Science.gov

Sample records for fracture technology development

  1. An interim report on shallow-flaw fracture technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; McAfee, W.J.

    1995-06-01

    Shallow-flaw fracture technology is being developed for application to the safety assessment of radiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVS) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallow surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT{sub NDT}) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) a strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness.

  2. Developing Next Generation Natural Fracture Detection and Prediction Technology

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Billingsley

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of the ''Next Generation'' project was to develop technology that will provide a quantitative description of natural fracture properties and locations in low-permeability reservoirs. The development of this technology has consistently been ranked as one of the highest priority needs by industry. Numerous researchers and resource assessment groups have stated that the ability to identify area where intense clusters of natural fractures co-exist with gas-charged sands, the so called ''sweet spots'', will be the key to unlocking the vast quantities of gas in-place contained in these low-permeability gas basins. To meet this technology need, the ''Next Generation'' project was undertaken with three performance criteria in mind: (1) provide an integrated assessment of the burial and tectonic stresses in a basin responsible for natural fracture genesis (using seismic data, a significantly modified application of geomechanics, and a discrete natural fracture generation model); (2) link the assessment of natural fracture properties and locations to the reservoir's fluid, storage and flow properties; and, (3) provide a reservoir simulation-based calculation of the gas (and water) production capacity of a naturally fractured reservoir system. Phase III of the ''Next Generation'' project entailed the performance of a field demonstration of the software in an ''exploration'' setting. The search for an Industry Partner willing to host an exploratory field demonstration was unsuccessful and Phase III was canceled effective May, 31, 2005. The failure to find an Industry Partner can be attributed to severe changes in the petroleum industry competitive environment between 1999 when the project was initiated and 2005 when further demonstration efforts were halted. The software was employed in portions of other, non-exploratory, projects underway during the development time period, and insights gained will be summarized here in lieu of a full field demonstration.

  3. Contesting Technologies in the Networked Society: A Case Study of Hydraulic Fracturing and Shale Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopke, Jill E.

    In this dissertation, I study the network structure and content of a transnational movement against hydraulic fracturing and shale development, Global Frackdown. I apply a relational perspective to the study of role of digital technologies in transnational political organizing. I examine the structure of the social movement through analysis of hyperlinking patterns and qualitative analysis of the content of the ties in one strand of the movement. I explicate three actor types: coordinator, broker, and hyper-local. This research intervenes in the paradigm that considers international actors as the key nodes to understanding transnational advocacy networks. I argue this focus on the international scale obscures the role of globally minded local groups in mediating global issues back to the hyper-local scale. While international NGOs play a coordinating role, local groups with a global worldview can connect transnational movements to the hyper-local scale by networking with groups that are too small to appear in a transnational network. I also examine the movement's messaging on the social media platform Twitter. Findings show that Global Frackdown tweeters engage in framing practices of: movement convergence and solidarity, declarative and targeted engagement, prefabricated messaging, and multilingual tweeting. The episodic, loosely-coordinated and often personalized, transnational framing practices of Global Frackdown tweeters support core organizers' goal of promoting the globalness of activism to ban fracking. Global Frackdown activists use Twitter as a tool to advance the movement and to bolster its moral authority, as well as to forge linkages between localized groups on a transnational scale. Lastly, I study the relative prominence of negative messaging about shale development in relation to pro-shale messaging on Twitter across five hashtags (#fracking, #globalfrackdown, #natgas, #shale, and #shalegas). I analyze the top actors tweeting using the #fracking

  4. Fracture technology for brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.

    1988-01-01

    Ceramics materials have the potential for use in high-temperature, fuel-efficient engines. However, because these materials are brittle, their fracture characteristics must be well documented prior to their application. Thus Lewis is working to understand the fracture and strength properties of brittle ceramic and ceramic matrix materials. An understanding of fracture properties aids both designers who are attempting to design high-temperature structures and materials scientists who seek to design more temperature-resistant materials. Both analytical and experimental approaches to fracture analysis are being taken. Methods for testing fracture toughness, crack growth resistance, and strength are being developed. The failure mechanisms at both room and elevated temperatures are also being investigated. Such investigations aid materials scientists in developing better high-temperature materials. Of concern is the anisotropy of ceramic materials and the experimental verification of ceramic design codes that will allow brittle material behavior to be accurately predicted at high temperature.

  5. A review of fracture mechanics life technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besuner, P. M.; Harris, D. O.; Thomas, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Lifetime prediction technology for structural components subjected to cyclic loads is examined. The central objectives of the project are: (1) to report the current state of the art, and (2) recommend future development of fracture mechanics-based analytical tools for modeling subcritical fatigue crack growth in structures. Of special interest is the ability to apply these tools to practical engineering problems and the developmental steps necessary to bring vital technologies to this stage. The authors conducted a survey of published literature and numerous discussions with experts in the field of fracture mechanics life technology. One of the key points made is that fracture mechanics analyses of crack growth often involve consideration of fatigue and fracture under extreme conditions. Therefore, inaccuracies in predicting component lifetime will be dominated by inaccuracies in environment and fatigue crack growth relations, stress intensity factor solutions, and methods used to model given loads and stresses. Suggestions made for reducing these inaccuracies include development of improved models of subcritical crack growth, research efforts aimed at better characterizing residual and assembly stresses that can be introduced during fabrication, and more widespread and uniform use of the best existing methods.

  6. A review of fracture mechanics life technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. M.; Besuner, P. M.; Harris, D. O.

    1985-01-01

    Current lifetime prediction technology for structural components subjected to cyclic loads was reviewed. The central objectives of the project were to report the current state of and recommend future development of fracture mechanics-based analytical tools for modeling and forecasting subcritical fatigue crack growth in structures. Of special interest to NASA was the ability to apply these tools to practical engineering problems and the developmental steps necessary to bring vital technologies to this stage. A survey of published literature and numerous discussions with experts in the field of fracture mechanics life technology were conducted. One of the key points made is that fracture mechanics analyses of crack growth often involve consideration of fatigue and fracture under extreme conditions. Therefore, inaccuracies in predicting component lifetime will be dominated by inaccuracies in environment and fatigue crack growth relations, stress intensity factor solutions, and methods used to model given loads and stresses. Suggestions made for reducing these inaccuracies include: development of improved models of subcritical crack growth, research efforts aimed at better characterizing residual and assembly stresses that can be introduced during fabrication, and more widespread and uniform use of the best existing methods.

  7. Technology Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomory, Ralph E.

    1983-01-01

    The evolutionary character and complexity of technological development is discussed, focusing on the steam engine and computer as examples. Additional topics include characteristics of science/technology, cultural factors in technological development, technology transfer, and problems in technological organization. (JN)

  8. Heavy-Section Steel Technology program fracture issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    Large scale fracture mechanics tests have resulted in the identification of a number of fracture technology issues. Identification of additional issues has come from the reactor vessel materials irradiation test program and from reactor operating experience. This paper provides a review of fracture issues with an emphasis on their potential impact on a reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock (PTS) analysis. Mixed mode crack propagation emerges as a major issue, due in large measure to the poor performance of existing models for the prediction of ductile tearing. Rectification of ductile tearing technology deficiencies may require extending the technology to include a more complete treatment of stress state and loading history effects. The effect of cladding on vessel fracture remains uncertain to the point that it is not possible to determine at this time if the net effect will be positive or negative. Enhanced fracture toughness for shallow flaws has been demonstrated for low strength structural steels. Demonstration of a similar effect in reactor pressure vessel steels could have a significant beneficial effect on the probabilistic analysis of reactor vessel fracture. Further development of existing fracture mechanics models and concepts is required to meet the special requirements for fracture evaluation of circumferential flaws in the welds of ring forged vessels. Fracture technology advances required to address the issues discussed in this paper are the major objective for the ongoing Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program at ORNL. 24 refs., 18 figs.

  9. Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program fracture issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Large-scale fracture mechanics tests have resulted in the identification of a number of fracture-technology issues. Identification of additional issues has come from the reactor vessel materials-irradiation test program and from reactor operating experience. This paper provides a review of fracture issues with an emphasis on their potential impact on a reactor vessel pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) analysis. Mixed-mode crack propagation emerges as a major issue, due in large measure to the poor performance of existing models for the prediction of ductile tearing. Rectification of ductile tearing technology deficiencies may require extending the technology to include a more complete treatment of stress-state and loading history effects. The effect of cladding on vessel fracture remains uncertain to the point that it is not possible to determine at this time if the net effect will be positive or negative. Enhanced fracture toughness for shallow flaws has been demonstrated for low-strength structural steels. Demonstration of a similar effect in reactor pressure vessel steels could have a significant beneficial effect on the probabilistic analysis of reactor vessel fracture. Further development of existing fracture-mechanics models and concepts is required to meet the special requirements for fracture evaluation of circumferential flaws in the welds of ring-forged vessels. Fracture technology advances required to address the issues discussed in this paper are the major objective for the ongoing Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). 22 refs., 18 figs.

  10. Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Final report, March 7, 1996 to September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Dershowitz, William S.; Einstein, Herbert H.; LaPoint, Paul R.; Eiben, Thorsten; Wadleigh, Eugene; Ivanova, Violeta

    1998-12-01

    This report summarizes research conducted for the Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies Project. The five areas studied are development of hierarchical fracture models; fractured reservoir compartmentalization, block size, and tributary volume analysis; development and demonstration of fractured reservoir discrete feature data analysis tools; development of tools for data integration and reservoir simulation through application of discrete feature network technologies for tertiary oil production; quantitative evaluation of the economic value of this analysis approach.

  11. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in

  12. Hydraulic fracturing and geothermal energy development in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Suyama, J.; Takahashi, H.

    1982-09-01

    This paper is a review of research and development on geothermal energy extraction in Japan especially on hydraulic fracturing. First recent geothermal developments in Japan are outlined in Part I. An increase in the production rate of geothermal wells may be highly dependent on the geothermal well stimulation technology based on hydraulic fracturing. The hydraulic fracturing technique must be developed also for geothermal energy to be extracted from hot, dry rock masses. In Part II, the research on hydraulic fracturing and field application are reviewed.

  13. IPIRG programs - advances in pipe fracture technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Olson, R.; Scott, P.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the advances made in fracture control technology as a result of the research performed in the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. The findings from numerous experiments and supporting analyses conducted to investigate the behavior of circumferentially flawed piping and pipe systems subjected to high-rate loading typical of seismic events are summarized. Topics to be discussed include; (1) Seismic loading effects on material properties, (2) Piping system behavior under seismic loads, (3) Advances in elbow fracture evaluations, and (4) {open_quotes}Real{close_quotes} piping system response. The presentation for each topic will be illustrated with data and analytical results. In each case, the state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics prior to the first IPIRG program will be contrasted with the state-of-the-art at the completion of the IPIRG-2 program.

  14. Technology development.

    PubMed

    Gomory, R E

    1983-05-01

    In technology development significant advances are as often the result of a series of evolutionary steps as they are of breakthroughs. This is illustrated by the examples of the steam engine and the computer. Breakthroughs, such as the transistor, are relatively rare, and are often the result of the introduction of new knowledge coming from a quite different area. Technology development is often difficult to predict because of its complexity; practical considerations may far outweigh apparent scientific advantages, and cultural factors enter in at many levels. In a large technological organization problems exist in bringing scientific knowledge to bear on development, but much can be done to obviate these difficulties. PMID:17749515

  15. Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Annual report, March 7, 1996--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dershowitz, W.S.; La Pointe, P.R.; Einstein, H.H.; Ivanova, V.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress on the project, {open_quotes}Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies{close_quotes} during the period March 7, 1996 to February 28, 1997. The report presents summaries of technology development for the following research areas: (1) development of hierarchical fracture models, (2) fractured reservoir compartmentalization and tributary volume, (3) fractured reservoir data analysis, and (4) integration of fractured reservoir data and production technologies. In addition, the report provides information on project status, publications submitted, data collection activities, and technology transfer through the world wide web (WWW). Research on hierarchical fracture models included geological, mathematical, and computer code development. The project built a foundation of quantitative, geological and geometrical information about the regional geology of the Permian Basin, including detailed information on the lithology, stratigraphy, and fracturing of Permian rocks in the project study area (Tracts 17 and 49 in the Yates field). Based on the accumulated knowledge of regional and local geology, project team members started the interpretation of fracture genesis mechanisms and the conceptual modeling of the fracture system in the study area. Research on fractured reservoir compartmentalization included basic research, technology development, and application of compartmentalized reservoir analyses for the project study site. Procedures were developed to analyze compartmentalization, tributary drainage volume, and reservoir matrix block size. These algorithms were implemented as a Windows 95 compartmentalization code, FraCluster.

  16. Experimental Investigation into Hydraulic Fracture Network Propagation in Gas Shales Using CT Scanning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushi, Zou; Shicheng, Zhang; Tong, Zhou; Xiang, Zhou; Tiankui, Guo

    2016-01-01

    Multistage fracturing of the horizontal well is recognized as the main stimulation technology for shale gas development. The hydraulic fracture geometry and stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) is interpreted by using the microseismic mapping technology. In this paper, we used a computerized tomography (CT) scanning technique to reveal the fracture geometry created in natural bedding-developed shale (cubic block of 30 cm × 30 cm × 30 cm) by laboratory fracturing. Experimental results show that partially opened bedding planes are helpful in increasing fracture complexity in shale. However, they tend to dominate fracture patterns for vertical stress difference Δ σ v ≤ 6 MPa, which decreases the vertical fracture number, resulting in the minimum SRV. A uniformly distributed complex fracture network requires the induced hydraulic fractures that can connect the pre-existing fractures as well as pulverize the continuum rock mass. In typical shale with a narrow (<0.05 mm) and closed natural fracture system, it is likely to create complex fracture for horizontal stress difference Δ σ h ≤ 6 MPa and simple transverse fracture for Δ σ h ≥ 9 MPa. However, high naturally fractured shale with a wide open natural fracture system (>0.1 mm) does not agree with the rule that low Δ σ h is favorable for uniformly creating a complex fracture network in zone. In such case, a moderate Δ σ h from 3 to 6 MPa is favorable for both the growth of new hydraulic fractures and the activation of a natural fracture system. Shale bedding, natural fracture, and geostress are objective formation conditions that we cannot change; we can only maximize the fracture complexity by controlling the engineering design for fluid viscosity, flow rate, and well completion type. Variable flow rate fracturing with low-viscosity slickwater fluid of 2.5 mPa s was proved to be an effective treatment to improve the connectivity of induced hydraulic fracture with pre-existing fractures. Moreover, the

  17. Fracture toughness testing data: A technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhrke, W. F.; Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Technical abstracts for about 90 significant documents relating to fracture toughness testing for various structural materials including information on plane strain and the developing areas of mixed mode and plane stress test conditions are presented. An overview of the state-of-the-art represented in the documents that have been abstracted is included. The abstracts in the report are mostly for publications in the period April 1962 through April 1974. The purpose of this report is to provide, in quick reference form, a dependable source for current information in the subject field.

  18. Fracture detection, mapping, and analysis of naturally fractured gas reservoirs using seismic technology. Final report, November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Many basins in the Rocky Mountains contain naturally fractured gas reservoirs. Production from these reservoirs is controlled primarily by the shape, orientation and concentration of the natural fractures. The detection of gas filled fractures prior to drilling can, therefore, greatly benefit the field development of the reservoirs. The objective of this project was to test and verify specific seismic methods to detect and characterize fractures in a naturally fractured reservoir. The Upper Green River tight gas reservoir in the Uinta Basin, Northeast Utah was chosen for the project as a suitable reservoir to test the seismic technologies. Knowledge of the structural and stratigraphic geologic setting, the fracture azimuths, and estimates of the local in-situ stress field, were used to guide the acquisition and processing of approximately ten miles of nine-component seismic reflection data and a nine-component Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP). Three sources (compressional P-wave, inline shear S-wave, and cross-line, shear S-wave) were each recorded by 3-component (3C) geophones, to yield a nine-component data set. Evidence of fractures from cores, borehole image logs, outcrop studies, and production data, were integrated with the geophysical data to develop an understanding of how the seismic data relate to the fracture network, individual well production, and ultimately the preferred flow direction in the reservoir. The multi-disciplinary approach employed in this project is viewed as essential to the overall reservoir characterization, due to the interdependency of the above factors.

  19. A unified technology plan for fatigue and fracture design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.

    1973-01-01

    An integrated research program is proposed that seeks to improve the technology of designing against fatigue and fracture and to develop a computerized capability for assessing the adequacy of a given design. Both fatigue life prediction and damage tolerance considerations are incorporated. The research for each of these considerations is organized to account for material behavior, the effect of structural configurations, the cumulative effects of the operating loadings, and for the effects of environment - temperature and corrosion. The goal is to achieve a viable fatigue and fracture design procedure for any practical problem. The overall program is outlined, assessments are made of the state of the art, subgoals are proposed, and means for achieving them are suggested.

  20. Fracture control technology for natural gas pipelines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eiber, R.J.; Bubenik, T.A.; Maxey, W.A.

    1993-12-01

    The fracture defect tolerance and fracture arrest characteristics of natural gas pipelines are key elements in assuring a pipeline`s integrity. Research results on fracture control in pipelines as developed by the Pipeline Research Committee (PRC) of the American Gas Association are presented in this report. In addition and perhaps more importantly, the fracture control measures have been assembled into a fracture control plan complete with examples for existing and new pipelines. The fracture control plan contains requirements to assure that a pipeline can tolerate large defects before leaks or ruptures occur. It also contains requirements to control the length of a fracture as a secondary level of control. Fracture control procedures are presented for new lines and existing lines. These procedures provide guidance on line-pipe specifications, operational modifications, and the use of crack arrestors. The objective of this report is to produce one document that covers all of the fracture control methods developed for pipelines by the PRC. The fracture control approaches do not cover all factors that influence defects and defect tolerances of pipelines. Rather, the approaches address flaw tolerances as a function of operating conditions and material properties, such as steel toughness. The report is divided into three sections. This first section defines basic terminology, describes how fracture control fits into an operator`s overall assurance plan for pipeline integrity, and discusses general philosophies of fracture control. The remaining two sections describe fracture initiation control and fracture propagation control. Background information needed to understand the fracture concepts is presented in each of the sections. Example problems are presented in the appendices along with computer programs to facilitate the application of the fracture control plans.

  1. Fragility fracture: recent developments in risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    More than half of older women who sustain a fragility fracture do not have osteoporosis by World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria; and, while BMD has been used to assess fracture risk for over 30 years, a range of other skeletal and nonskeletal clinical risk factors (CRFs) for fracture have been recognized. More than 30 assessment tools using CRFs have been developed, some predicting fracture risk and others low BMD alone. Recent systematic reviews have reported that many tools have not been validated against fracture incidence, and that the complexity of tools and the number of CRFs included do not ensure best performance with poor assessment of (internal or comparative) validity. Internationally, FRAX® is the most commonly recommended tool, in addition to QFracture in the UK, The Canadian Association of Radiologists and Osteoporosis Canada (CAROC) tool in Canada and Garvan in Australia. All tools estimate standard 10-year risk of major osteoporotic and 10-year risk of hip fracture: FRAX® is able to estimate fracture risk either with or without BMD, but CAROC and Garvan both require BMD and QFracture does not. The best evidence for the utility of these tools is in case finding but there may be future prospects for the use of 10-year fracture risk as a common currency with reference to the benefits of treatment, whether pharmacological or lifestyle. The use of this metric is important in supporting health economic analyses. However, further calibration studies will be needed to prove that the tools are robust and that their estimates can be used in supporting treatment decisions, independent of BMD. PMID:25650086

  2. Novel fracture technology proves marginal Viking prospect economic, part I: Implementation of fracture treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Rylance, M.; Haidar, S.; Sykes, G.; Pyecroft, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the implementation of a twin propped fracture stimulation treatment, carried out on the 49/17-12 exploration well of the Viking Wx structure, in the Southern North Sea (SNS). Initial appraisal of the potential field development was disappointing, the well flowing at a rate of only 8.5 MM.scf/d, indicating a field development to be uneconomic. Stimulation by a joint Conoco/BPX team, employing novel fracturing technology, provided dramatic increases in production to ca. 43.5 MM.scf/d with less applied drawdown. The design approaches employed during these treatments could have potential for widespread application to other SNS gas fields. In this paper critical pre-treatment testing and reasoning behind operational decisions are discussed. In a companion paper the post stimulation rates/testing and well clean-up are described. Several key aspects of these treatments included: the use of two stacked fractures in order to successfully place proppant across the entire 830 ft reservoir section; the use of a Step Down Test (SDT) to identify the nature of high near wellbore pressure losses and subsequent removal using sand slugs; the use of a newly developed dual-coat partially curable Resin Coated Proppant (RCP) product, never previously utilized in the field, to minimize the opportunity for prolonged proppant back production and a seawater Mini-Frac to attempt to help identify the true in-situ permeability. Finally, the use of a Surface Read-Out (SRO) gauge enabled real-time decision making to optimize the treatment schedule.

  3. Development of a shallow-flaw fracture assessment methodology for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; McAfee, W.J.; Pennell, W.E.

    1996-06-01

    Shallow-flaw fracture technology is being developed within the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program for application to the safety assessment of radiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing postulated shallow flaws. Cleavage fracture in shallow-flaw cruciform beam specimens tested under biaxial loading at temperatures in the lower transition temperature range was shown to be strain-controlled. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation was developed and shown to be capable of predicting the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture toughness for strain-controlled fracture. A probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) model that includes both the properties of the inner-surface stainless-steel cladding and a biaxial shallow-flaw fracture toughness correlation gave a reduction in probability of cleavage initiation of more than two orders of magnitude from an ASME-based reference case.

  4. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION AND APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI/RISK REDUCTION ENGINEERING LABORATORY - HYDRAULIC FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two pilot-scale demonstrations of the hydraulic fracturing technology for enhancing the permeability of contaminated silty clays have been evaluated under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program.The hydraulic fracturing technology was demonstrated in 1991 an...

  5. Lost Circulation Technology Development Status

    SciTech Connect

    Glowka, David A.; Schafer, Diane M.; Loeppke, Glen E.; Scott, Douglas D.; Wernig, Marcus D.; Wright, Elton K.

    1992-03-24

    Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the U.S. Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30-50% through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April, 1991-March, 1992.

  6. Development of a fracture network: a block and springs model

    SciTech Connect

    Ferer, M.V.; Jozwick, A.; Smith, D.H.

    2008-03-01

    Since flow in fractured reservoirs is significantly enhanced by clusters of inter-connecting fractures, it's important to understand their inter-connectedness. In these fractured reservoirs, one often finds two sets of fractures due to two separate geologic events. We have developed a blocks and springs model to study how the second generation fractures intersect the first generation of. We find a percolation-like transition where the cluster size grows with increasing strain leading to system-spanning fractal clusters. Increasing the thickness of the layer being fractured leads to sparser system-spanning fracture clusters with smaller fractal dimension. We have studied how the thickness of the layer affects the fractal character of the fracture clusters as well as their number distribution, and the correlations within the large fracture cluster.

  7. NEW AND NOVEL FRACTURE STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE REVITALIZATION OF EXISTING GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-12-01

    Gas storage wells are prone to continued deliverability loss at a reported average rate of 5% per annum (in the U.S.). This is a result of formation damage due to the introduction of foreign materials during gas injection, scale deposition and/or fines mobilization during gas withdrawal, and even the formation and growth of bacteria. As a means to bypass this damage and sustain/enhance well deliverability, several new and novel fracture stimulation technologies were tested in gas storage fields across the U.S. as part of a joint U.S. Department of Energy and Gas Research Institute R&D program. These new technologies include tip-screenout fracturing, hydraulic fracturing with liquid CO{sub 2} and proppant, extreme overbalance fracturing, and high-energy gas fracturing. Each of these technologies in some way address concerns with fracturing on the part of gas storage operators, such as fracture height growth, high permeability formations, and fluid sensitivity. Given the historical operator concerns over hydraulic fracturing in gas storage wells, plus the many other unique characteristics and resulting stimulation requirements of gas storage reservoirs (which are described later), the specific objective of this project was to identify new and novel fracture stimulation technologies that directly address these concerns and requirements, and to demonstrate/test their potential application in gas storage wells in various reservoir settings across the country. To compare these new methods to current industry deliverability enhancement norms in a consistent manner, their application was evaluated on a cost per unit of added deliverability basis, using typical non-fracturing well remediation methods as the benchmark and considering both short-term and long-term deliverability enhancement results. Based on the success (or lack thereof) of the various fracture stimulation technologies investigated, guidelines for their application, design and implementation have been

  8. High-energy gas-fracturing development. Annual report, April 1981-March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Cuderman, J.F.

