulrich; Schmeisser, Michael J; Boeckers, Tobias M; Tenzer, Stefan; Vlachos, Andreas; Deller, Thomas; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in dendritic spine numbers are linked to deficits in learning and memory. While we previously revealed that postsynaptic plasticity-related gene 1 (PRG-1) controls lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling at glutamatergic synapses via presynaptic LPA receptors, we now show that PRG-1 also affects spine density and synaptic plasticity in a cell-autonomous fashion via protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)/β1-integrin activation. PRG-1 deficiency reduces spine numbers and β1-integrin activation, alters long-term potentiation (LTP), and impairs spatial memory. The intracellular PRG-1 C terminus interacts in an LPA-dependent fashion with PP2A, thus modulating its phosphatase activity at the postsynaptic density. This results in recruitment of adhesome components src, paxillin, and talin to lipid rafts and ultimately in activation of β1-integrins. Consistent with these findings, activation of PP2A with FTY720 rescues defects in spine density and LTP of PRG-1-deficient animals. These results disclose a mechanism by which bioactive lipid signaling via PRG-1 could affect synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:27453502

  12. The HAB1 PP2C is inhibited by ABA-dependent PYL10 interaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Shi, Chaowei; Sun, Demeng; He, Yao; Lai, Chaohua; Lv, Pei; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Longhua; Wu, Fangming; Tian, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    PYL10 is a monomeric abscisic acid (ABA) receptor that inhibits protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies reported that the PP2C phosphatase inhibition by PYL10 was ABA-independent. Here, systematic PYL10 biochemical studies demonstrated that PYL10 activity was ABA-dependent, and the previously reported studies was interfered by the presence of BSA in the commercial kit. To investigate dynamic mechanism of how ABA binding to PYL10 induces PP2C phosphatase inhibiting activity, solution NMR relaxation analysis of apo-PYL10 and PYL10/ABA were conducted following backbone resonance assignments. Reduced spectrum density mapping of the backbone relaxation data revealed that PYL10 was more flexible in ABA bound form than apo-PYL10, indicating an increased conformational entropy upon ligand binding. Moreover, to illustrate conformation exchanges of PYL10 upon ABA binding, NMR line shape analysis was performed with increasing concentrations of ABA, and the results indicated that PYL10 backbone conformational changes occur at different time scales. PMID:26044871

  13. Isospin mixing reveals 30P(p, γ)31S resonance influencing nova nucleosynthesis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bennett, M. B.; Wrede, C.; Brown, B. A.; Liddick, S. N.; Perez-Loureiro, D.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chen, A. A.; Chipps, K. A.; Fry, C.; Glassman, B. E.; et al

    2016-03-08

    Here, the thermonuclear 30P(p, γ)31S reaction rate is critical for modeling the final elemental and isotopic abundances of ONe nova nucleosynthesis, which affect the calibration of proposed nova thermometers and the identification of presolar nova grains, respectively. Unfortunately, the rate of this reaction is essentially unconstrained experimentally, because the strengths of key 31S proton capture resonance states are not known, largely due to uncertainties in their spins and parities. Using the β decay of 31Cl, we have observed the β-delayed γ decay of a 31S state at Ex = 6390.2(7) keV, with a 30P(p, γ)31S resonance energy of Er =more » 259.3(8) keV, in the middle of the 30P(p, γ)31S Gamow window for peak nova temperatures. This state exhibits isospin mixing with the nearby isobaric analog state at Ex = 6279.0(6) keV, giving it an unambiguous spin and parity of 3/2+ and making it an important l = 0 resonance for proton capture on 30P.« less

  14. Essential and nonessential sequences in malPp, a positively controlled promoter in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Raibaud, O; Gutierrez, C; Schwartz, M

    1985-03-01

    A plasmid bearing the malPp promoter was digested with Bal31 to obtain a set of deletions with closely spaced endpoints in the upstream region of this promoter. Some of these deletions were sequenced, and their effect on malPQ expression was determined after having transferred them onto the chromosome. We found that a site which binds the cyclic AMP receptor protein in vitro and which is centered at position -93 with respect to the site of transcription initiation could be deleted without affecting malPQ expression. In contrast, the activity of the malPp promoter decreased abruptly when the deletions reached position -72. The downstream region of the promoter was analyzed by using a technique of "sequence replacement" which involved the selection of Mal+ pseudorevertants from strains which carried small deletions in the -25 region. The pseudorevertants, which expressed the malPQ operon in a manner indistinguishable from wild type, had grossly different sequences downstream from position -38, except for a few positions, some of which must be important for promoter function. By combining all presently available information, it is suggested that the malPp promoter contains three binding sites for its activator, the product of gene malT. These sites are defined by three quasi-identical hexanucleotides present in one orientation around position -37 and twice in the other orientation around positions -60 and -73. PMID:3156124

  15. Co-overexpression of PpPDI enhances secretion of ancrod in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shou-Tao; Fang, Hui-Min; Zhao, Li; Tian, Qing-Nan; Qin, Yun-Fei; Lu, Ping; Chen, San-Jun; Bao, Zhen-Xia; Liang, Feng

    2011-08-01

    Ancrod, a serine protease purified from the venom of Agkistrodon rhodostoma, is highly specific for fibrinogen. It causes anticoagulation by defibrinogenation and has been used as a therapeutic anticoagulant for the treatment of moderate to severe forms of peripheral arterial circulatory disorders in a variety of countries. The DNA of ancrod was amplified by recursive PCR with a yeast bias codon and cloned into the pGEM-T Easy vector. In order to achieve a high level secretion and a full activity expression of ancrod in Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris), the P. pastoris protein disulfide bond isomerase (PpPDI) was co-overexpressed in the strain. The secretion characteristics of ancrod with and without PpPDI were examined. With co-overexpression of PpPDI, the production of recombinant ancrod (rAncrod) was increased to 315 mg/L in the culture medium, which is twofold higher than the control strain carrying only the ancrod gene. Through purified by Ni²⁺ affinity chromatography and phenyl Sepharose column, the purity of rAncrod was found to be as high as 95.2%. The fibrinogenolytic and zymographic activities of the rAncrod were determined and found to be similar to that of the native protein. This improved expression system can facilitate further studies and the industrial production of ancrod. PMID:21340538

  16. Fin1-PP1 Helps Clear Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Protein Bub1 from Kinetochores in Anaphase.

    PubMed

    Bokros, Michael; Gravenmier, Curtis; Jin, Fengzhi; Richmond, Daniel; Wang, Yanchang

    2016-02-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors chromosome attachment defects, and the assembly of SAC proteins at kinetochores is essential for its activation, but the SAC disassembly process remains unknown. We found that deletion of a 14-3-3 protein, Bmh1, or hyperactivation of Cdc14 early anaphase release (FEAR) allows premature SAC silencing in budding yeast, which depends on a kinetochore protein Fin1 that forms a complex with protein phosphatase PP1. Previous works suggest that FEAR-dependent Fin1 dephosphorylation promotes Bmh1-Fin1 dissociation, which enables kinetochore recruitment of Fin1-PP1. We found persistent kinetochore association of SAC protein Bub1 in fin1Δ mutants after anaphase entry. Therefore, we revealed a mechanism that clears SAC proteins from kinetochores. After anaphase entry, FEAR activation promotes kinetochore enrichment of Fin1-PP1, resulting in SAC disassembly at kinetochores. This mechanism is required for efficient SAC silencing after SAC is challenged, and untimely Fin1-kinetochore association causes premature SAC silencing and chromosome missegregation. PMID:26832405

  17. Study of J/ψ→pp̄ and J/ψ→nn̄

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; et al

    2012-08-31

    The decays J/ψ→pp̄ and J/ψ→nn̄ have been investigated with a sample of 225.2×10⁶ J/ψ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e⁺e⁻ collider. The branching fractions are determined to be B(J/ψ→pp̄)=(2.112±0.004±0.031)×10⁻³ and B(J/ψ→nn̄)=(2.07±0.01±0.17)×10⁻³. Distributions of the angle θ between the proton or antineutron and the beam direction are well described by the form 1+αcos²θ, and we find α=0.595±0.012±0.015 for J/ψ→pp̄ and α=0.50±0.04±0.21 for J/ψ→nn̄. Our branching-fraction results suggest a large phase angle between the strong and electromagnetic amplitudes describing the J/ψ→NN¯¯¯ decay.

  18. Influence of flavour absorption on oxygen permeation through LDPE, PP, PC and PET plastics food packaging.

    PubMed

    van Willige, R W G; Linssen, J P H; Meinders, M B J; van der Stege, H J; Voragen, A G J

    2002-03-01

    The effect of flavour absorption on the oxygen permeability of low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was studied using an isostatic continuous flow system. Polymer samples were exposed to a model solution containing limonene, hexyl acetate, nonanone and decanal at 40 degrees C. After exposure, one part of each sample was analysed for absorbed flavour compounds using a Large Volume Injection GC Ultrasonic 'in vial' extraction method, and from the other part, oxygen permeability was measured in a permeation cell at 25 degrees C. After 8 h of exposure, LDPE and PP samples showed a significant linear (R2 = 0.82 and 0.99) increase in oxygen permeability of 21 and 130%, respectively. Owing to swelling of the polymer samples resulting from flavour absorption, the structure of the polymeric network changed (i.e. opened) and consequently increased oxygen permeability. The oxygen permeability of exposed PC showed a significant linear (R2 = 0.78) decrease of 11% after 21 days. PC obviously did not swell like LDPE or PP. Therefore, it was suggested that absorbed flavour compounds occupied or blocked 'microcavities' through which normally oxygen is transported. Absorption of flavour compounds by PET did not affect the oxygen permeability of PET significantly. PMID:11837243

  19. (p)ppGpp-dependent and -independent pathways for salt tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tarusawa, Takefusa; Ito, Shion; Goto, Simon; Ushida, Chisato; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2016-07-01

    Addition of some kinds of translation inhibitors targeting the ribosome such as kasugamycin to the culture medium as well as removal of a ribosome maturation factor or a ribosomal protein provides Escherichia coli cells with tolerance to high salt stress. Here, we found that another kind of translation inhibitor, serine hydroxamate (SHX), which induces amino acid starvation leading to (p)ppGpp production, also has a similar effect, but via a different pathway. Unlike kasugamycin, SHX was not effective in (p)ppGpp-null mutant cells. SHX and depletion of RsgA, a ribosome maturation factor, had an additive effect on salt tolerance, while kasugamycin or depletion of RsgA did not. These results indicate the presence of two distinct pathways, (p)ppGpp-dependent and -independent pathways, for salt tolerance of E. coli cell. Both pathways operate even in the absence of σ(S), an alternative sigma factor involved in the stationary phase or stress response. Hastened activation of the exocytoplasmic stress-specific sigma factor, σ(E), after salt shock was observed in the cells treated with SHX, as has been observed in the cells treated with a translation inhibitor or depleted of a ribosome maturation factor. PMID:26823481

  20. A Conserved Motif Provides Binding Specificity to the PP2A-B56 Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Emil Peter Thrane; Kruse, Thomas; Davey, Norman E; López-Méndez, Blanca; Sigurðsson, Jón Otti; Montoya, Guillermo; Olsen, Jesper V; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-08-18

    Dynamic protein phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism regulating biological processes in all organisms. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the main source of phosphatase activity in the cell, but the molecular details of substrate recognition are unknown. Here, we report that a conserved surface-exposed pocket on PP2A regulatory B56 subunits binds to a consensus sequence on interacting proteins, which we term the LxxIxE motif. The composition of the motif modulates the affinity for B56, which in turn determines the phosphorylation status of associated substrates. Phosphorylation of amino acid residues within the motif increases B56 binding, allowing integration of kinase and phosphatase activity. We identify conserved LxxIxE motifs in essential proteins throughout the eukaryotic domain of life and in human viruses, suggesting that the motifs are required for basic cellular function. Our study provides a molecular description of PP2A binding specificity with broad implications for understanding signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:27453045

  1. Bio-composites fabricated by sandwiching sisal fibers with polypropylene (PP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosiati, H.; Nahyudin, A.; Fauzi, I.; Wijayanti, D. A.; Triyana, K.

    2016-04-01

    Sisal fibers reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites were successfully fabricated using sandwiching sisal fibers with PP sheets. The ratio of fiber and polymer matrix was 50:50 (wt. %). Untreated short and long sisal fibers, and alkali treated short sisal fibers in 6% NaOH at 100°C for 1 and 3 h were used as reinforcement or fillers. A small amount (3 wt. %) of maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (MAPP) was added as a coupling agent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the surface morphology and chemical composition of the fibers, respectively. Flexural test of sisal/PP composites was done according to ASTM D 790-02. The results showed that flexural strength of untreated long fiber reinforced composite is much higher than that of the untreated and alkali treated short fibers reinforced composites with and without the addition of MAPP. Alkalization related to fiber surface modification, fiber length/fiber orientation and a composite fabrication technique are important factors in contributing to the fiber distribution within the matrix, the bonding between the fiber and the matrix and the enhancement of flexural strength of the bio-composite.

  2. Energy dependence of p¯/p ratio in p+p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Subhash; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Kumar, Lokesh; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2010-10-01

    We compiled the experimentally measured p¯/p ratio at midrapidity in p+p collisions from s=23 to 7000 GeV and compared it to various mechanisms of baryon production as implemented in the pythia, phojet, and Heavy Ion Jet Interaction Generator (HIJING)/B-B¯ models. For the models studied with default settings, phojet has the best agreement with the measurements, pythia gives a higher value for s<200 GeV, and the ratios from HIJING/B-B¯ are consistently lower for all the s studied. A comparison of the data to different mechanisms of baryon production as implemented in pythia shows that through a suitable tuning of the suppression of diquark-antidiquark pair production in the color field relative to quark-antiquark production and allowing the diquarks to split according to the popcorn scheme, a fairly reasonable description of the measured p¯/p ratio for s<200 GeV is given. A comparison of the beam energy dependence of the p¯/p ratio in p+p and nucleus-nucleus (A + A) collisions at midrapidity shows that the baryon production is significantly more for A + A collisions relative to p+p collisions for s<200 GeV. We also carry out a phenomenological fit to the ybeam dependence of the p¯/p ratio.

  3. Energy dependence of p-bar/p ratio in p+p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Singha, Subhash; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Kumar, Lokesh

    2010-10-15

    We compiled the experimentally measured p-bar/p ratio at midrapidity in p+p collisions from {radical}(s)=23 to 7000 GeV and compared it to various mechanisms of baryon production as implemented in the pythia, phojet, and Heavy Ion Jet Interaction Generator (HIJING)/B-B models. For the models studied with default settings, phojet has the best agreement with the measurements, pythia gives a higher value for {radical}(s)<200 GeV, and the ratios from HIJING/B-B are consistently lower for all the {radical}(s) studied. A comparison of the data to different mechanisms of baryon production as implemented in pythia shows that through a suitable tuning of the suppression of diquark-antidiquark pair production in the color field relative to quark-antiquark production and allowing the diquarks to split according to the popcorn scheme, a fairly reasonable description of the measured p-bar/p ratio for {radical}(s)<200 GeV is given. A comparison of the beam energy dependence of the p-bar/p ratio in p+p and nucleus-nucleus (A + A) collisions at midrapidity shows that the baryon production is significantly more for A + A collisions relative to p+p collisions for {radical}(s)<200 GeV. We also carry out a phenomenological fit to the y{sub beam} dependence of the p-bar/p ratio.

  4. Strange particle production in p+p collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Caines, H.; Catu, O.; Chikanian, A.; Du, F.; Finch, E.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Lin, G.; Majka, R.; Nattrass, C.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Smirnov, N.; Witt, R.; Adams, J.; Barnby, L. S.

    2007-06-15

    We present strange particle spectra and yields measured at midrapidity in {radical}(s)=200 GeV proton-proton (p+p) collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We find that the previously observed universal transverse mass (m{sub T}{identical_to}{radical}(p{sub T}{sup 2}+m{sup 2})) scaling of hadron production in p+p collisions seems to break down at higher m{sub T} and that there is a difference in the shape of the m{sub T} spectrum between baryons and mesons. We observe midrapidity antibaryon to baryon ratios near unity for {lambda} and {xi} baryons and no dependence of the ratio on transverse momentum, indicating that our data do not yet reach the quark-jet dominated region. We show the dependence of the mean transverse momentum on measured charged particle multiplicity and on particle mass and infer that these trends are consistent with gluon-jet dominated particle production. The data are compared with previous measurements made at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron and Intersecting Storage Rings and in Fermilab experiments and with leading-order and next-to-leading-order string fragmentation model predictions. We infer from these comparisons that the spectral shapes and particle yields from p+p collisions at RHIC energies have large contributions from gluon jets rather than from quark jets.

  5. DSC study of the isothermal crystallization of iPP-CNF nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipara, Dorina M.; Chipara, Mircea

    2013-03-01

    Nanocomposite materials have been obtained by dispersing vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCNFs) with diameters ranging between 60 and 100 nm and lengths between 30,000 and 100,000 nm supplied by Pyrograf Products, Inc (PR-24AG) within a polymer matrix - isotactic polypropylene (iPP) - type Marlex HLN-120-01 with density 0.906 g/cm3 and melt flow rate at 230 oC of 12 g/10 min, supplied by Philips Sumika Polypropylene Company. VGCNFs have been purified and disentangled by reflux in dichloromethane and deionized water followed by vacuum filtering (for 24 h) and drying at 110 oC for 24h. The nanocomposites were obtained by melt mixing at 180 oC for 9 minutes with a speed of 65 rpm followed by an additional mixing at 90 rpm for 5 minutes, using a HAAKE Rheomix, Nanocomposites loaded with various amounts of VGCNFs (0%, 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% wt.) have been prepared and investigated by TA DSC Q-500. Isothermal crystallization was investigated in detail and analyzed by using an expression derived from the Avrami equation. The effect of the filler on the isothermal crystallization of iPP is discussed in detail. The research is focused on the effect of VGCNF on the degree of crystallization of iPP, crystallization rate, and dimensionality of the crystallization process. This research has been supported by National Science Foundation under DMR. Contract grant number 0934157.

  6. PP-wave string interactions from perturbative Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, Neil R.; Freedman, Daniel Z.; Headrick, Matthew; Minwalla, Shiraz; Motl, Lubos; Postnikov, Alexander; Skiba, Witold

    2002-07-01

    Recently, Berenstein et al. have proposed a duality between a sector of Script N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory with large R-charge J, and string theory in a pp-wave background. In the limit considered, the effective 't Hooft coupling has been argued to be λ' = gYM2N/J2 = 1/(μp+α')2. We study Yang-Mills theory at small λ' (large μ) with a view to reproducing string interactions. We demonstrate that the effective genus counting parameter of the Yang-Mills theory is g22 = J4/N2 = (4πgs)2(μp+α')4, the effective two-dimensional Newton constant for strings propagating on the pp-wave background. We identify g2(λ')1/2 as the effective coupling between a wide class of excited string states on the pp-wave background. We compute the anomalous dimensions of BMN operators at first order in g22 and λ' and interpret our result as the genus one mass renormalization of the corresponding string state. We postulate a relation between the three-string vertex function and the gauge theory three-point function and compare our proposal to string field theory. We utilize this proposal, together with quantum mechanical perturbation theory, to recompute the genus one energy shift of string states, and find precise agreement with our gauge theory computation.

  7. Separase biosensor reveals that cohesin cleavage timing depends on phosphatase PP2ACdc55 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yaakov, Gilad; Thorn, Kurt; Morgan, David O.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In anaphase, sister chromatids separate abruptly and are then segregated by the mitotic spindle. The protease separase triggers sister separation by cleaving the Scc1/Mcd1 subunit of the cohesin ring that holds sisters together. Polo-kinase phosphorylation of Scc1 promotes its cleavage, but the underlying regulatory circuits are unclear. We developed a separase biosensor in Saccharomyces cerevisae that provides a quantitative indicator of cohesin cleavage in single cells. Separase is abruptly activated and cleaves most cohesin within one minute, after which anaphase begins. Cohesin near centromeres and telomeres is cleaved at the same rate and time. Protein phosphatase PP2ACdc55 inhibits cohesin cleavage by counteracting polo-kinase phosphorylation of Scc1. In early anaphase, the previously described separase inhibition of PP2ACdc55 promotes cohesin cleavage. Thus, separase acts directly on Scc1 and also indirectly, through inhibition of PP2ACdc55, to stimulate cohesin cleavage, providing a feedforward loop that may contribute to a robust and timely anaphase. PMID:22814605

  8. Strange particle production in p+p collisions at s=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lehocka, S.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Kolk, N. Van Der; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, V. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J. W.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wetzler, A.; , C. Whitten, Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, A. N.; Zuo, J. X.

