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Sample records for frambuesas rubus idaeus

  1. Saturated linkage map construction in Rubus idaeus using genotyping by sequencing and genome-independent imputation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid development of highly saturated genetic maps aids molecular breeding, which can accelerate gain per breeding cycle in woody perennial plants such as Rubus idaeus (red raspberry). Recently, robust genotyping methods based on high-throughput sequencing were developed, which provide high marker d...

  2. Detection and Characterization of a Plant Virus in Wild Raspberry, Rubus idaeus L., in Alaska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2008, mosaic leaf symptoms were detected on wild raspberry plants, Rubus idaeus L., in north central Alaska. They were growing on remnant patches within developing agricultural sites. Partially purified virus samples were obtained by differential centrifugation of homogenized leaves according to ...

  3. The antimicrobial activity of fruits from some cultivar varieties of Rubus idaeus and Rubus occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Krauze-Baranowska, M; Majdan, M; Hałasa, R; Głód, D; Kula, M; Fecka, I; Orzeł, A

    2014-10-01

    Raspberries, derived from different cultivar varieties, are a popular ingredient of everyday diet, and their biological activity is a point of interest for researchers. The ethanol-water extracts from four varieties of red (Rubus idaeus'Ljulin', 'Veten', 'Poranna Rosa') and black (Rubus occidentalis'Litacz') raspberries were evaluated in the range of their antimicrobial properties as well as phenolic content - sanguiin H-6, free ellagic acid and anthocyanins. The antimicrobial assay was performed with the use of fifteen strains of bacteria, both Gram-negative and Gram-positive. The antimicrobial activity of the extracts varied and depended on the analysed strain of bacteria and cultivar variety, with the exception of Helicobacter pylori, towards which the extracts displayed the same growth inhibiting activity. Two human pathogens Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Moraxella catarrhalis proved to be the most sensitive to raspberry extracts. Contrary to the extracts, sanguiin H-6 and ellagic acid were only active against eight and nine bacterial strains, respectively. The determined MIC and MBC values of both compounds were several times lower than the tested extracts. The highest sensitivity of Corynebacterium diphtheriae to extracts from both black and red raspberries may be due to its sensitivity to sanguiin H-6 and ellagic acid. PMID:25131001

  4. [Acceleration of osmotic dehydration process through ohmic heating of foods: raspberries (Rubus idaeus)].

    PubMed

    Simpson, Ricardo R; Jiménez, Maite P; Carevic, Erica G; Grancelli, Romina M

    2007-06-01

    Raspberries (Rubus idaeus) were osmotically dehydrated by applying a conventional method under the supposition of a homogeneous solution, all in a 62% glucose solution at 50 degrees C. Raspberries (Rubus idaeus) were also osmotically dehydrated by using ohmic heating in a 57% glucose solution at a variable voltage (to maintain temperature between 40 and 50 degrees C) and an electric field intensity <100 V/cm. When comparing the results from both experiments it was evident that processing time is reduced when ohmic heating technique was used. In some cases this reduction reached even 50%. This is explained by the additional effect to the thermal damage that is generated in an ohmic process, denominated electroporation. PMID:17992985

  5. Pathogenicity, fungicide resistance, and genetic variability of Phytophthora rubi isolates from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) in the Western United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rot of raspberry (Rubus idaeus), thought to be primarily caused by Phytophthora rubi, is an economically important disease in the western United States. The objectives of this study were to determine which Phytophthora species are involved in root rot, examine the efficacy of different isolatio...

  6. Impact and occurrence of Phytophthora rubi and Pratylenchus penetrans in commercial red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) fields in northwestern Washington

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) production is a vital component of northwestern Washington’s agriculture. The main objectives of this study were to document the occurrence of soilborne pathogens Phytophthora rubi and Pratylenchus penetrans in early stage production fields, relate this information to so...

  7. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC) of phenolic compounds from the shoots of Rubus idaeus 'Glen Ample' cultivar variety.

    PubMed

    Kula, Marta; Głód, Daniel; Krauze-Baranowska, Mirosława

    2016-03-20

    In this study the application of two-dimensional LC (2D LC) for qualitative analysis of polyphenols and simple phenols in the shoots of Rubus idaeus 'Glen Ample' variety is presented. In the preliminary analysis, the methanol extract of the shoots was analyzed by one-dimensional LC. One-dimensional LC separation profiles of phenolics from R. idaeus 'Glen Ample' shoots were dependent on column type, mobile phase composition and gradient program used. Two-dimensional LC system was built from connecting an octadecyl C-18 silica column in the first dimension and pentafluorophenyl column in the second dimension, coupled with DAD and MS (ESI, APCI, DUIS ionization) detectors. A total of 34 phenolic compounds belonging to the groups of phenolic acids, ellagitannins, flavan-3-ols, flavonols and ellagic acid conjugates were identified in the shoots of R. idaeus 'Glen Ample'. The established 2D LC method offers an effective tool for analysis of phenolics present in Rubus species. PMID:26799975

  8. Saturated linkage map construction in Rubus idaeus using genotyping by sequencing and genome-independent imputation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rapid development of highly saturated genetic maps aids molecular breeding, which can accelerate gain per breeding cycle in woody perennial plants such as Rubus idaeus (red raspberry). Recently, robust genotyping methods based on high-throughput sequencing were developed, which provide high marker density, but result in some genotype errors and a large number of missing genotype values. Imputation can reduce the number of missing values and can correct genotyping errors, but current methods of imputation require a reference genome and thus are not an option for most species. Results Genotyping by Sequencing (GBS) was used to produce highly saturated maps for a R. idaeus pseudo-testcross progeny. While low coverage and high variance in sequencing resulted in a large number of missing values for some individuals, a novel method of imputation based on maximum likelihood marker ordering from initial marker segregation overcame the challenge of missing values, and made map construction computationally tractable. The two resulting parental maps contained 4521 and 2391 molecular markers spanning 462.7 and 376.6 cM respectively over seven linkage groups. Detection of precise genomic regions with segregation distortion was possible because of map saturation. Microsatellites (SSRs) linked these results to published maps for cross-validation and map comparison. Conclusions GBS together with genome-independent imputation provides a rapid method for genetic map construction in any pseudo-testcross progeny. Our method of imputation estimates the correct genotype call of missing values and corrects genotyping errors that lead to inflated map size and reduced precision in marker placement. Comparison of SSRs to published R. idaeus maps showed that the linkage maps constructed with GBS and our method of imputation were robust, and marker positioning reliable. The high marker density allowed identification of genomic regions with segregation distortion in R. idaeus, which

  9. Radical scavenging activity and composition of raspberry (Rubus idaeus) leaves from different locations in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Venskutonis, P R; Dvaranauskaite, A; Labokas, J

    2007-02-01

    Raspberry (Rubus idaeus) leaves, collected in different locations of Lithuania were extracted with ethanol and the extracts were tested for their antioxidant activity (AA) by using ABTS(.)(+) decolourisation and DPPH(.) scavenging methods. All extracts were active, with radical scavenging capacity at the used concentrations from 20.5 to 82.5% in DPPH(.) reaction system and from 8.0 to 42.7% in ABTS(.)(+) reaction. The total amount of phenolic compounds in the leaves varied from 4.8 to 12.0 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE) in 1 g of plant extract. Quercetin glucuronide, quercetin-3-O-glucoside and rutin were identified in the extracts. PMID:17215088

  10. Differential expression of ethylene biosynthesis genes in drupelets and receptacle of raspberry (Rubus idaeus).

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Lida; Monsalve, Liliam; Morales-Quintana, Luis; Valdenegro, Mónika; Martínez, Juan-Pablo; Defilippi, Bruno G; González-Agüero, Mauricio

    2015-05-01

    Red Raspberry (Rubus idaeus) is traditionally classified as non-climacteric, and the role of ethylene in fruit ripening is not clear. The available information indicates that the receptacle, a modified stem that supports the drupelets, is involved in ethylene production of ripe fruits. In this study, we report receptacle-related ethylene biosynthesis during the ripening of fruits of cv. Heritage. In addition, the expression pattern of ethylene biosynthesis transcripts was evaluated during the ripening process. The major transcript levels of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (RiACS1) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (RiACO1) were concomitant with ethylene production, increased total soluble solids (TSS) and decreased titratable acidity (TA) and fruit firmness. Moreover, ethylene biosynthesis and transcript levels of RiACS1 and RiACO1 were higher in the receptacle, sustaining the receptacle's role as a source of ethylene in regulating the ripening of raspberry. PMID:25847526

  11. Co-ordinated gene expression during phases of dormancy release in raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) buds.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Luca; Hancock, Robert D; Haupt, Sophie; Walker, Paul G; Pont, Simon D A; McNicol, Jim; Cardle, Linda; Morris, Jenny; Viola, Roberto; Brennan, Rex; Hedley, Peter E; Taylor, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Bud break in raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) is often poor and uneven, with many of the subapical buds remaining in a dormant state. In order to determine the dormancy status of raspberry buds, an empirical measure of bud burst in a growth-permissive environment following exposure to chilling (4 degrees C cold storage) was developed. For cv. Glen Ample, percentage bud burst in intact canes and isolated nodes was recorded after 14 d. Isolated nodes (a measure of endodormancy) achieved 100% bud burst after approximately 1500 h chilling whereas buds on intact plants (combined endo- and paradormancy) required an additional 1000 h chilling. A microarray approach was used to follow changes in gene expression that occurred during dormancy transition. The probes for the microarrays were obtained from endodormant and paradormant raspberry bud cDNA libraries. The expression profiles of 5300 clones from these libraries were subjected to principal component analysis to determine the most significant expression patterns. Sequence analysis of these clones, in many cases, enabled their functional categorization and the development of hypotheses concerning the mechanisms of bud dormancy release. Thus a set of novel candidates for key dormancy-related genes from raspberry buds have been identified. Bud dormancy is fundamental to the study of plant developmental processes and, in addition, its regulation is of significant economic importance to fruit and horticultural industries. PMID:17244630

  12. HPLC analysis of polyphenols in the fruits of Rubus idaeus L. (Rosaceae).

    PubMed

    Sparzak, B; Merino-Arevalo, M; Vander Heyden, Y; Krauze-Baranowska, M; Majdan, M; Fecka, I; Głód, D; Bączek, T

    2010-11-01

    The separation of anthocyanins present in the fruits of 11 varieties of red raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.) was performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a diode-array detector and evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD). The ELSD parameters--drift tube temperature, nebulising gas flow rate and gain value--were optimised to get the best detection and identification of the anthocyanins. The varieties Heritage and Willamette had the simplest anthocyanin sets consisting of only two predominant anthocyanins--cyanidin-3-O-sophoroside (1) and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (3), while in the other varieties two other predominant compounds were also present, cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside (4) and cyanidin-3-O-(2(G)-O-glucosylrutinoside) (2). Moreover, using ELSD, simultaneous analysis of anthocyanins and sanguiin H-6 (5), an ellagitannin, was performed. The contents of anthocyanins and sanguiin H-6 (5) were estimated by HPLC with ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) light detection. The determined concentrations of anthocyanins varied from 76.22 to 277.06 mg per 100 g of dry weight (d.w.). The content of sanguiin H-6 (5) was in the range from 135.04 to 547.48 mg per 100 g of d.w. PMID:21104526

  13. Ellagitannins from Raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) Fruit as Natural Inhibitors of Geotrichum candidum.

    PubMed

    Klewicka, Elżbieta; Sójka, Michał; Klewicki, Robert; Kołodziejczyk, Krzysztof; Lipińska, Lidia; Nowak, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the chemical characteristics of ellagitannins isolated from raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) fruit and their in vitro and in situ antifungal activity against Geotrichum candidum ŁOCK 0511. The study investigated a complex preparation containing various raspberry ellagitannins at a concentration of 86% w/w, as well as pure lambertianin C and sanguiin H-6. The ellagitannin preparation was obtained by extracting raspberry press cake and purifying the extract using Amberlite XAD resin, while individual compounds were isolated by means of preparative HPLC. The complex preparation was analyzed for the content of ellagitannins, anthocyanins, and flavan-3-ols using HPLC and LC-MS. The antifungal activity of the complex ellagitannin preparation and the isolated ellagitannins was determined for the strain Geotrichum candidum. The MIC and MFC values (10.0 mg/mL and 30.0 mg/mL, respectively) were found to be the same for lambertianin C, sanguiin H-6, and the complex ellagitannin preparation. The fungistatic activity of the studied ellagitannin preparation at a concentration of 10 mg/mL, as determined by the poisoned medium method, was 65.2% following 6 day incubation of Geotrichum candidum, with the linear growth rate of only 16.2 mm/day. The corresponding parameters for the control sample were 0% and 56 mm/day, respectively. The study demonstrated both in vitro and in situ antifungal activity of raspberry ellagitannins against Geotrichum candidum. PMID:27420041

  14. Isolation and Linkage Mapping of NBS-LRR Resistance Gene Analogs in Red Raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) and Classification Among 269 Rosaceae NGS-LRR Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant R genes are known to confer resistance to a variety of pathogens in a gene-for-gene mode. Seventy-five putative resistance gene analogs (RGAs) containing conserved domains were cloned and sequenced from the red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) cultivar ‘Latham’ using degenerate primers based on RGA...

  15. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) impacts on organic Chinese red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) fruit on quality and active components over postharvest storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) impacts on market quality and actives preservation of organic Chinese red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) fruit over postharvest storage. Fruit were harvested, cooled, and sorted for uniform maturity and quality. Fruit were ...

  16. GENETIC VARIATION IN RED RASPBERRIES (RUBUS IDAEUS L.; ROSACEAE) FROM SITES DIFFERING IN ORGANIC POLLUTANTS COMPARED WITH SYNTHETIC TANDEM REPEAT DNA PROBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two synthetic tandem repetitive DNA probes were used to compare genetic variation at variable-number-tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci among Rubus idaeus L. var. strigosus (Michx.) Maxim. (Rosaceae) individuals sampled at eight sites contaminated by pollutants (N = 39) and eight adjacent...

  17. CD39/NTPDase-1 expression and activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells are differentially regulated by leaf extracts from Rubus caesius and Rubus idaeus.

    PubMed

    Dudzinska, Dominika; Luzak, Boguslawa; Boncler, Magdalena; Rywaniak, Joanna; Sosnowska, Dorota; Podsedek, Anna; Watala, Cezary

    2014-09-01

    Many experimental studies have demonstrated the favorable biological activities of plants belonging to the genus Rubus, but little is known of the role of Rubus leaf extracts in the modulation of the surface membrane expression and activity of endothelial apyrase. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of 1-15 μg/ml Rubus extracts on CD39 expression and enzymatic activity, and on the activation (ICAM-1 expression) and viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The polyphenolic contents and antioxidative capacities of extracts from dewberry (R. caesius L.) and raspberry (R. idaeus L.) leaves were also investigated. The techniques applied were flow cytometry (endothelial surface membrane expression of ICAM-1 and CD39), malachite green assay (CD39 activity), HPLC-DAD (quantitative analysis of polyphenolic extract), ABTS, DPPH and FRAP spectrometric assays (antioxidant capacity), and the MTT test (cell viability). Significantly increased CD39 expressions and significantly decreased ATPDase activities were found in the cells treated with 15 μg/ml of either extract compared to the results for the controls. Neither of the extracts affected cell proliferation, but both significantly augmented endothelial cell ICAM-1 expression. The overall antioxidant capacities of the examined extracts remained relatively high and corresponded well to the determined total polyphenol contents. Overall, the results indicate that under in vitro conditions dewberry and raspberry leaf extracts have unfavorable impact on endothelial cells. PMID:25034034

  18. The influence of Rubus idaeus and Rubus caesius leaf extracts on platelet aggregation in whole blood. Cross-talk of platelets and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dudzinska, Dominika; Bednarska, Katarzyna; Boncler, Magdalena; Luzak, Boguslawa; Watala, Cezary

    2016-07-01

    Recently, polyphenols have gained attention as potential natural cardioprotective therapeutics, due to their antiplatelet, anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant activity. Species belonging to the genus Rubus sp. have been reported to be a source of polyphenolic compounds with antioxidative proprieties and beneficial biological activities. This study investigates the effects of leaf extracts obtained from red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) and European dewberry (Rubus caesius L.) on the reactivity of blood platelets. In ADP-stimulated blood, raspberry and dewberry extracts (15 µg/ml) markedly decreased platelet surface membrane expression of activated GPIIbIIIa receptor by 16% and 21%, respectively (P < 0.01) and significantly inhibited platelet aggregation (by 31-41% for raspberry and by 38-55% for dewberry, P < 0.01). In platelet-rich plasma (PRP), the extracts had no effect on ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The effectiveness of the extracts in whole blood and the lack of their activity in PRP indicate that leukocytes are likely to participate in the platelet response to the extracts. Our experiments show that the extracts significantly reduced the amount of free radicals released by activated neutrophils in whole blood (P < 0.001), as well as in suspensions of isolated neutrophils (P < 0.05). Moreover, the reduced number of neutrophils leads to the decreased efficiency of the extracts in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. In summary, our findings show that the raspberry and dewberry leaf extracts considerably modulated blood platelet reactivity in whole blood: they influenced blood platelet aggregation, possibly via the modulation of the redox status dependent on the oxidative activity of neutrophils. PMID:26836594

  19. Molecular and biochemical characterization of benzalacetone synthase and chalcone synthase genes and their proteins from raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Desen; Hrazdina, Geza

    2008-02-15

    Two new members of the polyketide synthase (PKS) gene family (RiPKS4 and RiPKS5) were cloned from raspberry fruits (Rubus idaeus L., cv Royalty) and expressed in Escherichia coli. Characterization of the recombinant enzyme products indicated that RiPKS4 is a bifunctional polyketide synthase producing both 4-hydroxybenzalacetone and naringenin chalcone. The recombinant RiPKS4 protein, like the native protein from raspberry fruits [W. Borejsza-Wysocki, G. Hrazdina, Plant Physiol. 1996;110: 791-799] accepted p-coumaryl-CoA and ferulyl-CoA as starter substrates and catalyzed the formation of both naringenin chalcone, 4-hydroxy-benzalacetone and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzalacetone. Although activity of RiPKS4 was higher with ferulyl-CoA than with p-coumaryl-CoA, the corresponding product, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy phenylbutanone could not be detected in raspberries to date. Sequence analysis of the genes and proteins suggested that this feature of RiPKS4 was created by variation in the C-terminus due to DNA recombination at the 3' region of its coding sequence. RiPKS5 is a typical chalcone synthase (CHS) that uses p-coumaryl-CoA only as starter substrate and produces naringenin chalcone exclusively as the reaction product. PMID:18068110

  20. Rapid Identification of Flavonoid Constituents Directly from PTP1B Inhibitive Extract of Raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) Leaves by HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuan-Hong; Guo, Han; Xu, Wen-Bin; Ge, Juan; Li, Xin; Alimu, Mireguli; He, Da-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Many potential health benefits of raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) leaves were attributed to polyphenolic compounds, especially flavonoids. In this study, the methanol extract of R. idaeus leaves showed significant protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activity with IC50 value of 3.41 ± 0.01 µg mL(-1) Meanwhile, a rapid and reliable method, employed high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry, was established for structure identification of flavonoids from PTP1B inhibitive extract of R. idaeus leaves using accurate mass measurement and characteristic fragmentation patterns. A total of 16 flavonoids, including 4 quercetin derivatives, 2 luteolin derivatives, 8 kaempferol derivatives and 2 isorhamnetin derivatives, were identified. Compounds 3: and 4: , Compounds 6: and 7: and Compounds 15: and 16: were isomers with different aglycones and different saccharides. Compounds 8: , 9: and 10: were isomers with the same aglycone and the same saccharide but different substituent positions. Compounds 11: and 12: were isomers with the same aglycone but different saccharides. Compounds 2: , 8: , 9: and 10: possessed the same substituent saccharide of glycuronic acid. Most of them were reported inR. idaeus for the first time. PMID:26896347

  1. Construction of black (Rubus occidentalis) and red (R. idaeus) raspberry linkage maps and their comparison to the genomes of strawberry, apple, and peach.

    PubMed

    Bushakra, J M; Stephens, M J; Atmadjaja, A N; Lewers, K S; Symonds, V V; Udall, J A; Chagné, D; Buck, E J; Gardiner, S E

    2012-07-01

    The genus Rubus belongs to the Rosaceae and is comprised of 600-800 species distributed world-wide. To date, genetic maps of the genus consist largely of non-transferable markers such as amplified fragment length polymorphisms. An F(1) population developed from a cross between an advanced breeding selection of Rubus occidentalis (96395S1) and R. idaeus 'Latham' was used to construct a new genetic map consisting of DNA sequence-based markers. The genetic linkage maps presented here are constructed of 131 markers on at least one of the two parental maps. The majority of the markers are orthologous, including 14 Rosaceae conserved orthologous set markers, and 60 new gene-based markers developed for raspberry. Thirty-four published raspberry simple sequence repeat markers were used to align the new maps to published raspberry maps. The 96395S1 genetic map consists of six linkage groups (LG) and covers 309 cM with an average of 10 cM between markers; the 'Latham' genetic map consists of seven LG and covers 561 cM with an average of 5 cM between markers. We used BLAST analysis to align the orthologous sequences used to design primer pairs for Rubus genetic mapping with the genome sequences of Fragaria vesca 'Hawaii 4', Malus × domestica 'Golden Delicious', and Prunus 'Lovell'. The alignment of the orthologous markers designed here suggests that the genomes of Rubus and Fragaria have a high degree of synteny and that synteny decreases with phylogenetic distance. Our results give unprecedented insights into the genome evolution of raspberry from the putative ancestral genome of the single ancestor common to Rosaceae. PMID:22398438

  2. Biosynthesis of monoterpenes and norisoprenoids in raspberry fruits (Rubus idaeus L.): the role of cytosolic mevalonate and plastidial methylerythritol phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Daniela; Swatski, Anna; Mosandl, Armin; Wüst, Matthias

    2007-10-31

    The biosynthesis of the monoterpenes (-)-alpha-pinene, linalool, and the norisoprenoids alpha- and beta-ionone in raspberry fruits (rubus idaeus L.) was investigated by in vivo feeding experiments with [5,5-(2)H2]-mevalonic acid lactone and [5,5-(2)H2]-1-deoxy-D-xylulose. The volatile compounds were extracted by stirbar sorptive extraction and analyzed using thermal desorption-multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-enantio-MDGC-MS). The feeding experiments demonstrate that (-)-alpha-pinene and (S)-linalool are exclusively synthesized via the cytosolic mevalonic acid pathway. In contrast, (2)H-labeled (R)-(E)-alpha-ionone and (2)H-labeled (E)-beta-ionone are detectable after application of d2-1-deoxy-D-xylulose and d2-mevalonic acid lactone, respectively. However, (R)-linalool reveals no incorporation of either one of the fed precursors, even though this enantiomer is detectable in the fruit tissue. PMID:17907775

  3. In-vitro mutagenic potential and effect on permeability of co-administered drugs across Caco-2 cell monolayers of Rubus idaeus and its fortified fractions.