    1982-04-01

    The objective of this program is to develop and optimize the High Energy Gas Fracturing technique for producing multiple fractures about a wellbore and thereby stimulate natural gas production. Most gas wells in Devonian shales require stimulation to obtain commercially economic production. A propellant based technology has been developed which permits control of pressure loading to obtain multiple fracturing in a borehole. The High Energy Fracturing technique uses a full borehole charge of propellant tailored to produce multiple fractures radiating from the wellbore. The multiple fracture regime has been defined as a function of borehole size, pressure risetime, and surface wave velocity. The pressure risetime and peak pressure obtained in a borehole have been measured for different propellants and borehole diameters. These data make possible propellant specifications for a given peak pressure and pressure risetime. Semiempirical models using results from earlier experiments successfully predict stress and acceleration levels and fracture radii in surrounding rock. A finite element model has been developed which predicts fracture type, and direction of fractures as a function of pressure loading, in situ stress, and material properties. The High Energy Gas Fracturing program consists of three parts: (1) In situ experiments at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS), (2) modeling activities, and (3) a full scale experimemt in a Devonian shale gas well.

  9. A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad Ghassemi

    2003-06-30

    Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are

  10. FIELD TESTING & OPTIMIZATION OF CO2/SAND FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond L. Mazza

    2004-11-30

    These contract efforts involved the demonstration of a unique liquid free stimulation technology which was, at the beginning of these efforts, in 1993 unavailable in the US. The process had been developed, and patented in Canada in 1981, and held promise for stimulating liquid sensitive reservoirs in the US. The technology differs from that conventionally used in that liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), instead of water is the base fluid. The CO{sub 2} is pumped as a liquid and then vaporizes at reservoir conditions, and because no other liquids or chemicals are used, a liquid free fracture is created. The process requires a specialized closed system blender to mix the liquid CO{sub 2} with proppant under pressure. These efforts were funded to consist of up to 21 cost-shared stimulation events. Because of the vagaries of CO{sub 2} supplies, service company support and operator interest only 19 stimulation events were performed in Montana, New Mexico, and Texas. Final reports have been prepared for each of the four demonstration groups, and the specifics of those demonstrations are summarized. A summary of the demonstrations of a novel liquid-free stimulation process which was performed in four groups of ''Candidate Wells'' situated in Crockett Co., TX; San Juan Co., NM; Phillips Co., MT; and Blaine Co., MT. The stimulation process which employs CO{sub 2} as the working fluid and the production responses were compared with those from wells treated with conventional stimulation technologies, primarily N{sub 2} foam, excepting those in Blaine Co., MT where the reservoir pressure is too low to clean up spent stimulation liquids. A total of 19 liquid-free CO{sub 2}/sand stimulations were performed in 16 wells and the production improvements were generally uneconomic.

  11. Mission critical technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, Nancy

    1991-01-01

    Mission critical technology development is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: organization/philosophy overview; fault management technology; and introduction to optical processing.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for

  13. In situ experiments of geothermal well stimulation using gas fracturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Warpinski, N.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1988-07-01

    The results of an experimental study of gas fracturing technology for geothermal well stimulation demonstrated that multiple fractures could be created to link water-filled boreholes with existing fractures. The resulting fracture network and fracture interconnections were characterized by mineback as well as flow tests. Commercial oil field fracturing tools were used successfully in these experiments. Simple scaling laws for gas fracturing and a brief discussion of the application of this technique to actual geothermal well stimulation are presented. 10 refs., 42 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Chris Moore delivers a presentation from the Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration (ETDD) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX....

  15. Mechanics of fracture - Fundamentals and some recent developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Subramonian, N.; Lee, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    An overview is presented of the fundamental aspects of and recent developments in fracture mechanics. Reference is made to linear elastic fracture mechanics including the state of stresses and displacements in the vicinity of cracks, effects of crack geometry and orientation on stress intensity factors, energy balance of Griffith, Irwin's stress intensity concept, and linear elastic fracture mechanics testing for fracture toughness. Other aspects of this paper include the non-linear behavior of materials and their influence on fracture mechanics parameters, consideration of viscoelasticity and plasticity, non-linear fracture toughness parameters as C.O.D., R-curve and J-integral, and a non-linear energy method, proposed by Liebowitz. Finite element methods applied to fracture mechanics problems are indicated. Also, consideration has been given to slow crack growth, dynamic effects on K(IC), Sih's criterion for fracture, Lee and Liebowitz's criterion relating crack growth with plastic energy, and applications of fracture mechanics to aircraft design. Suggestions are offered for future research efforts to be undertaken in fracture mechanics.

  16. Graphite technology development plan

    SciTech Connect

    1986-07-01

    This document presents the plan for the graphite technology development required to support the design of the 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR within the US National Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. Besides descriptions of the required technology development, cost estimates, and schedules, the plan also includes the associated design functions and design requirements.

  17. Some recent theoretical and experimental developments in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Eftis, J.; Hones, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental developments in four distinct areas of fracture mechanics research are described. These are as follows: experimental comparisons of different nonlinear fracture toughness measures, including the nonlinear energy, R curve, COD and J integral methods; the singular elastic crack-tip stress and displacement equations and the validity of the proposition of their general adequacy as indicated, for example, by the biaxially loaded infinite sheet with a flat crack; the thermodynamic nature of surface energy induced by propagating cracks in relation to a general continuum thermodynamic description of brittle fracture; and analytical and experimental aspects of Mode II fracture, with experimental data for certain aluminum, steel and titanium alloys.

  18. NASA Balloon Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbrother, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Balloon Program has been, and will continue to be, committed to improving the capabilities of balloons to support science missions. Fundamental to vehicle improvement is a program of technology development that will enable improved flight performance throughout the next decade. The program s technology thrust areas include: materials, vehicle design & development, structural analysis, operations & support systems, performance modeling and planetary balloons. Building on the foundations of the 18-year research and development program, a technology roadmap has been generated which identifies specific areas of interest to NASA and the vision of future developments. The major components of the roadmap are: vehicle systems, balloon-craft systems, operational and safety support systems, and planetary vehicles. Current technology activities include nanocomposite balloon films, a new balloon designed to lift 3600 kgs to 36 km, a balloon rotation rate study and Mars pumpkin balloon investigations. The technology roadmap, as well as specific projects and recent advancements, will be presented.

  19. NASA balloon technology developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbrother, D. A.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Balloon Program has been, and will continue to be, committed to improving the capabilities of balloons to support science missions. Fundamental to vehicle improvement is a program of technology development that will enable improved flight performance throughout the next decade. The program's technology thrust areas include: materials, vehicle design & development, structural analysis, operations & support systems, performance modeling and planetary balloons. Building on the foundations of the 18-year research and development program, a technology roadmap has been generated which identifies specific areas of interest to NASA and the vision of future developments. The major components of the roadmap are: vehicle systems, ballooncraft systems, operational and safety support systems, and planetary vehicles. Current technology activities include nanocomposite balloon films, a new balloon designed to lift 3600 kgs to 36 km, a balloon rotation rate study and Mars pumpkin balloon investigations. The technology roadmap, as well as specific projects and recent advancements, will be presented.

  20. Advances in fracture algorithm development in GRIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullis, I.; Church, P.; Greenwood, P.; Huntington-Thresher, W.; Reynolds, M.

    2003-09-01

    The numerical treatment of fracture processes has long been a major challenge in any hydrocode, but has been particularly acute in Eulerian Hydrocodes. This is due to the difficulties in establishing a consistent process for treating failure and the post failure treatment, which is complicated by advection, mixed cell and interface issues, particularly post failure. This alone increase the complexity of incorporating and validating a failure model compared to a Lagrange hydrocode, where the numerical treatment is much simpler. This paper outlines recent significant progress in the incorporation of fracture models in GRIM and the advection of damage across cell boundaries within the mesh. This has allowed a much more robust treatment of fracture in an Eulerian frame of reference and has greatly expanded the scope of tractable dynamic fracture scenarios. The progress has been possible due to a careful integration of the fracture algorithm within the numerical integration scheme to maintain a consistent representation of the physics. The paper describes various applications, which demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of the scheme and highlight some of the future challenges.

  1. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Frauk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2001-08-15

    Research continues on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. Work has progressed on developing techniques for estimating fracture properties from seismic and well log data, developing naturally fractured wellbore models, and developing a model to characterize the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the fracture system for use in the naturally fractured reservoir simulator.

  2. The Role of Active Fractures on Borehole Breakout Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahara, D.; Kohl, T.; Schoenball, M.; Müller, B.

    2013-12-01

    The properties of georeservoirs are strongly related to the stress field and their interpretation is a major target in geotechnical management. Borehole breakouts are direct indicators of the stress field as they develop due to the concentration of the highest compressional stress toward the minimum horizontal stress direction. However, the interaction with fractures might create local perturbations. Such weakened zones are often observed by localized anomalies of the borehole breakout orientation. We examined high-quality acoustic borehole televiewer (UBI) logs run in the entire granite sections at the deep well GPK4 at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France. The borehole is moderately inclined (15° - 35°) in its middle section. Detailed analysis of 1221 borehole elongation pairs in the vicinity of 1871 natural fractures observed in GPK4 well is used to infer the role of fractures on the borehole breakouts shape and orientation. Patterns of borehole breakout orientation in the vicinity of active fractures suggest that the wavelength of the borehole breakout orientation anomalies in this granite rock depend on the scale of the fracture while the rotation amplitude and direction is strongly influenced by the fracture orientation. In the upper and middle part of the well even a linear trend between fracture and breakout orientations could be established. In addition to the rotation, breakouts typically are found to be asymmetrically formed in zones of high fracture density. We find that major faults tend to create a systematic rotation of borehole breakout orientation with long spatial wavelength while abrupt changes are often observed around small fractures. The finding suggest that the borehole breakout heterogeneities are not merely governed by the principal stress heterogeneities, but that the effect of mechanical heterogeneities like elastic moduli changes, rock strength anisotropy and fracturing must be taken into account. Thus, one has to be careful to infer the

  3. Application of microseismic technology to hydraulic fracture diagnostics: GRI/DOE Field Fracturing Multi-Sites Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmer, R.; Warpinski, N.R.; Wright, T.B.; Branagan, P.T.; Fix, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of the Field Fracturing Multi-Sites Project (M-Site) is to conduct field experiments and analyze data that will result in definitive determinations of hydraulic fracture dimensions using remote well and treatment well diagnostic techniques. In addition, experiments will be conducted to provide data that will resolve significant unknowns with regard to hydraulic fracture modeling, fracture fluid rheology and fracture treatment design. These experiments will be supported by a well-characterized subsurface environment as well as surface facilities and equipment conducive to acquiring high-quality data. It is anticipated that the project`s research advancements will provide a foundation for a fracture diagnostic service industry and hydraulic fracture optimization based on measured fracture response. The M-Site Project is jointly sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site developed for M-Site hydraulic fracture experimentation is the former DOE Multiwell Experiment (MWX) site located near Rifle, Colorado. The MWX project drilled three closely-spaced wells (MWX-1, MWX-2 and MWX-3) which were the basis for extensive reservoir analyses and tight gas sand characterizations in the blanket and lenticular sandstone bodies of the Mesaverde Group. The research results and background knowledge gained from the MWX project are directly applicable to research in the current M-Site Project.

  4. JPL antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Systems-level technology for evolving cost-effective, STS compatible antennas that will be automatically deployed in orbit to perform a variety of missions in the 1985 to 2000 time period is discussed. For large space-based antenna systems, the LSST program has selected deployable antennas for development. The maturity of this class of antenna, demonstrated by the success of smaller size apertures, provides a potential capability for satisfying a significant number of near-term, space-based applications. The offset wrap-rib concept development is the basis of the JPL LSST antenna technology development program. Supporting technology to the antenna concept development include analytical performance prediction, the capability for measuring and evaluating mechanical antenna performance in the intended service environment, and the development of candidate system-level configurations for potential applications utilizing the offset wrap-rib antenna concept.

  5. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  6. Composite Group Technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehoff, Kevin

    A comprehensive classification methodology for graphite composite assemblies was developed at Boeing Helicopters. This classification scheme was used to create a Group Technology (GT) database containing part features and attributes which capture both product and process definition. GT data is available to both Engineering and Operations personnel for retrieval and analysis. This paper will address the applications of group technology at Boeing Helicopters. In particular, the role of GT in Aircraft Design Build (concurrent engineering) processes will be highlighted. Examples of design standardization efforts for composite airframe structural parts will be discussed. In addition, the group technology foundation for cellular manufacturing and a methodology for planning future composite manufacturing facilities will be presented.

  7. Fusion development and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following: superconducting magnet technology; high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies--aries; ITER physics: alpha physics and alcator R D for ITER; lower hybrid current drive and heating in the ITER device; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; ITER systems studies; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development.

  8. Stirling technology development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochat, George R.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1993-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling power converters have the potential to meet the many future space power requirements for a wide variety of applications with less mass, better efficiency, and less total area (collector and radiator) than other power converter options. These benefits result in significant dollar savings over the projected mission lifetime. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)—Lewis Research Center (LeRC), which has the responsibility to evaluate and develop power technologies that can satisfy anticipated future space mission power requirements, has been developing free-piston Stirling power converters and is bringing the Stirling technology to readiness. As the principal contractor to NASA-LeRC, Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) is under contract to develop the necessary space Stirling technology but also demonstrate the readiness of the technology in two generations of full-scale power converters. The first generation Stirling power converter, the component test power converter (CTPC), initiated cold end testing at the end of 1991, with hot testing scheduled during 1992. This paper reviews test progress of the CTPC including the initial hot engine test results. Modifications incorporated into the CTPC from the earlier space power demonstrator engine are reviewed as well.

  9. Stirling technology development status

    SciTech Connect

    Dochat, G.R. ); Dudenhoefer, J.E. )

    1993-01-15

    Free-piston Stirling power converters have the potential to meet the many future space power requirements for a wide variety of applications with less mass, better efficiency, and less total area (collector and radiator) than other power converter options. These benefits result in significant dollar savings over the projected mission lifetime. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)---Lewis Research Center (LeRC), which has the responsibility to evaluate and develop power technologies that can satisfy anticipated future space mission power requirements, has been developing free-piston Stirling power converters and is bringing the Stirling technology to readiness. As the principal contractor to NASA-LeRC, Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) is under contract to develop the necessary space Stirling technology but also demonstrate the readiness of the technology in two generations of full-scale power converters. The first generation Stirling power converter, the component test power converter (CTPC), initiated cold end testing at the end of 1991, with hot testing scheduled during 1992. This paper reviews test progress of the CTPC including the initial hot engine test results. Modifications incorporated into the CTPC from the earlier space power demonstrator engine are reviewed as well.

  10. Development of 3-D fracture network visualization software based on graphical user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young-Hwan, Noh; Jeong-Gi, Um; Yosoon, Choi; Myong-Ho, Park; Jaeyoung, Choi

    2013-04-01

    A sound understanding of the structural characteristics of fractured rock masses is important in designing and maintaining earth structures because their strength, deformability, and hydraulic behavior depend mainly on the characteristics of discontinuity network structures. Despite considerable progress in understanding the structural characteristics of rock masses, the complexity of discontinuity patterns has prevented satisfactory analysis based on a 3-D rock mass visualization model. This research presents the results of studies performed to develop rock mass visualization in 3-D to analysis the mechanical and hydraulic behavior of fractured rock masses. General and particular solutions of non-linear equations of disk-shaped fractures have been derived to calculated lines of intersection and equivalent pipes. Also, program modules of DISK3D, FNTWK3D, BOUNDARY and BDM(borehole data management) have been developed to perform the visualization of fracture network and corresponding equivalent pipes for DFN based fluid flow model. The developed software for the 3-D fractured rock mass visualization model based on MS visual studio can be used to characterize rock mass geometry and network systems effectively. The results obtained in this study will be refined and then combined for use as a tool for assessing geomechanical problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the 2011 Energy Efficiency and Resources Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant.

  11. Remediation Technology Collaboration Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, John; Olsen, Wade

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews programs at NASA aimed at development at Remediation Technology development for removal of environmental pollutants from NASA sites. This is challenging because there are many sites with different environments, and various jurisdictions and regulations. There are also multiple contaminants. There must be different approaches based on location and type of contamination. There are other challenges: such as costs, increased need for resources and the amount of resources available, and a regulatory environment that is increasing.

  12. Development of heterogeneity in proppant distribution due to engineered and natural processes during hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J.; Roy, P.; Walsh, S.

    2015-12-01

    Proppant, such as sand, is injected during hydraulic fracturing to maintain fracture aperture and conductivity. Proppant performance is a complex result of fluid flow, discrete particle mechanics and geomechanical deformation. We present investigations into these phenomena at scales ranging from millimeters to meters. Traditionally, the design goal for proppant placement is uniform distribution by using viscous carrier fluids that keep the proppant suspended and maintain conductivity over the full area of the fracture. Large volume hydraulic fracturing in shales typically use low viscosity fluids, resulting in proppant settling out from the carrier fluid. Consequently, the proppant occupies the lower portion of the fracture. In addition, many shale plays host natural fractures that take up injected carrier fluid, but may not develop sufficient aperture to accommodate proppant. We present simulations investigating natural development of heterogeneity in proppant distribution within fracture networks due to settling and network flow. In addition to natural development of heterogeneity, the petroleum industry has sought to engineer heterogeneity to generate isolated propped portions of the fracture that maintain aperture in adjacent, open channels. We present two examples of such heterogeneous proppant placement (HPP) technologies. The first involves pulsating proppant at the wellhead and the second utilizes a homogenous composite fluid that develops heterogeneity spontaneously through hydrodynamic instabilities. We present simulation results that compare these approaches and conclude that spontaneous creation of heterogeneity has distinct geomechanical advantages. Finally, we present simulations at the scale of individual proppant particles that emphasize the complexity of dynamic instabilities and their influence upon proppant fate. Disclaimer: This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under

  13. ABC Technology Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-14

    The Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) facility will be designed to accomplish the following mission: `Provide a weapon`s grade plutonium disposition capability in a safe, economical, and environmentally sound manner on a prudent schedule for [50] tons of weapon`s grade plutonium to be disposed on in [20] years.` This mission is supported by four major objectives: provide a reliable plutonium disposition capability within the next [15] years; provide a level of safety and of safety assurance that meets or exceeds that afforded to the public by modern commercial nuclear power plants; meet or exceed all applicable federal, state, and local regulations or standards for environmental compliance; manage the program in a cost effective manner. The ABC Technology Development Program defines the technology development activities that are required to accomplish this mission. The technology development tasks are related to the following topics: blanket system; vessel systems; reactivity control systems; heat transport system components; energy conversion systems; shutdown heat transport systems components; auxiliary systems; technology demonstrations - large scale experiments.

  14. Textile technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Bharat M.

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this report were to evaluate and select resin systems for Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Powder Towpreg Material, to develop and evaluate advanced textile processes by comparing 2-D and 3-D braiding for fuselage frame applications and develop window belt and side panel structural design concepts, to evaluate textile material properties, and to develop low cost manufacturing and tooling processes for the automated manufacturing of fuselage primary structures. This research was in support of the NASA and Langley Research Center (LaRc) Advanced Composite Structural Concepts and Materials Technologies for Primary Aircraft Structures program.

  15. Effective Stress Approximation using Geomechanical Formulation of Fracturing Technology (GFFT) in Petroleum Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, A.; Asef, M.; Kharrat, R.

    2010-12-01

    Recently, rock mechanics and geophysics contribution in petroleum industry has been significantly increased. Wellbore stability analysis in horizontal wells, sand production problem while extracting hydrocarbon from sandstone reservoirs, land subsidence due to production induced reservoir compaction, reservoir management, casing shearing are samples of these contributions. In this context, determination of the magnitude and orientation of the in-situ stresses is an essential parameter. This paper is presenting new method to estimate the magnitude of in-situ stresses based on fracturing technology data. Accordingly, kirsch equations for the circular cavities and fracturing technology models in permeable formations have been used to develop an innovative Geomechanical Formulation (GFFT). GFFT introduces a direct reasonable relation between the reservoir stresses and the breakdown pressure of fracture, while the concept of effective stress was employed. Thus, this complex formula contains functions of some rock mechanic parameters such as poison ratio, Biot’s coefficient, Young’s modulus, rock tensile strength, depth of reservoir and breakdown/reservoir pressure difference. Hence, this approach yields a direct method to estimate maximum and minimum effective/insitu stresses in an oil field and improves minimum in-situ stress estimation compared to previous studies. In case of hydraulic fracturing; a new stress analysis method is developed based on well known Darcy equations for fluid flow in porous media which improves in-situ stress estimation using reservoir parameters such as permeability, and injection flow rate. The accuracy of the method would be verified using reservoir data of a case history. The concepts discussed in this research would eventually suggest an alternative methodology with sufficient accuracy to derive in-situ stresses in hydrocarbon reservoirs, while no extra experimental work is accomplished for this purpose.

  16. ECH Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard

    2014-12-24

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is needed for plasma heating, current drive, plasma stability control, and other applications in fusion energy sciences research. The program of fusion energy sciences supported by U. S. DOE, Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences relies on the development of ECH technology to meet the needs of several plasma devices working at the frontier of fusion energy sciences research. The largest operating ECH system in the world is at DIII-D, consisting of six 1 MW, 110 GHz gyrotrons capable of ten second pulsed operation, plus two newer gyrotrons. The ECH Technology Development research program investigated the options for upgrading the DIII-D 110 GHz ECH system. Options included extending present-day 1 MW technology to 1.3 – 1.5 MW power levels or developing an entirely new approach to achieve up to 2 MW of power per gyrotron. The research consisted of theoretical research and designs conducted by Communication and Power Industries of Palo Alto, CA working with MIT. Results of the study would be validated in a later phase by research on short pulse length gyrotrons at MIT and long pulse / cw gyrotrons in industry. This research follows a highly successful program of development that has led to the highly reliable, six megawatt ECH system at the DIII-D tokamak. Eventually, gyrotrons at the 1.5 megawatt to multi-megawatt power level will be needed for heating and current drive in large scale plasmas including ITER and DEMO.

  17. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

    2007-09-01

    This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

  18. Technology Development Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Ujihara, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) is developing and testing VLBI technologies and conducts observations with this new equipment. This report gives an overview of the Technology Development Center (TDC) at NICT and summarizes recent activities.