    2007-06-01

    We present strange particle spectra and yields measured at midrapidity in s=200 GeV proton-proton (p+p) collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We find that the previously observed universal transverse mass (mT≡pT2+m2) scaling of hadron production in p+p collisions seems to break down at higher mT and that there is a difference in the shape of the mT spectrum between baryons and mesons. We observe midrapidity antibaryon to baryon ratios near unity for Λ and Ξ baryons and no dependence of the ratio on transverse momentum, indicating that our data do not yet reach the quark-jet dominated region. We show the dependence of the mean transverse momentum on measured charged particle multiplicity and on particle mass and infer that these trends are consistent with gluon-jet dominated particle production. The data are compared with previous measurements made at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron and Intersecting Storage Rings and in Fermilab experiments and with leading-order and next-to-leading-order string fragmentation model predictions. We infer from these comparisons that the spectral shapes and particle yields from p+p collisions at RHIC energies have large contributions from gluon jets rather than from quark jets.

  9. Inclusive π° production in 360 GeV pp interactions using the european hybrid spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly, J. L.; Bartl, W.; Bruyant, F.; Bugg, W. M.; Caso, C.; Contri, R.; Dibon, H.; di Marco, R.; Epp, B.; Ferrando, A.; Fontanelli, F.; Girtler, P.; Gurfu, A.; Hart, E. L.; Herquet, P.; Hrubec, J.; Iga, Y.; Kisteney, E.; Kitamura, S.; Kohli, J. M.; Kohno, H.; Marin, J. C.; Markytan, M.; Mittra, I. S.; Montanet, L.; Neuhofer, G.; Petrovykh, Y.; Plano, R.; Poljakov, B.; Porth, P.; Powell, B.; Pylgroms, B.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, A. H.; Salicio, J.; Squarcia, S.; Stamer, P.; Stopchenko, V.; Sudhakar, K.; Trevisan, U.; Willmott, C.; Yamagata, T.; Yarba, V.

    1984-06-01

    The intermediate and forward gamma detectors of EHS are used to reconstruct π°'s produced by 360 GeV/c pp interactions in the Rapid Cycling Bubble Chamber (RCBC). Using the pp forwardbackward symmetry, the inclusive π° production cross section is obtained σ π°=(132±11) mb. The average π° multiplicity is determined as a function of the charged particle multiplicity. The (1-x) dependence is given for different p T regions.

  10. Enhancement and optimization of PpIX-based photodynamic therapy of skin cancer: translational studies from bench to clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Baran, Christine; Honari, Golara; Lohser, Sara; Kyei, Angela; Bailin, Philip; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-02-01

    Nonmelanoma skin carcinomas are the most common of all human cancers. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) has been used to treat these tumors, but has shown variable results. We are pursuing a multifaceted approach toward optimizing tumor responsiveness. First, a new paradigm is being developed in which tumors are pretreated with differentiation-inducing agents, e.g. methotrexate or Vitamin D, to enhance synthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) and improve tumor cell killing upon exposure to 635 nm light. This principle was first elucidated in cell culture studies, and has now been shown to hold true for murine skin tumors, and for a human subcutaneous tumor model (A431 cells injected in nude mice). Clinical trials to test methotrexate and Vitamin D as augmenting agents for ALA-PDT of nonmelanoma skin cancer are being designed. Second, better methods to measure PpIX in patients' skin tumors in real time are being developed. In a clinical study to measure PpIX in patients with dysplastic skin lesions, in vivo fluorescence dosimetry was used to measure the accumulation of PpIX over time, and revealed that intralesional PpIX may reach clinically-useful levels earlier than previously thought for the treatment of actinic keratoses. In a second clinical study to examine depth of PpIX production in nonmelanoma skin cancer, the depth of PpIX within BCC tumors was found at relatively deep levels (>1 mm) in some tumor nests, but not in others. Production of PpIX in deep squamous cell carcinoma was very low. In summary, molecular approaches such as differentiation therapy to enhance ALA-PDT for individual patients may ultimately be needed to help to improve skin cancer responses to this modality.

  11. Fcp1 phosphatase controls Greatwall kinase to promote PP2A-B55 activation and mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Della Monica, Rosa; Visconti, Roberta; Cervone, Nando; Serpico, Angela Flavia; Grieco, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    During cell division, progression through mitosis is driven by a protein phosphorylation wave. This wave namely depends on an activation-inactivation cycle of cyclin B-dependent kinase (Cdk) 1 while activities of major protein phosphatases, like PP1 and PP2A, appear directly or indirectly repressed by Cdk1. However, how Cdk1 inactivation is coordinated with reactivation of major phosphatases at mitosis exit still lacks substantial knowledge. We show here that activation of PP2A-B55, a major mitosis exit phosphatase, required the phosphatase Fcp1 downstream Cdk1 inactivation in human cells. During mitosis exit, Fcp1 bound Greatwall (Gwl), a Cdk1-stimulated kinase that phosphorylates Ensa/ARPP19 and converts these proteins into potent PP2A-B55 inhibitors during mitosis onset, and dephosphorylated it at Cdk1 phosphorylation sites. Fcp1-catalyzed dephosphorylation drastically reduced Gwl kinase activity towards Ensa/ARPP19 promoting PP2A-B55 activation. Thus, Fcp1 coordinates Cdk1 and Gwl inactivation to derepress PP2A-B55, generating a dephosphorylation switch that drives mitosis progression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10399.001 PMID:26653855

  12. The dependence receptor UNC5H2/B triggers apoptosis via PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of DAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Guenebeaud, Céline; Goldschneider, David; Castets, Marie; Guix, Catherine; Chazot, Guillaume; Delloye-Bourgeois, Céline; Eisenberg-Lerner, Avital; Shohat, Galit; Zhang, Mingjie; Laudet, Vincent; Kimchi, Adi; Bernet, Agnès; Mehlen, Patrick

    2010-12-22

    The UNC5H dependence receptors promote apoptosis in the absence of their ligand, netrin-1, and this is important for neuronal and vascular development and for limitation of cancer progression. UNC5H2 (also called UNC5B) triggers cell death through the activation of the serine-threonine protein kinase DAPk. While performing a siRNA screen to identify genes implicated in UNC5H-induced apoptosis, we identified the structural subunit PR65β of the holoenzyme protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). We show that UNC5H2/B recruits a protein complex that includes PR65β and DAPk and retains PP2A activity. PP2A activity is required for UNC5H2/B-induced apoptosis, since it activates DAPk by triggering its dephosphorylation. Moreover, netrin-1 binding to UNC5H2/B prevents this effect through interaction of the PP2A inhibitor CIP2A to UNC5H2/B. Thus we show here that, in the absence of netrin-1, recruitment of PP2A to UNC5H2/B allows the activation of DAPk via a PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation and that this mechanism is involved in angiogenesis regulation. PMID:21172653

  13. The relationship between the violet pigment PP-V production and intracellular ammonium level in Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ryo; Arai, Teppei; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Kasumi, Takafumi; Watanabe, Taisuke; Ogihara, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Penicillium purpurogenum is the fungus that produces an azaphilone pigment. However, details about the pigment biosynthesis pathway are unknown. The violet pigment PP-V is the one of the main pigments biosynthesized by this fungus. This pigment contains an amino group in a pyran ring as its core structure. We focused on this pigment and examined the relationship between intracellular ammonium concentration and pigment production using glutamine as a nitrogen source. The intracellular ammonium level decreased about 1.5-fold in conditions favoring PP-V production. Moreover, P. purpurogenum was transferred to medium in which it commonly produces the related pigment PP-O after cultivating it in the presence or absence of glutamine to investigate whether this fungus biosynthesizes PP-V using surplus ammonium in cells. Only mycelia cultured in medium containing 10 mM glutamine produced the violet pigment, and simultaneously intracellular ammonium levels decreased under this condition. From comparisons of the amount of PP-V that was secreted with quantity of surplus intracellular ammonium, it is suggested that P. purpurogenum maintains ammonium homeostasis by excreting waste ammonium as PP-V. PMID:27368914

  14. Novel Ser/Thr Protein Phosphatase 5 (PP5) Regulated Targets during DNA Damage Identified by Proteomics Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Bryan M.; Jayachandran, Hemalatha; Yang, Feng; Jaitly, Navdeep; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Wang, Ling; Zhao, Rui; Purvine, Samuel O.; Livesay, Eric A.; Camp, David G.; Rossie, Sandra S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-02-05

    The DNA damage response is a global phosphorylation signaling cascade process involved in sensing the damaged DNA condition and coordinating responses to cope with and repair the perturbed cellular state. We utilized a label-free liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach to evaluate changes in protein phosphorylation associated with PP5 activity during the DNA damage response. Biological replicate analyses of bleomycin-treated HeLa cells expressing either WT-PP5 or mutant inactive PP5 lead to the identification of six potential target proteins of PP5 action. Four of these putative targets are known to be involved in DNA damage responses. Using phospho-site specific antibodies, we confirmed that phosphorylation of one target, ribosomal protein S6, was selectively decreased in cells overexpressing catalytically inactive PP5. Our findings also suggest that PP5 may play a role in controlling translation and in regulating substrates for proline-directed kinases, such as MAP kinases and cyclin-dependent protein kinases that are involved in response to DNA damage.

  15. PP2A regulatory subunit Bα controls endothelial contractility and vessel lumen integrity via regulation of HDAC7.

    PubMed

    Martin, Maud; Geudens, Ilse; Bruyr, Jonathan; Potente, Michael; Bleuart, Anouk; Lebrun, Marielle; Simonis, Nicolas; Deroanne, Christophe; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Soubeyran, Philippe; Peixoto, Paul; Mottet, Denis; Janssens, Veerle; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Claes, Filip; Carmeliet, Peter; Kettmann, Richard; Gerhardt, Holger; Dequiedt, Franck

    2013-09-11

    To supply tissues with nutrients and oxygen, the cardiovascular system forms a seamless, hierarchically branched, network of lumenized tubes. Here, we show that maintenance of patent vessel lumens requires the Bα regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Deficiency of Bα in zebrafish precludes vascular lumen stabilization resulting in perfusion defects. Similarly, inactivation of PP2A-Bα in cultured ECs induces tubulogenesis failure due to alteration of cytoskeleton dynamics, actomyosin contractility and maturation of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) contacts. Mechanistically, we show that PP2A-Bα controls the activity of HDAC7, an essential transcriptional regulator of vascular stability. In the absence of PP2A-Bα, transcriptional repression by HDAC7 is abrogated leading to enhanced expression of the cytoskeleton adaptor protein ArgBP2. ArgBP2 hyperactivates RhoA causing inadequate rearrangements of the EC actomyosin cytoskeleton. This study unravels the first specific role for a PP2A holoenzyme in development: the PP2A-Bα/HDAC7/ArgBP2 axis maintains vascular lumens by balancing endothelial cytoskeletal dynamics and cell-matrix adhesion. PMID:23955003

  16. pp and p¯p total cross sections and elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnachie, A.; Landshoff, P. V.

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that pp and ppbar data, including those from the TOTEM experiment, agree well with Regge theory. making the three form factors Fi(t) identical and of the simple form (1c); making the trajectories αi(t) linear; making the ρ and ω trajectories degenerate, and also the f2 and a2; omitting all non-single exchanges other than PP and taking it to have the simple form (2b); assuming the simple form (3b) for the ggg term when t is not large. Fig. 4 shows an example of data that were not used to make the fit but are described well by it. Another such example is the ratio of the real to imaginary parts of the forward amplitudes, Fig. 5. A correct description of the dips is challenging and our simple model is able to describe those in pp scattering rather better than in pbarp scattering. We will not succumb to the temptation to say that, having been taken somewhat hurriedly in the very last few days of operation of the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings, the pbarp data at 53 GeV are unreliable.The triple-gluon-exchange term g(t) plays a key role in giving the dips. At large enough t it results in dσ/dt∼0.073/t8, somewhat smaller than our old fit [20]. Fig. 6 shows the pp elastic differential cross section at various energies. The data make our fit very energy-independent for |t|>4 GeV, where it is dominated by the term ggg. We have previously [26] drawn attention to the interest of checking whether, at sufficiently high energy, this energy independence might give way to a steady increase with energy.The term P contributes a behaviour s0.110 to the total cross sections, while PP is negative and behaves as s0.220 together with the denominator logarithmic factors shown in (2b). Fig. 7 shows that, over a very wide range of values of √{s}, together their behaviour is very close to the simple power behaviour s0.096 that was extracted from the data by Cudell and collaborators [5]. The Froissart-Lukaszuk-Martin bound [27] is about 20 barns at LHC energies and so has

  17. pp32 (ANP32A) Expression Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth and Induces Gemcitabine Resistance by Disrupting HuR Binding to mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bildzukewicz, Nikolai A.; Richards, Nathan G.; Rittenhouse, David W.; Einstein, Lisa; Cozzitorto, Joseph A.; Keen, Judith C.; Dasgupta, Abhijit; Gorospe, Myriam; Gonye, Gregory E.; Yeo, Charles J.; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K.; Brody, Jonathan R.

    2010-01-01

    The expression of protein phosphatase 32 (PP32, ANP32A) is low in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancers and is linked to the levels of HuR (ELAV1), a predictive marker for gemcitabine response. In pancreatic cancer cells, exogenous overexpression of pp32 inhibited cell growth, supporting its long-recognized role as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer. In chemotherapeutic sensitivity screening assays, cells overexpressing pp32 were selectively resistant to the nucleoside analogs gemcitabine and cytarabine (ARA-C), but were sensitized to 5-fluorouracil; conversely, silencing pp32 in pancreatic cancer cells enhanced gemcitabine sensitivity. The cytoplasmic levels of pp32 increased after cancer cells are treated with certain stressors, including gemcitabine. pp32 overexpression reduced the association of HuR with the mRNA encoding the gemcitabine-metabolizing enzyme deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), causing a significant reduction in dCK protein levels. Similarly, ectopic pp32 expression caused a reduction in HuR binding of mRNAs encoding tumor-promoting proteins (e.g., VEGF and HuR), while silencing pp32 dramatically enhanced the binding of these mRNA targets. Low pp32 nuclear expression correlated with high-grade tumors and the presence of lymph node metastasis, as compared to patients' tumors with high nuclear pp32 expression. Although pp32 expression levels did not enhance the predictive power of cytoplasmic HuR status, nuclear pp32 levels and cytoplasmic HuR levels associated significantly in patient samples. Thus, we provide novel evidence that the tumor suppressor function of pp32 can be attributed to its ability to disrupt HuR binding to target mRNAs encoding key proteins for cancer cell survival and drug efficacy. PMID:21152064

  18. Predictions from a Simple Hadron Rescattering Model for pp Collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truesdale, David C.

    With studies of heavy ion and pp physics already under way at the LHC, it is necessary to consider how hadron rescattering will effect the observed results from experiments such as ALICE, ATLAS and CMS. Through the use of a simple, relativistic kinematics based hadron rescattering model, this dissertation shows that the hadron rescattering phase can obscure some signals for radial flow in pp collisions at LHC energies. This dissertation presents an in depth description of the hardware based alignment monitoring system developed for the ALICE Inner Tracking System. It details the development of the ITSAMS, which uses geometric optics and a CMOS array to measure micron scale motion between two points. By monitoring three strategic points on the ITS in relation to the TPC endplate, the ITSAMS can determine translational shifts between the two detectors to a resolution of 9.4 mum in the transverse plane and 78 mum along the longitudinal axis. The ITSAMS can measure rotational shifts to 10 murad or better about all three axes. After a brief discussion of the ALICE experiment and the theory and practice of two-particle intensity interferometry, this dissertation details a simple hadron rescattering computer model developed by Dr. T. J. Humanic. The process of porting the model to the C++ computer language is presented here, along with the improvements made. The model has been updated with a new space-time distribution scheme that is more appropriate for pp collision studies. The model is then compared with final-state PYTHIA generated Monte-Carlo data. It is shown that the hadron rescattering model accurately reproduces pseudorapidity distributions for pp collisions at s = 0.9, 7, 10, and 14 TeV. Moreover, except for a slight overprediction of kaons and a slight underprediction of protons, the rescattering model accurately reproduces PYTHIA pT spectra. This dissertation then endeavours compare results to the HBT radii present in the ALICE collaboration's analysis of

  19. Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) Regulatory Subunits ParA and PabA Orchestrate Septation and Conidiation and Are Essential for PP2A Activity in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Guo-wei; Jiang, Ping; Qiao, Wei-ran; Zhang, Yuan-wei; Wei, Wen-fan

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major intracellular protein phosphatase that regulates multiple aspects of cell growth and metabolism. Different activities of PP2A and subcellular localization are determined by its regulatory subunits. Here we identified and characterized the functions of two protein phosphatase regulatory subunit homologs, ParA and PabA, in Aspergillus nidulans. Our results demonstrate that ParA localizes to the septum site and that deletion of parA causes hyperseptation, while overexpression of parA abolishes septum formation; this suggests that ParA may function as a negative regulator of septation. In comparison, PabA displays a clear colocalization pattern with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained nuclei, and deletion of pabA induces a remarkable delayed-septation phenotype. Both parA and pabA are required for hyphal growth, conidiation, and self-fertilization, likely to maintain normal levels of PP2A activity. Most interestingly, parA deletion is capable of suppressing septation defects in pabA mutants, suggesting that ParA counteracts PabA during the septation process. In contrast, double mutants of parA and pabA led to synthetic defects in colony growth, indicating that ParA functions synthetically with PabA during hyphal growth. Moreover, unlike the case for PP2A-Par1 and PP2A-Pab1 in yeast (which are negative regulators that inactivate the septation initiation network [SIN]), loss of ParA or PabA fails to suppress defects of temperature-sensitive mutants of the SEPH kinase of the SIN. Thus, our findings support the previously unrealized evidence that the B-family subunits of PP2A have comprehensive functions as partners of heterotrimeric enzyme complexes of PP2A, both spatially and temporally, in A. nidulans. PMID:25280816

  20. Strong binding and shrinkage of single and double nuclear systems (K−pp, K−ppn, K−K−p and K−K−pp) predicted by Faddeev-Yakubovsky calculations

    PubMed Central

    MAEDA, Shuji; AKAISHI, Yoshinori; YAMAZAKI, Toshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    Non-relativistic Faddeev and Faddeev-Yakubovsky calculations were made for K−pp, K−ppn, K−K−p and K−K−pp kaonic nuclear clusters, where the quasi bound states were treated as bound states by employing real separable potential models for the K−-K− and the K−-nucleon interactions as well as for the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The binding energies and spatial shrinkages of these states, obtained for various values of the interaction, were found to increase rapidly with the interaction strength. Their behaviors are shown in a reference diagram, where possible changes by varying the interaction in the dense nuclear medium are given. Using the Λ(1405) ansatz with a PDG mass of 1405 MeV/c2 for K−p, the following ground-state binding energies together with the wave functions were obtained: 51.5 MeV (K−pp), 69 MeV (K−ppn), 30.4 MeV (K−K−p) and 93 MeV (K−K−pp), which are in good agreement with previous results of variational calculation based on the Akaishi-Yamazaki coupled-channel potential. The K−K−pp state has a significantly increased density where the two nucleons are located very close to each other, in spite of the inner NN repulsion. Relativistic corrections on the calculated non-relativistic results indicate substantial lowering of the bound-state masses, especially of K−K−pp, toward the kaon condensation regime. The fact that the recently observed binding energy of K−pp is much larger (by a factor of 2) than the originally predicted one may infer an enhancement of the interaction in dense nuclei by about 25% possibly due to chiral symmetry restoration. In this respect some qualitative accounts are given based on “clearing QCD vacuum” model of Brown, Kubodera and Rho. PMID:24213206

