Science.gov

Sample records for fracture network generator

  1. FRACGEN™ Stochastically Generates Fracture Networks Consistent with Data

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; McKoy, M.L.; Boyle, E.J.

    2006-10-01

    FRACGEN(tm) generates fracture networks for highly fractured reservoirs (< 60,000 fractures) consistent with field data (e.g., outcrop data, fmi and other logs) and a geologist’s intuition. It uses four Boolean models of increasing complexity through a Monte Carlo process that samples statistical distributions for various network attributes of each fracture set as found from the data. Three models account for hierarchical relations among fracture sets, and two generate fracture swarming. Termination/intersection frequencies may be controlled implicitly or explicitly. The code also is being upgraded to allow specification of fractal properties for the fracture network. FRACGEN provides an output file that specifies length, orientation, and effective aperture for each fracture. This output file can be used by a unique reservoir engineering code, NFFLOW, to perform reservoir engineering studies for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. This presentation describes use of FRACGEN to describe a reservoir in the Oriskany Sandstone in West Virginia.

  2. A 3-Dimensional discrete fracture network generator to examine fracture-matrix interaction using TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Kazumasa; Yongkoo, Seol

    2003-04-09

    Water fluxes in unsaturated, fractured rock involve the physical processes occurring at fracture-matrix interfaces within fracture networks. Modeling these water fluxes using a discrete fracture network model is a complicated effort. Existing preprocessors for TOUGH2 are not suitable to generate grids for fracture networks with various orientations and inclinations. There are several 3-D discrete-fracture-network simulators for flow and transport, but most of them do not capture fracture-matrix interaction. We have developed a new 3-D discrete-fracture-network mesh generator, FRACMESH, to provide TOUGH2 with information about the fracture network configuration and fracture-matrix interactions. FRACMESH transforms a discrete fracture network into a 3 dimensional uniform mesh, in which fractures are considered as elements with unique rock material properties and connected to surrounding matrix elements. Using FRACMESH, individual fractures may have uniform or random aperture distributions to consider heterogeneity. Fracture element volumes and interfacial areas are calculated from fracture geometry within individual elements. By using FRACMESH and TOUGH2, fractures with various inclinations and orientations, and fracture-matrix interaction, can be incorporated. In this paper, results of flow and transport simulations in a fractured rock block utilizing FRACMESH are presented.

  3. Drainage fracture networks in elastic solids with internal fluid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobchenko, Maya; Hafver, Andreas; Jettestuen, Espen; Galland, Olivier; Renard, François; Meakin, Paul; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Dysthe, Dag K.

    2013-06-01

    Experiments in which CO2 gas was generated by the yeast fermentation of sugar in an elastic layer of gelatine gel confined between two glass plates are described and analyzed theoretically. The CO2 gas pressure causes the gel layer to fracture. The gas produced is drained on short length scales by diffusion and on long length scales by flow in a fracture network, which has topological properties that are intermediate between river networks and hierarchical-fracture networks. A simple model for the experimental system with two parameters that characterize the disorder and the intermediate (river-fracture) topology of the network was developed and the results of the model were compared with the experimental results.

  4. Radionuclide gas transport through nuclear explosion-generated fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. In conclusion, seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.

  5. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-01-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable. PMID:26676058

  6. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B; Stauffer, Philip H; Knight, Earl E; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N

    2015-01-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable. PMID:26676058

  7. Radionuclide gas transport through nuclear explosion-generated fracture networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gasmore » breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. In conclusion, seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.« less

  8. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.

  9. Finite element generation of arbitrary 3-D fracture networks for flow analysis in complicated discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi-Hua

    2015-10-01

    Finite element generation of complicated fracture networks is the core issue and source of technical difficulty in three-dimensional (3-D) discrete fracture network (DFN) flow models. Due to the randomness and uncertainty in the configuration of a DFN, the intersection lines (traces) are arbitrarily distributed in each face (fracture and other surfaces). Hence, subdivision of the fractures is an issue relating to subdivision of two-dimensional (2-D) domains with arbitrarily-distributed constraints. When the DFN configuration is very complicated, the well-known approaches (e.g. Voronoi Delaunay-based methods and advancing-front techniques) cannot operate properly. This paper proposes an algorithm to implement end-to-end connection between traces to subdivide 2-D domains into closed loops. The compositions of the vertices in the common edges between adjacent loops (which may belong to a single fracture or two connected fractures) are thus ensured to be topologically identical. The paper then proposes an approach for triangulating arbitrary loops which does not add any nodes to ensure consistency of the meshes at the common edges. In addition, several techniques relating to tolerance control and improving code robustness are discussed. Finally, the equivalent permeability of the rock mass is calculated for some very complicated DFNs (the DFN may contain 1272 fractures, 633 connected fractures, and 16,270 closed loops). The results are compared with other approaches to demonstrate the veracity and efficiency of the approach proposed in this paper.

  10. Transport of conservative solutes in simulated fracture networks: 1. Synthetic data generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Donald M.; Benson, David A.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2008-05-01

    This paper investigates whether particle ensembles in a fractured rock domain may be adequately modeled as an operator-stable plume. If this statistical model applies to transport in fractured media, then an ensemble plume in a fractured rock domain may be modeled using the novel Fokker-Planck evolution equation of the operator-stable plume. These plumes (which include the classical multi-Gaussian as a subset) are typically characterized by power law leading-edge concentration profiles and super-Fickian growth rates. To investigate the possible correspondence of ensemble plumes to operator-stable densities, we use numerical simulations of fluid flow and solute transport through large-scale (2.5 km by 2.5 km), randomly generated fracture networks. These two-dimensional networks are generated according to fracture statistics obtained from field studies that describe fracture length, transmissivity, density, and orientation. A fracture continuum approach using MODFLOW is developed for the solution of fluid flow within the fracture network and low-permeability rock matrix, while a particle-tracking code, random walk particle method for simulating transport in heterogeneous permeable media (RWHet), is used to simulate the advective motion of conservative solutes through the model domain. By deterministically mapping individual fractures onto a highly discretized finite difference grid (1 m × 1 m × 1 m here), the MODFLOW "continuum" simulations can faithfully preserve details of the generated network and can approximate fluid flow in a discrete fracture network model. An advantage of the MODFLOW approach is that matrix permeability can be made nonzero to account for any degree of matrix flow and/or transport.

  11. Fracture Networks in Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vevatne, Jonas; Rimstad, Eivind; Hansen, Alex; Korsnes, Reinert; Hope, Sigmund

    2014-04-01

    Fracturing and refreezing of sea ice in the Kara sea are investigated using complex networkanalysis. By going to the dual network, where the fractures are nodes and their intersectionslinks, we gain access to topological features which are easy to measure and hence comparewith modeled networks. Resulting network reveal statistical properties of the fracturing process.The dual networks have a broad degree distribution, with a scale-free tail, high clusteringand efficiency. The degree-degree correlation profile shows disassortative behavior, indicatingpreferential growth. This implies that long, dominating fractures appear earlier than shorterfractures, and that the short fractures which are created later tend to connect to the longfractures.The knowledge of the fracturing process is used to construct growing fracture network (GFN)model which provides insight into the generation of fracture networks. The GFN model isprimarily based on the observation that fractures in sea ice are likely to end when hitting existingfractures. Based on an investigation of which fractures survive over time, a simple model forrefreezing is also added to the GFN model, and the model is analyzed and compared to the realnetworks.

  12. A structural analysis of the Minas da Panasqueira vein network and related fracture generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Dominique; Vieira, Romeu; Muchez, Philippe; Sintubin, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The Minas da Panasqueira is a world-class W-Cu-Sn vein-type deposit, situated within the Central Iberian Zone of the Palaeozoic Iberian Massif (Portugal). The deposit consists of a network of subhorizontal, sill-like massive quartz veins situated above the southwestern extremity of a greisen cupola, within regionally metamorphosed, isoclinally folded, lower-greenschist slates and greywackes. The greisen cupola is part of a larger intrusive complex, emplaced during the late- to post-tectonic stage of the Variscan orogeny. The late-Variscan granitoid(s) underlying the Panasqueira deposit is considered to have served as a major metal source. The structure of the network of subhorizontal extension veins, consists of numerous planar vein lobes that are separated by host-rock bridges and merge at branch-points. A structural analysis demonstrates that not only within the Panasqueira mine, but also on a more regional scale, one or more generations of flat-lying fractures are present. The veins clearly exploited these pre-existing discontinuities, as confirmed by (1) the vein geometry being directly influenced by variations in the orientation of the initial fracture sets and (2) the geometry of the rock bridges and overlapping vein morphologies, consistently showing straight-line propagating crack tips. If veining is governed by a preferential, strongly developed anisotropy in the host rock, the hypothesis of vein lobes and rock bridges forming during propagation of the parent crack by tip-line bifurcation and confinement processes (Foxford et al., 2000) does not seem plausible. Instead, we propose that the rock bridges formed from several, initially separate and small veinlets that eventually overlapped in an en echelon arrangement during progressive propagation and inflation. Bending of the rock bridges and incipient vein rotation indicate that veining occurred near the brittle-ductile transition. Using a quantitative analysis of bridge orientations, vein aspect ratios

  13. Modeling of Interaction of Hydraulic Fractures in Complex Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresse, O. 2; Wu, R.; Weng, X.; Gu, H.; Cohen, C.

    2011-12-01

    A recently developed unconventional fracture model (UFM) is able to simulate complex fracture network propagation in a formation with pre-existing natural fractures. Multiple fracture branches can propagate at the same time and intersect/cross each other. Each open fracture exerts additional stresses on the surrounding rock and adjacent fractures, which is often referred to as "stress shadow" effect. The stress shadow can cause significant restriction of fracture width, leading to greater risk of proppant screenout. It can also alter the fracture propagation path and drastically affect fracture network patterns. It is hence critical to properly model the fracture interaction in a complex fracture model. A method for computing the stress shadow in a complex hydraulic fracture network is presented. The method is based on an enhanced 2D Displacement Discontinuity Method (DDM) with correction for finite fracture height. The computed stress field is compared to 3D numerical simulation in a few simple examples and shows the method provides a good approximation for the 3D fracture problem. This stress shadow calculation is incorporated in the UFM. The results for simple cases of two fractures are presented that show the fractures can either attract or expel each other depending on their initial relative positions, and compares favorably with an independent 2D non-planar hydraulic fracture model. Additional examples of both planar and complex fractures propagating from multiple perforation clusters are presented, showing that fracture interaction controls the fracture dimension and propagation pattern. In a formation with no or small stress anisotropy, fracture interaction can lead to dramatic divergence of the fractures as they tend to repel each other. However, when stress anisotropy is large, the fracture propagation direction is dominated by the stress field and fracture turning due to fracture interaction is limited. However, stress shadowing still has a strong effect

  14. Hydrostructural Characterization of Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, T. W.; Hermanson, J.

    2007-12-01

    Over the past 30 years, research in underground laboratories for radioactive waste has led to the development of integrated site investigation and modeling methods for fracture networks. These activities began with the Stripa Project in central Sweden from 1977 to 1992 and have continued worldwide. Experiments on the scale of 100- 200 meter blocks have demonstrated the effectiveness of integrating testing during drilling, pressure monitoring, geologic description, flow logging, pressure transient testing, and groundwater chemistry to define fracture network geometries, particularly with respect to the identification of major features, background fractures, and compartmentalization. Major features are those large fractures or fracture zones that control the flow at the scale of interest, and must be simulated as deterministic features. Background fractures are defined stochastically, and provide connectivity between deterministic features. Based on the experience of block-scale investigations, it is possible to develop a clear picture of hydraulic networks using an integrated structural geologic, hydraulic, and hydrochemical approach. Although fracture network characterization requires a good geologic description of fractures and fracture zones from core and image logging, not all geologic features are water-conducting. Identifying water-conducting fractures begins with measurements of flow during drilling and flow logging immediately afterwards to identify significant conducting features. Major flow features must be hydraulically isolated using multiple point piezometer systems, if subsequent investigation methods are to be successful. Once installed, the pressure responses in the piezometers to subsequent drilling provide key information on connectivity and compartmentalization. Generally with three holes are sufficient to develop initial conceptual models of the major, controlling features. Subsequent boreholes test these geometric hypotheses and provide bases

  15. Estimating the hydraulic conductivity of two-dimensional fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, C. T.; Zimmerman, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    Most oil and gas reservoirs, as well as most potential sites for nuclear waste disposal, are naturally fractured. In these sites, the network of fractures will provide the main path for fluid to flow through the rock mass. In many cases, the fracture density is so high as to make it impractical to model it with a discrete fracture network (DFN) approach. For such rock masses, it would be useful to have recourse to analytical, or semi-analytical, methods to estimate the macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the fracture network. We have investigated single-phase fluid flow through stochastically generated two-dimensional fracture networks. The centres and orientations of the fractures are uniformly distributed, whereas their lengths follow either a lognormal distribution or a power law distribution. We have considered the case where the fractures in the network each have the same aperture, as well as the case where the aperture of each fracture is directly proportional to the fracture length. The discrete fracture network flow and transport simulator NAPSAC, developed by Serco (Didcot, UK), is used to establish the “true” macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the network. We then attempt to match this conductivity using a simple estimation method that does not require extensive computation. For our calculations, fracture networks are represented as networks composed of conducting segments (bonds) between nodes. Each bond represents the region of a single fracture between two adjacent intersections with other fractures. We assume that the bonds are arranged on a kagome lattice, with some fraction of the bonds randomly missing. The conductance of each bond is then replaced with some effective conductance, Ceff, which we take to be the arithmetic mean of the individual conductances, averaged over each bond, rather than over each fracture. This is in contrast to the usual approximation used in effective medium theories, wherein the geometric mean is used. Our

  16. A fracture network model for water flow and solute transport

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes code development work and sample calculations for FRACNET, a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and solute transport in fractured porous media. The model analyzes flow and transport by generating a fracture network based on statistical characteristics of fractures obtained from well logs and other data. After a network is generated, flow and tracer transport are computed for appropriate boundary conditions and wellbore source/sink terms. In addition, for a given realization, the code can be used to indicate whether the medium can be treated as an equivalent porous medium. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Numerical investigation of hydraulic fracture network propagation in naturally fractured shale formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yushi; Zhang, Shicheng; Ma, Xinfang; Zhou, Tong; Zeng, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic fracture network (HFN) propagation in naturally fractured shale formations is investigated numerically using a 3D complex fracturing model based on the discrete element method. To account for the plastic deformation behavior of shales, the Drucker-Prager plasticity model is incorporated into the fracturing model. Parametric studies are then conducted for different Young's moduli, horizontal differential stresses, natural fracture (NF) properties, injection rates, and number and spacing of perforation clusters. Numerical results show that horizontal differential stress primarily determines the generation of a complex HFN. The plastic deformation of shale can reduce the stimulated reservoir volume; this is more obvious with Young's modulus of less than 20 GPa. In addition, a higher injection rate could largely increase the fracture complexity index (FCI). Moreover, increasing perforation cluster numbers per fracturing stage is beneficial for increasing the FCI, but it also increases the potential merging of neighboring fractures, which may lead to non-uniform development of HFN in far-wellbore regions. To achieve uniform development of HFN within a fracturing stage, the distribution of NFs should be fully considered. The results presented here may provide improved understanding of HFN generation and are favorable for optimizing fracturing treatment designs for shale formations.

  18. Percolation and permeability of heterogeneous fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Pierre; Mourzenko, Valeri; Thovert, Jean-François

    2013-04-01

    Natural fracture fields are almost necessarily heterogeneous with a fracture density varying with space. Two classes of variations are quite frequent. In the first one, the fracture density is decreasing from a given surface; the fracture density is usually (but not always see [1]) an exponential function of depth as it has been shown by many measurements. Another important example of such an exponential decrease consists of the Excavated Damaged Zone (EDZ) which is created by the excavation process of a gallery [2,3]. In the second one, the fracture density undergoes some local random variations around an average value. This presentation is mostly focused on the first class and numerical samples are generated with an exponentially decreasing density from a given plane surface. Their percolation status and hydraulic transmissivity can be calculated by the numerical codes which are detailed in [4]. Percolation is determined by a pseudo diffusion algorithm. Flow determination necessitates the meshing of the fracture networks and the discretisation of the Darcy equation by a finite volume technique; the resulting linear system is solved by a conjugate gradient algorithm. Only the flow properties of the EDZ along the directions which are parallel to the wall are of interest when a pressure gradient parallel to the wall is applied. The transmissivity T which relates the total flow rate per unit width Q along the wall through the whole fractured medium to the pressure gradient grad p, is defined by Q = - T grad p/mu where mu is the fluid viscosity. The percolation status and hydraulic transmissivity are systematically determined for a wide range of decay lengths and anisotropy parameters. They can be modeled by comparison with anisotropic fracture networks with a constant density. A heuristic power-law model is proposed which accurately describes the results for the percolation threshold over the whole investigated range of heterogeneity and anisotropy. Then, the data

  19. Optimization of flow modeling in fractured media with discrete fracture network via percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donado-Garzon, L. D.; Pardo, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Fractured media are very heterogeneous systems where occur complex physical and chemical processes to model. One of the possible approaches to conceptualize this type of massifs is the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN). Donado et al., modeled flow and transport in a granitic batholith based on this approach and found good fitting with hydraulic and tracer tests, but the computational cost was excessive due to a gigantic amount of elements to model. We present in this work a methodology based on percolation theory for reducing the number of elements and in consequence, to reduce the bandwidth of the conductance matrix and the execution time of each network. DFN poses as an excellent representation of all the set of fractures of the media, but not all the fractures of the media are part of the conductive network. Percolation theory is used to identify which nodes or fractures are not conductive, based on the occupation probability or percolation threshold. In a fractured system, connectivity determines the flow pattern in the fractured rock mass. This volume of fluid is driven through connection paths formed by the fractures, when the permeability of the rock is negligible compared to the fractures. In a population of distributed fractures, each of this that has no intersection with any connected fracture do not contribute to generate a flow field. This algorithm also permits us to erase these elements however they are water conducting and hence, refine even more the backbone of the network. We used 100 different generations of DFN that were optimized in this study using percolation theory. In each of the networks calibrate hydrodynamic parameters as hydraulic conductivity and specific storage coefficient, for each of the five families of fractures, yielding a total of 10 parameters to estimate, at each generation. Since the effects of the distribution of fault orientation changes the value of the percolation threshold, but not the universal laws of classical

  20. Some Characteristics of Regular Fracture-lineament Global Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhin, Vladimir; Longinos, Biju

    2013-04-01

    Existence of regular fracture-lineament global network global network (FLGN) (or regmatic network), was known for lands of the Earth in many regions. Authors made more than 20 000 measurements of lineaments and faults azimuths of the lineaments and fractures on geographic, geologic and tectonic maps for number of regions and for all Earth. Later all data files have subjected by the factor analysis. We detect existence FLGN in the Ocean bottom. Statistic relation between fractures and lineaments directions was established. Control of large-scale lineaments by fractures within the competence of the FLGN was based. Predominating strike directions of line elements of FLGN are: 0 - 10˚, 80 - 90˚, 30 - 60˚, 120 - 150˚. FLGN have attribute of fractality. One-direction lines elements of the FLGN alternate with constant step within the competence of defined scale. FLGN was formed under a continuous stress, which exist at least throughout the entire earthcrust thickness and during the time of at least the entire Phanerozoe. This stress was generated by a complex of forces: rotational, pulsating and, possibly, some others in the earthcrust. All of these forces are symmetric to the Earth rotation axis and some of them also to the equator. Rotation and pulsating processes of the Earth are the main factors of these forces and, hence, formation of the fracture- lineament network. FLGN determines the most favorable place for fracturing, formation of fracture-controlled landforms, volcanic and seismic processes (geohazards), fluid flow and ore-formation (minerals).

  1. Particle Swarm Transport in Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Mackin, T.; Boomsma, E.

    2012-12-01

    Colloidal particles of many types occur in fractures in the subsurface as a result of both natural and industrial processes (e.g., environmental influences, synthetic nano- & micro-particles from consumer products, chemical and mechanical erosion of geologic material, proppants used in gas and oil extraction, etc.). The degree of localization and speed of transport of such particles depends on the transport mechanisms, the chemical and physical properties of the particles and the surrounding rock, and the flow path geometry through the fracture. In this study, we investigated the transport of particle swarms through artificial fracture networks. A synthetic fracture network was created using an Objet Eden 350V 3D printer to build a network of fractures. Each fracture in the network had a rectangular cross-sectional area with a constant depth of 7 mm but with widths that ranged from 2 mm to 11 mm. The overall dimensions of the network were 132 mm by 166 mm. The fracture network had 7 ports that were used either as the inlet or outlet for fluid flow through the sample or for introducing a particle swarm. Water flow rates through the fracture were controlled with a syringe pump, and ranged from zero flow to 6 ml/min. Swarms were composed of a dilute suspension (2% by mass) of 3 μm fluorescent polystyrene beads in water. Swarms with volumes of 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 μl were used and delivered into the network using a second syringe pump. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system illuminated by green (525 nm) LED arrays and captured by a CCD camera. For fracture networks with quiescent fluids, particle swarms fell under gravity and remained localized within the network. Large swarms (30-60 μl) were observed to bifurcate at shallower depths resulting in a broader dispersal of the particles than for smaller swarm volumes. For all swarm volumes studied, particle swarms tended to bifurcate at the intersection between fractures. These

  2. A semi-analytical model for the flow behavior of naturally fractured formations with multi-scale fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Pin; Cheng, Linsong; Huang, Shijun; Wu, Yonghui

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical model for the flow behavior of naturally fractured formations with multi-scale fracture networks. The model dynamically couples an analytical dual-porosity model with a numerical discrete fracture model. The small-scale fractures with the matrix are idealized as a dual-porosity continuum and an analytical flow solution is derived based on source functions in Laplace domain. The large-scale fractures are represented explicitly as the major fluid conduits and the flow is numerically modeled, also in Laplace domain. This approach allows us to include finer details of the fracture network characteristics while keeping the computational work manageable. For example, the large-scale fracture network may have complex geometry and varying conductivity, and the computations can be done at predetermined, discrete times, without any grids in the dual-porosity continuum. The validation of the semi-analytical model is demonstrated in comparison to the solution of ECLIPSE reservoir simulator. The simulation is fast, gridless and enables rapid model setup. On the basis of the model, we provide detailed analysis of the flow behavior of a horizontal production well in fractured reservoir with multi-scale fracture networks. The study has shown that the system may exhibit six flow regimes: large-scale fracture network linear flow, bilinear flow, small-scale fracture network linear flow, pseudosteady-state flow, interporosity flow and pseudoradial flow. During the first four flow periods, the large-scale fracture network behaves as if it only drains in the small-scale fracture network; that is, the effect of the matrix is negligibly small. The characteristics of the bilinear flow and the small-scale fracture network linear flow are predominantly determined by the dimensionless large-scale fracture conductivity. And low dimensionless fracture conductivity will generate large pressure drops in the large-scale fractures surrounding the wellbore. With

  3. Generation of spatially correlated fracture models for seismic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Ravi; Gibson, Richard L., Jr.

    2011-04-01

    The critical geometrical parameters that quantify the spatial distribution of natural fractures are the orientation, length and position of fractures. Knowledge of their spatial distribution is important as they control the movement of subsurface fluids and also influence seismic waves propagating in the subsurface. However, generating realistic models of all of these geometrical parameters to use in forward seismic modelling or inversion applications can become very difficult, especially when constraints are available only at a few sparse well locations. Hence, this provides strong motivation for applying seismic data to estimate these quantities in field settings, and reliable seismic modelling provides important constraints for interpretation and inversion. The Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) approach has been used frequently to generate models with stochastic distributions of fractures based on sparse well and seismic data. However, most of these studies lack any constraint from physical models of the behaviour of fractured media. In this paper, we implement and extend an alternative modelling technique to generate several realizations of a fracture model beginning with theoretical results for the strain energy of a fractured material and propose ways to better incorporate geological field observations. The method utilizes an elastic energy function that sums the interactions of all pairs of fractures present in the model. The energy for each pair depends on the distance between the two fractures, their orientations, lengths and some material properties. This energy function also serves as an objective function for a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm used to obtain multiple realizations of correlated fracture networks. We improve earlier versions of this technique by incorporating periodic boundary conditions, including criteria to limit the maximum range of pair-wise calculations and suggesting methods to constrain models to match field data. Assuming that

  4. Random fracture networks: percolation, geometry and flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Thovert, J. F.; Mourzenko, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews some of the basic properties of fracture networks. Most of the data can only be derived numerically, and to be useful they need to be rationalized, i.e., a large set of numbers should be replaced by a simple formula which is easy to apply for estimating orders of magnitude. Three major tools are found useful in this rationalization effort. First, analytical results can usually be derived for infinite fractures, a limit which corresponds to large densities. Second, the excluded volume and the dimensionless density prove crucial to gather data obtained at intermediate densities. Finally, shape factors can be used to further reduce the influence of fracture shapes. Percolation of fracture networks is of primary importance since this characteristic controls transport properties such as permeability. Recent numerical studies for various types of fracture networks (isotropic, anisotropic, heterogeneous in space, polydisperse, mixture of shapes) are summarized; the percolation threshold rho is made dimensionless by means of the excluded volume. A general correlation for rho is proposed as a function of the gyration radius. The statistical characteristics of the blocks which are cut in the solid matrix by the network are presented, since they control transfers between the porous matrix and the fractures. Results on quantities such as the volume, surface and number of faces are given and semi empirical relations are proposed. The possible intersection of a percolating network and of a cubic cavity is also summarized. This might be of importance for the underground storage of wastes. An approximate reasoning based on the excluded volume of the percolating cluster and of the cubic cavity is proposed. Finally, consequences on the permeability of fracture networks are briefly addressed. An empirical formula which verifies some theoretical properties is proposed.

  5. Towards effective flow simulations in realistic discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrone, Stefano; Pieraccini, Sandra; Scialò, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We focus on the simulation of underground flow in fractured media, modeled by means of Discrete Fracture Networks. Focusing on a new recent numerical approach proposed by the authors for tackling the problem avoiding mesh generation problems, we further improve the new family of methods making a step further towards effective simulations of large, multi-scale, heterogeneous networks. Namely, we tackle the imposition of Dirichlet boundary conditions in weak form, in such a way that geometrical complexity of the DFN is not an issue; we effectively solve DFN problems with fracture transmissivities spanning many orders of magnitude and approaching zero; furthermore, we address several numerical issues for improving the numerical solution also in quite challenging networks.

  6. Fracture size and transmissivity correlations: Implications for transport simulations in sparse three-dimensional discrete fracture networks following a truncated power law distribution of fracture size

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Aldrich, Garrett Allen; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Makedonska, Nataliia; Karra, Satish

    2016-08-25

    We characterize how different fracture size-transmissivity relationships influence flow and transport simulations through sparse three-dimensional discrete fracture networks. Although it is generally accepted that there is a positive correlation between a fracture's size and its transmissivity/aperture, the functional form of that relationship remains a matter of debate. Relationships that assume perfect correlation, semicorrelation, and noncorrelation between the two have been proposed. To study the impact that adopting one of these relationships has on transport properties, we generate multiple sparse fracture networks composed of circular fractures whose radii follow a truncated power law distribution. The distribution of transmissivities are selected somore » that the mean transmissivity of the fracture networks are the same and the distributions of aperture and transmissivity in models that include a stochastic term are also the same. We observe that adopting a correlation between a fracture size and its transmissivity leads to earlier breakthrough times and higher effective permeability when compared to networks where no correlation is used. While fracture network geometry plays the principal role in determining where transport occurs within the network, the relationship between size and transmissivity controls the flow speed. Lastly, these observations indicate DFN modelers should be aware that breakthrough times and effective permeabilities can be strongly influenced by such a relationship in addition to fracture and network statistics.« less

  7. Analysis of the Complex Fracture Flow in Multiple Fractured Horizontal Wells with the Fractal Tree-Like Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wendong; Su, Yuliang; Zhang, Xiao; Sheng, Guanglong; Ren, Long

    2015-03-01

    This paper formulates a fractal-tree network model to address the challenging problem of characterizing the hydraulic fracture network in unconventional reservoirs. It has been proved that the seepage flow in tight/shale oil reservoirs is much more complicated to the conventional formation. To further understand the flow mechanisms in such a complex system, a semi-analytical model considering "branch network fractures" was established stage by stage using point source method and superposition principle. Fractal method was employed to generate and represent induced fracture network around bi-wing fractures. In addition, based on the new established model and solution, deterministic fractal-tree-like fracture network patterns and heterogeneity were carefully investigated and compared with the simulation model. Results show that the fractal dimension for the fracture network has significant effect on the connectivity of the stimulated reservoir. The proposed fractal model may capture the characteristics of the heterogeneous complex fracture network and help in understanding the flow and transport mechanisms of multiple fractured horizontal wells.

  8. Effect of Internal Aperture Variability on Tracer Transport in Large Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Hyman, J.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Aperture variability within individual fractures is usually neglected in modeling flow and transport through fractured media. Typically, individual fractures are assumed to be homogeneous. However, in reality, individual fractures are heterogeneous, which may affect flow and transport in fractured media. The relative importance of including in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling has been under debate for a long time. Previous studies have shown flow channeling on an individual fracture with internal variability, where the fracture is considered isolated from the rest of the fracture network. Although these studies yield some clear insights into the process, the boundary conditions are impractical for field-scale networks, where the realistic boundary conditions are determined by fracture connections in the network. Therefore, flow in a single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. In order to address the question of the importance of in-fracture variability, the internal heterogeneity of every individual fracture is incorporated into a three-dimensional fracture network, represented by a composition of intersecting fractures. The new DFN simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate a kilometer scale DFNs similar to the Forsmark, Sweden site. In our DFN model, the in-fracture aperture variability is scattered over each cell of the computational mesh along the fracture, representing by a stationary Gaussian random field with various correlation lengths. The Lagrangian particle tracking is conducted in multiple DFN realizations and the flow-dependent Lagrangian parameters, non-reacting travel time, τ, and cumulative reactivity parameter, β, are obtained along particles streamlines. It is shown that early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture aperture variability than tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the aperture variations and spatial

  9. Compartmentalization analysis using discrete fracture network models

    SciTech Connect

    La Pointe, P.R.; Eiben, T.; Dershowitz, W.; Wadleigh, E.

    1997-08-01

    This paper illustrates how Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) technology can serve as a basis for the calculation of reservoir engineering parameters for the development of fractured reservoirs. It describes the development of quantitative techniques for defining the geometry and volume of structurally controlled compartments. These techniques are based on a combination of stochastic geometry, computational geometry, and graph the theory. The parameters addressed are compartment size, matrix block size and tributary drainage volume. The concept of DFN models is explained and methodologies to compute these parameters are demonstrated.

  10. Compartmentalization analysis using discrete fracture network models

    SciTech Connect

    La Pointe, P.R.; Eiben, T.; Dershowitz, W.; Wadleigh, E.

    1997-12-31

    This paper illustrates how Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) technology can serve as a basis for the calculation of reservoir engineering parameters for the development of fractured reservoirs. It describes the development of quantitative techniques for defining the geometry and volume of structurally controlled compartments. These techniques are based on a combination of stochastic geometry, computational geometry, and graph theory. The parameters addressed are compartment size, matrix block size and tributary drainage volume. The concept of DFN models is explained and methodologies to compute these parameters are demonstrated.

  11. SIZE SCALING RELATIONSHIPS IN FRACTURE NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas H. Wilson

    2000-01-01

    The research conducted under DOE grant DE-FG26-98FT40385 provides a detailed assessment of size scaling issues in natural fracture and active fault networks that extend over scales from several tens of kilometers to less than a tenth of a meter. This study incorporates analysis of data obtained from several sources, including: natural fracture patterns photographed in the Appalachian field area, natural fracture patterns presented by other workers in the published literature, patterns of active faulting in Japan mapping at a scale of 1:100,000, and lineament patterns interpreted from satellite-based radar imagery obtained over the Appalachian field area. The complexity of these patterns is always found to vary with scale. In general,but not always, patterns become less complex with scale. This tendency may reverse as can be inferred from the complexity of high-resolution radar images (8 meter pixel size) which are characterized by patterns that are less complex than those observed over smaller areas on the ground surface. Model studies reveal that changes in the complexity of a fracture pattern can be associated with dominant spacings between the fractures comprising the pattern or roughly to the rock areas bounded by fractures of a certain scale. While the results do not offer a magic number (the fractal dimension) to characterize fracture networks at all scales, the modeling and analysis provide results that can be interpreted directly in terms of the physical properties of the natural fracture or active fault complex. These breaks roughly define the size of fracture bounded regions at different scales. The larger more extensive sets of fractures will intersect and enclose regions of a certain size, whereas smaller less extensive sets will do the same--i.e. subdivide the rock into even smaller regions. The interpretation varies depending on the number of sets that are present, but the scale breaks in the logN/logr plots serve as a guide to interpreting the

  12. Sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başağaoğlu, Hakan; Succi, Sauro; Manepally, Chandrika; Fedors, Randall; Wyrick, Danielle Y.