  19. Insights into fracture development from microseismic attenuation anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, P. J.; Kendall, J. M.; Kelly, C. M.; Rietbrock, A.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic monitoring is used to investigate hydraulic fracture stimulation and its associated micro-seismicity. Fracture development is expected in the form of fracture sets leading to velocity, permeability and attenuation anisotropy. A temporal variation in these properties is also expected corresponding to the injection of fluids. The velocity anisotropy causes shear wave splitting, creating a fast and a slow S-wave. Here we measure attenuation anisotropy for a dataset from the Cotton Valley formation in east Texas, where a high pressure fluid has been injected at depth to increase the permeability in the formation. The resulting micro-seismicity has been monitored from two borehole arrays of three-component geophones (Rutledge et al., 2004). The log-spectral-ratio method is used to measure attenuation for the fast and the slow S wave. Attenuation is measured as the difference in t* (the accumulated attenuation along a ray path). The events used occur in clusters or multiplets, where the events are co-located in space but not in time. These events show a significant increase in the magnitude of shear wave splitting (Wuestefeld et al., 2011) over a 30 minute time period. An increase in t* is observed for the slow S wave but the fast S wave shows negligible change. This is concurrent with the injection of the high pressure fluid, and the increase in shear wave splitting. It is difficult to explain this observation due to changes in ray path length, or inclination. Using a model of poroelastic flow in fractured media developed by Chapman (2003), we can explain the changes in t* as an increase in fracturing and also a decrease in the aspect ratio of the fractures. Together this work suggests that we have measured temporal changes in attenuation anisotropy and that it is related to the development of fracture networks caused by the hydraulic stimulation. Chapman, M. (2003). Frequency-dependent anisotropy due to meso-scale fractures in the presence of equant porosity

  20. Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Recent studies on the epidemiology and repair of fractures are reviewed. The type and severity of the fracture bears a relation to the age, sex and occupation of the patient. Bone tissue after fracture shows a process of inflammation and repair common to all members of the connective tissue family, but it repairs with specific tissue. Cartilage forms when the oxygen supply is outgrown. After a fracture, the vascular bed enlarges. The major blood supply to healing tissue is from medullary vessels and destruction of them will cause necrosis of the inner two-thirds of the cortex. Callus rapidly mineralizes, but full mineralization is achieved slowly; increased mineral metabolism lasts several years after fracture. PMID:13952119

  1. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects

    PubMed Central

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper. PMID:19907123

  2. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects.

    PubMed

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper. PMID:19907123

  3. Fracture mechanics. [review of fatigue crack propagation and technology of constructing safe structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.

    1974-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a rapidly emerging discipline for assessing the residual strength of structures containing flaws due to fatigue, corrosion or accidental damage and for anticipating the rate of which such flaws will propagate if not repaired. The discipline is also applicable in the design of structures with improved resistance to such flaws. The present state of the design art is reviewed using this technology to choose materials, to configure safe and efficient structures, to specify inspection procedures, to predict lives of flawed structures and to develop reliability of current and future airframes.

  4. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  5. ADVANCED FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY FOR TIGHT GAS: AN EAST TEXAS FIELD DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mukul M. Sharma

    2005-03-01

    The primary objective of this research was to improve completion and fracturing practices in gas reservoirs in marginal plays in the continental United States. The Bossier Play in East Texas, a very active tight gas play, was chosen as the site to develop and test the new strategies for completion and fracturing. Figure 1 provides a general location map for the Dowdy Ranch Field, where the wells involved in this study are located. The Bossier and other tight gas formations in the continental Unites States are marginal plays in that they become uneconomical at gas prices below $2.00 MCF. It was, therefore, imperative that completion and fracturing practices be optimized so that these gas wells remain economically attractive. The economic viability of this play is strongly dependent on the cost and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracturing used in its well completions. Water-fracs consisting of proppant pumped with un-gelled fluid is the type of stimulation used in many low permeability reservoirs in East Texas and throughout the United States. The use of low viscosity Newtonian fluids allows the creation of long narrow fractures in the reservoir, without the excessive height growth that is often seen with cross-linked fluids. These low viscosity fluids have poor proppant transport properties. Pressure transient tests run on several wells that have been water-fractured indicate a long effective fracture length with very low fracture conductivity even when large amounts of proppant are placed in the formation. A modification to the water-frac stimulation design was needed to transport proppant farther out into the fracture. This requires suspending the proppant until the fracture closes without generating excessive fracture height. A review of fracture diagnostic data collected from various wells in different areas (for conventional gel and water-fracs) suggests that effective propped lengths for the fracture treatments are sometimes significantly shorter than those

  6. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  7. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  8. Emerging Sealing Technologies Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Under this Cooperative Agreement, the objective was to investigate several emerging sealing technologies of interest to the Mechanical Components Branch of National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (NASA GRC). The majority of the work conducted was to support the development of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for application to aeronautic auxiliary power units, though technical investigations of interest to other groups and projects were also conducted. In general, accomplishments and results were periodically reported to the NASA Technical Monitor, the NASA GRC Seal Team staff, and NASA GRC project management. Several technical reports, journal articles, and presentations were given internally to NASA GRC and to the external public.

  9. SEDSAT-1 Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maier, Mark W.; Wells, B. Earl

    1996-01-01

    The Students for the Exploration and Development of Space Satellite (SEDSAT-1) is an ambitious project to design, build, and fly a generally-accessible low-cost satellite which will 1) act as a technology demonstration to verify the suitability of novel optical, battery, microprocessor, and memory hardware for space flight environments, (2) to advance the understanding of tether dynamics and environmental science through the development of advanced imaging experiments, (3) to act as a communication link for radio amateurs, and (4) to provide graduate and undergraduate students with a unique multi-disciplinary experience in designing complex real-world hardware/software. This report highlights the progress made on this project during the time period from January 2, 1996 to June 1, 1996 at the end of which time the SEASIS 0.7 version software was completed and integrated on the SEASIS breadboard, a functional prototype of the Panoramic Annual Lenses (PAL) camera was developed, the preferred image compression technique was selected, the layout of the SEASIS board was begun, porting of the SCOS operating system to the command data system (CDS) board was begun, a new design for a tether release mechanism was developed, safety circuitry to inhibit tether cutting was developed and prototyped, material was prepared to support a comprehensive safety review of the project which was held at Johnson Space Center (JSC) (which was personally attended by one of the Principal Investigators), and prototype ground software was developed.

  10. On the development of a new fracture toughness procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, M.; Provan, J. W.

    1989-05-01

    The present ASTM test procedure for plane strain fracture toughness is time consuming, expensive, includes specimen thickness requirements, and provides no assurance of a valid K(sub IC). An attempt to circumvent the thickness limitations and to develop a simple, inexpensive method to determine plane strain fracture toughness is reported. A novel disc-shaped specimen geometry was investigated for the determination of the plane strain fracture toughness of metallic materials. The specimen has an axisymmetric notch on its upper face, is clamped on its periphery and is uniformly and perpendicularly loaded around the notch. The frozen stress photoelasticity method was applied to Araldite specimens with fatigue precracked notches to determine the stress intensity factors and the fracture mode. One configuration was retained and using the crack profile from the test, a finite element study was performed to determine the compliance of the specimen geometry. Finally, the fracture toughness of aluminium Al7075-T651 was determined by applying the critical load obtained from rupture tests.

  11. Application of new and novel fracture stimulation technologies to enhance the deliverability of gas storage wells

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Based on the information presented in this report, our conclusions regarding the potential for new and novel fracture stimulation technologies to enhance the deliverability of gas storage wells are as follows: New and improved gas storage well revitalization methods have the potential to save industry on the order of $20-25 million per year by mitigating deliverability decline and reducing the need for costly infill wells Fracturing technologies have the potential to fill this role, however operators have historically been reluctant to utilize this approach due to concerns with reservoir seal integrity. With advanced treatment design tools and methods, however, this risk can be minimized. Of the three major fracturing classifications, namely hydraulic, pulse and explosive, two are believed to hold potential to gas storage applications (hydraulic and pulse). Five particular fracturing technologies, namely tip-screenout fracturing, fracturing with liquid carbon dioxide, and fracturing with gaseous nitrogen, which are each hydraulic methods, and propellant and nitrogen pulse fracturing, which are both pulse methods, are believed to hold potential for gas storage applications and will possibly be tested as part of this project. Field evidence suggests that, while traditional well remediation methods such as blowing/washing, mechanical cleaning, etc. do improve well deliverability, wells are still left damaged afterwards, suggesting that considerable room for further deliverability enhancement exists. Limited recent trials of hydraulic fracturing imply that this approach does in fact provide superior deliverability results, but further RD&D work is needed to fully evaluate and demonstrate the benefits and safe application of this as well as other fracture stimulation technologies.

  12. Geode development and multiple fractures in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lowthian, P J; Calin, A

    1985-01-01

    The radiological development from normal bone of geodes and subsequent fractures in phalanges of two adjacent fingers is described in a patient with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Presentation was as a septic, discharging focus, but infection was excluded; the pathology is described. Images PMID:3977410

  13. Geode development and multiple fractures in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lowthian, P J; Calin, A

    1985-02-01

    The radiological development from normal bone of geodes and subsequent fractures in phalanges of two adjacent fingers is described in a patient with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Presentation was as a septic, discharging focus, but infection was excluded; the pathology is described. PMID:3977410

  14. Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program: Recent developments in crack initiation and arrest research

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Technology for the analysis of crack initiation and arrest is central to the reactor pressure vessel fracture-margin-assessment process. Regulatory procedures for nuclear plants utilize this technology to assure the retention of adequate fracture-prevention margins throughout the plant operating license period. As nuclear plants age and regulatory procedures dictate that fracture-margin assessments be performed, interest in the fracture-mechanics technology incorporated into those procedures has heightened. This has led to proposals from a number of sources for development and refinement of the underlying crack-initiation and arrest-analysis technology. This paper presents an overview of ongoing Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program research aimed at refining the fracture toughness data used in the analysis of fracture margins under pressurized-thermal-shock loading conditions. 33 refs., 13 figs.

  15. IDC Infrasound technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mialle, P.; Brown, D. J.; Le Bras, R.; Charbit, M. J. C.; Given, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    The first atmospheric event built only from infrasound arrivals was reported in the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) of the International Data Centre (IDC) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) in 2003. In the last decade, 48 infrasound stations from the International Monitoring System (IMS) have been installed and are transmitting data to the IDC. The infrasound component of the IMS daily registers infragenic signals originating from various sources such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, microbaroms, meteorites entering the atmosphere and accidental explosions. The IDC routinely and automatically processes infrasound data reviewed by interactive analysis; the detected and located events are then included in the IDC products. The IDC advances its methods and continuously improves its automatic system for the infrasound technology. The IDC focuses on enhancing the automatic system for the identification of valid signals and the optimization of the network detection threshold by identifying ways to refine signal characterization methodology and association criteria. An objective of this study is to reduce the number of associated infrasound arrivals that are rejected from the automatic bulletins when generating the reviewed event bulletins. A number of ongoing projects at the IDC will be presented, such as: - improving the detection accuracy at the station processing stage by enhancing the infrasound signal detector DFX-PMCC (Detection and Feature eXtraction - Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation) and by evaluating the performances of detection software. - separating infrasound data from other waveform technologies at the automatic network processing stage for technology development and for preparing the implementation of next generation of waveform association algorithm. Infrasound rules in Global Association (GA) are revisited to pursue a lower ratio of false alarms. - determining station noise for IMS infrasound, seismic and

  16. Payload software technology: Software technology development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Programmatic requirements for the advancement of software technology are identified for meeting the space flight requirements in the 1980 to 1990 time period. The development items are described, and software technology item derivation worksheets are presented along with the cost/time/priority assessments.

  17. JPL antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Plans for evaluating, designing, fabricating, transporting and deploying cost effective and STS compatible offset wrap rib antennas up to 300 meters in diameter for mobile communications, Earth resources observation, and for the orbiting VLBI are reviewed. The JPL surface measurement system, intended for large mesh deployable antenna applications will be demonstrated and validated as part of the antenna ground based demonstration program. Results of the offset wrap rib deployable antenna technology development will include: (1) high confidence structural designs for antennas up to 100 meters in diameter; (2) high confidence estimates of functional performance and fabrication cost for a wide range of antenna sizes (up to 300 meters in diameter); (3) risk assessment for fabricating the large size antennas; and (4) 55 meter diameter flight quality hardware that can be cost effectively completed toto accommodate a flight experiment and/or application.

  18. Aerocapture Technology Development Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Michelle M.; Moon, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper will explain the investment strategy, the role of detailed systems analysis, and the hardware and modeling developments that have resulted from the past 5 years of work under NASA's In-Space Propulsion Program (ISPT) Aerocapture investment area. The organizations that have been funded by ISPT over that time period received awards from a 2002 NASA Research Announcement. They are: Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Applied Research Associates, Inc., Ball Aerospace, NASA s Ames Research Center, and NASA s Langley Research Center. Their accomplishments include improved understanding of entry aerothermal environments, particularly at Titan, demonstration of aerocapture guidance algorithm robustness at multiple bodies, manufacture and test of a 2-meter Carbon-Carbon "hot structure," development and test of evolutionary, high-temperature structural systems with efficient ablative materials, and development of aerothermal sensors that will fly on the Mars Science Laboratory in 2009. Due in large part to this sustained ISPT support for Aerocapture, the technology is ready to be validated in flight.

  19. The development and validation of a ductile fracture analysis model

    SciTech Connect

    Kanninen, M.F.; Morrow, T.B.; Grant, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is a user-oriented methodology that can be used by gas transmission company engineers for assessing the risk of ductile fracture propagation in the full range of design and operating conditions anticipated for their gas transmission pipeline system. A thoroughly validated procedure is therefore required that encompasses the full range of pipe diameters, operating pressures, pipe steels and rich gas compositions (RGCs) used by North American gas transmission companies. The final result could be incorporated into a user friendly PC-based code that would allow engineering assessment of safety margins for pipeline design and operation to be determined. Towards this objective, this report describes two specific tasks that were undertaken to advance the model development. Parametric calculations of crack tip pressure vs. wave speed were completed that bound the full range of (RGCs) decompression. The results were used in parametric ductile fracture computations, conducted to proclude an interpolating formula for the computation of the upper bound crack driving force for RGCs, supplementing the formula developed previously for methane. The results of the research completed to date can be used for a new pipeline design; or to calculate the critical pressure for an existing pipeline above which any rupture could lead to long propagating fracture. For either application, the ductile fracture resistance of candidate or existing line pipe steel can be determined using the procedures given in App. B.

  20. Mars Technology Program: Planetary Protection Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of Planetary Protection Technology in the Mars Technology Program. The goal of the program is to develop technologies that will enable NASA to build, launch, and operate a mission that has subsystems with different Planetary Protection (PP) classifications, specifically for operating a Category IVb-equivalent subsystem from a Category IVa platform. The IVa category of planetary protection requires bioburden reduction (i.e., no sterilization is required) The IVb category in addition to IVa requirements: (i.e., terminal sterilization of spacecraft is required). The differences between the categories are further reviewed.

  1. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  2. NASA Development of Aerocapture Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Bonnie; Munk, Michelle; Moon, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Aeroassist technology development is a vital part of the NASA ln-Space Propulsion Program (ISP), which is managed by the NASA Headquarters Office of Space Science, and implemented by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Aeroassist is the general term given to various techniques to maneuver a space vehicle within an atmosphere, using aerodynamic forces in lieu of propulsive fuel. Within the ISP, the current aeroassist technology development focus is aerocapture. The objective of the ISP Aerocapture Technology Project (ATP) is to develop technologies that can enable and/or benefit NASA science missions by significantly reducing cost, mass, and/or travel times. To accomplish this objective, the ATP identifies and prioritizes the most promising technologies using systems analysis, technology advancement and peer review, coupled with NASA Headquarters Office of Space Science target requirements. Plans are focused on developing mid-Technology Readiness Level (TRL) technologies to TRL 6 (ready for technology demonstration in space).

  3. NASA Development of Aerocapture Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Bonnie; Munk, Michelle; Moon, Steve

    2004-01-01

    Aeroassist technology development is a vital part of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Program (ISP), which is managed by the NASA Headquarters Office of Space Science, and implemented by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Aeroassist is the general term given to various techniques to maneuver a space vehicle within an atmosphere, using aerodynamic forces in lieu of propulsive fuel. Within the ISP, the current aeroassist technology development focus is aerocapture. The objective of the ISP Aerocapture Technology Project (ATP) is to develop technologies that can enable and/or benefit NASA science missions by significantly reducing cost, mass, and/or travel times. To accomplish this objective, the ATP identifies and prioritizes the most promising technologies using systems analysis, technology advancement and peer review, coupled with NASA Headquarters Office of Space Science target requirements. Plans are focused on developing mid-Technology Readiness Level (TRL) technologies to TRL 6 (ready for technology demonstration in space).

  4. Planetary rover technology development requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedard, Roger J., Jr.; Muirhead, Brian K.; Montemerlo, Melvin D.; Hirschbein, Murray S.

    1989-01-01

    Planetary surface (including lunar) mobility and sampling capability is required to support proposed future National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) solar system exploration missions. The NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) is addressing some of these technology needs in its base research and development program, the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) and a new technology initiative entitled Pathfinder. The Pathfinder Planetary Rover (PPR) and Sample Acquisition, Analysis and Preservation (SAAP) programs will develop and validate the technologies needed to enable both robotic and piloted rovers on various planetary surfaces. The technology requirements for a planetary roving vehicle and the development plans of the PPR and SAAP programs are discussed.

  5. Haystack Observatory Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaudoin, Chris; Corey, Brian; Niell, Arthur; Cappallo, Roger; Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Technology development at MIT Haystack Observatory were focused on four areas in 2012: VGOS developments at GGAO; Digital backend developments and workshop; RFI compatibility at VLBI stations; Mark 6 VLBI data system development.

  6. Technology Education and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazinica, Aleksandar, Ed.; Calafate, Carlos, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The widespread deployment and use of Information Technologies (IT) has paved the way for change in many fields of our societies. The Internet, mobile computing, social networks and many other advances in human communications have become essential to promote and boost education, technology and industry. On the education side, the new challenges…

  7. Mars Technology Program Planetary Protection Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the NASA Planetary Protection program are to preserve biological and organic conditions of solar-system bodies for future scientific exploration and to protect the Earth from potential hazardous extraterrestrial contamination. As the exploration of solar system continues, NASA remains committed to the implementation of planetary protection policy and regulations. To fulfill this commitment, the Mars Technology Program (MTP) has invested in a portfolio of tasks for developing necessary technologies to meet planetary protection requirements for the next decade missions.

  8. Development of a methodology for the assessment of shallow-flaw fracture in nuclear reactor pressure vessels: Generation of biaxial shallow-flaw fracture toughness data

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow-surface flaws. Shallow-flaw fracture toughness of RPV material has been shown to be higher than that for deep flaws, because of the relaxation of crack-tip constraint. This report describes the preliminary test results for a series of cruciform specimens with a uniform depth surface flaw. These specimens are all of the same size with the same depth flaw. Temperature and biaxial load ratio are the independent variables. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading could have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. Through that temperature range, the effect of full biaxial (1:1) loading on uniaxial, shallow-flaw toughness varied from no effect near the lower shelf to a reduction of approximately 58% at higher temperatures.

  9. Understanding Hydraulic Fracture Stimulations in Oil-Gas Developments Using Microseismicity (M<0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbancic, T.; Baig, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Microseismic monitoring is widely recognized as a powerful production optimization tool in the oil and gas industry. In particular, microseismic imaging has been shown to provide insight into the dynamic behavior of reservoirs during hydraulic fracture stimulations. In this presentation, we explore ideas and provide examples of preliminary work linking microseismicity, geology and engineering to build predictive reservoir models and to assist with their calibration and validation. Generally, microseismic imaging of hydraulic fractures focuses on mapping event locations. By simply examining the spatial and temporal variations in microseismicity, overall geometric measures such as orientation, fracture extent (height, length, and width) and fracture growth can be assessed. Examining fracture growth in the context of traditional hydraulic fracture models, estimates of fracture geometry based on microseismic data have been used to support the accepted fracture behavior. In hydraulic fracture stimulations, fractures are generally considered to develop along a single fracture azimuth or along a plane of fracturing controlled by regional stresses (i.e. along the direction of maximum principle stress), even within the context of a three-dimensional fracture network. In this study, we show how seismic moment tensors and source parameters have been used to assess the orientation of newly formed or reactivated fractures, as well as evaluate their size or time-dependent response to fluid injections. As well, using nearest-neighbor statistics, events can be grouped into behavioral domains, such as near-treatment-well and fracture extension regions, and used to outline a Discrete Fracture Network (DFN). Evaluating the spatial-temporal development of the DFN within the defined volumes can then be used to assess the fracture connectivity and enhanced permeability associated with the treatment. With moment tensor analysis, we show how petroleum engineers can also assess the

  10. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Tan, Ting; Liu, Ken C

    2014-01-01

    Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of great interest regarding reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks, however, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen, in addition to the inherited specimen size effect. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, a torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  11. Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    James Reeves

    2005-01-31

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

  12. Smart Fabrics Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Cory; Potter, Elliott; Potter, Elliott; McCabe, Mary; Baggerman, Clint

    2010-01-01

    Advances in Smart Fabrics technology are enabling an exciting array of new applications for NASA exploration missions, the biomedical community, and consumer electronics. This report summarizes the findings of a brief investigation into the state of the art and potential applications of smart fabrics to address challenges in human spaceflight.

  13. Developments in Enzyme Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Enzyme technology has a well-established industrial base, with applications that have survived competition. The most prominent applications of enzymes in biotechnology are examined with an explanation of some theoretical background. Topics include extending an enzyme's useful life, partition and diffusion, industrial uses, and therapeutic uses.…

  14. Robotics Technology Development Program. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) is a ``needs-driven`` effort. A lengthy series of presentations and discussions at DOE sites considered critical to DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programs resulted in a clear understanding of needed robotics applications toward resolving definitive problems at the sites. A detailed analysis of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR), Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA), Mixed Waste Operations (MWO), and Decontamination & Dismantlement (D&D). The RTDP Group realized that much of the technology development was common (Cross Cutting-CC) to each of these robotics application areas, for example, computer control and sensor interface protocols. Further, the OTD approach to the Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E) process urged an additional organizational break-out between short-term (1--3 years) and long-term (3--5 years) efforts (Advanced Technology-AT). The RDTP is thus organized around these application areas -- TWR, CAA, MWO, D&D and CC&AT -- with the first four developing short-term applied robotics. An RTDP Five-Year Plan was developed for organizing the Program to meet the needs in these application areas.

  15. New Space Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Visitors from Moon Express, a privately funded commercial space company, will be visiting KSC Swamp Works. This presentation includes a high-level introduction to NASA and commercial partnerships, as well as brief background on the moon - what we used to think about it hundreds of years ago, and what we know today with advanced technologies.***This third part being added includes Swamp Works technical capabilities and has a high-level overview of a selection of projects.***

  16. Science and Technology for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlinguet, Louis

    1981-01-01

    Presents the viewpoint that science and technology are an integral part of international development and that governments in the developed countries should invest money in science and technology in the Third World for the mutual benefit of all. (Author/CS)

  17. JWST Mirror Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Since the initial Design Studies leading to JWST, Mirror Technology was identified as a (if not the) critical capability necessary to enable the next generation of large aperture space telescopes required to achieve the science goals of imaging the earliest galaxies and proto-galaxies after the big bang. Specific telescope architectures were explored via three independent design concept studies conducted during the summer of 1996. Achieving the desired science objectives required a never before demonstrated space telescope capability, one with an 8 meter class primary mirror that is diffraction limited at 2 micrometers and operating in deep space at temperatures well below 70K. Beryllium was identified in the NASA "Yardstick" design as the preferred material because of its ability to provide stable optical performance in the anticipated thermal environment as well as its excellent specific stiffness. Because of launch vehicle constraints, two very significant architectural constraints were placed upon the telescope: segmentation and areal density. Each of these directly resulted in specific technology capability requirements. First, because the maximum launch vehicle payload fairing diameter is approximately 4.5 meters, the only way to launch an 8 meter class mirror is to segment it, fold it and deploy it on orbit - resulting in actuation and control requirements. Second, because of launch vehicle mass limits, the primary mirror allocation was only 1000 kg - resulting in a maximum areal density specification of 20 kilograms per square meter.