  1. Observation and study of the baryonic B-meson decays B→D(*)pp̄(π)(π)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; et al

    2012-05-30

    We present results for B-meson decay modes involving a charm meson, protons, and pions using 455×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ pairs recorded by the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider. The branching fractions are measured for the following ten decays: B¯¯¯⁰→D⁰pp̄, B¯¯¯⁰→D*⁰pp̄, B¯¯¯⁰→D⁺pp̄π⁻, B¯¯¯⁰→D*⁺pp̄π⁻, B⁻→D⁰pp̄π⁻, B⁻→D*⁰pp̄π⁻, B¯¯¯⁰→D⁰pp̄π⁻π⁺, B¯¯¯⁰→D*⁰pp̄π⁻π⁺, B⁻→D⁺pp̄π⁻π⁻, and B⁻→D*⁺pp̄π⁻π⁻. The four B⁻ and the two five-body B¯¯¯⁰ modes are observed for the first time. The four-body modes are enhanced compared to the three- and the five-body modes. In the three-body modes, the M(pp̄) and M(D(*)⁰p) invariant-mass distributions show enhancements near threshold values. In the four-body mode B¯¯¯⁰→D⁺pp̄π⁻, themore » M(pπ⁻) distribution shows a narrow structure of unknown origin near 1.5 GeV/c². The distributions for the five-body modes, in contrast to the others, are similar to the expectations from uniform phase-space predictions.« less

  2. Combination of cetuximab and PP242 synergistically suppress the progression of wild-type KRAS colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; Xia, Zuguang; Bian, Xinyu; Li, Guangchao; Hu, Jing; Cao, Ya; Wang, Qing; Qian, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been shown to be overactive in human colorectal cancer, but the first-generation mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, has failed to show clinical efficacy against colorectal cancer. On the other hand, although the second-generation mTOR inhibitor, PP242, has exerted substantial efficacy, it was revealed that independent inhibition by PP242 was transient, which could lead to positive-feedback loop to EGFR. Using wild-type KRAS colorectal cancer cells as models, we investigate the treatment efficacy of a widely used anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, and PP242, alone or in combination in vitro and in vivo. Results of cell viability assays confirmed the synergistic inhibitory effect of PP242 and cetuximab on the survival of Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. Moreover, the ability of cancer-cell invasion and proliferation was also significantly inhibited by the combination therapy when compared with cetuximab or PP242 alone. Interestingly, the percentage of CD44-positive cancer cells was substantially decreased by the combination therapy in comparison with PP242 alone through fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The growth of cancer stem-like cell spheres in vitro was also maximally inhibited by combination therapy, in terms of either diameter or number. More importantly, the efficacy of combination therapy was more prominent than either drug alone in established tumor xenografts. These findings supported the potential use of combination therapy of PP242 and cetuximab against wild-type KRAS colorectal carcinomas. PMID:26586952

  3. The PP-motif in luminal loop 2 of ZnT transporters plays a pivotal role in TNAP activation.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Shigeyuki; Tsuji, Tokuji; Fujiwara, Takashi; Takeda, Taka-Aki; Merriman, Chengfeng; Fukunaka, Ayako; Nishito, Yukina; Fu, Dax; Hoch, Eitan; Sekler, Israel; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Miyamae, Yusaku; Masuda, Seiji; Nagao, Masaya; Kambe, Taiho

    2016-09-01

    Secretory and membrane-bound zinc-requiring enzymes are thought to be activated by binding zinc in the early secretory pathway. One such enzyme, tissue-non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), is activated through a two-step mechanism, via protein stabilization and subsequent enzyme activation through metalation, by ZnT5-ZnT6 heterodimers or ZnT7 homodimers. However, little is known about the molecular basis underlying the activation process. In the present study, we found that the di-proline motif (PP-motif) in luminal loop 2 of ZnT5 and ZnT7 is important for TNAP activation. TNAP activity was significantly reduced in cells lacking ZnT5-ZnT6 heterodimers and ZnT7 homodimers [triple knockout (TKO) cells]. The decreased TNAP activity was restored by expressing hZnT5 with hZnT6 or hZnT7, but significantly less so (almost 90% less) by expressing mutants thereof in which the PP-motif was mutated to alanine (PP-AA). In TKO cells, overexpressed hTNAP was not completely activated, and it was converted less efficiently into the holo form by expressing a PP-AA mutant of hZnT5 with hZnT6, whose defects were not restored by zinc supplementation. The zinc transport activity of hZnT7 was not significantly impaired by the PP-AA mutation, indicating that the PP-motif is involved in the TNAP maturation process, although it does not control zinc transport activity. The PP-motif is highly conserved in ZnT5 and ZnT7 orthologues, and its importance for TNAP activation is conserved in the Caenorhabditis elegans hZnT5 orthologue CDF5. These results provide novel molecular insights into the TNAP activation process in the early secretory pathway. PMID:27303047

  4. Assessment of the genotoxic potential of benzo(a)pyrene and pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene in Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha).

    PubMed

    Binelli, Andrea; Riva, Consuelo; Cogni, Daniele; Provini, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    The single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay and the micronucleus (MN) test were carried out with haemocytes of Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) specimens to evaluate the potential genotoxicity of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (pp'-DDE, a metabolite of pp'-DDT). Mussels were exposed to three different concentrations (0.1 microg/L, 2 microg/L, 10 microg/L) of each chemical in water during 168 h (SCGE assay) and 96 h (MN test) of exposure under laboratory conditions. These levels correspond to nominal molar concentrations of 0.4 nM, 7.9 nM and 40 nM for BaP and 0.3 nM, 6.2 nM and 31 nM for pp'-DDE, respectively. Concurrently, the levels of toxicants were measured in soft tissues of the mussels by gas-chromatographic analyses, to evaluate their temporal trends and the dose/response relationships. Significant increases of the ratio between the comet length and the diameter of the comet head (LDR) and of micronucleus frequencies in comparison with baseline levels were observed not only for all concentrations of BaP, but also for pp'-DDE (except 0.3 nM). The concentration above which DNA damage starts to be significantly increased was 0.8 nmol/g lipids for BaP and 1.6 nmol/g lipids for pp'-DDE, respectively. The results of these experiments show a clear genotoxic effect on this non-target organism not only for the well-known genotoxicant BaP, but also for the final metabolite of pp'-DDT at soft-tissue concentrations that have been found in several aquatic ecosystems worldwide. PMID:17997130

  5. Bicaudal D1-Dependent Trafficking of Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Protein pp150 in Virus-Infected Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Indran, Sabarish V.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Britt, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) virion assembly takes place in the nucleus and cytoplasm of infected cells. The HCMV virion tegument protein pp150 (ppUL32) is an essential protein of HCMV and has been suggested to play a role in the cytoplasmic phase of HCMV assembly. To further define its role in viral assembly and to identify host cell proteins that interact with pp150 during viral assembly, we utilized yeast two-hybrid analyses to detect an interaction between pp150 and Bicaudal D1 (BicD1), a protein thought to play a role in trafficking within the secretory pathway. BicD1 is known to interact with the dynein motor complex and the Rab6 GTPase. The interaction between pp150 and BicD1 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Depletion of BicD1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) caused decreased virus yield and a defect in trafficking of pp150 to the cytoplasmic viral assembly compartment (AC), without altering trafficking to the AC of another essential tegument protein, pp28, or the viral glycoprotein complex gM/gN. The C terminus of BicD1 has been previously shown to interact with the GTPase Rab6, suggesting a potential role for Rab6-mediated vesicular trafficking in HCMV assembly. Finally, overexpression of the N terminus of truncated BicD1 acts in a dominant-negative manner and leads to disruption of the AC and a decrease in the assembly of infectious virus. This phenotype was similar to that observed following overexpression of dynamitin (p50) and provided additional evidence that morphogenesis of the AC and virus assembly were dynein dependent. PMID:20089649

  6. Condensate-enclosed chiral-bag model of the proton and pp elastic scattering at LHC 13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. M.; Luddy, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Our investigation of high energy pp and p¯p elastic scattering over the last ten years has led us to consider that the proton has three regions: (i) an outer region consisting of a quark-antiquark (qq¯) condensate ground state (also described as quark-antiquark outer cloud), (ii) an inner shell of topological (geometrical) baryonic charge of size ˜ 0.44 fm, and (iii) a core of size ˜ 0.2 fm, where the three valence quarks of a proton with baryonic charges are confined. The proton structure that has emerged leads to four main elastic scattering processes in pp scattering. The first process (which gives rise to diffraction scattering) is described by a profile function. The second process involves multiple ω-exchanges. The third process in pp scattering is quark-quark scattering via gluon-gluon interaction. The fourth process — which appears for the first time in our investigation of pp scattering — is a glancing collision at the boundary of a proton with that of the other proton. To describe quantitatively the four processes, their parameters have to be determined. For this purpose, we investigate: (i) pp 7 TeV dσ/dt measured by the TOTEM Collaboration and (ii) p¯p 1.96 TeV dσ/dt measured by the D0 Collaboration. Once the parameters are satisfactorily obtained, we calculate pp dσ/dt at 7 TeV and compare with the TOTEM data. We also calculate p¯p dσ/dt at 1.96 TeV and compare with the D0 data. We then predict pp elastic dσ/dt at 13 TeV which will soon be measured at LHC by the TOTEM Collaboration. This measurement will establish how well we have predicted the 13 TeV dσ/dt and determined the structure of the proton.

  7. A Longitudinal Study of Behavioral Deficits in an AβPP Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Havas, Daniel; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Ubhi, Kiren; Rockenstein, Edward; Crailsheim, Karl; Masliah, Eliezer; Windisch, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the age-dependent alterations in transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) is important for understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and designing experimental therapies. Cross-studies have previously characterized some time-dependent behavioral and pathological alterations in AβPP Tg mice, however, a more comprehensive longitudinal study is needed to fully examine the progressive nature of behavioral deficits in these mice. In order to better understand the age- and gender-dependent progression of behavioral alterations, we performed a longitudinal study wherein Tg mice overexpressing human AβPP751 with the London (V717I) and Swedish (K670M/N671L) mutations under the regulatory control of the neuron specific murine (m)Thy-1 promoter (mThy1-hAβPP751) were behaviorally analyzed at 3 months and then re-tested at 6 and 9 months of age. The results show that there was an age-associated impairment in learning in the water maze task and habituation in the hole-board task. Motor coordination of the mThy1-hAβPP751 Tg mice was well-preserved throughout the investigated life span however, gender-specific deficits were observed in spontaneous activity and thigmotaxis. Neuropathologically, mThy1-hAβPP751 Tg mice displayed a progressive increase in the number of Aβ plaques and mean plaque size in the cortex and hippocampus from 3 to 6 and from 6 to 9 months of age. Taken together, these results indicate that the mThy1-hAβPP751 Tg mice model AD from the early onset of the disease through to later stages, allowing them to be utilized at numerous points during the timeline for drug test designs. PMID:21403389

  8. The architecture and ppGpp-dependent expression of the primary transcriptome of Salmonella Typhimurium during invasion gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Invasion of intestinal epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) requires expression of the extracellular virulence gene expression programme (STEX), activation of which is dependent on the signalling molecule guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp). Recently, next-generation transcriptomics (RNA-seq) has revealed the unexpected complexity of bacterial transcriptomes and in this report we use differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) to define the high-resolution transcriptomic architecture of wild-type S. Typhimurium and a ppGpp null strain under growth conditions which model STEX. In doing so we show that ppGpp plays a much wider role in regulating the S. Typhimurium STEX primary transcriptome than previously recognised. Results Here we report the precise mapping of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) for 78% of the S. Typhimurium open reading frames (ORFs). The TSS mapping enabled a genome-wide promoter analysis resulting in the prediction of 169 alternative sigma factor binding sites, and the prediction of the structure of 625 operons. We also report the discovery of 55 new candidate small RNAs (sRNAs) and 302 candidate antisense RNAs (asRNAs). We discovered 32 ppGpp-dependent alternative TSSs and determined the extent and level of ppGpp-dependent coding and non-coding transcription. We found that 34% and 20% of coding and non-coding RNA transcription respectively was ppGpp-dependent under these growth conditions, adding a further dimension to the role of this remarkable small regulatory molecule in enabling rapid adaptation to the infective environment. Conclusions The transcriptional architecture of S. Typhimurium and finer definition of the key role ppGpp plays in regulating Salmonella coding and non-coding transcription should promote the understanding of gene regulation in this important food borne pathogen and act as a resource for future research. PMID:22251276

  9. Observation and study of the baryonic B-meson decays B→D(*)pp̄(π)(π)

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Flanigan, J. M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.

    2012-05-30

    We present results for B-meson decay modes involving a charm meson, protons, and pions using 455×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ pairs recorded by the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider. The branching fractions are measured for the following ten decays: B¯¯¯⁰→D⁰pp̄, B¯¯¯⁰→D*⁰pp̄, B¯¯¯⁰→D⁺pp̄π⁻, B¯¯¯⁰→D*⁺pp̄π⁻, B⁻→D⁰pp̄π⁻, B⁻→D*⁰pp̄π⁻, B¯¯¯⁰→D⁰pp̄π⁻π⁺, B¯¯¯⁰→D*⁰pp̄π⁻π⁺, B⁻→D⁺pp̄π⁻π⁻, and B⁻→D*⁺pp̄π⁻π⁻. The four B⁻ and the two five-body B¯¯¯⁰ modes are observed for the first time. The four-body modes are enhanced compared to the three- and the five-body modes. In the three-body modes, the M(pp̄) and M(D(*)⁰p) invariant-mass distributions show enhancements near threshold values. In the four-body mode B¯¯¯⁰→D⁺pp̄π⁻, the M(pπ⁻) distribution shows a narrow structure of unknown origin near 1.5 GeV/c². The distributions for the five-body modes, in contrast to the others, are similar to the expectations from uniform phase-space predictions.

  10. Effect of cyclical thermal to mechanical properties of Hybrid Laminate Composites (HLC) with skin recycle polypropylene/natural fiber/halloysite and core PP/KF composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sri Suharty, Neng; Ismail, Hanafi; Suci Handayani, Desi; Diharjo, Kuncoro; Rachman Wibowo, Fajar; Arnita Wuri, Margaretha

    2016-02-01

    This research has successfully synthesized six hybrid laminate composites (HLC). These HLC consist of two layers skin composites and one layer of core PP/KF composites. There are sticked with epoxy adhesive by using cold press method. In this research 6 types of skin are used, namely the rPP (recycled polypropylene, HC1); rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/KF (HC2); rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/Hall (HC3); rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/Hall+ZB (HC4); rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/KF/Hall (HC5) and rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/KF/Hall+ZB (HC6) composites. The mechanical properties assessment tensile strength (TS) of various HLC before and after cyclical thermal (CT) was done by ASTM D638. While testing the flame retardant: such as time to ignition (TTI) and burning rate (BR) was done by ASTM D635. Heat stability of HLC can be recognized by conducting the CT treatment. It is to determine the effect of fluctuating heat loads on mechanical properties of HLC materials. The TS result of five HLCs (HC2, HC3, HC4, HC5 and HC6) before CT treatment were higher than HC1 (blank HLC). Those five HLC are also able to increase the TTI and reduce the BR compared to HC1. The CT treatment conditions performed at 45 oC as much as 125 times. After CT treatment, the TS values only slightly decline compared to before CT treatment.

  11. A protein phosphatase 1 gamma (PP1γ) of the human protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is involved in proliferation and cell attachment to the host cell.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Christian; Pérez, Mauricio; Orrego, Patricio R; Osorio, Luis; Gutiérrez, Bessy; Sagua, Hernán; Castillo, Juan L; Martínez-Oyanedel, Jose; Arroyo, Rossana; Meza-Cervantez, Patricia; da Silveira, Jose Franco; Midlej, Victor; Benchimol, Marlene; Cordero, Esteban; Morales, Patricio; Araya, Jorge E; González, Jorge

    2012-07-01

    In this work, evidence for a critical role of Trichomonas vaginalis protein phosphatase 1 gamma (TvPP1γ) in proliferation and attachment of the parasite to the mammalian cell is provided. Firstly, proliferation and attachment of T. vaginalis parasites to HeLa cells was blocked by calyculin A (CA), a potent PP1 inhibitor. Secondly, it was demonstrated that the enzyme activity of native and recombinant TvPP1γ proteins was inhibited by CA. Thirdly, reverse genetic studies confirmed that antisense oligonucleotides targeted to PP1γ but not PP1α or β inhibited proliferation and attachment of trichomonads CA-treated parasites underwent cytoskeletal modifications, including a lack of axostyle typical labelling, suggesting that cytoskeletal phosphorylation could be regulated by a CA-sensitive phosphatase where the role of PP1γ could not be ruled out. Analysis of subcellular distribution of TvPP1γ by cell fractionation and electron microscopy demonstrated the association between TvPP1γ and the cytoskeleton. The expression of adhesins, AP120 and AP65, at the cell surface was also inhibited by CA. The concomitant inhibition of expression of adhesins and changes in the cytoskeleton in CA-treated parasites suggest a specific role for PP1γ -dependent dephosphorylation in the early stages of the host-parasite interaction. Molecular modelling of TvPP1γ showed the conservation of residues critical for maintaining proper folding into the gross structure common to PP1 proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that TvPP1γ could be considered a potential novel drug target for treatment of trichomoniasis. PMID:22713760

  12. A Mechanistic Study of Protein Phosphatase-1 (PP1), A Catalytically Promiscuous Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    McWhirter, Claire; Lund, Elizabeth A.; Tanifum, Eric A.; Feng, Guoqiang; Sheikh, Qaiser; Hengge, Alvan C.; Williams, Nicholas H.

    2009-01-01

    The reaction catalyzed by the protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) has been examined by linear free energy relationships and kinetic isotope effects. With the substrate 4-nitrophenyl phosphate (4NPP), the reaction exhibits a bell-shaped pH-rate profile for kcat/KM indicative of catalysis by both acidic and basic residues, with kinetic pKas of 6.0 and 7.2. The enzymatic hydrolysis of a series of aryl monoester substrates yields a Brønsted βlg of -0.32, considerably less negative than that of the uncatalyzed hydrolysis of monoester dianions (-1.23). Kinetic isotope effects in the leaving group with the substrate 4NPP are 18(V/K)bridge = 1.0170 and 15(V/K) = 1.0010 which, compared against other enzymatic KIEs with and without general acid catalysis, are consistent with a loose transition state with partial neutralization of the leaving group. PP1 also efficiently catalyzes the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl methylphosphonate (4NPMP). The enzymatic hydrolysis of a series of aryl methylphosphonate substrates yields a Brønsted βlg of -0.30, smaller than the alkaline hydrolysis (-0.69) and similar to the βlg measured for monoester substrates, indicative of similar transition states. The KIEs and the βlg data point to a transition state for the alkaline hydrolysis of 4NPMP that is similar to that of diesters with the same leaving group. For the enzymatic reaction of 4NPMP, the KIEs are indicative of a transition state that is somewhat looser than the alkaline hydrolysis reaction, and similar to the PP1-catalyzed monoester reaction. The data cumulatively point to enzymatic transition states for aryl phosphate monoester and aryl methylphosphonate hydrolysis reactions that are much more similar to one another than the nonenzymatic hydrolysis reactions of the two substrates. PMID:18798625

  13. Jet production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions measured by ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Rosi; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    Particle jets, formed when a hard scattered parton fragments into a jet of hadrons, are an ideal probe of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. The hard-scattered partons that produce them come from early in the collision, prior to the medium formation. These partons lose energy as they traverse the medium, and eventually fragment into jets of hadrons, which exhibit a modification when compared to jets produced in pp and p-Pb collisions. At LHC energies, the parton production cross-section is much larger than at RHIC, allowing jets to be reconstructed over a much wider kinematic range. Jet reconstruction allows for a more differential investigation of the parton energy loss than single hadrons, which have been used as jet proxies in the past, as the jets collect a larger percentage of the final state energy, which means their kinematics are more closely correlated to the kinematics of the initial parton. Jets are reconstructed in ALICE either using information from the tracking systems, or by combining this with the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal). In these proceedings, jet spectra from 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb and pp collisions will be presented. In particular, the centrality and event-plane dependence of the measured spectra and the background will be discussed. Jets from different centrality classes and event-plane orientations provide additional information necessary for understanding the path-length and temperature dependence of energy loss mechanisms. The reconstruction and correction procedures for jets will be shown. Results from Pb-Pb events will be compared to the baseline pp and p-Pb results, which allows the initial state and cold nuclear matter effects to be disentangled from hot medium effects. The jet nuclear modification, which quantifies the suppression, will be compared to energy-loss models.