    PubMed

    Kreander, Kari; Galkin, Anna; Vuorela, Satu; Tammela, Päivi; Laitinen, Leena; Heinonen, Marina; Vuorela, Pia

    2006-11-01

    This study investigated the mutagenic, anti-mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of acetone extract of raspberry, Rubus idaeus L. (v. Ottawa) Rosaceae, and the isolated and characterized ellagitannin and anthocyanin fractions thereof, suitable for food applications. The studied raspberry extract and fractions did not show any mutagenic effects determined in the miniaturized Ames test and were not cytotoxic to Caco-2 cells at the used concentrations. However, the anti-mutagenic properties were changed (i.e. decreased mutagenicity of 2-nitrofluorene in strain TA98, and slightly increased mutagenicity of 2-aminoanthracene in strain TA100) with metabolic activation. Further, their influence on the permeability of co-administered common drugs (ketoprofen, paracetamol, metoprolol and verapamil) across Caco-2 monolayers was evaluated. The apical-to-basolateral permeability of highly permeable verapamil was mostly affected (decreased) during co-administration of the raspberry extract or the ellagitannin fraction. Ketoprofen permeability was decreased by the ellagitannin fraction. Consumption of food rich in phytochemicals, as demonstrated here with chemically characterized raspberry extract and fractions, with well-absorbing drugs would seem to affect the permeability of some of these drugs depending on the components. Thus their effects on the absorption of drugs in-vivo cannot be excluded. PMID:17132218

  4. A case study on toxicological aspects of the pest and disease control in the production of the high-quality raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.).

    PubMed

    Sadło, Stanisław; Szpyrka, Ewa; Piechowicz, Bartosz; Grodzicki, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    The field studies on the residue levels of the fungicides and insecticides used in commercial raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) plantation have been performed. Starting on the first day of harvesting (on June 19), 20 laboratory samples of fruit, 10 laboratory samples of leaves and 4 samples of soil were analyzed and the residue levels were compared to the Maximum Residue Limits (MRL) and Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADI). All analyses were carried out using extraction method and gas chromatography technique. Esfenwalerate (Sumi-alpha 050 EC) and beta-cyfluthrin (Bulldock 025 EC), the insecticides belonging to the group of synthetic pyrethroids, were not found in harvested ripe fruits, while cypermethrin residues (Cyperkill 25 EC) applied on May 24, 25 days later was still found on low levels in fruits (0.026 mg kg(-1)) and in leaves (2.58 mg kg(-1)). In turn, residues of chlorpyrifos (Dursban 480 EC), applied to the soil on May 15 against the cockchafers Melolontha melolontha and Otiorhynchus sp., were found at the level 0.004 mg kg(-1). The content of pesticides in ripe fruits depended mainly on the dose and on the time that has elapsed from the date of their application and were as follows: boscalid -0.950, pyrimethanil -0.917, pyraclostrobin -0.253 cypermethrin -0.026 and chlorpyrifos -0.004 mg kg(-1) while in leaves: boscalid -30.64, pyrimethanil -8.13, pyraclostrobin -15.82, cypermethrin -2.58 and chlorpyrifos -0.15 mg kg(-1). The highest average daily intake was in the case of boscalid, and in fruits and leaves reached the levels 0.205 and 6.63, in total 0.33% and 12.18% of ADI, respectively. PMID:25421623

  5. Improved recovery of cryotherapy-treated shoot tips following thermotherapy of in vitro-grown stock shoots of raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiaochun; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2009-01-01

    Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) can be efficiently eradicated from raspberry plants (Rubus idaeus) by a procedure combining thermotherapy and cryotherapy. However, the bottleneck of this procedure is that, following thermotherapy, cryopreserved shoot tips become chlorotic during regrowth and eventually die after several subcultures. In addition, survival of heat-treated stock shoots and recovery of cryopreserved shoot tips following thermotherapy are low. The present study focused towards improving regrowth of cryopreserved raspberry shoot tips following thermotherapy. Results showed that preconditioning stock shoots with salicylic acid (SA; 0.01-0.1 mM) markedly increased survival of stock shoots after 4 weeks of thermotherapy. Regrowth of cryopreserved shoot tips following thermotherapy was also significantly enhanced when SA (0.05-0.1 mM) was used for preconditioning stock shoots. Addition of either Fe-ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (Fe-EDTA, 50 mg per L) or Fe-ethylenediaminedi(o)hydroxyphenylacetic acid (Fe-EDDHA, 50 mg per L) to post-culture medium strongly promoted regrowth and totally prevented chlorosis of shoots regenerated from cryopreserved shoot tips following thermotherapy. Using the parameters optimized in the present study, about 80 percent survival of heat-treated stock shoots and about 33 percent regrowth of cryopreserved shoot tips following thermotherapy were obtained. Morphology of plants regenerated from cryopreserved shoot tips following thermotherapy was identical to that of control plants, based on observations of leaf shape and size, internode length and plant height. Optimization of the thermotherapy procedure followed by cryotherapy will facilitate the wider application of this technique to eliminate viruses which can invade meristems. PMID:19750241

  6. Pomological features, nutritional quality, polyphenol content analysis, and antioxidant properties of domesticated and 3 wild ecotype forms of raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.).

    PubMed

    Gülçin, Ilhami; Topal, Fevzi; Çakmakçı, Ramazan; Bilsel, Mine; Gören, Ahmet C; Erdogan, Ummugulsum

    2011-05-01

    The raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) is an economically important berry crop that contains many phenolic compounds with potential health benefits. In this study, important pomological features, including nutrient content and antioxidant properties, of a domesticated and 3 wild (Yayla, Yavuzlar, and Yedigöl) raspberry fruits were evaluated. Also, the amount of total phenolics and flavonoids in lyophilized aqueous extracts of domesticated and wild ecotypes of raspberry fruits were calculated as gallic acid equivalents (GAEs) and quercetin equivalents (QE). The highest phenolic compounds were found in wild Yayla ecotype (26.66 ± 3.26 GAE/mg extract). Whilst, the highest flavonoids were determined in wild Yedigöl ecotype (6.09 ± 1.21 QA/mg extract). The antioxidant activity of lyophilized aqueous extracts of domesticated and wild ecotypes of raspberry fruits were investigated as trolox equivalents using different in vitro assays including DPPH(•), ABTS(•+), DMPD(•+), and O(•-)(2) radical scavenging activities, H(2)O(2) scavenging activity, ferric (Fe(3+)) and cupric ions (Cu(2+)) reducing abilities, ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activity. In addition, quantitative amounts of caffeic acid, ferulic acid, syringic acid, ellagic acid, quercetin, α-tocopherol, pyrogallol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillin, p-coumaric acid, gallic acid, and ascorbic acid in lyophilized aqueous extracts of domesticated and wild ecotypes of raspberry fruits were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The results clearly show that p-coumaric acid is the main phenolic acid responsible for the antioxidant and radical scavenging activity of lyophilized aqueous extracts of domesticated and wild ecotypes of raspberry fruits. PMID:22417339

  7. Hepatoprotective effect of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. lignans and its formula with Rubus idaeus on chronic alcohol-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ou; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Jia; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Feng; Ji, Baoping

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the liver protection effect of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. (SC) lignans and its combination with Rubus idaeus (RI) on chronic alcohol-induced mice. A low level of SC lignans (SL) was prepared from the clear juice of sarcocarp. Lignans were further extracted from the SC seeds and added to the SL to form high-level SC lignans (SH). Moreover, RI clear juice lyophilized powder was mixed with SL (SR), and the liver protection effects of SL, SH and SR were investigated. Male ICR mice were administered with the corresponding samples and gastrically infused with 50% alcohol (1 h later) once per day for 60 d. In the in vitro study, the characteristic lignans in the SC clear juice and the seed extract were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant capability of SL, SH, and SR were determined. The results of the in vivo study showed that SC lignans exhibited a dose-dependent effect on the regulation of hepatic antioxidant status, serum transaminases levels, hyperlipidemia and hepatic fat deposition in mice. However, hepatic lesions were observed in the SH mice, which indicated a potential side effect caused by long-term consumption of SH under chronic alcohol administration. By contrast, SR exhibited a similar hepatoprotective effect as SH without any abnormality found in the histological analysis. After analysis with HPLC, Schizandrol A and Schizandrol B were identified in the SC clear juice, and two more kinds of lignans, Schisandrin A and Schisandrin B, were identified in the seed extracts. The SR sample had the highest TPC and exhibited the best antioxidant capability. In conclusion, RI strengthened the liver protection effect of SC lignans effectively and safely, which was probably achieved by enhancing the antioxidant status and the positive effect of their combination was possibly attributed to both lignans and polyphenols. This study demonstrated that the

  8. Construction of black (Rubus occidentalis) and red (R. idaeus) raspberry linkage maps and their comparison to the genomes of strawberry, apple, and peach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Rubus belongs to the Rosaceae and is comprised of 600-800 species distributed worldwide. To date, genetic maps of the genus consist largely of non-transferable markers such as amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP). An F1 population developed from a cross between an advanced breedi...

  9. Rubus idaeus L. reverses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and suppresses cell invasion and protease activities by targeting ERK1/2 and FAK pathways in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Chu, Shu-Chen; Hsu, Li-Sung; Chen, Kuo-Shuen; Lai, Ming-Tsung; Yeh, Chia-Heng; Chen, Pei-Ni

    2013-12-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been considered essential for cancer metastasis, a multistep complicated process including local invasion, intravasation, extravasation, and proliferation at distant sites. Herein we provided molecular evidence associated with the antimetastatic effect of Rubus idaeus L. extracts (RIE) by showing a nearly complete inhibition on the invasion (p<0.001) of highly metastatic A549 cells via reduced activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and urokinasetype plasminogen activator (u-PA). We performed Western blot to find that RIE could induce up-regulation of epithelial marker such as E-cadherin and α-catenin and inhibit the mesenchymal markers such as N-cadherin, fibronectin, snail-1, and vimentin. Selective snail-1 inhibition by snail-1-specific-siRNA also showed increased E-cadherin expression in A549 cells suggesting a possible involvement of snail-1 inhibition in RIE-caused increase in E-cadherin level. RIE also inhibited p-FAK, p-paxillin and AP-1 by Western blot analysis, indicating the anti-EMT effect of RIE in human lung carcinoma. Importantly, an in vivo BALB/c nude mice xenograft model showed that RIE treatment reduced tumor growth by oral gavage, and RIE represent promising candidates for future phytochemical-based mechanistic pathway-targeted cancer prevention strategies. PMID:24161487

  10. Transferability of Rubus Microsatellite Markers to Black Raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers have been developed from genomic and expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries in red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L., subgenus Idaeobatus) and also in blackberry (Rubus L. subgenus Rubus). Recently, there has also been increased interest in the use of...

  11. Transferability of Rubus Microsatellite Markers for use in Black Raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are valuable as co-dominant genetic markers with a variety of applications such as DNA fingerprinting, linkage mapping, and population structure analysis. To date, SSR marker development in Rubus has focused on red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L., subgenu...

  12. The genome of black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) is an important specialty fruit crop in the U.S. Pacific Northwest that can hybridize with the globally commercialized red raspberry (R. idaeus). Here we report a 243 Mb draft genome of black raspberry that will serve as a useful reference for the Rosaceae and Ru...

  13. Rubus idaeus L Inhibits Invasion Potential of Human A549 Lung Cancer Cells by Suppression Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Akt Pathway In Vitro and Reduces Tumor Growth In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shu-Chen; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Hsu, Li-Sung; Chen, Kuo-Shuen; Chiang, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Pei-Ni

    2014-05-01

    The metastasis of lung cancer is the most prevalent cause of patient death. Various treatment strategies have targeted the prevention of the occurrence of metastasis. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in lung cancer cells is considered a prerequisite to acquire the invasive/migratory phenotype and to subsequently achieve metastasis. However, the effects ofRubus idaeuson cancer invasion and the EMT of the human lung carcinoma remain unclear. In this article, we test the hypothesis thatR idaeusethyl acetate (RIAE) possesses an antimetastatic effect and reverses the EMT potential of human lung A549 cells. We extract the raspberryR idaeuswith methanol (RIME), chloroform (RICE), ethyl acetate (RIAE),n-butanol (RIBE), and water (RIWE). The RIAE treatment obviously inhibits the invasive (P< .001), motility (P< .001), spreading, and migratory potential (P< .001) of highly metastatic human lung cancer A549 cells. The zymography and promoter luciferase analysis reveals that RIAE decreases the proteinase and transcription activities of MMP-2 and u-PA. Molecular analyses show that RIAE increases the E-cadherin level that is mainly localized at the cellular membrane. This result was also verified through confocal analyses. RIAE also induces the upregulation of an epithelial marker, such as α-catenin, and decreases mesenchymal markers, such as snail-1 and N-cadherin, that promote cell invasion and metastasis. RIAE inhibits MMP-2 and u-PA by attenuating the NF-κB and p-Akt expression. The inhibition of RIAE on the growth of A549 cells in vivo was also verified using a cancer cell xenograft nude mice model. Our results show the anti-invasive/antitumor effects of RIAE and associated mechanisms, which suggest that RIAE should be further tested in clinically relevant models to exploit its potential benefits against metastatic lung cancer cells. PMID:24335666

  14. Host status of Rubus species and hybrids for the root lesion nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The root lesion nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans, is a production-limiting pest in red raspberry, Rubus idaeus, in the United States. Having resistance as a tool to manage P. penetrans in raspberries would reduce the impact of this nematode on raspberry productivity as well as reduce the need for pr...

  15. Rubus Stunt Phytoplasma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubus stunt is a severe disease that naturally infects only plants in the genus Rubus, and no immune Rubus germplasm has been reported. Apium, Chrysanthemum, Fragaria, and Trifolium species have been used as experimental hosts for Rubus stunt phytoplasma. The disease occurs in wild and cultivated R...

  16. A comparison of fruit chemical characteristics of two wild grown Rubus species from different locations of Croatia.

    PubMed

    Dujmović Purgar, Dubravka; Duralija, Boris; Voća, Sandra; Vokurka, Aleš; Ercisli, Sezai

    2012-01-01

    The main focus of our study was to investigate differences in nutritional (dry matter, soluble solids content, total acidity and pH value) and bioactive values (ascorbic acid, total anthocyanins, total phenols, and non-flavonoids content) of wild grown raspberry (Rubus idaeus) and blackberry (Rubus discolor) genotypes harvested from native populations in Croatia. The average total acidity ranged from 0.93 to 1.72% in R. discolor and 1.57 to 1.91% in R. idaeus. Ascorbic acid was found between 22.34 mg and 45.00 mg 100 g⁻¹ in R. idaeus, while it was between 30.64 mg and 33.09 mg 100 g⁻¹ in R. discolor genotypes. A great variability in total anthocyanins was detected in roatian wild blackberry and raspberry genotypes, ranging from 2,226 to 2,367 mg kg⁻¹ for blackberries and 279 to 582 mg kg⁻¹ for raspberries, indicating wild blackberries are particularly rich in anthocyanins. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that investigated wild growing fruit species have a great potential in nutritive research, as well as in biodiversity research. It is necessary to carry out further investigation and evaluation of wild growing fruit species to utilize them in the most appropriate way, as well as conservation of interesting accessions in the gene banks. PMID:22936111

  17. Epidemiology of Xiphinema americanum and Tomato ringspot virus on Red Raspberry, Rubus idaeus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The population dynamics and the ability of Xiphinema americanum to transmit Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV) are poorly understood in the raspberry pathosystem. Soil samples were collected monthly from 1999 through 2002 in a ToRSV infected 'Willamette' red raspberry field in Clark County, WA, USA. Pop...

  18. Comparison of flavonoid composition of red raspberries ( Rubus idaeus L.) grown in the southern United States.

    PubMed

    Bradish, Christine M; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Fernandez, Gina E; Xie, Guoxiang; Jia, Wei

    2012-06-13

    Raspberry flavonoid compounds have significant antioxidant activities, and regular consumption may help prevent and/or moderate chronic diseases. Targeted metabolite profiling is useful to identify compounds contributing to these antioxidant properties and health benefits and for tailored breeding for functional foods. In this study, metabolomic variation was determined among three fall-fruiting red raspberry cultivars ('Autumn Britten', 'Caroline', 'Nantahala') grown at three North Carolina locations differing in elevation and average day/night temperatures. 'Nantahala' was specifically bred for the mountainous regions of the southern United States. Ten flavonoid compounds were detected by liquid chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS). Of those, cyanidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-sophoroside, cyanidin-3-rutinoside, cyanidin-3-sambubioside, and quercetin-3-glucoside were quantified against external standards. Variation in flavonoid composition was primarily attributed to genotype and associated with night temperature and hours exposed to temperatures over 29 °C. 'Nantahala' had particularly high levels of cyanidin-3-sambubioside, indicative of its purple raspberry lineage. Quercetin-3-glucoside levels increased the most with elevated temperatures. PMID:22128912

  19. Method to reduce low temperature stress (LTS) in red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Norway and other Nordic regions, the floricanes of red raspberries often suffer 20 to 30 percent injury from exposures to extremely low temperatures. We studied from 2011 to 2014 to determine the effect of bending the floricanes of ‘Glen Ample’, ‘Stiora’ and KV91-39-7 red raspberries close to th...

  20. Temporal sequence of cell wall disassembly events in developing fruits. 1. Analysis of raspberry (Rubus idaeus).

    PubMed

    Vicente, Ariel R; Ortugno, Claudia; Powell, Ann L T; Greve, L Carl; Labavitch, John M

    2007-05-16

    Raspberry fruits were harvested at five developmental stages, from green to red ripe, and the changes in cell wall composition, pectin and hemicellulose solubilization, and depolymerization were analyzed. Fruit softening at intermediate stages of ripening was associated with increased pectin solubilization, which occurred without depolymerization. Arabinose was found to be the most abundant noncellulosic neutral sugar in the cell wall and showed dramatic solubilization late in ripening. No changes in pectin molecular size were observed even at the 100% red stage. Subsequently, as fruit became fully ripe a dramatic depolymerization occurred. In contrast, the hemicellulosic fractions showed no significant changes in content or polymer size during ripening. The paper discusses the sequence of events leading to cell wall disassembly in raspberry fruit. PMID:17428067

  1. Quality and chemical composition of ten red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) genotypes during three harvest seasons.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Sebastian Piotr; Nes, Arnfinn; Wold, Anne-Berit; Remberg, Siv Fagertun; Aaby, Kjersti

    2014-10-01

    Colour and chemical composition of fruits of 10 red raspberry genotypes grown in Nordic climate during three harvest seasons were studied. The main phenolic compounds in the fruits were ellagitannins and anthocyanins, contributing 57% and 42% to the quantified phenolic compounds, respectively. Cyanidin-3-sophoroside was the most abundant anthocyanin (61%). All quality parameters were significantly affected by genotype. The genotypes could be categorised into three groups. 'Veten' and 'RU984 06038' were characterised by high concentrations of flavonoids, i.e., anthocyanins and quercetin glycosides, and dark red colour. 'Octavia', 'Glen Magna', 'RU004 03067', 'Glen Ample' and 'RU974 07002' were characterised by light colour, high titratable acids and low flavonoid concentrations. 'Malling Hestia', 'RU024 01003' and 'RU004 04095' had high content of dry matter, soluble solids, ascorbic acid and ellagic acid containing compounds, in addition to high hue and chroma values. All quality parameters, except ascorbic acid and lambertianin C, varied significantly between harvest seasons. The lowest seasonal variation in fruit quality was observed in 'RU024 01003' and 'Glen Ample' and the highest 'RU004 03067' and 'Glen Magna'. PMID:24799233

  2. Fermentative behavior of Saccharomyces strains during microvinification of raspberry juice (Rubus idaeus L.).

    PubMed

    Duarte, Whasley F; Dragone, Giuliano; Dias, Disney R; Oliveira, José M; Teixeira, José A; Silva, João B Almeida E; Schwan, Rosane F

    2010-10-15

    Sixteen different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus were evaluated in the production of raspberry fruit wine. Raspberry juice sugar concentrations were adjusted to 16° Brix with a sucrose solution, and batch fermentations were performed at 22 °C. Various kinetic parameters, such as the conversion factors of the substrates into ethanol (Y(p/s)), biomass (Y(x/s)), glycerol (Y(g/s)) and acetic acid (Y(ac/s)), the volumetric productivity of ethanol (Q(p)), the biomass productivity (P(x)), and the fermentation efficiency (E(f)) were calculated. Volatile compounds (alcohols, ethyl esters, acetates of higher alcohols and volatile fatty acids) were determined by gas chromatography (GC-FID). The highest values for the E(f), Y(p/s), Y(g/s), and Y(x/s) parameters were obtained when strains commonly used in the fuel ethanol industry (S. cerevisiae PE-2, BG, SA, CAT-1, and VR-1) were used to ferment raspberry juice. S. cerevisiae strain UFLA FW 15, isolated from fruit, displayed similar results. Twenty-one volatile compounds were identified in raspberry wines. The highest concentrations of total volatile compounds were found in wines produced with S. cerevisiae strains UFLA FW 15 (87,435 μg/L), CAT-1 (80,317.01 μg/L), VR-1 (67,573.99 μg/L) and S. bayanus CBS 1505 (71,660.32 μg/L). The highest concentrations of ethyl esters were 454.33 μg/L, 440.33 μg/L and 438 μg/L for S. cerevisiae strains UFLA FW 15, VR-1 and BG, respectively. Similar to concentrations of ethyl esters, the highest concentrations of acetates (1927.67 μg/L) and higher alcohols (83,996.33 μg/L) were produced in raspberry wine from S. cerevisiae UFLA FW 15. The maximum concentration of volatile fatty acids was found in raspberry wine produced by S. cerevisiae strain VR-1. We conclude that S. cerevisiae strain UFLA FW 15 fermented raspberry juice and produced a fruit wine with low concentrations of acids and high concentrations of acetates, higher alcohols and ethyl esters. PMID:20828848

  3. Characterization of red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) genotypes for their physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Tosun, M; Ercisli, S; Karlidag, H; Sengul, M

    2009-09-01

    The worldwide tendency for growing more small fruits, including raspberries, shows permanent increase because this group of fruits has a relatively higher content of bioactive nutrients. To study the health benefits of red raspberry fruits, 11 preselected wild-grown and 1 well-known cultivar, Heritage, were evaluated for some of their physicochemical properties such as fruit weight, total antioxidant capacity (measured by beta-carotene bleaching and FRAP assays), total phenolics, ascorbic acid, soluble solid content (SSC), and acidity. Fruit weight, SSC, and ascorbic acid contents were between 1.47 and 2.32 g, 10.87% and 13.60%, and 21 and 36 mg/100 g, respectively. Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content varied among genotypes and the ERZ5 genotype had the highest antioxidant capacity as ascertained by both methods. This genotype also had the highest total phenolic (2031 microg GAE/g FW) content. There are linear relationships between antioxidant capacities and total phenols. The present study demonstrates the potential of certain wild genotypes, notably ERZ5, for improving the nutritional value through germplasm enhancement programs. PMID:19895463

  4. [Technology of production and biological activity of toothpaste from Rubus idaeus].