  18. Subglacial extensional fracture development and implications for Alpine Valley evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Kerry; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Amann, Florian; Loew, Simon

    2014-01-01

    stresses induced through exhumation and tectonic processes play a key role in the topographic evolution of alpine valleys. Using a finite difference model combining the effects of tectonics, erosion, and long-term bedrock strength, we assess the development of near-surface in situ stresses and predict bedrock behavior in response to glacial erosion in an Alpine Valley (the Matter Valley, southern Switzerland). Initial stresses are derived from the regional tectonic history, which is characterized by ongoing transtensional or extensional strain throughout exhumation of the brittle crust. We find that bedrock stresses beneath glacial ice in an initial V-shaped topography are sufficient to induce localized extensional fracturing in a zone extending laterally 600 m from the valley axis. The limit of this zone is reflected in the landscape today by a valley "shoulder," separating linear upper mountain slopes from the deep U-shaped inner valley. We propose that this extensional fracture development enhanced glacial quarrying between the valley shoulder and axis and identify a positive feedback where enhanced quarrying promoted valley incision, which in turn increased in situ stress concentrations near the valley floor, assisting erosion and further driving rapid U-shaped valley development. During interglacial periods, these stresses were relieved through brittle strain or topographic modification, and without significant erosion to reach more highly stressed bedrock, subsequent glaciation caused a reduction in differential stress and suppressed extensional fracturing. A combination of stress relief during interglacial periods, and increased ice accumulation rates in highly incised valleys, will reduce the likelihood of repeat enhanced erosion events.

  19. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION OF PNEUMATIC FRACTURING EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in cooperation with Accutech Remedial Systems (ARS) and the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) performed a field demonstration of Pneumatic Fracturing Extraction (PFE) for the removal of chlorinated volatile organics (VOCS) f...

  20. GSFC Technology Development Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himwich, Ed; Gipson, John; Gonzalez, Raymond; Vandenberg, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the GSFC Technology Development Center for 2003. The report forecasts activities planned for the year 2004. The GSFC Technology Development Center (TDC) develops station software including the Field System (FS), scheduling software (SKED), hardware including tools for station timing and meteorology, scheduling algorithms, operational procedures, and provides a pool of individuals to assist with station implementation, check-out, upgrades, and training.

  1. Composite Tank Technologies Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2005-01-01

    The need for cryogenic fuel tanks continues to expand, and research at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is addressing these needs. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of composite tank development, including tank testing, cryogenic materials research, tank liners, and dual-walled tanks, at MSFC.

  2. Insensitive control technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, C. A.; Pope, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    THe investigation of two insensitive controller synthesis techniques was reported. The finite dimensional inverse approach produces a time varying insensitive controller and/or parameter identifier by constructing inverse functions derived from a finite number of input output pair relationships. The MD/IM concept relies on the information matrix theory that was developed in the estimation and identification field. The MD/IM synthesis technique is based on the hypothesis that minimizing the information matrix will reduce system identifiability and consequently system sensitivity to uncertain parameters. The controllers designed with both techniques were evaluated on a realistic C-5A aircraft flight control problem. Results indicate that the FDI controller is more suited to trajectory type problems because of its time varying nature. The MD/IM controller performed as well as the top-rated controllers of the initial effort and has direct application to aircraft flight control problems.

  3. Magnetic Suspension Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin

    1998-01-01

    This Cooperative Agreement, intended to support focused research efforts in the area of magnetic suspension systems, was initiated between NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Old Dominion University (ODU) starting January 1, 1997. The original proposal called for a three-year effort, but funding for the second year proved to be unavailable, leading to termination of the agreement following a 5-month no-cost extension. This report covers work completed during the entire 17-month period of the award. This research built on work that had taken place over recent years involving both NASA LARC and the Principal Investigator (PI). The research was of a rather fundamental nature, although specific applications were kept in mind at all times, such as wind tunnel Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS), space payload pointing and vibration isolation systems, magnetic bearings for unconventional applications, magnetically levitated ground transportation and electromagnetic launch systems. Fundamental work was undertaken in areas such as the development of optimized magnetic configurations, analysis and modelling of eddy current effects, control strategies for magnetically levitated wind tunnel models and system calibration procedures. Despite the termination of this Cooperative Agreement, several aspects of the research work are currently continuing with alternative forms of support.

  4. Thermal mechanical modeling of cooling history and fracture development in inflationary basalt lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon A.; Schaefer, Conrad J.

    2008-03-01

    Thermal-mechanical analyses of isotherms in low-volume basalt flows having a range of aspect ratios agree with inferred isotherm patterns deduced from cooling fracture patterns in field examples on the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho, and highlight the caveats of analytical models of sheet flow cooling when considering low-volume flows. Our field observations show that low-volume lava flows have low aspect ratios (width divided by thickness), typically < 5. Four fracture types typically develop: column-bounding, column-normal, entablature (all of which are cooling fractures), and inflation fractures. Cooling fractures provide a proxy for isotherms during cooling and produce patterns that are strongly influenced by flow aspect ratio. Inflation fractures are induced by lava pressure-driven inflationary events and introduce a thermal perturbation to the flow interior that is clearly evidenced by fracture patterns around them. Inflation fracture growth occurs incrementally due to blunting of the lower tip within viscoelastic basalt, allowing the inflation fracture to pivot open. The final stage of growth involves propagation beyond the blunted tip towards the stress concentration at the tapered tip of a lava core, resulting in penetration of the core that causes quenching of the lava and the formation of a densely fractured entablature. We present numerical models that include the effects of inflation fractures on lava cooling and which support field-based inferences that inflation fractures depress the isotherms in the vicinity of the fracture, cause a subdivision of the lava core, control the location of the final portion of the lava flow to solidify, and cause significant changes in the local cooling fracture orientations. In addition to perturbing isotherms, inflation fractures cause a lava flow to completely solidify in a shorter amount of time than an identically shaped flow that does not contain an inflation fracture.

  5. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions and Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport: Development of efficient particle-tracking methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rajaram, Harihar; Brutz, Michael; Klein, Dylan R; Mallikamas, Wasin

    2014-09-18

    Matrix Diffusion and Adsorption within a rock matrix are important mechanisms for retarding transport of radionuclides in fractured rock. Due to computational limitations and difficulties in characterizing complex subsurface systems, diffusive exchange between a fracture network and surrounding rock matrix is often modeled using simplified conceptual representations. There is significant uncertainty in “effective” parameters used in these models, such as the “effective matrix diffusivity”. Often, these parameters are estimated by fitting sparse breakthrough data, and estimated values fall outside meaningful ranges, because simplified interpretive models do not consider complex three-dimensional flow. There is limited understanding of the relationship between the effective parameters and rock mass characteristics including network structure and matrix properties. There is also evidence for an apparent scale-dependence in “effective matrix diffusion” coefficients. These observations raise questions on whether fracture-matrix interaction parameters estimated from small-scale tracer tests can be used for predicting radionuclide fate and transport at the scale of DOE field sites. High-resolution three-dimensional Discrete-Fracture-Network-Matrix (DFNM) models based on well-defined local scale transport equations can help to address some of these questions. Due to tremendous advances in computational technology over the last 10 years, DFNM modeling in relatively large domains is now feasible. The overarching objective of our research is to use DFNM modeling to improve fundamental understanding of how effective parameters in conceptual models are related to fracture network structure and matrix properties. An advanced three-dimensional DFNM model is being developed, which combines upscaled particle-tracking algorithms for fracture-matrix interaction and a parallel fracture-network flow simulator. The particle-tracking algorithms allow complexity in flow fields

  6. Development and validation of a predictive bone fracture risk model for astronauts.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Emily S; Lewandowski, Beth; Licata, Angelo; Myers, Jerry G

    2009-11-01

    There are still many unknowns in the physiological response of human beings to space, but compelling evidence indicates that accelerated bone loss will be a consequence of long-duration spaceflight. Lacking phenomenological data on fracture risk in space, we have developed a predictive tool based on biomechanical and bone loading models at any gravitational level of interest. The tool is a statistical model that forecasts fracture risk, bounds the associated uncertainties, and performs sensitivity analysis. In this paper, we focused on events that represent severe consequences for an exploration mission, specifically that of spinal fracture resulting from a routine task (lifting a heavy object up to 60 kg), or a spinal, femoral or wrist fracture due to an accidental fall or an intentional jump from 1 to 2 m. We validated the biomechanical and bone fracture models against terrestrial studies of ground reaction forces, skeletal loading, fracture risk, and fracture incidence. Finally, we predicted fracture risk associated with reference missions to the moon and Mars that represented crew activities on the surface. Fracture was much more likely on Mars due to compromised bone integrity. No statistically significant gender-dependent differences emerged. Wrist fracture was the most likely type of fracture, followed by spinal and hip fracture. PMID:19707874

  7. Evaluation of Clinical Use of Indigenously Developed Delta Plate in Management of Subcondylar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Anirudhan, Anroop; Khalam, Sherin A.; Zachariah, Rakesh Koshy

    2013-01-01

    Condylar fractures account for 25-35% of mandibular fractures and deserve a special consideration apart from rest of the mandible due to their anatomical differences and healing potential. Previous clinical and biomechanical studies have recommended using two miniplates for fixation of condyle fractures. Two miniplates require a certain size of the proximal condyle fragment and thus are applicable mainly in cases involving low fractures. The present study evaluates the clinical use of indigenously developed titanium delta-shaped miniplate in open reduction and internal fixation of subcondylar fracture. PMID:24765516

  8. Evaluation of clinical use of indigenously developed delta plate in management of subcondylar fracture.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, Anroop; Khalam, Sherin A; Zachariah, Rakesh Koshy

    2013-08-01

    Condylar fractures account for 25-35% of mandibular fractures and deserve a special consideration apart from rest of the mandible due to their anatomical differences and healing potential. Previous clinical and biomechanical studies have recommended using two miniplates for fixation of condyle fractures. Two miniplates require a certain size of the proximal condyle fragment and thus are applicable mainly in cases involving low fractures. The present study evaluates the clinical use of indigenously developed titanium delta-shaped miniplate in open reduction and internal fixation of subcondylar fracture. PMID:24765516

  9. Assessment of outcome after hip fracture: development of a universal assessment system for hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Thomas M.; Parker, Martyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to refine current evaluation systems used to assess outcome after a hip fracture and to devise a simple and practical system to assess all hip fracture patients. Methods: Three continuous scales were defined for pain, mobility and functional independence. These were all found to have an acceptable degree of inter-observer agreement. The pre-fracture mobility and independence scores were related to the one-year mortality for a consecutive series of 381 patients. Results: Scores for mobility and functional independence were highly predictive of mortality (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: It is recommended that the outcome after hip fracture should be standardised to these principle outcomes of pain, regain of mobility and independence and mortality. These scores can be use to assess progress and identify those who may require additional assessment or intervention. PMID:27259572

  10. Development of stimulation diagnostic technology. Annual report, January 1991--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Lorenz, J.C.; Sleefe, G.E.; Engler, B.P.

    1993-02-01

    To apply Sandia`s expertise and technology towards the development of stimulation diagnostic technology in the areas of in situ stress, natural fracturing, stimulation processes and instrumentation systems. The approach to stimulation diagnostics is to integrate in situ stress measurements (including microfracs, anelastic strain recovery, circumferential velocity analysis, and coring-induced fractures) with natural fracture characterization, stimulation analyses (including Fracpro, other models, finite-element analyses, and various pressure analyses), and fracture diagnostics in order to validate hydraulic fracture concepts, models and diagnostic capabilities. The focus of this year`s efforts has been on the planning and development of the M-Site experiment facility for hydraulic fracture diagnostic development. A microseismic suitability test was conducted at the site with very positive results. In four small fracture treatments, over 1,000 microseismic were recorded, with most of these events having analyzable polarization and p- and s-wave arrivals. In the area of in situ stress, comparative studies are being made to evaluate stress measurement techniques, and an in situ stress topical report is being prepared. Natural fracture studies of the Frontier formation are progressing; the genesis and stratigraphic controls on two fracture sets have been hypothesized.

  11. Hydraulic fracturing-1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers on hydraulic fracturing. Topics covered include: An overview of recent advances in hydraulic fracturing technology; Containment of massive hydraulic fracture; and Fracturing with a high-strength proppant.

  12. Recent developments in analysis of crack propagation and fracture of practical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Elber, W.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Present U.S. Air Force and proposed U.S. civil airworthiness regulations are based on considerations of 'damage tolerance' in aircraft structures. Airworthiness is assured by demonstrating that damage that escapes one in a sequence of periodic inspections will not grow to critical size before the next inspection. The evaluations conducted employ fracture mechanics analyses. Problems arise because the features of fracture mechanics applications related to aircraft structures are more complex than the cases of fracture mechanics which have been mainly investigated. NASA has, therefore, conducted a variety of research tasks to extend the capabilities of fracture mechanics to deal with some of these complexities. The current stage of development of these capabilities is described. Attention is given to the limitations of linear elastic fracture mechanics, a two-parameter fracture criterion, aspects of fatigue crack propagation, and crack propagation and fracture in built-up structures.

  13. VLBI Technology Development at SHAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiuzhong; Shu, Fengchun; Xiang, Ying; Zhu, Renjie; Xu, Zhijun; Chen, Zhong; Zheng, Weimin; Luo, Jintao; Wu, Yajun

    2010-01-01

    VLBI technology development made significant progress at SHAO in the last few years. The development status of the Chinese DBBC, the software and FPGA-based correlators, and the new VLBI antenna, as well as VLBI applications are summarized in this paper.

  14. GSFC Technology Development Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himwich, Ed; Gipson, John

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the GSFC Technology Development Center (TDC) for 2012 and forecasts planned activities for 2013. The GSFC TDC develops station software including the Field System (FS), scheduling software (SKED), hardware including tools for station timing and meteorology, scheduling algorithms, and operational procedures. It provides a pool of individuals to assist with station implementation, check-out, upgrades, and training.

  15. JWST Mirror Technology Development Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2007-01-01

    Mirror technology is a critical enabling capability for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). JWST requires a Primary Mirror Segment Assembly (PMSA) that can survive launch, deploy and align itself to form a 25 square meter collecting area 6.5 meter diameter primary mirror with a 131 nm rms wavefront error at temperatures less than 50K and provide stable optical performance. At the inception of JWST in 1996, such a capability did not exist. A highly successful technology development program was initiated including the Sub-scale Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (SBMD) and Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) projects. These projects along with flight program activities have matured and demonstrated mirror technology for JWST. Directly traceable prototypes or flight hardware has been built, tested and operated in a relevant environment. This paper summarizes that technology development effort.

  16. Fracture-mode map of brittle coatings: Theoretical development and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chong; Xie, Zhaoqian; Guo, Zhenbin; Yao, Haimin

    2015-10-01

    Brittle coatings, upon sufficiently high indentation load, tend to fracture through either ring cracking or radial cracking. In this paper, we systematically study the factors determining the fracture modes of bilayer material under indentation. By analyzing the stress field developed in a coating/substrate bilayer under indentation in combination with the application of the maximum-tensile-stress fracture criterion, we show that the fracture mode of brittle coatings due to indentation is determined synergistically by two dimensionless parameters being functions of the mechanical properties of coating and substrate, coating thickness and indenter tip radius. Such dependence can be graphically depicted by a diagram called 'fracture-mode map', whereby the fracture modes can be directly predicated based on these two dimensionless parameters. Experimental verification of the fracture-mode map is carried out by examining the fracture modes of fused quartz/cement bilayer materials under indentation. The experimental observation exhibits good agreement with the prediction by the fracture-mode map. Our finding in this paper may not only shed light on the mechanics accounting for the fracture modes of brittle coatings in bilayer structures but also pave a new avenue to combating catastrophic damage through fracture mode control.

  17. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume 1. Fracturing proppants and their properties

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    A review of previously published literature on proppant permeability is presented. This data will be used in the subsequent phases of the geothermal stimulation project. Much information comes from the oil and gas industry which has tested various proppants during the past thirty years over a range of different closure stresses at the lower temperatures found in oil reservoirs. The historical development of proppants is summarized and reviewed and a variety of data on proppants found in today's literature is presented. Also included are several standard test procedures and equipment setups used in measuring proppant properties and in proppant testing.

  18. Advanced Mirror & Modelling Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Laura; Maffett, Steven; Egerman, Robert; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Mosier, Gary; Blaurock, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The 2020 Decadal technology survey is starting in 2018. Technology on the shelf at that time will help guide selection to future low risk and low cost missions. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) team has identified development priorities based on science goals and engineering requirements for Ultraviolet Optical near-Infrared (UVOIR) missions in order to contribute to the selection process. One key development identified was lightweight mirror fabrication and testing. A monolithic, stacked, deep core mirror was fused and replicated twice to achieve the desired radius of curvature. It was subsequently successfully polished and tested. A recently awarded second phase to the AMTD project will develop larger mirrors to demonstrate the lateral scaling of the deep core mirror technology. Another key development was rapid modeling for the mirror. One model focused on generating optical and structural model results in minutes instead of months. Many variables could be accounted for regarding the core, face plate and back structure details. A portion of a spacecraft model was also developed. The spacecraft model incorporated direct integration to transform optical path difference to Point Spread Function (PSF) and between PSF to modulation transfer function. The second phase to the project will take the results of the rapid mirror modeler and integrate them into the rapid spacecraft modeler.

  19. Space technology developments in Malaysia:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabirin, A.

    The venture of space is, by nature, a costly one. However, exploring space is not just an activity reserved for international superpowers. Smaller and emerging space nations, some with burgeoning space programs of their own, can play a role in space technology development and interplanetary exploration, sometimes simply by just being there. Over the past four decades, the range of services delivered by space technologies in Malaysia has grown enormously. For many business and public services, space based technologies have become the primary means of delivery of such services. Space technology development in Malaysia started with Malaysia's first microsatellite, TiungSAT-1. TiungSAT-1 has been successfully launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on the 26th of September 2000 on a Russian-Ukrainian Dnepr rocket. There have been wide imaging applications and information extraction using data from TiungSAT-1. Various techniques have been applied to the data for different applications in environmental assessment and monitoring as well as resource management. As a step forward, Malaysia has also initiated another space technology programme, RAZAKSAT. RAZAKSAT is a 180kg class satellite designed to provide 2.5meter ground sampling distance resolution imagery on a near equatorial orbit. Its mission objective is to demonstrate the capability of a medium high resolution remote sensing camera using a cost effective small satellite platform and a multi-channel linear push-broom electro-optical instrument. Realizing the immense benefits of space technology and its significant role in promoting sustainable development, Malaysia is committed to the continuous development and advancement of space technology within the scope of peaceful use of outer space and boosting its national economic growth through space related activities.

  20. Night vision device technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.; Nordholt, J.; Suszcynsky, D.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop microchannel plate (MCP) technologies for enhancement of night vision device (NVD) capabilities. First, segmented microchannel plates with independent gain control to minimize loss of low level light images in the presence of a bright light source (e.g., battlefield lasers, flares, and headlights) need to be developed. This enables, for example, enhanced vision capabilities during night operations in, for example, a city environment and continuous capability of aviators to see the horizon, nearground obstructions, and ground targets. Furthermore, curved microchannel plate technology to increase the field of view of NVDs while minimizing optical aberrations needs to be developed and applied. This development would significantly enhance peripheral vision capabilities of aviators and result in easier adaptation of the human eye to NVDs.

  1. Mechanical rock properties, fracture propagation and permeability development in deep geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonie Philipp, Sonja; Reyer, Dorothea

    2010-05-01

    layers. Thus, to minimise exploration risks and for effective stimulation, the geometry of the fracture system and the mechanical properties of the host rock must be known. Here we present first results of structural geological field studies of fracture systems in outcrop analogues studies of rocks that could be used to host man-made geothermal reservoirs in sedimentary rocks in the North German Basin. As examples, we show data from different lithologies, including Buntsandstein (Lower Triassic), a sandstone-shale succession and Muschelkalk (Middle Triassic), a limestone-marl succession. We analyse natural fracture systems and the effects of rock heterogeneities, particularly stiffness variations between layers (mechanical layering) on the propagation of natural fractures. Important fracture parameters include attitude, aperture and interconnectivity to fracture systems. The field studies are supplemented by laboratory measurements of the above mentioned rock mechanical properties. Our field studies indicate that many fractures become arrested at layer contacts, particularly at contacts between layers with contrasting mechanical properties. Measurements of thousands of fractures indicate that even very thin layers (mm to cm-scale thicknesses) of shale or marl may be responsible for the arrest of many fractures. Our results suggest that the propagation and aperture variation of fractures are important parameters in the permeability development of deep geothermal reservoirs. These studies provide a basis for models of fracture networks and fluid transport in future man-made reservoirs. We conclude that the likely permeability of a man-made geothermal reservoir can be inferred from field data from outcrop analogues, laboratory measurements, and numerical models.

  2. Progress in The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Wright, E.K.

    1991-01-01

    Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30--50{percent} through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April, 1990--March, 1991. 4 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2002-10-08

    During this reporting period, research was continued on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. This report proposed a model to relate the seismic response to production data to determine crack spacing and aperture, provided details of tests of proposed models to obtain fracture properties from conventional well logs with actual field data, and verification of the naturally fractured reservoir simulator developed in this project.

  4. Technology to Develop Algebraic Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polly, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Students' use of technology allows them to generate and manipulate multiple representations of a concept, compute numbers with relative ease, and focus more on mathematical concepts and higher-order thinking skills. In elementary school mathematics classrooms, students develop higher-order thinking skills by completing complex tasks that require…

  5. Technology and Motor Ability Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Lang, Yong; Luo, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    As a new member joining the technology family, active video games have been developed to promote physical exercise. This working-in-progress paper shares an ongoing project on examining the basic motor abilities that are enhanced through participating in commercially available active video games. [For the full proceedings see ED557181.

  6. Unshrouded Impeller Technology Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droege, Alan R.; Williams, Robert W.; Garcia, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    To increase payload and decrease the cost of future Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs), engineers at NASA/MSFC and Boeing, Rocketdyne are developing unshrouded impeller technology for application to rocket turbopumps. An unshrouded two-stage high-pressure fuel pump is being developed to meet the performance objectives of a three-stage shrouded pump. The new pump will have reduced manufacturing costs and pump weight. The lower pump weight will allow for increased payload.

  7. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: ACCUTECH PNEUMATIC FRACTURING EXTRACTION AND HOT GAS INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pneumatic Fracturing Extraction (PFE) process developed by Accutech Remedial Systems, Inc. makes it possible to use vapor extraction to remove volatile organics at increased rates from a broader range of vadose zones. he low permeability of sits, clays, shales, etc. would oth...

  8. Development of an Advanced Hydraulic Fracture Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Norm Warpinski; Steve Wolhart; Larry Griffin; Eric Davis

    2007-01-31

    The project to develop an advanced hydraulic fracture mapping system consisted of both hardware and analysis components in an effort to build, field, and analyze combined data from tiltmeter and microseismic arrays. The hardware sections of the project included: (1) the building of new tiltmeter housings with feedthroughs for use in conjunction with a microseismic array, (2) the development of a means to use separate telemetry systems for the tilt and microseismic arrays, and (3) the selection and fabrication of an accelerometer sensor system to improve signal-to-noise ratios. The analysis sections of the project included a joint inversion for analysis and interpretation of combined tiltmeter and microseismic data and improved methods for extracting slippage planes and other reservoir information from the microseisms. In addition, testing was performed at various steps in the process to assess the data quality and problems/issues that arose during various parts of the project. A prototype array was successfully tested and a full array is now being fabricated for industrial use.

  9. Technology development life cycle processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, David Franklin

    2013-05-01

    This report and set of appendices are a collection of memoranda originally drafted in 2009 for the purpose of providing motivation and the necessary background material to support the definition and integration of engineering and management processes related to technology development. At the time there was interest and support to move from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Level One (ad hoc processes) to Level Three. As presented herein, the material begins with a survey of open literature perspectives on technology development life cycles, including published data on %E2%80%9Cwhat went wrong.%E2%80%9D The main thrust of the material presents a rational expose%CC%81 of a structured technology development life cycle that uses the scientific method as a framework, with further rigor added from adapting relevant portions of the systems engineering process. The material concludes with a discussion on the use of multiple measures to assess technology maturity, including consideration of the viewpoint of potential users.