  14. Progestin-inducible EDD E3 ubiquitin ligase binds to α4 phosphoprotein to regulate ubiquitination and degradation of protein phosphatase PP2Ac.

    PubMed

    McDonald, William J; Thomas, Lynn N; Koirala, Samir; Too, Catherine K L

    2014-01-25

    Mammalian α4 phosphoprotein binds to the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) to regulate PP2A activity, and to poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) and progestin-inducible EDD E3 ubiquitin ligase. This study showed induction of the EDD protein by progesterone, 17β-estradiol and prolactin in breast cancer cells. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses, using lysates of COS-1 cells transfected with α4-deletion constructs, showed the α4 N-terminus binding to endogenous PP2Ac and PABP, and the C-terminus to EDD. Monoubiquitinated α4 in MCF-7 cells was unaffected by EDD-targeting siRNA (siEDD) nor by non-targetting siNT, thus, EDD does not ubiquitinate α4. PP2Ac is polyubiquitinated, and 36-kDa PP2Ac only was detected in siEDD- or siNT-transfected cells. However, treatment with proteasomal inhibitor MG132 showed polyubiquitinated-PP2Ac molecules (∼65-250kDa) abundantly in siNT controls but low in siEDD-transfectants, implicating PP2Ac as an EDD substrate. Finally, progesterone induction of EDD in MCF-7 cells correlated with decreased PP2Ac levels, further implicating hormone-inducible EDD in PP2Ac turnover. PMID:24145130

  15. The Stringent Response Mediated by (p)ppGpp Is Required for Virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Its Survival on Tomato.

    PubMed

    Chatnaparat, Tiyakhon; Li, Zhong; Korban, Schuyler S; Zhao, Youfu

    2015-07-01

    The hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) type III secretion system (T3SS) is a key pathogenicity factor in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000). In this study, the role of the second messenger (p)ppGpp on virulence and survival of DC3000 was investigated. Results have demonstrated that (p)ppGpp-deficient mutant (ppGpp(0)) of DC3000 exhibited lower levels of expression of the T3SS and genes of other virulence traits, such as coronatine toxin. The ppGpp(0) mutant of DC3000 was greatly impaired in causing disease and in growth in planta. Furthermore, (p)ppGpp was required for swarming motility, pyoverdine production, the oxidative stress response, as well as γ-amino butyric acid utilization. Screening of amino acids, major signals in activation of ppGpp biosynthesis, revealed that promoter activities of the avrPto gene could be either activated or suppressed by various amino acids in a ppGpp-dependent or -independent manner. Moreover, the ppGpp(0) mutant exhibited increased cell size and decreased survival on plant surfaces. Altogether, these findings indicate that ppGpp acts as an internal signal that regulates the T3SS as well as other virulence factors in pseudomonads and suggest that bacterial pathogens utilize intracellular messengers to sense environmental and nutritional signals for rapid, precise, and reversible control of their pathogenesis and survival. PMID:25675257

  16. TaPP2C1, a Group F2 Protein Phosphatase 2C Gene, Confers Resistance to Salt Stress in Transgenic Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Yan, Yan; Hou, Xiaowan; He, Yanzhen; Wei, Yunxie; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan; Peng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Group A protein phosphatases 2Cs (PP2Cs) are essential components of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in Arabidopsis; however, the function of group F2 subfamily PP2Cs is currently less known. In this study, TaPP2C1 which belongs to group F2 was isolated and characterized from wheat. Expression of the TaPP2C1-GFP fusion protein suggested its ubiquitous localization within a cell. TaPP2C1 expression was downregulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and NaCl treatments, but upregulated by H2O2 treatment. Overexpression of TaPP2C1 in tobacco resulted in reduced ABA sensitivity and increased salt resistance of transgenic seedlings. Additionally, physiological analyses showed that improved resistance to salt stress conferred by TaPP2C1 is due to the reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, the improved antioxidant system, and the increased transcription of genes in the ABA-independent pathway. Finally, transgenic tobacco showed increased resistance to oxidative stress by maintaining a more effective antioxidant system. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TaPP2C1 negatively regulates ABA signaling, but positively regulates salt resistance. TaPP2C1 confers salt resistance through activating the antioxidant system and ABA-independent gene transcription process. PMID:26057628

  17. Study on the preparation and structural performance of polyaniline/PP conductive fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Lijiu

    2007-07-01

    Polyaniline/PP conductive fiber was obtained by in-situ adsorption polymerization. In this work, we discussed the influence of these reaction factors such as adulteration acid concentration, oxidizer concentration, polyaniline monomer content and reaction time to the polymerization and conduct property. In the meanwhile, surface handling with plasma have also been compared for examining the change of polymerization and conduct property. FT-IR spectra analysis and the physic mechanical properties have been used to investigate the structure and properties of conductive fibers. The result shows that with this method of polymerization the conductive property is superior and the conductivity can be reached by 4.5KΩ.

  18. Production of Λ -hyperons in inelastic p+p interactions at 158 {GeV}/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aduszkiewicz, A.; Ali, Y.; Andronov, E.; Antićić, T.; Antoniou, N.; Baatar, B.; Bay, F.; Blondel, A.; Bogomilov, M.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bunyatov, S. A.; Busygina, O.; Christakoglou, P.; Ćirković, M.; Czopowicz, T.; Damyanova, A.; Davis, N.; Dembinski, H.; Deveaux, M.; Diakonos, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dominik, W.; Dumarchez, J.; Dynowski, K.; Engel, R.; Ereditato, A.; Feofilov, G. A.; Fodor, Z.; Garibov, A.; Gaździcki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hervé, A. E.; Hierholzer, M.; Igolkin, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Johnson, S. R.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kisiel, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V. P.; Korzenev, A.; Kowalik, K.; Kowalski, S.; Koziel, M.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kuich, M.; Kurepin, A.; Larsen, D.; László, A.; Lewicki, M.; Lyubushkin, V. V.; Maćkowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Maksiak, B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Manić, D.; Marcinek, A.; Marino, A. D.; Marton, K.; Mathes, H.-J.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G. L.; Messerly, B.; Mills, G. B.; Morozov, S.; Mrówczyński, S.; Nagai, Y.; Nakadaira, T.; Naskręt, M.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Paolone, V.; Pavin, M.; Petukhov, O.; Pistillo, C.; Płaneta, R.; Popov, B. A.; Posiadała, M.; Puławski, S.; Puzović, J.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Redij, A.; Renfordt, R.; Richter-Wąs, E.; Robert, A.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rumberger, B. T.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczynski, M.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Schmidt, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seryakov, A.; Seyboth, P.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Słodkowski, M.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Ströbele, H.; Šuša, T.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Taranenko, A.; Tefelski, D.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberič, D.; Vechernin, V. V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vinogradov, L.; Wilczek, A.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.; Wyszyński, O.; Zambelli, L.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2016-04-01

    Inclusive production of Λ -hyperons was measured with the large acceptance NA61/SHINE spectrometer at the CERN SPS in inelastic p+p interactions at beam momentum of 158 {GeV}/c. Spectra of transverse momentum and transverse mass as well as distributions of rapidity and x_{_F} are presented. The mean multiplicity was estimated to be 0.120 {± } 0.006(stat.){± }0.010(sys.). The results are compared with previous measurements and predictions of the Epos, Ur qmd and Fritiof models.

  19. Distributions of topological observables in inclusive three- and four-jet events in pp collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, l.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Primavera, F.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Biasotto, M.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Galanti, M.; Giubilato, P.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. 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C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents distributions of topological observables in inclusive three- and four-jet events produced in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 with a data sample collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to a luminosity of 5.1. The distributions are corrected for detector effects, and compared with several event generators based on two- and multi-parton matrix elements at leading order. Among the considered calculations, MadGraph interfaced with pythia6 displays the overall best agreement with data.

  20. Two-pion Bose-Einstein correlations in pp collisions at s=900GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamodt, K.; Abel, N.; Abeysekara, U.; Abrahantes Quintana, A.; Abramyan, A.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahn, S. U.; Akimoto, R.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anelli, G.; Angelov, V.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antinori, S.; Antipin, K.; Antończyk, D.; Antonioli, P.; Anzo, A.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arceo, R.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bablok, S.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Bán, J.; Barbera, R.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Barile, F.; Basile, M.; Basmanov, V.; Bastid, N.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Becker, B.; Belikov, I.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belogianni, A.; Benhabib, L.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdermann, E.; Berdnikov, Y.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bimbot, L.; Biolcati, E.; Blanc, A.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Bohm, J.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bombonati, C.; Bondila, M.; Borel, H.; Borisov, A.; Bortolin, C.; Bose, S.; Bosisio, L.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Böttger, S.; Bourdaud, G.; Boyer, B.; Braun, M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bravina, L.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Bruckner, G.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo, E.; Camacho, E.; Camerini, P.; Campbell, M.; Canoa Roman, V.; Capitani, G. P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Catanescu, V.; Cattaruzza, E.; Cavicchioli, C.; Cerello, P.; Chambert, V.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charpy, A.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chuman, F.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Cobanoglu, O.; Coffin, J.-P.; Coli, S.; Colla, A.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Conner, E. S.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cormier, T. M.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Cussonneau, J.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, I.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gaspari, M.; de Groot, J.; de Gruttola, D.; de Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; de Remigis, R.; de Rooij, R.; de Vaux, G.; Delagrange, H.; Delgado, Y.; Dellacasa, G.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; Dénes, E.; Deppman, A.; D'Erasmo, G.; Derkach, D.; Devaux, A.; di Bari, D.; di Giglio, C.; di Liberto, S.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Dialinas, M.; Díaz, L.; Díaz, R.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobretsov, V.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Domínguez, I.; Don, D. M. M.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubuisson, J.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Enokizono, A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evrard, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabjan, C. W.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fateev, O.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Fekete, V.; Felea, D.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Fini, R.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Fodor, Z.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Formenti, F.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Frolov, A.; Fuchs, U.; Furano, F.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gadrat, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Ganoti, P.; Ganti, M. S.; Garabatos, C.; García Trapaga, C.; Gebelein, J.; Gemme, R.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Giraudo, G.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glasow, R.; Glässel, P.; Glenn, A.; Gómez Jiménez, R.; González Santos, H.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Gorbunov, Y.; Gotovac, S.; Gottschlag, H.; Grabski, V.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gustafsson, H.-A.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamblen, J.; Han, B. H.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Hasch, D.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heide, M.; Heinz, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Hernández, C.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hiei, A.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Hu, S.; Huang, M.; Huber, S.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Iwasaki, T.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jančurová, L.; Jangal, S.; Janik, R.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jirden, L.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jovanović, P.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalisky, M.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kamal, A.; Kamermans, R.; Kanaki, K.; Kang, E.; Kang, J. H.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplin, V.; Kapusta, S.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kikola, D.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, H. N.; Kim, J.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Klovning, A.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Kniege, S.; Koch, K.; Kolevatov, R.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskih, A.; Kornaś, E.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Kozlov, K.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krawutschke, T.; Krivda, M.; Krumbhorn, D.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, N.; Kupczak, R.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. N.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kutouski, M.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Rocca, P.; Lackner, F.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lafage, V.; Lal, C.; Lara, C.; Larsen, D. T.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Bornec, Y.; Le Bris, N.; Lee, H.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lefèvre, F.; Lenhardt, M.; Leistam, L.; Lehnert, J.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lopez, X.; López Noriega, M.; López-Ramírez, R.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lozea Feijo Soares, A.; Lu, S.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Lutz, J.-R.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Makhlyueva, I.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malaev, M.; Malagalage, K. J.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malek, M.; Malinina, L.; Malkiewicz, T.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez Hernández, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Maruyama, Y.; Marzari Chiesa, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masetti, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastromarco, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayani, D.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mendez Lorenzo, P.; Meoni, M.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Mereu, P.; Miake, Y.; Michalon, A.; Miftakhov, N.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minafra, F.; Mischke, A.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mizoguchi, K.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Mondal, M. M.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Moukhanova, T.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munoz, J.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Navach, F.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nendaz, F.; Newby, J.; Nianine, A.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nyiri, A.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Odyniec, G.; Oeschler, H.; Oinonen, M.; Okada, K.; Okada, Y.; Oldenburg, M.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orsini, F.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Osmic, F.; Österman, L.; Ostrowski, P.; Otterlund, I.; Otwinowski, J.; Øvrebekk, G.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Panse, R.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Pastirčák, B.; Pastore, C.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pepato, A.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D.; Pérez, C.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Peschek, J.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Peters, A. J.; Petráček, V.; Petridis, A.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Peyré, J.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piuz, F.; Platt, R.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta Lerma, P. L. M.; Poggio, F.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Polozov, P.; Polyakov, V.; Pommeresch, B.; Pop, A.; Posa, F.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Pouthas, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Radomski, S.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Rammler, M.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rath, S.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Ricaud, H.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Röhrich, D.; Román López, S.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosinský, P.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Rousseau, S.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio-Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Rusanov, I.; Russo, G.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Saini, J.; Saiz, P.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salgueiro Domingues da Silva, R.; Salur, S.; Samanta, T.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Saturnini, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schindler, H.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schossmaier, K.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Segato, G.; Semenov, D.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serkin, L.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharkov, G.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddi, E.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silenzi, A.; Silvermyr, D.; Simili, E.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Snow, H.; Søgaard, C.; Soloviev, A.; Soltveit, H. K.; Soltz, R.; Sommer, W.; Son, C. W.; Son, H.; Song, M.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Soyk, D.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Staley, F.; Stan, E.; Stefanek, G.; Stefanini, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stocco, D.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, P.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Swoboda, D.; Symons, J.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Szuba, M.; Tadel, M.; Tagridis, C.; Takahara, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tanabe, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Taureg, H.; Tauro, A.; Tavlet, M.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Tieulent, R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Tolyhy, T.; Torcato de Matos, C.; Torii, H.; Torralba, G.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Tournaire, A.; Traczyk, T.; Tribedy, P.; Tröger, G.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsiledakis, G.; Tsilis, E.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Turvey, A.; Tveter, T. S.; Tydesjö, H.; Tywoniuk, K.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vacchi, A.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Kolk, N.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A.; Vassiliev, I.; Vasileiou, M.; Vechernin, V.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vetlitskiy, I.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopianov, A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, V.; Wallet, L.; Wan, R.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Wen, Q.; Wessels, J.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Willis, N.; Windelband, B.; Xu, C.; Yang, C.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yermia, F.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yuan, X.; Yurevich, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zabrodin, E.; Zagreev, B.; Zalite, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanevsky, Yu.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zenin, A.; Zepeda, A.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, S.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zycháček, V.; Zynovyev, M.

    2010-09-01

    We report on the measurement of two-pion correlation functions from pp collisions at s=900GeV performed by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Our analysis shows an increase of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss radius with increasing event multiplicity, in line with other measurements done in particle- and nuclear collisions. Conversely, the strong decrease of the radius with increasing transverse momentum, as observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at Tevatron, is not manifest in our data.

  1. New physics and signal-background interference in associated pp → HZ production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph; Rosenfeld, Rogerio; Spannowsky, Michael; Tonero, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    We re-investigate electroweak signal-background interference in associated Higgs production via gluon fusion in the presence of new physics in the top Higgs sector. Considering the full final state pp \\to b \\bar b \\ell^+\\ell^-~(\\ell=e,μ) , we discuss how new physics in the top Higgs sector that enhances the ZZ component can leave footprints in the HZ limit setting. In passing we investigate the phenomenology of a class of new physics interactions that can be genuinely studied in this process.

  2. Hyperon production inbar pp interactions at 22.4 GeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herynek, I.; Muríň, P.; Staroba, P.; Suk, M.; Šimák, V.; Valkárová, A.; Vávra, J.

    1993-07-01

    In the present paper we investigate the production of charged hyperons and antihy-perons inbar pp interactions at 22.4 GeV/ c recorded in the 2m hydrogen bubble chamber “Ludmila”. After correction for losses due to the kinematics of hyperon decays and for scanning efficiency we have obtained 610 events with charged hyperons or antihyperons. A total cross section of 1.3{-0.05/+0.4} mb for ∑±/overline {sum ^ ± } has been obtained, and various associated charged particle multiplicity distributions are presented.

  3. Femtoscopy of pp and Pb-Pb collisions with the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loggins, Vera; Alice Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Femtoscopy is unique among all analysis techniques utilized in subatomic collision experiments as it directly addresses the space-time structure of the evolving system at the femtometer scale. We report on the results of two-particle Bose-Einstein correlation analyses in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV and √{sNN} = 2 . 76 TeV, respectively, recorded by the ALICE experiment at the LHC. We discuss femtoscopic correlations for pions, kaons, and protons as a function of event multiplicity and total pair momentum.

  4. Single Spin Asymmetry in Inclusive Hadron Production in pp Scattering from Collins Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng; Yuan, Feng

    2008-04-14

    We study the Collins mechanism contribution to the single transverse spin asymmetry in inclusive hadron production in pp scattering p{up_arrow}p {yields} {pi}X from the leading jet fragmentation. The azimuthal asymmetric distribution of hadron in the jet leads to a single spin asymmetry for the produced hadron in the Lab frame. The effect is evaluated in a transverse momentum dependent model that takes into account the transverse momentum dependence in the fragmentation process. We find the asymmetry is comparable in size to the experimental observation at RHIC at {radical}s = 200GeV.

  5. Proton source size measurements in the eA {yields} e{prime}ppX reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksey Stavinskiy; Konstantin Mikhaylov; R. Lednicky; Alexander Vlassov; Et. Al.

    2004-06-01

    Two-proton correlations at small relative momentum q were studied in the eA({sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, C, Fe) {yields} e{prime}ppX reaction at E{sub 0} = 4.46 GeV using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. The enhancement of the correlation function at small q was found to be in accordance with theoretical expectation. Emission region sizes were extracted and proved to be dependent on A and proton momentum. The size of the two-proton emission region on the lightest possible nucleus, He, was measured for the first time.

  6. Absolute np and pp cross section determinations aimed at improving the standard for cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, Alexander B; Haight, Robert C; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arndt, Richard A; Briscoe, William J; Paris, Mark W; Strakovsky, Igor I; Workman, Ron L

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of present research is a keeping improvement of the standard for cross section measurements of neutron-induced reactions. The cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1000 MeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PW As) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-V11.0 and JENDL-4.0 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Also a comparison of evaluated data with recent experimental data was made to check a quality of evaluation. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

  7. Absolute np and pp Cross Section Determinations Aimed At Improving The Standard For Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, A. B.; Haight, R. C.; Tovesson, F.; Arndt, R. A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Paris, M. W.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Workman, R. L.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose of present research is a keeping improvement of the standard for cross section measurements of neutron-induced reactions. The cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1 GeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PWAs) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-4.0 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Also a comparison of evaluated data with recent experimental data was made to check a quality of evaluation. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

  8. Proton Structure in High-Energy High-Multiplicity p-p Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głazek, Stanisław D.; Kubiczek, Patryk

    2016-06-01

    A few-body proton image, expected to be derivable from QCD in the renormalization group procedure for effective particles, is used within the Monte Carlo Glauber model to calculate the anisotropy coefficients in the initial collision-state of matter in high-energy high-multiplicity proton-proton interaction events. We estimate the ridge-like correlations in the final hadronic state by assuming their proportionality to the initial collision-state anisotropy. In our estimates, some distinct few-body proton structures appear capable of accounting for the magnitude of p-p ridge effect, with potentially discernible differences in dependence on multiplicity.

  9. The energy dependence of the pp {yields} K{sup +}n{Sigma}{sup +} reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Valdau, Yu.