    PubMed

    Bakuridze, A D; Nikolaev, S M; Tsurtsumiia, I G; Berashvili, D T

    2009-09-01

    Composition and the technology of manufacturing of toothpaste from extract of blackberry with anti-inflammatory activity have been developed. Toothpaste contains the following ingredients (g): Blackberry extract - 3.0 5.0 7.0 Aluminum hydroxide - 30,0 Glycerin - 10,0 Sodim carboxymethylcellulose - 1,5 Sodium laurilsulfate - 2,0 Calcium glycerophosphate - 1,5 Sodium monofluorophosphate - 1.0 Titanium dioxide - 1,0 Perfume - 1,0 Sorbit - 1,0 Purified water to 100 ml. Toothpaste containing 3%, 5% and 7% of blackberry extract possesses higher antioedemic activity and has mild influence on alteration and proliferation processes. This allows us to recommend researched toothpaste for application. PMID:19801745

  5. Pesticide residues in raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.) and dietary risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Łozowicka, B; Kaczyński, P; Jankowska, M; Rutkowska, E; Hrynko, I

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the residues of 140 pesticides in raspberries from north-eastern Poland (2005-2010). Gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) and nitrogen phosphorous detector (GC-NPD) was used. Among the 128 samples, 66 (51.6%) were found to detect residues: 14.1% contained one pesticide and around 38% multiple pesticide residues. The most frequently detected were pyrimethanil residues (36.0%). Twenty-seven (21.1%) raspberry samples exceeded the maximum residue limits. The estimated daily intakes ranged from 0.003% to 3.183% of the acceptable daily intake (ADI) for adults 0.008% and 9.7% for toddlers, respectively. The most critical case is procymidone, the acute risk was 180.9% of acute reference dose (ARfD) for toddlers and for adults (83% of ARfD) which is high. PMID:24779781

  6. Characterization and biological activities of a novel polysaccharide isolated from raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) fruits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zeyuan; Liu, Lu; Xu, Yaqin; Wang, Libo; Teng, Xin; Li, Xingguo; Dai, Jing

    2015-11-01

    A water-soluble polysaccharide namely RCP-II from raspberry fruits was obtained by complex enzyme method followed by successive purification using macroporous resin D4020 and Sephadex G-100 columns. RCP-II was an acidic heteropolysaccharide and the characteristic structure of polysaccharide was determined. The carbohydrate of RCP-II was composed with galacturonic acid, rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, glucose and galactose in a molar ratio of 1.00:0.55:1.19:0.52:0.44:1.90 and the average molecular weight was estimated to be 4013 Da, based on dextran standards. RCP-II presented high scavenging activity toward DPPH•, HO•, O2(•-) in a concentration-dependent manner. The determination of the inhibitory activity on protein glycation showed that in 14 days of incubation the inhibitory ability of RCP-II was more effective on the development of non-enzymatic glycation reaction at early phase than that at the following two phases. PMID:26256339

  7. Bioactivity of Meeker and Willamette raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) pomace extracts.

    PubMed

    Cetojević-Simin, Dragana D; Velićanski, Aleksandra S; Cvetković, Dragoljub D; Markov, Siniša L; Cetković, Gordana S; Tumbas Šaponjac, Vesna T; Vulić, Jelena J; Canadanović-Brunet, Jasna M; Djilas, Sonja M

    2015-01-01

    Taking into account the substantial potential of raspberry processing by-products, pomace extracts from two raspberry cultivars, Meeker and Willamette, were investigated. Total phenolic, flavonoid and anthocyanin contents were determined. Willamette pomace extract (EC₅₀=0.042 mg/ml) demonstrated stronger 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl DPPH radical-scavenging activity than did Meeker pomace extract (EC₅₀=0.072 mg/ml). The most pronounced cell growth inhibition effect was obtained in the breast adenocarcinoma cell line, reaching EC50 values of 34.8 and 60.3 μg/ml for Willamette and Meeker extracts, respectively. Both extracts demonstrated favourable non-tumor/tumor cell growth ratios and potently increased the apoptosis/necrosis ratio in breast adenocarcinoma and cervix carcinoma cells. In reference and wild bacterial strains, minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were achieved in a concentration range from 0.29 to 0.59 mg/ml, and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC) in a range from 0.39 to 0.78 mg/ml. The results indicate significant antioxidant, antiproliferative, proapoptotic and antibacterial activities of raspberry pomace and favour its use as a functional food ingredient. PMID:25053074

  8. A variant of Rubus yellow net virus with altered genomic organization.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Lara, Alfredo; Mosier, Nola J; Keller, Karen E; Martin, Robert R

    2015-02-01

    Rubus yellow net virus (RYNV) is a member of the genus Badnavirus (family: Caulimoviridae). RYNV infects Rubus species causing chlorosis of the tissue along the leaf veins, giving an unevenly distributed netted symptom in some cultivars of red and black raspberry. Recently, a strain of RYNV was sequenced from a Rubus idaeus plant in Alberta, Canada, exhibiting such symptoms. The viral genome contained seven open reading frames (ORFs) with five of them in the sense-strand, including a large polyprotein. Here we describe a graft-transmissible strain of RYNV from Europe infecting cultivar 'Baumforth's Seedling A' (named RYNV-BS), which was sequenced using rolling circle amplification, enzymatic digestion, cloning and primer walking, and it was resequenced at a 5X coverage. This sequence was then compared with the RYNV-Ca genome and significant differences were observed. Genomic analysis identified differences in the arrangement of coding regions, promoter elements, and presence of motifs. The genomic organization of RYNV-BS consisted of five ORFs (four ORFs in the sense-strand and one ORF in the antisense-strand). ORFs 1, 2, and 3 showed a high degree of homology to RYNV-Ca, while ORFs 4 and 6 of RYNV-BS were quite distinct. Also, the predicted ORFs 5 and 7 in the RYNV-Ca were absent in the RYNV-BS sequence. These differences may account for the lack of aphid transmissibility of RYNV-BS. PMID:25480633

  9. Complete genomic sequence of a Rubus yellow net virus isolate and detection of genome-wide pararetrovirus-derived small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kalischuk, Melanie L; Fusaro, Adriana F; Waterhouse, Peter M; Pappu, Hanu R; Kawchuk, Lawrence M

    2013-12-26

    Rubus yellow net virus (RYNV) was cloned and sequenced from a red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) plant exhibiting symptoms of mosaic and mottling in the leaves. Its genomic sequence indicates that it is a distinct member of the genus Badnavirus, with 7932bp and seven ORFs, the first three corresponding in size and location to the ORFs found in the type member Commelina yellow mottle virus. Bioinformatic analysis of the genomic sequence detected several features including nucleic acid binding motifs, multiple zinc finger-like sequences and domains associated with cellular signaling. Subsequent sequencing of the small RNAs (sRNAs) from RYNV-infected R. idaeus leaf tissue was used to determine any RYNV sequences targeted by RNA silencing and identified abundant virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs). The majority of the vsRNAs were 22-nt in length. We observed a highly uneven genome-wide distribution of vsRNAs with strong clustering to small defined regions distributed over both strands of the RYNV genome. Together, our data show that sequences of the aphid-transmitted pararetrovirus RYNV are targeted in red raspberry by the interfering RNA pathway, a predominant antiviral defense mechanism in plants. PMID:24076299

  10. The Chilean wild raspberry (Rubus geoides Sm.) increases intracellular GSH content and protects against H2O2 and methylglyoxal-induced damage in AGS cells.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Aspee, Felipe; Theoduloz, Cristina; Ávila, Felipe; Thomas-Valdés, Samanta; Mardones, Claudia; von Baer, Dietrich; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2016-03-01

    The Chilean raspberry Rubus geoides Sm. (Rosaceae) is a native species occurring in the Patagonia. Five R. geoides samples were assessed for phenolic content and composition, antioxidant activity, effect on total reduced glutathione (GSH) synthesis and protective effect against H2O2 and methylglyoxal (MGO)-induced stress in epithelial gastric AGS cells. The HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS profiles allowed the tentative identification of 39 phenolics including flavonol glycosides and tannins. R. geoides presented higher total phenolic and flavonoid content than Rubus idaeus. Two out of the five phenolic enriched R. geoides extracts (PEEs) exhibited better antioxidant activity than R. idaeus in the DPPH, FRAP and TEAC assays. A significant cytoprotective activity was observed when AGS cells were pre-incubated with extracts and subsequently challenged with H2O2 or MGO. Treatment with the PEEs increased the intracellular GSH content. R. geoides fruit extracts may induce the activation of intracellular protection mechanisms against oxidative and dicarbonyl-induced stress. PMID:26471634

  11. Raspberry (Rubus spp.)-Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are several important virus diseases of raspberry and black raspberry in the Pacific Northwest. Pollen-borne viruses include Raspberry bushy dwarf virus and Strawberry necrotic shock virus (aka Tobacco streak virus –Rubus isolate or Black raspberry latent virus). Strawberry necrotic shock viru...

  12. Sorbitol, Rubus fruit, and misconception

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is unclear how the misunderstanding that Rubus fruits (e.g., blackberries, raspberries) are high in sugar alcohol began, or when it started circulating in the United States. In reality, they contain little sugar alcohol. Numerous research groups have reported zero detectable amounts of sugar alco...

  13. Rubus fruit myths vs. reality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This factsheet corrects several popular media inaccuracies about Rubus fruit. Supplying the public with scientific facts is part of our continued efforts to assist consumers in making sound health conscious decisions. This project was partially funded by a Specialty Crop Research Initiative grant fr...

  14. Morphological Analysis of Rubus Seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Rubus exhibits morphological diversity and a wide range of reproductive systems and habitats. We examined seed coat ultrastructural morphology of seed accessions of 10 subgenera preserved at the US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Clonal Germplasm Reposito...

  15. Novel microsatellite markers acquired from Rubus coreanus Miq. and cross-amplification in other Rubus species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-An; Song, Jae Young; Choi, Heh-Ran; Chung, Jong-Wook; Jeon, Young-Ah; Lee, Jung-Ro; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Myung-Chul

    2015-01-01

    The Rubus genus consists of more than 600 species that are distributed globally. Only a few Rubus species, including raspberries and blueberries, have been domesticated. Genetic diversity within and between Rubus species is an important resource for breeding programs. We developed genomic microsatellite markers using an SSR-enriched R. coreanus library to study the diversity of the Rubus species. Microsatellite motifs were discovered in 546 of 646 unique clones, and a dinucleotide repeat was the most frequent (75.3%) type of repeat. From 97 microsatellite loci with reproducible amplicons, we acquired 29 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the Rubus coreanus collection. The transferability values ranged from 59.8% to 84% across six Rubus species, and Rubus parvifolius had the highest transferability value (84%). The average number of alleles and the polymorphism information content were 5.7 and 0.541, respectively, in the R. coreanus collection. The diversity index of R. coreanus was similar to the values reported for other Rubus species. A phylogenetic dendrogram based on SSR profiles revealed that seven Rubus species could be allocated to three groups, and that R. coreanus was genetically close to Rubus crataegifolius (mountain berry). These new microsatellite markers might prove useful in studies of the genetic diversity, population structure, and evolutionary relationships among Rubus species. PMID:25867828

  16. Rubus Pharmocology: Antiquity to the Present

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Rubus L., indigenous to six continents, includes blackberries, raspberries and their hybrids, and is commonly referred to as brambles or briers. Rubus species were a food and medicinal source for native peoples soon after the ice age. Medicinal uses for brambles were documented in the writ...

  17. Viruses and Virus Diseases of Rubus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubus species are propagated vegetatively and are subject to infection by viruses during development, propagation and fruit production stages. Reports of initial detection and symptoms of more than 30 viruses, virus-like diseases and phytoplasmas affecting Rubus spp. have been reviewed more than 20 ...

  18. A New Member of the Family Reoviridae May Contribute to Severe Crumbly Fruit in Red Raspberry, Rubus idaeus 'Meeker'

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A virus induced crumbly fruit disease of considerable importance in 'Meeker' and other cultivars of red raspberry has been observed in northern Washington, USA, and British Columbia, Canada and to a lesser extent in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV), a pollen-borne ...

  19. Influence of postflowering temperature on fruit size and chemical composition of Glen Ample raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.).

    PubMed

    Remberg, Siv Fagertun; Sønsteby, Anita; Aaby, Kjersti; Heide, Ola M

    2010-08-25

    The effects of postflowering temperature on the fruit chemical composition of Glen Ample raspberries were studied under controlled environment conditions. The berry weight decreased significantly with increasing temperature (12, 18, and 24 °C) and with progress of the harvest period. Because the moisture content increased in parallel with the berry weight, the antioxidant capacity (AOC) and the concentration of a range of bioactive compounds decreased with decreasing temperature and progress of the harvest season when expressed on a fresh weight basis in the conventional way. Under those circumstances, dry weight units are therefore preferable. However, despite the dilution effect of large berries, the concentration of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) increased with decreasing temperature, even on a fresh weight basis. Berry AOC was closely correlated with total phenolic concentration (r = 0.958), predominantly anthocyanins and ellagitannins. While a total of 10 anthocyanins were detected, cyanidin-3-sophoroside and cyanidin-3-(2(G)-glucosylrutinoside)-rutinoside accounted for 73% of the total, the former decreasing and the latter increasing with increasing growth temperature. By far, the most prevalent ellagitannins were lambertianin C and sanguiin H-6, both of which increased significantly with increasing temperature. It is concluded that the growth temperature has significant and contrasting effects on the concentration of a range of potentially bioactive compounds in raspberry. PMID:23654237

  20. Scarification and Germination Treatments Break Dormancy of Rubus Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Rubus exhibits morphological diversity and a wide range of reproductive systems and habitats. Seeds of blackberry (subgenus Rubus) and raspberry (subg. Idaeobatus) have a deep dormancy caused by one or more mechanisms. Rubus seeds are normally enclosed in a hard schlerenchymatous endocar...

  1. Ellagitannins from Rubus Berries for the Control of Gastric Inflammation: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sangiovanni, Enrico; Vrhovsek, Urska; Rossoni, Giuseppe; Colombo, Elisa; Brunelli, Cecilia; Brembati, Laura; Trivulzio, Silvio; Gasperotti, Mattia; Mattivi, Fulvio; Bosisio, Enrica; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Ellagitannins have shown anti-inflammatory and anti-Helicobacter pylori properties; however, their anti-inflammatory activity at gastric level was not previously investigated. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of ellagitannins from Rubus berries on gastric inflammation. Ellagitannin enriched extracts (ETs) were prepared from Rubus fruticosus L. (blackberry) and Rubus idaeus L. (raspberry). The anti-inflammatory activity was tested on gastric cell line AGS stimulated by TNF-α and IL-1β for evaluating the effect on NF-kB driven transcription, nuclear translocation and IL-8 secretion. In vivo the protective effect of ellagitannins was evaluated in a rat model of ethanol-induced gastric lesions. Rats were treated orally for ten days with 20 mg/kg/day of ETs, and ethanol was given one hour before the sacrifice. Gastric mucosa was isolated and used for the determination of IL-8 release, NF-kB nuclear translocation, Trolox equivalents, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. In vitro, ETs inhibited TNF-α induced NF-kB driven transcription (IC50: 0.67–1.73 µg/mL) and reduced TNF-α-induced NF-kB nuclear translocation (57%–67% at 2 µg/mL). ETs inhibited IL-8 secretion induced by TNF-α and IL-1β at low concentrations (IC50 range of 0.7–4 µg/mL). Sanguiin H-6 and lambertianin C, the major ETs present in the extracts, were found to be responsible, at least in part, for the effect of the mixtures. ETs of blackberry and raspberry decreased Ulcer Index by 88% and 75% respectively and protected from the ethanol induced oxidative stress in rats. CINC-1 (the rat homologue of IL-8) secretion in the gastric mucosa was reduced in the animals receiving blackberry and raspberry ETs. The effect of ETs on CINC-1 was associated to a decrease of NF-κB nuclear translocation in ETs treated animals. The results of the present study report for the first time the preventing effect of ETs in gastric inflammation and support for their use in dietary regimens

  2. Ellagitannins from Rubus berries for the control of gastric inflammation: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Sangiovanni, Enrico; Vrhovsek, Urska; Rossoni, Giuseppe; Colombo, Elisa; Brunelli, Cecilia; Brembati, Laura; Trivulzio, Silvio; Gasperotti, Mattia; Mattivi, Fulvio; Bosisio, Enrica; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Ellagitannins have shown anti-inflammatory and anti-Helicobacter pylori properties; however, their anti-inflammatory activity at gastric level was not previously investigated. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of ellagitannins from Rubus berries on gastric inflammation. Ellagitannin enriched extracts (ETs) were prepared from Rubus fruticosus L. (blackberry) and Rubus idaeus L. (raspberry). The anti-inflammatory activity was tested on gastric cell line AGS stimulated by TNF-α and IL-1β for evaluating the effect on NF-kB driven transcription, nuclear translocation and IL-8 secretion. In vivo the protective effect of ellagitannins was evaluated in a rat model of ethanol-induced gastric lesions. Rats were treated orally for ten days with 20 mg/kg/day of ETs, and ethanol was given one hour before the sacrifice. Gastric mucosa was isolated and used for the determination of IL-8 release, NF-kB nuclear translocation, Trolox equivalents, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. In vitro, ETs inhibited TNF-α induced NF-kB driven transcription (IC₅₀: 0.67-1.73 µg/mL) and reduced TNF-α-induced NF-kB nuclear translocation (57%-67% at 2 µg/mL). ETs inhibited IL-8 secretion induced by TNF-α and IL-1β at low concentrations (IC₅₀ range of 0.7-4 µg/mL). Sanguiin H-6 and lambertianin C, the major ETs present in the extracts, were found to be responsible, at least in part, for the effect of the mixtures. ETs of blackberry and raspberry decreased Ulcer Index by 88% and 75% respectively and protected from the ethanol induced oxidative stress in rats. CINC-1 (the rat homologue of IL-8) secretion in the gastric mucosa was reduced in the animals receiving blackberry and raspberry ETs. The effect of ETs on CINC-1 was associated to a decrease of NF-κB nuclear translocation in ETs treated animals. The results of the present study report for the first time the preventing effect of ETs in gastric inflammation and support for their use in dietary

  3. Rubus pharmacology: antiquity to the present

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aeschylus, Hippocrates, Krataeus, Dioscorides, and Galen; Romans: Cato, Ovid, and Pliny the Elder; Asian medicinal traditions, such as the Unani Tibb, traditional Chinese medicine, and the Ayurvedic tradition of India. Folk traditions of native peoples throughout the world have also applied Rubus fo...

  4. Diterpenoids from Leaves of Rubus chingii.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jicheng; Huang, Yingzheng; Cui, Hangqing; Peng, Caiying; Liu, Jianqun; Huang, Huilian

    2016-03-01

    The leaves of Rubus chingii were examined for their phytochemical composition and anti-yeast activity. In the process, seven diterpenoids (compounds 1-7), including a new natural compound (14β, 16-epoxy-7-pimarene-3α, 15β-diol, 1), were isolated and elucidated. Compound 1 exhibited moderate anti-Candida activity. PMID:27169185

  5. Antimicrobial activity of Rubus chamaemorus leaves.

    PubMed

    Thiem, B; Goślińska, O

    2004-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of Rubus chamaemorus leaf butanolic fraction of the methanol extract and ellagic acid was evaluated against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Antimycotic activity was assayed against Candida albicans. MICs and MBCs were determined by broth dilution test and by disc diffusion method. PMID:14693229

  6. Optimized scarification protocols improve germination of diverse Rubus germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed collections of the wild relatives of cultivated blackberry and raspberry (Rubus species) are maintained at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository, Corvallis, OR. Seeds of Rubus species are orthodox and can be stored dry and remain viable for many years; however germination is often poor or er...

  7. International Regulations Regarding Exchange of Rubus Plant Material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Rubus is native to six continents and many small islands throughout the world. Scientists and industry personnel are interested in moving wild and cultivated Rubus for research, breeding and cultivation from one country to another, and from one region to another. International regulations ...

  8. Proceedings of the XI International Rubus and Ribes Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This proceedings book summarizes the latest internationial research concerning Rubus, Ribes and their wild relatives. This proceedings includes 82 scientific reports from international scientists concerning the genetics and germplasm, pests and diseases, physiology and production systems, post harve...

  9. Comparison of compounds of three Rubus species and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Caidan, Rezeng; Cairang, Limao; Pengcuo, Jiumei; Tong, Li

    2015-12-01

    Rubus amabilis, Rubus niveus Thunb., and Rubus sachalinensis are three Rubus species that are alternatively found in Manubzhithang, a Tibetan medicine, in different areas of China. The current study analyzed HPLC/UV chromatograms and it compared compounds of these three Rubus species in contrast to reference substances such as 2,6-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenol-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, procyanidin B4, and isovitexin-7-O-glucoside. The three Rubus species produced similar peaks in chromatograms. The antioxidant activity of the three Rubus species was determined using an assay for DPPH free radical scavenging activity. Results indicated that the three Rubus species extracts had almost the same level of free radical scavenging activity. Thus, findings indicated the rationality of substituting these species for one another as an ingredient in Manubzhithang. PMID:26781923

  10. Triterpenoids from the roots of Rubus parvifolius.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Juan; Yang, Wan-Qing; Su, Cong; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuan; Zheng, Jiao; Shi, She-Po; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2016-05-01

    Two new oleanane-type triterpenoids, parvifolactone A (1) and rubuside P (2), together with 11 known triterpenoids, fupenzic acid (3), 18,19-seco,2α,3α-dihydroxyl-19-oxo-urs-11,13(18)-dien-28-oic acid (4), euscaphic acid (5), maslinic acid (6), 1β- hydroxyeuscaphic acid (7), 2α,3α,19α,23-tetrahydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (8), 2α,3β,19α,23-tetrahydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid (9), glucosyl pinfaensate (10), rubuside J (11), 2α,3α,19α,23-tetrahydroxyurs-12-en-24,28-dioic acid (12), and 2α,3β,19α- trihydroxyurs-12-en-23,28-dioic acid (13), were isolated from the roots of Rubus parvifolius. PMID:27478101

  11. Rubus fruit phenolic research: the good, the bad, and the confusing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we attempt to clarify contemporary scientific findings of Rubus fruit phenolics, focusing mainly on published peer-reviewed work from the last six years. Our review focuses on research papers that identified phenolics of Rubus fruit, although other edible parts of Rubus plants (i.e., leaves, ro...