    2009-09-01

    Active fractures refer to the portions of unsaturated, connected fractures that actively conduct water. The active fracture model parameter accounts for the reduction in the number of fractures carrying water and in the fracture-matrix interface area in field-scale simulations of flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rocks. One example includes the numerical analyses of the fault test results at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada (USA). In such applications, the active fracture model parameter is commonly used as a calibration parameter without relating it to fracture network orientations and infiltration rates. A two-dimensional, multiphase lattice-Boltzmann model was used in this study to investigate the sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios for an unsaturated, variable dipping, and geometrically simple fracture network. The active fracture model parameter differed by as much as 0.11-0.44 when the effects of fracture network orientation, injection rate, and injection mode were included in the simulations. Hence, the numerical results suggest that the sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation, injection rates, and injection modes should be explored at the field-scale to strengthen the technical basis and range of applicability of the active fracture model.

  13. Discrete modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in a complex pre-existing fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Nakagawa, S.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and stimulation of fracture networks are widely used by the energy industry (e.g., shale gas extraction, enhanced geothermal systems) to increase permeability of geological formations. Numerous analytical and numerical models have been developed to help understand and predict the behavior of hydraulically induced fractures. However, many existing models assume simple fracturing scenarios with highly idealized fracture geometries (e.g., propagation of a single fracture with assumed shapes in a homogeneous medium). Modeling hydraulic fracture propagation in the presence of natural fractures and homogeneities can be very challenging because of the complex interactions between fluid, rock matrix, and rock interfaces, as well as the interactions between propagating fractures and pre-existing natural fractures. In this study, the TOUGH-RBSN code for coupled hydro-mechanical modeling is utilized to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation and its interaction with pre-existing fracture networks. The simulation tool combines TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach, with the implementation of a lattice modeling approach for geomechanical and fracture-damage behavior, named Rigid-Body-Spring Network (RBSN). The discrete fracture network (DFN) approach is facilitated in the Voronoi discretization via a fully automated modeling procedure. The numerical program is verified through a simple simulation for single fracture propagation, in which the resulting fracture geometry is compared to an analytical solution for given fracture length and aperture. Subsequently, predictive simulations are conducted for planned laboratory experiments using rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed, pre-existing fracture network. The results of a preliminary simulation demonstrate selective fracturing and fluid infiltration along the pre-existing fractures, with additional fracturing in part

  14. Evaluating the effect of internal aperture variability on transport in kilometer scale discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Painter, Scott L.; Gable, Carl W.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2016-08-01

    The apertures of natural fractures in fractured rock are highly heterogeneous. However, in-fracture aperture variability is often neglected in flow and transport modeling and individual fractures are assumed to have uniform aperture distribution. The relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling within kilometer-scale field-scale fracture networks has been under a matter of debate for a long time because the flow in each single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. Computational limitations have previously prohibited researchers from investigating the relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling within large-scale fracture networks. We address this question by incorporating internal heterogeneity of individual fractures into flow simulations within kilometer scale three-dimensional fracture networks, where fracture intensity, P32 (ratio between total fracture area and domain volume) is between 0.027 and 0.031 [1/m]. A recently developed discrete fracture network (DFN) simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate DFNs that include in-fracture aperture variability represented by a stationary log-normal stochastic field with various correlation lengths and variances. The Lagrangian transport parameters, non-reacting travel time and cumulative retention, are calculated along particles streamlines. It is observed that due to local flow channeling early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture variability than the tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the in-fracture transmissivity variations and spatial correlation length is observed.

  15. Evaluating the effect of internal aperture variability on transport in kilometer scale discrete fracture networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Painter, Scott L.; Gable, Carl W.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2016-06-17

    The apertures of natural fractures in fractured rock are highly heterogeneous. However, in-fracture aperture variability is often neglected in flow and transport modeling and individual fractures are assumed to have uniform aperture distribution. The relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling within kilometer18 scale field–scale fracture networks has been under a matter of debate for a long time because the flow in each single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. Computational limitations have previously prohibited researchers from investigating the relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling withinmore » large-scale fracture networks. We address this question by incorporating internal heterogeneity of individual fractures into 23 flow simulations within kilometer scale three-dimensional fracture networks, where fracture intensity, P32 (ratio between total fracture area and domain volume) is between 0.027 and 0.031 [1/m]. A recently developed discrete fracture network (DFN) simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate DFNs that include in-fracture aperture variability represented by a stationary log-normal stochastic field with various correlation lengths and variances. The Lagrangian transport parameters, non-reacting travel time and cumulative retention, are calculated along particles streamlines. It is observed that due to local flow channeling early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture variability than the tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the in-fracture transmissivity variations and spatial correlation length is observed.« less

  16. Characterization of EGS Fracture Network Lifecycles

    SciTech Connect

    Gillian R. Foulger

    2008-03-31

    Geothermal energy is relatively clean, and is an important non-hydrocarbon source of energy. It can potentially reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and contribute to reduction in carbon emissions. High-temperature geothermal areas can be used for electricity generation if they contain permeable reservoirs of hot water or steam that can be extracted. The biggest challenge to achieving the full potential of the nation’s resources of this kind is maintaining and creating the fracture networks required for the circulation, heating, and extraction of hot fluids. The fundamental objective of the present research was to understand how fracture networks are created in hydraulic borehole injection experiments, and how they subsequently evolve. When high-pressure fluids are injected into boreholes in geothermal areas, they flow into hot rock at depth inducing thermal cracking and activating critically stressed pre-existing faults. This causes earthquake activity which, if monitored, can provide information on the locations of the cracks formed, their time-development and the type of cracking underway, e.g., whether shear movement on faults occurred or whether cracks opened up. Ultimately it may be possible to monitor the critical earthquake parameters in near-real-time so the information can be used to guide the hydraulic injection while it is in progress, e.g., how to adjust factors such as injectate pressure, volume and temperature. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to mature analysis techniques and software that were, at the start of this project, in an embryonic developmental state. Task 1 of the present project was to develop state-of-the-art techniques and software for calculating highly accurate earthquake locations, earthquake source mechanisms (moment tensors) and temporal changes in reservoir structure. Task 2 was to apply the new techniques to hydrofracturing (Enhanced Geothermal Systems, or “EGS”) experiments performed at the Coso geothermal field

  17. Laboratory Visualization of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation and Interaction with a Network of Preexisting Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Borglin, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    We present optical visualization experiments of hydraulic fracture propagation within transparent rock-analogue samples containing a network of preexisting fractures. Natural fractures and heterogeneities in rock have a great impact on hydraulic fracture propagation and resulting improvements in reservoir permeability. In recent years, many sophisticated numerical simulations on hydraulic fracturing have been conducted. Laboratory experiments on hydraulic fracturing are often performed with acoustic emission (Micro Earthquake) monitoring, which allows detection and location of fracturing and fracture propagation. However, the detected fractures are not necessarily hydraulically produced fractures which provide permeable pathways connected to the injection (and production) well. The primary objectives of our visualization experiments are (1) to obtain quantitative visual information of hydraulic fracture propagation affected by pre-existing fractures and (2) to distinguish fractures activated by the perturbed stress field away from the injected fluid and hydraulically produced fractures. The obtained data are also used to develop and validate a new numerical modeling technique (TOUGH-RBSN [Rigid-Body-Spring-Network] model) for hydraulic fracturing simulations, which is presented in a companion paper. The experiments are conducted using transparent soda-lime glass cubes (10 cm × 10 cm × 10 cm) containing either (1) 3D laser-engraved artificial fractures and fracture networks or (2) a random network of fractures produced by rapid thermal quenching. The strength (and also the permeability for the latter) of the fractures can be altered to examine their impact on hydraulic fracturing. The cubes are subjected to true-triaxial stress within a polyaxial loading frame, and hydraulic fractures are produced by injecting fluids with a range of viscosity into an analogue borehole drilled in the sample. The visual images of developing fractures are obtained both through a port

  18. Experimental Investigation into Hydraulic Fracture Network Propagation in Gas Shales Using CT Scanning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushi, Zou; Shicheng, Zhang; Tong, Zhou; Xiang, Zhou; Tiankui, Guo

    2016-01-01

    simultaneous fracturing can effectively reduce the stress difference and increase the fracture number, making it possible to generate a large-scale complex fracture network, even for high Δ σ h from 6 MPa to 12 MPa.

  19. Analysis of the Influence of a Natural Fracture Network on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation in Carbonate Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Mian; Zhang, Guangqing

    2014-03-01

    A new experimental model has been designed to simulate the influence of a natural fracture network on the propagation geometry of hydraulic fractures in naturally fractured formations using a tri-axial fracturing system. In this model, a parallel and symmetrical pre-fracture network was created by placing cement plates in a cubic mold and filling the mold with additional cement to create the final testing block. The surface of the plates will thus be weakly cemented and form pre-fractures. The dimension and direction of the pre-fractures can be controlled using the plates. The experiments showed that the horizontal differential stress and the angle between the maximum horizontal principal in situ stress and the pre-fracture are the dominating factors for the initiation and propagation of hydraulic fractures. For and or and , the direction of the initiation and propagation of the hydraulic fractures are consistent with or deviate from the normal direction of the pre-fracture. When the hydraulic fractures approach the pre-fractures, the direction of the hydraulic fracture propagation will be consistent with the normal direction of the pre-fracture. Otherwise, the hydraulic fracture will deflect and perpendicularly cross the parallel and symmetric pre-fracture network. For and , and or and , before the hydraulic fracture and the pre-fractures intersect, the direction of the hydraulic fracture propagation remains unchanged, and the pre-fractures open or dilate when the hydraulic fracture propagates to the intersection point, forming a complicated hydraulic fracture network with the propagation region of the overall hydraulic fracture network taking the shape of an ellipse. In this condition, the complexity level of the hydraulic fracture is controlled by the net pressure, the compressive normal stress acting on the pre-fractures, the shearing strength and the cohesion strength of the planes of weakness. The conclusions of this research are inconsistent with the

  20. A Spatial Clustering Approach for Stochastic Fracture Network Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifollahi, S.; Dowd, P. A.; Xu, C.; Fadakar, A. Y.

    2014-07-01

    Fracture network modelling plays an important role in many application areas in which the behaviour of a rock mass is of interest. These areas include mining, civil, petroleum, water and environmental engineering and geothermal systems modelling. The aim is to model the fractured rock to assess fluid flow or the stability of rock blocks. One important step in fracture network modelling is to estimate the number of fractures and the properties of individual fractures such as their size and orientation. Due to the lack of data and the complexity of the problem, there are significant uncertainties associated with fracture network modelling in practice. Our primary interest is the modelling of fracture networks in geothermal systems and, in this paper, we propose a general stochastic approach to fracture network modelling for this application. We focus on using the seismic point cloud detected during the fracture stimulation of a hot dry rock reservoir to create an enhanced geothermal system; these seismic points are the conditioning data in the modelling process. The seismic points can be used to estimate the geographical extent of the reservoir, the amount of fracturing and the detailed geometries of fractures within the reservoir. The objective is to determine a fracture model from the conditioning data by minimizing the sum of the distances of the points from the fitted fracture model. Fractures are represented as line segments connecting two points in two-dimensional applications or as ellipses in three-dimensional (3D) cases. The novelty of our model is twofold: (1) it comprises a comprehensive fracture modification scheme based on simulated annealing and (2) it introduces new spatial approaches, a goodness-of-fit measure for the fitted fracture model, a measure for fracture similarity and a clustering technique for proposing a locally optimal solution for fracture parameters. We use a simulated dataset to demonstrate the application of the proposed approach

  1. Influence of fracture scale heterogeneity on the flow properties of 3D Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; De Dreuzy, J.; Pichot, G.

    2011-12-01

    Flow channeling and permeability scaling in fractured media have been classically addressed either at the fracture- or at the network- scales. In the latter case they are linked to the topological structure of the network, while at the fracture scale they are controlled by the variability of the local aperture distribution inside individual fractures. In this study we analyze these two combined effects, investigating how flow localization below the scale of individual fractures influences that at the network scale and the resulting medium permeability. This is done by use of a new highly-resolved 3D discrete fracture network model (DFN). The local apertures of individual fractures are distributed according to a truncated Gaussian law, and exhibit self-affine spatial correlations that are bounded by an upper cutoff scale Lc; Lc and the fracture closure, defined as the ratio of the aperture fluctuations at scale Lc to the mean aperture, are considered homogeneous over the DFN. The network topology is controlled by a homogeneous scalar fracture density and a power law fracture length distribution. We have varied these features to investigate a large variety of DFN topologies, from sparse networks with varying degrees of fracture interconnections, flow bottlenecks and dead-ends (Fig. 1a), to dense well-connected networks (Fig. 1b). We have also investigated a large range of fracture closures, performing extensive simulations of about 105 different DFN realizations. At the fracture scale, accounting for local aperture fluctuations leads to a monotical deviation (which can exceed 50%) of the equivalent fracture transmissivity from the parallel plate behavior. At the network scale we observe a complex interaction between flow channeling within fracture planes and flow localization in the network. This interaction is controlled by the location of fracture interactions with respect to that of low local transmissivity zones (particularly the closed zones), in the fracture

  2. The Benefits of Maximum Likelihood Estimators in Predicting Bulk Permeability and Upscaling Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuele Rizzo, Roberto; Healy, David; De Siena, Luca

    2016-04-01

    directly into the permeability calculations. The application of Maximum Likelihood Estimators can have important consequences, especially when we aim to predict the tendency of fracture attributes towards smaller and larger scales than those observed, in order to build consistent, useable models from outcrop observations. The procedures presented here aim to understand whether the average permeability of a fracture network can be predicted, reducing its uncertainties; and if outcrop measurements of fracture attributes can be used directly to generate statistically identical fracture network models, which can then be easily up-scaled into larger areas or volumes. Gale et al. "Natural Fracture in shale: A review and new observations", AAPG Bulletin 98.11 (2014). Mauldon et al. "Circular scanlines and circular windows: new tools for characterizing the geometry of fracture traces", Journal of Structural Geology, 23 (2001). Oda "Permeability tensor for discontinuous rock masses", Geotechnique 35.4 (1985).

  3. Effects of fracture reactivation and diagenesis on fracture network evolution: Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, J. N.; Eichhubl, P.; Xu, G.; Ahn, H.; Fall, A.; Hargrove, P.; Laubach, S.; Ukar, E.

    2011-12-01

    The Cambrian Eriboll Formation quartzarenites contain abundant fractures with varying degrees of quartz cement infill. Fractures exist that are entirely sealed; are locally sealed by bridging cements but preserve pore space among bridges; are mostly open but lined with veneers of cement; or are devoid of cement. Fracture propagation in the Eriboll Formation is highly sensitive to the presence of pre-existing fractures. Fracture reactivation occurs in opening mode as individual fractures repeatedly open and are filled or bridged by syn-kinematic cements. As well, reactivation occurs in shear as opening of one fracture orientation coincides with shear displacement along pre-existing fractures of different orientations. The tendency for pre-existing fractures to slip varies in part by the extent of cement infill, yet we observe shear and opening-mode reactivation even among sealed fractures. Paleotemperature analysis of fluid inclusions within fracture cements suggests some fractures now in outcrop formed deep in the subsurface. Fractures within the Eriboll Formation may therefore affect later fracture propagation throughout geologic time. With progressive strain, fault zones develop within fracture networks by a sequence of opening-mode fracture formation, fracture reactivation and linkage, fragmentation, cataclasis, and the formation of slip surfaces. Cataclasite within fault zones is commonly more thoroughly cemented than fractures in the damage zone or outside the fault zone. This variance of cement abundance is likely the result of (1) continued exposure of freshly broken quartz surfaces within cataclasite, promoting quartz precipitation, and (2) possibly more interconnected pathways for mass transfer within the fault zone. Enhanced cementation of cataclasite results in strengthening or diagenetic strain hardening of the evolving fault zone. Further slip is accommodated by shear localization along discrete slip surfaces. With further linkage of fault segments

  4. A Study on the Effect of Fracture Aperture Variability on Advective Transport in aFractured Shale using Discrete Fracture Network Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Karra, S.; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; Gable, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas from unconventional fossil energy sources such as shale and tight gasformations has a profound impact on US energy independence. The current state ofproduction of methane and other hydrocarbons from low permeability shale involvesprocesses such as hydraulic fracturing of rock, multiphase flow, and recovery of the gasvia these fractures. Although hydraulic fracturing has been used for the past couple ofdecades, little is known about the underlying mechanisms behind the production curvesthat are seen in the field, such as, reasons for 50-60% decline after the first year in typicalproduction curves.Numerical experiments on a realistic fractured shale system are presented toidentify the effect of complex flow of gas in fractures and matrix diffusion on theproduction curve. For characterizing flow, including the characteristics and geometriesfor the fracture networks, we use a methodology that incorporates a recently developeddiscrete fracture network meshing approach [1], which is combined with the highlyparallel PFLOTRAN subsurface flow and reactive transport code [2] and a new particletracking capability [3]. The results of this reservoir-scale methodology for analyzing thedecline in gas production rates indicate dominant flow in fractures in the initial highproduction rate. Increase in matrix diffusivity improves production recovery after theinitial production of gas from fractures. Moreover, it is observed that increasing aperturevariability within a single fracture has little effect on the production compared tovariations of the mean fracture aperture from fracture to fracture in a fracture network. [1] Hyman, J.D., Gable C.W., Painter S.L., and Makedonska N., ConformingDelaunay Triangulation of Stochastically Generated Three Dimensional DiscreteFracture Networks: a Feature Rejection Algorithm f or Meshing Strategy, SIAM J.Sci. Comput, 2014 (in press). [2] Lichtner, P.C., Hammond G.E., Lu C., Karra S., Bisht G., Mills R.T., and KumarJ., PFLOTRAN User

  5. Flow and Transport Phenomena in Two-Dimensional Fracture Networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Adolfo Antonio

    1995-01-01

    analogous to the one developed for the steady-state problem. Results for this part of the work include the output flux as function of time for four different fracture networks; vector fields corresponding to different stages of the fluid-flow development were generated in order to interpret the macroscopic effects in terms of geometrical aspects of the network. The diffusion solute transport problem was solved for the case when a linear chemical reaction affected the solute. The procedure used for both the steady-state and transient problems are similar to the one described in the above paragraph; however, the steady-state problem did not require the use of Laplace transforms. Possible extensions to more general situations are discussed in the concluding chapter. These include extensions to three-dimensional situations and to non-linear problems.

  6. Development of a fracture network: a block and springs model

    SciTech Connect

    Ferer, M.V.; Jozwick, A.; Smith, D.H.

    2008-03-01

    Since flow in fractured reservoirs is significantly enhanced by clusters of inter-connecting fractures, it's important to understand their inter-connectedness. In these fractured reservoirs, one often finds two sets of fractures due to two separate geologic events. We have developed a blocks and springs model to study how the second generation fractures intersect the first generation of. We find a percolation-like transition where the cluster size grows with increasing strain leading to system-spanning fractal clusters. Increasing the thickness of the layer being fractured leads to sparser system-spanning fracture clusters with smaller fractal dimension. We have studied how the thickness of the layer affects the fractal character of the fracture clusters as well as their number distribution, and the correlations within the large fracture cluster.

  7. Creating permeable fracture networks for EGS: Engineered systems versus nature

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen L Karner

    2005-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy has set long-term national goals for the development of geothermal energy that are significantly accelerated compared to historical development of the resource. To achieve these goals, it is crucial to evaluate the performance of previous and existing efforts to create enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Two recently developed EGS sites are evaluated from the standpoint of geomechanics. These sites have been established in significantly different tectonic regimes: 1. compressional Cooper Basin (Australia), and 2. extensional Soultz-sous-Fôrets (France). Mohr-Coulomb analyses of the stimulation procedures employed at these sites, coupled with borehole observations, indicate that pre-existing fractures play a significant role in the generation of permeability networks. While pre-existing fabric can be exploited to produce successful results for geothermal energy development, such fracture networks may not be omnipresent. For mostly undeformed reservoirs, it may be necessary to create new fractures using processes that merge existing technologies or use concepts borrowed from natural hydrofracture examples (e.g. dyke swarms).

  8. a Fractal Network Model for Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Li, Cuihong; Qiu, Shuxia; Sasmito, Agus Pulung

    2016-04-01

    The transport properties and mechanisms of fractured porous media are very important for oil and gas reservoir engineering, hydraulics, environmental science, chemical engineering, etc. In this paper, a fractal dual-porosity model is developed to estimate the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media, where a fractal tree-like network model is used to characterize the fracture system according to its fractal scaling laws and topological structures. The analytical expressions for the effective permeability of fracture system and fractured porous media, tortuosity, fracture density and fraction are derived. The proposed fractal model has been validated by comparisons with available experimental data and numerical simulation. It has been shown that fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture have significant effect on the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media. The effective permeability of fracture system can be increased with the increase of fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture, while it can be remarkably lowered by introducing tortuosity at large branching angle. Also, a scaling law between the fracture density and fractal dimension for fracture length has been found, where the scaling exponent depends on the fracture number. The present fractal dual-porosity model may shed light on the transport physics of fractured porous media and provide theoretical basis for oil and gas exploitation, underground water, nuclear waste disposal and geothermal energy extraction as well as chemical engineering, etc.

  9. Flow focusing in unsaturated fracture networks: A numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2003-04-17

    A numerical modeling study is presented to investigate flow-focusing phenomena in a large-scale fracture network, constructed using field data collected from the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the proposed repository site for high-level nuclear waste. The two-dimensional fracture network for an area of 100 m x 150 m contains more than 20,000 fractures. Steady-state unsaturated flow in the fracture network is investigated for different boundary conditions and rock properties. Simulation results indicate that flow paths are generally vertical, and that horizontal fractures mainly provide pathways between neighboring vertical paths. In addition to fracture properties, flow-focusing phenomena are also affected by rock-matrix permeability, with lower matrix permeability leading to a high degree of flow focusing. The simulation results further indicate that the average spacing between flow paths in a layered system tends to increase and flow tends to becomes more focused, with depth.

  10. Effects of simplifying fracture network representation on inert chemical migration in fracture-controlled aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wellman, T.P.; Shapiro, A.M.; Hill, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    While it is widely recognized that highly permeable 'large-scale' fractures dominate chemical migration in many fractured aquifers, recent studies suggest that the pervasive 'small-scale' fracturing once considered of less significance can be equally important for characterizing the spatial extent and residence time associated with transport processes. A detailed examination of chemical migration through fracture-controlled aquifers is used to advance this conceptual understanding. The influence of fracture structure is evaluated by quantifying the effects to transport caused by a systematic removal of fractures from three-dimensional discrete fracture models whose attributes are derived from geologic and hydrologic conditions at multiple field sites. Results indicate that the effects to transport caused by network simplification are sensitive to the fracture network characteristics, degree of network simplification, and plume travel distance, but primarily in an indirect sense since correlation to individual attributes is limited. Transport processes can be 'enhanced' or 'restricted' from network simplification meaning that the elimination of fractures may increase or decrease mass migration, mean travel time, dispersion, and tailing of the concentration plume. The results demonstrate why, for instance, chemical migration may not follow the classic advection-dispersion equation where dispersion approximates the effect of the ignored geologic structure as a strictly additive process to the mean flow. The analyses further reveal that the prediction error caused by fracture network simplification is reduced by at least 50% using the median estimate from an ensemble of simplified fracture network models, and that the error from network simplification is at least 70% less than the stochastic variability from multiple realizations. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Effects of simplifying fracture network representation on inert chemical migration in fracture-controlled aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, Tristan P.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Hill, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    While it is widely recognized that highly permeable `large-scale' fractures dominate chemical migration in many fractured aquifers, recent studies suggest that the pervasive `small-scale' fracturing once considered of less significance can be equally important for characterizing the spatial extent and residence time associated with transport processes. A detailed examination of chemical migration through fracture-controlled aquifers is used to advance this conceptual understanding. The influence of fracture structure is evaluated by quantifying the effects to transport caused by a systematic removal of fractures from three-dimensional discrete fracture models whose attributes are derived from geologic and hydrologic conditions at multiple field sites. Results indicate that the effects to transport caused by network simplification are sensitive to the fracture network characteristics, degree of network simplification, and plume travel distance, but primarily in an indirect sense since correlation to individual attributes is limited. Transport processes can be `enhanced' or `restricted' from network simplification meaning that the elimination of fractures may increase or decrease mass migration, mean travel time, dispersion, and tailing of the concentration plume. The results demonstrate why, for instance, chemical migration may not follow the classic advection-dispersion equation where dispersion approximates the effect of the ignored geologic structure as a strictly additive process to the mean flow. The analyses further reveal that the prediction error caused by fracture network simplification is reduced by at least 50% using the median estimate from an ensemble of simplified fracture network models, and that the error from network simplification is at least 70% less than the stochastic variability from multiple realizations.

  12. Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer in a Heterogeneous Fracture Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisladottir, V. R.; Roubinet, D.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal energy harvesting requires extraction and injection of geothermal fluid. Doing so in an optimal way requires a quantitative understanding of site-specific heat transfer between geothermal fluid and the ambient rock. We develop a heat transfer particle-tracking approach to model that interaction. Fracture-network models of heat transfer in fractured rock explicitly account for the presence of individual fractures, ambient rock matrix, and fracture-matrix interfaces. Computational domains of such models span the meter scale, whereas fracture apertures are on the millimeter scale. The computations needed to model these multi-scale phenomenon can be prohibitively expensive, even for methods using nonuniform meshes. Our approach appreciably decreases the computational costs. Current particle-tracking methods usually assume both infinite matrix and one-dimensional (1D) heat transfer in the matrix blocks. They rely on 1D analytical solutions for heat transfer in a single fracture, which can lead to large predictive errors. Our two-dimensional (2D) heat transfer simulation algorithm is mesh-free and takes into account both longitudinal and transversal heat conduction in the matrix. It uses a probabilistic model to transfer particle to the appropriate neighboring fracture unless it returns to the fracture of origin or remains in the matrix. We use this approach to look at the impact of a fracture-network topology (e.g. the importance of smaller scale fractures), as well as the matrix block distribution on the heat transport in heterogeneous fractured rocks.

  13. A study of two phase flow in fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, K.; Pruess, K.; Vomvoris, S.; Segan, S.

    1994-12-31

    Accurate characterization of the two-phase flow behavior of the fractured rock mass is vital to the safety of a potential high level nuclear waste repository in the unsaturated, fractured welded tuff at Yucca Mountain, NV. A tool for studying the two-phase flow properties of a fracture networks was developed. It is based on a simple mechanistic model in which the capillary pressure of a fracture is a unique function of the aperture. Whether a particular fracture element is occupied by wetting fluid or non-wetting fluid is determined by allowability and accessibility criteria. Relative permeability characteristics of a simulated fracture network were investigated using the model. Different assumptions are examined regarding the interactions between phases. In all cases, strong phase interference was observed. Hysteresis effects and irreducible saturation were also explained based on the model.

  14. Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingjie; Sun, Yunwei; Fu, Pengcheng; Carrigan, Charles R.; Lu, Zhiming; Tong, Charles H.; Buscheck, Thomas A.

    2013-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has been used widely to stimulate production of oil, natural gas, and geothermal energy in formations with low natural permeability. Numerical optimization of fracture stimulation often requires a large number of evaluations of objective functions and constraints from forward hydraulic fracturing models, which are computationally expensive and even prohibitive in some situations. Moreover, there are a variety of uncertainties associated with the pre-existing fracture distributions and rock mechanical properties, which affect the optimized decisions for hydraulic fracturing. In this study, a surrogate-based approach is developed for efficient optimization of hydraulic fracturing well design in the presence of natural-system uncertainties. The fractal dimension is derived from the simulated fracturing network as the objective for maximizing energy recovery sweep efficiency. The surrogate model, which is constructed using training data from high-fidelity fracturing models for mapping the relationship between uncertain input parameters and the fractal dimension, provides fast approximation of the objective functions and constraints. A suite of surrogate models constructed using different fitting methods is evaluated and validated for fast predictions. Global sensitivity analysis is conducted to gain insights into the impact of the input variables on the output of interest, and further used for parameter screening. The high efficiency of the surrogate-based approach is demonstrated for three optimization scenarios with different and uncertain ambient conditions. Our results suggest the critical importance of considering uncertain pre-existing fracture networks in optimization studies of hydraulic fracturing.

  15. Percolation and permeability of fracture networks in Excavated Damaged Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourzenko, V.; Thovert, J.; Adler, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Generally, the excavation process of a gallery generates fractures in its immediate vicinity. The corresponding zone which is called the Excavated Damaged Zone (EDZ), has a larger permeability than the intact surrounding medium. The properties of the EDZ are attracting more and more attention because of their potential importance in repositories of nuclear wastes. The EDZ which is induced by the excavation process may create along the galleries of the repositories a high permeability zone which could directly connect the storage area with the ground surface. Therefore, the studies of its properties are of crucial importance for applications such as the storage of nuclear wastes. Field observations (such as the ones which have been systematically performed at Mont Terri by [1, 2]) suggest that the fracture density is an exponentially decreasing function of the distance to the wall with a characteristic length of about 0.5 m and that the fracture orientation is anisotropic (most fractures are subparallel to the tunnel walls) and well approximated by a Fisher law whose pole is orthogonal to the wall. Numerical samples are generated according to these prescriptions. Their percolation status and hydraulic transmissivity can be calculated by the numerical codes which are detailed in [3]. Percolation is determined by a pseudo diffusion algorithm. Flow determination necessitates the meshing of the fracture networks and the discretisation of the Darcy equation by a finite volume technique; the resulting linear system is solved by a conjugate gradient algorithm. Only the flow properties of the EDZ along the directions which are parallel to the wall are of interest when a pressure gradient parallel to the wall is applied. The transmissivity T which relates the total flow rate per unit width Q along the wall through the whole EDZ to the pressure gradient grad p, is defined by Q = - T grad p/mu where mu is the fluid viscosity. The percolation status and hydraulic transmissivity

  16. Incorporating Discrete Irregular Fracture Zone Networks into 3D Paleohydrogeologic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normani, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Dual continuum computational models which include both porous media and discrete fracture zones are valuable tools in assessing groundwater migration and pathways in fractured rock systems. Fracture generation models can produce stochastic realizations of fracture networks which honor geological structures and fracture propagation behaviors. Surface lineament traces can be propagated to depth based on fracture zone statistics to produce representations of geological structures in rock. The generated discrete, complex and irregular fracture zone networks, represented as a triangulated mesh, are embedded using orthogonal quadrilateral elements within a three-dimensional hexahedral finite element mesh. A detailed coupled density-dependent paleohydrogeologic groundwater analysis of a hypothetical 104 km2 portion of the Canadian Shield has been conducted using the discrete-fracture dual continuum finite element model FRAC3DVS to investigate the characterization of large-scale fracture zone networks on groundwater and tracer movement during a 120,000 year paleoclimate cycle. Permeability reduction due to permafrost was also applied. Time series data for the depth of permafrost, along with ice thickness and lake depth, were provided by the University of Toronto (UofT) Glacial Systems Model. The crystalline rock between fracture zones was assigned properties characteristic of those reported for the Canadian Shield. Total dissolved solids concentrations of 300 g/L are encountered at depth. Surface water features and a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) were used in a GIS framework to define the watershed boundaries at surface water divides and to populate the finite element mesh. This work will illustrate the long-term evolution and stability of the geosphere and groundwater systems to external perturbations caused by glaciation through the use of performance measures such as Mean Life Expectancy and the migration of a unit tracer to depth over a paleoclimate cycle.