    2011-10-24

    The energy dependence of the total cross section for the pp {yields} K{sup +}n{Sigma}{sup +} reaction has been investigated at the magnetic spectrometer COSY-ANKE. Signals from the production of the {Sigma}{sup +} hyperon were searched for in three simultaneously measured spectra. The values obtained for the total production cross section {sigma}({Sigma}{sup +}) are slightly below those of {sigma}({Sigma}{sup 0}) at the same excess energies. They follow a phase space dependence and do not show any evidence for strong threshold effects or a significant n{Sigma}{sup +} final state interaction.

  10. Analytical representation for pp elastic scattering at 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, A. K.; Ferreira, E.; Kodama, T.

    2013-04-15

    A precise analysis is performed of the recent pp elastic data at 7 TeV in terms of its real and imaginary amplitudes, that are fully disentangled, consistently with dispersion relations for amplitudes and for slopes. Real and imaginary slopes B{sub R} and B{sub I}, treated as independent quantities, influence the whole t-range and the determination of the total cross section {sigma}. The treatment includes extension to the universal perturbative tail at large |t|. Consistency is obtained in the values of {sigma}, ratio {rho}, B{sub R} and B{sub I} determined in forward and full-t approaches.

  11. QCD CORRECTIONS TO DILEPTON PRODUCTION NEAR PARTONIC THRESHOLD IN PP SCATTERING.

    SciTech Connect

    SHIMIZU, H.; STERMAN, G.; VOGELSANG, W.; YOKOYA, H.

    2005-10-02

    We present a recent study of the QCD corrections to dilepton production near partonic threshold in transversely polarized {bar p}p scattering, We analyze the role of the higher-order perturbative QCD corrections in terms of the available fixed-order contributions as well as of all-order soft-gluon resummations for the kinematical regime of proposed experiments at GSI-FAIR. We find that perturbative corrections are large for both unpolarized and polarized cross sections, but that the spin asymmetries are stable. The role of the far infrared region of the momentum integral in the resummed exponent and the effect of the NNLL resummation are briefly discussed.

  12. Measurement of the forward W boson cross-section in pp collisions at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-12-01

    A measurement of the inclusive W → μν production cross-section using data from pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of TeV is presented. The analysis is based on an integrated luminosity of about 1 .0 fb-1 recorded with the LHCb detector. Results are reported for muons with a transverse momentum greater than 20 GeV/ c and pseudorapidity between 2.0 and 4.5. The W + and W - production cross-sections are measured to be

  13. Multiplicity dependence of two-particle azimuthal correlations in pp collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdanikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, F.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Czopowicz, T. R.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Das, D.; Das, K.; Dash, S.; Dash, A.; De, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; Erasmo, G. D.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Elwood, B. G.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, M.; Gheata, A.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goerlich, L.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.

    2013-09-01

    We present the measurements of particle pair yields per trigger particle obtained from di-hadron azimuthal correlations in pp collisions at = 0 .9, 2.76, and 7 TeV recorded with the ALICE detector. The yields are studied as a function of the charged particle multiplicity. Taken together with the single particle yields the pair yields provide information about parton fragmentation at low transverse momenta, as well as on the contribution of multiple parton interactions to particle production. Data are compared to calculations using the PYTHIA6, PYTHIA8, and PHOJET event generators. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Inclusive charm cross sections in 800 GeV/ c p-p interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, R.; Banerjee, S.; Baland, J. F.; Ball, S.; Ball, R. C.; Bhat, P. C.; Bromberg, C.; Brun, R.; Canough, G. E.; Coffin, T.; Commichau, V.; Davis, R.; Dershem, T. O.; Dixon, R. L.; Fenker, H. C.; Ganguli, S. N.; Gensch, U.; Giokaris, N.; Girtler, P.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gress, J.; Gurtu, A.; Henri, V. P.; Hernandez, J. J.; Hrubec, J.; Iori, M.; Jones, L. W.; Knauss, D.; Kuhn, D.; Kwak, N.; Leedom, I. D.; Legros, P.; Lemonne, J.; Leutz, H.; Liu, X.; Malhotra, P. K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mendez, G. E.; Mikocki, S.; Miller, R.; Naumann, T.; Neuhofer, G.; Nguyen, A.; Nikolic, M.; Nowak, H.; Pilette, P.; Poppleton, A.; Poirier, J.; Raghavan, R.; Rasner, K.; Reucroft, S.; Robertson, W. J.; Roe, B. P.; Roos, C. E.; Roth, A.; Senko, M.; Struczinski, W.; Subramanian, A.; Touboul, M. C.; Vonck, B.; Voyvodic, L.; Walker, W. D.; Waters, J. W.; Weber, M. F.; Webster, M. S.; Wickens, J.; Wild, C. F.; Youtsey, S.; LEBC-MPS Collaboration

    1987-01-01

    We report a measurement of the inclusive D/D¯ production cross section in 800 GeV/ c proton-proton interactions. The experiment used the high resolution bubble chamber LEBC exposed to an 800 GeV/ c proton beam at the Fermilab MPS. We obtain σ( D/ D¯)=59 -15+22μ b (statistical errors), having analysed 25% of the total data sample. Comparison with 400 GeV/ c pp dat a obtained with LEBC at CERN shows a D/D¯ cross section increase by a factor of 1.7 -0.5+0.7. This is in good agreement with fusion model calculations.

  15. Proton source size measurements in the eA-->e'ppX reaction.

    PubMed

    Stavinsky, A V; Mikhailov, K R; Lednicky, R; Vlassov, A V; Adams, G; Ambrozewich, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carman, D S; Cetina, C; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Cords, D; Coleman, A; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Cummings, J P; Dashyan, N; Sanctis, E De; Vita, R De; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fersch, R G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilad, S; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ireland, D G; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kelley, J H; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, D H; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, M S; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M V; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuhn, J; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Leksin, G A; Lee, T; Li, Ji; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Nelson, S O; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N A; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Sabourov, K; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stepanyan, S; Stepanyan, S S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tkabladze, A; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vorobeyev, L S; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, C S; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L

    2004-11-01

    Two-proton correlations at small relative momentum q were studied in the eA(3He,4He,C,Fe)-->e(')ppX reaction at E(0)=4.46 GeV using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. The enhancement of the correlation function at small q was found to be in accordance with theoretical expectations. Sizes of the emission region were extracted, and proved to be dependent on A and on the proton momentum. The size of the two-proton emission region for He was measured in eA reactions for the first time. PMID:15600827

  16. Phosphotransferase-dependent accumulation of (p)ppGpp in response to glutamine deprivation in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Ronneau, Séverin; Petit, Kenny; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    The alarmone (p)ppGpp is commonly used by bacteria to quickly respond to nutrient starvation. Although (p)ppGpp synthetases such as SpoT have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms stimulating alarmone synthesis upon starvation. Here, we describe an essential role of the nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system (PTS(Ntr)) in controlling (p)ppGpp accumulation in Caulobacter crescentus. We show that cells sense nitrogen starvation by way of detecting glutamine deprivation using the first enzyme (EI(Ntr)) of PTS(Ntr). Decreasing intracellular glutamine concentration triggers phosphorylation of EI(Ntr) and its downstream components HPr and EIIA(Ntr). Once phosphorylated, both HPr∼P and EIIA(Ntr)∼P stimulate (p)ppGpp accumulation by modulating SpoT activities. This burst of second messenger primarily impacts the non-replicative phase of the cell cycle by extending the G1 phase. This work highlights a new role for bacterial PTS systems in stimulating (p)ppGpp accumulation in response to metabolic cues and in controlling cell cycle progression and cell growth. PMID:27109061

  17. Off-energy-shell p-p scattering at sub-Coulomb energies via the Trojan horse method

    SciTech Connect

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Cognata, M. La; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Campajola, L.; Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Z.; Gyuerky, G.; Kiss, G.; Somorjai, E.; Gialanella, L.; Ordine, A.

    2008-12-15

    Two-proton scattering at sub-Coulomb energies has been measured indirectly via the Trojan horse method applied to the p + d{yields}p + p + n reaction to investigate off-energy shell effects for scattering processes. The three-body experiment was performed at 5 and 4.7 MeV corresponding to a p-p relative energy ranging from 80 to 670 keV. The free p-p cross section exhibits a deep minimum right within this relative energy region due to Coulomb plus nuclear destructive interference. No minimum occurs instead in the Trojan horse p-p cross section, which was extracted by employing a simple plane-wave impulse approximation. A detailed formalism was developed to build up the expression of the theoretical half-off-shell p-p cross section. Its behavior agrees with the Trojan horse data and in turn formally fits the n-n, n-p, and nuclear p-p cross sections given the fact that in its expression the Coulomb amplitude is negligible with respect to the nuclear one. These results confirm the Trojan horse suppression of the Coulomb amplitude for scattering due to the off-shell character of the process.

  18. Phosphotransferase-dependent accumulation of (p)ppGpp in response to glutamine deprivation in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Ronneau, Séverin; Petit, Kenny; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    The alarmone (p)ppGpp is commonly used by bacteria to quickly respond to nutrient starvation. Although (p)ppGpp synthetases such as SpoT have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms stimulating alarmone synthesis upon starvation. Here, we describe an essential role of the nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system (PTSNtr) in controlling (p)ppGpp accumulation in Caulobacter crescentus. We show that cells sense nitrogen starvation by way of detecting glutamine deprivation using the first enzyme (EINtr) of PTSNtr. Decreasing intracellular glutamine concentration triggers phosphorylation of EINtr and its downstream components HPr and EIIANtr. Once phosphorylated, both HPr∼P and EIIANtr∼P stimulate (p)ppGpp accumulation by modulating SpoT activities. This burst of second messenger primarily impacts the non-replicative phase of the cell cycle by extending the G1 phase. This work highlights a new role for bacterial PTS systems in stimulating (p)ppGpp accumulation in response to metabolic cues and in controlling cell cycle progression and cell growth. PMID:27109061

  19. Lyn sustains oncogenic signaling in chronic lymphocytic leukemia by strengthening SET-mediated inhibition of PP2A.

    PubMed

    Zonta, Francesca; Pagano, Mario Angelo; Trentin, Livio; Tibaldi, Elena; Frezzato, Federica; Trimarco, Valentina; Facco, Monica; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Pavan, Valeria; Ribaudo, Giovanni; Bordin, Luciana; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Brunati, Anna Maria

    2015-06-11

    Aberrant protein kinase activities, and the consequent dramatic increase of Ser/Thr and -Tyr phosphorylation, promote the deregulation of the survival pathways in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), which is crucial to the pathogenesis and progression of the disease. In this study, we show that the tumor suppressor protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), one of the major Ser/Thr phosphatases, is in an inhibited form because of the synergistic contribution of 2 events, the interaction with its physiologic inhibitor SET and the phosphorylation of Y307 of the catalytic subunit of PP2A. The latter event is mediated by Lyn, a Src family kinase previously found to be overexpressed, delocalized, and constitutively active in CLL cells. This Lyn/PP2A axis accounts for the persistent high level of phosphorylation of the phosphatase's targets and represents a key connection linking phosphotyrosine- and phosphoserine/threonine-mediated oncogenic signals. The data herein presented show that the disruption of the SET/PP2A complex by a novel FTY720-analog (MP07-66) devoid of immunosuppressive effects leads to the reactivation of PP2A, which in turn triggers apoptosis of CLL cells. When used in combination with SFK inhibitors, the action of MP07-66 is synergistically amplified, providing a new option in the therapeutic strategy for CLL patients. PMID:25931585

  20. Study of e+e-→pp¯π0 in the vicinity of the ψ(3770)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M.  N.; Ai, X.  C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D.  J.; An, F.  F.; An, Q.; Bai, J.  Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; et al

    2014-08-22

    The process e+e-→pp¯π0 has been studied by analyzing data collected at √s=3.773 GeV, at s√=3.650 GeV, and during a ψ(3770) line shape scan with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider. The Born cross section of pp¯π0 in the vicinity of the ψ(3770) is measured, and the Born cross section of ψ(3770)→pp¯π0 is extracted considering interference between resonant and continuum production amplitudes. Two solutions with the same probability and a significance of 1.5σ are found. The solutions for the Born cross section of ψ(3770)→pp¯π0 are 33.8±1.8±2.1 pb and 0.06+0.10-0.04+0.01-0.01 pb (<0.22 pb at a 90% confidence level). Using the estimatedmore » cross section and a constant decay amplitude approximation, the cross section σ(pp¯→ψ(3770)π0) is calculated for the kinematic situation of the planned P¯ANDA experiment. The maximum cross section corresponding to the two solutions is expected to be less than 0.79 nb at 90% confidence level and 122±10 nb at a center-of-mass energy of 5.26 GeV.« less

  1. Oxygen Availability for Porphyrin Biosynthesis Enzymes Determines the Production of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Shimpei; Matsumoto, Kentaro; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Ogura, Shun-Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a precursor of porphyrin, is specifically converted to the fluorescent substance protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in tumors to be used as a prodrug for photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. Hypoxia, a common feature of solid tumors, decreases the efficacy of ALA-based photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. This decrease results from the excretion of porphyrin precursor coproporphyrinogen III (CPgenIII), an intermediate in the biosynthesis of PpIX. However, the mechanism of CPgenIII excretion during hypoxia remains unclear. In this study, we revealed the importance of mitochondrial respiration for the production of PpIX during hypoxia. Porphyrin concentrations were estimated in human gastric cancer cell lines by HPLC. Expression levels of porphyrin biosynthesis genes were measured by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Blockage of porphyrin biosynthesis was an oxygen-dependent phenomenon resulting from decreased PpIX production in mitochondria under hypoxic conditions. PpIX production was increased by the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration complexes, which indicates that the enzymes of porphyrin biosynthesis compete with respiration complexes for molecular oxygen. Our results indicate that targeting the respiration complexes is a rationale for enhancing the effect of ALA-mediated treatment and diagnosis. PMID:26717566

  2. Oxygen Availability for Porphyrin Biosynthesis Enzymes Determines the Production of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Shimpei; Matsumoto, Kentaro; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Ogura, Shun-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a precursor of porphyrin, is specifically converted to the fluorescent substance protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in tumors to be used as a prodrug for photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. Hypoxia, a common feature of solid tumors, decreases the efficacy of ALA-based photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. This decrease results from the excretion of porphyrin precursor coproporphyrinogen III (CPgenIII), an intermediate in the biosynthesis of PpIX. However, the mechanism of CPgenIII excretion during hypoxia remains unclear. In this study, we revealed the importance of mitochondrial respiration for the production of PpIX during hypoxia. Porphyrin concentrations were estimated in human gastric cancer cell lines by HPLC. Expression levels of porphyrin biosynthesis genes were measured by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Blockage of porphyrin biosynthesis was an oxygen-dependent phenomenon resulting from decreased PpIX production in mitochondria under hypoxic conditions. PpIX production was increased by the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration complexes, which indicates that the enzymes of porphyrin biosynthesis compete with respiration complexes for molecular oxygen. Our results indicate that targeting the respiration complexes is a rationale for enhancing the effect of ALA-mediated treatment and diagnosis. PMID:26717566

  3. Surface modification of polypropylene (PP) using single and dual high radio frequency capacitive coupled argon plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, D.

    2016-01-01

    Single (40.68 MHz) and dual (40.68/2.1 MHz) high radio frequency (RF) argon plasma discharge was employed as a source of a low-temperature treatment mechanism that was used to modify the surface of polypropylene (PP). The effects of argon plasma on the surface chemistry and the surface morphology of PP were studied using X-ray diffraction analyses. In this study, samples were treated under different plasma operation conditions for parameters such as RF power, gas pressure and treatment time. Furthermore, the crystallite size was calculated (using Scherrer equation) from the diffraction pattern of the β fraction (Full Width at Half maximum) for PP samples. The results reveal that the crystallite size strongly increases with RF power and treatment time, but decreases with gas pressure. From the analysis, it was found that the treated samples have higher crystallite sizes in compared to those of the single RF plasma discharge. This happens because the increase of plasma temperature leads to increases in the crystallization of PP sample, so that the crystallite size also increases. Furthermore, because of the advantageous features of the dual-RF plasma mode, the surface modification of PP sample can occur more quickly than is possible via the single-RF plasma discharge.

  4. Effect of mouse antisera targeting the Phlebotomus papatasi midgut chitinase PpChit1 on sandfly physiology and fitness

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Murguia, Maricela; Bloedow, Nicholas; Murray, Leigh; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    In sandflies, the absence of the peritrophic matrix (PM) affects the rate of blood digestion. Also, the kinetics of PM secretion varies according to species. We previously characterised PpChit1, a midgut-specific chitinase secreted in Phlebotomus papatasi (PPIS) that is involved in the maturation of the PM and showed that antibodies against PpChit1 reduce the chitinolytic activity in the midgut of several sandfly species. Here, sandflies were fed on red blood cells reconstituted with naïve or anti-PpChit1 sera and assessed for fitness parameters that included blood digestion, oviposition onset, number of eggs laid, egg bouts, average number of eggs per bout and survival. In PPIS, anti-PpChit1 led to a one-day delay in the onset of egg laying, with flies surviving three days longer compared to the control group. Anti-PpChit1 also had a negative effect on overall ability of flies to lay eggs, as several gravid females from all three species were unable to lay any eggs despite having lived longer than control flies. Whereas the longer survival might be associated with improved haeme scavenging ability by the PM, the inability of females to lay eggs is possibly linked to changes in PM permeability affecting nutrient absorption. PMID:25591111

  5. PP2A delays APC/C-dependent degradation of separase-associated but not free securin

    PubMed Central

    Hellmuth, Susanne; Böttger, Franziska; Pan, Cuiping; Mann, Matthias; Stemmann, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The universal triggering event of eukaryotic chromosome segregation is cleavage of centromeric cohesin by separase. Prior to anaphase, most separase is kept inactive by association with securin. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) constitutes another binding partner of human separase, but the functional relevance of this interaction has remained enigmatic. We demonstrate that PP2A stabilizes separase-associated securin by dephosphorylation, while phosphorylation of free securin enhances its polyubiquitylation by the ubiquitin ligase APC/C and proteasomal degradation. Changing PP2A substrate phosphorylation sites to alanines slows degradation of free securin, delays separase activation, lengthens early anaphase, and results in anaphase bridges and DNA damage. In contrast, separase-associated securin is destabilized by introduction of phosphorylation-mimetic aspartates or extinction of separase-associated PP2A activity. G2- or prometaphase-arrested cells suffer from unscheduled activation of separase when endogenous securin is replaced by aspartate-mutant securin. Thus, PP2A-dependent stabilization of separase-associated securin prevents precocious activation of separase during checkpoint-mediated arrests with basal APC/C activity and increases the abruptness and fidelity of sister chromatid separation in anaphase. PMID:24781523

  6. Acute Hyperammonemia Induces NMDA-Mediated Hypophosphorylation of Intermediate Filaments Through PP1 and PP2B in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Rônan Vivian; da Silva Ferreira, Fernanda; Heimfarth, Luana; Pierozan, Paula; Fernandes, Carolina; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we studied the effects of toxic ammonia levels on the cytoskeleton of neural cells, with emphasis in the homeostasis of the phosphorylating system associated with the intermediate filaments (IFs). We used in vivo and in vitro models of acute hyperammonemia in 10- and 21-day-old rats. In the in vivo model, animals were intraperitoneally injected with ammonium acetate (7 mmol/Kg), and the phosphorylation level of the cytoskeletal proteins was analyzed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus 30 and 60 min after injection. The injected ammonia altered the IF phosphorylation of astrocytes (GFAP and vimentin) and neurons (neurofilament subunits of low, middle, and high molecular weight, respectively: NFL, NFM, and NFH) from cerebral cortex of 21-day-old rats. This was a transitory effect observed 30 min after injection, recovering 30 min afterward. Phosphorylation was not altered in the cerebral cortex of 10-day-old pups. The homeostasis of hippocampal IFs was preserved at the studied ages and times. In the in vitro model, cortical slices of 10- and 21-day-old rats were incubated with 0.5, 1, or 5 mM NH4Cl, and the phosphorylation level of the IF proteins was analyzed after 30 min. The IF phosphorylation was not altered in cortical slices of 10-day-old rats; however, in cortical slices of 21-day-old pups, 5 mM NH4Cl induced hypophosphorylation of GFAP and vimentin, preserving neurofilament phosphorylation levels. Hypophosphorylation was mediated by the protein phosphatases 1 (PP1) and 2B (PP2B), and this event was associated with Ca(2+) influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors. The aim of this study is to show that acute ammonia toxicity targets the phosphorylating system of IFs in the cerebral cortex of rats in a developmentally regulated manner, and NMDA-mediated Ca(2+) signaling plays a central role in this mechanism. We propose that the disruption of cytoskeletal homeostasis could be an endpoint of the acute hyperammonemia

  7. Observation of χcJ decaying into the pp̄K⁺K⁻ final state

    SciTech Connect

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tang, X. F.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.; Zweber, P.