  12. Effects of Irrigation Method and Level of Water Application on Fruit Size and Yield in Red Raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) during the First Year of Full Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was done to determine the effects of irrigation method and amount of water application on production and fruit quality in red raspberry. Two cultivars, 'Meeker' and 'Coho', were irrigated by overhead sprinkler or subsurface drip at 50, 100, and 150% of the estimated crop evapotranspiration (...

  13. A New Member of the Family Reoviridae May Contribute to Severe Crumbly Fruit in Red Raspberry, Rubus idaeus ‘Meeker’

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A virus-induced crumbly fruit disease of considerable importance in ‘Meeker’ and other cultivars of red raspberry has been observed in northern Washington, United States and British Columbia, Canada. Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV), a pollen-borne virus, has been attributed as the causal agent of...

  14. The bioactive potential of red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) leaves in exhibiting cytotoxic and cytoprotective activity on human laryngeal carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Durgo, Ksenija; Belščak-Cvitanović, Ana; Stančić, Angela; Franekić, Jasna; Komes, Draženka

    2012-03-01

    In this article, the bioactive potential of red raspberry leaves, a by-product of this widely spread plant, mostly valued for its antioxidant-rich fruits, was determined. The polyphenolic profile and antioxidative properties of red raspberry leaf extract were determined and examined for potential biological activity. Cytotoxic effect, antioxidative/prooxidative effect, and effect on total glutathione concentration were determined in human laryngeal carcinoma (HEp2) and colon adenocarcinoma (SW 480) cell lines. SW 480 cells are more susceptible to raspberry leaf extract in comparison with HEp2 cells. The antioxidative nature of raspberry leaf extract was detected in HEp2 cells treated with hydrogen peroxide, as opposed to SW 480 cells, where raspberry leaf extract induced reactive oxygen species formation. Raspberry leaf extract increased total glutathione level in HEp2 cells. This effect was reinforced after 24 hours of recovery, indicating that induction was caused by products formed during cellular metabolism of compounds present in the extract. Comparison of the results obtained on these two cell lines indicates that cellular response to raspberry extract will depend on the type of the cells that are exposed to it. The results obtained confirmed the biological activity of red raspberry leaf polyphenols and showed that this traditional plant can supplement the daily intake of valuable natural antioxidants, which exhibit beneficial health effects. PMID:22082102

  15. Juice, pulp and seeds fractionated from dry climate primocane raspberry cultivars (Rubus idaeus) have significantly different antioxidant capacity, anthocyanin content and color.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Shannon M; Low, Richard M; Stocks, Janet C; Eggett, Dennis L; Parker, Tory L

    2012-12-01

    Raspberries contain flavonoid antioxidants whose relative concentrations may vary between the juice, pulp, and seed fractions. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), total anthocyanin content, and berry color were determined for six cultivars of primocane raspberries grown in a dry climate (Utah, USA). Significant ORAC differences were found between juice (18.4 ± 0.39 μmol TE/g), pulp (24.45 ± 0.43), and seeds (273.27 ± 11.15) with all Utah cultivars combined. A significantly higher concentration of anthocyanins was present in Utah raspberry juice (20.86 ± 0.35 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside eq./100 g), compared to pulp (13.96 ± 0.35). Anthocyanin content of juice and pulp were significantly positively correlated with dark color (L*). This is the first report of fractional differences in dry climate raspberries, and has implications for the juice and supplement industries. PMID:23132011

  16. Comparison of sugar, acids, and volatile composition in raspberry bushy dwarf virus-resistant transgenic raspberries and the wild type 'meeker' (rubus idaeus L.).

    PubMed

    Malowicki, Sarah M M; Martin, Robert; Qian, Michael C

    2008-08-13

    Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) causes a significant reduction in yield and quality in raspberry and raspberry-blackberry hybrid. Genetic modifications were made to 'Meeker' red raspberries to impart RBDV resistance. The RBDV-resistant transgenic and wild type 'Meeker' plants were grown in Oregon and Washington, and the fruits were harvested in the 2004 and 2005 growing seasons. Year-to-year and site-to-site variations were observed for the degrees Brix and titratable acidity, with Oregon raspberries having slightly higher degrees Brix and lower titratable acidity than Washington raspberries. Twenty-nine volatile compounds were quantified using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) paired with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). There were very few differences in volatile concentrations between the transgenic varieties and the wild type 'Meeker'. Much larger variations were observed between sites and harvest seasons. Raspberries grown in Oregon appeared to have higher concentrations of delta-octalactone, delta-decalactone, geraniol, and linalool. Chiral analysis of alpha-ionone, alpha-pinene, linalool, terpinen-4-ol, delta-octalactone, and delta-decalactone demonstrated a much higher percentage of one isomer over the other, particularly alpha-ionone, alpha-pinene, delta-octalactone, and delta-decalactone, with more than 90% of one isomer, while a racemic mixture was observed for linalool. The isomeric analysis revealed very little variation between varieties, locations, or years. The flavor compounds tested in this study did not show any difference between the transgenic lines and the wild type 'Meeker' raspberry. PMID:18598047

  17. GENETIC VARIATION IN RED RASPBERRIES (RUBUS IDAEUS L.; ROSACEAE) FROM SITES DIFFERING IN ORGANIC POLLUTANTS COMPARED WITH SYNTHETIC TANDEM REPEAT DNA PROBES. (R826602)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  18. Transfer and Mass Balance of Ellagitannins, Anthocyanins, Flavan-3-ols, and Flavonols during the Processing of Red Raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.) to Juice.

    PubMed

    Sójka, Michał; Macierzyński, Jakub; Zaweracz, Wojciech; Buczek, Maria

    2016-07-13

    The putative health benefits of raspberries and raspberry-based products are potentially attributable to the presence of polyphenolic compounds, such as ellagitannins, anthocyanins, flavanols, and flavonols. Their content in the products of raspberry processing into juice may be affected by the fruit cultivar, technological process parameters, and the properties of the polyphenolics themselves. The objective of the study was to investigate the composition and quantity of the above polyphenolics in raspberries and the products of their processing (that is, juice and press cake, including its seed and seedless fractions). The study also examined the relationship between the molecular mass of ellagitannins and their transfer to juice. The average percentage contributions of ellagitannins, anthocyanins, flavanols, and flavonols to total polyphenolics in the fruits were 64.2%, 17.1%, 16.9%, and 1.8%, respectively. Analysis of raspberry products showed that the dominant compounds in juice were anthocyanins, with 65.1% contribution to total polyphenolics, while in raspberry press cake, they were tannins (98.0%, mainly ellagitannin including lambertianin C and sanguiin H-6). As shown by our mass-balance calculations, on average, 68.1% of ellagitannins and 87.7% of flavanols were retained in press cake, especially in its seedless fraction. In addition, a significant negative correlation was found between the molecular mass of ellagitannins and their transfer to juice. An increase in molecular mass from 1568 to 2805 Da resulted in a more than 10-fold decrease in ellagitannin transfer. PMID:27292440

  19. Primocane-fruiting in black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of fruit on first year canes, or primocane-fruiting in caneberries (Rubus L.) has proven to be an important trait, allowing production, particularly for the fresh market, to expand into new geographic areas and non-traditional seasons. While not a new trait, primocane-fruiting black rasp...

  20. Genetic Stability of Cryopreserved Shoot Tips of Rubus Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Questions often arise concerning the genetic stability of plant materials stored in liquid nitrogen for long time periods. This study followed the genetic stability of cryopreserved shoot tips of Rubus germplasm that were stored in liquid nitrogen for over 12 years, then rewarmed and regrown. We a...

  1. Fingerprinting and Genetic Stability of Rubus Using Molecular Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA markers were used to identify raspberries and blackberries and to evaluate genetic stability of four cryopreserved Rubus accessions following 12 years of storage in liquid nitrogen. In the first study, 12 genomic Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers and one Expressed Sequence Tag- (EST)-SSR wer...

  2. Anthocyanin fingerprinting of true bokbunja (Rubus coreanus Miq.) fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interest in black raspberry products has been increasing due to its flavor and potential health benefits. While black raspberries grown in North America are Rubus occidentalis L., there has been some confusion regarding the identity of black raspberry grown in Korea (known as bokbunja; R. corean...

  3. Mistaken identity: clarification of Rubus coreanus Miquel (bokbunja)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the U.S., there has been a recent surge in Korean black raspberry products available and in the number of reports about this species appearing in the scientific literature. Despite this, the majority of products sold and the work carried out has been on Rubus occidentalis L., not R. coreanus Miqu...

  4. Heat unit model for predicting bloom dates in Rubus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants of Navaho and Apache blackberry cultivars were maintained at 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 or 35 degrees C in growth chambers to determine optimum temperature for anthesis (fewest days to flowering). In a separate experiment, bloom dates were observed for a collection of 117 Rubus genotypes over four s...

  5. Hydrology and Sedimentology of a Series of Dam-Breach Paleolakes at Idaeus Fossae, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salese, F.; Di Achille, G.; Ori, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the identification and geological study of a nearly 300-km-long valley system located westward of Idaeus Fossae, in Tempe Terra, Mars. The valley apparently originates from a subsided area surrounding the ejecta of a relatively fresh crater and after about 25 km from its source area enters a series of dam-breach paleolakes. The lake chain consists of six open basins (with associated fan-shaped sedimentary deposits) and covers an area of about 2500 sq. km over a E-W stretch of about 100 km. The latter lakes are interconnected and were likely coeval and drain eastward into a main 20-km-diameter crater-lake forming a complex and multilobate deltaic deposit whose front lies at about 1800-1820 m below the martian datum. The deltaic deposit is about 8-km-long and morphologically resembles the Jezero delta, showing a well-developed distributary pattern with evidence of channel switching on the delta plain. The floor of the crater-lake is not incised by the main valley, however a breach area is present along the eastern crater rim and consists of two spillover channels at about the same elevation of the crater inlet (-1820 m). These latter channels connect the crater lake to the eastward portion of the valley continuing towards Idaeus Fossae with a more than 180-km-long complex pattern of anabranching channels . We used high-resolution imagery and topography (HRSC, and CTX and HiRISE stereo pairs) to derive a geological-geomorphological map of the area and to understand its evolution. The extension and morphology of the observed fluvio-lacustrine features suggest relatively long-term (>103 yrs) formation timescales as also supported by the presence of the main fan delta in the central open basin. The overall water source for the 300-km-long fluvial system is unclear, though the occurrence of many rampart craters and the relationships between their ejecta and the channels suggest that subsurface volatiles might have also played an important role.

  6. A variant of Rubus yellow net virus with altered genomic organization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubus yellow net virus (RYNV) is a member of the family Caulimoviridae, genus Badnavirus. RYNV infects Rubus species causing chlorosis of the tissue along the leaf veins, giving an unevenly distributed netted symptom in some cultivars of red and black raspberry. Recently, this virus was isolated and...

  7. Factors Influencing Epidemiology and Management of Blackberry Rust in Cultivated Rubus laciniatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The blackberry rust pathogen, Phragmidium violaceum, was first observed in Oregon in spring 2005 on both commercially cultivated Rubus laciniatus and feral Rubus armeniacus. Several commercial plantings suffered severe economic losses. In three seasons subsequent to 2005, all five spore stages of ...

  8. Towards a national certification scheme for Rubus in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guidelines for a National Certification Scheme for Rubus in the United States have been drafted and are being evaluated in states with a tradition of Rubus propagation. The major components of the guidelines describe the procedures for propagating, testing and maintaining plants at four successive s...

  9. Lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis genes discriminate between Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infective genotypes of Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Braun-Kiewnick, Andrea; Mann, Rachel A; Rodoni, Brendan; Goesmann, Alexander; Duffy, Brion; Smits, Theo H M

    2012-10-01

    Comparative genomic analysis revealed differences in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis gene cluster between the Rubus-infecting strain ATCC BAA-2158 and the Spiraeoideae-infecting strain CFBP 1430 of Erwinia amylovora. These differences corroborate rpoB-based phylogenetic clustering of E. amylovora into four different groups and enable the discrimination of Spiraeoideae- and Rubus-infecting strains. The structure of the differences between the two groups supports the hypothesis that adaptation to Rubus spp. took place after species separation of E. amylovora and E. pyrifoliae that contrasts with a recently proposed scenario, based on CRISPR data, in which the shift to domesticated apple would have caused an evolutionary bottleneck in the Spiraeoideae-infecting strains of E. amylovora which would be a much earlier event. In the core region of the LPS biosynthetic gene cluster, Spiraeoideae-infecting strains encode three glycosyltransferases and an LPS ligase (Spiraeoideae-type waaL), whereas Rubus-infecting strains encode two glycosyltransferases and a different LPS ligase (Rubus-type waaL). These coding domains share little to no homology at the amino acid level between Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infecting strains, and this genotypic difference was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis of the associated DNA region in 31 Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infecting strains. The LPS biosynthesis gene cluster may thus be used as a molecular marker to distinguish between Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infecting strains of E. amylovora using primers designed in this study. PMID:22583486

  10. New insights into the variability of reproduction modes in European populations of Rubus subgen. Rubus: how sexual are polyploid brambles?

    PubMed

    Šarhanová, Petra; Vašut, Radim J; Dančák, Martin; Bureš, Petr; Trávníček, Bohumil

    2012-12-01

    Rubus subgen. Rubus includes common European species with highly complicated taxonomy, ongoing hybridisation and facultative apomixis. Out of approximately 750 species recognised in Europe, only 3 diploid sexual species are known, along with numerous apomictic brambles that are highly connected to polyploidy. One exception of a tetraploid taxon is R. ser. Glandulosi, which is known for prevalent sexuality. This taxon highly hybridises with tetraploid members of R. ser. Discolores and leads to the origin of many hybridogenous populations and individuals. In this study, we verify reproduction modes in different diploid, triploid and tetraploid species of subgen. Rubus, with focus on taxa putatively involved in such hybridisation by applying flow cytometric seed screen analysis. We found 100 % sexuality of diploid species, whereas triploid species had obligate unreduced embryo sac development. In contrast, tetraploid plants had varying degrees of sexuality. Additionally, we discovered that R. bifrons has the ability to undergo a reproduction mode switch as a reaction to environmental conditions. These results provide insight into reproductive modes of European brambles and shed light on their reticulate evolution and speciation. PMID:23114637

  11. Antiprotozoal activity of the constituents of Rubus coriifolius.

    PubMed

    Alanís, Alma Delia; Calzada, Fernando; Cedillo-Rivera, Roberto; Meckes, Mariana

    2003-06-01

    Extraction of the aerial parts of Rubus coriifolius, a medicinal plant used by the Maya communities in Southern Mexico to treat bloody diarrhoea, resulted in the isolation of seven known compounds (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin, hyperin, nigaichigoside F1, beta-sitosterol 3-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside, gallic acid and ellagic acid. All compounds were tested for their antiprotozoal activity against Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lambia. Epicatechin was the main responsible for the antiprotozoal activity of the extract against both protozoa, its activity was comparable to emetine, but no exceeded that of metronidazole. PMID:12820241

  12. In vitro antioxidant activity of Rubus ellipticus fruits

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Uma Shankar; Kumar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Various studies have been done to identify antioxidants from plant sources and efforts have been taken to incorporate it in conventional therapy. In our present study, petroleum ether, ethanolic, and aqueous extracts of Rubus ellipticus fruits have been evaluated for in vitro antioxidant activity using DPPH radical scavenging and reducing power assay. BHA was used as a standard antioxidant for DPPH radical scavenging activity. The reducing power assay of extracts was carried out with ascorbic acid as a standard reducing agent. All the analysis was made with the use of UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The results of the both assay showed that all the extracts of R. ellipticus fruits possess significant free radical scavenging and reducing power properties at concentration-dependent manner. Hence, it can be concluded that the R. ellipticus fruits could be pharmaceutically exploited for antioxidant properties. PMID:22171292

  13. Two new triterpenoids from the seeds of blackberry (Rubus fructicosus).

    PubMed

    Ono, Masateru; Yasuda, Shin; Nishi, Kaori; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Fuchizaki, Satoshi; Higuchi, Satomi; Komatsu, Haruki; Okawa, Masafumi; Kinjo, Junei; Yoshimitsu, Hitoshi; Nohara, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Two new ursane-type triterpenoids (1, 2) attached to isopropylidenedioxy group were isolated from the seeds of blackberry (Rubus fructicosus L., Rosaceae) along with two known ursane-type triterpenoids, 2,3-O-isopropylidenyl-2α,3α,19α-trihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid (3) and 1β-hydroxyeuscaphic acid (4). The chemical structures of 1 and 2 were determined to be 2,3-O-isopropylidene-1β,2β,3β,19α-tetrahydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid and 1,2-O-isopropylidene-1β,2α,3α,19α-tetrahydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid, respectively, based on spectroscopic data. Additionally, their cytotoxic activity towards HL-60 human leukaemia cells was evaluated. Among them, 3 demonstrated a clear cytotoxic activity with 72.8 μM of IC50 value. PMID:26305695

  14. Phylogenetic Insights into Chinese Rubus (Rosaceae) from Multiple Chloroplast and Nuclear DNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Qing; Chen, Tao; Tang, Haoru; Liu, Lin; Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Rubus L. is a large and taxonomically complex genus, species of which exhibit apomixis, polyploidy, and frequent hybridization. Most of Chinese Rubus are assigned in two major sections, Idaeobatus and Malachobatus. To explore the phylogenetic relationships within Chinese Rubus, inferences upon three chloroplast DNA (rbcL, rpl20-rps12, and trnG-trnS), nuclear ribosomal ITS, and two low-copy nuclear markers (GBSSI-2 and PEPC) were deduced in 142 Rubus taxa from 17 subsections in 6 sections. nrITS and GBSSI-2 were the most informative among the six DNA regions assessed. Phylogenetic relationships within Rubus were well-resolved by combined nuclear datasets rather than chloroplast markers. The phylogenetic inferences strongly supported that section Idaeobatus was a polyphyletic group with four distant clades. All samples of sect. Malachobatus formed a monophyletic clade, in which R. tsangorum and R. amphidasys of sect. Dalibardastrum, and R. peltatus from subsection Peltati of sect. Idaeobatus were always nested. Rubus pentagonus (2n = 2x = 14) from subsect. Alpestres of sect. Idaeobatus was a sister group to the polyploid sect. Malachobatus, as well as the polytomy of three sect. Cyalctis members. This suggests that some polyploids of Malachobatus might originate from common ancestors, via polyploidization of hybrids between R. pentagonus and sect. Cylactis species. They had experienced species explosion in a short time. Section Dalibardastrum species have potential parental lineages from subsects. Moluccani and Stipulosi of sect. Malachobatus. Based on molecular phylogenies, we also provided recommendations for the taxonomic treatments of four taxa. In addition, our results showed certain incongruence between chloroplast and nuclear markers, which might be due to hybridization and introgression. PMID:27446191

  15. Phylogenetic Insights into Chinese Rubus (Rosaceae) from Multiple Chloroplast and Nuclear DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Qing; Chen, Tao; Tang, Haoru; Liu, Lin; Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Rubus L. is a large and taxonomically complex genus, species of which exhibit apomixis, polyploidy, and frequent hybridization. Most of Chinese Rubus are assigned in two major sections, Idaeobatus and Malachobatus. To explore the phylogenetic relationships within Chinese Rubus, inferences upon three chloroplast DNA (rbcL, rpl20-rps12, and trnG-trnS), nuclear ribosomal ITS, and two low-copy nuclear markers (GBSSI-2 and PEPC) were deduced in 142 Rubus taxa from 17 subsections in 6 sections. nrITS and GBSSI-2 were the most informative among the six DNA regions assessed. Phylogenetic relationships within Rubus were well-resolved by combined nuclear datasets rather than chloroplast markers. The phylogenetic inferences strongly supported that section Idaeobatus was a polyphyletic group with four distant clades. All samples of sect. Malachobatus formed a monophyletic clade, in which R. tsangorum and R. amphidasys of sect. Dalibardastrum, and R. peltatus from subsection Peltati of sect. Idaeobatus were always nested. Rubus pentagonus (2n = 2x = 14) from subsect. Alpestres of sect. Idaeobatus was a sister group to the polyploid sect. Malachobatus, as well as the polytomy of three sect. Cyalctis members. This suggests that some polyploids of Malachobatus might originate from common ancestors, via polyploidization of hybrids between R. pentagonus and sect. Cylactis species. They had experienced species explosion in a short time. Section Dalibardastrum species have potential parental lineages from subsects. Moluccani and Stipulosi of sect. Malachobatus. Based on molecular phylogenies, we also provided recommendations for the taxonomic treatments of four taxa. In addition, our results showed certain incongruence between chloroplast and nuclear markers, which might be due to hybridization and introgression. PMID:27446191

  16. Rubus fruticosus (blackberry) use as an herbal medicine

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rameshwar; Gangrade, Tushar; Punasiya, Rakesh; Ghulaxe, Chetan

    2014-01-01

    Wild grown European blackberry Rubus fruticosus) plants are widespread in different parts of northern countries and have been extensively used in herbal medicine. The result show that European blackberry plants are used for herbal medicinal purpose such as antimicrobial, anticancer, antidysentery, antidiabetic, antidiarrheal, and also good antioxidant. Blackberry plant (R. fruticosus) contains tannins, gallic acid, villosin, and iron; fruit contains vitamin C, niacin (nicotinic acid), pectin, sugars, and anthocyanins and also contains of berries albumin, citric acid, malic acid, and pectin. Some selected physicochemical characteristics such as berry weight, protein, pH, total acidity, soluble solid, reducing sugar, vitamin C, total antioxidant capacity, antimicrobial screening of fruit, leaves, root, and stem of R. fruticosus, and total anthocyanins of four preselected wild grown European blackberry (R. fruticosus) fruits are investigated. Significant differences on most of the chemical content detect among the medicinal use. The highest protein content (2%), the genotypes with the antioxidant activity of standard butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) studies 85.07%. Different cultivars grown in same location consistently show differences in antioxidant capacity. PMID:25125882

  17. Antifatigue effect of Rubus coreanus Miquel extract in mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Ah; Han, Daeseok; Kwon, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Chang-Ho; Kim, Young-Eon