  17. Radionuclide migration analysis using a discrete fracture network model

    SciTech Connect

    Ijiri, Y.; Sawada, A.; Webb, E.K.; Watari, S.; Hatanaka, K.; Uchida, M.; Ishiguro, K.; Umeki, H.; Dershowitz, W.S.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes an approach for assessing the geosphere performance of nuclear waste disposal in fractured rock. In this approach, a three-dimensional heterogeneous channel-network model is constructed using a stochastic discrete fracture network (DFN) code. Radionuclide migration in the channel-network model is solved using the Laplace transform Galerkin finite element method, taking into account advection-dispersion in a fracture network, matrix diffusion, sorption in the rock matrix as well as radioactive chain decay. Preliminary radionuclide migration analysis was performed for fifty realizations of a synthetic block-scale DFN model. The total radionuclide release from all packages in the repository was estimated from the statistics of the results of fifty realizations under the hypothesis of ergodicity. The interpretation of the result of the three-dimensional network model by a combination of simpler one-dimensional parallel plate models is also discussed.

  18. Fluid permeability of deformable fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.R.; Bruhn, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The authors consider the problem of defining the fracture permeability tensor for each grid lock in a rock mass from maps of natural fractures. For this purpose they implement a statistical model of cracked rock due to M. Oda [1985], where the permeability tensor is related to the crack geometry via a volume average of the contribution from each crack in the population. In this model tectonic stress is implicitly coupled to fluid flow through an assumed relationship between crack aperture and normal stress across the crack. The authors have included the following enhancements to the basic model: (1) a realistic model of crack closure under stress has been added along with the provision to apply tectonic stresses to the fracture system in any orientation, the application of stress results in fracture closure and consequently a reduction in permeability; (2) the fracture permeability can be superimposed onto an arbitrary anisotropic matrix permeability; (3) the fracture surfaces are allowed to slide under the application of shear stress, causing fractures to dilate and result in a permeability increase. Through an example, the authors demonstrate that significant changes in permeability magnitudes and orientations are possible when tectonic stress is applied to a fracture system.

  19. Experimental Study of Heat Transport in Fractured Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Nicola; Cherubini, Claudia; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicoletta M.; Redondo, Jose M.; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2015-04-01

    Fractured rocks play an important role in transport of natural resources or contaminants transport through subsurface systems. In recent years, interest has grown in investigating heat transport by means of tracer tests, driven by the important current development of geothermal applications. In literature different methods are available for predicting thermal breakthrough in fractured reservoirs based on the information coming from tracer tests. Geothermal energy is one of the largest sources of renewable energies that are extracted from the earth. The growing interest in this new energy source has stimulated attempts to develop methods and technologies for extracting energy also from ground resource at low temperature. An example is the exploitation of low enthalpy geothermal energy that can be obtained at any place with the aid of ground-source heat pump system from the soil, rock and groundwater. In such geothermal systems the fluid movement and thermal behavior in the fractured porous media is very important and critical. Existing theory of fluid flow and heat transport through porous media is of limited usefulness when applied to fractured rocks. Many field and laboratory tracer tests in fractured media show that fracture -matrix exchange is more significant for heat than mass tracers, thus thermal breakthrough curves (BTCs) are strongly controlled by matrix thermal diffusivity. In this study the behaviour of heat transport in a fractured network at bench scale has been investigated. Heat tracer tests on an artificially created fractured rock sample have been carried out. The observed thermal BTCs obtained with six thermocouple probes located at different locations in the fractured medium have been modeled with the Explicit Network Model (ENM) based an adaptation of Tang's solution for solute transport in a semi-infinite single fracture embedded in a porous matrix. The ENM model is able to represent the behavior of observed heat transport except where the

  20. Characterization of fracture networks for fluid flow analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.C.S.; Billaux, D.; Hestir, K.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.; Karasaki, K.; Nihei, K.; Gentier, S.; Cox, L.

    1989-06-01

    The analysis of fluid flow through fractured rocks is difficult because the only way to assign hydraulic parameters to fractures is to perform hydraulic tests. However, the interpretation of such tests, or ''inversion'' of the data, requires at least that we know the geometric pattern formed by the fractures. Combining a statistical approach with geophysical data may be extremely helpful in defining the fracture geometry. Cross-hole geophysics, either seismic or radar, can provide tomograms which are pixel maps of the velocity or attenuation anomalies in the rock. These anomalies are often due to fracture zones. Therefore, tomograms can be used to identify fracture zones and provide information about the structure within the fracture zones. This structural information can be used as the basis for simulating the degree of fracturing within the zones. Well tests can then be used to further refine the model. Because the fracture network is only partially connected, the resulting geometry of the flow paths may have fractal properties. We are studying the behavior of well tests under such geometry. Through understanding of this behavior, it may be possible to use inverse techniques to refine the a priori assignment of fractures and their conductances such that we obtain the best fit to a series of well test results simultaneously. The methodology described here is under development and currently being applied to several field sites. 4 refs., 14 figs.

  1. Effective transmissivity of two-dimensional fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1995-04-01

    Many of the sites that have been proposed as potential locations of underground radioactive waste repositories contain fractured rocks. For example, both the saturated and unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, contains many hydrogeologic units that are extensively fractured. When modeling the hydrological behavior of these sites, for either the purpose of site characterization of performance assessment, computational grid-blocks are often used that contain large number of fractures. In order to treat these as equivalent continua, it is necessary to develop a procedure for relating the hydraulic properties of the individual fractures and he topology of the fracture network to the overall scale permeability. One aspect of this problem is that of determining the in situ hydraulic properties of the individual fractures. Another aspect is to reconstruct the three-dimensional geometry of the fracture network based on borehole or outcrop measurements. The final stage in the problem is that of taking a network of known geometry and determining it effective scale conductivity. The purpose of this paper is to describe a simple procedure for solving this latter problem,a nd to demonstrate it use in cases of both saturated and unsaturated flow. The TOUGH simulator was used.

  2. Fractal and geostatistical methods for modeling of a fracture network

    SciTech Connect

    Chiles, J.P.

    1988-08-01

    The modeling of fracture networks is useful for fluid flow and rock mechanics studies. About 6600 fracture traces were recorded on drifts of a uranium mine in a granite massif. The traces have an extension of 0.20-20 m. The network was studied by fractal and by geostatistical methods but can be considered neither as a fractal with a constant dimension nor a set of purely randomly located fractures. Two kinds of generalization of conventional models can still provide more flexibility for the characterization of the network: (a) a nonscaling fractal model with variable similarity dimension (for a 2-D network of traces, the dimension varying from 2 for the 10-m scale to 1 for the centimeter scale, (b) a parent-daughter model with a regionalized density; the geostatistical study allows a 3-D model to be established where: fractures are assumed to be discs; fractures are grouped in clusters or swarms; and fracturation density is regionalized (with two ranges at about 30 and 300 m). The fractal model is easy to fit and to simulate along a line, but 2-D and 3-D simulations are more difficult. The geostatistical model is more complex, but easy to simulate, even in 3-D.

  3. Periodic Hydraulic Testing for Discerning Fracture Network Connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M.; Le Borgne, T.; Bour, O.; Guihéneuf, N.; Cole, M.

    2015-12-01

    Discrete fracture network (DFN) models often predict highly variable hydraulic connections between injection and pumping wells used for enhanced oil recovery, geothermal energy extraction, and groundwater remediation. Such connections can be difficult to verify in fractured rock systems because standard pumping or pulse interference tests interrogate too large a volume to pinpoint specific connections. Three field examples are presented in which periodic hydraulic tests were used to obtain information about hydraulic connectivity in fractured bedrock. The first site, a sandstone in New York State, involves only a single fracture at a scale of about 10 m. The second site, a granite in Brittany, France, involves a fracture network at about the same scale. The third site, a granite/schist in the U.S. State of New Hampshire, involves a complex network at scale of 30-60 m. In each case periodic testing provided an enhanced view of hydraulic connectivity over previous constant rate tests. Periodic testing is particularly adept at measuring hydraulic diffusivity, which is a more effective parameter than permeability for identify the complexity of flow pathways between measurement locations. Periodic tests were also conducted at multiple frequencies which provides a range in the radius of hydraulic penetration away from the oscillating well. By varying the radius of penetration, we attempt to interrogate the structure of the fracture network. Periodic tests, therefore, may be uniquely suited for verifying and/or calibrating DFN models.

  4. Fractal modeling of natural fracture networks. Final report, June 1994--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ferer, M.V.; Dean, B.H.; Mick, C.

    1996-04-01

    Recovery from naturally fractured, tight-gas reservoirs is controlled by the fracture network. Reliable characterization of the actual fracture network in the reservoir is severely limited. The location and orientation of fractures intersecting the borehole can be determined, but the length of these fractures cannot be unambiguously determined. Fracture networks can be determined for outcrops, but there is little reason to believe that the network in the reservoir should be identical because of the differences in stresses and history. Because of the lack of detailed information about the actual fracture network, modeling methods must represent the porosity and permeability associated with the fracture network, as accurately as possible with very little apriori information. Three rather different types of approaches have been used: (1) dual porosity simulations; (2) `stochastic` modeling of fracture networks, and (3) fractal modeling of fracture networks. Stochastic models which assume a variety of probability distributions of fracture characteristics have been used with some success in modeling fracture networks. The advantage of these stochastic models over the dual porosity simulations is that real fracture heterogeneities are included in the modeling process. In the sections provided in this paper the authors will present fractal analysis of the MWX site, using the box-counting procedure; (2) review evidence testing the fractal nature of fracture distributions and discuss the advantages of using their fractal analysis over a stochastic analysis; (3) present an efficient algorithm for producing a self-similar fracture networks which mimic the real MWX outcrop fracture network.

  5. Semi-interpenetrating polymer network's of polyimides: Fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Marion Glenn

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to improve the fracture toughness of the PMR-15 thermosetting polyimide by co-disolving LaRC-TPI, a thermoplastic polyimide. The co-solvation of a thermoplastic into a thermoset produces an interpenetration of the thermoplastic polymer into the thermoset polyimide network. A second research program was planned around the concept that to improve the fracture toughness of a thermoset polyimide polymer, the molecular weight between crosslink points would be an important macromolecular topological parameter in producing a fracture toughened semi-IPN polyimide.

  6. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing. PMID:25966285

  7. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing. PMID:25966285

  8. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  9. A descriptive study of fracture networks in rocks using complex network metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Elizabeth; Velasco-Hernández, Jorge X.; Romero-Salcedo, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we describe the static topological fracture structure of five rock samples from three regions in Eastern Mexico by the application of centrality and communicability measures used in the area of complex networks. The information obtained from fracture images is used to characterize the fracture networks. The analysis is divided into two groups of characteristics. The first provides a general summary of the fracture network through the description of the number of nodes, edges, diameter, radius, lengths and clustering coefficients. A second group of features centers on the description of communicability in the network by means of three indexes recently proposed. In addition, we apply centrality measures (betweenness, closeness, eigenvector and eccentricity) for quantifying the importance of nodes in the entire network. Finally, we identify a topology for fracture networks using a classification based on the degree of communicability. The most important results obtained in this work are focused in the topological characteristic patterns found in fracture networks applying the approach of complex networks that in general provide local and global parameters of connectivity and communicability.

  10. Efficient generation of large random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batagelj, Vladimir; Brandes, Ulrik

    2005-03-01

    Random networks are frequently generated, for example, to investigate the effects of model parameters on network properties or to test the performance of algorithms. Recent interest in the statistics of large-scale networks sparked a growing demand for network generators that can generate large numbers of large networks quickly. We here present simple and efficient algorithms to randomly generate networks according to the most commonly used models. Their running time and space requirement is linear in the size of the network generated, and they are easily implemented.

  11. Developing Next Generation Natural Fracture Detection and Prediction Technology

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Billingsley

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of the ''Next Generation'' project was to develop technology that will provide a quantitative description of natural fracture properties and locations in low-permeability reservoirs. The development of this technology has consistently been ranked as one of the highest priority needs by industry. Numerous researchers and resource assessment groups have stated that the ability to identify area where intense clusters of natural fractures co-exist with gas-charged sands, the so called ''sweet spots'', will be the key to unlocking the vast quantities of gas in-place contained in these low-permeability gas basins. To meet this technology need, the ''Next Generation'' project was undertaken with three performance criteria in mind: (1) provide an integrated assessment of the burial and tectonic stresses in a basin responsible for natural fracture genesis (using seismic data, a significantly modified application of geomechanics, and a discrete natural fracture generation model); (2) link the assessment of natural fracture properties and locations to the reservoir's fluid, storage and flow properties; and, (3) provide a reservoir simulation-based calculation of the gas (and water) production capacity of a naturally fractured reservoir system. Phase III of the ''Next Generation'' project entailed the performance of a field demonstration of the software in an ''exploration'' setting. The search for an Industry Partner willing to host an exploratory field demonstration was unsuccessful and Phase III was canceled effective May, 31, 2005. The failure to find an Industry Partner can be attributed to severe changes in the petroleum industry competitive environment between 1999 when the project was initiated and 2005 when further demonstration efforts were halted. The software was employed in portions of other, non-exploratory, projects underway during the development time period, and insights gained will be summarized here in lieu of a full field demonstration.

  12. FROMS3D: New Software for 3-D Visualization of Fracture Network System in Fractured Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Y. H.; Um, J. G.; Choi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A new software (FROMS3D) is presented to visualize fracture network system in 3-D. The software consists of several modules that play roles in management of borehole and field fracture data, fracture network modelling, visualization of fracture geometry in 3-D and calculation and visualization of intersections and equivalent pipes between fractures. Intel Parallel Studio XE 2013, Visual Studio.NET 2010 and the open source VTK library were utilized as development tools to efficiently implement the modules and the graphical user interface of the software. The results have suggested that the developed software is effective in visualizing 3-D fracture network system, and can provide useful information to tackle the engineering geological problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses.

  13. Outgassing of silicic magma through bubble and fracture networks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, S.; Nakamura, M.; Uesugi, K.

    2013-12-01

    Outgassing of magma is a fundamental process that controls the style and explosivity of volcanic eruptions. Vesiculation during the ascent and decompression of magma results in the formation of bubble networks within the magma. The permeable gas escape through the bubble networks is an efficient way to induce the outgassing of silicic magma (Eichelberger et al., 1986). To understand magma ascent dynamics and predict the style and explosivity of eruptions, it is necessary to constrain the rate of magma outgassing as the magma ascends in a volcanic conduit. However, the gas permeability of natural samples should not be considered, because it reflects complicated processes involving vesiculation, deformation, outgassing, and compaction. Experimental studies have demonstrated that vesiculation and compaction processes show hysteresis behavior (Okumura et al., 2013). Thus, we have performed experiments to simulate magma decompression and the deformation of vesicular magmas (e.g., Okumura et al., 2009, 2012). A series of decompression and deformation experiments indicates that the gas permeability is less than the order of 10-15 m2 for isotropic vesiculation at vesicularity <60-80 vol%. When magma ascent is simulated with shear deformation, the gas permeability is much greater than that observed under isotropic conditions. Akin to bubble networks, permeable networks consisting of shear-induced brittle fractures are thought to be efficient outgassing pathways (Gonnermann and Manga, 2003). Our recent experiments demonstrated that fractured magma has a higher gas permeability than vesicular magma at least at vesicularities <~40 vol%. This indicates that fracture networks in magma become efficient parts for the outgassing. However, as shear fracturing results from high strain rates in highly viscous magma, outgassing via fracture networks can be enhanced in localized shear zones and shallow parts of the conduit. The permeable bubble and fracture networks are preferentially

  14. Estimation of the hydraulic conductivity of a two-dimensional fracture network using effective medium theory and power-law averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, R. W.; Leung, C. T.

    2009-12-01

    Most oil and gas reservoirs, as well as most potential sites for nuclear waste disposal, are naturally fractured. In these sites, the network of fractures will provide the main path for fluid to flow through the rock mass. In many cases, the fracture density is so high as to make it impractical to model it with a discrete fracture network (DFN) approach. For such rock masses, it would be useful to have recourse to analytical, or semi-analytical, methods to estimate the macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the fracture network. We have investigated single-phase fluid flow through generated stochastically two-dimensional fracture networks. The centers and orientations of the fractures are uniformly distributed, whereas their lengths follow a lognormal distribution. The aperture of each fracture is correlated with its length, either through direct proportionality, or through a nonlinear relationship. The discrete fracture network flow and transport simulator NAPSAC, developed by Serco (Didcot, UK), is used to establish the “true” macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the network. We then attempt to match this value by starting with the individual fracture conductances, and using various upscaling methods. Kirkpatrick’s effective medium approximation, which works well for pore networks on a core scale, generally underestimates the conductivity of the fracture networks. We attribute this to the fact that the conductances of individual fracture segments (between adjacent intersections with other fractures) are correlated with each other, whereas Kirkpatrick’s approximation assumes no correlation. The power-law averaging approach proposed by Desbarats for porous media is able to match the numerical value, using power-law exponents that generally lie between 0 (geometric mean) and 1 (harmonic mean). The appropriate exponent can be correlated with statistical parameters that characterize the fracture density.

  15. Hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale: reviewing influence factors and their mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lan; Zhao, Jinzhou; Hu, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture in shale reservoir presents complex network propagation, which has essential difference with traditional plane biwing fracture at forming mechanism. Based on the research results of experiments, field fracturing practice, theory analysis, and numerical simulation, the influence factors and their mechanism of hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale have been systematically analyzed and discussed. Research results show that the fracture propagation in shale reservoir is influenced by the geological and the engineering factors, which includes rock mineral composition, rock mechanical properties, horizontal stress field, natural fractures, treating net pressure, fracturing fluid viscosity, and fracturing scale. This study has important theoretical value and practical significance to understand fracture network propagation mechanism in shale reservoir and contributes to improving the science and efficiency of shale reservoir fracturing design. PMID:25032240

  16. Hydraulic Fracture Extending into Network in Shale: Reviewing Influence Factors and Their Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lan; Zhao, Jinzhou; Hu, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture in shale reservoir presents complex network propagation, which has essential difference with traditional plane biwing fracture at forming mechanism. Based on the research results of experiments, field fracturing practice, theory analysis, and numerical simulation, the influence factors and their mechanism of hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale have been systematically analyzed and discussed. Research results show that the fracture propagation in shale reservoir is influenced by the geological and the engineering factors, which includes rock mineral composition, rock mechanical properties, horizontal stress field, natural fractures, treating net pressure, fracturing fluid viscosity, and fracturing scale. This study has important theoretical value and practical significance to understand fracture network propagation mechanism in shale reservoir and contributes to improving the science and efficiency of shale reservoir fracturing design. PMID:25032240

  17. Importance of Stratabound Fracture Networks for Seismic Hazard Assessment of Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W.; Davidsen, J.; Pedersen, P. K.; Boroumand, N.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing, a powerful completion technique used to enhance oil or gas production from impermeable strata, may trigger unintended earthquake activity. The primary basis for assessment of triggered and natural seismic hazard is the classic Gutenberg-Richter (G-R) relation, which expresses scale-independent behavior of earthquake magnitudes. Using a stochastic approach to simulate microseismicity from three monitoring programs in North America, we show that magnitude-distance trends for microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing may deviate significantly from the G-R relation. This apparent breakdown in the power-law scaling paradigm, coupled with unusually high values for the b-parameter (slope) of the G-R relation, can be explained by a new model based on activation of stratabound fracture networks in which fracture height growth is limited by mechanical bed thickness. For the three areas considered, mechanical bed thickness is well represented by a lognormal distribution, which leads asymptotically to a Gaussian decay for induced magnitudes that fits the observations remarkably well. This new relationship has profound implications for understanding the scaling behavior of induced microearthquakes, as well as for forecasting the probability of larger earthquakes triggered by hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas development.

  18. Modelling of electro-seismic source generation in fractured fluid filled rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, N.; Tuckwell, G.

    2003-04-01

    Networks of fluid-filled fractures occur in all rocks at all scales. They control geological and geomechanical processes such as deformation, diagenesis, mineralisation, hydrocarbon production and groundwater flow. With microseismic monitoring methods alone, only three-dimensional, dynamic stress imaging of fracture initiation and propagation can be achieved with the presence/extent of fluid(s) within the fracture network remaining undetermined. As a fluid saturated rock fractures, propagating electro-seismic signals are generated at the fracture faces that contain information on the geomechanical and electro-seismic properties of the fracture source. However, source complexity, and the modification of the signals as they propagate through heterogeneous geological media, can make the interpretation of these electro-seismic signals exceedingly difficult. By developing appropriate numerical forward modelling solutions these processes can be investigated in detail and the recorded data analysed with a higher degree of confidence. With the ongoing development of cost-effective computing resources, fully three-dimensional electro-seismic wave propagation problems can be attempted at practical scales. We present a coupled Discrete-element/Finite-difference modelling method that is able to model the full three-dimensional electro-seismic wave-field including source generation, converted waves, reflections, multiples and diffractions in a single computational scheme. The scheme has the advantage of being easily formulated, flexible and operates in the time-domain without the need for complex mathematical transformations. The comprehensive nature of the method permits the use of multiple electro-seismic sources to describe the natural fracturing behaviour of the source materials and their complicated geometries. Results show that the presence of an asymmetrical displacement field along the fracture faces will produce independently propagating electromagnetic waves of high

  19. Anomalous transport in fracture networks: field scale experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, P. K.; Le Borgne, T.; Bour, O.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    Anomalous transport is widely observed in different settings and scales of transport through porous and fractured geologic media. A common signature of anomalous transport is the late-time power law tailing in breakthrough curves (BTCs) during tracer tests. Various conceptual models of anomalous transport have been proposed, including multirate mass transfer, continuous time random walk, and stream tube models. Since different conceptual models can produce equally good fits to a single BTC, tracer test interpretation has been plagued with ambiguity. Here, we propose to resolve such ambiguity by analyzing BTCs obtained from both convergent and push-pull flow configurations at two different fracture planes. We conducted field tracer tests in a fractured granite formation close to Ploemeur, France. We observe that BTC tailing depends on the flow configuration and the injection fracture. Specifically the tailing disappears under push-pull geometry, and when we injected at a fracture with high flux (Figure 1). This indicates that for this fractured granite, BTC tailing is controlled by heterogeneous advection and not by matrix diffusion. To explain the change in tailing behavior for different flow configurations, we employ a simple lattice network model with heterogeneous conductivity distribution. The model assigns random conductivities to the fractures and solves the Darcy equation for an incompressible fluid, enforcing mass conservation at fracture intersections. The mass conservation constraint yields a correlated random flow through the fracture system. We investigate whether BTC tailing can be explained by the spatial distribution of preferential flow paths and stagnation zones, which is controlled by the conductivity variance and correlation length. By combining the results from the field tests and numerical modeling, we show that the reversibility of spreading is a key mechanism that needs to be captured. We also demonstrate the dominant role of the injection

  20. Fractured Bedrock Storm Flow: a New Pathway for Runoff Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshun, J.; Salve, R.; Rempe, D. M.; Dietrich, W. E.; Fung, I.

    2010-12-01

    Groundwater dynamics in the fractured weathered bedrock underlying hillslopes may dominate storm runoff in many hilly and mountainous areas Few studies, however, have explored this runoff generation process. Here we use an intensively monitored site to study the spatial relationships between fractured bedrock and hydraulic properties in the weathered zone below a forested hillslope. The study site, Rivendell, is a 4000 m2 catchment draining directly into Elder Creek in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve (ACRR) in Northern California. The site is underlain by highly fractured and weak mudstones and boudinaged, ridge-forming sandstones that are turbidite sequences of the Coastal Franciscan Belt. The site receives an average of 1800mm of precipitation annually, with the vast majority falling between October and May. Rivendell has a thinly mantled soil layer underlain by a fractured rock zone, which thickens upslope to a depth of up to 30 m. Standard penetration tests show a consistent increase in bedrock resistance at depth before an abrupt lower boundary upon which the water table is perched. We use seven monitoring wells, precipitation data, soil moisture data, a steam gauge in Elder Creek, and well pump tests to characterize water movement through the fractured rock zone.. We analyze the lag time between peak rainfall and peak response at seven wells and Elder Creek from 2007-2010. The water table varies across the slope between 4 and 25 m below the ground surface, and the dynamic range of well water level increases with distance from Elder Creek. The magnitude and timing of well response shows a relationship to depth, magnitude of rainfall and antecedent moisture conditions. Although nearly all runoff is generated through fractured bedrock, we observe that Elder Creek consistently shows the shortest lag times compared to the wells on the hillslope. Wells show different trends in magnitude and timing of response throughout the rainy season. Pump tests reveal a

  1. Stochastic Generator of Chemical Structure. 3. Reaction Network Generation

    SciTech Connect

    FAULON,JEAN-LOUP; SAULT,ALLEN G.

    2000-07-15

    A new method to generate chemical reaction network is proposed. The particularity of the method is that network generation and mechanism reduction are performed simultaneously using sampling techniques. Our method is tested for hydrocarbon thermal cracking. Results and theoretical arguments demonstrate that our method scales in polynomial time while other deterministic network generator scale in exponential time. This finding offers the possibility to investigate complex reacting systems such as those studied in petroleum refining and combustion.

  2. A Network Synthesis Model for Generating Protein Interaction Network Families

    PubMed Central

    Sahraeian, Sayed Mohammad Ebrahim; Yoon, Byung-Jun

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a novel network synthesis model that can generate families of evolutionarily related synthetic protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks. Given an ancestral network, the proposed model generates the network family according to a hypothetical phylogenetic tree, where the descendant networks are obtained through duplication and divergence of their ancestors, followed by network growth using network evolution models. We demonstrate that this network synthesis model can effectively create synthetic networks whose internal and cross-network properties closely resemble those of real PPI networks. The proposed model can serve as an effective framework for generating comprehensive benchmark datasets that can be used for reliable performance assessment of comparative network analysis algorithms. Using this model, we constructed a large-scale network alignment benchmark, called NAPAbench, and evaluated the performance of several representative network alignment algorithms. Our analysis clearly shows the relative performance of the leading network algorithms, with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The algorithm and source code of the network synthesis model and the network alignment benchmark NAPAbench are publicly available at http://www.ece.tamu.edu/bjyoon/NAPAbench/. PMID:22912671

  3. Modeling in-situ transport of uranine and colloids in the fracture network in KURT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Woo; Lee, Jae-Kwang; Baik, Min-Hoon; Jeong, Jongtae

    2015-02-01

    An in-situ dipole migration experiment was conducted using the conservative tracer uranine and latex colloids in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) Underground Research Tunnel (KURT). The location and dimensions of the fractures between the two boreholes were estimated using the results of a borehole image processing system (BIPS) investigation, and the connectivity of the fractures was evaluated by a packer test. To investigate the flow and transport of uranine and colloids through an in-situ fracture network, a fracture network transport model was newly developed. The model consists of a series of one-dimensional advection-dispersion-matrix diffusion equations for each channel of the fracture network. Using the fracture network transport model, the most probable representation and the hydrologic parameters of the fracture network can be estimated by fitting the breakthrough of uranine. While the fracture network might not be unique, the representation chosen was adequate to describe the breakthrough of uranine and it represents a reasonable approach to modeling transport in the fracture network. An additional evaluation showed that the colloid transport in this study was influenced by filtration on the fracture surface rather than the enhancement of the colloid velocity. Overall, the model can explain successfully the in-situ experimental results of uranine and colloid transports through the fracture network. PMID:25543462

  4. dfnWorks: A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-11-01

    DFNWORKS is a parallelized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using DFNGEN, which combines FRAM (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs with the LaGriT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation. The representation produces a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computing finite volume solvers in an intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in dfnFlow, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code PFLOTRAN. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within DFNTRANS to determine pathlines and solute transport through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.

  5. DFNWORKS: A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-11-01

    DFNWORKS is a parallelized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using DFNGEN, which combines FRAM (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs with the LAGRIT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation. The representation produces a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computing finite volume solvers in an intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in DFNFLOW, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code PFLOTRAN. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within DFNTRANS to determine pathlines and solute transport through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.

  6. DFNWorks. A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-08-10

    DFNWorks is a parallalized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using dfnGen, which combines fram (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs on the basis of site specific data with the LaGriT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation, specifically a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computingmore » finite volume solvers, of the DFN in an intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in dfnFlow, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code pflotran. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within dfnTrans, which is an extension of the walkabout particle tracking method to determine pathlines through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.« less

  7. dfnWorks: A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-11-01

    DFNWORKS is a parallelized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using DFNGEN, which combines FRAM (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs with the LaGriT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation. The representation produces a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computing finite volume solvers in anmore » intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in dfnFlow, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code PFLOTRAN. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within DFNTRANS to determine pathlines and solute transport through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.« less

  8. DFNWorks. A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-08-10

    DFNWorks is a parallalized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using dfnGen, which combines fram (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs on the basis of site specific data with the LaGriT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation, specifically a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computing finite volume solvers, of the DFN in an intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in dfnFlow, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code pflotran. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within dfnTrans, which is an extension of the walkabout particle tracking method to determine pathlines through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.

  9. Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Final report, March 7, 1996 to September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Dershowitz, William S.; Einstein, Herbert H.; LaPoint, Paul R.; Eiben, Thorsten; Wadleigh, Eugene; Ivanova, Violeta

    1998-12-01

    This report summarizes research conducted for the Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies Project. The five areas studied are development of hierarchical fracture models; fractured reservoir compartmentalization, block size, and tributary volume analysis; development and demonstration of fractured reservoir discrete feature data analysis tools; development of tools for data integration and reservoir simulation through application of discrete feature network technologies for tertiary oil production; quantitative evaluation of the economic value of this analysis approach.

  10. Multiscale fracture network characterization and impact on flow: A case study on the Latemar carbonate platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardebol, N. J.; Maier, C.; Nick, H.; Geiger, S.; Bertotti, G.; Boro, H.

    2015-12-01

    A fracture network arrangement is quantified across an isolated carbonate platform from outcrop and aerial imagery to address its impact on fluid flow. The network is described in terms of fracture density, orientation, and length distribution parameters. Of particular interest is the role of fracture cross connections and abutments on the effective permeability. Hence, the flow simulations explicitly account for network topology by adopting Discrete-Fracture-and-Matrix description. The interior of the Latemar carbonate platform (Dolomites, Italy) is taken as outcrop analogue for subsurface reservoirs of isolated carbonate build-ups that exhibit a fracture-dominated permeability. New is our dual strategy to describe the fracture network both as deterministic- and stochastic-based inputs for flow simulations. The fracture geometries are captured explicitly and form a multiscale data set by integration of interpretations from outcrops, airborne imagery, and lidar. The deterministic network descriptions form the basis for descriptive rules that are diagnostic of the complex natural fracture arrangement. The fracture networks exhibit a variable degree of multitier hierarchies with smaller-sized fractures abutting against larger fractures under both right and oblique angles. The influence of network topology on connectivity is quantified using Discrete-Fracture-Single phase fluid flow simulations. The simulation results show that the effective permeability for the fracture and matrix ensemble can be 50 to 400 times higher than the matrix permeability of 1.0 · 10-14 m2. The permeability enhancement is strongly controlled by the connectivity of the fracture network. Therefore, the degree of intersecting and abutting fractures should be captured from outcrops with accuracy to be of value as analogue.

  11. Uncertainties in Parameterizing Faults for Discrete Fracture Network Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, T.

    2013-12-01

    Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models represent conducting faults and fractures as two dimensional features with transmissivity that defines the flow capacity, storativity that represents the open volume and compressibility, and aperture that determines the flow velocity. While these properties work well for capturing the pressure and flow behaviors they are not complete for understanding solute transport in groundwater or production in fault-dominated oil and gas reservoirs. For oil and gas production, water breakthrough will be controlled by the small portion of the fault that accounts for most of the fault's transmissivity, while the major portion in the fault's storage will be released more slowly. Similarly, in contaminant hydrology, the multiple porosities of the faults may enhance matrix diffusion effects. This presentation focuses on faults in granitic basement rock with low matrix permeability and porosity. Although these rocks contain joints and simple fractures, the major portion of the flow and storage may appear in faults and shear fractures that span a large range of scales. Unlike simple fractures or joints, faults and shear fractures have complex internal geometries including a range of materials including altered rock, breccia, mylonite, cataclasite, and gouge. These materials may have significant porosities ranging from a few percent to over thirty percent in heavily weathered or altered rocks. The core materials may act as either barriers or conduits. Altered granitic rock may also have porosities in the range of several percent. As faults may have thicknesses from a few centimeters to several tens of meters, the pore volumes in fault rock can be very significant. A key to understanding fault zone behaviors lies in having a range for the relative pore volumes of the conducting portion of the fault versus that of the larger damage zone. This presentation summarizes a literature review focusing on these fault properties. The conducting portion of

  12. Nodal network generator for CAVE3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, J. V.; Rathjen, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    A new extension of CAVE3 code was developed that automates the creation of a finite difference math model in digital form ready for input to the CAVE3 code. The new software, Nodal Network Generator, is broken into two segments. One segment generates the model geometry using a Tektronix Tablet Digitizer and the other generates the actual finite difference model and allows for graphic verification using Tektronix 4014 Graphic Scope. Use of the Nodal Network Generator is described.