    2011-06-27

    First measurements of the decays of the three χcJ states to pp̄K⁺K⁻ final states are presented. Intermediate Φ→K⁺K⁻ and Λ(1520)→pK⁻ resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for χcJ→p̄K⁺Λ(1520), Λ(1520)Λ¯¯¯(1520), and Φpp̄ are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct χcJpp̄K⁺K⁻ decays. These are first observations of χcJ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the χcJ states. The experiment uses samples of χcJ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106×10⁶ ψ' mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e⁺e⁻ collider.

  8. Coulomb suppression in the low-energy p-p elastic scattering via the Trojan Horse Method

    SciTech Connect

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Campajola, L.; Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, G.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E.; Gialanella, L.

    2010-11-24

    We present here an important test of the main feature of the Trojan Horse Method (THM), namely the suppression of Coulomb effects in the entrance channel due to off-energy-shell effects. This is done by measuring the THM p-p elastic scattering via the p+d{yields}p+p+n reaction at 4.7 and 5 MeV, corresponding to a p-p relative energy ranging from 80 to 670 keV. In contrast to the on-energy-shell (OES) case, the extracted p-p cross section does not exhibit the Coulomb-nuclear interference minimum due to the suppression of the Coulomb amplitude. This is confirmed by the half-off-energy shell (HOES) calculations and strengthened by the agreement with the calculated OES nuclear cross sections.

  9. The Phosphatase PP4c Controls Spindle Orientation to Maintain Proliferative Symmetric Divisions in the Developing Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunli; Jüschke, Christoph; Esk, Christopher; Hirotsune, Shinji; Knoblich, Juergen A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In the developing neocortex, progenitor cells expand through symmetric division before they generate cortical neurons through multiple rounds of asymmetric cell division. Here, we show that the orientation of the mitotic spindle plays a crucial role in regulating the transition between those two division modes. We demonstrate that the protein phosphatase PP4c regulates spindle orientation in early cortical progenitor cells. Upon removing PP4c, mitotic spindles fail to orient in parallel to the neuroepithelial surface and progenitors divide with random orientation. As a result, their divisions become asymmetric and neurogenesis starts prematurely. Biochemical and genetic experiments show that PP4c acts by dephosphorylating the microtubule binding protein Ndel1, thereby enabling complex formation with Lis1 to form a functional spindle orientation complex. Our results identify a key regulator of cortical development and demonstrate that changes in the orientation of progenitor division are responsible for the transition between symmetric and asymmetric cell division. PMID:23830831

  10. Measurements of Correlated Pair Momentum Distributions in {sup 3}He(e,e{prime}pp)n with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Rustam Niyazov

    2003-05-01

    We have measured the {sup 3}He(e,e{prime}pp)n reaction at 2.2 and 4.4 GeV over a wide kinematic range. The kinetic energy distribution for ''fast'' nucleons (p > 250 MeV/c) peaks where two nucleons each have 20% or less and the third or ''leading'' nucleon carries most of the transferred energy. These fast nucleon pairs (both pp and pn) are back-to-back and carry very little momentum along {rvec q}, indicating that they are spectators. Experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that we have measured NN correlations in {sup 3}He(e,e{prime}pp)n by striking the third nucleon and detecting the spectator correlated pair.

  11. Measurement of J/ψ production in Pb—Pb and pp collisions at the LHC with the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, Martino; ALICE Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) aims to study the behaviour of nuclear matter at high energy densities and the transition to Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), expected to occur in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Quarkonia are important probes of nuclear matter and QGP, through the modification of their yield in the hot and dense medium formed in heavy ion collisions. Their measurement in pp collisions is also crucial to the ALICE physics program. ALICE measures quarkonium production at both forward (in the dimuon channel) and mid-rapidity (in the dielectron channel). In 2010 and 2011 the Large Hadron Collider has provided pp collisions at TeV and 2.76 TeV and Pb-Pb collisions at TeV. The ALICE results on J/ψ production in both Pb-Pb and pp collisions are presented.

  12. Observation of χcJ decaying into the pp̄K⁺K⁻ final state

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; et al

    2011-06-27

    First measurements of the decays of the three χcJ states to pp̄K⁺K⁻ final states are presented. Intermediate Φ→K⁺K⁻ and Λ(1520)→pK⁻ resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for χcJ→p̄K⁺Λ(1520), Λ(1520)Λ¯¯¯(1520), and Φpp̄ are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct χcJ→pp̄K⁺K⁻ decays. These are first observations of χcJ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the χcJ states. The experiment uses samples of χcJ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106×10⁶ ψ' mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e⁺e⁻ collider.

  13. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-07-01

    The authors present a new measurement of the production cross section σ(pp = ZZ) at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, obtained from the analysis of the four charged lepton final state ℓ+ℓ-ℓ`+ℓ`-(ℓ, ℓ` = e or μ). They observe ten candidate events with an expected background of 0.37 ± 0.13 events. The measured cross section σ(pp =ZZ) = 1.26-0.37+0.47 (stat) ± 0.14 (syst) pb is in agreement with NLO QCD predictions. This result is combined with a previous result from the ZZ = ℓ+ℓ- νν channel resulting in a combined cross section of σ(pp = ZZ) = 1.40-0.37-0.43more » (stat) ±0.14 (syst) pb.« less

  14. The GridPP DIRAC project - DIRAC for non-LHC communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, D.; Colling, D.; Currie, R.; Fayer, S.; Huffman, A.; Martyniak, J.; Rand, D.; Richards, A.

    2015-12-01

    The GridPP consortium in the UK is currently testing a multi-VO DIRAC service aimed at non-LHC VOs. These VOs (Virtual Organisations) are typically small and generally do not have a dedicated computing support post. The majority of these represent particle physics experiments (e.g. NA62 and COMET), although the scope of the DIRAC service is not limited to this field. A few VOs have designed bespoke tools around the EMI-WMS & LFC, while others have so far eschewed distributed resources as they perceive the overhead for accessing them to be too high. The aim of the GridPP DIRAC project is to provide an easily adaptable toolkit for such VOs in order to lower the threshold for access to distributed resources such as Grid and cloud computing. As well as hosting a centrally run DIRAC service, we will also publish our changes and additions to the upstream DIRAC codebase under an open-source license. We report on the current status of this project and show increasing adoption of DIRAC within the non-LHC communities.

  15. Results from the first p+p runs of the ALICE High Level Trigger at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaki, Kalliopi; ALICE HLT Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The High Level Trigger for the ALICE experiment at LHC is a powerful, sophisticated tool aimed at compressing the raw data volume and issuing selective triggers for events with desirable physics content. At its current state it integrates information from all major ALICE detectors, i. e. the inner tracking system, the time projection chamber, the electromagnetic calorimeters, the transition radiation detector and the muon spectrometer performing real-time event reconstruction. The steam engine behind HLT is a high performance computing cluster of several hundred nodes. It has to reduce the data rate from 25 GB/s to 1.25 GB/s for fitting the DAQ mass storage bandwidth. The cluster is served by a full GigaBit Ethernet network, in addition to an InfiniBand backbone network. To cope with the great challenge of Pb+Pb collisions in autumn 2010, its performance capabilities are being enhanced with the addition of new nodes. Towards the same end the first GPU co-processors are in place. During the first period of data taking with p+p collisions the HLT was extensively used to reconstruct, analyze and display data from the various participating detectors. Among other tasks it contributed to the monitoring of the detector performance, selected events for their calibration and efficiency studies, and estimated primary and secondary vertices from p+p collisions identifying V0 topologies. The experience gained during these first months of online operation will be presented.

  16. The toxofilin–actin–PP2C complex of Toxoplasma: identification of interacting domains

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Gaelle; Delorme, Violaine; David, Violaine; Revenu, Celine; Rebollo, Angelita; Cayla, Xavier; Tardieux, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    Toxofilin is a 27 kDa protein isolated from the human protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which causes toxoplasmosis. Toxofilin binds to G-actin, and in vitro studies have shown that it controls elongation of actin filaments by sequestering actin monomers. Toxofilin affinity for G-actin is controlled by the phosphorylation status of its Ser53, which depends on the activities of a casein kinase II and a type 2C serine/threonine phosphatase (PP2C). To get insights into the functional properties of toxofilin, we undertook a structure–function analysis of the protein using a combination of biochemical techniques. We identified a domain that was sufficient to sequester G-actin and that contains three peptide sequences selectively binding to G-actin. Two of these sequences are similar to sequences present in several G- and F-actin-binding proteins, while the third appears to be specific to toxofilin. Additionally, we identified two toxofilin domains that interact with PP2C, one of which contains the Ser53 substrate. In addition to characterizing the interacting domains of toxofilin with its partners, the present study also provides information on an in vivo-based approach to selectively and competitively disrupt the protein–protein interactions that are important to parasite motility. PMID:17014426

  17. A search for excited leptons in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-10-01

    A search for excited leptons is carried out with the CMS detector at the LHC, using 36 inverse picobarns of pp collision data recorded at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. The search is performed for associated production of a lepton and an oppositely charged excited lepton pp to l l*, followed by the decay l* to l gamma, resulting in the l l gamma final state, where l = electron or muon. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed. Interpreting the findings in the context of l* production through four-fermion contact interactions and subsequent decay via electroweak processes, first upper limits are reported for l* production at this collision energy. The exclusion region in the compositeness scale Lambda and excited lepton mass M(l*) parameter space is extended beyond previously established limits. For Lambda = M(l*), excited lepton masses are excluded below 1070 GeV/c^2 for e* and 1090 GeV/c^2 for mu* at the 95% confidence level.

  18. Strange Particle Production in $p+p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 200GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta,N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-07-31

    We present strange particle spectra and yields measured atmid-rapidity in sqrt text s=200 GeV proton-proton (p+p) collisions atRHIC. We find that the previously observed universal transverse mass(mathrm mT \\equiv\\sqrt mathrm p_T 2+\\mathrm m2) scaling of hadronproduction in p+p collisions seems to break down at higher \\mt and thatthere is a difference in the shape of the \\mt spectrum between baryonsand mesons. We observe mid-rapidity anti-baryon to baryon ratios nearunity for Lambda and Xi baryons and no dependence of the ratio ontransverse momentum, indicating that our data do not yet reach thequark-jet dominated region. We show the dependence of the mean transversemomentum (\\mpt) on measured charged particle multiplicity and on particlemass and infer that these trends are consistent with gluon-jet dominatedparticle production. The data are compared to previous measurements fromCERN-SPS, ISR and FNAL experiments and to Leading Order (LO) and Next toLeading order (NLO) string fragmentation model predictions. We infer fromthese comparisons that the spectral shapes and particle yields from $p+p$collisions at RHIC energies have large contributions from gluon jetsrather than quark jets.

  19. Bioactive properties of peptides obtained from Argentinian defatted soy flour protein by Corolase PP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Coscueta, Ezequiel R; Amorim, Maria M; Voss, Glenise B; Nerli, Bibiana B; Picó, Guillermo A; Pintado, Manuela E

    2016-05-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of soybean meal protein isolate (SPI) obtained under two temperature conditions with Corolase PP was studied, assessing the impact of hydrolysis on potential antioxidant and antihypertensive activities. The protein was isolated from soybean meal under controlled conditions of time and temperature (70 °C, 1h; 90 °C, 30 min). Degree of hydrolysis assessed the progress of hydrolysis at different sampling times. For hydrolysates the antioxidant and angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities were measured. As observed, the DH was increasing until reaching 20% at 10h with disappearance of globular proteins and generation of low molecular weight peptides (less than 3kDa). A significant increase in antioxidant and ACE inhibitory capacities was observed. Five main peptides were identified, which may explain through their sequences the bioactive properties analyzed. Through this study was possible to obtain for the first time with Corolase PP soy hydrolysates with potential antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activities, which can be used to obtain new added value functional ingredients from soy meal. PMID:26769502

  20. Evolutionary Analysis of the B56 Gene Family of PP2A Regulatory Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Lauren M.; Cho, Hyuk; Choudhary, Madhusudan; Seeling, Joni M.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an abundant serine/threonine phosphatase that functions as a tumor suppressor in numerous cell-cell signaling pathways, including Wnt, myc, and ras. The B56 subunit of PP2A regulates its activity, and is encoded by five genes in humans. B56 proteins share a central core domain, but have divergent amino- and carboxy-termini, which are thought to provide isoform specificity. We performed phylogenetic analyses to better understand the evolution of the B56 gene family. We found that B56 was present as a single gene in eukaryotes prior to the divergence of animals, fungi, protists, and plants, and that B56 gene duplication prior to the divergence of protostomes and deuterostomes led to the origin of two B56 subfamilies, B56αβε and B56γδ. Further duplications led to three B56αβε genes and two B56γδ in vertebrates. Several nonvertebrate B56 gene names are based on distinct vertebrate isoform names, and would best be renamed. B56 subfamily genes lack significant divergence within primitive chordates, but each became distinct in complex vertebrates. Two vertebrate lineages have undergone B56 gene loss, Xenopus and Aves. In Xenopus, B56δ function may be compensated for by an alternatively spliced transcript, B56δ/γ, encoding a B56δ-like amino-terminal region and a B56γ core. PMID:25950761

  1. Proton Quark Helicity Structure via W-Boson Production in PP Collision @ Phenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, F.

    2016-02-01

    The spin structure of the proton has been long studied in the past decades, but, while the contributions to the proton spin from valence quarks is by now precisely known, large uncertainties are still affecting our knowledge of the sea quark contributions. The measurement of single-spin asymmetries of the parity violating W production in pp collision allows a (quasi-)model independent access to the flavor-dependent light sea quark contributions. Being maximally parity violating, the W charge can be directly realted to the quark and antiquark flavor, and in addition, moving from forward to backward rapidities with respect to the polarized proton beam direction it is possible to change the relative contributions of u, d, anti-u, anti-d quarks, thus accessing each light-quark spin alignment with respect to the proton spin. At PHENIX, the W boson produced in pp collision at center of mass energies of about 500 GeV is accessed via its decays into electron (muon) at central (forward) rapidities. Here the status of the analysis and the most updated results is reported.

  2. Characterization of blends of PP and SBS vulcanized with gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J.; Albano, C.; Candal, M. V.; Ichazo, M. N.; Hernández, M.

    2005-07-01

    The present work has the objective of analyzing blends of PP with 30 wt% SBS vulcanized with gamma irradiation. In order to do so, SBS was irradiated at 10, 25 and 50 kGy with gamma rays. Results indicate that the gel fraction increases with irradiation dose, varying from 0.3% to 13.0% for the doses employed. Concerning tensile properties, it can be seen that the incorporation of SBS non-irradiated or irradiated decreases Young's modulus, while increasing elongation at break. Respect to thermal studies, it was detected that SBS decreases melting enthalpy of blends, fact that implies a decrease on crystallinity degree, being this effect more noticeable when SBS is irradiated at doses higher than 10 kGy. On the other hand, melting temperature diminishes slightly when adding SBS to PP, but does not show significant variations when SBS is irradiated. PPs MFI decreased with the addition of SBS, being the effect more notorious with irradiation dose. Finally, it can be concluded that SBS can be vulcanized by gamma irradiation, and that the crosslinking degree increases with irradiation dose.

  3. Inclusive photon production at forward rapidities in pp collisions at LHC energies with the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudipan De for the ALICE collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of particles produced in pp collisions are important for the study of particle production mechanisms and to obtain baseline distributions to be compared with those from heavy-ion collisions. The inclusive photon measurements (dominated by π0 decays) are complementary to the charged particle measurements. The present work focuses on the forward rapidity region with comparisons to different models such as PYTHIA and PHOJET. We report the measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of inclusive photons using the ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) at forward rapidities (2.3 < η < 3.9) in pp collisions at = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV. It is observed that the photon multiplicity distributions are well described by negative binomial distributions (NBD). Multiplicity distributions are studied in terms of KNO variables for each energy. It is shown that the increase in the average photon multiplicity as a function of beam energy is compatible with both a logarithmic and power law dependence. The results are compared to different model predictions. These models reproduce experimental results at lower energy while they are not accurate at higher energies.

  4. Regrouping of the beam in the IHEP PS for the UNK p-p programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myae, E. A.; Nelipovich, E. S.; Pashkov, P. T.; Smirnov, A. V.

    Possibilities to form particle bunches in the IHEP machine whose longitudinal parameters would satisfy the requirements imposed by the UNK p-p programs are analyzed. In the case of the 3 x 3 TeV p-p program the accelerated proton beam in the IHEP PS after preliminary quasiadiabatic debunching process will be recaptured into a stable oscillating mode at 33.3 MHz. The peculiarities of the RF system designed for these purposes with an account of strong beam loading are discussed. For the 0.4 x 3 TeV UNK colliding beam regime, it is necessary to compress the accelerated proton bunches in the IHEP PS so that their length will be 4 times less. The main difficulties arising during 'RF gymnastics' which is used for beam compressing, are caused by nonlinearities of the external accelerating field and also the fields induced in the RF cavities by the beam. The compensation of such effects with the help of the special RF system is discussed.

  5. Src family kinase inhibitor PP2 accelerates differentiation in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Seltana, Amira; Guezguez, Amel; Lepage, Manon; Basora, Nuria; Beaulieu, Jean-François

    2013-01-25

    The proto-oncogene Src is an important protein tyrosine kinase involved in signaling pathways that control cell adhesion, growth, migration and survival. Here, we investigated the involvement of Src family kinases (SFKs) in human intestinal cell differentiation. We first observed that Src activity peaked in early stages of Caco-2/15 cell differentiation. Inhibition of SFKs with PP2, a selective SFK inhibitor, accelerated the overall differentiation program. Interestingly, all polarization and terminal differentiation markers tested, including sucrase-isomaltase, lactase-phlorizin hydrolase and E and Li-cadherins were found to be significantly up-regulated after only 3 days of treatment in the newly differentiating cells. Further investigation of the effects of PP2 revealed a significant up-regulation of the two main intestinal epithelial cell-specific transcription factors Cdx2 and HNF1α and a reduction of polycomb PRC2-related epigenetic repressing activity as measured by a decrease in H3K27me3, two events closely related to the control of cell terminal differentiation in the intestine. Taken together, these data suggest that SFKs play a key role in the control of intestinal epithelial cell terminal differentiation. PMID:23274493

  6. Influence of different components in a TPV PP/EPDM based with low hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheller, J.; Jacobi, M. M.

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) are a class of polymeric material obtained by dynamic vulcanization of an elastomer in a melted thermoplastic matrix. This work intend to evaluate different variables in the production of low hardness TPVs made of polypropylene (PP) and ethylene propylene rubber (EPDM), as well the optimization of the variables looking for TPVs with improved performance. In the Study I the influence of PP crystallinity were evaluated, in the Study II the effects of different amounts of dicumyl peroxide (DCP) were evaluated and in the Study III the amount of the phenolic resin were evaluated. This extended abstract presents, in a more detailed way, the results considering the curative phenolic resin content (Study III). The others results and discussions are briefly described in the results and discussions section. The compounds were obtained in a closed mixing chamber and their processability properties, swelling, hardness and tensile strength were evaluated. With the results obtained were possible to evaluate the influence of different ingredients in the TPVs properties. The results were discussed and presented looking for a better understanding of the influence of this variable in the final product, as well the correlation between then.