    2007-12-01

    The antifatigue properties of six Korean medicinal herb extracts were studied by evaluating forced swimming capacity and biochemical parameters in ICR mice. The treatment groups were orally administered 30% ethanolic extracts (500 mg/kg/day) of Rubus coreanus Miquel, Cyperus rotundus Linn., Acanthopanax sessiliflorus, Saururus chinensis Baili, Epimedium koreanumNakai, or Houttuynia cordata Thunb. for 4 weeks. Swimming time to exhaustion was found to be longer for the group fed R. coreanus than for the control group (P < .05). No significant differences were found in the plasma levels of either glucose or lactate between the control group and the group fed R. coreanus, which swam longer than the control. The plasma ammonia levels were significantly lower in the groups fed R. coreanus and A. sessiliflorus, when compared to the control group (P < .05). No significant differences were found in gastrocnemius muscle or liver glycogen content between the control group and any treatment group. These results suggest that R. coreanus extract, and none of the other herbs, has antifatigue effects in mice, as demonstrated by the increased forced swimming capacity and decreased plasma ammonia accumulation. PMID:18158842

  18. Nematicidal natural products from the aerial parts of Rubus niveus.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Nighat; Akhter, Musarrat; Khatoon, Zakia

    2010-03-01

    Studies on the aerial parts of Rubus niveus yielded six known compounds, 3,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid C(7)H(6)O(4), (1), gallic acid C(7)H(6)O(5) (2), ethyl galactoside (3), oleanolic acid (4), beta-sitosterol (5) and 3-O-[beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(12)-D-glucopyranoside (6). Besides this, a gallic acid derivative with methyl substitution was synthesised as tetramethyl gallate (3). Together with this derivative, compounds 1, 2, the alcohol soluble, chloroform soluble and petroleum ether soluble extracts of the aerial parts of R. niveus were screened for its nematicidal activity against freshly hatched second stage juveniles of Meloidogyne incognita (root-knot nematode), exhibiting 100, 94, 100, 52, 45 and 14% mortality, respectively of M. incognita after 48 h at 0.5% concentration. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 were found to be more potent than the nematicide Azadirachta indica at the same concentration. Negative results were obtained for nematicidal activity of the petroleum ether extract of R. niveus leaf extract. This is the first report on the isolation of chemical constituents as well as the nematicidal activity of compounds and any part of R. niveus. PMID:20306362

  19. Antitumor and Wound Healing Properties of Rubus ellipticus Smith.

    PubMed

    George, Blassan Plackal; Parimelazhagan, Thangaraj; Kumar, Yamini T; Sajeesh, Thankarajan

    2015-06-01

    The present investigation has been undertaken to study the antioxidant, antitumor, and wound healing properties of Rubus ellipticus. The R. ellipticus leaves were extracted using organic solvents in Soxhlet and were subjected to in vitro antioxidant assays. R. ellipticus leaf methanol (RELM) extract, which showed higher in vitro antioxidant activity, was taken for the evaluation of in vivo antioxidant, antitumor, and wound healing properties. Acute oral and dermal toxicity studies showed the safety of RELM up to a dose of 2 g/kg. A significant wound healing property was observed in incision, excision, and Staphylococcus aureus-induced infected wound models in the treatment groups compared to the control group. A complete epithelialization period was noticed during the 13(th) day and the 19(th) day. A 250-mg/kg treatment was found to prolong the life span of mice with Ehrlich ascite carcinoma (EAC; 46.76%) and to reduce the volume of Dalton's lymphoma ascite (DLA) solid tumors (2.56 cm(3)). The present study suggests that R. ellipticus is a valuable natural antioxidant and that it is immensely effective for treating skin diseases, wounds, and tumors. PMID:26100067

  20. Rubus fruticosus L.: constituents, biological activities and health related uses.

    PubMed

    Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Riaz, Muhammad; De Feo, Vincenzo; Jaafar, Hawa Z E; Moga, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Rubus fruticosus L. is a shrub famous for its fruit called blackberry fruit or more commonly blackberry. The fruit has medicinal, cosmetic and nutritive value. It is a concentrated source of valuable nutrients, as well as bioactive constituents of therapeutic interest highlighting its importance as a functional food. Besides use as a fresh fruit, it is also used as ingredient in cooked dishes, salads and bakery products like jams, snacks, desserts, and fruit preserves. R. fruticosus contains vitamins, steroids and lipids in seed oil and minerals, flavonoids, glycosides, terpenes, acids and tannins in aerial parts that possess diverse pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial anti-diabetic, anti-diarrheal, and antiviral. Various agrogeoclimatological factors like cultivar, environmental conditions of the area, agronomic practices employed, harvest time, post-harvest storage and processing techniques all influence the nutritional composition of blackberry fruit. This review focuses on the nutrients and chemical constituents as well as medicinal properties of different parts of R. fruticosus. Various cultivars and their physicochemical characteristics, polyphenolic content and ascorbic acid content are also discussed. The information in the present work will serve as baseline data and may lead to new biomedical applications of R. fruticosus as functional food. PMID:25072202

  1. Immature Rubus coreanus Shows a Free Radical-Scavenging Effect and Inhibits Cholesterol Synthesis and Secretion in Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, B.; Lee, H. Y.; Back, H. I.; Park, S. H.; Kim, M. G.; Kwon, J. W.; Song, J. Y.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, H. R.; Chae, S. W.; Chae, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Rubus coreanus fruits have been employed as a traditional medicine for centuries in the Asia-Pacific region. Its pharmacological action differs according to the different extraction methods utilized and the degree of fruit ripening. In this study, we determined the cellular effect of different ethanol extracts of mature and immature Rubus coreanus fruits in human hepatic cell line, HepG2 cells. The antioxidant activity, effect on superoxide dismutase activity and cholesterol biosynthesis efficiency was also evaluated. Immature Rubus coreanus extract showed higher antioxidant capability, compared with that of its mature fractions. Cellular antioxidant proteins including HO-1, Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase and catalase were highly expressed in the presence of Rubus coreanus. Cholesterol levels in HepG2 cells treated with the water fraction of immature Rubus coreanus were significantly reduced. This antihyperlipidaemic action of Rubus coreanus is a consequence of cholesterol biosynthesis and extracellular secretion in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that among different ethanol fraction of mature and immature Rubus coreanus fruit extracts, water extract of immature fruit extract shows higher antioxidant as well as higher antihyperlipidaemic action. PMID:23440938

  2. A blackberry (Rubus L.) expressed sequence tag library for the development of simple sequence repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The recent development of novel repeat-fruiting types of blackberry (Rubus L.) cultivars, combined with a long history of morphological marker-assisted selection for thornlessness by blackberry breeders, has given rise to increased interest in using molecular markers to facilitate blackb...

  3. Toward understanding genotype x environment interactions in black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last 75 years, the black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.)industry in the United States has undergone a steady contraction because of a lack of adapted, disease resistant cultivars. Recent research supporting the health benefits of a diet rich in polyphenolics, and black raspberries in part...

  4. Japanese Raspberry (Rubus parvifolius L.): An Invasive Species Threat in Savanna and Prairie

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Japanese raspberry, (Rubus parvifolius L.) is native to eastern Asia and Australia and has naturalized in several locations in Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Missouri, and Ohio. This species was introduced in North America for food and erosion control, but the authors are concerned that it is becomi...

  5. Performance and phenology of wild black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) germplasm in a common garden

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A lack of genetic diversity in cultivated black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) germplasm has been widely recognized as a major factor limiting progress towards breeding improved cultivars. Despite this, little effort has been made since the early twentieth century to systematically collect and ev...

  6. Range of black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) anthocyanin content from 26 seedling populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) has long been recognized as a rich source of anthocyanins. Despite renewed interest in this crop for its potential health benefits, its range of anthocyanin, and other phenolics, content has not been well examined. Our objective was to establish baseline value...

  7. Range of black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) anthocyanin content from 26 seedling populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) has long been recognized as a rich source of anthocyanins. Despite renewed interest in this crop for its potential health benefits, its range of anthocyanin, and other phenolic, contents have not been well examined. Our objective was to establish baseline valu...

  8. Analysis of bokbunja products show they contain Rubus occidentalis L. fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first report of species adulteration in a collection of commercially available bokbunja (Rubus coreanus Miquel) products sold in Korea and the US (all originated from Korea). Seventeen bokbunja products were obtained for examination, though twelve samples contained R. occidentalis L. fru...

  9. Potential classical biological control of invasive Himalayan yellow raspberry, Rubus ellipticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubus ellipticus is one of the world's worst invasive alien species. It is a serious problem in Hawaii and Queensland and has naturalized in many other countries. Biological control is being considered as a means to suppress it by introducing natural enemies from Asia, its native region. In this pap...

  10. Challenges and Strategies in Breeding Black Raspberries (Rubus occidentalis L.) for Improved Nutraceutical Value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) consumption has increased in recent years due in part to studies showing these berries to be particularly high in anthocyanins and other polyphenolics, which have been demonstrated to have antioxidant capacities. This has resulted in renewed interest in black ...

  11. First Report of a Leaf Spot caused by Sphaerulina tirolensis on Rubus phoenicolasius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diseased leaves of Rubus phoenicolasius (wineberry) were discovered on October 11, 2013 in a small, 3x3 m, infestation at a sunny location along Indian Springs Rd., Frederick, MD (N 39.467634, W 77.461362). Although the proportion of diseased plants was estimated to be less than10 per cent of the po...

  12. Evaluation of Rubus spp. and Hybrids for Root Lesion Nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans, Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The root lesion nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans, is a production-limiting pest in red raspberry, Rubus ideaus, in the United States. Having resistance as a tool to manage P. penetrans in raspberries would reduce the impact of this nematode on raspberry productivity as well as reduce the need for p...

  13. A blackberry (Rubus L.) expressed sequence tag library for the development of simple sequence repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A blackberry (Rubus L.) expressed sequence tag (EST) library was produced for developing simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from the tetraploid blackberry cultivar, Merton Thornless, the source of the thornless trait in commercial cultivars. RNA was extracted from young expanding leaves and used f...

  14. Transitory polymorphisms are observed in cryopreserved Rubus shoot tips using AFLP markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Questions often arise concerning the genetic stability of plant materials stored in liquid nitrogen for long time periods. This study followed the genetic stability of cryopreserved shoot tips of Rubus germplasm that were stored in liquid nitrogen for over 12 years, then rewarmed and regrown. We a...

  15. Alaskan Ribes L. and Rubus L. Plant Species Surveyed for Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alaska’s domesticated and native Ribes and Rubus genera have virtually gone unchecked for pathogen detections. Cultivated Ribes species are predominantly found in home gardens and landscape areas along highways and in cities. In 2008, while surveying native plants for diseases in North Central Alask...

  16. Japanese Raspberry (Rubus parvifolius L.): An Invasive Species Threat in Savanna and Prairie

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Japanese raspberry, (Rubus parvifolius L.) is native to eastern Asia and Australia and has naturalized in several locations in Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Missouri, and Virginia. This species was introduced in North America for food and erosion control, but the authors are concerned that it is a ...

  17. Wound Healing Activity of Rubus sanctus Schreber (Rosaceae): Preclinical Study in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Süntar, Ipek; Koca, Ufuk; Keleş, Hikmet; Akkol, Esra Küpeli

    2011-01-01

    Young shoots of Rubus species have been used for healing of wounds, infected insect bites and pimples in folk medicine for ages. In order to evaluate the wound healing activity of Rubus sanctus, four different extracts were prepared from the whole aerial parts of the plant by using n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively. Incision wound healing model by using tensiometer on rats and excision model on mice were employed to assess the activity. Remarkable wound healing activity was observed with the ointment formulation of the methanol extract at 1% concentration on the mentioned models. The results of histopathological examination also supported the outcome of both incision and excision wound models. The wound healing effect was comparatively evaluated with a reference ointment Madecassol. The experimental data confirmed the ethnobotanical usage of R. sanctus. PMID:19755505

  18. Molecular characterization of the Andean blackberry, Rubus glaucus, using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Marulanda, M; López, A M; Uribe, M

    2012-01-01

    The species Rubus glaucus, also known as the Andean or "Castilla" blackberry, is one of nine edible species of this genus that grow naturally in Central and South America. In Colombia, this species is the most important of all Rubus species for agricultural and commercial purposes. We used 20 SSRs developed for other Rubus species to characterize 44 Colombian R. glaucus genotypes, collected from eight different departments, and to look for molecular differences between thornless and thorny cultivated blackberries. Eighty-two bands were obtained from 28 loci. The genotypes were classified into eight populations, corresponding to collection sites. The mean number of polymorphic alleles per locus in all populations and genotypes ranged from 1.857 to 2.393. Samples collected from Valle del Cauca, Quindío, Caldas, and Risaralda departments had the highest heterozygosity values. The finding of exclusive bands from R. glaucus genotypes from Valle del Cauca, Quindío, and Caldas demonstrates genetic and molecular differentiation between thorny and thornless Andean blackberries. PMID:22370934

  19. How just a few makes a lot: Speciation via reticulation and apomixis on example of European brambles (Rubus subgen. Rubus, Rosaceae).

    PubMed

    Sochor, Michal; Vašut, Radim J; Sharbel, Timothy F; Trávníček, Bohumil

    2015-08-01

    New species are generated by many means, among which hybridization plays an important role. Interspecific hybrids can form isolated evolutionary units, especially when mechanisms increasing viability and fertility, like polyploidy and apomixis, are involved. A good model system to study reticulate evolution in plants is Rubus subgen. Rubus (brambles, blackberries), which only in Europe includes 748 accepted species, out of which only four are sexual diploids and all others are polyploid apomicts. We employed two molecular markers (ITS and cpDNA) to shed light on the evolutionary history of European bramble flora and main processes generating such high species diversity. We distinguished just six ancestral diploids (including two extinct ones) for both markers, which gave rise to all European polyploid accessions, and revealed an extreme reticulation in bramble evolution. We furthermore detected hybridogenous origins and identified putative parents for several taxa (e.g. ser. Nessenses), while in other groups (e.g. ser. Discolores) we could also infer the direction of hybridization. By comparing different cp haplotypes having clear geographic patterns, we hypothesize that the origin of European brambles can be attributed to both Holocene species range expansion and Pleistocene climate fluctuations. PMID:25882835

  20. Phytochemical Composition and Biological Activities of Selected Wild Berries (Rubus moluccanus L., R. fraxinifolius Poir., and R. alpestris Blume).

    PubMed

    Abu Bakar, Mohd Fadzelly; Ismail, Nur Amalina; Isha, Azizul; Mei Ling, Angelina Lee

    2016-01-01

    Berries, from the genus Rubus, are among the vital components in a healthy diet. In this study, 80% methanol extracts from the three wild Rubus species (Rubus moluccanus L., Rubus fraxinifolius Poir., and Rubus alpestris Blume) were evaluated for their phytochemical contents (total phenolics, flavonoid, anthocyanin, and carotenoid content), antioxidant (DPPH, FRAP, and ABTS assays), antiacetylcholinesterase, and antibacterial activities. GC-MS was used for quantification of naturally occurring phytochemicals. The results showed that R. alpestris contained the highest total phenolic [24.25 ± 0.1 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g] and carotenoid content [21.86 ± 0.63 mg β-carotene equivalents (BC)/g], as well as the highest DPPH scavenging and FRAP activities. The highest total flavonoid [18.17 ± 0.20 mg catechin equivalents (CE)/g] and anthocyanin content [36.96 ± 0.39 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents (c-3-gE)/g] have been shown by R. moluccanus. For antibacterial assays, R. moluccanus and R. alpestris extracts showed mild inhibition towards Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella enteritidis. Anticholinesterase activity for all extracts was in the range of 23-26%. The GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of at least 12, 21, and 7 different organic compounds in 80% methanol extracts of R. alpestris, R. moluccanus, and R. fraxinifolius, respectively, which might contribute to the bioactivity. PMID:27437023

  1. Phytochemical Composition and Biological Activities of Selected Wild Berries (Rubus moluccanus L., R. fraxinifolius Poir., and R. alpestris Blume)

    PubMed Central

    Abu Bakar, Mohd Fadzelly; Ismail, Nur Amalina; Isha, Azizul; Mei Ling, Angelina Lee

    2016-01-01

    Berries, from the genus Rubus, are among the vital components in a healthy diet. In this study, 80% methanol extracts from the three wild Rubus species (Rubus moluccanus L., Rubus fraxinifolius Poir., and Rubus alpestris Blume) were evaluated for their phytochemical contents (total phenolics, flavonoid, anthocyanin, and carotenoid content), antioxidant (DPPH, FRAP, and ABTS assays), antiacetylcholinesterase, and antibacterial activities. GC-MS was used for quantification of naturally occurring phytochemicals. The results showed that R. alpestris contained the highest total phenolic [24.25 ± 0.1 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g] and carotenoid content [21.86 ± 0.63 mg β-carotene equivalents (BC)/g], as well as the highest DPPH scavenging and FRAP activities. The highest total flavonoid [18.17 ± 0.20 mg catechin equivalents (CE)/g] and anthocyanin content [36.96 ± 0.39 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents (c-3-gE)/g] have been shown by R. moluccanus. For antibacterial assays, R. moluccanus and R. alpestris extracts showed mild inhibition towards Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella enteritidis. Anticholinesterase activity for all extracts was in the range of 23–26%. The GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of at least 12, 21, and 7 different organic compounds in 80% methanol extracts of R. alpestris, R. moluccanus, and R. fraxinifolius, respectively, which might contribute to the bioactivity. PMID:27437023

  2. A universal fingerprinting set for red raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red raspberry, Rubus idaeus L., is the most economically important fruit crop in the highly diverse Rubus subgenus Idaeobatus. This subgenus also includes black raspberry R. occidentalis L. The USDA-ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository (Corvallis, Ore.), is responsible for preserving a Rubus col...

  3. Enhanced Immunomodulatory Activity of Gelatin-Encapsulated Rubus coreanus Miquel Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yong Chang; Choi, Woon Yong; Lee, Choon Geun; Cha, Seon Woo; Kim, Young Ock; Kim, Jin-Chul; Drummen, Gregor P. C.; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the immunomodulatory activities of Rubus coreanus Miquel extract-loaded gelatin nanoparticles. The mean size of the produced nanoparticles was 143 ± 18 nm with a bandwidth of 76 nm in the size distribution and a maximum size of ~200 nm, which allows effective nanoparticle uptake by cells. Confocal imaging confirmed this, since the nanoparticles were internalized within 30 min and heterogeneously distributed throughout the cell. Zeta-potential measurements showed that from pH = 5 onwards, the nanoparticles were highly negatively charged, which prevents agglomeration to clusters by electrostatic repulsion. This was confirmed by TEM imaging, which showed a well dispersed colloidal solution. The encapsulation efficiency was nearly 60%, which is higher than for other components encapsulated in gelatin nanoparticles. Measurements of immune modulation in immune cells showed a significant effect by the crude extract, which was only topped by the nanoparticles containing the extract. Proliferation of B-, T- and NK cells was notably enhanced by Rubus coreanus-gelatin nanoparticles and in general ~2–3 times higher than control and on average ~2 times higher than ferulic acid. R. coreanus-gelatin nanoparticles induced cytokine secretion (IL-6 and TNF-α) from B- and T-cells on average at a ~2–3 times higher rate compared with the extract and ferulic acid. In vivo immunomodulatory activity in mice fed with R. coreanus-gelatin nanoparticles at 1 mL/g body weight showed a ~5 times higher antibody production compared to control, a ~1.3 times higher production compared to the extract only, and a ~1.6 times higher production compared to ferulic acid. Overall, our results suggest that gelatin nanoparticles represent an excellent transport vehicle for Rubus coreanus extract and extracts from other plants generally used in traditional Asian medicine. Such nanoparticles ensure a high local concentration that results in enhancement of immune

  4. Rubus coreanus Miquel Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase Activity and Prevents Cognitive Impairment in a Mouse Model of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cho Rong; Choi, Soo Jung; Oh, Seung Sang; Kwon, Yoon Kyung; Lee, Na Young; Park, Gwi Gun; Kim, Youn-Jung; Heo, Ho Jin; Jun, Woo Jin; Park, Cheung-Seog; Shin, Dong-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Abstract To find acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors for the prevention of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, ethanol extracts of promising traditional edible Korean plants were tested. Among them, Rubus coreanus Miquel extract exhibited the most significant AChE inhibitory activity. The effect of R. coreanus extract on trimethyltin-induced memory impairment in mice was investigated using Y-maze and passive avoidance tests. Our results showed that administration of R. coreanus extract significantly improved alternation behavior and step-through latency. In addition, R. coreanus extract was sequentially fractionated, and the purified constituent was determined to be 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid. PMID:24044488

  5. Bioassay Directed Isolation and Biological Evaluation of Compounds Isolated from Rubus fairholmianus Gard.

    PubMed Central

    Plackal George, Blassan; Thangaraj, Parimelazhagan; Sulaiman, Cheruthazhakkatt; Piramanayagam, Shanmughavel; Ramaswamy, Sathish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro and in silico analysis of Rubus fairholmianus acetone extract for antioxidant, antiproliferative, and anti-inflammatory activity led to the isolation of six compounds. Amongst all the six isolated compounds tested, 1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methylpentan-1-one (compound 1) and 2-[(3-methylbutoxy) carbonyl] benzoic acid (compound 2) were found to be more active in inhibiting BRCA and COX target proteins, which also showed the better results for DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging assays. The promising results of this investigation emphasize the importance of using R. fairholmianus in the treatment of radical generated disorders mainly cancer and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25254204

  6. Rubus occidentalis: The black raspberry--its potential in the prevention of cancer.

    PubMed

    Kula, Marta; Krauze-Baranowska, Mirosława

    2016-01-01

    Rubus occidentalis is a black-fruited raspberry originating from North America. Its popularity and demand has been growing over the years, as studies outline its high anthocyanin and ellagitannin content and significance for human health. Interaction between chemical composition and pharmacological activity, mechanisms of action at cellular and molecular levels are all active areas of study. The vast majority of research concerning black raspberries is focused on chemoprevention and anticancer effects. This review summarizes the data on chemical composition and anticancer activity of black raspberry fruits throughout the years. PMID:26699735

  7. Fatigue-alleviating effect on mice of an ethanolic extract from Rubus coreanus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Somi; You, Yanghee; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Kim, Kyungmi; Park, Jeongjin; Kim, Sunoh; Ho, Jin-Nyoung; Lee, Jeongmin; Shim, Sangin; Jun, Woojin

    2011-01-01

    The fatigue-alleviating effects on mice of Rubus coreanus were investigated by using an adjustable-current water pool. The mice were exhaustively exercised for 2 consecutive days, and those administered with the 80% ethanol extract (RCE) of R. coreanus displayed a lower reduction (20%) in swimming time on day 2 than the control group (41% reduction). RCE significantly prevented the depletion of hepatic antioxidants during exercise-induced fatigue. These results suggest that RCE alleviated fatigue by elevating the antioxidative potential. PMID:21307576

  8. Antinociceptive activity of niga-ichigoside F1 from Rubus imperialis.

    PubMed

    Niero, R; Cechinel Filho, V; Souza, M M; Montanari, J L; Yunes, R A; Delle Monache, F

    1999-08-01

    This work describes the antinociceptive effect of a triterpene glycoside, niga-ichigoside F1 (1), obtained from an EtOAc extract of the aerial parts of Rubus imperialis. When evaluated against an HOAc-induced writhing model, it exhibited an ID(50) value of 3.1 mg/kg (ip). Moreover, in a formalin-induced pain model, both phases of pain were inhibited by compound 1, with ID(50) values of 2.6 (first phase) and 2.7 (second phase) mg/kg, (ip), respectively. PMID:10479322

  9. Methyl Jasmonate Enhances Antioxidant Activity, Flavonoid Content and Antiproliferation of Human Cancer Cells in Blackberries (Rubus spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of preharvest methyl jasmonate (MJ) application on fruit quality, antioxidant activity and flavonoid content in blackberries (Rubus spp.) were determined. Anticancer activity against human lung A549 cells and HL-60 leukemia cells was also evaluated. Three blackberry cultivars (Chester T...