  13. Analysis of microseismicity using fuzzy logic and fractals for fracture network characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, F.; Ayatollahy Tafti, T.; Maity, D.; Boyle, K.; Sahimi, M.; Sammis, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    The area where microseismic events occur may be correlated with the fracture network at a geothermal field. For an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir, an extensive fracture network with a large aerial distribution is required. Pore-pressure increase, temperature changes, volume change due to fluid withdrawal/injection and chemical alteration of fracture surfaces are all mechanisms that may explain microseismic events at a geothermal field. If these mechanisms are operative, any fuzzy cluster of the microseismic events should represent a connected fracture network. Drilling new EGS wells (both injection and production wells) in these locations may facilitate the creation of an EGS reservoir. In this article we use the fuzzy clustering technique to find the location and characteristics of fracture networks in the Geysers geothermal field. We also show that the centers of these fuzzy clusters move in time, which may represent fracture propagation or fluid movement within the fracture network. Furthermore, analyzing the distribution of fuzzy hypocenters and quantifying their fractal structure helps us to develop an accurate fracture map for the reservoir. Combining the fuzzy clustering results with the fractal analysis allows us to better understand the mechanisms for fracture stimulation and better characterize the evolution of the fracture network. We also show how micro-earthquake date collected in different time periods can be correlated with drastic changes in the distribution of active fractures resulting from injection, production or other transient events.

  14. Fracture network evaluation program (FraNEP): A software for analyzing 2D fracture trace-line maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeb, Conny; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul D.; Virgo, Simon; Blum, Philipp

    2013-10-01

    Fractures, such as joints, faults and veins, strongly influence the transport of fluids through rocks by either enhancing or inhibiting flow. Techniques used for the automatic detection of lineaments from satellite images and aerial photographs, LIDAR technologies and borehole televiewers significantly enhanced data acquisition. The analysis of such data is often performed manually or with different analysis software. Here we present a novel program for the analysis of 2D fracture networks called FraNEP (Fracture Network Evaluation Program). The program was developed using Visual Basic for Applications in Microsoft Excel™ and combines features from different existing software and characterization techniques. The main novelty of FraNEP is the possibility to analyse trace-line maps of fracture networks applying the (1) scanline sampling, (2) window sampling or (3) circular scanline and window method, without the need of switching programs. Additionally, binning problems are avoided by using cumulative distributions, rather than probability density functions. FraNEP is a time-efficient tool for the characterisation of fracture network parameters, such as density, intensity and mean length. Furthermore, fracture strikes can be visualized using rose diagrams and a fitting routine evaluates the distribution of fracture lengths. As an example of its application, we use FraNEP to analyse a case study of lineament data from a satellite image of the Oman Mountains.

  15. Editorial: Next Generation Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, Marco; Cincotti, Gabriella; Pizzinat, Anna; Vetter, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade we have seen an increasing number of operators deploying Fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) solutions in access networks, in order to provide home users with a much needed network access upgrade, to support higher peak rates, higher sustained rates and a better and more uniform broadband coverage of the territory.

  16. Multiple-point statistical prediction on fracture networks at Yucca Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Chengyuan; Liu, Quansheng; Birkholzer, Jens

    2009-05-01

    In many underground nuclear waste repository systems, such as Yucca Mountain project, water flow rate and amount of water seepage into the waste emplacement drifts are mainly determined by hydrological properties of fracture network in the surrounding rock mass. Natural fracture network system is not easy to describe, especially with respect to its connectivity which is critically important for simulating the water flow field. In this paper, we introduced a new method for fracture network description and prediction, termed multi-point-statistics (MPS). The process of Multi-point Statistical method is to record multiple-point statistics concerning the connectivity patterns of fracture network from a known fracture map, and to reproduce multiple-scale training fracture patterns in a stochastic manner, implicitly and directly. It is applied to fracture data to study flow field behavior at Yucca Mountain waste repository system. First, MPS method is used to create fracture network with original fracture training image from Yucca Mountain dataset. After we adopt a harmonic and arithmetic average method to upscale the permeability to a coarse grid, THM simulation is carried out to study near-field water flow in surrounding rock of waste emplacement drifts. Our study shows that connectivity or pattern of fracture network can be grasped and reconstructed by Multi-Point-Statistical method. In theory, it will lead to better prediction of fracture system characteristics and flow behavior. Meanwhile, we can obtain variance from flow field, which gives us a way to quantify uncertainty of models even in complicated coupled THM simulation. It indicates that Multi-Point Statistics is a potential method to characterize and reconstruct natural fracture network in a fractured rock mass with advantages of quantifying connectivity of fracture system and its simulation uncertainty simultaneously.

  17. Multiple-point statistical prediction on fracture networks at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.Y; Zhang, C.Y.; Liu, Q.S.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2009-05-01

    In many underground nuclear waste repository systems, such as at Yucca Mountain, water flow rate and amount of water seepage into the waste emplacement drifts are mainly determined by hydrological properties of fracture network in the surrounding rock mass. Natural fracture network system is not easy to describe, especially with respect to its connectivity which is critically important for simulating the water flow field. In this paper, we introduced a new method for fracture network description and prediction, termed multi-point-statistics (MPS). The process of the MPS method is to record multiple-point statistics concerning the connectivity patterns of a fracture network from a known fracture map, and to reproduce multiple-scale training fracture patterns in a stochastic manner, implicitly and directly. It is applied to fracture data to study flow field behavior at the Yucca Mountain waste repository system. First, the MPS method is used to create a fracture network with an original fracture training image from Yucca Mountain dataset. After we adopt a harmonic and arithmetic average method to upscale the permeability to a coarse grid, THM simulation is carried out to study near-field water flow in the surrounding waste emplacement drifts. Our study shows that connectivity or patterns of fracture networks can be grasped and reconstructed by MPS methods. In theory, it will lead to better prediction of fracture system characteristics and flow behavior. Meanwhile, we can obtain variance from flow field, which gives us a way to quantify model uncertainty even in complicated coupled THM simulations. It indicates that MPS can potentially characterize and reconstruct natural fracture networks in a fractured rock mass with advantages of quantifying connectivity of fracture system and its simulation uncertainty simultaneously.

  18. Evolution of Permeability and Induced Seismicity during Reservoir Stimulation; Role of Fluid Pressure and Thermal Transients on Reactivated Fractured Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadi, G.; Elsworth, D.

    2012-12-01

    ) within the reservoir. We illustrate that the representation with the highest fracture density generates both the most and the largest seismic events (MS =1.9) within the 21 day stimulation. Rate of hydraulic and thermal transport has a considerable influence on the frequency, location and time of failure and ultimately event rate. Thus the event rate is highest when the fracture network has the largest density (0.9m-1) and is located at depth where the initial stresses are highest (zone D). Apparent from these data is that the closely spaced fracture network with the higher stress regime (at the deeper level) has the largest b-value ~0.74.

  19. Solute transport and retention in three-dimensional fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Frampton, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Resolving the hydrodynamic control of retention is an important step in predictive modeling of transport of sorbing tracers in fractured rock. The statistics of the transport resistance parameter β [T/L] and the related effective active specific surface area sf [1/L] are studied in a crystalline rock volume on a 100 m scale. Groundwater flow and advective transport are based on generic boundary conditions and realistic discrete fracture networks inferred from the Laxemar site, southeast Sweden. The overall statistics of β are consistent with statistics of the water residence time τ; the moments of β vary linearly with distance, at least up to 100 m. The correlation between log τ and log β is predominantly linear, however, there is significant dispersion; the parameter sf strongly depends on the assumed hydraulic law (theoretical cubic or empirical quadratic). Fast and slow trajectories/segments in the network determine the shape of the β distribution that cannot be reproduced by infinitely divisible model over the entire range; the low value range and median can be reproduced reasonably well with the tempered one-sided stable density using the exponent in the range 0.35-0.7. The low percentiles of the β distribution seems to converge to a Fickian type of behavior from a 50 to 100 m scale.

  20. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be

  1. Gender Differences in Cross-Generation Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troll, Lillian E.

    1987-01-01

    Members of cross-generational networks, which are primarily among kin, are likely to share basic values or to avoid issues that might cause conflict. Mother-daughter bonds are both the strongest through life and the most complex, linking household units into modified extended family networks. Critical conceptual methodological problems abound.…

  2. Fracture-fault network characterization of pavement imagery of the Whitby Mudstone, Yorkshire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, Quinten; Hardebol, Nico; Houben, Maartje; Barnhoorn, Auke; Drury, Martyn

    2015-04-01

    Natural fractures play an important role in the hydrocarbon production from tight reservoirs. The need for fracture network pathways by fraccing matters particularly for shale gas prospects, due to their micro- to nano-darcies matrix permeabilities. The study of natural fractures from outcrops helps to better understand network connectivity and possibility of reactivating pre-existing planes of weakness, induced by hydraulic stimulation. Microseismicity also show that natural fractures are reactivated during fraccing in tight gas reservoirs and influence the success of the stimulation. An accurate understanding of natural fracture networks can help in predicting the development of fracture networks. In this research we analyze an outcrop analogue, the Whitby Mustone Formation (WMF), in terms of its horizontal fracture network. The WMF is the time equivalent of the Posidonia Shale Formation (PSF), which on itself is the main shale gas prospect in the Dutch subsurface. The fracture network of the WMF is characterized by a system of steep dipping joints with two dominant directions with N-S and E-W strike. The network was digitized from bird-view imagery of the pavement with a spatial extent of ~100 m at sub-cm resolution. The imagery is interpreted in terms of orientation and length distributions, intensity and fractal dimensions. Samples from the field were analyzed for rock strength and sample mineralogy. The results indicate that the fracture networks greatly differ per bed. Observed differences are for example; the geometry of the fracture network, its cumulative length distribution law, the fracture intensity, the fracture length vs its orientation and the fractal dimension. All these parameters greatly influence fracture network connectivity, the probability that longer fractures exist within the pavement and whether the network is more prone to clustering or scattering. Apart from the differences, the networks display a fairly similar orthogonal arrangement

  3. Membership generation using multilayer neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jaeseok

    1992-01-01

    There has been intensive research in neural network applications to pattern recognition problems. Particularly, the back-propagation network has attracted many researchers because of its outstanding performance in pattern recognition applications. In this section, we describe a new method to generate membership functions from training data using a multilayer neural network. The basic idea behind the approach is as follows. The output values of a sigmoid activation function of a neuron bear remarkable resemblance to membership values. Therefore, we can regard the sigmoid activation values as the membership values in fuzzy set theory. Thus, in order to generate class membership values, we first train a suitable multilayer network using a training algorithm such as the back-propagation algorithm. After the training procedure converges, the resulting network can be treated as a membership generation network, where the inputs are feature values and the outputs are membership values in the different classes. This method allows fairly complex membership functions to be generated because the network is highly nonlinear in general. Also, it is to be noted that the membership functions are generated from a classification point of view. For pattern recognition applications, this is highly desirable, although the membership values may not be indicative of the degree of typicality of a feature value in a particular class.

  4. Review: Mathematical expressions for estimating equivalent permeability of rock fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Richeng; Li, Bo; Jiang, Yujing; Huang, Na

    2016-06-01

    Fracture networks play a more significant role in conducting fluid flow and solute transport in fractured rock masses, comparing with that of the rock matrix. Accurate estimation of the permeability of fracture networks would help researchers and engineers better assess the performance of projects associated with fluid flow in fractured rock masses. This study provides a review of previous works that have focused on the estimation of equivalent permeability of two-dimensional (2-D) discrete fracture networks (DFNs) considering the influences of geometric properties of fractured rock masses. Mathematical expressions for the effects of nine important parameters that significantly impact on the equivalent permeability of DFNs are summarized, including (1) fracture-length distribution, (2) aperture distribution, (3) fracture surface roughness, (4) fracture dead-end, (5) number of intersections, (6) hydraulic gradient, (7) boundary stress, (8) anisotropy, and (9) scale. Recent developments of 3-D fracture networks are briefly reviewed to underline the importance of utilizing 3-D models in future research.

  5. Implementation of Linear Pipe Channel Network to Estimate Hydraulic Parameters of Fractured Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J.; Um, J. G.; Wang, S.

    2014-12-01

    Modeling of fluid flow is important in geological, petroleum, environmental, civil and mining engineering. Fluid flow through fractured hard rock is very much dependent on the fracture network pattern in the rock mass and on the flow behavior through these fractures. This research deals with fluid flow behavior through fractures at an abandoned copper mine in southeast Korea. An injection well and three observation wells were installed at the mine site to monitor the hydraulic heads induced by injection of fresh water. A series of packer tests were performed to estimate the rock mass permeability and corresponding effective hydraulic aperture of the fractures. The three dimensional stochastic fracture network model was built and validated for the mine site. The two dimensional linear pipe network systems were constructed in directions of the observation wells using the fracture network model. A procedure of the fluid flow analysis on two dimensional discrete domain was applied to estimate the conductance, flow quantity and nodal head in the 2-D linear pipe channel network. The present results indicate that fracture geometry parameters (orientation, density and size) play an important role in the hydraulic characteristics of fractured rock masses.

  6. Laboratory measurement of hydrodynamic saline dispersion within a micro-fracture network induced in granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odling, Nicholas W. A.; Elphick, Stephen C.; Meredith, Philip; Main, Ian; Ngwenya, Bryne T.

    2007-08-01

    We report the first measurements of hydrodynamic dispersion in a microfractured granite using a combination of novel techniques. A fracture network was induced in a cylindrical plug of Ailsa Craig micro-granite by thermal stressing, to produce an isotropic network of fractures with an average aperture of ˜ 0.3 μm, a density of approximately 4 × 10 4 fractures/mm 3 and a permeability of 5.5 × 10 - 17 m 2. After saturating the cores with 0.01 M NaCl solution a step in the concentration profile to 1 M was advected into the plug at flow rates of 0.07 to 2.13 cm 3 h - 1 . The longitudinal electrical impedance of the plug was measured continuously as the solute front advected through its length until the plug was saturated with the concentrated electrolyte. Analysis of the impedance versus time relationships allows the derivation of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient, DL, and hydrodynamic retardation, RH. The Peclet number-dispersion relationship for the micro-fracture network is very similar to that predicted for other, radically different, fracture networks. Thus dispersion may be more dependent on fracture connectivity and length than fracture density and display a relationship similar to that shown by particle beds and clastic sandstones. The high retardation values observed (2.2-4.9) reflect flow behaviour within a fracture network with a proportion of 'blind' sections, and demonstrates how such networks can slow the advance of conservative solute components.

  7. 3D characterization of the fracture network in a deformed chalk reservoir analogue: The Lagerdorf case

    SciTech Connect

    Koestler, A.G.; Reksten, K.

    1994-12-31

    Quantitative descriptions of the 3D fracture networks in terms of connectivity, fracture types, fracture surface roughness and flow characteristics are necessary for reservoir evaluation, management, and enhanced oil recovery programs of fractured reservoirs. For a period of 2 years, a research project focused on an analogue to fractured chalk reservoirs excellently exposed near Laegerdorf, NW Germany. Upper Cretaceous chalk has been uplifted and deformed by an underlying salt diapir, and is now exploited for the cement industry. In the production wall of a quarry, the fracture network of the deformed chalk was characterized and mapped at different scales. The wall was scraped off as chalk exploitation proceeded, continuously revealing new sections through the faulted and fractured chalk body. A 230 m long part of the 35m high production wall was investigated during its recess of 25m. The large amount of fracture data were analyzed with respect to parameters such as fracture density distribution, orientation- and length distribution, and in terms of the representativity of data sets collected from restricted rock volumes. This 3D description and analysis of a fracture network revealed quantitative generic parameters of importance for modeling chalk reservoirs with less data and lower data quality.

  8. Simulation of hydraulic fracture networks in three dimensions utilizing massively parallel computing platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settgast, R. R.; Johnson, S.; Fu, P.; Walsh, S. D.; Ryerson, F. J.; Antoun, T.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has been an enabling technology for commercially stimulating fracture networks for over half of a century. It has become one of the most widespread technologies for engineering subsurface fracture systems. Despite the ubiquity of this technique in the field, understanding and prediction of the hydraulic induced propagation of the fracture network in realistic, heterogeneous reservoirs has been limited. A number of developments in multiscale modeling in recent years have allowed researchers in related fields to tackle the modeling of complex fracture propagation as well as the mechanics of heterogeneous materials. These developments, combined with advances in quantifying solution uncertainties, provide possibilities for the geologic modeling community to capture both the fracturing behavior and longer-term permeability evolution of rock masses under hydraulic loading across both dynamic and viscosity-dominated regimes. Here we will demonstrate the first phase of this effort through illustrations of fully three-dimensional, tightly coupled hydromechanical simulations of hydraulically induced fracture network propagation run on massively parallel computing scales, and discuss preliminary results regarding the mechanisms by which fracture interactions and the accompanying changes to the stress field can lead to deleterious or beneficial changes to the fracture network.

  9. Simulation and analysis of solute transport in 2D fracture/pipe networks: The SOLFRAC program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Jacques; Porel, Gilles; Delay, Fred; Ubertosi, Fabrice; Bernard, Stéphane; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2007-01-01

    The Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) method has been recently developed by Delay and Bodin [Delay, F. and Bodin, J., 2001. Time domain random walk method to simulate transport by advection-dispersion and matrix diffusion in fracture networks. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(21): 4051-4054.] and Bodin et al. [Bodin, J., Porel, G. and Delay, F., 2003c. Simulation of solute transport in discrete fracture networks using the time domain random walk method. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 6566: 1-8.] for simulating solute transport in discrete fracture networks. It is assumed that the fracture network can reasonably be represented by a network of interconnected one-dimensional pipes (i.e. flow channels). Processes accounted for are: (1) advection and hydrodynamic dispersion in the channels, (2) matrix diffusion, (3) diffusion into stagnant zones within the fracture planes, (4) sorption reactions onto the fracture walls and in the matrix, (5) linear decay, and (6) mass sharing at fracture intersections. The TDRW method is handy and very efficient in terms of computation costs since it allows for the one-step calculation of the particle residence time in each bond of the network. This method has been programmed in C++, and efforts have been made to develop an efficient and user-friendly software, called SOLFRAC. This program is freely downloadable at the URL http://labo.univ-poitiers.fr/hydrasa/intranet/telechargement.htm. It calculates solute transport into 2D pipe networks, while considering different types of injections and different concepts of local dispersion within each flow channel. Post-simulation analyses are also available, such as the mean velocity or the macroscopic dispersion at the scale of the entire network. The program may be used to evaluate how a given transport mechanism influences the macroscopic transport behaviour of fracture networks. It may also be used, as is the case, e.g., with analytical solutions, to interpret laboratory or field tracer test experiments

  10. Modeling the Effect of Fluid Flow on a Growing Network of Fractures in a Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhashim, Mohammed; Koch, Donald

    2015-11-01

    The injection of a viscous fluid at high pressure in a geological formation induces the fracturing of pre-existing joints. Assuming a constant solid-matrix stress field, a weak joint saturated with fluid is fractured when the fluid pressure exceeds a critical value that depends on the joint's orientation. In this work, the formation of a network of fractures in a porous medium is modeled. When the average length of the fractures is much smaller than the radius of a cluster of fractured joints, the fluid flow within the network can be described as Darcy flow in a permeable medium consisting of the fracture network. The permeability and porosity of the medium are functions of the number density of activated joints and consequently depend on the fluid pressure. We demonstrate conditions under which these relationships can be derived from percolation theory. Fluid may also be lost from the fracture network by flowing into the permeable rock matrix. The solution of the model shows that the cluster radius grows as a power law with time in two regimes: (1) an intermediate time regime when the network contains many fractures but fluid loss is negligible; and (2) a long time regime when fluid loss dominates. In both regimes, the power law exponent depends on the Euclidean dimension and the injection rate dependence on time.

  11. NICT New-Generation Network Vision and Five Network Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishinaga, Nozomu

    The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) vision and five network targets of research and development (R&D) of the NeW-Generation Network (NWGN) are presented in this letter. The NWGN is based on new design concepts that look beyond the next generation network (NGN). The NWGN will maintain the sustainability of our prosperous civilization and help resolve various social issues and problems by using information and communication technologies (ICTs). NICT's vision for NWGN is also presented in this letter. Based on this vision, 19 items concerning social issues and future social outlook are analyzed, and the functional requirements of the NWGN are extracted. The requirements are refined and categorized into five network targets that must be developed for realizing the vision.

  12. Radiology: "killer app" for next generation networks?

    PubMed

    McNeill, Kevin M

    2004-03-01

    The core principles of digital radiology were well developed by the end of the 1980 s. During the following decade tremendous improvements in computer technology enabled realization of those principles at an affordable cost. In this decade work can focus on highly distributed radiology in the context of the integrated health care enterprise. Over the same period computer networking has evolved from a relatively obscure field used by a small number of researchers across low-speed serial links to a pervasive technology that affects nearly all facets of society. Development directions in network technology will ultimately provide end-to-end data paths with speeds that match or exceed the speeds of data paths within the local network and even within workstations. This article describes key developments in Next Generation Networks, potential obstacles, and scenarios in which digital radiology can become a "killer app" that helps to drive deployment of new network infrastructure. PMID:15255516

  13. Design Guidelines for New Generation Network Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harai, Hiroaki; Fujikawa, Kenji; Kafle, Ved P.; Miyazawa, Takaya; Murata, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Masaaki; Ohta, Masataka; Umezawa, Takeshi

    Limitations are found in the recent Internet because a lot of functions and protocols are patched to the original suite of layered protocols without considering global optimization. This reveals that end-to-end argument in the original Internet was neither sufficient for the current societal network and nor for a sustainable network of the future. In this position paper, we present design guidelines for a future network, which we call the New Generation Network, which provides the inclusion of diverse human requirements, reliable connection between the real-world and virtual network space, and promotion of social potentiality for human emergence. The guidelines consist of the crystal synthesis, the reality connection, and the sustainable & evolutional guidelines.

  14. Integrated workflow for characterizing and modeling fracture network in unconventional reservoirs using microseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayatollahy Tafti, Tayeb

    We develop a new method for integrating information and data from different sources. We also construct a comprehensive workflow for characterizing and modeling a fracture network in unconventional reservoirs, using microseismic data. The methodology is based on combination of several mathematical and artificial intelligent techniques, including geostatistics, fractal analysis, fuzzy logic, and neural networks. The study contributes to scholarly knowledge base on the characterization and modeling fractured reservoirs in several ways; including a versatile workflow with a novel objective functions. Some the characteristics of the methods are listed below: 1. The new method is an effective fracture characterization procedure estimates different fracture properties. Unlike the existing methods, the new approach is not dependent on the location of events. It is able to integrate all multi-scaled and diverse fracture information from different methodologies. 2. It offers an improved procedure to create compressional and shear velocity models as a preamble for delineating anomalies and map structures of interest and to correlate velocity anomalies with fracture swarms and other reservoir properties of interest. 3. It offers an effective way to obtain the fractal dimension of microseismic events and identify the pattern complexity, connectivity, and mechanism of the created fracture network. 4. It offers an innovative method for monitoring the fracture movement in different stages of stimulation that can be used to optimize the process. 5. Our newly developed MDFN approach allows to create a discrete fracture network model using only microseismic data with potential cost reduction. It also imposes fractal dimension as a constraint on other fracture modeling approaches, which increases the visual similarity between the modeled networks and the real network over the simulated volume.

  15. Integrity of the osteocyte bone cell network in osteoporotic fracture: Implications for mechanical load adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliwaba, J. S.; Truong, L.; Codrington, J. D.; Fazzalari, N. L.

    2010-06-01

    The human skeleton has the ability to modify its material composition and structure to accommodate loads through adaptive modelling and remodelling. The osteocyte cell network is now considered to be central to the regulation of skeletal homeostasis; however, very little is known of the integrity of the osteocyte cell network in osteoporotic fragility fracture. This study was designed to characterise osteocyte morphology, the extent of osteocyte cell apoptosis and expression of sclerostin protein (a negative regulator of bone formation) in trabecular bone from the intertrochanteric region of the proximal femur, for postmenopausal women with fragility hip fracture compared to age-matched women who had not sustained fragility fracture. Osteocyte morphology (osteocyte, empty lacunar, and total lacunar densities) and the degree of osteocyte apoptosis (percent caspase-3 positive osteocyte lacunae) were similar between the fracture patients and non-fracture women. The fragility hip fracture patients had a lower proportion of sclerostin-positive osteocyte lacunae in comparison to sclerostin-negative osteocyte lacunae, in contrast to similar percent sclerostin-positive/sclerostin-negative lacunae for non-fracture women. The unexpected finding of decreased sclerostin expression in trabecular bone osteocytes from fracture cases may be indicative of elevated bone turnover and under-mineralisation, characteristic of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Further, altered osteocytic expression of sclerostin may be involved in the mechano-responsiveness of bone. Optimal function of the osteocyte cell network is likely to be a critical determinant of bone strength, acting via mechanical load adaptation, and thus contributing to osteoporotic fracture risk.

  16. Fault and Fracture Networks in the Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia; Implications for Structural Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, J.; King, R.; Holford, S. P.; Bailey, A. H.; Hand, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    The propensity for a fracture to be open to fluid flow is controlled by the orientation and magnitude of the in-situ stress field, types of cement within fractures, the rock strength of both fracture fills and wall rock and surrounding pore-fluid pressures in both fracture zone and surrounding rock. Although it is well understood that the optimal angle between σ1 and the fracture plane for slip is ~30 degrees, the cumulative effects of all these factors are poorly constrained within sedimentary basins; and therefore, the ability for fluid to flow through fractures is not well known. Naturally occurring fractures were recorded in the field, from outcrop of the Eumeralla Formation in the Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia. Over 1800 fractures were recorded showing a mean strike of NNE-SSW. Two distinctive fracture sets were identified with orientations of ~010-190 and ~045-225. Natural fractures were further characterised as open or closed. A total of 632 open fractures in two dominant sets were observed at surface, with mean strikes of N-S and ESE-WNW. A total of 878 closed fractures (generally being cemented) in two dominant sets were also observed at surface, also with mean strikes of N-S and ESE-WNW. Further investigation of these data showed that despite a majority of these closed fractures being optimally aligned with the present-day stress field, they remained closed. Thin sections revealed multiple generations of fracture cements. Inferring both a crack seal history and that these mineral cements could potentially be rendering the fractures stress insensitive. Failure of fractures to reactivate and remain open to fluid flow in the favourable stress conditions of the Otway Basin has potential to adversely affect and limit the secondary permeability of the system. This also validates the notion that the in-situ stress regime is not always the dominant factor in the propensity for a fracture to be open to fluid flow.

  17. Macroscopic properties of isotropic and anisotropic fracture networks from the percolation threshold to very large densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Thovert, J.; Mourzenko, V.

    2011-12-01

    The main purpose of this review paper is to summarize some recent studies of fracture networks. Progress has been made possible thanks to a very versatile numerical technique based on a three-dimensional discrete description of the fracture networks. Any network geometry, any boundary condition, and any distribution of the fractures can be addressed. The first step is to mesh the fracture network as it is by triangles of a controlled size. The second step consists in the discretization of the conservation equations by the finite volume technique. Two important properties were systematically studied, namely the percolation threshold rho_c and the macroscopic permeability K_n of the fracture network. Dimensionless quantities are denoted by a prime. The numerical results are interpreted in a systematic way with the concept of excluded volume which enables us to define a dimensionless fracture density rho' equal in the average to the average number of intersections per fracture. 1. Isotropic networks of identical fractures The dimensionless percolation threshold rho'_c of such networks was systematically studied for fractures of various shapes. rho'_c was shown to be almost independent of the shape except when one has very elongated rectangles. A formula is proposed for rho'_c. The permeability of these networks was calculated for a wide range of fracture densities and shapes. K'_n(rho') is almost independent of the fracture shape; an empirical formula is proposed for any value of rho' between rho'_c and infinity. For large rho', K_n is well approximated by the Snow formula initially derived for infinite fractures. 2. Anisotropic networks of identical fractures The fracture orientations are supposed to follow a Fisher distribution characterized by the parameter kappa; when kappa=0, the fractures are isotropic; when kappa=infinity, the fractures are perpendicular to a given direction. rho'_c does not depend significantly on kappa and the general formula proposed in 1

  18. Integrated approach for quantification of fractured tight reservoir rocks: Porosity, permeability analyses and 3D fracture network characterisation on fractured dolomite samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorn, Maarten; Barnhoorn, Auke; Exner, Ulrike; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Fractured reservoir rocks make up an important part of the hydrocarbon reservoirs worldwide. A detailed analysis of fractures and fracture networks in reservoir rock samples is thus essential to determine the potential of these fractured reservoirs. However, common analyses on drill core and plug samples taken from such reservoirs (including hand specimen analysis, thin section analysis and laboratory porosity and permeability determination) suffer from various problems, such as having a limited resolution, providing only 2D and no internal structure information, being destructive on the samples and/or not being representative for full fracture networks. In this study, we therefore explore the use of an additional method - non-destructive 3D X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) - to obtain more information on such fractured samples. Seven plug-sized samples were selected from narrowly fractured rocks of the Hauptdolomit formation, taken from wellbores in the Vienna Basin, Austria. These samples span a range of different fault rocks in a fault zone interpretation, from damage zone to fault core. 3D μCT data is used to extract porosity, fracture aperture, fracture density and fracture orientations - in bulk as well as locally. The 3D analyses are complemented with thin sections made to provide some 2D information with a much higher detail than the μCT data. Finally, gas- and water permeability measurements under confining pressure provide an important link (at least in order of magnitude) of the µCT results towards more realistic reservoir conditions. Our results show that 3D μCT can be applied efficiently on plug-sized samples of naturally fractured rocks, and that several important parameters can be extracted. μCT can therefore be a useful addition to studies on such reservoir rocks, and provide valuable input for modelling and simulations. Also permeability experiments under confining pressure provide important additional insights. Combining these and other

  19. Searching for fractures in a fracture network - a game theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barak, Liana; Braester, Carol

    1991-12-01

    Positioning of a fracture within a given permeability range, under the assumption that a prospective borehole is intersected by one fracture, was modeled by Braester and Barak as a two-person zero-sum game. This paper presents two extensions of the mentioned model, one referring to the situation when more than one fracture intersects each borehole, and the other one for the case when more than one borehole are drilled simultaneously. The one-fracture game model is proved to represent a strong basis in the formalization of these complex situations.

  20. BGen: A UML Behavior Network Generator Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terry; Reder, Leonard J.; Balian, Harry

    2010-01-01

    BGen software was designed for autogeneration of code based on a graphical representation of a behavior network used for controlling automatic vehicles. A common format used for describing a behavior network, such as that used in the JPL-developed behavior-based control system, CARACaS ["Control Architecture for Robotic Agent Command and Sensing" (NPO-43635), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 10 (October 2008), page 40] includes a graph with sensory inputs flowing through the behaviors in order to generate the signals for the actuators that drive and steer the vehicle. A computer program to translate Unified Modeling Language (UML) Freeform Implementation Diagrams into a legacy C implementation of Behavior Network has been developed in order to simplify the development of C-code for behavior-based control systems. UML is a popular standard developed by the Object Management Group (OMG) to model software architectures graphically. The C implementation of a Behavior Network is functioning as a decision tree.

  1. NASA's Next Generation Space Geodesy Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, S. D.; Gross, R. S.; Hilliard, L.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry, J. F.; Merkowitz, S. M.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; Pavlis, E. C.; Pearlman, M. R.; Stowers, D. A.; Webb, F. H.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Space Geodesy Project (SGP) is developing a prototype core site for a next generation Space Geodetic Network (SGN). Each of the sites in this planned network co-locate current state-of-the-art stations from all four space geodetic observing systems, GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS, with the goal of achieving modern requirements for the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). In particular, the driving ITRF requirements for this network are 1.0 mm in accuracy and 0.1 mm/yr in stability, a factor of 10-20 beyond current capabilities. Development of the prototype core site, located at NASA's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory at the Goddard Space Flight Center, started in 2011 and will be completed by the end of 2013. In January 2012, two operational GNSS stations, GODS and GOON, were established at the prototype site within 100 m of each other. Both stations are being proposed for inclusion into the IGS network. In addition, work is underway for the inclusion of next generation SLR and VLBI stations along with a modern DORIS station. An automated survey system is being developed to measure inter-technique vectorties, and network design studies are being performed to define the appropriate number and distribution of these next generation space geodetic core sites that are required to achieve the driving ITRF requirements. We present the status of this prototype next generation space geodetic core site, results from the analysis of data from the established geodetic stations, and results from the ongoing network design studies.