  7. Wide Angle X-Ray Scattering Investigations on Irradiated iPP-VGCNF Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Arnold; Chipara, Dorina; Lozano, Karen; Chipara, Mircea

    Isotactic Polypropylene (iPP) has been loaded by various amounts of Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofiber (VGCNF), ranging between 0 and 20 % wt., via melt mixing. The as obtained nanocomposites were gamma irradiated in air, at room temperature, at a dose rate of about 1 kGy/h and various integral doses ranging between 0 and 28 kGy. by using a 60Co source. Wide Angle X-Ray Spectroscopy has been used to quantify the changes in the crystalline structure and the degree of crystallinity of iPP-VGCNFs nanocomposites. The measurements have been carried out by a Bruker Discover 8 spectrometer. Additional measurements have been performed by Raman spectroscopy using a Renishaw InVia microscope system operating at 532 and 785 nm. The experimental spectra of the nanocomposite were fitted by assuming a superposition of extended Breit-Wigner-Fano line shapes. It is concluded that the observed modifications noticed in these nanocomposites are dominated by the radiation-induced degradation of the polymeric matrix. Differential Scanning calorimetry data provided additional information regarding the effect of the nanofiller on the degree of crystallinity.

  8. Comparison between two portable devices for widefield PpIX fluorescence during cervical intraepithelial neoplasia treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Inada, Natalia Mayumi; Lombardi, Welington; Cossetin, Natália Fernandez; Varoto, Cinthia; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2015-06-01

    The use of portable electronic devices, in particular mobile phones such as smartphones is increasing not only for all known applications, but also for diagnosis of diseases and monitoring treatments like topical Photodynamic Therapy. The aim of the study is to evaluate the production of the photosensitizer Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) after topical application of a cream containing methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) in the cervix with diagnosis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) through the fluorescence images captured after one and three hours and compare the images using two devices (a Sony Xperia® mobile and an Apple Ipod®. Was observed an increasing fluorescence intensity of the cervix three hours after cream application, in both portable electronic devices. However, because was used a specific program for the treatment of images using the Ipod® device, these images presented better resolution than observed by the Sony cell phone without a specific program. One hour after cream application presented a more selective fluorescence than the group of three hours. In conclusion, the use of portable devices to obtain images of PpIX fluorescence shown to be an effective tool and is necessary the improvement of programs for achievement of better results.

  9. Morphological and chemical analysis of PP film treated by Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Orto, E. C.; Vaccaro, A.; Riccardi, C.

    2014-11-01

    PP films have been activated by DBD, with different gases (air, N2, H2, CO2) and at different energy treatments. Then film surfaces were analysed by AFM, contact-angle technique, ink test measurements and XPS, to explore modifications in surface topography, wettability, and oxidation state. After the treatments, it is possible to observe the formation of water-soluble low-molecular-weight oxidized materials (LMWOMs), which dimensions and spatial density are related to treatment parameters. Using AFM data it is possible to analyse the statistical distribution of the bubbles sizes. The analysis of XPS spectra shows the formation of oxidized polar groups on surface (e.g. C-O, C=O, COH) and allows to evaluate the extent and the nature of film oxidation, and how it influences surfaces properties. The relationship between surface chemical and morphological modifications and treatment parameters is pointed out. Then PP sample have been monitored in the time, to determine the ageing effects.

  10. AtPP2CG1, a protein phosphatase 2C, positively regulates salt tolerance of Arabidopsis in abscisic acid-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Zhu, Yanming; Zhai, Hong; Cai, Hua; Ji, Wei; Luo, Xiao; Li, Jing; Bai, Xi

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AtPP2CG1 positively regulates salt tolerance in ABA-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AtPP2CG1 up-regulates the expression of marker genes in different pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AtPP2CG1 expresses in the vascular system and trichomes of Arabidopsis. -- Abstract: AtPP2CG1 (Arabidopsis thaliana protein phosphatase 2C G Group 1) was predicted as an abiotic stress candidate gene by bioinformatic analysis in our previous study. The gene encodes a putative protein phosphatase 2C that belongs to Group G of PP2C. There is no report of Group G genes involved in abiotic stress so far. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that AtPP2CG1 expression was induced by salt, drought, and abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. The expression levels of AtPP2CG1 in the ABA synthesis-deficient mutant abi2-3 were much lower than that in WT plants under salt stress suggesting that the expression of AtPP2CG1 acts in an ABA-dependent manner. Over-expression of AtPP2CG1 led to enhanced salt tolerance, whereas its loss of function caused decreased salt tolerance. These results indicate that AtPP2CG1 positively regulates salt stress in an ABA-dependent manner. Under salt treatment, AtPP2CG1 up-regulated the expression levels of stress-responsive genes, including RD29A, RD29B, DREB2A and KIN1. GUS activity was detected in roots, leaves, stems, flower, and trichomes of AtPP2CG1 promoter-GUS transgenic plants. AtPP2CG1 protein was localized in nucleus and cytoplasm via AtPP2CG1:eGFP and YFP:AtPP2CG1 fusion approaches.

  11. Cloning and sequence analysis of a full-length cDNA of SmPP1cb encoding turbot protein phosphatase 1 beta catalytic subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Fei; Guo, Huarong; Wang, Jian

    2008-02-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases, is an important and versatile mechanism by which eukaryotic cells regulate almost all the signaling processes. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is the first and well-characterized member of the protein serine/threonine phosphatase family. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding the beta isoform of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1(PP1cb), was for the first time isolated and sequenced from the skin tissue of flatfish turbot Scophthalmus maximus, designated SmPP1cb, by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The cDNA sequence of SmPP1cb we obtained contains a 984 bp open reading frame (ORF), flanked by a complete 39 bp 5' untranslated region and 462 bp 3' untranslated region. The ORF encodes a putative 327 amino acid protein, and the N-terminal section of this protein is highly acidic, Met-Ala-Glu-Gly-Glu-Leu-Asp-Val-Asp, a common feature for PP1 catalytic subunit but absent in protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B). And its calculated molecular mass is 37 193 Da and pI 5.8. Sequence analysis indicated that, SmPP1cb is extremely conserved in both amino acid and nucleotide acid levels compared with the PP1cb of other vertebrates and invertebrates, and its Kozak motif contained in the 5'UTR around ATG start codon is GXXAXXGXX ATGG, which is different from mammalian in two positions A-6 and G-3, indicating the possibility of different initiation of translation in turbot, and also the 3'UTR of SmPP1cb is highly diverse in the sequence similarity and length compared with other animals, especially zebrafish. The cloning and sequencing of SmPP1cb gene lays a good foundation for the future work on the biological functions of PP1 in the flatfish turbot.

  12. In-vivo fluorescence dosimetry of aminolevulinate-based protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulation in human nonmelanoma skin cancers and precancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Christine B.; Lohser, Sara; Chang, Sung; Bailin, Philip A.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2009-06-01

    PDT is clinically useful for precancers (actinic keratoses; AK) of the skin, but the optimal duration for 5-ALA application is still controversial. For basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), cure rates remain inferior to surgical excision. Lack of knowledge about regional levels of PpIX levels within target tissues clearly contribute to these suboptimal results. To investigate PpIX levels achievable in human skin neoplasias in-vivo, a clinical study to monitor PpIX accumulation in vivo was performed. PpIX-fluorescence in patients undergoing ALA-PDT for facial AK was monitored via real-time in-vivo fluorescence dosimetry, with measurements q20 min following application of 5-ALA (Levulan Kerastick). PpIX accumulation followed linear kinetics in nearly all cases. The slopes varied widely, and did not correlate with clinical outcome in all patients. Some patients with a low accumulation of PpIX fluorescence had a good response to therapy, whereas others with high PpIX accumulation required repeat treatment (although not necessarily of the same lesion). PpIX accumulation rates did correlate to a certain degree with the overall amount of erythema. We conclude that unknown factors besides PpIX levels must be critical for the response to treatment. To assess the relationship between PpIX levels in various skin cancers, patients undergoing routine Mohs surgery for BCC or SCC were measured by in-vivo dosimetry at 2 h after 5-ALA application. Overall, a progressive increase in PpIX signal during malignant progression was observed, in the following rank order: Normal skin < AK < SCC ~ BCC.

  13. The Arabidopsis mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase PP2C5 affects seed germination, stomatal aperture, and abscisic acid-inducible gene expression.

    PubMed

    Brock, Anita K; Willmann, Roland; Kolb, Dagmar; Grefen, Laure; Lajunen, Heini M; Bethke, Gerit; Lee, Justin; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gust, Andrea A

    2010-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone regulating various cellular processes in plants, including stomatal opening and seed germination. Although protein phosphorylation via mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) has been suggested to be important in ABA signaling, the corresponding phosphatases are largely unknown. Here, we show that a member of the Protein Phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), PP2C5, is acting as a MAPK phosphatase. The PP2C5 protein colocalizes and directly interacts with stress-induced MPK3, MPK4, and MPK6, predominantly in the nucleus. Importantly, altered PP2C5 levels affect MAPK activation. Whereas Arabidopsis plants depleted of PP2C5 show an enhanced ABA-induced activation of MPK3 and MPK6, ectopic expression of PP2C5 in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) resulted in the opposite effect, with the two MAPKs salicylic acid-induced protein kinase and wound-induced protein kinase not being activated any longer after ABA treatment. Moreover, depletion of PP2C5, whose gene expression itself is affected by ABA treatment, resulted in altered ABA responses. Loss-of-function mutation in PP2C5 or AP2C1, a close PP2C5 homolog, resulted in an increased stomatal aperture under normal growth conditions and a partial ABA-insensitive phenotype in seed germination that was most prominent in the pp2c5 ap2c1 double mutant line. In addition, the response of ABA-inducible genes such as ABI1, ABI2, RD29A, and Erd10 was reduced in the mutant plants. Thus, we suggest that PP2C5 acts as a MAPK phosphatase that positively regulates seed germination, stomatal closure, and ABA-inducible gene expression. PMID:20488890

  14. SMOS L1PP Performance Analysis with MIRAS Data from Validation Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, R.; Barbosa, J.; Candeias, H.; Catarino, N.; Freitas, J.; Freitas, S.; Gutierrez, A.; Lucas, B.

    2009-04-01

    Deimos Engenharia has been involved in the SMOS mission since 2003 and has played an important role in the project since then. The two main software packages that Deimos Engenharia has maintained during the past years are a) the Level 1 Processor Prototype (L1PP), where the scientific algorithms are implemented and verified; and b) the SMOS End-to-end Performance Simulator - Ground Segment (SEPS-GS), derived from the original simulator from the Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya (UPC) but with emphasis on Ground Segment capabilities. These tools have been widely used by the scientific community, as well as by the Deimos Engenharia's SMOS team, in preparation for the operational period of the SMOS mission. In May/June 2007, Image Validation Tests (IVT) were conducted in the Maxwell Anechoic Chamber at ESA/ESTEC, in Noordwijck. This campaign provided the first set of data available measured by the MIRAS instrument itself, instead of being generated by the SEPS-GS simulator. This data has now been extensively analysed by Deimos Engenharia, and several studies have been performed and released, aiming at the validation and improvement of the L1PP. The results have shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical expectations, confirming that the L1PP is well prepared for the upcoming commissioning phase. The IVT data analysis was mainly based on the study of reconstructed flat scenes obtained in the Maxwell chamber. This allowed the test of several optional calibration algorithms and alternative methods for image reconstruction and foreign sources removal. The L1PP was adapted specifically for the analysis of IVT data, through the implementation of a Near Field reconstruction algorithm. The Level 1 processing has then been evaluated with real data taken with MIRAS. The results have been consistently better than expected, since the theoretically predicted value for the radiometric accuracy (or pixel bias) of an averaged flat scene is estimated to be roughly 1 K and

  15. Afferent Arteriolar Dilation to 11,12-EET Analogs Involves PP2A Activity and Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Imig, John D.; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Reddy, D. Sudarshan; White, Richard E.; Falck, John R.

    2008-01-01

    The epoxygenase metabolite, 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (11,12-EET), has renal vascular actions. 11,12-EET analogs have been developed to determine the structure activity relationship for 11,12-EET and as a tool to investigate signaling mechanisms responsible for afferent arteriolar dilation. We hypothesized that 11,12-EET mediated afferent arteriolar dilation involves increased phosphoprotein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and large-conductance calcium activated K+ (KCa) channels. We evaluated the chemically and/or metabolically stable 11,12-EET analogs: 11,12-EET-N-methylsulfonimide (11,12-EET-SI), 11-nonyloxy-undec-8(Z)-enoic acid (11,12-ether-EET-8-ZE), and 11,12-trans-oxidoeicosa-8(Z)-eonoic acid (11,12-tetra-EET-8-ZE). Afferent arteriolar responses were assessed. Activation of KCa channels by 11,12-EET analogs were established by single cell channel recordings in renal myocytes. Assessment of renal vascular responses revealed that 11,12-EET analogs increased afferent arteriolar diameter. Vasodilator responses to 11,12-EET analogs were abolished by K+ channel or PP2A inhibition. 11,12-EET analogs activated renal myocyte large-conductance KCa channels. 11,12-EET analogs increased cAMP by 2-fold and PP2A activity increased 3-8 fold in renal myocytes. PP2A inhibition did not significantly affect the 11,12-EET analog mediated increase in cAMP and PP2A increased renal myocyte KCa channel activity to a much greater extent than PKA. These data support the concept that 11,12-EET utilizes PP2A dependent pathways to activate large-conductance KCa channels and dilate the afferent arteriole. PMID:18260004

  16. Quantitative fluorescence in intracranial tumor: implications for ALA-induced PpIX as an intraoperative biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, Pablo A.; Leblond, Frederic; Kim, Anthony; Harris, Brent T.; Wilson, Brian C.; Fan, Xiaoyao; Tosteson, Tor D.; Hartov, Alex; Ji, Songbai; Erkmen, Kadir; Simmons, Nathan E.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Object Accurate discrimination between tumor and normal tissue is crucial for optimal tumor resection. Qualitative fluorescence of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), synthesized endogenously following δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration, has been used for this purpose in high-grade glioma (HGG). The authors show that diagnostically significant but visually imperceptible concentrations of PpIX can be quantitatively measured in vivo and used to discriminate normal from neoplastic brain tissue across a range of tumor histologies. Methods The authors studied 14 patients with diagnoses of low-grade glioma (LGG), HGG, meningioma, and metastasis under an institutional review board–approved protocol for fluorescence-guided resection. The primary aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic capabilities of a highly sensitive, spectrally resolved quantitative fluorescence approach to conventional fluorescence imaging for detection of neoplastic tissue in vivo. Results A significant difference in the quantitative measurements of PpIX concentration occurred in all tumor groups compared with normal brain tissue. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of PpIX concentration as a diagnostic variable for detection of neoplastic tissue yielded a classification efficiency of 87% (AUC = 0.95, specificity = 92%, sensitivity = 84%) compared with 66% (AUC = 0.73, specificity = 100%, sensitivity = 47%) for conventional fluorescence imaging (p < 0.0001). More than 81% (57 of 70) of the quantitative fluorescence measurements that were below the threshold of the surgeon's visual perception were classified correctly in an analysis of all tumors. Conclusions These findings are clinically profound because they demonstrate that ALA-induced PpIX is a targeting biomarker for a variety of intracranial tumors beyond HGGs. This study is the first to measure quantitative ALA-induced PpIX concentrations in vivo, and the results have broad implications for guidance during resection of

  17. The broken "Off" switch in cancer signaling: PP2A as a regulator of tumorigenesis, drug resistance, and immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    Ruvolo, Peter P

    2016-12-01

    Aberrant activation of signal transduction pathways can transform a normal cell to a malignant one and can impart survival properties that render cancer cells resistant to therapy. A diverse set of cascades have been implicated in various cancers including those mediated by serine/threonine kinases such RAS, PI3K/AKT, and PKC. Signal transduction is a dynamic process involving both "On" and "Off" switches. Activating mutations of RAS or PI3K can be viewed as the switch being stuck in the "On" position resulting in continued signaling by a survival and/or proliferation pathway. On the other hand, inactivation of protein phosphatases such as the PP2A family can be seen as the defective "Off" switch that similarly can activate these pathways. A problem for therapeutic targeting of PP2A is that the enzyme is a hetero-trimer and thus drug targeting involves complex structures. More importantly, since PP2A isoforms generally act as tumor suppressors one would want to activate these enzymes rather than suppress them. The elucidation of the role of cellular inhibitors like SET and CIP2A in cancer suggests that targeting these proteins can have therapeutic efficacy by mechanisms involving PP2A activation. Furthermore, drugs such as FTY-720 can activate PP2A isoforms directly. This review will cover the current state of knowledge of PP2A role as a tumor suppressor in cancer cells and as a mediator of processes that can impact drug resistance and immune surveillance. PMID:27556014

  18. Search for the K-pp bound state via the in-flight 3He(K-, n) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sada, Y.; Ajimura, S.; Beer, G.; Bhang, H.; Bragadireanu, M.; Buehler, P.; Busso, L.; Cargnelli, M.; Choi, S.; Curceanu, C.; Enomoto, S.; Faso, D.; Fujioka, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Guaraldo, C.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayano, R. S.; Hiraiwa, T.; Iio, M.; Iliescu, M.; Inoue, K.; Ishiguro, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishimoto, S.; Ishiwatari, T.; Itahashi, K.; Iwai, M.; Iwasaki, M.; Kato, Y.; Kawasaki, S.; Kienle, P.; Kou, H.; Ma, Y.; Marton, J.; Matsuda, Y.; Mizoi, Y.; Morra, O.; Nagae, T.; Noumi, H.; Ohnishi, H.; Okada, S.; Outa, H.; Piscicchia, K.; Poli Lener, M.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakuma, F.; Sato, M.; Scordo, A.; Sekimoto, M.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, T.; Tanida, K.; Tatsuno, H.; Tokuda, M.; Tomono, D.; Toyoda, A.; Tsukada, K.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Weunschek, B. K.; Yamaga, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Yim, H.; Zhang, Q.; Zmeskal, J.

    2014-11-01

    In the J-PARC E15 experiment, a K- pp search was performed via the 3He(K-, n) reaction at 1.0 GeV/c. A forward-going neutron is detected by a neutron counter with 15 m flight length, and decay particles from K- pp are simultaneously measured by a cylindrical detector system that surrounds a liquid 3He target system. In March and May, 2013, we carried out the first physics data-taking with 5×109 incident kaons on the 3He target, and we have obtained a preliminary exclusive analysis result of 3He(K-, Λp)n reaction.

  19. Search for third-generation scalar leptoquarks in pp at square root s=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safonov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schleiphake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-08-10

    We report on a search for charge-1/3 third-generation leptoquarks (LQ) produced in pp collisions at square root s =1.96 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab. Third-generation leptoquarks are assumed to be produced in pairs and to decay to a tau neutrino and a b quark with branching fraction B. We place upper limits on sigma(pp --> LQLQ)B2 as a function of the leptoquark mass M(LQ). Assuming B=1, we exclude at the 95% confidence level third-generation scalar leptoquarks with M(LQ)<229 GeV. PMID:17930814

  20. Potential anti-tumor effects of FTY720 associated with PP2A activation: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Cristóbal, Ion; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Manso, Rebeca; González-Alonso, Paula; Rojo, Federico; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    FTY720 (Fingolimod, Gilenya (†) ) is an FDA-approved immunosuppressant currently used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. However, a large number of studies over the last few years have shown that FTY720 shows potent antitumor properties that suggest its potential usefulness as a novel anticancer agent. Interestingly, the restoration of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity mediated by FTY720 could play a key role in its antitumor effects. Taking into account that PP2A inactivation is a common event that determines poor outcome in several tumor types, FTY720 could serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for cancer patients with such alterations. PMID:26950691

  1. Study of two-photon corrections in the pp{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} process: Hard rescattering mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Guttmann, Julia; Vanderhaeghen, Marc; Kivel, Nikolai

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the two-photon corrections to the process pp{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} at large momentum transfer, aimed to access the timelike nucleon form factors. We estimate the two-photon corrections using a hard rescattering mechanism, which has already been used to calculate the corresponding corrections to elastic electron-proton scattering. Using different nucleon distribution amplitudes, we find that the two-photon corrections to the pp{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} cross sections in the momentum transfer range 5-30 GeV{sup 2} is below the 1% level.