  10. Night vision device technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.; Nordholt, J.; Suszcynsky, D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop microchannel plate (MCP) technologies for enhancement of night vision device (NVD) capabilities. First, the authors addressed the need for segmented microchannel plates with independent gain control to minimize loss of low level light images in the presence of a bright light source (e.g., battlefield lasers, flares, and headlights). This would enable, for example, enhanced vision capabilities during night operations in a city environment and continuous capability of aviators to see the horizon, near-ground obstructions, and ground targets. Second, the authors addressed the need for curved microchannel plate technology to increase the field of view of NVDs while minimizing optical aberrations. This development would significantly enhance peripheral vision capabilities of aviators and result in easier adaptation of the human eye to NVDs. The authors have developed two technologies to overcome these problems, and they have initiated a collaborative effort with an industrial partner to develop a proof-of-principle prototype.

  11. Fracture control methods for space vehicles. Volume 2: Assessment of fracture mechanics technology for space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehret, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The concepts explored in a state of the art review of those engineering fracture mechanics considered most applicable to the space shuttle vehicle include fracture toughness, precritical flaw growth, failure mechanisms, inspection methods (including proof test logic), and crack growth predictive analysis techniques.

  12. Enhancing Fracture and Wear Resistance of Dentures/Overdentures Utilizing Digital Technology: A Case Series Report.

    PubMed

    Afify, Ahmed; Haney, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Since it was first introduced into the dental world, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has improved dramatically in regards to both data acquisition and fabrication abilities. CAD/CAM is capable of providing well-fitting intra- and extraoral prostheses when sound guidelines are followed. As CAD/CAM technology encompasses both surgical and prosthetic dental applications as well as fixed and removable aspects, it could improve the average quality of dental prostheses compared with the results obtained by conventional manufacturing methods. The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction into the methods in which this technology may be used to enhance the wear and fracture resistance of dentures and overdentures. This article will also showcase two clinical reports in which CAD/CAM technology has been implemented. PMID:26916680

  13. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, John Jy-An; Ren, Fei; Tan, Tin; Liu, Ken

    2014-12-19

    Reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks is significantly influenced by the mechanical performance of the structural materials exposed in the hydrogen environment. Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of specific interest since they are relevant to many catastrophic failures. However, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, special testing apparatus were designed to facilitate in situ fracture testing in H2. A torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The design concepts will be discussed. Preliminary in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  14. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, John Jy-An; Ren, Fei; Tan, Tin; Liu, Ken

    2014-12-19

    Reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks is significantly influenced by the mechanical performance of the structural materials exposed in the hydrogen environment. Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of specific interest since they are relevant to many catastrophic failures. However, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, special testing apparatus were designed to facilitate in situ fracture testing in H2. A torsional fixture was developed to utilizemore » an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The design concepts will be discussed. Preliminary in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.« less

  15. Advanced Modular Inverter Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Szczepanek

    2006-02-04

    Electric and hybrid-electric vehicle systems require an inverter to convert the direct current (DC) output of the energy generation/storage system (engine, fuel cells, or batteries) to the alternating current (AC) that vehicle propulsion motors use. Vehicle support systems, such as lights and air conditioning, also use the inverter AC output. Distributed energy systems require an inverter to provide the high quality AC output that energy system customers demand. Today's inverters are expensive due to the cost of the power electronics components, and system designers must also tailor the inverter for individual applications. Thus, the benefits of mass production are not available, resulting in high initial procurement costs as well as high inverter maintenance and repair costs. Electricore, Inc. (www.electricore.org) a public good 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit advanced technology development consortium assembled a highly qualified team consisting of AeroVironment Inc. (www.aerovironment.com) and Delphi Automotive Systems LLC (Delphi), (www.delphi.com), as equal tiered technical leads, to develop an advanced, modular construction, inverter packaging technology that will offer a 30% cost reduction over conventional designs adding to the development of energy conversion technologies for crosscutting applications in the building, industry, transportation, and utility sectors. The proposed inverter allows for a reduction of weight and size of power electronics in the above-mentioned sectors and is scalable over the range of 15 to 500kW. The main objective of this program was to optimize existing AeroVironment inverter technology to improve power density, reliability and producibility as well as develop new topology to reduce line filter size. The newly developed inverter design will be used in automotive and distribution generation applications. In the first part of this program the high-density power stages were redesigned, optimized and fabricated. One of the main tasks

  16. Fracture-permeability development in organically-rich sediments through methane generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, John Napier, Jr.

    The result of methane generation in low-permeability rock matrices is fracture-permeability development. Such expansion is the result of methane generation which, in turn, is the result of burial of organic matter under euxinic conditions. The fracture-permeability-development process has been demonstrated in the laboratory using a microwave oven to generate gas (water vapor) in well-indurated, low-permeability sedimentary rocks. The process has been quantified through modeling constrained by principles of chemistry and physics. The modeling process is applied to both shales and limestones and relates sediment expansion to sediment organic carbon content converted to methane. The model shows that the quantity of organic carbon required to be converted into methane for microfracture development is small compared to the amount commonly contained in hydrocarbon source rocks. A wide variety of fracture-producing mechanisms proposed to explain natural fracture development in hydrocarbon reservoirs is acknowledged. However, fracture permeability-development that appears to occur selectively in low-permeability, organically-rich sequences has received much less attention. Additionally, unabsolved anomalies that persist when current explanations are applied call attention to the need for alternative explanations. The fracture permeability, including the distribution and orientation of those fractures, which some reservoirs exhibit seem to defy explanation until now. A better understanding of fracture-permeability development and related aspects of petroleum maturation will remain illusive until the methane-generation fracture-permeability process, which until now has not been adequately quantified, is fully appreciated. Sediment expansion through methane generation in low-permeability rock matrices explains fracture-permeability development in many naturally-fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs including cleat permeability in coalbed methane reservoirs. Evidence is presented

  17. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be

  18. Interleaved arrays antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Phase one and two of a program to further develop and investigate advanced graphite epoxy waveguides, radiators, and components with application to space antennas are discussed. The objective of the two phases were to demonstrate mechanical integrity of a small panel of radiators and parts procured under a previous contract and to develop alternate designs and applications of the technology. Most of the emphasis was on the assembly and test of a 5 x 5 element module. This effort was supported by evaluation of adhesives and waveguide joint configurations. The evaluation and final assembly considered not only mechanical performance but also producibility in large scale.

  19. Magnesium Research and Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Joost, William; Smith, Mark T.

    2009-12-30

    The Magnesium Research and Technical Development (MR&TD) project supports efforts to increase using magnesium in automotive applications, including improving technology, lowering costs and increasing the knowledge needed to enable alloy and manufacturing process optimization. MR&TD supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project in collaboration with China and Canada. The MR&TD projects also maintains the magnesium bibliographic database at magnesium.pnl.gov.

  20. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic fracturing is a physical process that creates fractures in silty clay soil to enhance its permeability. The technology, developed by the Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) and the University of Cincinnati, creates sand-filled horizontal fractures up to 1 in. i...

  1. Experimental study of step-displacement hydraulic fracturing on naturally fractured shale outcrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wan; Jin, Yan; Chen, Mian

    2015-08-01

    Low porosity and permeability make it extremely difficult to develop shale oil and gas reservoirs. The stimulated reservoir volume is believed to have potential to obtain industry production by multi-stage or simultaneous fracturing in horizontal wells. The formation mechanism of network hydraulic fractures in fractured shale reservoirs remains poorly understood. In this article, a true tri-axial hydraulic fracturing system associated acoustic emission monitor was deployed to simulate hydraulic fracturing on shale outcrops. Results showed that the properties of natural fractures (such as aperture, orientation), compared to the viscosity and displacement of the fracturing fluid, affect the propagation direction of hydraulic fractures more predominantly. Each natural fracture in a natural fracture network can independently affect the hydraulic fracture. Low displacement (below the diffusion ability of a reservoir) fracturing tends to connect pre-existing fractures, while high displacement (surpass the diffusion ability of a reservoir) tends to create new fractures. After the breakdown pressure, an increase in injection rate results in more acoustic emission energy and induces new fractures. These results suggest that step-displacement fracturing technology is a possible mechanism to obtain effective fracture networks. Such an understanding would help to avoid unproductive, or sometimes destructive, costly segments of the hydraulic fracturing treatment design.

  2. EAGLE: relay mirror technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Mary; Restaino, Sergio R.; Baker, Jeffrey T.; Payne, Don M.; Bukley, Jerry W.

    2002-06-01

    EAGLE (Evolutionary Air & Space Global Laser Engagement) is the proposed high power weapon system with a high power laser source, a relay mirror constellation, and the necessary ground and communications links. The relay mirror itself will be a satellite composed of two optically-coupled telescopes/mirrors used to redirect laser energy from ground, air, or space based laser sources to distant points on the earth or space. The receiver telescope captures the incoming energy, relays it through an optical system that cleans up the beam, then a separate transmitter telescope/mirror redirects the laser energy at the desired target. Not only is it a key component in extending the range of DoD's current laser weapon systems, it also enables ancillary missions. Furthermore, if the vacuum of space is utilized, then the atmospheric effects on the laser beam propagation will be greatly attenuated. Finally, several critical technologies are being developed to make the EAGLE/Relay Mirror concept a reality, and the Relay Mirror Technology Development Program was set up to address them. This paper will discuss each critical technology, the current state of the work, and the future implications of this program.

  3. Cyberfeminism, technology, and international "development".

    PubMed

    Gajjala, R; Mamidipudi, A

    1999-07-01

    This article reports on the implications and benefits of Internet technology among women from developing countries. Cyberfeminism is the practice of feminism in cyberspace. Feminists believe that women should take control and augment Internet technologies to empower themselves. Learning to use the computers, getting "connected," and surfing the Internet are encouraged among all women with the aim of advancing feminist causes and empowering women. The Internet has been observed to cause radical changes in the way business and social activities are conducted. A description of how two women have engaged in cyberfeminism and worked in development and technology programs is included. One contributor, Annapurna Mamipudi, is involved in a non-governmental organization working with traditional handloom weavers in India Another contributor is Radhika Gajjala, who works in academia and creates on-line "discussion lists" and Web sites from her North American geographical location. Her job is to create spaces that provide opportunities for dialogue and collaboration among women with Internet access all over the world. PMID:12349221

  4. Developing optic technologies in Belarus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubanov, Alexander S.; Shkadarevich, Alexei P.

    2001-03-01

    In this work we give a retrospective analysis of the development of optical technologies in Belarus. In the post-war period a great scientific and technological potential has been built up in this sphere, highly skilled specialist have been trained and prestigious scientific and technical schools have appeared. Belarusian multiprofile optical industry is noticed to be capable of producing not only the materials and equipment for optical production but also optical goods of the highest level of complication. The characteristics of cosmic photoequipment, photogrammetric and cinetheodolite techniques, a variety of laser devices and optical goods for civic purposes are given as an example. The instances demonstrating the realization of unique optical projects are considered as well. High quality of Belarusian optical production makes it be much in demand in Russia, Japan, USA, Germany, France, China, Korea, Sweden, Spain, England, United Arab Emirates and other countries.

  5. Development of a completion design to control screenouts caused by multiple near-wellbore fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Stadulis, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses possible explanations, based upon previous studies, for the hypothesis that multiple fractures at the borehole wall may be a common feature of the hydraulic fracturing process. It then uses field examples to show how the authors concluded that a type of low-concentration screenout common to three fields in Texas and Oklahoma was caused by multiple fractures. Next, it shows how they developed a completion that controls loss of the pad and slurry to multiple fractures. Finally, it discusses some of the implications of their experience for completion design in general. Since the symptoms of the low-concentration screenout have been documented in the literature by other authors and appear to be quite common, their design techniques should be effective in other areas as well. The completion design combines unoriented, zero-degree-phased, big-hole perforations shot at low density; and small, high-concentration proppant slugs with clean spacer stages pumped very early in the treatment. These strategies were chosen (1) to limit the number of separate fractures that initiate from individual perforations, and (2) to screen out narrow fractures early in the treatment so that more width is developed in the remaining fracture(s). They have used these techniques to increase overall sand/fluid ratios (including the pad) from about 2.3 ppg (lbm added per gal fluid) to over 8 ppg, on modestly-sized treatments up to 200,000 lbm.

  6. Children's Developing Understanding of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawson, Brent

    2010-01-01

    The issue of children's conceptions of technology and technology education is seen as important by technology educators. While there is a solid body of literature that documents groups of children's understandings of technology and technology education, this is primarily focused on snapshot studies of children aged 11 and above. There is little…

  7. Lunar Dust Mitigation Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Deluane, Paul B.

    2008-01-01

    NASA s plans for implementing the Vision for Space Exploration include returning to the moon as a stepping stone for further exploration of Mars, and beyond. Dust on the lunar surface has a ubiquitous presence which must be explicitly addressed during upcoming human lunar exploration missions. While the operational challenges attributable to dust during the Apollo missions did not prove critical, the comparatively long duration of impending missions presents a different challenge. Near term plans to revisit the moon places a primary emphasis on characterization and mitigation of lunar dust. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems. This paper presents the current perspective and implementation of dust knowledge management and integration, and mitigation technology development activities within NASA s Exploration Technology Development Program. This work is presented within the context of the Constellation Program s Integrated Lunar Dust Management Strategy. The Lunar Dust Mitigation Technology Development project has been implemented within the ETDP. Project scope and plans will be presented, along with a a perspective on lessons learned from Apollo and forensics engineering studies of Apollo hardware. This paper further outlines the scientific basis for lunar dust behavior, it s characteristics and potential effects, and surveys several potential strategies for its control and mitigation both for lunar surface operations and within the working volumes of a lunar outpost.

  8. Recommendations for the shallow-crack fracture toughness testing task within the HSST (Heavy-Section Steel Technology) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Theiss, T.J. )

    1990-09-01

    Recommendations for Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program's investigation into the influence of crack depth on the fracture toughness of a steel prototypic of those in a reactor pressure vessel are included in this report. The motivation for this investigation lies in the fact that probabilistic fracture mechanics evaluations show that shallow flaws play a dominant role in the likelihood of vessel failure, and shallow-flaw specimens have exhibited an elevated toughness compared with conventional deep-notch fracture toughness specimens. Accordingly, the actual margin of safety of vessels may be greater than that predicted using existing deep-notch fracture-toughness results. The primary goal of the shallow-crack project is to investigate the influence of crack depth on fracture toughness under conditions prototypic of a reactor vessel. A limited data base of fracture toughness values will be assembled using a beam specimen of prototypic reactor vessel material and with a depth of 100 mm (4 in.). This will permit comparison of fracture-toughness data from deep-cracked and shallow-crack specimens, and this will be done for several test temperatures. Fracture-toughness data will be expressed in terms of the stress-intensity factor and crack-tip-opening displacement. Results of this investigation are expected to improve the understanding of shallow-flaw behavior in pressure vessels, thereby providing more realistic information for application to the pressurized-thermal shock issues. 33 refs., 17 figs.

  9. Computational methods for fracture analysis of heavy-section steel technology (HSST) pressure vessel experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Bryan, R.H.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the capabilities and applications of the general-purpose and special-purpose computer programs that have been developed for use in fracture mechanics analyses of HSST pressure vessel experiments. Emphasis is placed on the OCA/USA code, which is designed for analysis of pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) conditions, and on the ORMGEN/ADINA/ORVIRT system which is used for more general analysis. Fundamental features of these programs are discussed, along with applications to pressure vessel experiments.

  10. Development of computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Nie, Yongkang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Several clinical trials indicated clearly that pharmacologic therapy for osteoporosis is effective for persons with vertebral fractures for preventing subsequent fractures. It is, therefore, important to diagnose vertebral fractures early. Although most vertebral fractures are asymptomatic, they can often be detected on lateral chest radiographs which may be obtained for other purposes. However, investigators have reported that vertebral fractures which were visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or underreported. Therefore, our purpose in this study was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs and to assist radiologists' image interpretation. Our computerized scheme is based on the detection of upper and lower edges of vertebrae on lateral chest images. A curved rectangular area which included a number of visible vertebrae was identified. This area was then straightened such that the upper and lower edges of the vertebrae were oriented horizontally. For detection of vertebral edges, line components were enhanced, and a multiple thresholding technique followed by image feature analysis was applied to the line enhanced image. Finally, vertebral heights determined from the detected vertebral edges were used for characterizing the shape of the vertebrae and for distinguishing fractured from normal vertebrae. Our preliminary results indicated that all of the severely fractured vertebrae in a small database were detected correctly by our computerized method.

  11. Technology Development for NASA Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, Samad

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on technology development for NASA Mars Missions is shown. The topics include: 1) Mars mission roadmaps; 2) Focus and Base Technology programs; 3) Technology Infusion; and 4) Feed Forward to Future Missions.

  12. A tuber calcanei avulsion fracture developed on the basis of idiopathic osteoporosis in a young male: a case report.

    PubMed

    Terzi, R; Özer, T

    2015-09-01

    Calcaneus fractures constitute 1.2 % of all fractures. Tuber calcanei avulsion fractures constitute 1.3-2.7 % of calcaneus fractures. Osteoporosis, osteomalacia, and diabetes mellitus have been reported to increase the risk of development of these fractures. It has been reported that tuber calcanei avulsion fractures in elderly females might develop due to osteoporosis. As far as we know, no tuber calcanei avulsion fracture developing on the basis of osteoporosis without presence of a trauma has been reported in young males in the literature. In the current case report, a 41-year-old male patient who was admitted with complaints of pain in the left heel and diagnosed with calcaneal avulsion fracture that developed on the basis of idiopathic osteoporosis and who was treated with conservative methods was presented. PMID:25851698

  13. Development of a Korean Fracture Risk Score (KFRS) for Predicting Osteoporotic Fracture Risk: Analysis of Data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eun Jin; Park, ByeongJu; Kim, Tae-Young; Shin, Soon-Ae

    2016-01-01

    Background Asian-specific prediction models for estimating individual risk of osteoporotic fractures are rare. We developed a Korean fracture risk prediction model using clinical risk factors and assessed validity of the final model. Methods A total of 718,306 Korean men and women aged 50–90 years were followed for 7 years in a national system-based cohort study. In total, 50% of the subjects were assigned randomly to the development dataset and 50% were assigned to the validation dataset. Clinical risk factors for osteoporotic fracture were assessed at the biennial health check. Data on osteoporotic fractures during the follow-up period were identified by ICD-10 codes and the nationwide database of the National Health Insurance Service (NHIS). Results During the follow-up period, 19,840 osteoporotic fractures were reported (4,889 in men and 14,951 in women) in the development dataset. The assessment tool called the Korean Fracture Risk Score (KFRS) is comprised of a set of nine variables, including age, body mass index, recent fragility fracture, current smoking, high alcohol intake, lack of regular exercise, recent use of oral glucocorticoid, rheumatoid arthritis, and other causes of secondary osteoporosis. The KFRS predicted osteoporotic fractures over the 7 years. This score was validated using an independent dataset. A close relationship with overall fracture rate was observed when we compared the mean predicted scores after applying the KFRS with the observed risks after 7 years within each 10th of predicted risk. Conclusion We developed a Korean specific prediction model for osteoporotic fractures. The KFRS was able to predict risk of fracture in the primary population without bone mineral density testing and is therefore suitable for use in both clinical setting and self-assessment. The website is available at http://www.nhis.or.kr. PMID:27399597

  14. Fracture development within a stratovolcano: The Karaha-Telaga Bodas geothermal field, Java volcanic arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemcok, M.; Moore, J.N.; Allis, R.; McCulloch, J.

    2004-01-01

    Karaha-Telaga Bodas, a vapour-dominated geothermal system located in an active volcano in western Java, is penetrated by more than two dozen deep geothermal wells reaching depths of 3 km. Detailed paragenetic and fluid-inclusion studies from over 1000 natural fractures define the liquid-dominated, transitional and vapour-dominated stages in the evolution of this system. The liquid-dominated stage was initiated by ashallow magma intrusion into the base of the volcanic cone. Lava and pyroclastic flows capped a geothermal system. The uppermost andesite flows were only weakly fractured due to the insulating effect of the intervening altered pyroclastics, which absorbed the deformation. Shear and tensile fractures that developed were filled with carbonates at shallow depths, and by quartz, epidote and actinolite at depths and temperatures over 1 km and 300??C. The system underwent numerous cycles of overpressuring, documented by subhorizontal tensile fractures, anastomosing tensile fracture patterns and implosion breccias. The development of the liquidsystem was interrupted by a catastrophic drop in fluid pressures. As the fluids boiled in response to this pressure drop, chalcedony and quartz were selectively deposited in fractures that had the largest apertures and steep dips. The orientations of these fractures indicate that the escaping overpressured fluids used the shortest possible paths to the surface. Vapour-dominated conditions were initiated at this time within a vertical chimney overlying the still hot intrusion. As pressures declined, these conditions spread outward to form the marginal vapour-dominated region encountered in the drill holes. Downward migration of the chimney, accompanied by growth of the marginal vapour-dominated regime, occurred as the intrusion cooled and the brittle-ductile transition migrated to greater depths. As the liquids boiled off, condensate that formed at the top of the vapour-dominated zone percolated downward and low

  15. Information Communication Technology Planning in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malapile, Sandy; Keengwe, Jared

    2014-01-01

    This article explores major issues related to Information Communication Technology (ICT) in education and technology planning. Using the diffusion of innovation theory, the authors examine technology planning opportunities and challenges in Developing countries (DCs), technology planning trends in schools, and existing technology planning models…

  16. Development of a completion design to control screenouts caused by multiple near-wellborne fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Stadulis, J.M.

    1996-09-01

    This paper discusses possible explanations, based upon previous studies, for the hypothesis that multiple fractures at the borehole wall may be a common feature of the hydraulic fracturing process. It then uses field examples to show how we concluded that a type of low-concentration screenout common to three fields in Texas and Oklahoma was caused by multiple fractures. Next, it shows how we developed a completion that controls loss of the pad and slurry to multiple fractures. Finally, it discusses some of the implications of our experience for completion design in general. Since the symptoms of the low-concentration screenout have been documented in the literature by other authors and appear to be quite common, our design techniques should be effective in other areas as well. The completion design combines unoriented, zero-degree-phased, big-hole perforations shot at low density- and small, high-concentration proppant slugs with clean spacer stages pumped very early in the treatment. These strategies were chosen (1) to limit the number of separate fractures that initiate from individual perforations, and (2) to screen out narrow fractures early in the treatment (so that more width is developed in the remaining fractures). We have used these techniques to increase overall sand/fluid ratios (including the pad) from about 2.3 ppg (lbm added per gal fluid) to over 8 ppg, on modestly-sized treatments up to 200,000 lbm.

  17. Fracture development and mechanical stratigraphy of Austin Chalk, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, K.; Friedman, M.; Spang, J.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanical stratigraphy of the Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is established from study of fracture intensity along its outcrop trend from Dallas to San Antonio and westward to Langtry, Texas, and in the subsurface from study of cores and/or fracture identification logs from 30 wells. Three mechanical-stratigraphic units are recognized. Representative samples from the three mechanical-stratigraphic units were experimentally shortened, dry, at 10, 17, 34, and 70 MPa confining pressure, at 24/sup 0/C, and at a strain rate of 2.5 x 10/sup -4/ sec/sup -1/ to determine if the relative mechanical behavior observed at the surface could be extrapolated into the subsurface at different simulated burial depths. SEM photomicrographs of undeformed specimens show that smectite and other clays are distributed as large (30 ..mu..m), discrete, amorphous, concentrated masses throughout the chalk. They are comminuted along the induced fracture surfaces where their grain size is 0.5 ..mu..m or less. These observations suggest that smectite acts as a soft-inclusion, localizing shear failure and corresponding weakening the material. 9 figures, 5 tables.