  2. A new computer code for discrete fracture network modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chaoshui; Dowd, Peter

    2010-03-01

    The authors describe a comprehensive software package for two- and three-dimensional stochastic rock fracture simulation using marked point processes. Fracture locations can be modelled by a Poisson, a non-homogeneous, a cluster or a Cox point process; fracture geometries and properties are modelled by their respective probability distributions. Virtual sampling tools such as plane, window and scanline sampling are included in the software together with a comprehensive set of statistical tools including histogram analysis, probability plots, rose diagrams and hemispherical projections. The paper describes in detail the theoretical basis of the implementation and provides a case study in rock fracture modelling to demonstrate the application of the software.

  3. Macroscopic properties of fracture networks from the percolation threshold to very large densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P.; Thovert, J.-F.; Mourzenko, V. V.

    2012-04-01

    Progress has been made possible thanks to a very versatile numerical technique based on a three-dimensional discrete description of the fracture networks. Any network geometry, any boundary condition, and any distribution of the fractures can be addressed. The first step is to mesh the fracture network as it is by triangles of a controlled size. The second step consists in the discretization of the conservation equations by the finite volume technique. Two important properties were systematically studied, namely the percolation threshold rhoc and the macroscopic permeability Kn of the fracture network. Dimensionless quantities are denoted by a prime. The numerical results are interpreted in a systematic way with the concept of excluded volume which enables us to define a dimensionless fracture density rho' equal in the average to the average number of intersections per fracture. 1. Isotropic networks of identical fractures The dimensionless percolation threshold rho'c of such networks was systematically studied for fractures of various shapes. rho'c was shown to be almost independent of the shape except when one has very elongated rectangles. A formula is proposed for rho'_c. The permeability of these networks was calculated for a wide range of fracture densities and shapes. K'_n(rho') is almost independent of the fracture shape; an empirical formula is proposed for any value of rho' between rho'c and infinity. For large rho', Kn is well approximated by the Snow formula initially derived for infinite fractures. 2. Anisotropic networks of identical fractures The fracture orientations are supposed to follow a Fisher distribution characterized by the parameter kappa; when kappa=0, the fractures are isotropic; when kappa=infinity, the fractures are perpendicular to a given direction. rho'c does not depend significantly on kappa and the general formula proposed in 1 can be used as a first approximation. A considerable simplification occurs for permeability. The

  4. Fracture-permeability development in organically-rich sediments through methane generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, John Napier, Jr.

    The result of methane generation in low-permeability rock matrices is fracture-permeability development. Such expansion is the result of methane generation which, in turn, is the result of burial of organic matter under euxinic conditions. The fracture-permeability-development process has been demonstrated in the laboratory using a microwave oven to generate gas (water vapor) in well-indurated, low-permeability sedimentary rocks. The process has been quantified through modeling constrained by principles of chemistry and physics. The modeling process is applied to both shales and limestones and relates sediment expansion to sediment organic carbon content converted to methane. The model shows that the quantity of organic carbon required to be converted into methane for microfracture development is small compared to the amount commonly contained in hydrocarbon source rocks. A wide variety of fracture-producing mechanisms proposed to explain natural fracture development in hydrocarbon reservoirs is acknowledged. However, fracture permeability-development that appears to occur selectively in low-permeability, organically-rich sequences has received much less attention. Additionally, unabsolved anomalies that persist when current explanations are applied call attention to the need for alternative explanations. The fracture permeability, including the distribution and orientation of those fractures, which some reservoirs exhibit seem to defy explanation until now. A better understanding of fracture-permeability development and related aspects of petroleum maturation will remain illusive until the methane-generation fracture-permeability process, which until now has not been adequately quantified, is fully appreciated. Sediment expansion through methane generation in low-permeability rock matrices explains fracture-permeability development in many naturally-fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs including cleat permeability in coalbed methane reservoirs. Evidence is presented

  5. A numerical procedure for transient free surface seepage through fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qinghui; Ye, Zuyang; Zhou, Chuangbing

    2014-11-01

    A parabolic variational inequality (PVI) formulation is presented for the transient free surface seepage problem defined for a whole fracture network. Because the seepage faces are specified as Signorini-type conditions, the PVI formulation can effectively eliminate the singularity of spillpoints that evolve with time. By introducing a continuous penalty function to replace the original Heaviside function, a finite element procedure based on the PVI formulation is developed to predict the transient free surface response in the fracture network. The effects of the penalty parameter on the solution precision are analyzed. A relative error formula for evaluating the flow losses at steady state caused by the penalty parameter is obtained. To validate the proposed method, three typical examples are solved. The solutions for the first example are compared with the experimental results. The results from the last two examples further demonstrate that the orientation, extent and density of fractures significantly affect the free surface seepage behavior in the fracture network.

  6. Fracture-frequency prediction from borehole wireline logs using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    FitzGerald, E.M.; Bean, C.J.; Reilly, R.

    1999-11-01

    Borehole-wall imaging is currently the most reliable means of mapping discontinuities within boreholes. As these imaging techniques are expensive and thus not always included in a logging run, a method of predicting fracture frequency directly from traditional logging tool responses would be very useful and cost effective. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) show great potential in this area. ANNs are computational systems that attempt to mimic natural biological neural networks. They have the ability to recognize patterns and develop their own generalizations about a given data set. Neural networks are trained on data sets for which the solution is known and tested on data not previously seen in order to validate the network result. The authors show that artificial neural networks, due to their pattern recognition capabilities, are able to assess the signal strength of fracture-related heterogeneity in a borehole log and thus fracture frequency within a borehole. A combination of wireline logs (neutron porosity, bulk density, P-sonic, S-sonic, deep resistivity and shallow resistivity) were used as input parameters to the ANN. Fracture frequency calculated from borehole televiewer data was used as the single output parameter. The ANN was trained using a back-propagation algorithm with a momentum learning function. In addition to fracture frequency within a single borehole, an ANN trained on a subset of boreholes in an area could be used for prediction over the entire set of boreholes, thus allowing the lateral correlation of fracture zones.

  7. Symbolic regression of generative network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Telmo; Roth, Camille

    2014-09-01

    Networks are a powerful abstraction with applicability to a variety of scientific fields. Models explaining their morphology and growth processes permit a wide range of phenomena to be more systematically analysed and understood. At the same time, creating such models is often challenging and requires insights that may be counter-intuitive. Yet there currently exists no general method to arrive at better models. We have developed an approach to automatically detect realistic decentralised network growth models from empirical data, employing a machine learning technique inspired by natural selection and defining a unified formalism to describe such models as computer programs. As the proposed method is completely general and does not assume any pre-existing models, it can be applied ``out of the box'' to any given network. To validate our approach empirically, we systematically rediscover pre-defined growth laws underlying several canonical network generation models and credible laws for diverse real-world networks. We were able to find programs that are simple enough to lead to an actual understanding of the mechanisms proposed, namely for a simple brain and a social network.

  8. Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Annual report, March 7, 1996--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dershowitz, W.S.; La Pointe, P.R.; Einstein, H.H.; Ivanova, V.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress on the project, {open_quotes}Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies{close_quotes} during the period March 7, 1996 to February 28, 1997. The report presents summaries of technology development for the following research areas: (1) development of hierarchical fracture models, (2) fractured reservoir compartmentalization and tributary volume, (3) fractured reservoir data analysis, and (4) integration of fractured reservoir data and production technologies. In addition, the report provides information on project status, publications submitted, data collection activities, and technology transfer through the world wide web (WWW). Research on hierarchical fracture models included geological, mathematical, and computer code development. The project built a foundation of quantitative, geological and geometrical information about the regional geology of the Permian Basin, including detailed information on the lithology, stratigraphy, and fracturing of Permian rocks in the project study area (Tracts 17 and 49 in the Yates field). Based on the accumulated knowledge of regional and local geology, project team members started the interpretation of fracture genesis mechanisms and the conceptual modeling of the fracture system in the study area. Research on fractured reservoir compartmentalization included basic research, technology development, and application of compartmentalized reservoir analyses for the project study site. Procedures were developed to analyze compartmentalization, tributary drainage volume, and reservoir matrix block size. These algorithms were implemented as a Windows 95 compartmentalization code, FraCluster.

  9. Ozone generation by rock fracture: Earthquake early warning?

    SciTech Connect

    Baragiola, Raul A.; Dukes, Catherine A.; Hedges, Dawn

    2011-11-14

    We report the production of up to 10 ppm ozone during crushing and grinding of typical terrestrial crust rocks in air, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at atmospheric pressure, but not in helium or nitrogen. Ozone is formed by exoelectrons emitted by high electric fields, resulting from charge separation during fracture. The results suggest that ground level ozone produced by rock fracture, besides its potential health hazard, can be used for early warning in earthquakes and other catastrophes, such as landslides or land shifts in excavation tunnels and underground mines.

  10. Fracture network characterisation of a landslide by electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalai, S.; Szokoli, K.; Novák, A.; Tóth, Á.; Metwaly, M.; Prácser, E.

    2014-06-01

    In contrary to most of the landslide studies which concentrate to the sliding surface in this paper the fracture system of a loess landslide is investigated. The continuity and geometry, orientation and dip of the major fractures are crucial parameters for assessing rock stability and landslide evolution. Rain infiltrating moreover easily into the rock mass through fractures providing lubrication for the material to slide, and increases the self-mass of the material increasing the slumping rate. Fracture maps enable beside of the characterisation of the fractured area the delineation of the endangered area of slow-moving landslides in due time and getting information about its inner structure. For constructing such maps Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements have been carried out using different geoelectric configurations. In spite of the high density of the fractures and their changing physical parameters in function of their water content - which make the interpretation rather difficult - a number of fractures have been detected and more or less well localised. On the basis of the present research the application of the Schlumberger and the Pole-Dipole arrays is recommended to fulfil the aim of the study. The optimised Stummer array is at the same time the only array which presents conductive anomalies (supposedly water filled fractures), as well, and indicates that fractures elongate deep downwards. Because these features seem to be realistic based on field observations or theoretical considerations the Stummer array may be a very good tool for completing e.g. P-Dp measurements. The study area could have been divided by all arrays into differently fractured zones, which assists a lot in understanding the landslide structure and evolution. It was shown, moreover, that in the still passive area there are thick fractures, too, verifying its dangerousness, as well. The ERT results enabled localising the rupture surfaces of future slumps which proved to

  11. A quasi steady state method for solving transient Darcy flow in complex 3D fractured networks accounting for matrix to fracture flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nœtinger, B.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling natural Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) receives more and more attention in applied geosciences, from oil and gas industry, to geothermal recovery and aquifer management. The fractures may be either natural, or artificial in case of well stimulation. Accounting for the flow inside the fracture network, and accounting for the transfers between the matrix and the fractures, with the same level of accuracy is an important issue for calibrating the well architecture and for setting up optimal resources recovery strategies. Recently, we proposed an original method allowing to model transient pressure diffusion in the fracture network only [1]. The matrix was assumed to be impervious. A systematic approximation scheme was built, allowing to model the initial DFN by a set of N unknowns located at each identified intersection between fractures. The higher N, the higher the accuracy of the model. The main assumption was using a quasi steady state hypothesis, that states that the characteristic diffusion time over one single fracture is negligible compared with the characteristic time of the macroscopic problem, e.g. change of boundary conditions. In that context, the lowest order approximation N = 1 has the form of solving a transient problem in a resistor/capacitor network, a so-called pipe network. Its topology is the same as the network of geometrical intersections between fractures. In this paper, we generalize this approach in order to account for fluxes from matrix to fractures. The quasi steady state hypothesis at the fracture level is still kept. Then, we show that in the case of well separated time scales between matrix and fractures, the preceding model needs only to be slightly modified in order to incorporate these fluxes. The additional knowledge of the so-called matrix to fracture transfer function allows to modify the mass matrix that becomes a time convolution operator. This is reminiscent of existing space averaged transient dual porosity models.

  12. Generation of oscillating gene regulatory network motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dorp, M.; Lannoo, B.; Carlon, E.

    2013-07-01

    Using an improved version of an evolutionary algorithm originally proposed by François and Hakim [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USAPNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.0304532101 101, 580 (2004)], we generated small gene regulatory networks in which the concentration of a target protein oscillates in time. These networks may serve as candidates for oscillatory modules to be found in larger regulatory networks and protein interaction networks. The algorithm was run for 105 times to produce a large set of oscillating modules, which were systematically classified and analyzed. The robustness of the oscillations against variations of the kinetic rates was also determined, to filter out the least robust cases. Furthermore, we show that the set of evolved networks can serve as a database of models whose behavior can be compared to experimentally observed oscillations. The algorithm found three smallest (core) oscillators in which nonlinearities and number of components are minimal. Two of those are two-gene modules: the mixed feedback loop, already discussed in the literature, and an autorepressed gene coupled with a heterodimer. The third one is a single gene module which is competitively regulated by a monomer and a dimer. The evolutionary algorithm also generated larger oscillating networks, which are in part extensions of the three core modules and in part genuinely new modules. The latter includes oscillators which do not rely on feedback induced by transcription factors, but are purely of post-transcriptional type. Analysis of post-transcriptional mechanisms of oscillation may provide useful information for circadian clock research, as recent experiments showed that circadian rhythms are maintained even in the absence of transcription.

  13. Realistic computer network simulation for network intrusion detection dataset generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payer, Garrett

    2015-05-01

    The KDD-99 Cup dataset is dead. While it can continue to be used as a toy example, the age of this dataset makes it all but useless for intrusion detection research and data mining. Many of the attacks used within the dataset are obsolete and do not reflect the features important for intrusion detection in today's networks. Creating a new dataset encompassing a large cross section of the attacks found on the Internet today could be useful, but would eventually fall to the same problem as the KDD-99 Cup; its usefulness would diminish after a period of time. To continue research into intrusion detection, the generation of new datasets needs to be as dynamic and as quick as the attacker. Simply examining existing network traffic and using domain experts such as intrusion analysts to label traffic is inefficient, expensive, and not scalable. The only viable methodology is simulation using technologies including virtualization, attack-toolsets such as Metasploit and Armitage, and sophisticated emulation of threat and user behavior. Simulating actual user behavior and network intrusion events dynamically not only allows researchers to vary scenarios quickly, but enables online testing of intrusion detection mechanisms by interacting with data as it is generated. As new threat behaviors are identified, they can be added to the simulation to make quicker determinations as to the effectiveness of existing and ongoing network intrusion technology, methodology and models.

  14. A generative model for protein contact networks.

    PubMed

    Livi, Lorenzo; Maiorino, Enrico; Giuliani, Alessandro; Rizzi, Antonello; Sadeghian, Alireza

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a generative model for protein contact networks (PCNs). The soundness of the proposed model is investigated by focusing primarily on mesoscopic properties elaborated from the spectra of the graph Laplacian. To complement the analysis, we also study the classical topological descriptors, such as statistics of the shortest paths and the important feature of modularity. Our experiments show that the proposed model results in a considerable improvement with respect to two suitably chosen generative mechanisms, mimicking with better approximation real PCNs in terms of diffusion properties elaborated from the normalized Laplacian spectra. However, as well as the other network models, it does not reproduce with sufficient accuracy the shortest paths structure. To compensate this drawback, we designed a second step involving a targeted edge reconfiguration process. The ensemble of reconfigured networks denotes further improvements that are statistically significant. As an important byproduct of our study, we demonstrate that modularity, a well-known property of proteins, does not entirely explain the actual network architecture characterizing PCNs. In fact, we conclude that modularity, intended as a quantification of an underlying community structure, should be considered as an emergent property of the structural organization of proteins. Interestingly, such a property is suitably optimized in PCNs together with the feature of path efficiency. PMID:26474097

  15. Extraction and visualization of a fracture network using Micro-Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, A.; Voorn, M.; Exner, U.

    2012-04-01

    Micro-Computed Tomography (µCT) measurements were conducted on 3 cm dolomite drill core plugs to gain knowledge about the distribution and orientation of a fracture network inside such plugs. µCT produces a 3D-image stack of 2D-images and these are used to reconstruct a 3D-Model of the fracture network representing the main pore space. The measurements are performed on a Rayscan 250 E at the University of Applied Sciences of Upper Austria (Fachhochschule Oberösterreich, FHÖO) using optimal recording parameters, to ensure the best spatial resolution and image quality. The resolution of the performed scans is around 20 µm. Each scan is acquired five times and then averaged to increase contrast and decrease noise artifacts. Due to the fact that the fracture apertures can be far below 20 µm, noise can be a main drawback to be able to segment the fractures. To decrease a further impact of noise we filter the images after image acquisition, by means of image histogram equalization and edge enhanced diffusion. Segmenting the fractures and the fracture network is not trivial. Many different segmentation routines the one option giving by far the best results was the Frangi Filter 2D. This filter was written in the medical research field to trace blood vessels. From a data perspective blood vessels are rather similar structures to fractures. However, the results are intensity images so that we still have to use a global threshold. This step is done by the automatic Otsu threshold, which is not biased by any human input. From a segmented image it is possible to quantify the apertures, orientation and distribution of the fractures. Using this technique can provide deep insight into the deformation history and a geometrical dataset to calculate permeability of a fracture network, which is additionally calibrated with conventional thin section analysis.

  16. Development of a new software for analyzing 3-D fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Jeong-Gi; Noh, Young-Hwan; Choi, Yosoon

    2014-05-01

    A new software is presented to analyze fracture network in 3-D. Recently, we completed the software package based on information given in EGU2013. The software consists of several modules that play roles in management of borehole data, stochastic modelling of fracture network, construction of analysis domain, visualization of fracture geometry in 3-D, calculation of equivalent pipes and production of cross-section diagrams. Intel Parallel Studio XE 2013, Visual Studio.NET 2010 and the open source VTK library were utilized as development tools to efficiently implement the modules and the graphical user interface of the software. A case study was performed to analyze 3-D fracture network system at the Upper Devonian Grosmont Formation in Alberta, Canada. The results have suggested that the developed software is effective in modelling and visualizing 3-D fracture network system, and can provide useful information to tackle the geomechanical problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviours of the fractured rock masses. This presentation describes the concept and details of the development and implementation of the software.

  17. Three Dimensional Flow, Transport and Geomechanical Simulations in Discrete Fracture Network Under Condition of Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Glascoe, L. G.; Antoun, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principle pathways for migration of water, heat and mass in enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, CO2 leakage from saline aquifers, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Data collected are often reduced to probability distribution functions for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable probabilistic assessment of flow, transport and geomechanical phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, we investigate the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions that characterize discrete fracture networks on the flow, heat and mass transport and geomechanics. Numerical results of first, second and third moments, normalized to a base case scenario, are presented and compared to theoretical results extended from percolation theory. (Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344)

  18. Effects of using a continuum representation of discrete fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, L.C.; Clemo, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    The substitution of matrix or continuum permeability for discrete fracture permeability in the simulation of complex fracture systems requires a radically different treatment of transport in the matrix. The spatial distribution of pressure is reasonably well described by inclusion of only the major fractures. Transport of tracer and heat, however, depends on a detailed knowledge of fluid velocities. Two factors are involved. First, the velocities are dependent on the active porosity of the system. Because fractures channel flow, the active porosity may be much smaller than the total porosity of the system. Secondly, the distribution of velocities is generally not normally distributed precluding the use of a Gaussian dispersion model. Characterization of the active porosity and velocity distribution are necessary to quantify tracer and heat movement.

  19. Mechanical transport in two-dimensional networks of fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, H.K.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives of this research are to evaluate directional mechanical transport parameters for anisotropic fracture systems, and to determine if fracture systems behave like equivalent porous media. The tracer experiments used to measure directional tortuosity, longitudinal geometric dispersivity, and hydraulic effective porosity are conducted with a uniform flow field and measurements are made from the fluid flowing within a test section where linear length of travel is constant. Since fluid flow and mechanical transport are coupled processes, the directional variations of specific discharge and hydraulic effective porosity are measured in regions with constant hydraulic gradients to evaluate porous medium equivalence for the two processes, respectively. If the fracture region behaves like an equivalent porous medium, the system has the following stable properties: (1) specific discharge is uniform in any direction and can be predicted from a permeability tensor; and (2) hydraulic effective porosity is directionally stable. Fracture systems with two parallel sets of continuous fractures satisfy criterion 1. However, in these systems hydraulic effective porosity is directionally dependent, and thus, criterion 2 is violated. Thus, for some fracture systems, fluid flow can be predicted using porous media assumptions, but it may not be possible to predict transport using porous media assumptions. Two discontinuous fracture systems were studied which satisfied both criteria. Hydraulic effective porosity for both systems has a value between rock effective porosity and total porosity. A length-density analysis (LDS) of Canadian fracture data shows that porous media equivalence for fluid flow and transport is likely when systems have narrow aperture distributions. 54 references, 90 figures, 7 tables.

  20. dfnWorks: A HPC Workflow for Discrete Fracture Network Modeling with Subsurface Flow and Transport Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gable, C. W.; Hyman, J.; Karra, S.; Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    dfnWorks generates discrete fracture networks (DFN) of planar polygons, creates a high quality conforming Delaunay triangulation of the intersecting DFN polygons, assigns properties (aperture, permeability) using geostatistics, sets boundary and initial conditions, solves pressure/flow in single or multi-phase fluids (water, air, CO2) using the parallel PFLOTRAN or serial FEHM, and solves for transport using Lagrangian particle tracking. We outline the dfnWorks workflow and present applications from a range of fractured rock systems. dfnWorks (http://www.lanl.gov/expertise/teams/view/dfnworks) is composed of three main components, all of which are freely available. dfnGen generates a distribution of fracture polygons from site characterization data (statistics or deterministic fractures) and utilizes the FRAM (Feature Rejection Algorithm for Meshing) to guarantee the mesh generation package LaGriT (lagrit.lanl.gov) will generate a high quality conforming Delaunay triangular mesh. dfnWorks links the mesh to either PFLOTRAN (pflotran.org) or FEHM (fehm.lanl.gov) for solving flow and transport. The various physics options available in FEHM and PFLOTRAN such as single and multi-phase flow and reactive transport are all available with appropriate initial and boundary conditions and material property models. dfnTrans utilizes explicit Lagrangian particle tracking on the DFN using a velocity field reconstructed from the steady state pressure/flow field solution obtained in PFLOTRAN or FEHM. Applications are demonstrated for nuclear waste repository in fractured granite, CO2 sequestration and extraction of unconventional hydrocarbon resources.

  1. Numerical Simulation of non-Newtonian Fluid Flows through Fracture Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmawan, I. A.; Ulhag, R. Z.; Endyana, C.; Aufaristama, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical simulation of non-Newtonian fluid flow in a twodimensional fracture network. The fracture is having constant mean aperture and bounded with Hurst exponent surfaces. The non-Newtonian rheology behaviour of the fluid is described using the Power-Law model. The lattice Boltzmann method is employed to calculate the solutions for non-Newtonian flow in finite Reynolds number. We use a constant force to drive the fluid within the fracture, while the bounceback rules and periodic boundary conditions are applied for the fluid-solid interaction and inflow outlflow boundary conditions, respectively. The validation study of the simulation is done via parallel plate flow simulation and the results demonstrated good agreement with the analytical solution. In addition, the fluid flow properties within the fracture network follow the relationships of power law fluid while the errors are becoming larger if the fluid more shear thinning.

  2. Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Recent studies on the epidemiology and repair of fractures are reviewed. The type and severity of the fracture bears a relation to the age, sex and occupation of the patient. Bone tissue after fracture shows a process of inflammation and repair common to all members of the connective tissue family, but it repairs with specific tissue. Cartilage forms when the oxygen supply is outgrown. After a fracture, the vascular bed enlarges. The major blood supply to healing tissue is from medullary vessels and destruction of them will cause necrosis of the inner two-thirds of the cortex. Callus rapidly mineralizes, but full mineralization is achieved slowly; increased mineral metabolism lasts several years after fracture. PMID:13952119

  3. Wave generation by fracture initiation and propagation in geomaterials with internal rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esin, Maxim; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Xu, Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Crack or fracture initiation and propagation in geomaterials are sources of waves and is important in both stability and fracture (e.g. hydraulic fracture) monitoring. Many geomaterials consist of particles or other constituents capable of rotating with respect to each other, either due to the absence of the binder phase (fragmented materials) or due to extensive damage of the cement between the constituents inflicted by previous loading. In investigating the wave generated in fracturing it is important to distinguish between the cases when the fracture is instantaneously initiated to its full length or propagates from a smaller initial crack. We show by direct physical experiments and discrete element modelling of 2D arrangements of unbonded disks that under compressive load fractures are initiated instantaneously as a result of the material instability and localisation. Such fractures generate waves as a single impulse impact. When the fractures propagate, they produce a sequence of impulses associated with the propagation steps. This manifests itself as acoustic (microseismic) emission whose temporal pattern contains the information of the fracture geometry, such as fractal dimension of the fracture. The description of this process requires formulating criteria of crack growth capable of taking into account the internal rotations. We developed an analytical solution based on the Cosserat continuum where each point of body has three translational and three rotational degrees of freedom. When the Cosserat characteristic lengths are comparable with the grain sizes, the simplified equations of small-scale Cosserat continuum can be used. We established that the order of singularity of the main asymptotic term for moment stress is higher than the order of singularity for conventional stress. Therefore, the mutual rotation of particles and related bending and/or twisting of the bonds between the particles represent an unconventional mechanism of crack propagation.

  4. Biology Question Generation from a Semantic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lishan

    Science instructors need questions for use in exams, homework assignments, class discussions, reviews, and other instructional activities. Textbooks never have enough questions, so instructors must find them from other sources or generate their own questions. In order to supply instructors with biology questions, a semantic network approach was developed for generating open response biology questions. The generated questions were compared to professional authorized questions. To boost students' learning experience, adaptive selection was built on the generated questions. Bayesian Knowledge Tracing was used as embedded assessment of the student's current competence so that a suitable question could be selected based on the student's previous performance. A between-subjects experiment with 42 participants was performed, where half of the participants studied with adaptive selected questions and the rest studied with mal-adaptive order of questions. Both groups significantly improved their test scores, and the participants in adaptive group registered larger learning gains than participants in the control group. To explore the possibility of generating rich instructional feedback for machine-generated questions, a question-paragraph mapping task was identified. Given a set of questions and a list of paragraphs for a textbook, the goal of the task was to map the related paragraphs to each question. An algorithm was developed whose performance was comparable to human annotators. A multiple-choice question with high quality distractors (incorrect answers) can be pedagogically valuable as well as being much easier to grade than open-response questions. Thus, an algorithm was developed to generate good distractors for multiple-choice questions. The machine-generated multiple-choice questions were compared to human-generated questions in terms of three measures: question difficulty, question discrimination and distractor usefulness. By recruiting 200 participants from

  5. Laboratory Experiments on Wave Emissions Generated by the Variable Viscosity of Fracturing Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahi Taleghani, A.; Lorenzo, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Microseismic analysis is recognized as the main method for estimating hydraulic fracture geometry. However, because of limited access to the subsurface and usually high levels of environmental noise it becomes crucial to verify assumed fracture propagation models under more controlled laboratory conditions. Considering the fact that fluid driven fractures may grow under different regimes i.e., toughness-dominated or viscous-dominated, scaling is necessary to reproduce the corresponding fracture growth regime. Scaling is achieved by constraining material deformational parameters, fluid flow rates, and fracturing-fluid viscosity for the appropriate value of the non-dimensional toughness. Hence, we implemented hydraulic fracturing tests on translucent plexiglass samples, at room temperature with contrasting fracturing fluid viscosities. A modest, biaxial loading frame creates relatively low directed principal stresses (< 1000 psi, or less < 1 km overburden pressure). A sealed fluid conduit generates fluid pressures (< 3000 psi) created by a positive displacement pump. We record microseismic events on the upper and lower faces of a thermally annealed, sample block (13 cm x 13 cm x 10 cm) with 3-component, broadband sensors (101-106). Preliminary results indicate that the dominant frequency band of the microseismic events appears similar for both toughness-dominated and viscous-dominated regimes (101-102 Hz). The experiments in both regimes show rippled crack surfaces although in the toughness-dominated regime, 'ripples' are more closely spaced (mm cf. cm). The fracture surfaces show bifurcating, "wish-bone" structures only in the viscous regime.

  6. Fracture-network 3D characterization in a deformed chalk reservoir analogue -- the Laegerdorf case

    SciTech Connect

    Koestler, A.G.; Reksten, K.

    1995-09-01

    Quantitative descriptions of 3D fracture networks in terms of fracture characteristics and connectivity are necessary for reservoir evaluation, management, and EOR programs of fractured reservoirs. The author`s research has focused on an analogue to North Sea fractured chalk reservoirs that is excellently exposed near Laegerdorf, northwest Germany. An underlying salt diapir uplifted and deformed Upper Cretaceous chalk; the cement industry now exploits it. The fracture network in the production wall of the quarry was characterized and mapped at different scales, and 12 profiles of the 230-m wide and 35-m high production wall were investigated as the wall receded 25 m. In addition, three wells were drilled into the chalk volume. The wells were cored and the wellbores were imaged with both the resistivity formation micro scanner (FMS) and the sonic circumferential borehole image logger (CBIL). The large amount of fracture data was analyzed with respect to parameters, such as fracture density distribution, orientation, and length distribution, and in terms of the representativity and predictability of data sets collected from restricted rock volumes.

  7. Relating permeability and electrical resistivity in fractures using random resistor network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Alison; Heinson, Graham; Krieger, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We use random resistor network models to explore the relationship between electrical resistivity and permeability in a fracture filled with an electrically conductive fluid. Fluid flow and current are controlled by both the distribution and the volume of pore space. Therefore, the aperture distribution of fractures must be accurately modeled in order to realistically represent their hydraulic and electrical properties. We have constructed fracture surface pairs based on characteristics measured on rock samples. We use these to construct resistor networks with variable hydraulic and electrical resistance in order to investigate the changes in both properties as a fault is opened. At small apertures, electrical conductivity and permeability increase moderately with aperture until the fault reaches its percolation threshold. Above this point, the permeability increases by 4 orders of magnitude over a change in mean aperture of less than 0.1 mm, while the resistivity decreases by up to a factor of 10 over this aperture change. Because permeability increases at a greater rate than matrix to fracture resistivity ratio, the percolation threshold can also be defined in terms of the matrix to fracture resistivity ratio, M. The value of M at the percolation threshold, MPT, varies with the ratio of rock to fluid resistivity, the fault spacing, and the fault offset. However, MPT is almost always less than 10. Greater M values are associated with fractures above their percolation threshold. Therefore, if such M values are observed over fluid-filled fractures, it is likely that they are open for fluid flow.

  8. Permeability, porosity, and percolation properties of two-dimensional disordered fracture networks.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Anoosheh; Hamzehpour, Hossein; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2011-10-01

    Using extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we study the effective permeability, porosity, and percolation properties of two-dimensional fracture networks in which the fractures are represented by rectangles of finite widths. The parameters of the study are the width of the fractures and their number density. For low and intermediate densities, the average porosity of the network follows a power-law relation with the density. The exponent of the power law itself depends on the fractures' width through a power law. For an intermediate range of the densities, the effective permeability scales with the fractures' width as a power law, with an exponent that depends on the density. For high densities the effective permeability also depends on the porosity through a power law, with an exponent that depends on the fractures' width. In agreement with the results, experimental data also indicate the existence of a power-law relationship between the effective permeability and porosity in consolidated sandstones and sedimentary rocks with a nonuniversal exponent. The percolation threshold or critical number density of the fractures depends on their width and is maximum if they are represented by squares, rather than rectangles. PMID:22181271

  9. Development of 3-D fracture network visualization software based on graphical user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young-Hwan, Noh; Jeong-Gi, Um; Yosoon, Choi; Myong-Ho, Park; Jaeyoung, Choi

    2013-04-01

    A sound understanding of the structural characteristics of fractured rock masses is important in designing and maintaining earth structures because their strength, deformability, and hydraulic behavior depend mainly on the characteristics of discontinuity network structures. Despite considerable progress in understanding the structural characteristics of rock masses, the complexity of discontinuity patterns has prevented satisfactory analysis based on a 3-D rock mass visualization model. This research presents the results of studies performed to develop rock mass visualization in 3-D to analysis the mechanical and hydraulic behavior of fractured rock masses. General and particular solutions of non-linear equations of disk-shaped fractures have been derived to calculated lines of intersection and equivalent pipes. Also, program modules of DISK3D, FNTWK3D, BOUNDARY and BDM(borehole data management) have been developed to perform the visualization of fracture network and corresponding equivalent pipes for DFN based fluid flow model. The developed software for the 3-D fractured rock mass visualization model based on MS visual studio can be used to characterize rock mass geometry and network systems effectively. The results obtained in this study will be refined and then combined for use as a tool for assessing geomechanical problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the 2011 Energy Efficiency and Resources Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant.