  10. Physicochemical and Sensory Characteristics of Sponge Cakes with Rubus coreanus Powder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    To develop new type of sponge cake, the effects of partial (0~40%) replacement with Rubus coreanus powder (RCP) on the quality characteristics of sponge cakes were investigated. The pH level and moisture content ranged from 4.05~8.23 and 28.49~36.59, respectively, and significantly decreased upon addition of RCP (P<0.05). Baking loss rate and cake firmness significantly increased with higher RCP content in the formulation, whereas morphological characteristics of cakes such as height, volume, and symmetry indices significantly decreased (P<0.05). For crumb color values, L*- and b*-values significantly decreased while a*-value significantly increased as a result of RCP substitution (P<0.05). Hedonic sensory results indicated that sponge cakes supplemented with 30~40% RCP showed the most favorable acceptance scores for most of the sensory attributes evaluated. Overall, Rubus coreanus sponge cake could be developed with comparable physicochemical qualities without sacrificing consumer acceptability. PMID:26451358

  11. Quantitative and fingerprint analyses of Chinese sweet tea plant (Rubus Suavissimus S. Lee)

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Guixin; Xu, Shun-Jun; Liu, Dong; Koh, Gar Yee; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Zhijun

    2009-01-01

    Quality of botanical food is increasingly assessed by the content of multiple bioactive compounds. In this study we report, for the first time, an HPLC fingerprinting method for the quality evaluation of Rubus suavissimus leaves possessing multiple bioactivities. Five constituents, gallic acid, rutin, ellagic acid, rubusoside, and steviol monoside were quantified and used in developing qualitative chromatographic fingerprints. The limits of detection and quantification ranged from 0.29 μg/mL to 37.86 μg/mL. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of intra- and inter-day precisions were no more than 3.14% and 3.01%, respectively. The average recoveries were between 93.1% and 97.5%. The developed method was validated in analyzing fourteen leaf samples with satisfactory results. The contents of the five marker compounds accounted for an average of about 6% w/w with a variability of 16% among the fourteen samples collected from a single site and year. Gallic acid was the least whereas steviol monoside the most variable compounds among the fourteen leaf samples. The characteristic compound rubusoside that is responsible for the sweet taste accounted for 5% of leaf weight. The validated method can now be used to quantitatively and qualitatively assess the quality of Rubus suavissimus leaves as traditional beverage or potential medicines. PMID:19138116

  12. Physicochemical and Sensory Characteristics of Sponge Cakes with Rubus coreanus Powder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho

    2015-09-01

    To develop new type of sponge cake, the effects of partial (0~40%) replacement with Rubus coreanus powder (RCP) on the quality characteristics of sponge cakes were investigated. The pH level and moisture content ranged from 4.05~8.23 and 28.49~36.59, respectively, and significantly decreased upon addition of RCP (P<0.05). Baking loss rate and cake firmness significantly increased with higher RCP content in the formulation, whereas morphological characteristics of cakes such as height, volume, and symmetry indices significantly decreased (P<0.05). For crumb color values, L*- and b*-values significantly decreased while a*-value significantly increased as a result of RCP substitution (P<0.05). Hedonic sensory results indicated that sponge cakes supplemented with 30~40% RCP showed the most favorable acceptance scores for most of the sensory attributes evaluated. Overall, Rubus coreanus sponge cake could be developed with comparable physicochemical qualities without sacrificing consumer acceptability. PMID:26451358

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mixed culture of blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius L.) juice: synergism in the aroma compounds production.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Rosales, Pedro Ulises; Ragazzo-Sánchez, Juan Arturo; Ruiz-Montañez, Gabriela; Ortiz-Basurto, Rosa Isela; Luna-Solano, Guadalupe; Calderón-Santoyo, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus sp.) juice was fermented using four different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Vitilevure-CM4457, Enoferm-T306, ICV-K1, and Greroche Rhona-L3574) recognized because of their use in the wine industry. A medium alcoholic graduation spirit (<6°GL) with potential to be produced at an industrial scale was obtained. Alcoholic fermentations were performed at 28°C, 200 rpm, and noncontrolled pH. The synergistic effect on the aromatic compounds production during fermentation in mixed culture was compared with those obtained by monoculture and physic mixture of spirits produced in monoculture. The aromatic composition was determined by HS-SPME-GC. The differences in aromatic profile principally rely on the proportions in aromatic compounds and not on the number of those compounds. The multivariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and factorial discriminant analysis (DFA) permit to demonstrate the synergism between the strains. PMID:25506606

  14. Microbiological and Pharmacological Evaluation of the Micropropagated Rubus liebmannii Medicinal Plant

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Cornejo-Garrido, Jorge; Rojas-Bribiesca, Gabriela; Nicasio-Torres, María del Pilar; Said-Fernández, Salvador; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito David; Molina-Salinas, Gloria María; Tortoriello, Jaime; Meckes-Fischer, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Rubus liebmannii is an endemic species from Mexico used in traditional medicine primarily to treat dysentery and cough. The in vitro activity against Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica that produces the ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of the plant led us to expand the pharmacological and phytochemical research of this species. Gastrointestinal disorders including amebiasis remain one of the health problems that need to be addressed and it is of interest to find alternatives that improve their treatment. Also, it is important to emphasize that R. liebmannii grows wild in the country and is not found in abundance; therefore, alternatives that avoid overexploitation of the natural resource are mandatory. Ongoing with the evaluation of the potentialities that R. liebmannii possesses for treating infectious gastrointestinal diseases, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the biological effects and the chemical composition of the micropropagated plant. PMID:22966243

  15. Effect of wall material on the antioxidant activity and physicochemical properties of Rubus fruticosus juice microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Dafne I; Beristain, Cesar I; Azuara, Ebner; Luna, Guadalupe; Jimenez, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) juice possesses compounds with antioxidant activity, which can be protected by different biopolymers used in the microencapsulation. Therefore, the effects of cell wall material including maltodextrin (MD), Arabic gum (GA) and whey protein concentrate (WPC) were evaluated on the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of encapsulated blackberries using a spray-drying technique. Anthocyanin concentration, polymeric colour, total polyphenols, radical scavenging activity of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrilhydrazil radical, reducing power and the stability at different storage conditions were evaluated. GA and MD conferred a similar protection to the antioxidant compounds when the microcapsules were stored at low water activities (aw < 0.515) in contrast to at a high moisture content (aw > 0.902), whereas WPC presented a high protection. Therefore, the selection of the best wall material for blackberry juice encapsulation depends of the conditions of storage of the powder. PMID:26006741

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mixed Culture of Blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius L.) Juice: Synergism in the Aroma Compounds Production

    PubMed Central

    Ragazzo-Sánchez, Juan Arturo; Ortiz-Basurto, Rosa Isela; Luna-Solano, Guadalupe; Calderón-Santoyo, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus sp.) juice was fermented using four different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Vitilevure-CM4457, Enoferm-T306, ICV-K1, and Greroche Rhona-L3574) recognized because of their use in the wine industry. A medium alcoholic graduation spirit (<6°GL) with potential to be produced at an industrial scale was obtained. Alcoholic fermentations were performed at 28°C, 200 rpm, and noncontrolled pH. The synergistic effect on the aromatic compounds production during fermentation in mixed culture was compared with those obtained by monoculture and physic mixture of spirits produced in monoculture. The aromatic composition was determined by HS-SPME-GC. The differences in aromatic profile principally rely on the proportions in aromatic compounds and not on the number of those compounds. The multivariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and factorial discriminant analysis (DFA) permit to demonstrate the synergism between the strains. PMID:25506606

  17. Evaluation of the hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities of Rubus parvifolius L.*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Sun, Cui-rong; Yang, Jie-hong; Shi, Jian-mei; Du, Yue-guang; Zhang, Yu-yan; Li, Jin-hui; Wan, Hai-tong

    2011-01-01

    The hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities of the n-butanol extract of Rubus parvifolius L. (RPL), a widely used medicinal plant, were evaluated. Results demonstrated that RPL extract possessed pronounced hepatoprotective effects against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic injury in mice, which was at least partially attributed to its strong antioxidant capacity. Treatment with RPL extract markedly attenuated the increases in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels caused by CCl4 intoxication. It also significantly prevented the decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and the increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) content of liver tissue. Meanwhile, histopathological changes of hepatic damage were also remarkably ameliorated. Phytochemical analysis based on high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) revealed the presence of various phenolic compounds, including caffeic acid conjugates, ellagic acid glycosides, and flavonol glycosides, which might be responsible for the hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities of RPL. PMID:21265045

  18. Ellagic Acid Derivatives from Rubus ulmifolius Inhibit Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Improve Response to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Quave, Cassandra L.; Estévez-Carmona, Miriam; Compadre, Cesar M.; Hobby, Gerren; Hendrickson, Howard; Beenken, Karen E.; Smeltzer, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Biofilms contribute to the pathogenesis of many forms of Staphylococcus aureus infection. Treatment of these infections is complicated by intrinsic resistance to conventional antibiotics, thus creating an urgent need for strategies that can be used for the prevention and treatment of biofilm-associated infections. Methodology/Principal Findings This study demonstrates that a botanical natural product composition (220D-F2) rich in ellagic acid and its derivatives can limit S. aureus biofilm formation to a degree that can be correlated with increased antibiotic susceptibility. The source of this composition is Rubus ulmifolius Schott. (Rosaceae), a plant used in complementary and alternative medicine in southern Italy for the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections. All S. aureus clonal lineages tested exhibited a reduced capacity to form a biofilm at 220D-F2 concentrations ranging from 50–200 µg/mL, which were well below the concentrations required to limit bacterial growth (530–1040 µg/mL). This limitation was therapeutically relevant in that inclusion of 220D-F2 resulted in enhanced susceptibility to the functionally-distinct antibiotics daptomycin, clindamycin and oxacillin. Testing with kidney and liver cell lines also demonstrated a lack of host cell cytotoxicity at concentrations of 220D-F2 required to achieve these effects. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that extract 220D-F2 from the root of Rubus ulmifolius can be used to inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation to a degree that can be correlated with increased antibiotic susceptibility without toxic effects on normal mammalian cells. Hence, 220D-F2 is a strong candidate for development as a botanical drug for use in the prevention and treatment of S. aureus biofilm-associated infections. PMID:22242149

  19. Microsatellite markers for raspberry and blackberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    welve microsatellites were isolated from SSR-enriched genomic libraries of Rubus idaeus L.‘Meeker’ red raspberry (diploid) and R. loganobaccus L. H. Bailey ‘Marion’ blackberry-raspberry hybrid (hexaploid). These primer pairs, with the addition of one developed from a GenBank R. idaeus sequence, we...

  20. Decay resistance to Botrytis cinerea and quality characteristics during storage of raspberry genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberries are a delicate, high value crop with an extremely short shelf life exacerbated by postharvest decay caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers. European red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) is the most widely grown. Yellow (R. idaeus L.), black (R. occidentalis L.) and purple raspberries (R. ×neglectus ...

  1. Microsatellite Markers for Raspberries and Blackberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve microsatellites were isolated from SSR-enriched genomic libraries of Rubus idaeus L.‘Meeker’ red raspberry (diploid) and R. loganobaccus L. H. Bailey ‘Marion’ blackberry-raspberry hybrid (hexaploid). These primer pairs, with the addition of one developed from a GenBank R. idaeus sequence, w...

  2. Traditional herbal drugs of southern Uganda. Part III: isolation and methods for physical characterization of bioactive alkanols from Rubus apetalus.

    PubMed

    Hamill, F A; Apio, S; Mubiru, N K; Mosango, M; Bukenya-Ziraba, R; Maganyi, O W; Soejarto, D D

    2003-07-01

    The East African plant Rubus apetalus Poir. was collected as a component of an ethnobotanical survey in southern Uganda. No phytochemical investigations of this plant have been found in the literature. Preliminary antimicrobial susceptibility tests performed in Uganda indicated biological activity against several bacterial and one fungal human pathogen. Bulk re-collection of Rubus apetalus was accomplished and crude extraction performed in preparation for further testing. Two chemical fractions of the crude extract were active in the antimicrobial susceptibility assay. Fractionation of one of the active crude fractions led to the isolation and elucidation of a mixture of related compounds that exhibit antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC=62 microg/ml), Streptococcus faecalis (16 microg/ml) and Candida albicans (32 microg/ml). PMID:12787949

  3. Phylogeny and biogeography of pacific Rubus subgenus Idaeobatus (Rosaceae) species: Investigating the origin of the endemic Hawaiian raspberry R. macraei

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morden, C.W.; Gardner, D.E.; Weniger, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    The endemic Hawaiian raspberries Rubus hawaiensis and R. macraei (both subgenus Idaeobatus) had been thought to be closely related species until recent molecular studies demonstrated otherwise. These studies suggest that they are the products of separate colonizations to the Hawaiian Islands. Affinities of R. hawaiensis to R. spectabilis of western North America were clearly confirmed. However, no clear relation to R. macraei has been published. This study was initiated to examine species of subg. Idaeobatus from the surrounding Pacific region as well as species from other subgenera to better evaluate biogeographic and phylogenetic affinities of R. macraei by means of chromosome analysis and molecular data using the chloroplast gene ndbF. Results show that R. macraei clusters in a clade with species of blackberries, subg. Rubus, and of these it is most closely linked to R. ursinus. Chromosomally, R. macraei is 2n = 6x = 42, a number that would be a new report for subg. Idaeobatus. However, polyploidy is common in subg. Rubus. Analyses indicate that R. macraei and R. hawaiensis are derived from separate colonizations from North America and that similarities between them are due to convergent evolution in the Hawaiian environment.

  4. Antigiardial activity of methanolic extracts from Helianthemum glomeratum Lag. and Rubus coriifolius Focke in suckling mice CD-1.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Elizabeth; Calzada, Fernando; Campos, Rafael

    2006-12-01

    The antigiardial activity of crude methanolic extracts from Helianthemum glomeratum and Rubus coriifolius, plants used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of diarrhea and dysentery, were demonstrated using experimental infections of Giardia lamblia in suckling female CD-1 mice. In vivo antigiardial activity was studied to determine the dose required to kill 50% of the trophozoites (ED50). Five single-doses between 1.25 and 20 mg extract/kg body weight were tested. Drugs metronidazole and emetine were used as reference. The ED50 (mg/kg) obtained for the extracts and drugs used as reference was 0.125 for Helianthemum glomeratum, 0.506 for Rubus coriifolius, 0.194 for metronidazole and 0.167 for emetine. Both methanolic extracts showed antigiardial activity, the extract of Helianthemum glomeratum was more active than Rubus coriifolius, and its activity is comparable to metronidazole and emetine. Our results hold the perspective for the utilization of the extracts of these plants as an option to develop of novel antigiardial phytodrugs. PMID:16824716

  5. Antiviral Effects of Black Raspberry (Rubus coreanus) Seed and Its Gallic Acid against Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Oh, Mi; Seok, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Sella; Lee, Dan Bi; Bae, Garam; Bae, Hae-In; Bae, Seon Young; Hong, Young-Min; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Lee, Dong-Hun; Song, Chang-Seon; Mun, Ji Young; Chung, Mi Sook; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a serious public health concern worldwide, as it causes significant morbidity and mortality. The emergence of drug-resistant viral strains requires new approaches for the treatment of influenza. In this study, Rubus coreanus seed (RCS) that is left over from the production of wine or juice was found to show antiviral activities against influenza type A and B viruses. Using the time-of-addition plaque assay, viral replication was almost completely abolished by simultaneous treatment with the RCS fraction of less than a 1-kDa molecular weight (RCSF1). One of the polyphenols derived from RCSF1, gallic acid (GA), identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, showed inhibitory effects against both influenza type A and B viruses, albeit at relatively high concentrations. RCSF1 was bound to hemagglutinin protein, inhibited hemagglutination significantly and disrupted viral particles, whereas GA was found to only disrupt the viral particles by using transmission electron microscopy. In BALB/c mice infected with influenza virus, oral administration of RCSF1 significantly improved the survival rate and reduced the viral titers in the lungs. Our results demonstrate that RCSF1 and GA show potent and broad antiviral activity against influenza A and B type viruses and are promising sources of agents that target virus particles. PMID:27275830

  6. Antiviral Effects of Black Raspberry (Rubus coreanus) Seed and Its Gallic Acid against Influenza Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Oh, Mi; Seok, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Sella; Lee, Dan Bi; Bae, Garam; Bae, Hae-In; Bae, Seon Young; Hong, Young-Min; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Lee, Dong-Hun; Song, Chang-Seon; Mun, Ji Young; Chung, Mi Sook; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a serious public health concern worldwide, as it causes significant morbidity and mortality. The emergence of drug-resistant viral strains requires new approaches for the treatment of influenza. In this study, Rubus coreanus seed (RCS) that is left over from the production of wine or juice was found to show antiviral activities against influenza type A and B viruses. Using the time-of-addition plaque assay, viral replication was almost completely abolished by simultaneous treatment with the RCS fraction of less than a 1-kDa molecular weight (RCSF1). One of the polyphenols derived from RCSF1, gallic acid (GA), identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, showed inhibitory effects against both influenza type A and B viruses, albeit at relatively high concentrations. RCSF1 was bound to hemagglutinin protein, inhibited hemagglutination significantly and disrupted viral particles, whereas GA was found to only disrupt the viral particles by using transmission electron microscopy. In BALB/c mice infected with influenza virus, oral administration of RCSF1 significantly improved the survival rate and reduced the viral titers in the lungs. Our results demonstrate that RCSF1 and GA show potent and broad antiviral activity against influenza A and B type viruses and are promising sources of agents that target virus particles. PMID:27275830

  7. Bioactivities and extraction optimization of crude polysaccharides from the fruits and leaves of Rubus chingii Hu.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Tian; Lu, Chuan-Li; Jiang, Jian-Guo; Wang, Min; Wang, Dong-Mei; Zhu, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Polysaccharides of Rubus chingii Hu fruit and leaf were extracted to compare their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities against breast cancer cells MCF-7 and liver cancer cells Bel-7402. Results showed that all the tested bioactivities of polysaccharides from leaf (L-Ps) were better than those of polysaccharides from fruit (F-Ps). Response surface methodology was then used to optimize the extraction conditions of polysaccharides from leaf. Additionally, polysaccharides from fruit and leaf were characterized and their contents of total sugars, proteins and uronic acid were compared. It was found that polysaccharides from fruit and leaf were similar in IR and UV absorption, but significantly different in contents of total sugars, protein and uronic acid. Their elution profiles of DEAE-Sepharose fast flow column were different too. The main peak of polysaccharides from fruit was eluted with 0.3 mol/l NaCl solution and the main peak of polysaccharides from leaf was eluted with deionized water. The differences between the two polysaccharides may be responsible for their differences in bioactivities. Further studies are required to explore their complete structural characteristics, structure-activity relationship and the mechanism of their activities. PMID:26076631

  8. Ultrasound as pretreatment to convective drying of Andean blackberry (Rubus glaucus Benth).

    PubMed

    Romero J, Carlos A; Yépez V, Byron D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the use of ultrasound as a pretreatment for convective drying of Andean blackberry (Rubus glaucus Benth). For this, a Box-Behnken experimental design was used to study the effect of ultrasound vibration amplitude (0-90μm), time of sonication (10-30min) and air temperature (40-60°C) on the retention of antioxidant compounds and on the kinetics of convective drying. The results showed that the antioxidant activity on fruit was reduced as the vibration amplitude and time of sonication increased, while was found that vibration amplitude ultrasound and air drying temperature were the variables that more affect the drying rate of blackberries. The drying rate increased by almost five times when samples were treated with ultrasound at 90μm for 20min. They were then dried using air at 60°C. It is concluded that the application of ultrasound in blackberry processing allows to obtain a dehydrated product with better functional quality and shows to be effective in reducing the time necessary to achieve a given value of moisture during convective drying. PMID:25023827

  9. Ripe fruit of Rubus coreanus inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Choi, Phil Hyung; Yoo, Jin-Su; Jeon, Hoon; Chae, Byeong-Suk; Park, Jeong-Suk; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Shin, Tae-Yong

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of a water extract of the ripe fruits of Rubus coreanus Miq. (Rosaceae) (RFRC) on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as anaphylaxis, rhinitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis. RFRC dose-dependently inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis and serum histamine release in mice. RFRC reduced the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated local allergic reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. RFRC attenuated histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and human mast cells by the reduction of intracellular calcium. RFRC decreased the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and the calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of RFRC on cytokine production was nuclear factor (NF)-κB- and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent. In addition, RFRC suppressed the activation of caspase-1. Our findings provide evidence that RFRC inhibits mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory reactions, and for the involvement of calcium, NF-κB, MAPKs and caspase-1 in these effects. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro anti-allergic inflammatory effects of RFRC provide affirmative proof of a possible therapeutic application of this agent in allergic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22075758

  10. Antifungal activity of Rubus chingii extract combined with fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Chen, Jia; Yu, Yi-qun; Cao, Yong-bing; Jiang, Yuan-ying

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of Rubus chingii extract in combination with fluconazole (FLC) against FLC-resistant Candida albicans 100 in vitro. A R. chingii extract and FLC-resistant C. albicans fungus suspension were prepared. The minimum inhibitory concentration and fractional inhibitory concentration index of R. chingii extract combined with FLC against C. albicans were determined, after which growth curves for C. albicans treated with R. chingii extract, FLC alone and a combination of these preparations were constructed. Additionally, the mechanisms of drug combination against C. albicans were explored by flow cytometry, gas chromatographic mass spectrometry and drug efflux pump function detection. R. chingii extract combined with FLC showed significant synergy. Flow cytometry suggested that C. albicans cells mainly arrest in G1 and S phases when they have been treated with the drug combination. The drug combination resulted in a marked decrease in the ergosterol content of the cell membrane. Additionally, efflux of Rhodamine 6G decreased with increasing concentrations of R. chingii extract. R. chingii extract combined with FLC has antifungal activity against FLC-resistant C. albicans. PMID:26891940

  11. What is the role of unripe Rubus coreanus extract on penile erection?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Kim, Hye Kyung; Kim, Sung Zoo; Chae, Han Jung; Cui, Wan Shou; Lee, Sung Won; Jeon, Ju Hong; Park, Jong Kwan

    2011-07-01

    The effect of unripe Rubus coreanus extract on rabbit penile corpus cavernosum (PCC) was evaluated. Penises were obtained from healthy male New Zealand white rabbits (2.5-3.0 kg). The pre-contracted penis with phenylephrine (Phe, 10 μM) was treated with various concentrations of an extract of unripe R. coreanus (0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 mg/mL). The change in penile tension was recorded, cyclic nucleotides in the perfusate and the PCC were measured by radioimmunoassay, and the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the perfused PCC were measured by western blotting. The interaction between unripe R. coreanus and sildenafil was also evaluated. The PCC relaxation induced by the extracts of R. coreanus was in a concentration-dependent manner and enhanced sildenafil-induced PCC relaxation. The perfusion of penile cavernous tissue with the unripe R. coreanus extract increased cGMP and cAMP in the tissue and in the perfusate and the expression of eNOS and nNOS in the tissue. The unripe R. coreanus extract exerts a relaxing effect on penile cavernous tissue in part by activating the NO-cGMP system and it may improve erectile dysfunction (ED), which does not completely respond to sildenafil citrate. PMID:21254274

  12. Identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in berries of Fragaria and Rubus species (family Rosaceae).