  18. LISA Technology Development at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira; McWilliams, S.; Baker, J.

    2008-01-01

    The prime focus of LISA technology development efforts at NASA/GSFC has been in LISA interferometry, specifically in the area of laser frequency noise mitigation. Laser frequency noise is addressed through a combination of stabilization and common-mode rejection. Current plans call for two stages of stabilization, pre-stabilization to a local frequency reference and further stabilization using the constellation as a frequency reference. In order for these techniques to be used simultaneously, the pre-stabilization step must provide an adjustable frequency offset. Here, we report on a modification to the standard modulation/demodulation techniques used to stabilize to optical cavities that generates a frequency-tunable reference from a fixed-length cavity. This technique requires no modifications to the cavity itself and only minor modifications to the components. The measured noise performance and dynamic range of the laboratory prototype meets the LISA requirements.

  19. Technology in Sustainable Development Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kimio

    The economic and demographic growth in Asia has put increased importance to this part of the world whose contribution to the global community is vital in meeting global challenges. International cooperation in engineering education assumes a pivotal role in providing access to the frontiers of scientific and technological knowledge to the growing youths in the region. The thrust for advancement has been provided by the logic coming from the academic world itself, whereas expectations are high that the engineering education responds to challenges that are coming from outside the universities, such as environmental management, disaster management, and provision of common knowledge platform across disciplinary lines. Some cases are introduced in curriculum development that incorporates fieldwork and laboratory work intended to enhance the ability to cooperate. The new mode is discussed with focus on production, screening, storing/delivery, and leaning phases of knowledge. The strength of shared information will be enhanced through international cooperation.

  20. Developing technologies for synthetic fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprow, F. B.

    1981-05-01

    After consideration of a likely timetable for the development of a synthetic fuels industry and its necessary supporting technology, the large variety of such fuels and their potential roles is assessed along with their commercialization outlook. Among the fuel production methods considered are: (1) above-ground retorting of oil shale; (2) in-situ shale retorting; (3) open pit mining of tar sands; (4) in-situ steam stimulation of tar sands; (5) coal gasification; (6) methanol synthesis from carbon monoxide and hydrogen; and (7) direct coal liquefaction by the hydrogenation of coal. It is shown that while the U.S. has very limited resource bases for tar sands and heavy crudes, the abundance of shale in the western states and the abundance and greater geographical dispersion of coal will make these the two most important resources of a future synthetic fuels industry.

  1. Advanced Refrigerator/Freezer Technology Development. Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaseor, Thomas; Hunter, Rick; Hamill, Doris

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, through contract with Oceaneering Space Systems, is engaged in a project to develop advanced refrigerator/freezer (R/F) technologies for future Life and Biomedical Sciences space flight missions. The first phase of this project, a technology assessment, has been completed to identify the advanced R/F technologies needed and best suited to meet the requirements for the five R/F classifications specified by Life and Biomedical Science researchers. Additional objectives of the technology assessment were to rank those technologies based on benefit and risk, and to recommend technology development activities that can be accomplished within this project. This report presents the basis, the methodology, and results of the R/F technology assessment, along with technology development recommendations.

  2. Technology transfer and international development: Materials and manufacturing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Policy oriented studies on technological development in several relatively advanced developing countries were conducted. Priority sectors defined in terms of technological sophistication, capital intensity, value added, and export potential were studied in Brazil, Venezuela, Israel, and Korea. The development of technological policy alternatives for the sponsoring country is assessed. Much emphasis is placed on understanding the dynamics of the sectors through structured interviews with a large sample of firms in the leading manufacturing and materials processing sectors.

  3. Instructional Technology and Faculty Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Carole A.

    This paper explores the challenges instructional technology presents to faculty and administration. For example: students will not accept lectures that fail to draw upon Internet resources; integrating technology sparks the faculty debate that the use of technology will "dehumanize teaching and learning"; community college professors criticize…

  4. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

    2008-12-31

    The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

  5. Colorado Technology Transfer Plan for Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Advanced Tech. Inst., Denver.

    Recognizing the importance of technology transfer to economic growth, the U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) provided the Colorado Advanced Technology Institute (CATI) with a grant to coordinate the development of a plan for using technology transfer in Colorado's economic development. The plan, outlined in this report, describes the…

  6. Development of a new software for analyzing 3-D fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Jeong-Gi; Noh, Young-Hwan; Choi, Yosoon

    2014-05-01

    A new software is presented to analyze fracture network in 3-D. Recently, we completed the software package based on information given in EGU2013. The software consists of several modules that play roles in management of borehole data, stochastic modelling of fracture network, construction of analysis domain, visualization of fracture geometry in 3-D, calculation of equivalent pipes and production of cross-section diagrams. Intel Parallel Studio XE 2013, Visual Studio.NET 2010 and the open source VTK library were utilized as development tools to efficiently implement the modules and the graphical user interface of the software. A case study was performed to analyze 3-D fracture network system at the Upper Devonian Grosmont Formation in Alberta, Canada. The results have suggested that the developed software is effective in modelling and visualizing 3-D fracture network system, and can provide useful information to tackle the geomechanical problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviours of the fractured rock masses. This presentation describes the concept and details of the development and implementation of the software.

  7. Development of an Ex Vivo Protocol to Model Bone Fracture in Laying Hens Resulting from Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, Michael J.; Wilkins, Lindsay J.; Millburn, Georgina; Thorpe, Katherine; Tarlton, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Fractures of the keel bone, a bone extending ventrally from the sternum, are a serious health and welfare problem in free range laying hens. Recent findings suggest that a major cause of keel damage within extensive systems is collisions with internal housing structures, though investigative efforts have been hindered by difficulties in examining mechanisms and likely influencing factors at the moment of fracture. The objectives of this study were to develop an ex vivo impact protocol to model bone fracture in hens caused by collision, to assess impact and bird-related factors influencing fracture occurrence and severity, and to identify correlations of mechanical and structural properties between different skeletal sites. We induced keel bone fractures in euthanized hens using a drop-weight impact tester able to generate a range of impact energies, producing fractures that replicate those commonly found in commercial settings. The results demonstrated that impact energies of a similar order to those expected in normal housing were able to produce fractures, and that greater collision energies resulted in an increased likelihood of fractures and of greater severity. Relationships were also seen with keel’s lateral surface bone mineral density, and the peak reactive force (strength) at the base of the manubrial spine. Correlations were also identified between the keel and long bones with respect to both strength and bone mineral density. This is the first study able to relate impact and bone characteristics with keel bone fracture at the moment of collision. Greater understanding of these relationships will provide means to reduce levels of breakage and severity in commercial systems. PMID:23785487

  8. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe-9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (KJQ) at represented temperatures: 240-280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160-220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic-martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616.

  9. High-energy gas-fracturing development. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Cuderman, J.F.

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and optimize the High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF) technique to produce multiple fractures around a wellbore in order to stimulate natural-gas production in Devonian shale. The HEGF technique uses a wellbore charge of a propellant tailored to produce pressure loading in the borehole that avoids crushing yet produces multiple fractures radiating from the wellbore. The multiple-fracture regime has been characterized and releated to parameters such as borehole size, pressure risetime, and surface-wave velocity. Pressure risetimes and peak pressures, measured for different propellants in boreholes to specify a propellant for a desired peak pressure and pressure risetime. Semiempirical models, using results from previous experiments, successfully relate stress, acceleration, and fracture radii in surrounding rock to peak pressure and pressure risetime. A finite-element model also has been developed which predicts fracture type and direction of fractures as a function of pressure loading, in situ stress, and material properties. A full-scale HEGF system has been developed for application in gas-well-stimulation experiments in Devonian shale. During this quarter, a proof test of the full-scale HEGF was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The designed pressure pulse of 0.5 ms risetime was achieved, and the tamp remained in place during the test. The borehole was successfully cleared posttest. Multiple fracturing was verified with a downhole TV camera. The test of the full-scale hardware and its operational capability was successful. As a result, the HEGF system is ready for application in gas-well-stimulation experiments in Devonian shale. Tests were conducted to determine worst-case accident scenarios to establish sensitivity to shock and fire. There appears to be no risk of initiation resulting from shock or breakage of the propellant-canister segments.

  10. Lewis Structures Technology, 1988. Volume 3: Structural Integrity Fatigue and Fracture Wind Turbines HOST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The charter of the Structures Division is to perform and disseminate results of research conducted in support of aerospace engine structures. These results have a wide range of applicability to practioners of structural engineering mechanics beyond the aerospace arena. The specific purpose of the symposium was to familiarize the engineering structures community with the depth and range of research performed by the division and its academic and industrial partners. Sessions covered vibration control, fracture mechanics, ceramic component reliability, parallel computing, nondestructive evaluation, constitutive models and experimental capabilities, dynamic systems, fatigue and damage, wind turbines, hot section technology (HOST), aeroelasticity, structural mechanics codes, computational methods for dynamics, structural optimization, and applications of structural dynamics, and structural mechanics computer codes.

  11. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR DETERMINING THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.

    2013-09-30

    Plausible, but unvalidated, theoretical model constructs for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of fractured porous media are currently used in Performance Assessment (PA) modeling for cracked saltstone and concrete (Flach 2011). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has expressed concern about the lack of model support for these assumed Moisture Characteristic Curves (MCC) data, as noted in Requests for Additional Information (RAIs) PA-8 and SP-4 (Savannah River Remediation, LLC, 2011). The objective of this task was to advance PA model support by developing an experimental method for determining the hydraulic conductivity of fractured cementitious materials under unsaturated conditions, and to demonstrate the technique on fractured saltstone samples. The task was requested through Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-SSF-TTR-2012-0016 and conducted in accordance with Task Technical & Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-TR-2012-00090. Preliminary method development previously conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) identified transient outflow extraction as the most promising method for characterizing the unsaturated properties of fractured porous media. While the research conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) focused on fractured media analogs such as stacked glass slides, the current task focused directly on fractured saltstone. For this task, four sample types with differing fracture geometries were considered: 1) intact saltstone, 2) intact saltstone with a single saw cut, smooth surface fracture, 3) micro-fractured saltstone (induced by oven drying), and 4) micro-fractured saltstone with a single, fully-penetrating, rough-surface fracture. Each sample type was tested initially for saturated hydraulic conductivity following method ASTM D 5084 using a flexible wall permeameter. Samples were subsequently tested using the transient outflow extraction method to determine cumulative outflow as a function of time and applied pressure. Of the four sample types tested, two yielded

  12. Success factors in technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Universities in the U.S. have a significant impact on business through the transfer of technology. This paper describes goals and philosophy of the Technology Licensing Office at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This paper also relates the critical factors for susscessful technology transfer, particularly relating to new business formation. These critical factors include the quality of the technology, the quality of the management, the quality of the investor, the passion for success, and the image of the company. Descriptions of three different levels of investment are also given and the most successful level of investment for starting a new company is reviewed. Licensing to large companies is also briefly reviewed, as this type of licensing requires some different strategies than that of licensing to start-up companies. High quality critical factors and intelligent investment create rewards for the parties and successful ventures.

  13. Situating Technology Professional Development in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Ellen B.

    2005-01-01

    The Center for Technology and School Change (CTSC) is a research and development center specializing in professional development, evaluation and technology integration research. The goal of the qualitative research reported in this article was to identify factors that strengthen the integration of technology in classrooms in ways that are…

  14. Mobile Sensor Technologies Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Lawrence C.; Oberle, Lawrence G.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing small mobile platforms for sensor placement, as well as methods for communicating between roving platforms and a central command location. The first part of this project is to use commercially available equipment to miniaturize an existing sensor platform. We developed a five-circuit-board suite, with an average board size of 1.5 by 3 cm. Shown in the preceding photograph, this suite provides all motor control, direction finding, and communications capabilities for a 27- by 21- by 40-mm prototype mobile platform. The second part of the project is to provide communications between mobile platforms, and also between multiple platforms and a central command location. This is accomplished with a low-power network labeled "SPAN," Sensor Platform Area Network, a local area network made up of proximity elements. In practice, these proximity elements are composed of fixed- and mobile-sensor-laden science packages that communicate to each other via radiofrequency links. Data in the network will be shared by a central command location that will pass information into and out of the network through its access to a backbone element. The result will be a protocol portable to general purpose microcontrollers satisfying a host of sensor networking tasks. This network will enter the gap somewhere between television remotes and Bluetooth but, unlike 802.15.4, will not specify a physical layer, thus allowing for many data rates over optical, acoustical, radiofrequency, hardwire, or other media. Since the protocol will exist as portable C-code, developers may be able to embed it in a host of microcontrollers from commercial to space grade and, of course, to design it into ASICs. Unlike in 802.15.4, the nodes will relate to each other as peers. A demonstration of this protocol using the two test bed platforms was recently held. Two NASA modified, commercially available, mobile platforms communicated and shared data with each other and a

  15. Denosumab for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures in post-menopausal women: a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Scotland, Graham; Waugh, Norman; Royle, Pamela; McNamee, Paul; Henderson, Rob; Hollick, Rosemary

    2011-11-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of denosumab (Amgen Inc., UK) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of denosumab for the prevention of fragility fractures in post-menopausal women, as part of the Institute's single technology appraisal (STA) process. The University of Aberdeen Health Technology Assessment Group were commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG); the role of the ERG being to appraise the manufacturer's submission and to produce an independent report. This article provides a description of the company submission, the ERG review and NICE's subsequent decisions. The manufacturer considered that denosumab would be appropriate for patients unable to take, comply with or tolerate oral bisphosphonates. Comparator treatments selected for the submission were, therefore, 'no treatment', raloxifene, strontium ranelate, intravenous zoledronic acid, intravenous ibandronate and teriparatide. The main effectiveness evidence for denosumab was derived from a large randomized controlled trial comparing denosumab with placebo. Given by subcutaneous injection at 6-monthly intervals for 3 years, denosumab reduced the incidence of hip fracture by 40%, and reduced the incidence of clinical vertebral fracture by 69%. An indirect treatment comparison was used to derive adjusted relative risk (RR) estimates for different types of fracture for each comparator versus placebo. The RRs (95% CI) applied for denosumab were 0.316 (0.208, 0.478) for clinical vertebral fracture, 0.605 (0.373, 0.983) for hip fracture and 0.842 (0.638, 1.110) for wrist fracture. Despite a number of concerns surrounding the methodology of the indirect comparison, the ERG was satisfied with the robustness of the effect estimates. The RR estimates were applied in a good-quality Markov model that took account of drug costs, administration and monitoring costs, costs associated with fractures, and long-term nursing home

  16. Policy issues inherent in advanced technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, P.D.

    1994-12-31

    In the development of advanced technologies, there are several forces which are involved in the success of the development of those technologies. In the overall development of new technologies, a sufficient number of these forces must be present and working in order to have a successful opportunity at developing, introducing and integrating into the marketplace a new technology. This paper discusses some of these forces and how they enter into the equation for success in advanced technology research, development, demonstration, commercialization and deployment. This paper limits itself to programs which are generally governmental funded, which in essence represent most of the technology development efforts that provide defense, energy and environmental technological products. Along with the identification of these forces are some suggestions as to how changes may be brought about to better ensure success in a long term to attempt to minimize time and financial losses.

  17. Development of indirect ring tension test for fracture characterization of asphalt mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali Siavashani, Alireza

    Low temperature cracking is a major distress in asphalt pavements. Several test configurations have been introduced to characterize the fracture properties of hot mix (HMA); however, most are considered to be research tools due to the complexity of the test methods or equipment. This dissertation describes the development of the indirect ring tension (IRT) fracture test for HMA, which was designed to be an effective and user-friendly test that could be deployed at the Department of Transportation level. The primary advantages of this innovative and yet practical test include: relatively large fracture surface test zone, simplicity of the specimen geometry, widespread availability of the required test equipment, and ability to test laboratory compacted specimens as well as field cores. Numerical modeling was utilized to calibrate the stress intensity factor formula of the IRT fracture test for various specimen dimensions. The results of this extensive analysis were encapsulated in a single equation. To develop the test procedure, a laboratory study was conducted to determine the optimal test parameters for HMA material. An experimental plan was then developed to evaluate the capability of the test in capturing the variations in the mix properties, asphalt pavement density, asphalt material aging, and test temperature. Five plant-produced HMA mixtures were used in this extensive study, and the results revealed that the IRT fracture test is highly repeatable, and capable of capturing the variations in the fracture properties of HMA. Furthermore, an analytical model was developed based on the viscoelastic properties of HMA to estimate the maximum allowable crack size for the pavements in the experimental study. This analysis indicated that the low-temperature cracking potential of the asphalt mixtures is highly sensitive to the fracture toughness and brittleness of the HMA material. Additionally, the IRT fracture test data seemed to correlate well with the data from

  18. Energy Storage (II): Developing Advanced Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L

    1974-01-01

    Energy storage, considered by some scientists to be the best technological and economic advancement after advanced nuclear power, still rates only modest funding for research concerning the development of advanced technologies. (PEB)

  19. Information Technology Developments for Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensen, G. D.; Meertens, C. M.; Sheehan, A. F.

    2004-12-01

    Some recent research at UNAVCO and the University of Colorado has been focused on Rocky Mountain tectonics, and Information Technology (IT) in the areas of data visualization and distributed data serving. At UNAVCO, we are participating in the geodynamics work in the Rocky Mountain Testbed of the GEON NSF funded (IT) Research project (www.geongrid.org). As part of this work, a variety of seismic tomography models, GPS velocity vector data, strain rate models and other data have been recompiled into a standard format. These data and models are being incorporated into our OPeNDAP server and the Integrated Data Viewer (IDV). OPeNDAP servers are platform independent, self-describing distributed data servers allowing easy access to a wide audience. The IDV is a freely distributed visualization and analysis tool developed by UCAR that has several exciting capabilities such as online collaboration, and a variety of 1-d, 2-d and 3-d viewing options. Necessary solid earth viewing capabilities (earthquakes, focal mechanisms, faults, etc.) are currently being added to the IDV. Both our OPeNDAP server and visualization tool are being integrated into the GEON portal, a website for data searching, analysis, and visualization. Designing and implementing such systems now allows us to be more prepared for the volumes of data anticipated from various EarthScope projects. As part of the scientific research for GEON, we have also begun investigations of Colorado seismicity. The 1992 Rocky Mountain Front IRIS/PASSCAL seismic experiment recorded many local earthquakes. We have begun to locate these events and are working to create focal mechanisms and calculations of stress drop for this region. These will aid in improving seismic hazard and risk assessments for the rapidly growing Rocky Mountain population. New IT capabilities will help augment the quality of this work through sharing the data with a larger audience, providing a means to view and analyze integrated data, and quickly

  20. Development of Guidelines for Skeletal Survey in Young Children With Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Fakeye, Oludolapo; Feudtner, Chris; Mondestin, Valerie; Localio, Russell; Rubin, David M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop guidelines for performing initial skeletal survey (SS) in children <24 months old with fractures, based on available evidence and collective judgment of experts from diverse pediatric specialties. METHODS: Following the Rand/UCLA Method, a multispecialty panel of 13 experts applied evidence from a literature review combined with their own expertise in rating the appropriateness of performing an SS for 525 clinical scenarios involving fractures in children <24 months old. After discussion on the initial ratings, panelists rerated SS appropriateness for 240 revised scenarios and deemed that SSs were appropriate in 191 scenarios. The panelists then assessed in which of those 191 scenarios SSs were not only appropriate, but also necessary. RESULTS: Panelists agreed that SS is “appropriate” for 191 (80%) of 240 scenarios rated and “necessary” for 175 (92%) of the appropriate scenarios. Skeletal survey is necessary if a fracture is attributed to abuse, domestic violence, or being hit by a toy. With few exceptions, SS is necessary in children without a history of trauma. In children <12 months old, SS is necessary regardless of the fracture type or reported history, with rare exceptions. In children 12 to 23 months old, the necessity of obtaining SS is dependent on fracture type. CONCLUSIONS: A multispecialty panel reached agreement on multiple clinical scenarios for which initial SS is indicated in young children with fractures, allowing for synthesis of clinical guidelines with the potential to decrease disparities in care and increase detection of abuse. PMID:24935996

  1. FY-95 technology catalog. Technology development for buried waste remediation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program, which is now part of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area (LSFA), supports applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies dealing with underground radioactive and hazardous waste remediation. These innovative technologies are being developed as part of integrated comprehensive remediation systems for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste sites throughout the DOE complex. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) and Waste Management (EM-30) needs and objectives. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development (EM-50), BWID and LSFA work with universities and private industry to develop technologies that are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. This report contains the details of the purpose, logic, and methodology used to develop and demonstrate DOE buried waste remediation technologies. It also provides a catalog of technologies and capabilities with development status for potential users. Past FY-92 through FY-94 technology testing, field trials, and demonstrations are summarized. Continuing and new FY-95 technology demonstrations also are described.

  2. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of bone fragility and fracture healing using conventional radiography and advanced imaging technologies--focus on wrist fracture.

    PubMed

    Firoozabadi, Reza; Morshed, Saam; Engelke, Klaus; Prevrhal, Sven; Fierlinger, Anke; Miclau, Theodore; Genant, Harry K

    2008-09-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are one of the most common injuries presented to orthopaedic surgeons. A variety of treatment options are available for the vast array of fracture patterns. Research that explores bone fragility and fracture healing has led to new treatment modalities. As new products and methods are derived to aid in fracture healing it is essential to develop noninvasive and/or nondestructive techniques to assess structural information about bone. Quantitative assessment of macro-structural characteristics such as geometry, and microstructural features such as relative trabecular volume, trabecular spacing, and connectivity may improve our ability to estimate bone strength. Methods for quantitatively assessing macrostructure include (besides conventional radiographs) dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and computed tomography (CT), particularly volumetric quantitative computed tomography (vQCT). Methods for assessing microstructure of trabecular bone include high resolution computed tomography (hrCT), micro computed tomography (microCT), high resolution magnetic resonance (hrMR), and micro magnetic resonance microMR. Volumetric QCT, hrCT and hrMR are generally applicable in vivo; microCT and microMR are principally applicable in vitro. Clinically, the challenges for bone imaging include balancing the advantages of simple bone densitometry versus the more complex architectural features of bone, or the deeper research requirements versus the broader clinical needs. PMID:18753895

  3. Development of Pollution Prevention Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Polle, Juergen; Sanchez-Delgado, Roberto

    2013-12-30

    This project investigated technologies that may reduce environmental pollution. This was a basic research/educational project addressing two major areas: A. In the algae research project, newly isolated strains of microalgae were investigated for feedstock production to address the production of renewable fuels. An existing collection of microalgae was screened for lipid composition to determine strains with superior composition of biofuel molecules. As many microalgae store triacylglycerides in so-called oil bodies, selected candidate strains identified from the first screen that accumulate oil bodies were selected for further biochemical analysis, because almost nothing was known about the biochemistry of these oil bodies. Understanding sequestration of triacylglycerides in intracellular storage compartments is essential to developing better strains for achieving high oil productivities by microalgae. At the onset of the project there was almost no information available on how to obtain detailed profiles of lipids from strains of microalgae. Our research developed analytical methods to determine the lipid profiles of novel microalgal strains. The project was embedded into other ongoing microalgal projects in the Polle laboratory. The project benefited the public, because students were trained in cell cultivation and in the operation of state-of-the-art analytical equipment. In addition, students at Brooklyn College were introduced into the concept of a systems biology approach to study algal biofuels production. B. A series of new nanostructured catalysts were synthesized, and characterized by a variety of physical and chemical methods. Our catalyst design leads to active nanostructures comprising small metal particles in intimate contact with strongly basic sites provided by the supports, which include poly(4-vinylpyridine), magnesium oxide, functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide. The new materials display a good potential as catalysts

  4. Fracture Development within the Karaha-Telaga Bodas Geothermal Field, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemcok, M.; Moore, J.N.; Allis, R.; McCulloch, J.