  10. Next-Generation Synthetic Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Timothy K.; Khalil, Ahmad S.; Collins, James J.

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic biology is focused on the rational construction of biological systems based on engineering principles. During the field’s first decade of development, significant progress has been made in designing biological parts and assembling them into genetic circuits to achieve basic functionalities. These circuits have been used to construct proof-of-principle systems with promising results in industrial and medical applications. However, advances in synthetic biology have been limited by a lack of interoperable parts, techniques for dynamically probing biological systems, and frameworks for the reliable construction and operation of complex, higher-order networks. Here, we highlight challenges and goals for next-generation synthetic gene networks, in the context of potential applications in medicine, biotechnology, bioremediation, and bioenergy. PMID:20010597

  11. Conceptual Models for the Fracture Network in Contaminated Shale Based on Different Lines of Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, B. L.; Chapman, S.; Cherry, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    In investigations of groundwater flow in fractured sedimentary rock, there is typically a large discrepancy between the number of fractures identified by different methods in boreholes. The methods directed at fracture geometry such as inspection of continuous core and borehole imaging (acoustic, optical, electrical televiewing, borehole camera, etc.) commonly identify numerous fractures. In contrast, the methods that infer fractures from measurements in the open borehole water column (borehole flow meters, temperature, electrical conductance, full borehole dilution) show far fewer fractures. These two different categories of data support two very different conceptual models for the fracture networks in which groundwater flow occurs. A study was conducted at a contaminated industrial site in an area of approximately 150m by 100m located on a fractured Ordovician shale in New York State where a fracture network conceptual model was initially developed based primarily on borehole flow metering and related cross-borehole hydraulic tests. In this conceptual model based on eight boreholes having a maximum depth of 50 m, the total number of flow zones identified was 14 over 140 m of open hole and ranged from none to five per hole. PCE DNAPL released decades ago has caused substantial VOC contamination (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE, and VC) and this contamination was delineated by means of a large number of contaminant analyses on samples from continuous rock core at an average spacing of 0.3 m. Although groundwater flow occurs almost entirely in the fractures, almost all the contaminant mass resides in the rock matrix (porosity 2-5%) because of long term diffusion-driven mass transfer from fractures to the matrix. The rock core contaminant profiles indicate that advective transport has occurred over decades through numerous fractures in each borehole. Therefore, many of the fractures identified from corelogs and televiewing must have active groundwater flow. This supports a

  12. Fully Coupled Geomechanics and Discrete Flow Network Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, P; Johnson, S M; Hao, Y; Carrigan, C R

    2011-01-18

    The primary objective of our current research is to develop a computational test bed for evaluating borehole techniques to enhance fluid flow and heat transfer in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Simulating processes resulting in hydraulic fracturing and/or the remobilization of existing fractures, especially the interaction between propagating fractures and existing fractures, represents a critical goal of our project. To this end, we are continuing to develop a hydraulic fracturing simulation capability within the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC), a combined FEM/DEM analysis code with explicit solid-fluid mechanics coupling. LDEC simulations start from an initial fracture distribution which can be stochastically generated or upscaled from the statistics of an actual fracture distribution. During the hydraulic stimulation process, LDEC tracks the propagation of fractures and other modifications to the fracture system. The output is transferred to the Non-isothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code to capture heat transfer and flow at the reservoir scale. This approach is intended to offer flexibility in the types of analyses we can perform, including evaluating the effects of different system heterogeneities on the heat extraction rate as well as seismicity associated with geothermal operations. This paper details the basic methodology of our approach. Two numerical examples showing the capability and effectiveness of our simulator are also presented.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Non-Darcy CH4 Flow in Fracture Network of Coal Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Ju, Y.; Zheng, J.; Gong, W.

    2015-12-01

    Coal seams comprise fractured coal that is naturally separated by discontinuous fractures or joints. These discontinuous fractures constitute a complicated fracture network that leads to the Non-Darcy CH4 flow. It is intractable for conventional models to describe the behavior and its mechanism of Non-Darcy CH4 flow in fractured coal. This paper reports a promising numerical analysis of the complex CH4 flow in the fracture network of coal using Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). The flow properties of CH4 flow, including viscosity distribution, average flow speed, permeability coefficient, are derived using the LBM model. The analysis is validated by comparing the LBM results with the experimental observation data. Key words: Non-Darcy flow, CH4, fracture network, Lattice Boltzmann Method, Coal, Permeability

  14. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  15. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  16. Network integration of distributed power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondi, Peter; Bayoumi, Deia; Haederli, Christoph; Julian, Danny; Suter, Marco

    The world-wide move to deregulation of the electricity and other energy markets, concerns about the environment, and advances in renewable and high efficiency technologies has led to major emphasis being placed on the use of small power generation units in a variety of forms. The paper reviews the position of distributed generation (DG, as these small units are called in comparison with central power plants) with respect to the installation and interconnection of such units with the classical grid infrastructure. In particular, the status of technical standards both in Europe and USA, possible ways to improve the interconnection situation, and also the need for decisions that provide a satisfactory position for the network operator (who remains responsible for the grid, its operation, maintenance and investment plans) are addressed.

  17. Fracture Network Characteristics Informed by Detailed Studies of Chlorinated Solvent Plumes in Sedimentary Rock Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, B. L.; Chapman, S.

    2015-12-01

    Various numerical approaches have been used to simulate contaminant plumes in fractured porous rock, but the one that allows field and laboratory measurements to be most directly used as inputs to these models is the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) Approach. To effectively account for fracture-matrix interactions, emphasis must be placed on identifying and parameterizing all of the fractures that participate substantially in groundwater flow and contaminated transport. High resolution plume studies at four primary research sites, where chlorinated solvent plumes serve as long-term (several decades) tracer tests, provide insight concerning the density of the fracture network unattainable by conventional methods. Datasets include contaminant profiles from detailed VOC subsampling informed by continuous core logs, hydraulic head and transmissivity profiles, packer testing and sensitive temperature logging methods in FLUTe™ lined holes. These show presence of many more transmissive fractures, contrasting observations of only a few flow zones per borehole obtained from conventional hydraulic tests including flow metering in open boreholes. Incorporating many more fractures with a wider range of transmissivities is key to predicting contaminant migration. This new understanding of dense fracture networks combined with matrix property measurements have informed 2-D DFN flow and transport modelling using Fractran and HydroGeosphere to simulate plume characteristics ground-truthed by detailed field site plume characterization. These process-based simulations corroborate field findings that plumes in sedimentary rock after decades of transport show limited plume front distances and strong internal plume attenuation by diffusion, transverse dispersion and slow degradation. This successful application of DFN modeling informed by field-derived parameters demonstrates how the DFN Approach can be applied to other sites to inform plume migration rates and remedial efficacy.

  18. Impact of Geological Characterization Uncertainties on Subsurface Flow & Transport Using a Stochastic Discrete Fracture Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principal pathways for transport of water and contaminants in groundwater systems, enhanced geothermal system fluids, migration of oil and gas, carbon dioxide leakage from carbon sequestration sites, and of radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples, among other techniques. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distribution functions for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as a stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions of fracture density, orientation, aperture and size on the flow and transport using topological measures such as fracture connectivity, physical characteristics such as effective hydraulic conductivity tensors, and

  19. A Comprehensive Flow, Heat and Mass Transport Uncertainty Quantification in Discrete Fracture Network Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principle pathways for migration of water, heat and mass in enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, CO2 leakage from saline aquifers, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples among others. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distributions function for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, for probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions that characterize discrete fracture networks on the flow, heat and mass transport. Numerical results of first, second and third moments, normalized to a base case scenario, are presented and compared to theoretical results extended from percolation theory.

  20. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  1. Multi-scale fracture networks within layered shallow water tight carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panza, Elisa; Agosta, Fabrizio; Rustichelli, Andrea; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Zambrano, Miller; Prosser, Giacomo; Tondi, Emanuele

    2015-04-01

    The work is aimed at deciphering the contribution of background deformation and persistent fracture zones on the fluid flow properties of tight platform carbonates. Taking advantage of 3D exposures present in the Murge area of southern Italy, the fracture networks crosscutting at different scales the layered Cretaceous limestone of the Altamura Fm. were analyzed. The rock multi-layer is characterized by 10's of cm-thick, sub-horizontal, laterally continuous carbonate beds. Each bed commonly represents a shallowing-upward peritidal cycle made up of homogeneous micritic limestones grading upward to cm-thick stromatolitic limestones and/or fenestral limestones. The bed interfaces are formed by sharp maximum flooding surfaces. Porosity measurements carried out on 40 limestone samples collected from a single carbonate bed show values ranging between 0,5% and 5,5%. Background deformation includes both stratabound and non-stratabound fractures. The former elements consist of bed-perpendicular joints and sheared joints, which are confined within a single bed and often displace small, bed-parallel stylolites. Non-stratabound fractures consist of incipient, cm offset, sub-vertical strike-slip faults, which crosscut the bed interfaces. The aforementioned elements are often confined within individual bed-packages, which are identified by presence of pronounced surfaces locally marked by veneers of reddish clayey paleosoils. Persistent fracture zones consist of 10's of m-high, 10's of cm-offset strike-slip faults that offset the bed-package interfaces and are confined within individual bed-packages association. Laterally discontinuous, cm- to a few m-thick paleokarstic breccia levels separate the different bed-packages associations. Persistent fracture zones include asymmetric fractured damage zones and mm-thick veneers of discontinuous fault rocks. The fracture networks that pervasively crosscut the study limestone multi-layer are investigated by mean of scanline and scanarea

  2. Hexahedral mesh generation of complex composite domain - groundwater flow and transport analyses in fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tanighchi, Takeo; Goda, Tomoaki; Kasper, H.; Zielke, W.

    1996-12-31

    Hexahedral mesh generation for composite domain is necessary for many engineering fields, and this paper includes three methods to generate hexahedral finite elements from the result of the 3D Delaunay triangulation. One of the difficulties of mesh generation of composite domain is how to adjust the meshing on common surfaces between adjacent subdomains, and very simple method is proposed in this paper. Proposed methods are directly applied for any composite domain as a fractured rock which consists of many convex subdomains.

  3. The guitar chord-generating algorithm based on complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Tao; Wang, Yi-fan; Du, Dan; Liu, Miao-miao; Siddiqi, Awais

    2016-02-01

    This paper aims to generate chords for popular songs automatically based on complex network. Firstly, according to the characteristics of guitar tablature, six chord networks of popular songs by six pop singers are constructed and the properties of all networks are concluded. By analyzing the diverse chord networks, the accompaniment regulations and features are shown, with which the chords can be generated automatically. Secondly, in terms of the characteristics of popular songs, a two-tiered network containing a verse network and a chorus network is constructed. With this network, the verse and chorus can be composed respectively with the random walk algorithm. Thirdly, the musical motif is considered for generating chords, with which the bad chord progressions can be revised. This method can make the accompaniments sound more melodious. Finally, a popular song is chosen for generating chords and the new generated accompaniment sounds better than those done by the composers.

  4. Particle method for upscaling transport with retention and in-growth in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, V.; Frampton, A.; Painter, S.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    An important challenge in subsurface hydrology is predictive modeling of tracer transport in sparsely fractured rock. A particular issue relevant for applications is how to accurately account for retention processes that are due to exchange (diffusion-sorption) of tracers between mobile fluid in fractures and immobile fluid in the rock matrix. Typically, tracers are subject to decay processes which may involve chains and in-growth (e.g., for radionuclides and some classes of hydrocarbons). Recently, a comprehensive particle-based methodology for upscaling transport with emphasis on tracer retention has been presented and applied to stochastic 2D discrete fracture networks (Frampton and Cvetkovic 2007, WRR, 43, W10429). Furthermore, a time domain random walk method has also recently been presented that effectively accounts for different exchange mechanisms and in-growth (Painter et al. 2008, WRR, 44, W01406). Now we present further advances in coupling these novel methodologies for solving radionuclide transport, and apply them to realistic 3D fracture networks, based on comprehensive data sets obtained from site characterization of the Laxemar area in south-east Sweden. Site measurements have revealed at least five fracture sets based on statistically significant orientation data, exhibiting power-law behaviour for fracture size and inferred transmissivity distributions. A few equally probable DFN realizations are generated based on these interpretations of the field data, in which advective fluid flow is solved using boundary conditions that mimic natural conditions. Thereafter, many particles are injected and tracked through the system, providing first- passage distributions of particle residence time and of the transport resistance parameter (quantifying the hydrodynamic control of retention). These distributions are then used as a basis for implementing the particle time-domain random walk model for radionuclide transport with retention and in-growth. Also, an

  5. Discrete Fracture Network Models for Risk Assessment of Carbon Sequestration in Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Pashin; Guohai Jin; Chunmiao Zheng; Song Chen; Marcella McIntyre

    2008-07-01

    A software package called DFNModeler has been developed to assess the potential risks associated with carbon sequestration in coal. Natural fractures provide the principal conduits for fluid flow in coal-bearing strata, and these fractures present the most tangible risks for the leakage of injected carbon dioxide. The objectives of this study were to develop discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling tools for risk assessment and to use these tools to assess risks in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama, where coal-bearing strata have high potential for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. DFNModeler provides a user-friendly interface for the construction, visualization, and analysis of DFN models. DFNModeler employs an OpenGL graphics engine that enables real-time manipulation of DFN models. Analytical capabilities in DFNModeler include display of structural and hydrologic parameters, compartmentalization analysis, and fluid pathways analysis. DFN models can be exported to third-party software packages for flow modeling. DFN models were constructed to simulate fracturing in coal-bearing strata of the upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin. Outcrops and wireline cores were used to characterize fracture systems, which include joint systems, cleat systems, and fault-related shear fractures. DFN models were constructed to simulate jointing, cleating, faulting, and hydraulic fracturing. Analysis of DFN models indicates that strata-bound jointing compartmentalizes the Pottsville hydrologic system and helps protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. Analysis of fault zones, however, suggests that faulting can facilitate cross-formational flow. For this reason, faults should be avoided when siting injection wells. DFN-based flow models constructed in TOUGH2 indicate that fracture aperture and connectivity are critical variables affecting the leakage of injected CO{sub 2} from coal. Highly transmissive joints

  6. Analysis of fracture networks in a reservoir dolomite by 3D micro-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorn, Maarten; Hoyer, Stefan; Exner, Ulrike; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2013-04-01

    Narrow fractures in reservoir rocks can be of great importance when determining the hydrocarbon potential of such a reservoir. Such fractures can contribute significantly to - or even be dominant for - the porosity and permeability characteristics of such rocks. Investigating these narrow fractures is therefore important, but not always trivial. Standard laboratory measurements on sample plugs from a reservoir are not always suitable for fractured rocks. Thin section analysis can provide very important information, but mostly only in 2D. Also other sources of information have major drawbacks, such as FMI (Formation Micro-Imager) during coring (insufficient resolution) and hand specimen analysis (no internal information). 3D imaging of reservoir rock samples is a good alternative and extension to the methods mentioned above. The 3D information is in our case obtained by X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography (µCT) imaging. Our used samples are 2 and 3 cm diameter plugs of a narrowly fractured (apertures generally <200 µm) reservoir dolomite (Hauptdolomit formation) from below the Vienna Basin, Austria. µCT has the large advantage of being non-destructive to the samples, and with the chosen sample sizes and settings, the sample rocks and fractures can be imaged with sufficient quality at sufficient resolution. After imaging, the fracture networks need to be extracted (segmented) from the background. Unfortunately, available segmentation approaches in the literature do not provide satisfactory results on such narrow fractures. We therefore developed the multiscale Hessian fracture filter, with which we are able to extract the fracture networks from the datasets in a better way. The largest advantages of this technique are that it is inherently 3D, runs on desktop computers with limited resources, and is implemented in public domain software (ImageJ / FIJI). The results from the multiscale Hessian fracture filtering approach serve as input for porosity determination. Also

  7. USING A NEURAL NETWORK TO PREDICT ELECTRICITY GENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses using a neural network to predict electricity generation. uch predictions are important in developing forecasts of air pollutant release and in evaluating the effectiveness of alternative policies which may reduce pollution. eural network model (NUMOD) that pr...

  8. High Resolution Modelling of Anomalous Transport of Carbon Dioxide in Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, R.; Main, I. G.; Geiger, S.

    2012-12-01

    Currently, large-scale modelling for Geological Carbon Storage (GCS) focuses mainly on carbon dioxide plume migration in porous media and do not account for sub-grid heterogeneities. A prevailing assumption therefore is that component transport and chemical reaction happens under well-mixed conditions. However, it has been shown that spreading of a dispersed plume and mixing of its components with the moving fluid is being affected by spatial changes in hydraulic and chemical properties. This leads to incomplete mixing as relevant processes at scales considered are not in local equilibrium resulting in anomalous transport. Anomalous transport is characterized by early or late component arrival and non-linear growth of the second moment of phase distributions and displacing saturation front. Incomplete mixing affects the amount of carbon dioxide in storage repositories. Using classical means to compute effective transport properties by averaging permeabilities and porosities, and assuming well-mixed carbon dioxide concentrations, may lead to significantly different patterns for large-scale flow and transport. Subsequent trapping processes such as capillary, solubility and mineral trapping therefore overpredicts the amount of supercritical carbon dioxide in storage repositories as as only a fraction of the rock volume will be exposed to it. We study the impact of variable length correlated apertures of fracture networks on breakthrough curves and on upscaled effective properties for carbon dioxide transport. We use an advection-dispersion equation which accounts for capillarity and gravity effects. Chemical reactions are not considered. Simulations are carried out using a general purpose reservoir simulator, the 'Complex System Modelling Platform (CSMP)'. It has been purposefully designed to solve compositional and compressible multi-phase flow and transport problems for fractured porous media in complex geological settings. It uses a Godunov operator

  9. Discrete fracture network modelling of Groß Schönebeck stimulation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urpi, L.; Zimmermann, G.; Blöcher, G.; van Wees, J. D. A. M.; Wassing, B.

    2012-04-01

    Microseismic events associated to geothermal reservoir are recorded before, during and after the establishment of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Differentiating recorded seismicity between natural and induced can be ambiguous, but reservoir response to stimulations treatment can be modelled and give useful insights in designing treatment. Our model reproduces the stimulation treatment done at Groß Schönebeck reservoir. The stimulation target was the volcanic layer of the Rotliegend formation at 4km depth. The treatment increased by a factor 22 the productivity index (volume of fluid produced per unit of time per drawdown) of the reservoir, while recorded seismicity was lower than expected (<100 events recorded, max magnitude mL=-1). The microevents signal properties are compatible with shearing events and their locations along a plane give us little information on the processes occurring during the water injection. Bottom hole injection pressure was over the minimum stress, therefore we expect fracture opening due to both tensile and shearing opening. The interaction between a primary fracture initiating from the wellbore due to the injection and the secondary discrete fracture network (DFN) has been modelled with a hydraulic fracturing simulator. The DFN has been populated on the basis of available borehole data and lithological properties determined from rock sample analysis. Heat transfer has been computed since the temperature difference between injected fluid and reservoir rocks is over 100°C, inducing thermoelastic stresses around the the fractures. The model shows the importance of the natural fracture network, perturbing the reservoir state at distance in direction parallel to the minimum stress. Results are compared with commercial tensile and shear fracture models, which are compatible in term of predicting increased productivity of the well. We justify the absence of larger magnitude events after shut-in with the low natural seismicity and the

  10. System and method for generating a relationship network

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Kasian; Myers, Cornelia A.; Podowski, Raf M.

    2011-07-26

    A computer-implemented system and process for generating a relationship network is disclosed. The system provides a set of data items to be related and generates variable length data vectors to represent the relationships between the terms within each data item. The system can be used to generate a relationship network for documents, images, or any other type of file. This relationship network can then be queried to discover the relationships between terms within the set of data items.

  11. System and method for generating a relationship network

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Kasian; Myers, Cornelia A; Podowski, Raf M

    2015-05-05

    A computer-implemented system and process for generating a relationship network is disclosed. The system provides a set of data items to be related and generates variable length data vectors to represent the relationships between the terms within each data item. The system can be used to generate a relationship network for documents, images, or any other type of file. This relationship network can then be queried to discover the relationships between terms within the set of data items.

  12. A parallel multigrid preconditioner for the simulation of large fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Rahul S; Barai, Pallab; Nukala, Phani K

    2010-01-01

    Computational modeling of a fracture in disordered materials using discrete lattice models requires the solution of a linear system of equations every time a new lattice bond is broken. Solving these linear systems of equations successively is the most expensive part of fracture simulations using large three-dimensional networks. In this paper, we present a parallel multigrid preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm to solve these linear systems. Numerical experiments demonstrate that this algorithm performs significantly better than the algorithms previously used to solve this problem.

  13. Fracture Networks from a deterministic physical model as 'forerunners' of Maze Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferer, M. V.; Smith, D. H.; Lace, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    'Fractures are the chief forerunners of caves because they transmit water much more rapidly than intergranular pores.[1] Thus, the cave networks can follow the fracture networks from which the Karst caves formed by a variety of processes. Traditional models of continental Karst define water flow through subsurface geologic formations, slowly dissolving the rock along the pathways (e.g. water saturated with respect to carbon dioxide flowing through fractured carbonate formations). We have developed a deterministic, physical model of fracturing in a model geologic layer of a given thickness, when that layer is strained in one direction and subsequently in a perpendicular direction. It was observed that the connected fracture networks from our model visually resemble maps of maze caves. Since these detailed cave maps offer critical tools in modeling cave development patterns and conduit flow in Karst systems, we were able to test the qualitative resemblance by using statistical analyses to compare our model networks in geologic layers of four different thicknesses with the corresponding statistical analyses of four different maze caves, formed in a variety of geologic settings. The statistical studies performed are: i) standard box-counting to determine if either the caves or the model networks are fractal. We found that both are fractal with a fractal dimension Df ≈ 1.75 . ii) for each section inside a closed path, we determined the area and perimeter-length, enabling a study of the tortuosity of the networks. From the dependence of the section's area upon its perimeter-length, we have found a power-law behavior (for sufficiently large sections) characterized by a 'tortuosity' exponent. These exponents have similar values for both the model networks and the maze caves. The best agreement is between our thickest model layer and the maze-like part of Wind Cave in South Dakota where the data from the model and the cave overlie each other. For the present networks from

  14. Numerical Modeling of Hydraulic Fractures Interaction in Complex Naturally Fractured Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresse, Olga; Weng, Xiaowei; Gu, Hongren; Wu, Ruiting

    2013-05-01

    A recently developed unconventional fracture model (UFM) is able to simulate complex fracture network propagation in a formation with pre-existing natural fractures. A method for computing the stress shadow from fracture branches in a complex hydraulic fracture network (HFN) based on an enhanced 2D displacement discontinuity method with correction for finite fracture height is implemented in UFM and is presented in detail including approach validation and examples. The influence of stress shadow effect from the HFN generated at previous treatment stage on the HFN propagation and shape at new stage is also discussed.

  15. Unsaturated Flow Through a Fractured-Matrix-Network: Dynamic Pathways in Meso-Scale Laboratory Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Thomas Ronald

    2002-12-01

    We conducted two laboratory experiments at the meter scale in which water was applied to the top of an initially dry, uncemented wall composed of porous bricks. One experiment (Experiment 1) encouraged evaporation and resulting mineral precipitation, while the other (Experiment 2) was designed to minimize these processes. In both cases, processes acting within the fracture network controlled early time behavior, forming discrete pathways and demonstrating fractures to act as both flow conductors and capillary barriers. At a later time, evaporation–mineral precipitation in Experiment 1 constrained flow, strengthening some pathways and starving others. In Experiment 2, the wetted structure took on the appearance of a diffuse plume; however, individual pathways persisted within the wetted structure and interacted, displaying erratic outflow over a wide range of timescales, including switching between pathways. Thus, under conditions of constant supply and both with and without evaporation–mineral precipitation, unsaturated flow through fractured rock can create dynamic preferential pathways.

  16. Comment on"Sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios" by Basagaoglu et al. (2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.

    2010-04-01

    Basagaoglu et al. (2009) present a study on detailed unsaturated flow behavior in two-dimensional fracture networks using numerical experiments (simulations) based on the lattice-Boltzmann method. Their results are valuable for improving our understanding of unsaturated flow processes and evaluating the active fracture model (AFM) that was developed for capturing large-scale preferential flow in fractured rocks (Liu et al., 1998; 2003). As indicated in Basagaoglu et al. (2009), a previous study was conducted to evaluate the AFM with numerical experiments (Seol et al., 2003). However, the methodology used in that study and the corresponding conclusions are highly questioned for the following two reasons. First, the evaluation relies on a condition that simulated water flow processes in a fracture network are adequately represented with a continuum approach, because they draw their conclusions by comparing simulation results with those obtained from a dual-continuum model based on the AFM. No effort was made by Seol et al. (2003) to justify the validity of the continuum approach for their specific fracture network that includes a small number of fractures only. (The analyses of Basagaoglu et al. (2009) do not need the similar condition.) Second, Seol et al. (2003) use numerical dispersion to represent the matrix diffusion process. This treatment is not valid simply because numerical dispersion results from numerical errors and is not a physical process.

  17. Simulation of steady-state flow in three-dimensional fracture networks using the boundary-element method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.; Andersson, J.

    1985-01-01

    An efficient method for simulating steady-state flow in three-dimensional fracture networks is formulated with the use of the boundary-element method. The host rock is considered to be impervious, and the fractures can be of any orientation and areal extent. The fractures are treated as surfaces where fluid movement is essentially two-dimensional. Fracture intersections are regarded as one-dimensional fluid conduits. Hence, the three-dimensional geometric characteristics of the fracture geometry is retained in solutions of coupled sets of one- and two-dimentional equations. Use of the boundary-element method to evaluate the fluid responses in the fractures precludes the need to internally discretize the areal extent of the fractures. ?? 1985.

  18. Fatigue damage of steam turbine shaft at asynchronous connections of turbine generator to electrical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovsunovsky, A. P.

    2015-07-01

    The investigations of cracks growth in the fractured turbine rotors point out at theirs fatigue nature. The main reason of turbine shafts fatigue damage is theirs periodical startups which are typical for steam turbines. Each startup of a turbine is accompanied by the connection of turbine generator to electrical network. During the connection because of the phase shift between the vector of electromotive force of turbine generator and the vector of supply-line voltage the short-term but powerful reactive shaft torque arises. This torque causes torsional vibrations and fatigue damage of turbine shafts of different intensity. Based on the 3D finite element model of turbine shaft of the steam turbine K-200-130 and the mechanical properties of rotor steel there was estimated the fatigue damage of the shaft at its torsional vibrations arising as a result of connection of turbine generator to electric network.

  19. A simplified fracture network model for studying the efficiency of a single well semi open loop heat exchanger in fractured crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Bernardie, Jérôme; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Bour, Olivier; Thierion, Charlotte; Ausseur, Jean-Yves; Lesuer, Hervé; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable energy source particularly attractive due to associated low greenhouse gas emission rates. Crystalline rocks are in general considered of poor interest for geothermal applications at shallow depths (< 100m), because of the low permeability of the medium. In some cases, fractures may enhance permeability, but thermal energy storage at these shallow depths is still remaining very challenging because of the complexity of fractured media. The purpose of this study is to test the possibility of efficient thermal energy storage in shallow fractured rocks with a single well semi open loop heat exchanger (standing column well). For doing so, a simplified numerical model of fractured media is considered with few fractures. Here we present the different steps for building the model and for achieving the sensitivity analysis. First, an analytical and dimensional study on the equations has been achieved to highlight the main parameters that control the optimization of the system. In a second step, multiphysics software COMSOL was used to achieve numerical simulations in a very simplified model of fractured media. The objective was to test the efficiency of such a system to store and recover thermal energy depending on i) the few parameters controlling fracture network geometry (size and number of fractures) and ii) the frequency of cycles used to store and recover thermal energy. The results have then been compared to reference shallow geothermal systems already set up for porous media. Through this study, relationships between structure, heat exchanges and storage may be highlighted.

  20. SNAP: A computer program for generating symbolic network functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, P. M.; Alderson, G. E.

    1970-01-01

    The computer program SNAP (symbolic network analysis program) generates symbolic network functions for networks containing R, L, and C type elements and all four types of controlled sources. The program is efficient with respect to program storage and execution time. A discussion of the basic algorithms is presented, together with user's and programmer's guides.

  1. Network congestion analysis of gravity generated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniadakis, Dimitris; Varoutas, Dimitris

    2014-07-01

    The network topology has lately proved to be critical to the appearance of traffic congestion, with scale-free networks being the less affected at high volumes of traffic. Here, the congestion dynamics are investigated for a class of networks that has experienced a resurgence of interest, the networks based on the gravity model. In addition, supplementary to the standard paradigm of uniform traffic volumes between randomly interacting node pairs, more realistic gravity traffic patterns are used to simulate the flows in the network. Results indicate that depending on the traffic pattern, the networks have different tolerance to congestion. Experiment simulation shows that the topologies created on the basis of the gravity model suffer less from congestion than the random, the scale-free or the Jackson-Rogers ones under both random and gravity traffic patterns. The congestion level is found to be approximately correlated with the network clustering coefficient in the case of random traffic, whereas in the case of gravity traffic such a correlation is not a trivial one. Other basic network properties such as the average shortest path and the diameter are seen to correlate fairly well with the congestion level. Further investigation on the adjustment of the gravity model parameters indicates particular sensitivity to network congestion. This work may have practical implications for designing traffic networks with both reasonable budget and good performance.

  2. Generation of large postinjection-induced seismic events by backflow from dead-end faults and fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Mark W.

    2015-08-01

    Induced seismicity is common during hydraulic stimulation in fractured crystalline rock. Fluid injection pressurizes preexisting fractures, triggering slip and seismicity. Often, the largest induced events occur after the end of injection, which complicates efforts to manage seismic risk. In this study, a three-dimensional discrete fracture network simulator that couples fluid flow with earthquake simulation was used to investigate a novel hypothesis for why large postinjection seismic events occur. Fractures that form dead-end pathways differentially pressurize during injection. After injection is stopped, fluid backflows through the well from the dead-end fractures into larger fractures, inducing additional seismicity and potentially causing events larger than occurred during injection. Our simulations indicate that flowing fluid back to the surface immediately after injection could mitigate this effect and reduce postinjection seismicity.

  3. The value of inclined coreholes for characterizing the geometry of 3-D fracture networks in bedrock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Jonathan; Parker, Beth

    2013-04-01

    In bedrock aquifers where matrix permeability is low, the nature and distribution of the fracture network has a strong impact on the transport and fate of contaminants. Accurate fracture characterization is therefore essential to fully understand the flow system and to predict contaminant migration. Powerful DFN models exist, yet the limitation is often on obtaining field data of sufficient quality to use as input parameters. One major contributing factor is the common practice of using only vertical coreholes to characterize bedrock aquifers. This can lead to datasets that are significantly biased toward fractures perpendicular to the corehole and are therefore not well suited for three-dimensional (3-D) fracture geometry characterization. This bias is particularly pronounced in flat-lying sedimentary strata where fracture networks are typically comprised of flat-lying bedding parallel fractures and vertical, or near vertical joints. An examination of such bias was conducted at a contaminated site in Guelph, Ontario, Canada, in a Silurian dolostone aquifer. Three inclined coreholes plunging 60 degrees with varying azimuths were drilled between 2010 and 2012 to supplement existing data from eleven vertical coreholes from previous investigations. Depth discrete datasets were collected in the coreholes including lithological and fracture logs from rock core, downhole geophysical surveys (e.g, acoustic televiewer, formation conductivity, temperature, natural gamma), and hydraulic testing including the first use of flexible liner profiling in inclined coreholes. These datasets were integrated to provide estimates of fracture frequency, orientation and aperture distributions and to estimate values of bulk effective fracture porosity. Orientation analysis revealed three dominant fracture sets on site that vary in intensity through mechanical layers. These sets consist of a horizontal, bedding-plane set with an average spacing of 0.3m, and two high-angle sets, NE-SW and

  4. The New Generation Russian VLBI Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelstein, Andrey; Ipatov, Alexander; Smolentsev, Sergey; Mardyshkin, Vyacheslav; Fedotov, Leonid; Surkis, Igor; Ivanov, Dmitrij; Gayazov, Iskander

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with a new project of the Russian VLBI Network dedicated for Universal Time determinations in quasi on-line mode. The basic principles of the network design and location of antennas are explained. Variants of constructing receiving devices, digital data acquisition system, and phase calibration system are specially considered. The frequency ranges and expected values of noise temperature are given.