    PubMed

    Määttä-Riihinen, Kaisu R; Kamal-Eldin, Afaf; Törrönen, A Riitta

    2004-10-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography combined with diode array and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection was used to study soluble and insoluble forms of phenolic compounds in strawberries, raspberries (red and yellow cultivated and red wild), arctic bramble, and cloudberries. Hydroxycinnamic acids were present as free forms in cloudberries and mainly as sugar esters in the other berries. Quercetin 3-glucuronide was the typical flavonol glycoside in all of the berries studied. The composition of the predominant anthocyanins can be used to distinguish the studied red Rubus species from each other since cyanidin was glycosylated typically with 3-sophorose (56%) in cultivated red raspberry, with 3-sophorose (30%) and 3-glucose (27%) in wild red raspberry, and with 3-rutinose (80%) in arctic bramble. Ellagic acid was present as free and glycosylated forms and as ellagitannins of varying degrees of polymerization. Comparable levels of ellagitannins were obtained by the analysis of soluble ellagitannins as gallic acid equivalents and by the analysis of ellagic acid equivalents released by acid hydrolysis of the extracts. PMID:15453684

  13. A member of a new genus in the Potyviridae infects Rubus.

    PubMed

    Susaimuthu, James; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E; Gergerich, Rose C; Martin, Robert R

    2008-02-01

    Blackberry yellow vein disease causes devastating losses on blackberry in the south and southeastern United States. Blackberry yellow vein associated virus (BYVaV) was identified as the putative causal agent of the disease but the identification of latent infections of BYVaV led to the investigation of additional agents being involved in symptomatology. A potyvirus, designated as Blackberry virus Y (BVY), has been identified in plants with blackberry yellow vein disease symptoms also infected with BYVaV. BVY is the largest potyvirus sequenced to date and the first to encode an AlkB domain. The virus shows minimal sequence similarity with known members of the family and should be considered member of a novel genus in the Potyviridae. The relationship of BVY with Bramble yellow mosaic virus, the only other potyvirus known to infect Rubus was investigated. The presence of the BVY was verified in several blackberry plants, but it is not the causal agent of blackberry yellow vein disease since several symptomatic plants were not infected with the virus and BVY was also detected in asymptomatic plants. PMID:17933412

  14. Impact of agrochemicals on Peronospora sparsa and phenolic profiles in three Rubus arcticus cultivars.

    PubMed

    Hukkanen, Anne; Kostamo, Katri; Kärenlampi, Sirpa; Kokko, Harri

    2008-02-13

    The main arctic bramble ( Rubus arcticus) cultivars are susceptible to downy mildew ( Peronospora sparsa), which seriously threatens the cultivation. The efficiency of Aliette, Euparen M, phosphite-containing Phosfik, Phostrol, Farm-Fos-44, and Kaliumfosfiet, as well as Bion was evaluated in the greenhouse. Fewer symptoms and less Peronospora DNA were found in plants treated with Euparen M and Bion, whereas Aliette, Phosfik, and Phostrol gave moderate protection. Three arctic bramble cultivars showed varying susceptibility to P. sparsa. An inexpensive and fast in vitro plate test gave results parallel with those obtained in the greenhouse. Quantitative differences were found in the phenolic profiles of the leaves of different cultivars and in different treatments. Several phenolic compounds were tentatively identified in arctic bramble for the first time, for example, monomeric and oligomeric ellagitannins and galloylglucoses. Negative correlation was found between the amount of P. sparsa DNA and flavonol glycosides and some ellagitannins in the leaves 8 days after inoculation, suggesting a possible role for these phenolics in the defense. PMID:18183950

  15. Rubus chlorotic mottle virus, a new sobemovirus infecting raspberry and bramble.

    PubMed

    McGavin, W J; Macfarlane, S A

    2009-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a new member of the unassigned genus Sobemovirus, isolated from raspberry and bramble plants in north east Scotland and given the name Rubus chlorotic mottle virus (RuCMV), was obtained. The virus has a single, positive-strand RNA genome of 3,983 nucleotides and, in common with other sobemoviruses, contains four open reading frames (ORFs) encoding, from 5' to 3', the P1 protein that is likely to be a suppressor of RNA silencing, ORF2a that has homology to serine-proteases, ORF2b that is the probable RNA dependent RNA polymerase, and ORF3 that is the coat protein. ORF2b protein is potentially expressed as a fusion with ORF2a protein by a -1 frameshift at the heptanucleotide sequence UUUAAAC. Phylogenetic analyses showed that RuCMV is a distinct virus not closely related to any of the other sequenced sobemoviruses. Based on the obtained sequence a full-length cDNA copy of RuCMV was cloned and in vitro transcripts derived from this clone were shown to be fully infectious. PMID:18929604

  16. Caspase dependent apoptotic inhibition of melanoma and lung cancer cells by tropical Rubus extracts.

    PubMed

    George, Blassan Plackal Adimuriyil; Abrahamse, Heidi; Hemmaragala, Nanjundaswamy M

    2016-05-01

    Rubus fairholmianus Gard. inhibits human melanoma (A375) and lung cancer (A549) cell growth by the caspase dependent apoptotic pathway. Herbal products have a long history of clinical use and acceptance. They are freely available natural compounds that can be safely used to prevent various ailments. The plants and plant derived products became the basis of traditional medicine system throughout the world for thousands of years. The effects of R. fairholmianus root acetone extract (RFRA) on the proliferation of A375 and A549 cells was examined in this study. RFRA led to a decrease in cell viability, proliferation and an increase in cytotoxicity in a dose dependent manner when compared with control and normal skin fibroblast cells (WS1). The morphology of treated cells supported apoptotic cell death. Annexin V/propidium iodide staining indicated that RFRA induced apoptosis in A375 and A549 cells and the percentages of early and late apoptotic populations significantly increased. Moreover, the apoptotic inducing ability of RFRA when analysing effector caspase 3/7 activity, indicated a marked increase in treated cells. In summary, we have shown the anticancer effects of RFRA in A375 and A549 cancer cells via induction of caspase dependent apoptosis in vitro. The extract is more effective against melanoma; which may suggest the usefulness of RFRA-based anticancer therapies. PMID:27133056

  17. Microsatellite Markers Identify Raspberries and Blackberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve genomic SSRs and one Expressed Sequence Tag- (EST)-simple sequence repeats (SSR) designed from an (AT)6-containingred raspberry, R. idaeus sequence from Genbank were used for fingerprinting 48 raspberry and 48 blackberry (Rubus L. subgenus Rubus)cultivars stored at the United States Departmen...

  18. Location of the mechanism of resistance to Amphorophora agathonica (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in red raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aphid Amphorophora agathonica Hottes is an important virus vector in red (Rubus idaeus L.) and black (Rubus occidentalis L.) raspberries in North America. Host plant resistance in the form of a single dominant gene named Ag1 has been relied upon to help control aphid-transmitted plant viruses; h...

  19. A universal fingerprinting set for red raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red raspberry, Rubus idaeus L., is the most economically important fruit crop in the highly diverse Rubus subgenus Idaeobatus, which also includes black raspberry R. occidentalis L. Major world production occurs in Europe, South and North America including central highlands of Mexico, California (U...

  20. Genetic variation detected by use of the M13 "DNA fingerprint" probe in Malus, Prunus, and Rubus (Rosaceae).

    PubMed

    Nybom, H; Rogstad, S H; Schaal, B A

    1990-02-01

    Recently, "DNA fingerprints" have been reported in a wide array of organisms. We used the M13 repeat probe on several genera and species in the angiosperm family Rosaceae. Four apple cultivars could be differentiated when any one of five restriction enzymes was used to analyze minisatellite DNA. Similarly, four individual trees of Prunus serotina (black cherry) exhibited different "fingerprints" with each of four enyzmes. A total of 14 Rubus (blackberries and raspberries) plants representing four species were investigated with two enzymes. Extensive inter-and intraspecific variation was found. However, some closely growing plants had identical "fingerprints", probably due to their being derived through vegetative propagation. PMID:24226211

  1. A polysaccharide from the stems of Rubus amabilis Focke and its immunological enhancement activity.

    PubMed

    Diao, Yu-Lin; Shan, Jun-Jie; Ma, Hao; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Bin

    2016-09-01

    A water-soluble polysaccharide (named RAP) was newly isolated from the stems of Rubus amabilis. Structural confirmation of the polysaccharide was provided by hydrolysis, periodate oxidation, Smith degradation, and methylation analysis, combined with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), capillary electrophoresis (CE), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and gas chromatography-mass spectra (GC-MS). In vitro immunological enhancement activity was characterized using the proliferative activity of spleen lymphocytes and phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages in mice. The polysaccharide was mainly composed of xylose, arabinose, glucose, rhamnose, galactose, mannose, glucuronic acid, and galactocuronic acid in the molar ratio of 1.0:6.9:0.8:1.1:6.9:0.3:0.5:3.3, with the average molecular weight of 26.2 kDa. The linkage types of netural monosaccharides were as follows: the arabinose was →2) Ara (1→ and galactose were Gal (1→, →3) Gal (1→, →3,6) Gal (1→, →2,3,6) Gal (1→ and →2,3,6) Galf (1→. Xyl (1→, →6) Glc (1→, →2) Glc (1→, →3) Rha (1→, Rha (1→ and Man (1→ were also found in the structure. RAP-B-2 could improve the proliferative activity of spleen T cells and B cells and boost phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages at the concentration of 50 μg/ml (p < 0.05, p < 0.01). PMID:27256478

  2. Morphological and molecular identification to secure cultivar maintenance and management of self-sterile Rubus arcticus

    PubMed Central

    Kostamo, K.; Toljamo, A.; Antonius, K.; Kokko, H.; Kärenlampi, S. O.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Preservation of cultivar purity creates a particular challenge for plants that are self-incompatible, require insects for cross-pollination, and have easily germinating seeds and vigorously spreading rhizomes. As the fields must be planted with mixed populations, and a balance must be maintained between the cultivars to achieve effective pollination, methods for field monitoring of the relative density of different cultivars must be practical. Furthermore, a DNA-based method is needed for cultivar verification in the collections and outside of the growing season. The aim of this study was to develop both types of methods for Rubus arcticus (arctic bramble). Methods Morphological parameters were measured from six cultivars grown on three farms. Observations from the flowers and fruits included: petal and sepal number, flower diameter, arrangement of petals, size of calyx in relation to corolla, fruit weight, yield and soluble sugars. Observations from the leaves included: width and height of middle leaflet, shape of the base of terminal leaflet, shape of terminal leaflet, leaf margin serration and fingertip touch. The applicability of simple sequence repeat (SSR) or microsatellite DNA markers developed for red raspberry was tested on eight arctic bramble cultivars. Key Results and Conclusions Morphological and molecular identification methods were developed for R. arcticus. The best morphological characteristics were the length-to-width ratio of the middle leaflet and leaf margin serration. A particular characteristic, fingertip touch, was shown by electron microscopy to be related to the density and quality of the leaf hairs. Red raspberry SSR marker no. 126 proved to be applicable for differentiation of the eight arctic bramble cultivars tested. These identification methods are critical to secure the maintenance and management of R. arcticus. However, the challenges faced and approaches taken are equally applicable to other species with similar

  3. Effect of starch-beeswax coatings on quality parameters of blackberries (Rubus spp.).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gallardo, Alfonso; García-Almendárez, Blanca; Barbosa-Cánovas, Gustavo; Pimentel-González, Diana; Reyes-González, L R; Regalado, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    There is increased interest in berry fruits due to health benefits, and maintenance of fruit quality for longer periods of time has been a priority. We previously found that starch based coatings applied on raspberries was associated to volatile compounds production due to anoxic conditions. The objective of this work was to design more hydrophobic coatings with reduced thickness. A starch-beeswax dispersion containing 2 % (w/v) modified tapioca starch added with either 0.5 or 1.0 % (w/v) beeswax microparticles was produced, and used for spray coating freshly harvested blackberries (Rubus spp.). Coatings were air dried, packed in plastic trays and stored up to 16 days at 4 °C and 88 % relative humidity. Storage quality parameters such as hardness, respiration rate, anthocyanins content, total phenols, color changes and weight loss were evaluated. We did not find Interactions among coating ingredients, and incorporation of beeswax reduced moisture transfer rate. Coatings did not occlude the stomata and apparently did not over-hydrate the cuticle. This characteristic allowed appropriate gas exchange (O2 and CO2), and reduced accumulation of volatile compounds associated to fermentative metabolism. Respiration rates were 4.207 ± 0.157, 4.557 ± 0.220 and 4.780 ± 0.050 mmol CO2 kg(-1) h(-1) for control, 0.5 and 1 % of wax content in coatings, respectively. However, ethylene production increased throughout storage time along with beeswax concentration, indicating stressful conditions for the fruit. This trend appears to be related with changes in total phenols and anthocyanins during storage. Edible coatings based on starch and hydrophobic particles should be reformulated to maintain quality of stored berry fruits. PMID:26344973

  4. A genetic linkage map of black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) and the mapping of Ag4 conferring resistance to the aphid Amphorophora agathonica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) is a high-value crop in the Pacific Northwest of North America with an international marketplace. Few genetic resources are readily available and little improvement has been achieved through breeding efforts to address production challenges involved in growing...

  5. A Raspberry bushy dwarf virus isolate from Ecuadorean Rubus glaucus contains an additional RNA that is a rearrangement of RNA 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new Raspberry bushy dwarf virus isolate was found in commercial blackberry (Rubus glaucus) in Azuay, province of Ecuador and named RBDV-Ec-Az. The complete bipartite genome was sequenced using dsRNA as initial template. RNA 1 was 5449 nucleotides (nt) long and the normal RBDV RNA 2 was 2231 nt lon...

  6. Spontaneous hybrids between native and exotic Rubus in the Western United States produce offspring both by apomixis and by sexual recombination.

    PubMed

    Clark, L V; Jasieniuk, M

    2012-11-01

    Facultative asexual reproduction is a trait commonly found in invasive species. With a combination of sexual and asexual reproductive modes, such species may adapt to new environments via sexual recombination during range expansion, while at the same time having the benefits of asexuality such as the maintenance of fitness effects that depend upon heterozygosity. In the Western United States, native species of Rubus (Rosaceae) reproduce sexually whereas exotic naturalized Rubus species reproduce by pseudogamous apomixis. We hypothesized that new asexual lineages of Rubus could arise from hybridization in this range. To detect hybridization between native and exotic Rubus, we genotyped 579 individuals collected across California, Oregon and Washington with eight nuclear microsatellites and two chloroplast markers. Principal Coordinate Analysis and Bayesian clustering revealed a limited amount of hybridization of the native R. ursinus with the exotic R. armeniacus and R. pensilvanicus, as well as cultivated varieties. Genetic distances between these hybrids and their offspring indicated that both R. ursinus × R. armeniacus and R. ursinus × R. pensilvanicus produced a mix of apomictic and sexual seeds, with sexual seeds being more viable. Although neither of these hybrid types is currently considered invasive, they model the early stages of evolution of new invasive lineages, given the potential for fixed heterosis and the generation of novel genotypes. The hybrids also retain the ability to increase their fitness via sexual recombination and natural selection. Mixed reproductive systems such as those described here may be an important step in the evolution of asexual invasive species. PMID:22850699

  7. A dedication: Hugh A. Daubeny (1931-2015): A wonderful small fruit legacy including a critical driver of the Rubus-Ribes Symposia.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Hugh Daubeny had a productive career as a strawberry and red raspberry breeder with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. As part of that career, he could be considered the “patron saint” of the Rubus-Ribes symposia as he was instrumental in the early development, hosted two symposia, attended all o...

  8. Correction: Impact of metallurgical activities on the content of trace elements in the spatial soil and plant parts of Rubus fruticosus L.

    PubMed

    Nujkić, M M; Dimitrijević, M D; Alagić, S Č; Tošić, S B; Petrović, J V

    2016-06-15

    Correction for 'Impact of metallurgical activities on the content of trace elements in the spatial soil and plant parts of Rubus fruticosus L.' by M. M. Nujkićet al., Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2016, 18, 350-360. PMID:27173003

  9. Antimicrobial activity against Helicobacter pylori strains and antioxidant properties of blackberry leaves (Rubus ulmifolius) and isolated compounds.

    PubMed

    Martini, Silvia; D'Addario, Claudia; Colacevich, Andrea; Focardi, Silvia; Borghini, Francesca; Santucci, Annalisa; Figura, Natale; Rossi, Claudio

    2009-07-01

    Rubus spp. (Rosaceae) provide extracts used in traditional medicine as antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, muscle relaxant and radical scavenging agents. Resistance to antibiotics used to treat Helicobacter pylori infection as well as their poor availability in developing countries prompted us to test the antimicrobial activity of Rubus ulmifolius leaves and isolated polyphenols against two H. pylori strains with different virulence (CagA+ strain 10K and CagA(-) strain G21). The antioxidant activity (TEAC values) of the tested compounds ranged from 4.88 (gallic acid) to 1.60 (kaempferol), whilst the leaf extract gave a value of 0.12. All the isolated polyphenols as well as the leaf extract showed antibacterial activity against both of the H. pylori strains. The minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the extract for H. pylori strains G21 and 10K, respectively, were 1200 microg/mL and 1500 microg/mL after 24h of exposure and 134 microg/mL and 270 microg/mL after 48 h exposure. Ellagic acid showed very low MBC values towards both of the H. pylori strains after 48 h (2 microg/mL and 10 microg/mL for strains G21 and 10K, respectively) and kaempferol toward G21 strain (MBC=6 microg/mL). A relationship between antimicrobial activity and antioxidant capacity was found only for H. pylori strain G21 CagA(-) strain. PMID:19386474

  10. Polyphenols of Rubus coreanum Inhibit Catecholamine Secretion from the Perfused Adrenal Medulla of SHRs

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Byung-Sik; Na, Duck-Mi; Kang, Mi-Young

    2009-01-01

    The present study was attempted to investigate whether polyphenolic compounds isolated from wine, which is brewed from Rubus coreanum Miquel (PCRC), may affect the release of catecholamines (CA) from the isolated perfused adrenal medulla of the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), and to establish its mechanism of action. PCRC (20~180 µg/ml) perfused into an adrenal vein for 90 min relatively dose-dependently inhibited the CA secretory responses to ACh (5.32 mM), high K+ (56 mM), DMPP (100 µM) and McN-A-343 (100 µM). PCRC itself did not affect basal CA secretion (data not shown). Also, in the presence of PCRC (60 µg/ml), the CA secretory responses to veratridine (a selective Na+ channel activator (10 µM), Bay-K-8644 (a L-type dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel activator, 10 µM), and cyclopiazonic acid (a cytoplasmic Ca2+ -ATPase inhibitor, 10 µM) were significantly reduced, respectively. In the simultaneous presence of PCRC (60 µg/ml) and L-NAME (an inhibitor of NO synthase, 30 µM), the inhibitory responses of PCRC on the CA secretion evoked by ACh, high K+, DMPP, and Bay-K-8644 were considerably recovered to the extent of the corresponding control secretion compared with that of PCRC-treatment alone. The level of NO released from adrenal medulla after the treatment of PCRC (60 µg/ml) was greatly elevated compared with the corresponding basal level. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PCRC inhibits the CA secretion from the isolated perfused adrenal medulla of the SHRs evoked by stimulation of cholinergic receptors as well as by direct membrane-depolarization. It seems that this inhibitory effect of PCRC is mediated by blocking the influx of calcium and sodium into the adrenal medullary chromaffin cells of the SHRs as well as by inhibition of Ca2+ release from the cytoplasmic calcium store at least partly through the increased NO production due to the activation of NO synthase. PMID:20054501

  11. Acute toxicity, brine shrimp cytotoxicity, anthelmintic and relaxant potentials of fruits of Rubus fruticosus Agg

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rubus fruticosus is used in tribal medicine as anthelmintic and an antispasmodic. In the current work, we investigated the anthelmintic and antispasmodic activities of crude methanol extract of fruits of R. fruticosus on scientific grounds. Acute toxicity and brine shrimp cytotoxicity activity of the extract were also performed. Methods Acute toxicity study of crude methanol extract of R. fruticosus was performed on mice. In vitro Brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay was performed on shrimps of Artemia salina. In vitro Anthelmintic activity was tested against Raillietina spiralis and Ascaridia galli. Relaxant activities were tested on spontaneous rabbits’ jejunal preparations. Calcium chloride curves were constructed to elucidate possible mode of action of the extract. Results LD 50 of the extract for acute toxicity studies was 887.75 ± 9.22 mg/ml. While CC 50 of the extract for Brine shrimps cytotoxicity assay was 13.28 ± 2.47 μg/ml. Test samples of crude methanolic extract of R. fruticosus (Rf.Cr) at concentration 20 mg/ml showed excellent anthelmintic activity against Raillietina spiralis. Anthelmintic activity was 1.37 times of albendazole against the Raillietina spiralis at concentration 40 mg/ml. At higher concentration (40 mg/ml), Rf.Cr has 89. 83% parasiticidal activity. The mean EC50 relaxation activity for spontaneous and KCl-induced contractions was 7.96 ± 0.1 and 6.45 ± 0.29 mg/ml, respectively. EC 50 (Log[Ca++]M) for control calcium chloride curves was −1.75 ± 0.01 vs. EC 50 −1.78 ± 0.06 in the presence of 3.0 mg/ml of Rf.Cr. Similarly, EC 50(Log[Ca++]M) in the absence and presence of verapamil (0.1 μM) were −2.46 ± 0.01 and −1.72 ± 0.02, respectively. Conclusions The anthelmintic and relaxant activities explained traditional uses of R. fruticosus on scientific grounds. Relaxant activity follows the inhibition of voltage gated channels. Although the plant extract has cytotoxic effects, yet it is

  12. Possible impacts of the invasive plant Rubus niveus on the native vegetation of the Scalesia forest in the Galapagos islands.