    2002-01-01

    Karaha-Telaga Bodas is a partially vapor-dominated geothermal system located in an active volcano in western Java. More than 2 dozen geothermal wells have been drilled to depths of 3 km. Detailed paragenetic and fluid-inclusion studies have defined liquid-dominated, transitional and vapor-dominated stages in the evolution of this system. The liquid-dominated stage was initiated by shallow magma intrusion into the base of the volcanic cone. Lava and pyroclastic flows capped a geothermal system. The uppermost andesite flows were only weakly fractured due to the insulating effect of the intervening altered pyroclastics, which absorbed the deformation. Shear and tensile fractures were filled with carbonates at shallow depths and by quartz, epidote and actinolite at depths and temperatures over 1km and 300??C. The system underwent numerous local cycles of overpressuring, which are marked by subhorizontal tensile fractures, anastomosing tensile fractures and implosion breccias. The development of the liquid system was interrupted by a catastrophic drop in fluid pressures. As the fluids boiled in response to this pressure drop, chalcedony and quartz were deposited in fractures having the largest apertures and steep dips. The orientations of these fractures indicate that the escaping overpressured fluids used the shortest possible paths to the surface. Vapor-dominated conditions were initiated within a vertical chimney over the still hot intrusion. As pressures declined these conditions spread outward. Downward migration of the chimney occurred as the intrusion cooled and the brittle-ductile transition migrated to greater depths. Condensate that formed at the top of the vapor-dominated zone percolated downward and lowsalinity meteoric water entered the marginal parts of the system. Calcite, anhydrite, and fluorite precipitated in fractures upon heating. A progressive sealing of the fractures occurred, resulting in the downward migration of the cap rock. In response to

  5. Opportunities for Technology Development at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, D. A.

    1999-05-01

    Many opportunities for space science-related technology development exist at NASA. They include the following programs: Advanced Concepts, Cross Enterprise Technology Development (CETD), Enterprise-unique (or focused), New Millennium, mission-specific, and Small Business Innovative Research. The ability to access the opportunities depends upon the maturity of the technology being sought for additional development and the customers who would benefit from the technology products. NASA is divided into Enterprises or business units. Customer requirements are derived from the Enterprise Strategic Plans, and the Strategic Plans are updated based upon the results of the Enterprise roadmaps. The CETD program funds technology applicable to more than one Enterprise that has not achieved mid-level maturity. The Advanced Concepts program funds very early technology development. Enterprise-unique programs such as the Explorer technology and X2000 programs focus on technology development unique to space science that has not achieved mid-level maturity. The New Millennium Program focuses on systems-level flight validations of breakthrough or enabling technology. Space science-unique instrument technology is developed within the space science program. Technology that has achieved pre-prototype validation in a relevant environment and is applicable to a specific mission is developed as part of the development of the mission. Small Business Innovative Research provides an opportunity for small businesses to develop technology for future NASA and commercial applications. Most of the technology development is funded through competitive procurements. Announcements of the procurement forecasts and procurement releases are available on the Internet. Details of the contents of the technology programs will be presented.

  6. Computer-assisted virtual technology in intracapsular condylar fracture with two resorbable long-screws.

    PubMed

    Wang, W H; Deng, J Y; Zhu, J; Li, M; Xia, B; Xu, B

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to fix intracapsular condylar fractures (ICF) with two resorbable long screws using preoperative computer-assisted virtual technology. From February 2008 to July 2011, 19 patients with ICF were treated with two resorbable long screws. Preoperatively we took panoramic radiographs and spiral computed tomography (CT). Depending on their digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data, the dislocated condylar segments were restored using the SimPlant Pro™ software, version 11.04. The mean (SD) widths of the condylar head and neck from lateral to medial were 19.01 (1.28)mm and 13.84 (1.13)mm, respectively. In all patients, the mandibles and the ICF seen intraoperatively corresponded with the preoperative three-dimensional and virtual reposition. All patients were followed up for 6-46 months (mean 21). Occlusion and mouth opening had been restored completely in all but one patient, and absolute anatomical reduction was also achieved in most cases. Computer-assisted virtual technology plays an important part in the diagnosis of ICF, as well as in its preoperative design. Fixation with only two resorbable long screws is an effective and reliable method for fixing ICF. PMID:22546281

  7. JWST Primary Mirror Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Mirror Technology was identified as a (if not the) critical capability necessary to achieve the Level 1 science goals. A never before demonstrated space telescope capability was required: 6 to 8 meter class pri mary mirror, diffraction limited at 2 micrometers and operates at temperatures below 50K. Launch vehicle constraints placed significant architectural constraints: deployed/segmented primary mirror (4.5 meter fairing diameter) 20 kg/m2 areal density (PM 1000 kg mass) Such mirror technology had never been demonstrated - and did not exist

  8. Technology Mapping: An Approach for Developing Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Charoula; Valanides, Nicos

    2013-01-01

    Technology mapping[TM] is proposed as an approach for developing technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK). The study discusses in detail instructional design guidelines in relation to the enactment of TM, and reports on empirical findings from a study with 72 pre-service primary teachers within the context of teaching them how to teach…

  9. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-05-15

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  10. Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-09-30

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  11. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher E. Hull

    2005-11-04

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  12. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident.

  13. History of nuclear technology development in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    2015-04-29

    Nuclear technology development in Japan has been carried out based on the Atomic Energy Basic Act brought into effect in 1955. The nuclear technology development is limited to peaceful purposes and made in a principle to assure their safety. Now, the technologies for research reactors radiation application and nuclear power plants are delivered to developing countries. First of all, safety measures of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be enhanced based on lesson learned from TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident.

  14. Space Station engineering and technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Historical background, costs, organizational assignments, technology development, user requirements, mission evolution, systems analyses and design, systems engineering and integration, contracting, and policies of the space station are discussed.

  15. Pipe Leak Detection Technology Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that one of the nation’s biggest infrastructural needs is the replacement or rehabilitation of the water distribution and transmission systems. The institution of more effective pipe leak detection technology will im...

  16. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AS DEVELOPMENT FACTORS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LENGYEL, PETER

    PROCEEDINGS FROM A MEETING OF UNESCO'S ADVISORY COUNCIL TO ITS OFFICE OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS AND ITS DIVISION OF SCIENCE POLICY ARE REPORTED. THE CENTRAL THEME OF THE CONFERENCE IS SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. AN INTRODUCTORY PAPER DEALS WITH RESOURCES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, THE INFLUENCE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ON…

  17. Videodisc Technology: Developments 1980-1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddick, John

    1983-01-01

    This 14-item annotated literature review summarizes and analyzes scientific developments in and applications of optical and videodisc technology. Implications for information storage and retrieval, prospects for the optical disc in the office, preservation and the new technology, electronic document delivery, and the impact of technology on…

  18. Vocational Education's Role in Developing Technological Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyrenfurth, Michael J.; Lemons, Dale

    1982-01-01

    The authors discuss the role industrial arts and vocational education must play in developing the technological literacy of our youth. This literacy includes understanding technology (production, energy and power, and communication), consumer knowledge of technological products, ability to use microcomputers, and increased comfort with…

  19. Fracture resistance development in ceramic composites with nonlinear fiber pullout relationship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the fracture resistance mechanism in fiber reinforced ceramics, and focuses attention on the specific effects associated with nonlinear nature of the fiber pullout mechanism. The model is based on a consideration of the representative boundary value problem typical for the bridging process. The theoretical solution includes an accurate account of the nonlinear fiber matrix friction. The developed approach allows consideration of several types of nonlinear fiber pullout-force dependence. The distinct features of the nonlinear process demonstrate that, contrary to the linear case, the universal fracture resistance curves cannot be developed in cases with significant nonlinear contribution in the fiber friction law. The resulting resistance curves depend strongly on the absolute values of the matrix fracture toughness. On the other hand, these distinct patterns may be used for identification of the particular friction law and determination of the friction parameters.

  20. An inverse technique for developing models for fluid flow in fracture systems using simulated annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Mauldon, A.D.; Karasaki, K.; Martel, S.J.; Long, J.C.S.; Landsfield, M.; Mensch, A. ); Vomvoris, S. )

    1993-11-01

    One of the characteristics of flow and transport in fractured rock is that the flow may be largely confined to a poorly connected network of fractures. In order to represent this condition, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been developing a new type of fracture hydrology model called an equivalent discontinuum model. In this model we represent the discontinuous nature of the problem through flow on a partially filled lattice. This is done through a statistical inverse technique called [open quotes]simulated annealing.[close quotes] The fracture network model is [open quotes]annealed[close quotes] by continually modifying a base model, or [open quotes]template,[close quotes] so that with each modification, the model behaves more and more like the observed system. This template is constructed using geological and geophysical data to identify the regions that possibly conduct fluid an the probable orientations of channels that conduct fluid. In order to see how the simulated annealing algorithm works, we have developed a synthetic case. In this case, the geometry of the fracture network is completely known, so that the results of annealing to steady state data can be evaluated absolutely. We also analyze field data from the Migration Experiment at the Grimsel Rock Laboratory in Switzerland. 28 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. The Developing Science and Technology List

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, R.

    The Militarily Critical Technologies Program (MCTP), a DoD responsibility directed by Congress, provides a systematic, ongoing assessment and analysis of goods and technologies to determine those technologies that would permit significant advances in the development, production and use of military capabilities of potential adversaries and those that are being developed worldwide that have the potential to significantly enhance or degrade US military capabilities in the future. The program's objective is to characterize the technologies, including quantitative values and parameters, and assess worldwide technology capabilities. The MCTP is composed of two documents, the well known Militarily Critical Technology List (MCTL), and one called the Developing Science and Technologies List (DSTL). Both are products of the MCTP process. However, the DSTL is a compendium of scientific & technological capabilities being developed worldwide which have the potential to significantly enhance or degrade U.S. military capabilities starting five years into the future. The DSTL is sponsored by DDR&E and is used by other government organizations and agencies as well to aid in the prioritization and understanding of new technologies being developed worldwide. Working within an informal structure, TWG members are composed of government, industry and academia subject matter experts, who strive to produce objective analyses across each technology areas. This process and details of the current MCTP/DSTL are outlined in this poster paper. This poster paper focuses on Space Optics technology to provide a sample of the DSTL content.

  2. Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Technology Development Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Struk, Peter M.; Green, Jennifer L.; Chau, Savio N.; Curell, Philip C.; Dempsey, Cathy A.; Patterson, Linda P.; Robbins, William; Steele, Michael A.; DAnnunzio, Anthony; Meseroll, Robert; Quiter, John; Shannon, Russell; Easton, John W.; Madaras, Eric I.; BrownTaminger, Karen M.; Tabera, John T.; Tellado, Joseph; Williams, Marth K.; Zeitlin, Nancy P.

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Technology Development Roadmap is a guide for developing the technologies needed to enable the supportable, sustainable, and affordable exploration of the Moon and other destinations beyond Earth. Supportability is defined in terms of space maintenance, repair, and related logistics. This report considers the supportability lessons learned from NASA and the Department of Defense. Lunar Outpost supportability needs are summarized, and a supportability technology strategy is established to make the transition from high logistics dependence to logistics independence. This strategy will enable flight crews to act effectively to respond to problems and exploit opportunities in an environment of extreme resource scarcity and isolation. The supportability roadmap defines the general technology selection criteria. Technologies are organized into three categories: diagnostics, test, and verification; maintenance and repair; and scavenge and recycle. Furthermore, "embedded technologies" and "process technologies" are used to designate distinct technology types with different development cycles. The roadmap examines the current technology readiness level and lays out a four-phase incremental development schedule with selection decision gates. The supportability technology roadmap is intended to develop technologies with the widest possible capability and utility while minimizing the impact on crew time and training and remaining within the time and cost constraints of the program.

  3. Clean Technology Evaluation & Workforce Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Glaza

    2012-12-01

    The overall objective of the Clean Technology Evaluation portion of the award was to design a process to speed up the identification of new clean energy technologies and match organizations to testing and early adoption partners. The project was successful in identifying new technologies targeted to utilities and utility technology integrators, in developing a process to review and rank the new technologies, and in facilitating new partnerships for technology testing and adoption. The purpose of the Workforce Development portion of the award was to create an education outreach program for middle & high-school students focused on clean technology science and engineering. While originally targeting San Diego, California and Cambridge, Massachusetts, the scope of the program was expanded to include a major clean technology speaking series and expo as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

  4. Innovative Technology Development Program. Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, J.

    1995-08-01

    Through the Office of Technology Development (OTD), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a national applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program, whose goal has been to resolve the major technical issues and rapidly advance technologies for environmental restoration and waste management. The Innovative Technology Development (ITD) Program was established as a part of the DOE, Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E) Program. The plan is part of the DOE`s program to restore sites impacted by weapons production and to upgrade future waste management operations. On July 10, 1990, DOE issued a Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) through the Idaho Operations Office to solicit private sector help in developing innovative technologies to support DOE`s clean-up goals. This report presents summaries of each of the seven projects, which developed and tested the technologies proposed by the seven private contractors selected through the PRDA process.

  5. Welding technology. [technology transfer of NASA developments to commercial organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Welding processes which have been developed during NASA space program activities are discussed. The subjects considered are: (1) welding with an electron gun, (2) technology of welding special alloys, and (3) welding shop techniques and equipment. The material presented is part of the combined efforts of NASA and the Small Business Administration to provide technology transfer of space-related developments to the benefit of commercial organizations.

  6. Technology transfer to a developing nation, Korea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, C. A.; Uccetta, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental project is reported which was undertaken. to determine if selected types of technology developed for the aerospace program during the past decade are relevant to specific industrial problems of a developing nation and to test whether a structured program could facilitate the transfer of relevant technologies. The Korea Institute of Science and Technology and the IIT Research Institute were selected as the active transfer agents to participate in the program. The pilot project was based upon the approach to the transfer of domestic technology developed by the NASA Technology Utilization Division and utilized the extensive data and technical resources available through the Space Agency and its contractors. This pilot project has helped to clarify some aspects of the international technology transfer process and to upgrade Korean technological capabilities.

  7. Oil heat technology research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Kweller, E.R.; McDonald, R.J.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this United States Department of Energy (DOE)/Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) program is to develop a technology base for advancing the state-of-the-art related to oilfired combustion equipment. The major thrust is through technology based research that will seek new knowledge leading to improved designs and equipment optimization. The Combustion Equipment space Conditioning Technology program currently deals exclusively with residential and small commercial building oil heat technology.

  8. Technology Development Roadmaps - a Systematic Approach to Maturing Needed Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    John W. Colllins; Layne Pincock

    2010-07-01

    Abstract. Planning and decision making represent important challenges for all projects. This paper presents the steps needed to assess technical readiness and determine the path forward to mature the technologies required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. A Technology Readiness Assessment is used to evaluate the required systems, subsystems, and components (SSC) comprising the desired plant architecture and assess the SSCs against established Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). A validated TRL baseline is then established for the proposed physical design. Technology Development Roadmaps are generated to define the path forward and focus project research and development and engineering tasks on advancing the technologies to increasing levels of maturity. Tasks include modeling, testing, bench-scale demonstrations, pilot-scale demonstrations, and fully integrated prototype demonstrations. The roadmaps identify precise project objectives and requirements; create a consensus vision of project needs; provide a structured, defensible, decision-based project plan; and, minimize project costs and schedules.

  9. Microhole Drilling Tractor Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Western Well Tool

    2007-07-09

    In an effort to increase the U.S. energy reserves and lower costs for finding and retrieving oil, the USDOE created a solicitation to encourage industry to focus on means to operate in small diameter well-Microhole. Partially in response to this solicitation and because Western Well Tool's (WWT) corporate objective to develop small diameter coiled tubing drilling tractor, WWT responded to and was awarded a contract to design, prototype, shop test, and field demonstrate a Microhole Drilling Tractor (MDT). The benefit to the oil industry and the US consumer from the project is that with the MDT's ability to facilitate Coiled Tubing drilled wells to be 1000-3000 feet longer horizontally, US brown fields can be more efficiently exploited resulting in fewer wells, less environmental impact, greater and faster oil recovery, and lower drilling costs. Shortly after award of the contract, WWT was approached by a major oil company that strongly indicated that the specified size of a tractor of 3.0 inches diameter was inappropriate and that immediate applications for a 3.38-inch diameter tractor would substantially increase the usefulness of the tool to the oil industry. Based on this along with an understanding with the oil company to use the tractor in multiple field applications, WWT applied for and was granted a no-cost change-of-scope contract amendment to design, manufacture, assemble, shop test and field demonstrate a prototype a 3.38 inch diameter MDT. Utilizing existing WWT tractor technology and conforming to an industry developed specification for the tool, the Microhole Drilling Tractor was designed. Specific features of the MDT that increase it usefulness are: (1) Operation on differential pressure of the drilling fluid, (2) On-Off Capability, (3) Patented unique gripping elements (4) High strength and flexibility, (5) Compatibility to existing Coiled Tubing drilling equipment and operations. The ability to power the MDT with drilling fluid results in a highly

  10. Managing Space Technology Development at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Christopher L.

    2007-01-01

    NASA uses a structured process for managing projects that develop advanced space technologies and transition them into the designs of flight systems. The four-part process consists of formulation, approval, implementation, and transition. In the formulation phase, technology needs are derived from mission concept studies, various technical approaches for meeting the technology needs are identified, technical performance goals called Key Performance Parameters (KPPs) are established, and a project plan is developed. Prior to project approval, an Independent Formulation Review is conducted to ensure that the project objectives are aligned with the mission needs, and that the project is well planned to meet the objectives. In the implementation phase, the technology development project matures the technology, and progress towards the KPPs is evaluated in periodic status reviews. Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) are used throughout the project lifecycle to assess the progress of technology maturation. In the transition phase, technologies that are successful in achieving the required level of maturity are transitioned to a customer for further development, are used in system designs, or are thoroughly documented for resumption of development at a later date. The customer or end-user of the technology is involved in all phases of the technology development process.

  11. Miniature-MCA technology developments

    SciTech Connect

    Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Stephens, M.M.; Biddle, R.S.

    1991-12-31

    We have recently reduced the size of multichannel analyzers (MCAs) and have implemented more features in hardware to relieve software requirements. We built and tested a spectroscopy grade, 4096-channel MCA. Exclusive of amplifier and power supply, it fits on two boards each approximately 7 by 15 cm. This paper discusses the features and performance of the analyzer and some reasonable applications of these technologies.

  12. KSC Education Technology Research and Development Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, Michael R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Educational technology is facilitating new approaches to teaching and learning science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Cognitive research is beginning to inform educators about how students learn providing a basis for design of more effective learning environments incorporating technology. At the same time, access to computers, the Internet and other technology tools are becoming common features in K-20 classrooms. Encouraged by these developments, STEM educators are transforming traditional STEM education into active learning environments that hold the promise of enhancing learning. This document illustrates the use of technology in STEM education today, identifies possible areas of development, links this development to the NASA Strategic Plan, and makes recommendations for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Education Office for consideration in the research, development, and design of new educational technologies and applications.

  13. Advances in Technology, Education and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouwenhoven, Wim, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    From 3rd to 5th March 2008 the International Association of Technology, Education and Development organised its International Technology, Education and Development Conference in Valencia, Spain. Over a hundred papers were presented by participants from a great variety of countries. Summarising, this book provides a kaleidoscopic view of work that…

  14. Aligning Technology Education Teaching with Brain Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to determine if there is a level of alignment between technology education curriculum and theories of intellectual development. The researcher compared Epstein's Brain Growth Theory and Piaget's Status of Intellectual Development with technology education curriculum from Australia, England, and the United…

  15. The Human Response to Technological Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Luellen

    Technological development and our human potential are two of the greatest challenges facing humankind today. The appropriate response to technological development seems to be to shape it for positive and productive human uses. Just as America once shifted from an agricultural economy to an industrial economy, we are now shifting from an industrial…

  16. Recent developments of gigatron technology

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, P.M.; Elliott, S.M.; Gray, H.; Lee, B.; Pang, Yaoqi; Popovic, M. . Dept. of Physics; Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC; Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    Gigatron is a new design concept for microwave power devices. A gated field-emitter array is employed as a directly modulated cathode. A ribbon beam configuration is used to mitigate space-charge effects and provide for efficient output coupling. A traveling-wave output coupler is used to obtain optimum coupling to a wide beam. Recent cathode tests are reported. Modeling of the bunched-emission process has led to an improved cathode fabrication procedure. A new application of a similar structure has led to a design for a new technology for precision tracking chambers for SSC detectors.

  17. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  18. SRS environmental technology development field test platform

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B.D.; Rossabi, J.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1995-09-01

    A critical and difficult step in the development and implementation of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is successfully transferring these technologies to industry and government users for routine assessment and compliance activities. The Environmental Sciences Section of the DOE Savannah River Technology Center provides a forum for developers, potential users, and regulatory organizations to evaluate new technologies in comparison with baseline technologies in a well characterized field test bed. The principal objective of this project is to conduct comprehensive, objective field tests of monitoring and characterization technologies that are not currently used in EPA standard methods and evaluate their performance during actual operating conditions against baseline methods. This paper provides an overview of the field test site and a description of some of the technologies demonstrated at the site including their field applications.

  19. Advanced Refrigerator/Freezer Technology Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairelli, James E.; Geng, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Refrigerator/Freezer (R/F) Technology Development Project was initiated in 1994, on the basis of recommendations of a team of NASA Scientists and engineers, who assessed the need for advanced technology to support future life and biomedical sciences space flight missions. The project, which was cofunded by NASA's Office of Aerospace Technology and Life and Biomedical Sciences & Applications Division, has two phases. In the Phase I Advanced R/F Technology Assessment, candidate technologies were identified and ranked, on the basis of a combination of their effect on system performance and their risk of developmental success. In Phase II Technology Development, the advanced technologies with the highest combined ranking, which could be accomplished within the budgetary constraints, were pursued. The effort has been mainly by contract, with a modest in-house effort at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) of Houston, Texas, was selected as the prime contractor for both contract phases.

  20. Development of a fracture control method for composite tanks with load sharing liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bixler, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to establish a fracture control method for composite tanks with load sharing liners. Uniaxial specimens containing surface flaws were loaded to failure (static fractured) and cycled to failure and the results were compared with burst tests and cyclic life tests of composite tanks having surface flaws present in the load sharing metal liners. The liner materials investigated were Inconel X750 STA, 2219-T62 aluminum and cryostretched 301 stainless steel at room temperature and at 78 K (-320 F) in liquid nitrogen. Differences were observed in comparing the uniaxial and tank test results. These differences should be resolved if an adequate fracture control method is to be developed.

  1. Technology Development: From Idea to Implementation - 12131

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, Renee H.

    2012-07-01

    There are good ideas and new technologies proposed every day to solve problems within the DOE complex. A process to transition a new technology from inception to the decision to launch a project with baselines is described. Examples from active technology development projects within Savannah River Remediation (SRR) will be used to illustrate the points. The process includes decision points at key junctures leading to preliminary design. At that point, normal project management tools can be employed. The technology development steps include proof-of-principle testing, scaled testing and analysis, and conceptual design. Tools are used that define the scope necessary for each step of technology development. The tools include use of the DOE technology readiness guide, Consolidated Hazards Analysis (CHA) and internal checklists developed by Savannah River Remediation. Integration with operating or planned facilities is also included. The result is a roadmap and spreadsheet that identifies each open question and how it may be answered. Performance criteria are developed that enable simple decisions to be made after the completion of each step. Conceptual design tasks should begin as the technology development continues. The most important conceptual design tasks at this point in the process include process flow diagrams (PFDs), high level Process and Instrumentation Drawings (P and IDs), and general layout drawings. These should influence the design of the scaled simulant testing. Mechanical and electrical drawings that support cost and schedule development should also be developed. An early safety control strategy developed from the CHA will also influence the cost. The combination of test results, calculations and early design output with rough order of magnitude cost and schedule information provide input into the decisions to proceed with a project and data to establish the baseline. This process can be used to mature any new technology, especially those that must be

  2. Developments on Bearingless Drive Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrhein, Wolfgang; Silber, Siegfried; Nenninger, Klaus; Trauner, Gernot; Reisinger, Martin; Schoeb, Reto

    Meanwhile the bearingless motor technology offers a lot of mechanical and electrical design variants for various kinds of applications. A comparison of switched reluctance motor, asynchronous motor and permanent magnet motor technology shows advantages and disadvantages with regard to different technical requirements. Especially for small motor applications with large air gaps the permanent magnet motor is of great importance. This is confirmed by a comparison of electromagnetic and permanent-magnetic pole designs. Based on bearingless permanent magnet motors with integrated winding systems for levitation as well as torque generation reliability and fault-tolerant design studies are carried out. It is shown that with an appropriate motor design a failure of an arbitrary phase can be compensated by the motor itself. In such a case there is no need for failure detection in order to switch over to special auxiliary control algorithms. A further advantage of the integrated winding system is the high grade of copper utilization independent of the ratio of radial force and torque loads.