  5. Network generation and analysis of complex biomass conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, S.; Kaminski, T.; Van Wyk, E.; Bhan, A.; Daoutidis, P.

    2011-01-01

    A modular computational tool for automated generation and rule-based post-processing of reaction systems in biomass conversion is presented. Cheminformatics and graph theory algorithms are used to generate chemical transformations pertaining to heterogeneous and homogeneous chemistries in the automated rule-based network generator. A domain-specific language provides a user-friendly English-like chemistry specification interface to the network generator. A rule-based pathway analysis module enables the user to extract and query pathways from the reaction network. A demonstration of the features of this tool is presented using Fructose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural as a case study.

  6. Phase structure within a fracture network beneath a surface pond: Field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.; NICHOLL,M.J.

    2000-05-09

    The authors performed a simple experiment to elucidate phase structure within a pervasively fractured welded tuff. Dyed water was infiltrated from a surface pond over a 36 minute period while a geophysical array monitored the wetted region within vertical planes directly beneath. They then excavated the rock mass to a depth of {approximately}5 m and mapped the fracture network and extent of dye staining in a series of horizontal pavements. Near the pond the network was fully stained. Below, the phase structure immediately expanded and with depth, the structure became fragmented and complicated exhibiting evidence of preferential flow, fingers, irregular wetting patterns, and varied behavior at fracture intersections. Limited transient geophysical data suggested that strong vertical pathways form first followed by increased horizontal expansion and connection within the network. These rapid pathways are also the first to drain. Estimates also suggest that the excavation captured from {approximately}10% to 1% or less of the volume of rock interrogated by the infiltration slug and thus the penetration depth could have been quite large.

  7. Imaging hydraulic fractures at Median Tectonic Line, Japan using multiply generated and scattered tube waves in a shallow VSP experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Shohei; Ghose, Ranajit; Tsuji, Takeshi; Ikeda, Michiharu; Onishi, Kozo

    2016-04-01

    Tube waves are low frequency guided waves that propagate along a fluid-filled borehole. The analysis of tube waves is a promising approach to image and characterize hydraulic fractures intersecting a borehole. It exploits tube waves generated by an external seismic wavefield which compresses fractures and injects fluid into the borehole. It also utilizes the attenuation of tube waves due to fluid exchange between the fracture and the borehole, which creates scattered waves (reflection and transmission). Conventional approaches consider tube waves due to a single fracture. However, when the spacing between multiple fractures is short relative to the wavelength of the tube waves, the generated and scattered tube waves interfere with each other, making it difficult to isolate the effect of a single fracture. The analysis of closely spaced fractures is important in highly fractured areas, such as a fault zone. In this study, we explore the possibility of prediction and utilization of generated and scattered tube waves due to multiple fractures. We derive a new integral equation of the full tube wavefield using 1D wavefield representation theory incorporating nonwelded interfaces. We adapt the recent developments in modeling tube wave generation/scattering at a fracture. In these models, a fracture is represented as a parallel wall or a thin poloelastic layer. This allowed us to consider the effects of a dynamic fracture aperture with fracture compliances and the permeability. The representation also leads to a new imaging method for the hydraulic fractures, using multiply-generated and scattered tube waves. This is achieved by applying an inverse operator to the observed tube waves, which focuses the tube waves to the depth where they are generated and/or scattered. The inverse operator is constructed by a tube wave Green's function with a known propagation velocity. The Median Tectonic Line (MTL) is the most significant fault in Japan, extending NE-SW for over 1000 km

  8. Artificial neural network models for predicting 1-year mortality in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fractures in China

    PubMed Central

    Shi, L.; Wang, X.C.; Wang, Y.S.

    2013-01-01

    The mortality rate of older patients with intertrochanteric fractures has been increasing with the aging of populations in China. The purpose of this study was: 1) to develop an artificial neural network (ANN) using clinical information to predict the 1-year mortality of elderly patients with intertrochanteric fractures, and 2) to compare the ANN's predictive ability with that of logistic regression models. The ANN model was tested against actual outcomes of an intertrochanteric femoral fracture database in China. The ANN model was generated with eight clinical inputs and a single output. ANN's performance was compared with a logistic regression model created with the same inputs in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and discriminability. The study population was composed of 2150 patients (679 males and 1471 females): 1432 in the training group and 718 new patients in the testing group. The ANN model that had eight neurons in the hidden layer had the highest accuracies among the four ANN models: 92.46 and 85.79% in both training and testing datasets, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of the automatically selected ANN model for both datasets were 0.901 (95%CI=0.814-0.988) and 0.869 (95%CI=0.748-0.990), higher than the 0.745 (95%CI=0.612-0.879) and 0.728 (95%CI=0.595-0.862) of the logistic regression model. The ANN model can be used for predicting 1-year mortality in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fractures. It outperformed a logistic regression on multiple performance measures when given the same variables. PMID:24270906

  9. Phoebus: Network Middleware for Next-Generation Network Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Swany

    2012-06-16

    The Phoebus project investigated algorithms, protocols, and middleware infrastructure to improve end-to-end performance in high speed, dynamic networks. The Phoebus system essentially serves as an adaptation point for networks with disparate capabilities or provisioning. This adaptation can take a variety of forms including acting as a provisioning agent across multiple signaling domains, providing transport protocol adaptation points, and mapping between distributed resource reservation paradigms and the optical network control plane. We have successfully developed the system and demonstrated benefits. The Phoebus system was deployed in Internet2 and in ESnet, as well as in GEANT2, RNP in Brazil and over international links to Korea and Japan. Phoebus is a system that implements a new protocol and associated forwarding infrastructure for improving throughput in high-speed dynamic networks. It was developed to serve the needs of large DOE applications on high-performance networks. The idea underlying the Phoebus model is to embed Phoebus Gateways (PGs) in the network as on-ramps to dynamic circuit networks. The gateways act as protocol translators that allow legacy applications to use dedicated paths with high performance.

  10. Next generation multi-service optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavendish, D., Jr.; Ji, P. N.; Qian, D.; Wang, T.; Zong, L.

    2005-11-01

    Current optical transport networks are based on non-transparent SONET/SDH technology. Wavelength multiplexed systems (WDM) modulate optical signals with SONET/SDH digital formats at 2.5 and 10Gb/s rates. Transparent Optical Networks have been actively researched as a way to make optical transport independent from the electronic signals transmitted. In this article, we review recent developments in optical components that facilitate a flexible spectrum usage of DWDM systems. In addition, we discuss emerging optical transport services and how they can be best served by a state-of-the-art transport network.

  11. Fracture network heterogeneity in continental lithosphere: An example from the Lewisian Gneiss Complex, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. C.; Holdsworth, R. E.; McCaffrey, K.; Conway, A.; Krabendam, M.

    2009-12-01

    Pre-existing ductile and brittle structures in continental lithosphere are thought to influence the orientation and spatial characteristics of subsequent deformation sets. By using quantitative techniques to describe fracture attributes it should be possible to determine whether these pre-existing weaknesses affect fracture network development. To test this hypothesis, the mainland Lewisian Gneiss Complex (LGC), in NW Scotland is being used as an example. The Late Archaean - Early Proterozoic LGC comprises TTG gneisses, mafic and ultramafic dykes and meta-volcanic and meta-sedimentary sequences that were accreted as a series of terranes during the Precambrian. Three regional fracture trends are recognised (from oldest to youngest); (1) steeply-dipping NW-SE Paleoproterozoic faults (mainly sinistral oblique) that are preferentially developed as foliation-parallel structures in pre-existing ductile shear zones (2) N-S to ENE-WSW trending, hematite stained normal fault ‘ladder fractures’ associated with the deposition of the overlying Neoproterozoic (1.2 Ga.) Stoer Group rift-related sediments. (3) NE-SW trending younger (likely Mesozoic) faults. Each fault set is associated with characteristic fault rock and mineral assemblages. The present project focuses on characterising these fracture sets on the regional to outcrop scale, using a variety of remote and fieldwork analysis techniques. Regional data comprises 2D lineament maps created from high resolution NEXTMap® digital elevation models. Outcrop data consists of 1D sample lines and 2D photo-mosaics which have allowed fracture attribute characterisations to be made. This project centres on the Assynt and Rhiconich terranes to assess the heterogeneity in fracture networks due to variations in lithology and metamorphic grade. Results from statistical analysis of outcrop and regional orientation data show that the tonalitic and granulite-facies Assynt terrane shows a correlation between intense foliation and

  12. Microfluidic Investigation of Oil Mobilization in Shale Fracture Networks at Reservoir Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M. L.; Jimenez-Martinez, J.; Carey, J. W.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Investigations of pore-scale fluid flow and transport phenomena using engineered micromodels has steadily increased in recent years. In these investigations fluid flow is restricted to two-dimensions allowing for real time visualization and quantification of complex flow and reactive transport behavior, which is difficult to obtain in other experimental systems. One drawback to these studies is the use of engineered materials that do not faithfully represent the rock properties (e.g., porosity, wettability, roughness, etc.) encountered in subsurface formations. In this work, we describe a unique high pressure (up to 1500 psi) and temperature (up to 80 °C) microfluidics experimental system in which we investigate fluid flow and transport in geo-material (e.g., shale, Portland cement, etc.) micromodels. The use of geo-material micromodels allows us to better represent fluid-rock interactions including wettability, chemical reactivity, and nano-scale porosity at conditions representative of natural subsurface environments. Here, we present experimental results in fracture systems with applications to hydrocarbon mobility in hydraulically fractured shale. Complex fracture network patterns are derived from 3D x-ray tomography images of actual fractures created in shale rock cores. We use both shale and glass micromodels, allowing for a detailed comparison between flow phenomena in the different materials. We discuss results from two-phase huff-and-puff experiments involving N2 and n-Decane, as well as three-phase displacement experiments involving supercritical CO2, brine, and n-Decane.

  13. Stereological analysis of fractures in the Roselend tunnel and permeability determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarche, Delphine; Pili, Eric; Adler, Pierre Michel; Thovert, Jean-FrançOis

    2007-09-01

    Fracture traces and water fluxes have been determined along the 128 m long Roselend tunnel (French Alps). Fractures can be classified into two families: large fractures which intersect the tunnel and small fractures which partially intersect it. Three different zones in the tunnel are distinguished with mild, low, and high water fluxes, starting from the entrance. A stereological analysis of the trace length probability densities of small fractures provides the fracture diameter probability density distribution which is best approximated by a power law. Large fractures are assumed monodisperse, with a 5 m estimated radius. The generated fracture networks obtained by combining large and small fractures do percolate, while networks consisting of only small fractures do not percolate. Computed macroscopic permeabilities of the fracture networks are in agreement with the observed water fluxes when the fracture permeability is a power law of its lateral extent with an exponent equal to 3.

  14. Physical Configuration of the Next Generation Home Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Shohei; Kakishima, Yu; Hanawa, Dai; Oguchi, Kimio

    The number of broadband users is rapidly increasing worldwide. Japan already has over 10 million FTTH users. Another trend is the rapid digitalization of home electrical equipment e. g. digital cameras and hard disc recorders. These trends will encourage the emergence of the next generation home network. In this paper, we introduce the next generation home network image and describe the five domains into which home devices can be classified. We then clarify the optimum medium with which to configure the network given the requirements imposed by the home environment. Wiring cable lengths for three network topologies are calculated. The results gained from the next generation home network implemented on the first phase testbed are shown. Finally, our conclusions are given.

  15. Cosmic microwave background anisotropies generated by domain wall networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, L.; Avelino, P. P.

    2015-10-01

    We develop a numerical tool for the fast computation of the temperature and polarization power spectra generated by domain wall networks, by extending the publicly available cmbact code—which calculates the cosmic microwave background signatures generated by active sources—to also describe domain wall networks. In order to achieve this, we adapt the unconnected segment model for cosmic strings to also describe domain wall networks, and use it to model the energy-momentum contribution of domain wall networks throughout their cosmological history. We use this new tool to compute and study the TT, EE, TE and BB power spectra generated by standard domain wall networks, and derive a conservative constraint on the energy scale of the domain wall-forming phase transition of η <0.92 MeV (which is a slight improvement over the original Zel'dovich bound of 1 MeV).

  16. Inter-generational contact from a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Marcum, Christopher Steven; Koehly, Laura M

    2015-06-01

    Pathways for resource--or other--exchanges within families have long been known to be dependent on the structure of relations between generations (Agree et al., 2005; Fuller-Thomson et al., 1997; Silverstein, 2011; Treas & Marcum, 2011). Much life course research has theorized models of inter-generational exchange--including, the 'sandwich generation' (Miller, 1981) and the 'skipped generation' pathways (Chalfie, 1994)--but there is little work relating these theories to relevant network mechanisms such as liaison brokerage (Gould & Fernandez, 1989) and other triadic configurations (Davis & Leinhardt, 1972; Wasserman & Faust, 1994). To address this, a survey of models of resource allocation between members of inter-generational households from a network perspective is introduced in this paper. Exemplary data come from health discussion networks among Mexican-origin multi-generational households. PMID:26047986

  17. Probing next Generation Portuguese Academic Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friacas, Carlos; Massano, Emanuel; Domingues, Monica; Veiga, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide several viewpoints about monitoring aspects related to recent deployments of a new technology (IPv6). Design/methodology/approach: Several views and domains were used, with a common point: the Portuguese research and education network (RCTS). Findings: A significant amount of work is yet to be…

  18. Propagating mode-I fracture in amorphous materials using the continuous random network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, Shay I.; Kessler, David A.; Levine, Herbert

    2011-08-01

    We study propagating mode-I fracture in two-dimensional amorphous materials using atomistic simulations. We use the continuous random network model of an amorphous material, creating samples using a two-dimensional analog of the Wooten-Winer-Weaire Monte Carlo algorithm. For modeling fracture, molecular-dynamics simulations were run on the resulting samples. The results of our simulations reproduce the main experimental features. In addition to achieving a steady-state crack under a constant driving displacement (which has not yet been achieved by other atomistic models for amorphous materials), the runs show microbranching, which increases with driving, transitioning to macrobranching for the largest drivings. In addition to the qualitative visual similarity of the simulated cracks to experiment, the simulation also succeeds in reproducing qualitatively the experimentally observed oscillations of the crack velocity.

  19. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L; Bui, Quan M; Gable, Carl; Karra, Satish

    2015-01-01

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. We demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  20. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L; Bui, Quan M; Gable, Carl; Karra, Satish

    2015-01-01

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. We demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  1. A statistical model of fracture for a 2D hexagonal mesh: The Cell Network Model of Fracture for the bamboo Guadua angustifolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Gabriel; Linero, Dorian L.; Muñoz, José D.

    2011-01-01

    A 2D, hexagonal in geometry, statistical model of fracture is proposed. The model is based on the drying fracture process of the bamboo Guadua angustifolia. A network of flexible cells are joined by brittle junctures of fixed Young moduli that break at a certain thresholds in tensile force. The system is solved by means of the Finite Element Method (FEM). The distribution of avalanche breakings exhibits a power law with exponent -2.93(9), in agreement with the random fuse model (Bhattacharyya and Chakrabarti, 2006) [1].

  2. The next generation of neural network chips

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1997-08-01

    There have been many national and international neural networks research initiatives: USA (DARPA, NIBS), Canada (IRIS), Japan (HFSP) and Europe (BRAIN, GALA TEA, NERVES, ELENE NERVES 2) -- just to mention a few. Recent developments in the field of neural networks, cognitive science, bioengineering and electrical engineering have made it possible to understand more about the functioning of large ensembles of identical processing elements. There are more research papers than ever proposing solutions and hardware implementations are by no means an exception. Two fields (computing and neuroscience) are interacting in ways nobody could imagine just several years ago, and -- with the advent of new technologies -- researchers are focusing on trying to copy the Brain. Such an exciting confluence may quite shortly lead to revolutionary new computers and it is the aim of this invited session to bring to light some of the challenging research aspects dealing with the hardware realizability of future intelligent chips. Present-day (conventional) technology is (still) mostly digital and, thus, occupies wider areas and consumes much more power than the solutions envisaged. The innovative algorithmic and architectural ideals should represent important breakthroughs, paving the way towards making neural network chips available to the industry at competitive prices, in relatively small packages and consuming a fraction of the power required by equivalent digital solutions.

  3. Geometric Analysis of Vein Fracture Networks From the Awibengkok Core, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatwa, A.; Bruhn, R. L.; Brown, S. R.

    2003-12-01

    Fracture network systems within rocks are important features for the transportation and remediation of hazardous waste, oil and gas production, geothermal energy extraction and the formation of vein fillings and ore deposits. A variety of methods, including computational and laboratory modeling have been employed to further understand the dynamic nature of fractures and fracture systems (e.g. Ebel and Brown, this session). To substantiate these studies, it is also necessary to analyze the characteristics and morphology of naturally occurring vein systems. The Awibengkok core from a geothermal system in West Java, Indonesia provided an excellent opportunity to study geometric and petrologic characteristics of vein systems in volcanic rock. Vein minerals included chlorite, calcite, quartz, zeolites and sulphides. To obtain geometric data on the veins, we employed a neural net image processing technique to analyze high-resolution digital photography of the veins. We trained a neural net processor to map the extent of the vein using RGB pixel training classes. The resulting classification image was then converted to a binary image file and processed through a MatLab program that we designed to calculate vein geometric statistics, including aperture and roughness. We also performed detailed petrographic and microscopic geometric analysis on the veins to determine the history of mineralization and fracturing. We found that multi-phase mineralization due to chemical dissolution and re-precipitation as well as mechanical fracturing was a common feature in many of the veins and that it had a significant role for interpreting vein tortuosity and history of permeability. We used our micro- and macro-scale observations to construct four hypothetical permeability models that compliment the numerical and laboratory modeled data reported by Ebel and Brown. In each model, permeability changes, and in most cases fluctuates, differently over time as the tortuosity and aperture of

  4. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Fracture Patterns Generated by Underground Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, H.; Mihaly, J. M.; Rosakis, A.; Sammis, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    A dynamic micro-mechanical damage mechanics model, developed by Bhat, Rosakis and Sammis, J. Appl. Mech., 2012, is used to simulate two-dimensional explosions in a brittle material. The theoretical patterns of circumferential and radial fractures are quantitatively compared with those produced by point explosions in very brittle "candy glass" plates. In these experiments the evolution of the fracture pattern is monitored using high-speed digital photography, which also images the resultant elastic waves (P and S). Theoretical estimates of the spatial extent of circumferential and radial cracking as well as the propagation speed of the comminution front and the growth-rate of individual radial cracks all compare well with the experimental observations. The wave-forms of the P and S waves, specifically the local particle velocities, are also recorded at selected points using laser vibrometers. Asymmetric fracture patterns caused by a non isotropic pre-stress, the preferred orientation of initial flaws (a rift plane), or a lithostatic gradient lead to the generation of strong S-waves from the otherwise spherically symmetric point source.

  5. Voltage regulation in distribution networks with distributed generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blažič, B.; Uljanić, B.; Papič, I.

    2012-11-01

    The paper deals with the topic of voltage regulation in distribution networks with relatively high distributed energy resources (DER) penetration. The problem of voltage rise is described and different options for voltage regulation are given. The influence of DER on voltage profile and the effectiveness of the investigated solutions are evaluated by means of simulation in DIgSILENT. The simulated network is an actual distribution network in Slovenia with a relatively high penetration of distributed generation. Recommendations for voltage control in networks with DER penetration are given at the end.

  6. Penetration tests in next generation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezac, Filip; Voznak, Miroslav

    2012-06-01

    SIP proxy server is without any doubts centerpiece of any SIP IP telephony infrastructure. It also often provides other services than those related to VoIP traffic. These softswitches are, however, very often become victims of attacks and threats coming from public networks. The paper deals with a system that we developed as an analysis and testing tool to verify if the target SIP server is adequately secured and protected against any real threats. The system is designed as an open-source application, thus allowing independent access and is fully extensible to other test modules.

  7. Generating functionals for autonomous latching dynamics in attractor relict networks

    PubMed Central

    Linkerhand, Mathias; Gros, Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Coupling local, slowly adapting variables to an attractor network allows to destabilize all attractors, turning them into attractor ruins. The resulting attractor relict network may show ongoing autonomous latching dynamics. We propose to use two generating functionals for the construction of attractor relict networks, a Hopfield energy functional generating a neural attractor network and a functional based on information-theoretical principles, encoding the information content of the neural firing statistics, which induces latching transition from one transiently stable attractor ruin to the next. We investigate the influence of stress, in terms of conflicting optimization targets, on the resulting dynamics. Objective function stress is absent when the target level for the mean of neural activities is identical for the two generating functionals and the resulting latching dynamics is then found to be regular. Objective function stress is present when the respective target activity levels differ, inducing intermittent bursting latching dynamics. PMID:23784373

  8. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Propagation in Naturally Fractured Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Prodanovic, M.; Olson, J. E.; Schultz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing consists of injecting fluid at high pressure and high flowrate to the wellbore for the purpose of enhancing production by generating a complex fracture network. Both tensile failure and shear failure occur during the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The shear event can be caused by slip on existing weak planes such as faults or natural fractures. From core observation, partially cemented and fully cemented opening mode natural fractures, often with considerable thickness are widely present. Hydraulic fractures can propagate either within the natural fracture (tensile failure) or along the interface between the natural fracture and the rock matrix (tensile/shear failure), depending on the relative strength of cement and rock matrix materials, the bonding strength of interface, as well as the presence of any heterogeneities. In this study, we evaluate the fracture propagation both experimentally and numerically. We embed one or multiple inclusions of different mechanical properties within synthetic hydrostone samples in order to mimic cemented natural fractures and rock. A semi-circular bending test is performed for each set of properties. A finite element model built with ABAQUS is used to mimic the semi-circular bending test and study the fracture propagation path, as well as the matrix-inclusion bonding interface status. Mechanical properties required for the numerical model are measured experimentally. The results indicate that the match between experiment and modeling fracture path are extremely sensitive to the chosen interface (bonding) model and related parameters. The semi-circular bending test is dry and easily conducted, providing a good platform for validating numerical approaches. A validated numerical model will enable us to add pressurized fluid within the crack and simulate hydraulic fracture-natural fracture interaction in the reservoir conditions, ultimately providing insights into the extent of the fracture network.

  9. Networks Generated from Natural Language Text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemann, Chris; Quasthoff, Uwe

    The study of large-scale characteristics of graphs that arise in natural language processing is an essential step in finding structural regularities. Structure discovery processes have to be designed with an awareness of these properties. Examining and contrasting the effects of processes that generate graph structures similar to those observed in language data sheds light on the structure of language and its evolution.

  10. Optical performance monitoring for the next generation optical communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhongqi; Yu, Changyuan; Willner, Alan E.

    2010-01-01

    Today's optical networks function are in a fairly static fashion and are built to operate within well-defined specifications. This scenario is quite challenging for next generation high-capacity systems, since network paths are not static and channel-degrading effects can change with temperature, component drift, aging, fiber plant maintenance and many other factors. Moreover, we are far from being able to simply "plug-and-play" an optical node into an existing network in such a way that the network itself can allocate resources to ensure error-free transmission. Optical performance monitoring could potentially enable higher stability, reconfigurability, and flexibility in a self-managed optical network. This paper will describe the specific fiber impairments that future intelligent optical network might want to monitor as well as some promising techniques.

  11. Inter-generational Contact From a Network Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Marcum, Christopher Steven; Koehly, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Pathways for resource—or other—exchanges within families have long been known to be dependent on the structure of relations between generations (Silverstein, 2011; Fuller-Thomson et al., 1997; Agree et al., 2005; Treas and Marcum, 2011). Much life course research has theorized models of inter-generational exchange— including, the ‘sandwich generation’ (Miller, 1981) and the ‘skipped generation’ pathways (Chalfie, 1994)—but there is little work relating these theories to relevant network mechanisms such as liaison brokerage (Gould and Fernandez, 1989) and other triadic configurations (Davis and Leinhardt, 1972; Wasserman and Faust, 1994). To address this, a survey of models of resource allocation between members of inter-generational households from a network perspective is introduced in this paper. Exemplary data come from health discussion networks among Mexican-origin multi-generational households. PMID:26047986

  12. New generation of elastic network models.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    The intrinsic flexibility of proteins and nucleic acids can be grasped from remarkably simple mechanical models of particles connected by springs. In recent decades, Elastic Network Models (ENMs) combined with Normal Model Analysis widely confirmed their ability to predict biologically relevant motions of biomolecules and soon became a popular methodology to reveal large-scale dynamics in multiple structural biology scenarios. The simplicity, robustness, low computational cost, and relatively high accuracy are the reasons behind the success of ENMs. This review focuses on recent advances in the development and application of ENMs, paying particular attention to combinations with experimental data. Successful application scenarios include large macromolecular machines, structural refinement, docking, and evolutionary conservation. PMID:26716577

  13. Size distribution and waiting times for the avalanches of the Cell Network Model of Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Gabriel; Kun, Ferenc; Linero, Dorian L.; Muñoz, José D.

    2011-09-01

    The Cell Network Model is a fracture model recently introduced that resembles the microscopical structure and drying process of the parenchymatous tissue of the Bamboo Guadua angustifolia. The model exhibits a power-law distribution of avalanche sizes, with exponent -3.0 when the breaking thresholds are randomly distributed with uniform probability density. Hereby we show that the same exponent also holds when the breaking thresholds obey a broad set of Weibull distributions, and that the humidity decrements between successive avalanches (the equivalent to waiting times for this model) follow in all cases an exponential distribution. Moreover, the fraction of remaining junctures shows an exponential decay in time. In addition, introducing partial breakings and cumulative damages induces a crossover behavior between two power-laws in the histogram of avalanche sizes. This results support the idea that the Cell Network Model may be in the same universality class as the Random Fuse Model.

  14. Interfacial fracture between highly crosslinked polymer networks and a solid surface: Effect of interfacial bond density

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-03-23

    For highly crosslinked, polymer networks bonded to a solid surface, the effect of interfacial bond density as well as system size on interfacial fracture is studied molecular dynamics simulations. The correspondence between the stress-strain curve and the sequence of molecular deformations is obtained. The failure strain for a fully bonded surface is equal to the strain necessary to make taut the average minimal path through the network from the bottom solid surface to the top surface. At bond coverages less than full, nanometer scale cavities form at the surface yielding an inhomogeneous strain profile. The failure strain and stress are linearly proportional to the number of bonds at the interface unless the number of bonds is so few that van der Waals interactions dominate. The failure is always interfacial due to fewer bonds at the interface than in the bulk.

  15. Magnitude-recurrence statistics for stratabound fracture networks in layered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, David; Davidsen, Joern

    2014-05-01

    Variants of the Gutenberg-Richter (G-R) relation, which express scale-independent behavior of earthquakes over a range of values, are almost universally used to describe magnitude-recurrence statistics for microseismic observations. The b value, which is the slope derived from classic G-R plots, is a particularly important parameter that effectively measures the abundance of large-magnitude events relative to small events. Hydraulic fracture monitoring programs often yield apparent b values of 2.0 or greater. These values are exceptionally high compared to earthquake fault sysems, which typically exhibit b values close to 1.0. In some reports, a sudden reduction in b value during treatment has been attributed to unintended activation of a pre-existing fault. An alternative model is developed here to describe magnitude statistics of microseismic events that occur on steeply dipping to vertical fracture surfaces in horizontally layered media. Termination of fractures at mechanical layer boundaries imposes a size-dependent scaling relationship and results in a stratabound fracture networks, which are well described in a number of field studies. In the case of constant stress drop, microseismic magnitude distributions will mimic bed-thickness distributions under these circumstances. A lognormal distribution of mechanical bed thickness, which provides a good fit for three examples considered here from various parts of North America, leads asymptotically to a Gaussian distribution of microseismic magnitudes that readily explains apparent observed b values of close to 2.0. This model is consistent with a sudden reduction in b value arising from uninended triggering of a pre-existing fault, and also implies that subtle changes in b value during a treatment program may be indicative of spatial variations in reservoir facies.

  16. Treatments for the Fifth Metacarpal Neck Fractures: A Network Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Zong, Shuang-Le; Zhao, Gang; Su, Li-Xin; Liang, Wei-Dong; Li, Li-Geng; Cheng, Guang; Wang, Ai-Jun; Cao, Xiao-Qiang; Zheng, Qiu-Tao; Li, Li-Dong; Kan, Shi-Lian

    2016-03-01

    The fifth metacarpal neck fractures (commonly termed boxer's fractures) are the most common type of metacarpal fractures. Many types of treatments are available in clinical practice, some of which have already been compared with other treatments by various researchers. However, a comprehensive treatment comparison is lacking. We estimated the comparative efficacy of different interventions for total complications, through a network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.We conducted a systematic search of the literature through October 2015. The outcome measurements were the total complications. We used a Bayesian network meta-analysis to combine direct and indirect evidence and to estimate the relative effects of treatment.We identified 6 RCTs registering a total of 288 patients who were eligible for our network meta-analysis. The literature's quality is relatively high. The median Structured Effectiveness for Quality Evaluation of Study score for the included trials was 33.8. The overall methodological quality was high. Of the 6 studies, all were 2-arm controlled trials comparing active intervention. Among the 4 treatments-conservative treatment (CT), antegrade intramedullary nailing (AIMN), transverse pinning (TP) with K-wires, and plate fixation (PF)-CT had the best rankings (ie, lowest risk of total complications), followed by PF, AIMN, and TP (ie, highest risk of total complications). Furthermore, we also presented the results using surface under the cumulative ranking curve. The surface under the cumulative ranking curve probabilities were 94.1%, 52.9%, 37.3%, and 15.7% for CT, PF, AIMN, and TP, respectively.In conclusion, current evidence suggested that conservative treatment is the optimum treatment for the fifth metacarpal neck fractures because of reduced total complication rates. Moreover, the TP with K-wires is the worst option with highly total complication rates. PF and AIMN therapy should be considered as the first-line choices. Larger and

  17. Fracture resistance of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-generated composite resin-based molar crowns.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akio; Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Inagaki, Ryoichi; Örtengren, Ulf; Niwano, Yoshimi; Sasaki, Keiichi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether different fabrication processes, such as the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system or the manual build-up technique, affect the fracture resistance of composite resin-based crowns. Lava Ultimate (LU), Estenia C&B (EC&B), and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic IPS e.max press (EMP) were used. Four types of molar crowns were fabricated: CAD/CAM-generated composite resin-based crowns (LU crowns); manually built-up monolayer composite resin-based crowns (EC&B-monolayer crowns); manually built-up layered composite resin-based crowns (EC&B-layered crowns); and EMP crowns. Each type of crown was cemented to dies and the fracture resistance was tested. EC&B-layered crowns showed significantly lower fracture resistance compared with LU and EMP crowns, although there was no significant difference in flexural strength or fracture toughness between LU and EC&B materials. Micro-computed tomography and fractographic analysis showed that decreased strength probably resulted from internal voids in the EC&B-layered crowns introduced by the layering process. There was no significant difference in fracture resistance among LU, EC&B-monolayer, and EMP crowns. Both types of composite resin-based crowns showed fracture loads of >2000 N, which is higher than the molar bite force. Therefore, CAD/CAM-generated crowns, without internal defects, may be applied to molar regions with sufficient fracture resistance. PMID:25683749

  18. Overlapping community detection using a generative model for networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenwen; Hu, Yanli; Xiao, Weidong; Ge, Bin

    2013-10-01

    Detecting overlapping communities is a challenging task in analyzing networks, where nodes may belong to more than one community. Many present methods optimize quality functions to extract the communities from a network. In this paper, we present a probabilistic method for detecting overlapping communities using a generative model. The model describes the probability of generating a network with the model parameters, which reflect the communities in the network. The community memberships of each node are determined based on a probabilistic approach using those model parameters, whose values can be obtained by fitting the model to the network. This method has the advantage that the node participation degrees in each community are also computed. The proposed method is compared with some other community detection methods on both synthetic networks and real-world networks. The experiments show that this method is efficient at detecting overlapping communities and can provide better performance on the networks where a majority of nodes belong to more than one community.