  2. pp-GalNAc-T13 induces high metastatic potential of murine Lewis lung cancer by generating trimeric Tn antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yasuyuki; Zhang, Qing; Akita, Kaoru; Nakada, Hiroshi; Hamamura, Kazunori; Tokuda, Noriyo; Tsuchida, Akiko; Matsubara, Takeshi; Hori, Tomoko; Okajima, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Keiko; Urano, Takeshi; Furukawa, Koichi

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 was up-regulated in high metastatic sublines of Lewis lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 expression enhanced cell invasion activity in low metastatic sublines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trimeric Tn antigen was induced in the transfectant cells of ppGalNAc-T13 cDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A major protein carrying trimeric Tn structure was identified as Syndecan-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of ppGalNAc-T13 resulted in the reduction of invasion and of metastasis.. -- Abstract: In order to analyze the mechanisms for cancer metastasis, high metastatic sublines (H7-A, H7-Lu, H7-O, C4-sc, and C4-ly) were obtained by repeated injection of mouse Lewis lung cancer sublines H7 and C4 into C57BL/6 mice. These sublines exhibited increased proliferation and invasion activity in vitro. Ganglioside profiles exhibited lower expression of GM1 in high metastatic sublines than the parent lines. Then, we established GM1-Si-1 and GM1-Si-2 by stable silencing of GM1 synthase in H7 cells. These GM1-knockdown clones exhibited increased proliferation and invasion. Then, we explored genes that markedly altered in the expression levels by DNA microarray in the combination of C4 vs. C4-ly or H7 vs. H7 (GM1-Si). Consequently, pp-GalNAc-T13 gene was identified as up-regulated genes in the high metastatic sublines. Stable transfection of pp-GalNAc-T13 cDNA into C4 (T13-TF) resulted in increased invasion and motility. Then, immunoblotting and flow cytometry using various antibodies and lectins were performed. Only anti-trimeric Tn antibody (mAb MLS128), showed increased expression levels of trimeric Tn antigen in T13-TF clones. Moreover, immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting was performed by mAb MLS128, leading to the identification of an 80 kDa band carrying trimeric Tn antigen, i.e. Syndecan-1. Stable silencing of endogenous pp-GalNAc-T13 in C4-sc (T13-KD) revealed that primary tumors generated by

  3. Dexamethasone alone and in combination with desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid or levetiracetam interferes with 5-ALA-mediated PpIX production and cellular retention in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Johnathan E; Steele, Christopher J; Rovin, Richard A; Belton, Robert J; Winn, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Extent of resection of glioblastoma (GBM) correlates with overall survival. Fluorescence-guided resection (FGR) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) can improve the extent of resection. Unfortunately not all patients given 5-ALA accumulate sufficient quantities of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) for successful FGR. In this study, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone, desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid, and levetiracetam on the production and accumulation of PpIX in U87MG cells. All of these drugs, except levetiracetam, reduce the total amount of PpIX produced by GBM cells (p < 0.05). When dexamethasone is mixed with another drug (desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid or levetiracetam) the amount of PpIX produced is further decreased (p < 0.01). However, when cells are analyzed for PpIX cellular retention, dexamethasone accumulated significantly more PpIX than the vehicle control (p < 0.05). Cellular retention of PpIX was not different from controls in cells treated with dexamethasone plus desipramine, valproic acid or levetiracetam, but was significantly less for dexamethasone plus phenytoin (p < 0.01). These data suggest that medications given before and during surgery may interfere with PpIX accumulation in malignant cells. At this time, levetiracetam appears to be the best medication in its class (anticonvulsants) for patients undergoing 5-ALA-mediated FGR. PMID:26643803

  4. Multiple phosphorylation sites at the C-terminus regulate nuclear import of HCMV DNA polymerase processivity factor ppUL44

    SciTech Connect

    Alvisi, Gualtiero; Marin, Oriano; Pari, Gregory; Mancini, Manuela; Avanzi, Simone; Loregian, Arianna; Jans, David A.; Ripalti, Alessandro

    2011-09-01

    The processivity factor of human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase, phosphoprotein ppUL44, is essential for viral replication. During viral infection ppUL44 is phosphorylated by the viral kinase pUL97, but neither the target residues on ppUL44 nor the effect of phosphorylation on ppUL44's activity are known. We report here that ppUL44 is phosphorylated when transiently expressed in mammalian cells and coimmunoprecipitates with cellular kinases. Of three potential phosphorylation sites (S413, S415, S418) located upstream of ppUL44's nuclear localization signal (NLS) and one (T427) within the NLS itself, protein kinase CK2 (CK2) specifically phosphorylates S413, to trigger a cascade of phosphorylation of S418 and S415 by CK1 and CK2, respectively. Negative charge at the CK2/CK1 target serine residues facilitates optimal nuclear accumulation of ppUL44, whereas negative charge on T427, a potential cyclin-dependent 1 phosphorylation site, strongly decreases nuclear accumulation. Thus, nuclear transport of ppUL44 is finely tuned during viral infection through complex phosphorylation events.

  5. Suppression of the Coulomb Interaction in the Off-Energy-Shell p-p Scattering from the p+d{yields}p+p+n Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mudo, F.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Z.; Gyuerky, G.; Kiss, G.; Somorjai, E.

    2007-06-22

    Off-energy-shell effects in p-p scattering have been investigated at p-p relative energies from 600 down to 80 keV applying the Trojan horse method (THM) to the p+d{yields}p+p+n reaction at 5 MeV. In contrast with the on-energy-shell case, no Coulomb-nuclear interference minimum has been found in the extracted THM p-p cross section, due to the suppression of the Coulomb amplitude as predicted by the half-off-energy shell calculations. This hypothesis is strengthened by the agreement between THM p-p data and calculated on-energy-shell n+n, n+p and nuclear p+p cross sections.

  6. Measurement of associated production of z bosons with charm quark jets in pp collisions at √s=1.96  TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2014-01-31

    We present the first measurements of the ratios of cross sections σ(pp → Z+c jet)/σ(pp → Z+jet) and σ(pp → Z+c jet)/σ(pp → Z+b jet) for the associated production of a Z boson with at least one charm or bottom quark jet. Jets have transverse momentum ​pT(jet)​>20  GeV and pseudorapidity |​η(jet)​|<2.5. These cross section ratios are measured differentially as a function of jet and Z boson transverse momenta, based on 9.7  fb(-1) of pp collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s=1.96  TeV. The measurements show significant deviations from perturbative QCD calculations and predictions from various event generators. PMID:24580440

  7. Measurement of Associated Production of Z Bosons with Charm Quark Jets in pp¯ Collisions at √s =1.96 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the ratios of cross sections σ(pp¯→Z +c jet)/σ(pp¯→Z +jet) and σ(pp¯→Z +c jet)/σ(pp¯→Z +b jet) for the associated production of a Z boson with at least one charm or bottom quark jet. Jets have transverse momentum ​pTjet​>20 GeV and pseudorapidity |​ηjet​|<2.5. These cross section ratios are measured differentially as a function of jet and Z boson transverse momenta, based on 9.7 fb-1 of pp¯ collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s =1.96 TeV. The measurements show significant deviations from perturbative QCD calculations and predictions from various event generators.

  8. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man; Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-01

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H2O), glycerol (C3H8O3) and diiodomethane (CH2I2) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  9. Key factors limiting the open circuit voltage of n(+)pp(+) indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, Chandra; Thesling, William; Weinberg, Irving

    1990-01-01

    Solar cells made from gallium arsenide (Gaas), with a room temperature bandgap of E(sub g) = 1.43 eV have exhibited the best measured open circuit voltage (V sub oc) of 1.05 V at 1 AM0, 25 C. The material InP is in many ways similar to GaAs. A simple calculation comparing InP to GaAs then shows that solar cells made from InP, with E(sub g) = 1.35 at 300 K, should exhibit the best measured V sub oc of approximately 950 mV at 1 AM0, 300 K. However, to date, the best measured V sub oc for InP solar cells made by any fabrication method is 899 mV at AM1.5, 25 C which would translate to 912 mV at 1 AM0, 25 C. The V sub oc of an n(+)pp(+) InP solar cell is governed by several factors. Of these, some factors, such as the thickness and doping of the emitter and base regions, are easily controlled and can be adjusted to desired values dictated by a good performance optimizing model. Such factors were not considered. There are other factors which also govern V sub oc, and their values are not so easily controlled. The primary ones among these are (1) the indirect or Hall-Shockley-Read lifetimes in the various regions of the cell, (2) the low-doping intrinsic carrier concentration n(sub i) of the InP material, (3) the heavy doping factors in the emitter and BSF regions, and (4) the front surface recombination velocity S(sub F). The influence of these latter factors on the V sub oc of the n(+)pp(+) InP solar cell and the results were used to produce a near-optimum design of the n(+)pp(+) InP solar cell.

  10. Key factors limiting the open circuit voltage of n(+)pp(+) indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, Chandra; Thesling, William; Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    Solar cells made from gallium arsenide (GaAs), with a room temperature bandgap of E(sub g) = 1.43 eV have exhibited the best measured open circuit voltage (V sub OC) of 1.05 V at 1 AMO, 25 C. The material InP is in many ways similar to GaAs. A simple calculation comparing InP to GaAs then shows that solar cells made from InP, with E(sub g) = 1.35 at 300 K, should exhibit the best measured (V sub OC) of approximately 950 mV at 1 AMO, 300 K. However, to date, the best measured V(sub OC) for InP solar cells made by any fabrication method is 899 mV at AM1.5, 25 C which would translate to 912 mV at 1 AMO, 25 C. The V(sub OC) of an n(+)pp(+) InP solar cell is governed by several factors. Of these, some factors, such as the thickness and doping of the emitter and base regions, are easily controlled and can be adjusted to desired values dictated by a good performance optimizing model. Such factors were not considered. There are other factors which also govern V(sub OC), and their values are not so easily controlled. The primary ones among these are (1) the indirect or Hall-Shockley-Read lifetimes in the various regions of the cell, (2) the low-doping intrinsic carrier concentration n(sub i) of the InP material, (3) the heavy doping factors in the emitter and BSF regions, and (4) the front surface recombination velocity S(sub F). The influence of these latter factors on the V(sub OC) of the n(+)pp(+) InP solar cell and the results were used to produce a near-optimum design of the n(+)pp(+) InP solar cell.

  11. Implementation of the PR&PP methodology: the role of formal expert elicitations

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2010-01-01

    The application of the methodology developed by the GenIV International Forum's (GIF's) Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) Working Group is an expert elicitation. Although the framework of the methodology is structured and systematic, it does not by itself constitute or require a formal elicitation. However, formal elicitation can be utilized in the PR&PP context to provide a systematic, credible and transparent qualitative analysis and develop input for quantitative analyses. This section provides an overview of expert elicitations, a discussion of the role formal expert elicitations can play in the PR&PP methodology, an outline of the formal expert elicitation process and a brief practical guide to conducting formal expert elicitations. Expert elicitation is a process utilizing knowledgeable people in cases, for example, when an assessment is needed but physically based data is absent or open to interpretation. More specifically, it can be used to: (1) predict future events; (2) provide estimates on new, rare, complex or poorly understood phenomena; (3) integrate or interpret existing information; or (4) determine what is currently known, how well it is known or what is worth learning in a field. Expert elicitation can be informal or formal. The informal application of expert judgment is frequently used. Although it can produce good results, it often provides demonstrably biased or otherwise flawed answers to problems. This along with the absence of transparency can result in a loss of confidence when experts speak on issues. More formal expert elicitation is a structured process that makes use of people knowledgeable in certain areas to make assessments. The reason for advocating formal use is that the quality and accuracy of expert judgment comes from the completeness of the expert's understanding of the phenomena and the process used to elicit and analyze the data. The use of a more formal process to obtain, lU1derstand and analyze expert

  12. The Arabidopsis AtPP2CA Protein Phosphatase Inhibits the GORK K+ Efflux Channel and Exerts a Dominant Suppressive Effect on Phosphomimetic-activating Mutations.

    PubMed

    Lefoulon, Cécile; Boeglin, Martin; Moreau, Bertrand; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Szponarski, Wojciech; Dauzat, Myriam; Michard, Erwan; Gaillard, Isabelle; Chérel, Isabelle

    2016-03-18

    The regulation of the GORK (Guard Cell Outward Rectifying) Shaker channel mediating a massive K(+) efflux in Arabidopsis guard cells by the phosphatase AtPP2CA was investigated. Unlike the gork mutant, the atpp2ca mutants displayed a phenotype of reduced transpiration. We found that AtPP2CA interacts physically with GORK and inhibits GORK activity in Xenopus oocytes. Several amino acid substitutions in the AtPP2CA active site, including the dominant interfering G145D mutation, disrupted the GORK-AtPP2CA interaction, meaning that the native conformation of the AtPP2CA active site is required for the GORK-AtPP2CA interaction. Furthermore, two serines in the GORK ankyrin domain that mimic phosphorylation (Ser to Glu) or dephosphorylation (Ser to Ala) were mutated. Mutations mimicking phosphorylation led to a significant increase in GORK activity, whereas mutations mimicking dephosphorylation had no effect on GORK. In Xenopus oocytes, the interaction of AtPP2CA with "phosphorylated" or "dephosphorylated" GORK systematically led to inhibition of the channel to the same baseline level. Single-channel recordings indicated that the GORK S722E mutation increases the open probability of the channel in the absence, but not in the presence, of AtPP2CA. The dephosphorylation-independent inactivation mechanism of GORK by AtPP2CA is discussed in relation with well known conformational changes in animal Shaker-like channels that lead to channel opening and closing. In plants, PP2C activity would control the stomatal aperture by regulating both GORK and SLAC1, the two main channels required for stomatal closure. PMID:26801610

  13. Binding Properties of the N-Acetylglucosamine and High-Mannose N-Glycan PP2-A1 Phloem Lectin in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Beneteau, Julie; Renard, Denis; Marché, Laurent; Douville, Elise; Lavenant, Laurence; Rahbé, Yvan; Dupont, Didier; Vilaine, Françoise; Dinant, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Phloem Protein2 (PP2) is a component of the phloem protein bodies found in sieve elements. We describe here the lectin properties of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PP2-A1. Using a recombinant protein produced in Escherichia coli, we demonstrated binding to N-acetylglucosamine oligomers. Glycan array screening showed that PP2-A1 also bound to high-mannose N-glycans and 9-acyl-N-acetylneuraminic sialic acid. Fluorescence spectroscopy-based titration experiments revealed that PP2-A1 had two classes of binding site for N,N′,N″-triacetylchitotriose, a low-affinity site and a high-affinity site, promoting the formation of protein dimers. A search for structural similarities revealed that PP2-A1 aligned with the Cbm4 and Cbm22-2 carbohydrate-binding modules, leading to the prediction of a β-strand structure for its conserved domain. We investigated whether PP2-A1 interacted with phloem sap glycoproteins by first characterizing abundant Arabidopsis phloem sap proteins by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Then we demonstrated that PP2-A1 bound to several phloem sap proteins and that this binding was not completely abolished by glycosidase treatment. As many plant lectins have insecticidal activity, we also assessed the effect of PP2-A1 on weight gain and survival in aphids. Unlike other mannose-binding lectins, when added to an artificial diet, recombinant PP2-A1 had no insecticidal properties against Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae. However, at mid-range concentrations, the protein affected weight gain in insect nymphs. These results indicate the presence in PP2-A1 of several carbohydrate-binding sites, with potentially different functions in the trafficking of endogenous proteins or in interactions with phloem-feeding insects. PMID:20442276

  14. LB100, a small molecule inhibitor of PP2A with potent chemo- and radio-sensitizing potential.

    PubMed

    Hong, Christopher S; Ho, Winson; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Chunzhang; Elder, J Bradley; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine phosphatase that plays a significant role in mitotic progression and cellular responses to DNA damage. While traditionally viewed as a tumor suppressor, inhibition of PP2A has recently come to attention as a novel therapeutic means of driving senescent cancer cells into mitosis and promoting cell death via mitotic catastrophe. These findings have been corroborated in numerous studies utilizing naturally produced compounds that selectively inhibit PP2A. To overcome the known human toxicities associated with these compounds, a water-soluble small molecule inhibitor, LB100, was recently developed to competitively inhibit the PP2A protein. This review summarizes the pre-clinical studies to date that have demonstrated the anti-cancer activity of LB100 via its chemo- and radio-sensitizing properties. These studies demonstrate the tremendous therapeutic potential of LB100 in a variety of cancer types. The results of an ongoing phase 1 trial are eagerly anticipated. PMID:25897893

  15. Hipk2 and PP1c cooperate to maintain Dvl protein levels required for Wnt signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Ishitani, Shizuka; Sato, Atsushi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Ishitani, Tohru

    2014-09-11

    The phosphoprotein Dishevelled (Dvl) is a common essential component of Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathways. However, the regulation and significance of Dvl phosphorylation are not fully understood. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (Hipk2) facilitates protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1c)-mediated dephosphorylation of Dvl via its C-terminal domain and that this dephosphorylation blocks ubiquitination and consequent degradation mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch, which targets the phosphorylated form of Dvl proteins. Inhibition of Hipk2 or PP1c function reduces Dvl protein levels and suppresses Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/PCP pathway-dependent events in mammalian cells and zebrafish embryos, suggesting that Hipk2 and PP1c are essential for maintaining Dvl protein levels that are sufficient to activate Wnt signaling. We also show that Wnt-3a, a Wnt/β-catenin ligand, induces dissociation of the Dvl-Hipk2-PP1c complex and Dvl degradation under high-cell-density conditions. This regulation may be a negative feedback mechanism that fine-tunes Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:25159144

  16. Nutritional Control of Cell Size by the Greatwall-Endosulfine-PP2A·B55 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chica, Nathalia; Rozalén, Ana Elisa; Pérez-Hidalgo, Livia; Rubio, Angela; Novak, Bela; Moreno, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    Proliferating cells adjust their cell size depending on the nutritional environment. Cells are large in rich media and small in poor media. This physiological response has been demonstrated in both unicellular and multicellular organisms. Here we show that the greatwall-endosulfine (Ppk18-Igo1 in fission yeast) pathway couples the nutritional environment to the cell-cycle machinery by regulating the activity of PP2A·B55. In the presence of nutrients, greatwall (Ppk18) protein kinase is inhibited by TORC1 and PP2A·B55 is active. High levels of PP2A·B55 prevent the activation of mitotic Cdk1·Cyclin B, and cells increase in size in G2 before they undergo mitosis. When nutrients are limiting, TORC1 activity falls off, and the activation of greatwall (Ppk18) leads to the phosphorylation of endosulfine (Igo1) and inhibition of PP2A·B55, which in turn allows full activation of Cdk1·CyclinB and entry into mitosis with a smaller cell size. Given the conservation of this pathway, it is reasonable to assume that this mechanism operates in higher eukaryotes, as well. PMID:26776736

  17. Figure of merit comparison of PP-based electret and PVDF-based piezoelectric polymer energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrlík, M.; Leadenham, S.; AlMaadeed, M. A.; Erturk, A.

    2016-04-01

    The harvesting of mechanical strain and kinetic energy has received great attention over the past two decades in order to power wireless electronic components such as those used in passive and active monitoring applications. Piezoelectric ceramics, such as PZT (lead zirconate titanate), constitute the most commonly used electromechanical interface in vibration energy harvesters. However, there are applications in which piezoelectric ceramics cannot be used due to their low allowable curvature and brittle nature. Soft polymer PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) is arguably the most popular non-ceramic soft piezoelectric energy harvester material for such scenarios. Another type of polymer that has received less attention is PP (polypropylene) for electret-based energy harvesting using the thickness mode (33- mode). This work presents figure of merit comparison of PP versus PVDF for off-resonant energy harvesting in thickness mode operation, revealing substantial advantage of PP over PVDF. For thickness mode energy harvesting scenarios (e.g. dynamic compression) at reasonable ambient vibration frequencies, the figure of merit for the maximum power output is proportional to the square of the effective piezoelectric strain constant divided by the effective permittivity constant. Under optimal conditions and for the same volume, it is shown that PP can generate more than two orders of magnitude larger electrical power as compared to PVDF due to the larger effective piezoelectric strain constant and lower permittivity of the former.

  18. Biodegradability of PP