  3. Advanced Reactor Technology -- Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP)

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, Wayne Leland

    2015-05-01

    This DOE-NE Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) regulatory technology development plan (RTDP) will link critical DOE nuclear reactor technology development programs to important regulatory and policy-related issues likely to impact a “critical path” for establishing a viable commercial AdvSMR presence in the domestic energy market. Accordingly, the regulatory considerations that are set forth in the AdvSMR RTDP will not be limited to any one particular type or subset of advanced reactor technology(s) but rather broadly consider potential regulatory approaches and the licensing implications that accompany all DOE-sponsored research and technology development activity that deal with commercial non-light water reactors. However, it is also important to remember that certain “minimum” levels of design and safety approach knowledge concerning these technology(s) must be defined and available to an extent that supports appropriate pre-licensing regulatory analysis within the RTDP. Final resolution to advanced reactor licensing issues is most often predicated on the detailed design information and specific safety approach as documented in a facility license application and submitted for licensing review. Because the AdvSMR RTDP is focused on identifying and assessing the potential regulatory implications of DOE-sponsored reactor technology research very early in the pre-license application development phase, the information necessary to support a comprehensive regulatory analysis of a new reactor technology, and the resolution of resulting issues, will generally not be available. As such, the regulatory considerations documented in the RTDP should be considered an initial “first step” in the licensing process which will continue until a license is issued to build and operate the said nuclear facility. Because a facility license application relies heavily on the data and information generated by technology development studies, the anticipated regulatory

  4. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture on the nanometer scale.

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2005-11-01

    This work covers three distinct aspects of deformation and fracture during indentations. In particular, we develop an approach to verification of nanoindentation induced film fracture in hard film/soft substrate systems; we examine the ability to perform these experiments in harsh environments; we investigate the methods by which the resulting deformation from indentation can be quantified and correlated to computational simulations, and we examine the onset of plasticity during indentation testing. First, nanoindentation was utilized to induce fracture of brittle thin oxide films on compliant substrates. During the indentation, a load is applied and the penetration depth is continuously measured. A sudden discontinuity, indicative of film fracture, was observed upon the loading portion of the load-depth curve. The mechanical properties of thermally grown oxide films on various substrates were calculated using two different numerical methods. The first method utilized a plate bending approach by modeling the thin film as an axisymmetric circular plate on a compliant foundation. The second method measured the applied energy for fracture. The crack extension force and applied stress intensity at fracture was then determined from the energy measurements. Secondly, slip steps form on the free surface around indentations in most crystalline materials when dislocations reach the free surface. Analysis of these slip steps provides information about the deformation taking place in the material. Techniques have now been developed to allow for accurate and consistent measurement of slip steps and the effects of crystal orientation and tip geometry are characterized. These techniques will be described and compared to results from dislocation dynamics simulations.

  5. Technology development and applications at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, P.J.; Skriba, M.C.; Warner, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    At the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio, the U.S. Department of Energy and contractor Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) are aggressively pursuing both the development and the application of improved, innovative technology to the environmental restoration task. Application of emerging technologies is particularly challenging in a regulatory environment that places pressure on operational managers to develop and meet tight schedules. The regulatory and operational needs make close communication essential between technology developers and technology users (CERCLA/RCRA Unit managers). At Fernald this cooperation and communication has led, not only to the development and demonstration of new technologies with applications at other sites, but also to application of new technologies directly to the Fernald clean up. New technologies have been applied to improve environmental safety and health, improve the effectiveness of restoration efforts, and to cut restoration costs. The paper will describe successful efforts to develop and apply new technologies at the FEMP and will emphasize those technologies that have been applied and are planned for use in the clean up of this former uranium production facility.

  6. Predicting dissolution patterns in variable aperture fractures: 1. Development and evaluation of an enhanced depth-averaged computational model

    SciTech Connect

    Detwiler, R L; Rajaram, H

    2006-04-21

    Water-rock interactions within variable-aperture fractures can lead to dissolution of fracture surfaces and local alteration of fracture apertures, potentially transforming the transport properties of the fracture over time. Because fractures often provide dominant pathways for subsurface flow and transport, developing models that effectively quantify the role of dissolution on changing transport properties over a range of scales is critical to understanding potential impacts of natural and anthropogenic processes. Dissolution of fracture surfaces is controlled by surface-reaction kinetics and transport of reactants and products to and from the fracture surfaces. We present development and evaluation of a depth-averaged model of fracture flow and reactive transport that explicitly calculates local dissolution-induced alterations in fracture apertures. The model incorporates an effective mass transfer relationship that implicitly represents the transition from reaction-limited dissolution to transport-limited dissolution. We evaluate the model through direct comparison to previously reported physical experiments in transparent analog fractures fabricated by mating an inert, transparent rough surface with a smooth single crystal of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), which allowed direct measurement of fracture aperture during dissolution experiments using well-established light transmission techniques [Detwiler, et al., 2003]. Comparison of experiments and simulations at different flow rates demonstrate the relative impact of the dimensionless Peclet and Damkohler numbers on fracture dissolution and the ability of the computational model to simulate dissolution. Despite some discrepancies in the small-scale details of dissolution patterns, the simulations predict the evolution of large-scale features quite well for the different experimental conditions. This suggests that our depth-averaged approach to simulating fracture dissolution provides a useful approach for

  7. Some advances in fracture studies under the heavy-section steel technology program

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.; Corwin, W.R.; Bryan, R.H,; Bass, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent results are summarized from HSST studies in three major areas that relate to assessing nuclear reactor pressure vessel integrity under pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) conditions: irradiation effects on the fracture properties of stainless steel cladding, crack run-arrest behavior under nonisothermal conditions, and fracture behavior of a thick-wall vessel under combined thermal and pressure loadings.

  8. Space Technology Mission Directorate: Game Changing Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    NASA and the aerospace community have deep roots in manufacturing technology and innovation. Through it's Game Changing Development Program and the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Project NASA develops and matures innovative, low-cost manufacturing processes and products. Launch vehicle propulsion systems are a particular area of interest since they typically comprise a large percentage of the total vehicle cost and development schedule. NASA is currently working to develop and utilize emerging technologies such as additive manufacturing (i.e. 3D printing) and computational materials and processing tools that could dramatically improve affordability, capability, and reduce schedule for rocket propulsion hardware.

  9. Titan probe technology assessment and technology development plan study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    The need for technology advances to accomplish the Titan probe mission was determined by defining mission conditions and requirements and evaluating the technology impact on the baseline probe configuration. Mission characteristics found to be technology drivers include (1) ten years dormant life in space vacuum; (2) unknown surface conditions, various sample materials, and a surface temperature; and (3) mission constraints of the Saturn Orbiter Dual Probe mission regarding weight allocation. The following areas were identified for further development: surface sample acquisition system; battery powered system; nonmetallic materials; magnetic bubble memory devices, and the landing system. Preentry science, reliability, and weight reduction and redundancy must also be considered.

  10. Risks to Water Resources from Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Warner, Nathaniel; Darrah, Thomas H.; Kondash, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    The rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has expanded oil and gas exploration in the USA. The rapid rate of shale gas exploration has triggered an intense public debate regarding the potential environmental and human health effects. A review of the updated literature has identified four potential risks for impacts on water resources: (1) stray gas contamination of shallow aquifers near shale gas sites; (2) contamination of surface water and shallow groundwater from spills, leaks, and disposal of inadequately treated wastewater or hydraulic fracturing fluids; (3) accumulation of toxic and radioactive residues in soil or stream sediments near disposal or spill sites; and (4) over-extraction of water resources for drilling and hydraulic fracturing that could induce water shortages and conflicts with other water users, particularly in water-scarce areas. As part of a long-term research on the potential water contamination associated with shale gas development, new geochemical and isotopic techniques have been developed for delineating the origin of gases and contaminants in water resource. In particular, multiple geochemical and isotopic (carbon isotopes in hydrocarbons, noble gas, strontium, boron, radium isotopes) tracers have been utilized to distinguish between naturally occurring dissolved gas and salts in water and contamination directly induced from shale gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing operations.

  11. Development of Inflatable Entry Systems Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Player, Charles J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Corliss, James

    2005-01-01

    Achieving the objectives of NASA s Vision for Space Exploration will require the development of new technologies, which will in turn require higher fidelity modeling and analysis techniques, and innovative testing capabilities. Development of entry systems technologies can be especially difficult due to the lack of facilities and resources available to test these new technologies in mission relevant environments. This paper discusses the technology development process to bring inflatable aeroshell technology from Technology Readiness Level 2 (TRL-2) to TRL-7. This paper focuses mainly on two projects: Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE), and Inflatable Aeroshell and Thermal Protection System Development (IATD). The objectives of IRVE are to conduct an inflatable aeroshell flight test that demonstrates exoatmospheric deployment and inflation, reentry survivability and stability, and predictable drag performance. IATD will continue the development of the technology by conducting exploration specific trade studies and feeding forward those results into three more flight tests. Through an examination of these projects, and other potential projects, this paper discusses some of the risks, issues, and unexpected benefits associated with the development of inflatable entry systems technology.

  12. Mathematical algorithm development and parametric studies with the GEOFRAC three-dimensional stochastic model of natural rock fracture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Violeta M.; Sousa, Rita; Murrihy, Brian; Einstein, Herbert H.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results from research conducted at MIT during 2010-2012 on modeling of natural rock fracture systems with the GEOFRAC three-dimensional stochastic model. Following a background summary of discrete fracture network models and a brief introduction of GEOFRAC, the paper provides a thorough description of the newly developed mathematical and computer algorithms for fracture intensity, aperture, and intersection representation, which have been implemented in MATLAB. The new methods optimize, in particular, the representation of fracture intensity in terms of cumulative fracture area per unit volume, P32, via the Poisson-Voronoi Tessellation of planes into polygonal fracture shapes. In addition, fracture apertures now can be represented probabilistically or deterministically whereas the newly implemented intersection algorithms allow for computing discrete pathways of interconnected fractures. In conclusion, results from a statistical parametric study, which was conducted with the enhanced GEOFRAC model and the new MATLAB-based Monte Carlo simulation program FRACSIM, demonstrate how fracture intensity, size, and orientations influence fracture connectivity.

  13. Assessment of femur geometrical parameters using EOS™ imaging technology in patients with atypical femur fractures; preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Morin, Suzanne N; Wall, Michelle; Belzile, Etienne L; Godbout, Benoit; Moser, Thomas P; Michou, Laëtitia; Ste-Marie, Louis-Georges; de Guise, Jacques A; Rahme, Elham; Brown, Jacques P

    2016-02-01

    Atypical femur fractures (AFF) arise in the subtrochanteric and diaphyseal regions. Because of this unique distribution, we hypothesized that patients with AFF demonstrate specific geometrical variations of their lower limb whereby baseline tensile forces applied to the lateral cortex are higher and might favor the appearance of these rare stress fractures, when exposed to bisphosphonates. Using the low irradiation 2D-3D X-ray scanner EOS™ imaging technology we aimed to characterize and compare femur geometric parameters between women who sustained bisphosphonate-associated AFF and those who had experienced similar duration of exposure to bisphosphonates but did not sustain fractures. Conditional logistic regression models were constructed to estimate the association between selected geometric parameters and the occurrence of AFF. We identified 16 Caucasian women with AFF and recruited 16 ethnicity-, sex-, age-, height- and cumulative bisphosphonate exposure-matched controls from local osteoporosis clinics. Compared to controls, those with AFF had more lateral femur bowing (-3.2° SD [3.4] versus -0.8° SD [1.9] p=0.02). In regression analysis, lateral femur bowing was associated with the risk of AFF (aOR 1.54; 95% CI 1.04-2.28, p=0.03). Women who sustained a subtrochanteric AFF demonstrated a lesser femoral neck shaft angle (varus geometry) than those with a fracture at a diaphyseal site (121.9 [3.6]° versus 127.6 [7.2]°, p=0.07), whereas femur bowing was more prominent in those with a diaphyseal fracture compared to those with a subtrochanteric fracture (-4.3 [3.2]° versus -0.9 [2.7]°, p=0.07). Our analyses support that subjects with AFF exhibit femoral geometry parameters that result in higher tensile mechanical load on the lateral femur. This may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of AFF and requires further evaluation in a larger size population. PMID:26541215

  14. Advanced technology satellite demodulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Stephen A.

    1989-01-01

    Ford Aerospace has developed a proof-of-concept satellite 8 phase shift keying (PSK) modulation and coding system operating in the Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) mode at a data range of 200 Mbps using rate 5/6 forward error correction coding. The 80 Msps 8 PSK modem was developed in a mostly digital form and is amenable to an ASIC realization in the next phase of development. The codec was developed as a paper design only. The power efficiency goal was to be within 2 dB of theoretical at a bit error rate (BER) of 5x10(exp 7) while the measured implementation loss was 4.5 dB. The bandwidth efficiency goal was 2 bits/sec/Hz while the realized bandwidth efficiency was 1.8 bits/sec/Hz. The burst format used a preamble of only 40 8 PSK symbol times including 32 symbols of all zeros and an eight symbol unique word. The modem and associated special test equipment (STE) were fabricated mostly on a specially designed stitch-weld board although a few of the highest rate circuits were built on printed circuit cards. All the digital circuits were ECL to support the clock rates of from 80 MHz to 360 MHz. The transmitter and receiver matched filters were square-root Nyquist bandpass filters realized at the 3.37 GHz i.f. The modem operated as a coherent system although no analog phase locked (PLL) loop was employed. Within the budgetary constraints of the program, the approach to the demodulator has been proven and is eligible to proceed to the next phase of development of a satellite demodulator engineering model. This would entail the development of an ASIC version of the digital portion of the demodulator, and MMIC version of the quadrature detector, and SAW Nyquist filters to realize the bandwidth efficiency.

  15. Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology; and (2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabrication technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

  16. Potential effect of fracture technology on IPTS (Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock) analysis (Fracture toughness: K sub la and K sub lc and warm prestressing)

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A major nuclear plant life extension issue to be confronted in the 1990's is pressure vessel integrity for the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) loading condition. Governing criteria associated with PTS are included in The PTS Rule'' (10 CFR 50.61) and Regulatory Guide 1.154: Format and Content of Plant-Specific Pressurized Thermal Shock Safety Analysis Reports for Pressurized Water Reactors. The results of the Integrated Pressurized Water Reactors. The results of the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program, along with risk assessments and fracture analyses performed by the NRC and reactor system vendors, contributed to the derivation of the PTS Rule. Over the last several years, the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has performed a series of large-scale fracture-mechanics experiments. The Thermal Shock Experiments (TSE), Pressurized Thermal Shock Experiments (PTSE), and Wide Plate Experiments (WPE) produced K{sub IC} and K{sub Ia} data that suggest increased mean K{sub IC} and K{sub Ia} curves relative to the ones used in the IPTS study. Also, the PTSE and WPE have demonstrated that prototypical nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels are capable of arresting a propagating crack at K{sub I} values considerably above 220 MPa{radical}m, the implicit limit of the ASME Code and the limit used in the IPTS studies. This document provides a discussion of the results of these experiments.

  17. Development of discrete flow paths in unsaturated fractures at Yucca Mountain.

    PubMed

    Bodvarsson, G S; Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, Keni

    2003-01-01

    We have carried out numerical modeling studies to investigate the development of discrete-fracture flow paths and flow-focusing phenomena in the unsaturated rock of the potential repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These studies are based on two- and three-dimensional (2-D and 3-D) numerical models using site-specific parameters. The 2-D and 3-D models use high-resolution spatial discretization to explicitly include effects of discrete fractures with stochastically developed fracture permeabilities and a continuum approach. The permeability field is generated based on air permeability measurements at various scales. For most of the cases considered, uniform infiltration with different average rates (1-500 mm/year) is prescribed at the top of the model, while variability in outflow at the bottom of the model is used to evaluate the degree of flow focusing. In addition, scenarios involving nonuniform infiltration at the top boundary, different permeability correlation lengths and different flow-allocation schemes were analyzed. The modeling results obtained from all of the cases showed a remarkably similar flow-focusing pattern at the repository horizon. Furthermore, tracer transport simulation results also revealed additional features of focused flow and transport through the fracture network. PMID:12714283

  18. Water Processor Assembly Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert; Parker, Dave; OConnor, Ed

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Water Processor Assembly (WPA) produces potable quality water from humidity condensate, carbon dioxide reduction water, water obtained from fuel cells, reclaimed urine distillate, shower, handwash and oral hygiene waste waters. This paper describes the WPA integration into the ISS Node 3. It details the substantial development history supporting the design and describes the WPA System characteristics and its physical layout.

  19. ARES I-X USS Fracture Analysis Loads Spectra Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Curtis; Mackey, Alden

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the development of a set of bounding load spectra for the ARES I-X launch vehicle. These load spectra are used in the determination of the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) of the welds in the ARES I-X upper stage simulator (USS).

  20. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  1. Interleaved array antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the third phase of a program to establish an antenna concept for shuttle and free flying spacecraft earth resources experiments using Synthetic Aperture Radar. The feasibility of a plated graphite epoxy waveguide for a space antenna was evaluated. A quantity of flat panels and waveguides were developed, procured, and tested for electrical and mechanical properties. In addition, processes for the assembly of a unique waveguide array were investigated. Finally, trades between various configurations that would allow elevation (range) electronic scanning and that would minimize feed complexity for various RF bandwidths were made.

  2. FRACTURE ENHANCED SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION AT THE A-014 OUTFALL

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Richard Hall , R

    2008-03-12

    Data collected during this study show that the performance of hydraulically fractured wells (with respect to mass removal rates) may tend to decrease with time following precipitation events. These effects are due to temporary increases in water saturation in the formation within the vicinity of the fractures, therefore, the wells should tend to rebound during subsequent dry periods. The data available for fractured well versus conventional well performance (with respect to flow rate versus vacuum pressure) are limited in this study. However, the data that we have to draw from suggest that, with the possible exception of a few extreme examples, hydraulically fractured wells tend to perform better than conventional wells during soil vapor extraction (SVE) operation at the A-14 Outfall. The pancake like geometry associated with hydraulic fractures also leads to a significant increase in zone of influence (ZOI), as compared to conventional wells. The increase in ZOI is due to the radially extending, horizontal, high-permeability conduit nature of the hydraulic fracture, however, air-flow into the fracture is predominately vertical (occurring at right angles to the fracture plane). Flow rates from above and below the fracture will tend to be equivalent when the formation is homogeneous, however, in the case of directionally fining depositional sequences flow rates will be greater from the direction of increasing permeability. The Upland Unit is a fining upward sequence, therefore flow rates (and contaminant mass flow rates) will tend to be higher below the fracture. This suggests that emplacing the fractures slightly above the source zone is an important strategy for accelerating contaminant removal at the A-014 Outfall site and in the Upland Unit at the SRS. However, due to the multitude of previous borings at the A-014 Outfall site, the shallower fractures failed. More than 2500 lbs of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) were removed during approximately 6

  3. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

  4. Space power development impact on technology requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, J. F.; Fitzgerald, T. J.; Gilje, R. I.; Gordon, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the selection of a specific spacecraft power technology and the identification of technology development to meet system requirements. Requirements which influence the selection of a given technology include the power level required, whether the load is constant or transient in nature, and in the case of transient loads, the time required to recover the power, and overall system safety. Various power technologies, such as solar voltaic power, solar dynamic power, nuclear power systems, and electrochemical energy storage, are briefly described.

  5. Photo sensor array technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossman, M. W.; Young, V. F.; Beall, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The development of an improved capability photo sensor array imager for use in a Viking '75 type facsimile camera is presented. This imager consists of silicon photodiodes and lead sulfide detectors to cover a spectral range from 0.4 to 2.7 microns. An optical design specifying filter configurations and convergence angles is described. Three electronics design approaches: AC-chopped light, DC-dual detector, and DC-single detector, are investigated. Experimental and calculated results are compared whenever possible using breadboard testing and tolerance analysis techniques. Results show that any design used must be forgiving of the relative instability of lead sulfide detectors. A final design using lead sulfide detectors and associated electronics is implemented by fabrication of a hybrid prototype device. Test results of this device show a good agreement with calculated values.

  6. Multiple fracturing experiments: propellant and borehole considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Cuderman, J F

    1982-01-01

    The technology for multiple fracturing of a wellbore, using progressively burning propellants, is being developed to enhance natural gas recovery. Multiple fracturing appears especially attractive for stimulating naturally fractured reservoirs such as Devonian shales where it is expected to effectively intersect existing fractures and connect them to a wellbore. Previous experiments and modeling efforts defined pressure risetimes required for multiple fracturing as a function of borehole diameter, but identified only a weak dependence on peak pressure attained. Typically, from four to eight equally spaced major fractures occur as a function of pressure risetime and in situ stress orientation. The present experiments address propellant and rock response considerations required to achieve the desired pressure risetimes for reliable multiple fracturing.

  7. Aerospace Flywheel Technology Development for IPACS Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLallin, Kerry L.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Fausz, Jerry; Bauer, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) are cooperating under a space act agreement to sponsor the research and development of aerospace flywheel technologies to address mutual future mission needs. Flywheel technology offers significantly enhanced capability or is an enabling technology. Generally these missions are for energy storage and/or integrated power and attitude control systems (IPACS) for mid-to-large satellites in low earth orbit. These missions require significant energy storage as well as a CMG or reaction wheel function for attitude control. A summary description of the NASA and AFRL flywheel technology development programs is provided, followed by specific descriptions of the development plans for integrated flywheel system tests for IPACS applications utilizing both fixed and actuated flywheel units. These flywheel system development tests will be conducted at facilities at AFRL and NASA Glenn Research Center and include participation by industry participants Honeywell and Lockheed Martin.

  8. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION TEST - ACCUTECH PNEUMATIC FRACTURING EXTRACTION AND HOT GAS INJECTION, PHASE 1 - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pneumatic Fracturing Extraction (PFE) process developed by Accutech Remedial Systems, Inc. makes it possible to use vapor extraction to remove volatile organics at increased rates from a broader range of vadose zones. The low permeability of silts, clays, shales, etc. would o...

  9. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh W. Rimmer

    2004-05-12

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the seventeen subprojects awarded in the first year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices. Due to the time taken up by the solicitation/selection process, these cover the initial 6-month period of project activity only. The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 1999, U.S. mining operations produced $66.7 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $533 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium--Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno--that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation (2) Solid-liquid separation (3) Chemical/Biological Extraction (4) Modeling and Control, and (5) Environmental Control.

  10. X-43 Hypersonic Vehicle Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voland, Randall T.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; McClinton, Charles R.

    2005-01-01

    NASA recently completed two major programs in Hypersonics: Hyper-X, with the record-breaking flights of the X-43A, and the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program. The X-43A flights, the culmination of the Hyper-X Program, were the first-ever examples of a scramjet engine propelling a hypersonic vehicle and provided unique, convincing, detailed flight data required to validate the design tools needed for design and development of future operational hypersonic airbreathing vehicles. Concurrent with Hyper-X, NASA's NGLT Program focused on technologies needed for future revolutionary launch vehicles. The NGLT was "competed" by NASA in response to the President s redirection of the agency to space exploration, after making significant progress towards maturing technologies required to enable airbreathing hypersonic launch vehicles. NGLT quantified the benefits, identified technology needs, developed airframe and propulsion technology, chartered a broad University base, and developed detailed plans to mature and validate hypersonic airbreathing technology for space access. NASA is currently in the process of defining plans for a new Hypersonic Technology Program. Details of that plan are not currently available. This paper highlights results from the successful Mach 7 and 10 flights of the X-43A, and the current state of hypersonic technology.