  19. Learning Orthographic Structure With Sequential Generative Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Testolin, Alberto; Stoianov, Ivilin; Sperduti, Alessandro; Zorzi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Learning the structure of event sequences is a ubiquitous problem in cognition and particularly in language. One possible solution is to learn a probabilistic generative model of sequences that allows making predictions about upcoming events. Though appealing from a neurobiological standpoint, this approach is typically not pursued in connectionist modeling. Here, we investigated a sequential version of the restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM), a stochastic recurrent neural network that extracts high-order structure from sensory data through unsupervised generative learning and can encode contextual information in the form of internal, distributed representations. We assessed whether this type of network can extract the orthographic structure of English monosyllables by learning a generative model of the letter sequences forming a word training corpus. We show that the network learned an accurate probabilistic model of English graphotactics, which can be used to make predictions about the letter following a given context as well as to autonomously generate high-quality pseudowords. The model was compared to an extended version of simple recurrent networks, augmented with a stochastic process that allows autonomous generation of sequences, and to non-connectionist probabilistic models (n-grams and hidden Markov models). We conclude that sequential RBMs and stochastic simple recurrent networks are promising candidates for modeling cognition in the temporal domain. PMID:26073971

  20. Toward green next-generation passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Energy efficiency has become an increasingly important aspect of designing access networks, due to both increased concerns for global warming and increased network costs related to energy consumption. Comparing access, metro, and core, the access constitutes a substantial part of the per subscriber network energy consumption and is regarded as the bottleneck for increased network energy efficiency. One of the main opportunities for reducing network energy consumption lies in efficiency improvements of the customer premises equipment. Access networks in general are designed for low utilization while supporting high peak access rates. The combination of large contribution to overall network power consumption and low Utilization implies large potential for CPE power saving modes where functionality is powered off during periods of idleness. Next-generation passive optical network, which is considered one of the most promising optical access networks, has notably matured in the past few years and is envisioned to massively evolve in the near future. This trend will increase the power requirements of NG-PON and make it no longer coveted. This paper will first provide a comprehensive survey of the previously reported studies on tackling this problem. A novel solution framework is then introduced, which aims to explore the maximum design dimensions and achieve the best possible power saving while maintaining the QoS requirements for each type of service.

  1. Satellite communications for the next generation telecommunication services and networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitre, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Satellite communications can play an important role in provisioning the next-generation telecommunication services and networks, provided the protocols specifying these services and networks are satellite-compatible and the satellite subnetworks, consisting of earth stations interconnected by the processor and the switch on board the satellite, interwork effectively with the terrestrial networks. The specific parameters and procedures of frame relay and broadband integrated services digital network (B-ISDN) protocols which are impacted by a satellite delay. Congestion and resource management functions for frame relay and B-ISDN are discussed in detail, describing the division of these functions between earth stations and on board the satellite. Specific onboard and ground functions are identified as potential candidates for their implementation via neural network technology.

  2. Interaction Networks: Generating High Level Hints Based on Network Community Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagle, Michael; Johnson, Matthew; Barnes, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel data structure, the Interaction Network, for representing interaction-data from open problem solving environment tutors. We show how using network community detecting techniques are used to identify sub-goals in problems in a logic tutor. We then use those community structures to generate high level hints between sub-goals.…

  3. Network Traffic Generator for Low-rate Small Network Equipment Software

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzisera, Steven

    2013-05-28

    Application that uses the Python low-level socket interface to pass network traffic between devices on the local side of a NAT router and the WAN side of the NAT router. This application is designed to generate traffic that complies with the Energy Star Small Network Equipment Test Method.

  4. An innovative approach to recognizing and parameterizing sparse channel networks in fractured rocks based on field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, J. H.

    2009-12-01

    Groundwater flow through fractured crystalline rocks has long been recognized as flow through a network of channels. Our new approach to the concept is to recognize that real channel systems at depth are composed of long distances between intersections, much larger than the intersection of recognizable fractures. We term them 'sparse channel networks'. Sparse channel networks have some key attributes. They percolate at much lower area to volume densities than equidimensional fracture networks. They are less well interconnected than equidimensional fracture networks. Above all they are less capable of adhering to imposed boundary conditions than any other system of flowing groundwater. The concept has been arrived at by re-examining 25 year old experiments in the Stripa Underground Research Laboratory in Sweden. It has been discovered that what was previously interpreted as a low permeability skin around underground openings caused by damage during excavation is, in reality, a direct outcome of the sparseness of the channel network and its inability to conform to the radial flow assumption inherent in the interpretation. Skin is therefore a direct field measure of the parameters defining the network. In the Stripa case, channels appear to extend in the order of 10 or 20 metres without intersection or bifurcation. Other characteristics of sparse channel networks are the tendency to form well connected patches (or compartments) separated by occasional 'chokes'. These compartments, sometimes of head, and often of individual water chemistry, are the second method of parameterization in the field. A further characteristic is the tendency for exploratory boreholes to behave as significant components of the systems because they are so sparse. The paper briefly describes how such systems were recognized in the Stripa experiments and how they have been modelled using a specially constructed lattice network model. The paper concludes with some ideas on how to conduct tests to

  5. Critical hydraulic gradient for nonlinear flow through rock fracture networks: The roles of aperture, surface roughness, and number of intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Richeng; Li, Bo; Jiang, Yujing

    2016-02-01

    Transition of fluid flow from the linear to the nonlinear regime has been confirmed in single rock fractures when the Reynolds number (Re) exceeds some critical values, yet the criterion for such a transition in discrete fracture networks (DFNs) has received little attention. This study conducted flow tests on crossed fracture models with a single intersection and performed numerical simulations on fluid flow through DFNs of various geometric characteristics. The roles of aperture, surface roughness, and number of intersections of fractures on the variation of the critical hydraulic gradient (Jc) for the onset of nonlinear flow through DFNs were systematically investigated. The results showed that the relationship between hydraulic gradient (J) and flow rate can be well quantified by Forchheimer's law; when J drops below Jc, it reduces to the widely used cubic law, by diminishing the nonlinear term. Larger apertures, rougher fracture surfaces, and a greater number of intersections in a DFN would result in the onset of nonlinear flow at a lower Jc. Mathematical expressions of Jc and the coefficients involved in Forchheimer's law were developed based on multi-variable regressions of simulation results, which can help to choose proper governing equations when solving problems associated with fluid flow in fracture networks.

  6. Functional Human Vascular Network Generated in Photocrosslinkable Gelatin Methacrylate Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Qi, Hao; Yang, Yunzhi; Bae, Hojae; Melero-Martin, Juan M; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-05-23

    The generation of functional, 3D vascular networks is a fundamental prerequisite for the development of many future tissue engineering-based therapies. Current approaches in vascular network bioengineering are largely carried out using natural hydrogels as embedding scaffolds. However, most natural hydrogels present a poor mechanical stability and a suboptimal durability, which are critical limitations that hamper their widespread applicability. The search for improved hydrogels has become a priority in tissue engineering research. Here, the suitability of a photopolymerizable gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel to support human progenitor cell-based formation of vascular networks is demonstrated. Using GelMA as the embedding scaffold, it is shown that 3D constructs containing human blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) generate extensive capillary-like networks in vitro. These vascular structures contain distinct lumens that are formed by the fusion of ECFC intracellular vacuoles in a process of vascular morphogenesis. The process of vascular network formation is dependent on the presence of MSCs, which differentiate into perivascular cells occupying abluminal positions within the network. Importantly, it is shown that implantation of cell-laden GelMA hydrogels into immunodeficient mice results in a rapid formation of functional anastomoses between the bioengineered human vascular network and the mouse vasculature. Furthermore, it is shown that the degree of methacrylation of the GelMA can be used to modulate the cellular behavior and the extent of vascular network formation both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that GelMA hydrogels can be used for biomedical applications that require the formation of microvascular networks, including the development of complex engineered tissues. PMID:22907987

  7. Functional Human Vascular Network Generated in Photocrosslinkable Gelatin Methacrylate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Qi, Hao; Yang, Yunzhi; Bae, Hojae

    2012-01-01

    The generation of functional, 3D vascular networks is a fundamental prerequisite for the development of many future tissue engineering-based therapies. Current approaches in vascular network bioengineering are largely carried out using natural hydrogels as embedding scaffolds. However, most natural hydrogels present a poor mechanical stability and a suboptimal durability, which are critical limitations that hamper their widespread applicability. The search for improved hydrogels has become a priority in tissue engineering research. Here, the suitability of a photopolymerizable gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel to support human progenitor cell-based formation of vascular networks is demonstrated. Using GelMA as the embedding scaffold, it is shown that 3D constructs containing human blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) generate extensive capillary-like networks in vitro. These vascular structures contain distinct lumens that are formed by the fusion of ECFC intracellular vacuoles in a process of vascular morphogenesis. The process of vascular network formation is dependent on the presence of MSCs, which differentiate into perivascular cells occupying abluminal positions within the network. Importantly, it is shown that implantation of cell-laden GelMA hydrogels into immunodeficient mice results in a rapid formation of functional anastomoses between the bioengineered human vascular network and the mouse vasculature. Furthermore, it is shown that the degree of methacrylation of the GelMA can be used to modulate the cellular behavior and the extent of vascular network formation both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that GelMA hydrogels can be used for biomedical applications that require the formation of microvascular networks, including the development of complex engineered tissues. PMID:22907987

  8. New Generation System. "An Interstate Information Network Serving America's Children."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and I Univ., Kingsville.

    The New Generation System (NGS) is a computer network developed to transfer academic records of migrant students. NGS was developed as a result of the phasing out of the Migrant Student Record Transfer System. NGS is backed by a 29-state consortium that uses the Internet to transfer records because of its speed, availability, and…

  9. Generating Coherent Patterns of Activity from Chaotic Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sussillo, David; Abbott, L. F.

    2009-01-01

    Neural circuits display complex activity patterns both spontaneously and when responding to a stimulus or generating a motor output. How are these two forms of activity related? We develop a procedure called FORCE learning for modifying synaptic strengths either external to or within a model neural network to change chaotic spontaneous activity into a wide variety of desired activity patterns. FORCE learning works even though the networks we train are spontaneously chaotic and we leave feedback loops intact and unclamped during learning. Using this approach, we construct networks that produce a wide variety of complex output patterns, input-output transformations that require memory, multiple outputs that can be switched by control inputs, and motor patterns matching human motion capture data. Our results reproduce data on pre-movement activity in motor and premotor cortex, and suggest that synaptic plasticity may be a more rapid and powerful modulator of network activity than generally appreciated. PMID:19709635

  10. A methodology to constrain the parameters of a hydrogeological discrete fracture network model for sparsely fractured crystalline rock, exemplified by data from the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follin, Sven; Hartley, Lee; Rhén, Ingvar; Jackson, Peter; Joyce, Steven; Roberts, David; Swift, Ben

    2014-03-01

    The large-scale geological structure of the crystalline rock at the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, Sweden, has been classified in terms of deformation zones of elevated fracture frequency. The rock between deformation zones was divided into fracture domains according to fracture frequency. A methodology to constrain the geometric and hydraulic parameters that define a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for each fracture domain is presented. The methodology is based on flow logging and down-hole imaging in cored boreholes in combination with DFN realizations, fracture connectivity analysis and pumping test simulations. The simulations suggest that a good match could be obtained for a power law size distribution where the value of the location parameter equals the borehole radius but with different values for the shape parameter, depending on fracture domain and fracture set. Fractures around 10-100 m in size are the ones that typically form the connected network, giving inflows in the simulations. The report also addresses the issue of up-scaling of DFN properties to equivalent continuous porous medium (ECPM) bulk flow properties. Comparisons with double-packer injection tests provide confidence that the derived DFN formulation of detailed flows within individual fractures is also suited to simulating mean bulk flow properties and their spatial variability.

  11. A movement pattern generator model using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S; Gander, R E; Wood, H C

    1992-07-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANN's) allow a new approach to biological modeling. The main applications of ANN's have been geared towards the modeling of the association and learning mechanisms of the brain; only a few researchers have explored them for motor control. The fact that ANN's are based on biological systems indicates their potential application for a biological act such as locomotion. Towards this goal, we have developed a "movement pattern generator," using an ANN for generating periodic movement trajectories. This model is based on the concept of "central pattern generators." Jordan's sequential network, which is capable of learning sequences of patterns, was modified and used to generate several bipedal trajectories (or gaits), coded in task space, at different frequencies. The network model successfully learned all of the trajectories presented to it. The model has many attractive properties such as limit cycle behavior, generalization of trajectories and frequencies, phase maintenance, and fault tolerance. The movement pattern generator model is potentially applicable for improved understanding of animal locomotion and for use in legged robots and rehabilitation medicine. PMID:1516938

  12. Optical performance monitoring (OPM) in next-generation optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhauser, Richard E.

    2002-09-01

    DWDM transmission is the enabling technology currently pushing the transmission bandwidths in core networks towards the multi-Tb/s regime with unregenerated transmission distances of several thousand km. Such systems represent the basic platform for transparent DWDM networks enabling both the transport of client signals with different data formats and bit rates (e.g. SDH/SONET, IP over WDM, Gigabit Ethernet, etc.) and dynamic provisioning of optical wavelength channels. Optical Performance Monitoring (OPM) will be one of the key elements for providing the capabilities of link set-up/control, fault localization, protection/restoration and path supervisioning for stable network operation becoming the major differentiator in next-generation networks. Currently, signal quality is usually characterized by DWDM power levels, spectrum-interpolated Optical Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (OSNR), and channel wavelengths. On the other hand there is urgent need for new OPM technologies and strategies providing solutions for in-channel OSNR, signal quality measurement, fault localization and fault identification. Innovative research and product activities include polarization nulling, electrical and optical amplitude sampling, BER estimation, electrical spectrum analysis, and pilot tone technologies. This presentation focuses on reviewing the requirements and solution concepts in current and next-generation networks with respect to Optical Performance Monitoring.

  13. A source generation model for near-field seismic impact of coal fractures in stress concentration zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Junjun; Wang, Enyuan; Shen, Rongxi; Chen, Liang; Li, Xuelong; Li, Nan

    2016-08-01

    To study the near-field seismic impact of coal fractures in stress concentration zones, we established a source generation model based on finite dislocation source theory and dynamic fracture mechanics, derived an analytical expression for near-field seismic displacements caused by coal fractures in the zone and numerically computed the resultant near-field seismic displacements within the coal mass. The results show that (1) the larger difference between the vertical and horizontal normal stresses in the stress concentration zone leads to a greater fracture speed, which thereby causes a stronger seismic impact; (2) the P-wave component in the near-field seismic displacements mainly impacts on the middle of the roadway, while the SH- and SV wave components mainly affect the junctions between the roadway and both the roof and the floor, and the damage caused by the SH- and SV waves within the coal mass is more significant than that caused by the P-waves; and (3) the effective way to mitigate the seismic impact induced by coal fractures in stress concentration zones is to reduce the difference between the vertical and horizontal normal stresses as far as possible. It is hoped that this study will provide a better understanding of the seismic impacts induced by coal fractures in stress concentration zones and thus help engineers to discover ways to prevent roadway failure.

  14. Data Generators for Learning Systems Based on RBF Networks.

    PubMed

    Robnik-Sikonja, Marko

    2016-05-01

    There are plenty of problems where the data available is scarce and expensive. We propose a generator of semiartificial data with similar properties to the original data, which enables the development and testing of different data mining algorithms and the optimization of their parameters. The generated data allow large-scale experimentation and simulations without danger of overfitting. The proposed generator is based on radial basis function networks, which learn sets of Gaussian kernels. These Gaussian kernels can be used in a generative mode to generate new data from the same distributions. To assess the quality of the generated data, we evaluated the statistical properties of the generated data, structural similarity, and predictive similarity using supervised and unsupervised learning techniques. To determine usability of the proposed generator we conducted a large scale evaluation using 51 data sets. The results show a considerable similarity between the original and generated data and indicate that the method can be useful in several development and simulation scenarios. We analyze possible improvements in the classification performance by adding different amounts of the generated data to the training set, performance on high-dimensional data sets, and conditions when the proposed approach is successful. PMID:26011896

  15. How memory generates heterogeneous dynamics in temporal networks.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Christian L; Génois, Mathieu; Barrat, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Empirical temporal networks display strong heterogeneities in their dynamics, which profoundly affect processes taking place on these networks, such as rumor and epidemic spreading. Despite the recent wealth of data on temporal networks, little work has been devoted to the understanding of how such heterogeneities can emerge from microscopic mechanisms at the level of nodes and links. Here we show that long-term memory effects are present in the creation and disappearance of links in empirical networks. We thus consider a simple generative modeling framework for temporal networks able to incorporate these memory mechanisms. This allows us to study separately the role of each of these mechanisms in the emergence of heterogeneous network dynamics. In particular, we show analytically and numerically how heterogeneous distributions of contact durations, of intercontact durations, and of numbers of contacts per link emerge. We also study the individual effect of heterogeneities on dynamical processes, such as the paradigmatic susceptible-infected epidemic spreading model. Our results confirm in particular the crucial role of the distributions of intercontact durations and of the numbers of contacts per link. PMID:25375547

  16. Modes and timing of fracture network development in poly-deformed carbonate reservoir analogues, Mt. Chianello, southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Stefano; Dati, Francesco; Mazzoli, Stefano; Ciarcia, Sabatino; Guerriero, Vincenzo; Iannace, Alessandro

    2012-04-01

    Structural and paleostress analyses carried out on a kilometre-sized outcrop of allochthonous shallow-water carbonate units of the southern Apennines allowed us to unravel a superposed deformation pattern associated with plate convergence. The reconstructed tectonic evolution involves: (i) early extensional faulting and fracturing associated with bending of the foreland lithosphere during forebulge and foredeep stages (including the development of both 'tangential' and 'radial' normal fault and tensile fractures; Early-Middle Miocene); (ii) large-scale thrusting and folding (Late Miocene); (iii) transcurrent faulting (including two distinct sub-stages characterized by different remote stress fields; Pliocene-Early Pleistocene), and (iv) extensional faulting (late Quaternary). Stage (i) normal faults - generally occurring as conjugate sets - and related fractures and veins are variably deformed and overprinted by later horizontal shortening. Despite having experienced such a long and complex structural history, the studied carbonates are characterized by a 'background' fracture network - including two joint/vein sets orthogonal to each other and to bedding - that appears to be associated with the early fault sets that formed during the first (foredeep/forebulge-related) deformation stage. Therefore, away from younger (Late Miocene to Quaternary) fault zones, the permeability structure of the studied carbonates appears to be essentially controlled by the early, inherited fracture network. As a similar fracture network is likely to characterize also the buried Apulian Platform carbonates, representing the reservoir units for major oil fields in southern Italy, our results also bear possible implications for a better understanding of fluid flow in the subsurface and related hydrocarbon production.

  17. Advances Made in the Next Generation of Satellite Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.

    1999-01-01

    Because of the unique networking characteristics of communications satellites, global satellite networks are moving to the forefront in enhancing national and global information infrastructures. Simultaneously, broadband data services, which are emerging as the major market driver for future satellite and terrestrial networks, are being widely acknowledged as the foundation for an efficient global information infrastructure. In the past 2 years, various task forces and working groups around the globe have identified pivotal topics and key issues to address if we are to realize such networks in a timely fashion. In response, industry, government, and academia undertook efforts to address these topics and issues. A workshop was organized to provide a forum to assess the current state-of-the-art, identify key issues, and highlight the emerging trends in the next-generation architectures, data protocol development, communication interoperability, and applications. The Satellite Networks: Architectures, Applications, and Technologies Workshop was hosted by the Space Communication Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Nearly 300 executives and technical experts from academia, industry, and government, representing the United States and eight other countries, attended the event (June 2 to 4, 1998). The program included seven panels and invited sessions and nine breakout sessions in which 42 speakers presented on technical topics. The proceedings covers a wide range of topics: access technology and protocols, architectures and network simulations, asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) over satellite networks, Internet over satellite networks, interoperability experiments and applications, multicasting, NASA interoperability experiment programs, NASA mission applications, and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) over satellite: issues, relevance, and experience.

  18. Incidence of vertebral fractures in calcium and vitamin D-supplemented postmenopausal Brazilian women with osteopenia or osteoporosis: data from Arzoxifene Generations Trial.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Henrique Pierotti; Gimeno, Suely Godoy Agostinho; Chiang, Alan Y; Bilezikian, John P; Lazaretti-Castro, Marise

    2016-02-01

    Objective Vertebral fracture is the most common osteoporotic fracture, affecting quality of life and increasing mortality. Epidemiological data on incidence of vertebral fracture are scarce in Brazil and throughout Latin America. Our aim was to determine vertebral fracture incidence and risk factors in a female Brazilian population. Subjects and methods Postmenopausal women with low bone mass were studied from the Brazilian placebo group of Arzoxifene Generations Trial (n = 974), followed for up to 5 years. The primary endpoint was new vertebral fractures, detected by X-Ray. Experimental design defined two strata: A. Osteoporosis or previous vertebral fracture with osteopenia; B. Osteopenia without previous fracture. Previous fracture, T-score, ionized calcium, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine and glucose were analyzed at baseline. Crude and adjusted incidence rates of vertebral fractures were estimated and Poisson regression model was used. Results Incidence rate was 7.7 (95% CI of 5.4 to 10.9) per 1,000 person-years (PY), increasing as a function of age. Women with new vertebral fractures had higher prevalence of previous nonvertebral fracture after menopause, were older and had lower lumbar spine (LS) T-score. Fracture risk increased by 46% for each unit reduction in LS T-score. Variables correlated with new vertebral fracture were age (p = 0.034), LS T-score, stratum A (p = 0.001 for both) and previous nonvertebral fracture after menopause (p = 0.019). In the final model, LS T-score was the strongest predictor. Conclusions Incidence rate of vertebral fracture of 7.7 per 1,000 PY. Age and previous fractures were associated with new vertebral fracture, but LS T-score was the most important predictor. PMID:26909483

  19. Numerical study on criteria for design and operation of water curtain system in underground oil storage cavern using site descriptive fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jiwon; Yeo, In Wook

    2013-04-01

    Underground unlined caverns have been constructed in fractured rocks to stockpile oil and petroleum products, where they are hydraulically contained by natural groundwater pressure. However, for the case that natural groundwater pressure is not maintained at the required level, water curtain boreholes, through which water is injected, are often constructed above the cavern as engineering barrier to secure water pressure enough to overwhelm the operational pressure of the cavern. For secure containment of oil and petroleum products inside the cavern, it is essential to keep water pressure around the cavern higher than operational pressure of the cavern using either natural groundwater pressure or engineering barrier. In the Republic of Korea, a number of underground stockpile bases are being operated by Korea National Oil Corporation (KNOC) and private companies, most of which have water curtain system. The criterion that KNOC adopts for water curtain system design and operation such as the vertical distance from the cavern and operational injection rate is based on the Åberg hypothesis that the vertical hydraulic gradient should be larger than one. The criterion has been used for maintaining oil storage cavern without its thorough review. In this study, systematic numerical works have been done for reviewing the Åberg criterion. As groundwater predominantly takes places through fractures in underground caverns, discrete fracture modeling approach is essential for this study. Fracture data, obtained from boreholes drilled at the stage of site investigation at the Yeosu stockpile base in Korea, were statistically analyzed in terms of orientation and intensity, which were used to generate the site descriptive three dimensional fracture networks. Then, groundwater flow modeling has been carried out for the fracture networks. Constant head boundaries were applied along the circumference of the cavern and water curtain boreholes. Main flow channel and hydraulic

  20. High strain rate method of producing optimized fracture networks in reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Jeffery James; Antoun, Tarabay H.; Lomov, Ilya N.

    2015-06-23

    A system of fracturing a geological formation penetrated by a borehole. At least one borehole is drilled into or proximate the geological formation. An energetic charge is placed in the borehole. The energetic charge is detonated fracturing the geological formation.

  1. Gallery of Chaotic Attractors Generated by Fractal Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouallegue, Kais

    During the last decade, fractal processes and chaotic systems were widely studied in many areas of research. Chaotic systems are highly dependent on initial conditions. Small changes in initial conditions can generate widely diverging or converging outcomes for both bifurcation or attraction in chaotic systems. In this work, we present a new method on how to generate a new family of chaotic attractors by combining these with a network of fractal processes. The proposed approach in this article is based upon the construction of a new system of fractal processes.

  2. MHD generator with improved network coupling electrodes to a load

    DOEpatents

    Rosa, Richard J.

    1977-01-01

    An MHD generator has a plurality of segmented electrodes extending longitudinally of a duct, whereby progressively increasing high DC voltages are derived from a set of cathode electrodes and progressively increasing low DC voltages are derived from a set of anode electrodes. First and second load terminals are respectively connected to the cathode and anode electrodes by separate coupling networks, each of which includes a number of SCR's and a number of diode rectifiers.

  3. Mapping Generative Models onto a Network of Digital Spiking Neurons.

    PubMed

    Pedroni, Bruno U; Das, Srinjoy; Arthur, John V; Merolla, Paul A; Jackson, Bryan L; Modha, Dharmendra S; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2016-08-01

    Stochastic neural networks such as Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs) have been successfully used in applications ranging from speech recognition to image classification, and are particularly interesting because of their potential for generative tasks. Inference and learning in these algorithms use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure called Gibbs sampling, where a logistic function forms the kernel of this sampler. On the other side of the spectrum, neuromorphic systems have shown great promise for low-power and parallelized cognitive computing, but lack well-suited applications and automation procedures. In this work, we propose a systematic method for bridging the RBM algorithm and digital neuromorphic systems, with a generative pattern completion task as proof of concept. For this, we first propose a method of producing the Gibbs sampler using bio-inspired digital noisy integrate-and-fire neurons. Next, we describe the process of mapping generative RBMs trained offline onto the IBM TrueNorth neurosynaptic processor-a low-power digital neuromorphic VLSI substrate. Mapping these algorithms onto neuromorphic hardware presents unique challenges in network connectivity and weight and bias quantization, which, in turn, require architectural and design strategies for the physical realization. Generative performance is analyzed to validate the neuromorphic requirements and to best select the neuron parameters for the model. Lastly, we describe a design automation procedure which achieves optimal resource usage, accounting for the novel hardware adaptations. This work represents the first implementation of generative RBM inference on a neuromorphic VLSI substrate. PMID:27214915

  4. Toward robust AV conferencing on next-generation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haining; Cheng, Liang; El Zarki, Magda

    2005-01-01

    In order to enable a truly pervasive computing environment, next generation networks (including B3G and 4G) will merge the broadband wireless and wireline networking infrastructure. However, due to the tremendous complexity in administration and the unreliability of the wireless channel, provision of hard-guarantees for services on such networks will not happen in the foreseeable future. This consequently makes it particularly challenging to offer viable AV conferencing services due to their stringent synchronization, delay and data fidelity requirements. We propose in this paper a robust application-level solution for wireless mobile AV conferencing on B3G/4G networks. Expecting no special treatment from the network, we apply a novel adaptive delay and synchronization control mechanism to maintain the synchronization and reduce the latency as much as possible. We also employ a robust video coding technique that has better error-resilience capability. We investigate the performance of the proposed solution through simulations using a three-state hidden Markov chain as the generic end-to-end transport channel model. The results show that our scheme yields tight synchronization performance, relatively low end-to-end latency and satisfactory presentation quality. The scheme successfully provides a fairly robust AV conferencing service.

  5. Toward robust AV conferencing on next-generation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haining; Cheng, Liang; El Zarki, Magda

    2004-12-01

    In order to enable a truly pervasive computing environment, next generation networks (including B3G and 4G) will merge the broadband wireless and wireline networking infrastructure. However, due to the tremendous complexity in administration and the unreliability of the wireless channel, provision of hard-guarantees for services on such networks will not happen in the foreseeable future. This consequently makes it particularly challenging to offer viable AV conferencing services due to their stringent synchronization, delay and data fidelity requirements. We propose in this paper a robust application-level solution for wireless mobile AV conferencing on B3G/4G networks. Expecting no special treatment from the network, we apply a novel adaptive delay and synchronization control mechanism to maintain the synchronization and reduce the latency as much as possible. We also employ a robust video coding technique that has better error-resilience capability. We investigate the performance of the proposed solution through simulations using a three-state hidden Markov chain as the generic end-to-end transport channel model. The results show that our scheme yields tight synchronization performance, relatively low end-to-end latency and satisfactory presentation quality. The scheme successfully provides a fairly robust AV conferencing service.

  6. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition to the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.

  7. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition tomore » the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.« less

  8. Dynamic Fracture Initiation Toughness at Elevated Temperatures With Application to the New Generation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Draper, Susan; Shukla, Arun (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a new generation of titanium aluminide alloy, named Gamma-Met PX, has been developed with better rolling and post-rolling characteristics. I'revious work on this alloy has shown the material to have higher strengths at room and elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. In particular, this new alloy has shown increased ductility at elevated temperatures under both quasi-static and high strain rate uniaxial compressive loading. However, its high strain rate tensile ductility at room and elevated temperatures is limited to approx. 1%. In the present chapter, results of a study to investigate the effects of loading rate and test temperature on the dynamic fracture initiation toughness in Gamma-Met PX are presented. Modified split Hopkinson pressure bar was used along with high-speed photography to determine the crack initiation time. Three-point bend dynamic fracture experiments were conducted at impact speeds of approx. 1 m/s and tests temperatures of up-to 1200 C. The results show that thc dynamic fracture initiation toughness decreases with increasing test temperatures beyond 600 C. Furthermore, thc effect of long time high temperature air exposure on the fracture toughness was investigated. The dynamic fracture initiation toughness was found to decrease with increasing exposure time. The reasons behind this drop are analyzed and discussed.

  9. Effective Hydro-Mechanical Properties of Fluid-Saturated Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, N.; Vinci, C.; Renner, J.; Steeb, H.

    2015-12-01

    Consideration of hydro-mechanical processes is essential for the characterization of liquid-resources as well as for many engineering applications. Furthermore, the modeling of seismic waves in fractured porous media finds application not only in geophysical exploration but also reservoir management. Fractures exhibit high-aspect-ratio geometries, i.e. they constitute thin and long hydraulic conduits. Motivated by this peculiar geometry, the investigation of the hydro-mechanically coupled processes is performed by means of a hybrid-dimensional modeling approach. The effective material behavior of domains including complex fracture patterns in a porous rock is assessed by investigating the fluid pressure and the solid displacement of the skeleton saturated by compressible fluids. Classical balance equations are combined with a Poiseuille-type flow in the dimensionally reduced fracture. In the porous surrounding rock, the classical Biot-theory is applied. For simple geometries, our findings show that two main fluid-flow processes occur, leak-off from fractures to the surrounding rock and fracture flow within and between the connected fractures. The separation of critical frequencies of the two flow processes is not straightforward, in particular for systems containing a large number of fractures. Our aim is to model three dimensional hydro-mechanically coupled processes within complex fracture patterns and in particular determine the frequency-dependent attenuation characteristics. Furthermore, the effect of asperities of the fracture surfaces on the fracture stiffness and on the hydraulic conductivity will be added to the approach.

  10. A Retrospective Case Series of Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) Placement at the Afghan National Police Hospital, Kabul, Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Christian W; Royal, David; Arzoiey, Humayoon Abdul; Shefa, Azizullah; Sultani, Salim; Mosafa, Mohammed Omar; Sadat, Safiullah; Zirkle, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    In Afghanistan, adequate and cost-effective medical care for even routine conditions is lacking; especially for complex injuries like long-bone fractures. The Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) intramedullary nail is used for treatment of long-bone fractures from blunt injuries and does not require imaging. We are reporting for the first time results of the SIGN intramedullary nail at the Afghan National Police Hospital, a tertiary care facility in Kabul. 71 records from the SIGN Online Surgical Database were reviewed for gender, age, date of injury, implant date, patient's home of record, and type/ mechanism of injury. Mean age was 26.7 years, all but one being male; time from injury to implant ranged 1 to 401 days, with mean of 40.6 days. Long-bone fractures from motor vehicle accidents remained constant, and war injuries peaked in summer. Follow-up is limited because of security and financial burdens of travel. However, personal communication with Afghan National Police Hospital surgeons suggests that patients included in the current study have not experienced any adverse outcomes. While it remains to be seen if the SIGN Online Surgical Database will facilitate more comprehensive outcome studies, our results provide support for the efficacy of SIGN nails in treating long-bone fractures from war injuries. PMID:26741473