    PubMed

    Rentería, Jorge Luis; Gardener, Mark R; Panetta, F Dane; Atkinson, Rachel; Crawley, Mick J

    2012-01-01

    Originally from Asia, Rubus niveus has become one of the most widespread invasive plant species in the Galapagos Islands. It has invaded open vegetation, shrubland and forest alike. It forms dense thickets up to 4 m high, appearing to displace native vegetation, and threaten the integrity of several native communities. This study used correlation analysis between a R. niveus cover gradient and a number of biotic (vascular plant species richness, cover and vegetation structure) and abiotic (light and soil properties) parameters to help understand possible impacts in one of the last remaining fragments of the Scalesia forest in Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos. Higher cover of R. niveus was associated with significantly lower native species richness and cover, and a different forest structure. Results illustrated that 60% R. niveus cover could be considered a threshold for these impacts. We suggest that a maximum of 40% R. niveus cover could be a suitable management target. PMID:23118934

  13. Possible Impacts of the Invasive Plant Rubus niveus on the Native Vegetation of the Scalesia Forest in the Galapagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Rentería, Jorge Luis; Gardener, Mark R.; Panetta, F. Dane; Atkinson, Rachel; Crawley, Mick J.

    2012-01-01

    Originally from Asia, Rubus niveus has become one of the most widespread invasive plant species in the Galapagos Islands. It has invaded open vegetation, shrubland and forest alike. It forms dense thickets up to 4 m high, appearing to displace native vegetation, and threaten the integrity of several native communities. This study used correlation analysis between a R. niveus cover gradient and a number of biotic (vascular plant species richness, cover and vegetation structure) and abiotic (light and soil properties) parameters to help understand possible impacts in one of the last remaining fragments of the Scalesia forest in Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos. Higher cover of R. niveus was associated with significantly lower native species richness and cover, and a different forest structure. Results illustrated that 60% R. niveus cover could be considered a threshold for these impacts. We suggest that a maximum of 40% R. niveus cover could be a suitable management target. PMID:23118934

  14. Blackberry (Rubus spp.): a pH-dependent oral contrast medium for gastrointestinal tract images by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, María G; Sosa, Modesto; De León-Rodríguez, Luis M; Córdova, Teodoro; Bernal-Alvarado, Jesus; Avila-Rodríguez, Mario; Reyes-Aguilera, Jose A; Ortíz, Juan J; Barrios, Fernando A

    2006-02-01

    In this study, seven fruits have been tested on their magnetic properties, paramagnetic metal content and contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of phantom and in vivo. Magnetic susceptibility was determined for the fruit pulps, as well as the contents of paramagnetic metals; iron, manganese and copper. The total content of these metals was 4.3, 8.6, 11.1, 10.9, 12.3, 8.3 and 29.3 mg/kg of fruit for plum, blueberry, apple (red), pineapple, beet, grape, blackberry, respectively, and with magnetic susceptibility of -2.29+/-0.07, -2.43+/-0.07, -2.13+/-0.07, -1.84+/-0.02, -1.75+/-0.01, -1.78+/-0.06, -2.18+/-0.07 SI, respectively. T(1)- and T(2)-weighted MR images were performed for the seven fruits and water (chi= -9.98 x 10(-3) SI) and in one subject. While there was no correlation between the magnetic susceptibility and contrast enhancement, there is a correlation with the total paramagnetic metal content determined with contrast enhancement in MRI. Thus, blackberry (Rubus spp.) contrast enhancement was the highest among the fruits in T(1)-weighted images. Furthermore, this fruit's contrast enhancement shows to be pH-dependent. These characteristics and the wide availability of the Rubus spp. suggest that it should be implemented as an oral contrast agent in images by MR to assess the function of the gastric section of the GI tract. Furthermore, it has the advantage of being a natural meal, so that it can be well tolerated by the patients and use as much as it is needed without side effects. PMID:16455409

  15. Alleviation of weight-gain in mice by an ethanolic extract from Rubus coreanus under conditions of a high-fat diet and exercise.

    PubMed

    Chung, Changsik; You, Yanghee; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Kim, Kyungmi; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Lee, Jeongmin; Chung, Jin Woong; Chung, Hyunjung; Yang, Soojin; Jun, Woojin

    2013-01-01

    The administration of an ethanolic extract (RCE) from Rubus coreanus significantly reduced the body weight and epididymal fat tissue of mice under conditions of a high-fat diet (HFD) and exercise. The mice also displayed enhanced muscular carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) expression and increased superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels. These results suggest that RCE exerted an anti-obesity effect by up-regulating CPT1 and elevating the level of antioxidants. PMID:24096653

  16. Phylogenetic and ecological patterns in nighttime transpiration among five members of the genus Rubus co-occurring in western Oregon

    PubMed Central

    McNellis, Brandon; Howard, Ava R

    2015-01-01

    Nighttime transpiration is a substantial portion of ecosystem water budgets, but few studies compare water use of closely related co-occurring species in a phylogenetic context. Nighttime transpiration can range up to 69% of daytime rates and vary between species, ecosystem, and functional type. We examined leaf-level daytime and nighttime gas exchange of five species of the genus Rubus co-occurring in the Pacific Northwest of western North America in a greenhouse common garden. Contrary to expectations, nighttime transpiration was not correlated to daytime water use. Nighttime transpiration showed pronounced phylogenetic signals, but the proportion of variation explained by different phylogenetic groupings varied across datasets. Leaf osmotic water potential, water potential at turgor loss point, stomatal size, and specific leaf area were correlated with phylogeny but did not readily explain variation in nighttime transpiration. Patterns in interspecific variation as well as a disconnect between rates of daytime and nighttime transpiration suggest that variation in nighttime water use may be at least partly driven by genetic factors independent of those that control daytime water use. Future work with co-occurring congeneric systems is needed to establish the generality of these results and may help determine the mechanism driving interspecific variation in nighttime water use. PMID:26380686

  17. Developmental Patterns of the Invasive Bramble (Rubus alceifolius Poiret, Rosaceae) in Réunion Island: an Architectural and Morphometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    BARET, STÉPHANE; NICOLINI, ERIC; LE BOURGEOIS, THOMAS; STRASBERG, DOMINIQUE

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the developmental stages of Rubus alceifolius and to determine one or more characteristic morphological markers for each stage. The developmental reconstitution method used involved a detailed description of many individuals throughout the different stages of growth, from germination to the development of an adult shoot capable of fruiting. Results revealed that R. alceifolius passes through five developmental stages that can be distinguished by changes in several morphological markers such as internode length and diameter, pith diameter and plant shape. This analysis indicated that R. alceifolius has a heteroblastic developmental pattern, midway between that of a bush and a liana. Moreover, results showed that this species taps environmental resources early in its development, i.e. foliarization is high (the foliar component overrides the caulinary component) and an autotrophic stage is rapidly reached, whereas it ‘explores’ the environment during the adult stage, i.e. axialization is substantial (the caulinary component overrides the foliar component) and autotrophy occurs at a later stage. The morphological markers identified could benefit land‐use managers attempting to control this species before it reaches its optimum developmental stage. PMID:12495918

  18. In Vitro Antiproliferative Effect of the Acetone Extract of Rubus fairholmianus Gard. Root on Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Plackal Adimuriyil George, Blassan; Tynga, Ivan Mfouo

    2015-01-01

    Plants and plant derived products exert chemopreventive effects on various cancer cell lines by the induction of cell death mechanisms. The effects of root acetone extract of Rubus fairholmianus (RFRA) on the proliferation of human colorectal cancer (Caco-2) cells have been investigated in this study. The extract led to a dose dependent decrease in both viability and proliferation and increased cytotoxicity using trypan blue exclusion, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. The morphological features of the treated cells were supportive for the antiproliferative activity. The Annexin V/propidium iodide staining indicated that R. fairholmianus induced toxic effects in Caco-2 cells and the percentages of the early and late apoptotic population significantly increased when compared with control cells. Also we studied the apoptosis inducing ability of the extract by analysing caspase 3/7 activity and the induction of cell death via the effector caspases was confirmed; the activity increased in treated cells compared with control. Thus the present findings highlight that the R. fairholmianus root acetone extract exhibits antiproliferative activity on Caco-2 cells by the induction of apoptosis via caspase dependent pathway. PMID:26078938

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of Rubus coreanus Miquel through inhibition of NF-κB and MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Eun; Cho, Soo-Muk; Park, Eunkyo; Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Yuri; Auh, Joong Hyuck; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Lim, Sohee

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Rubus Coreanus Miquel (RCM), used as a traditional Korean medicine, reduces chronic inflammatory diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. However, its mechanism has not been elucidated. In this study, we examine the anti-inflammatory effects of RCM and their possible mechanisms using RAW 264.7 cells. MATERIALS/METHODS Unripe RCM ethanol extract (UE), unripe RCM water extract (UH), ripe RCM ethanol extract (RE), and ripe RCM water extract (RH) were prepared. Inflammatory response was induced with LPS treatment, and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and NO and PGE2 productions were assessed. To determine the anti-inflammatory mechanism of RCM, we measured NF-κB and MAPK activities. RESULTS UE and UH treatment significantly reduced NF-κB activation and JNK and p38 phosphorylation and reduced transcriptional activities decreased iNOS, COX-2, and pro-inflammatory cytokines expressions, and NO and PGE2 productions. RE and RH treatments reduced IL-1β and IL-6 expressions through suppressions of JNK and p38 phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS In this study, we showed that RCM had anti-inflammatory effects by suppression of pro-inflammatory mediator expressions. Especially, unripe RCM showed strong anti-inflammatory effects through suppression of NF-κB and MAPK activation. These findings suggest that unripe RCM might be used as a potential functional material to reduce chronic inflammatory responses. PMID:25324928

  20. Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease with Total Alkaloids in Rubus aleaefolius Poir through Regulation of Fat Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Jinyan; Zheng, Haiyin; Zhong, Xiaoyong; Zhou, Jianheng; Hong, Zhenfeng

    2014-01-01

    Total alkaloids in Rubus aleaefolius Poir (TARAP) is a folk medicinal herb that has been used clinically in China to treat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) for many years. However, the mechanism of its anti-NAFLD effect is largely unknown. In this study, we developed a NAFLD rat model by supplying a modified high-fat diet (mHFD) ad libitum for 8 weeks and evaluated the therapeutic effect of TARAP in NAFLD rats as well as the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that TARAP could reduce the serum triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) levels and increase the serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) level in NAFLD rats. In addition, TARAP treatment reduced expression of fatty acid synthetase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and upregulated the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT). Our results suggest that regulation of lipid metabolism may be a mechanism by which TARAP treats NAFLD. PMID:25404949

  1. Developmental patterns of the invasive bramble (Rubus alceifolius Poiret, Rosaceae) in Réunion island: an architectural and morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Baret, Stéphanie; Nicolini, Eric; Le Bourgeois, Thomas; Strasberg, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the developmental stages of Rubus alceifolius and to determine one or more characteristic morphological markers for each stage. The developmental reconstitution method used involved a detailed description of many individuals throughout the different stages of growth, from germination to the development of an adult shoot capable of fruiting. Results revealed that R. alceifolius passes through five developmental stages that can be distinguished by changes in several morphological markers such as internode length and diameter, pith diameter and plant shape. This analysis indicated that R. alceifolius has a heteroblastic developmental pattern, midway between that of a bush and a liana. Moreover, results showed that this species taps environmental resources early in its development, i.e. foliarization is high (the foliar component overrides the caulinary component) and an autotrophic stage is rapidly reached, whereas it 'explores' the environment during the adult stage, i.e. axialization is substantial (the caulinary component overrides the foliar component) and autotrophy occurs at a later stage. The morphological markers identified could benefit land-use managers attempting to control this species before it reaches its optimum developmental stage. PMID:12495918

  2. Metabolite Profiling Reveals the Effect of Dietary Rubus coreanus Vinegar on Ovariectomy-Induced Osteoporosis in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee Youn; Kim, Hyang Yeon; Singh, Digar; Yeo, Soo Hwan; Baek, Seong Yeol; Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at exploring the curative effects of Rubus coreanus (RC) vinegar against postmenopausal osteoporosis by using ovariectomized rats as a model. The investigations were performed in five groups: sham, ovariectomized (OVX) rats without treatment, low-dose RC vinegar (LRV)-treated OVX rats, high-dose RC vinegar (HRV)-treated OVX rats and alendronate (ALEN)-treated OVX rats. The efficacy of RC vinegar was evaluated using physical, biochemical, histological and metabolomic parameters. Compared to the OVX rats, the LRV and HRV groups showed positive effects on the aforementioned parameters, indicating estrogen regulation. Plasma metabolome analysis of the groups using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole-TOF-MS (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) with multivariate analysis revealed 19 and 16 metabolites, respectively. Notably, the levels of butyric acid, phenylalanine, glucose, tryptophan and some lysophosphatidylcholines were marginally increased in RC vinegar-treated groups compared to OVX. However, the pattern of metabolite levels in RC vinegar-treated groups was found similar to ALEN, but differed significantly from that in sham group. The results highlight the prophylactic and curative potential of dietary vinegar against postmenopausal osteoporosis. RC vinegar could be an effective natural alternative for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:26821009

  3. Extracts and constituents of Rubus chingii with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hsiou-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity of the fruits of Rubus chingii was studied in vitro. Ethanolic extract, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions from dried R. chingii fruits revealed strong DPPH free radical scavenging activity with IC(50) values of 17.9, 3.4 and 4.0 μg/mL, respectively. The ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions were further purified by a combination of silica gel chromatography, Lobar RP-8 chromatography, and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Nine compounds were isolated, where methyl (3-hydroxy-2-oxo-2,3-dihydroindol-3-yl)-acetate (2), vanillic acid (5), kaempferol (7), and tiliroside (9) showed stronger DPPH free radical scavenging activity than that of ascorbic acid (131.8 μM) with IC(50) values of 45.2, 34.9, 78.5, and 13.7 μM, respectively. In addition, rubusine (1) is a new compound discovered in the present study and methyl (3-hydroxy-2-oxo-2,3-dihydroindol-3-yl)-acetate (2), methyl dioxindole-3-acetate (3), and 2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinoline-4-carboxylic acid (4) were isolated from the fruits for the first time. PMID:21747716

  4. Characterization of the antibacterial activity and the chemical components of the volatile oil of the leaves of Rubus parvifolius L.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongqing; Hu, Xiaogang; Huang, Mingchun; Sun, Fengjun; Yang, Bo; He, Juying; Wang, Xianfeng; Xia, Peiyuan; Chen, Jianhong

    2012-01-01

    Rubus parvifolius L. (Rp) is a medicinal herb that possesses antibacterial activity. In this study, we extracted the volatile oil from the leaves of Rp to assess its antibacterial activity and analyze its chemical composition. A uniform distribution design was used to optimize the extraction procedure, which yielded 0.36% (w/w) of light yellowish oil from the water extract of Rp leaves. We found that the extracted oil effectively inhibited the growth of a wide range of Gram positive and negative bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, Bacillus cloacae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. We further analyzed the components contained in the hydro-distillated Rp volatile oil by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Twenty nine compounds were identified, including 4-hydroxy-3-methoxystyrene (66%), 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol (10%) and 4-tert-butylbenzoic acid (2%). Our results suggest that one or multiple constituents contained in Rp volatile oil may account for its antibacterial activity. PMID:22732887

  5. Application of Ultrasound in a Closed System: Optimum Condition for Antioxidants Extraction of Blackberry (Rubus fructicosus) Residues.

    PubMed

    Zafra-Rojas, Quinatzin Y; Cruz-Cansino, Nelly S; Quintero-Lira, Aurora; Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Alanís-García, Ernesto; Cervantes-Elizarrarás, Alicia; Güemes-Vera, Norma; Ramírez-Moreno, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Blackberry processing generates up to 20% of residues composed mainly of peel, seeds and pulp that are abundant in flavonoids. The objective of this study was to optimize the ultrasound conditions, in a closed system, for antioxidants extraction, using the response surface methodology. Blackberry (Rubus fructicosus) residues were analyzed for total phenolics, total anthocyanins, and antioxidant activity by ABTS and DPPH. The selected independent variables were ultrasound amplitude (X₁: 80%-90%) and extraction time (X₂: 10-15 min), and results were compared with conventional extraction methods. The optimal conditions for antioxidants extraction were 91% amplitude for 15 min. The results for total phenolic content and anthocyanins and antioxidant activity by ABTS and DPPH were of 1201.23 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/100 g dry weight basis (dw); 379.12 mg/100 g·dw; 6318.98 µmol Trolox equivalent (TE)/100 g·dw and 9617.22 µmol TE/100 g·dw, respectively. Compared to solvent extraction methods (water and ethanol), ultrasound achieved higher extraction of all compounds except for anthocyanins. The results obtained demonstrated that ultrasound is an alternative to improve extraction yield of antioxidants from fruit residues such as blackberry. PMID:27455210

  6. Bioactive comparison of main components from unripe fruits of Rubus chingii Hu and identification of the effective component.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Tian; Yang, Li; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2015-07-01

    Dried and unripe fruit of Rubus chingii Hu, known as "Fu-pen-zi" in Chinese, has been used as a food and tonic in China for a long time. In order to analyze its effective ingredients, polysaccharides, flavonoids, saponins and alkaloids were extracted from the unripe fruits and their contents were determined. The in vitro antioxidant, anticomplementary and anticancer activities against human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells of the four major constituents were investigated. Results showed that total flavonoids exhibited an obvious antioxidant activity, which was very close to ascorbic acid. The anticomplementary and anticancer activities of flavonoids were also the best among the four chemical compositions. Therefore, extraction process optimization of flavonoids was conducted using response surface methodology. The optimal conditions were as follows: extraction temperature 72.8 °C, ethanol concentration 30.67%, extraction time 2.66 h, and a liquid/solid ratio of 19.54 : 1. In addition, total flavonoids were subsequently separated by column chromatography and the major flavonoid was identified as tiliroside. Further experimental data revealed that tiliroside treatment could suppress the proliferation and induced the apoptosis of A549 cells. PMID:26053738

  7. Dietary effect of Rubus coreanus ethanolic extract on immune gene expression in white leg shrimp, Penaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Dharaneedharan; Jang, Yeoung-Hwan; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Kang, Bong-Jo; Heo, Moon-Soo

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary supplementation of a Rubus coreanus ethanolic extract on immunostimulatory response in white leg shrimp Penaeus vannamei. Shrimps with an average initial weight of 0.5 ± 0.04 g were collected and acclimatized for 10 days. Four experimental diets including a control diet, a probiotic diet and 0.25 and 0.5% of R. coreanus ethanolic extract (RcEE) diets were used to feed the shrimps. After 8 weeks of culture, shrimp fed with probiotic and 0.25% RcEE diet had showed significant enhancement in the growth while shrimp fed with 0.5% RcEE diet showed significantly increased expression of immune genes and antioxidant enzymes activities. One week of challenge experiments for all the four diets fed shrimps showed decreased cumulative mortality in the 0.5% RcEE diets fed shrimps, when compared with the probiotic and 0.25% RcEE diet fed shrimp groups. The results indicates that R. coreanus ethanolic extract could be used as a herbal immunostimulant for shrimps to increase its immunity and disease resistance against the bacterial pathogen, Vibrio alginolyticus. PMID:23811352

  8. Biomolecules and Natural Medicine Preparations: Analysis of New Sources of Bioactive Compounds from Ribes and Rubus spp. Buds

    PubMed Central

    Donno, Dario; Mellano, Maria Gabriella; Cerutti, Alessandro Kim; Beccaro, Gabriele Loris

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that plants are important sources for the preparation of natural remedies as they contain many biologically active compounds. In particular, polyphenols, terpenic compounds, organic acids, and vitamins are the most widely occurring groups of phytochemicals. Some endemic species may be used for the production of herbal preparations containing phytochemicals with significant bioactivity, as antioxidant activity and anti-inflammatory capacities, and health benefits. Blackberry sprouts and blackcurrant buds are known to contain appreciable levels of bioactive compounds, including flavonols, phenolic acids, monoterpenes, vitamin C, and catechins, with several clinical effects. The aim of this research was to perform an analytical study of blackcurrant and blackberry bud-preparations, in order to identify and quantify the main biomarkers, obtaining a specific phytochemical fingerprint to evaluate the single botanical class contribution to total phytocomplex and relative bioactivity, using a High Performance Liquid Chromatograph−Diode Array Detector; the same analyses were performed both on the University laboratory and commercial preparations. Different chromatographic methods were used to determine concentrations of biomolecules in the preparations, allowing for quantification of statistically significant differences in their bioactive compound content both in the case of Ribes nigrum and Rubus cultivated varieties at different harvest stages. In blackcurrant bud-extracts the most important class was organic acids (50.98%) followed by monoterpenes (14.05%), while in blackberry preparations the main bioactive classes were catechins (50.06%) and organic acids (27.34%). Chemical, pharmaceutical and agronomic-environmental knowledge could be important for obtaining label certifications for the valorization of specific genotypes, with high clinical and pharmaceutical value: this study allowed to develop an effective tool for the natural preparation quality

  9. Effects of Rubus coreanus-Cheonggukjang on Bone Mineral Density and Bone Mineral Content in Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun-Jung; Choi, Mi-Ja

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the bone-conserving effects of Rubus coreanus-Cheonggukjang (RC-CGJ) supplemented with more intensified phytochemicals compared to general Cheonggukjang (CGJ) in growing rats. Eighteen rats were divided into 3 treatment groups (Control, CGJ, and RC-CGJ) and were given experimental diets for 9 weeks. All of the rats in this study were fed a AIN-93G-based diet. Both CGJ groups were fed with 33.1% CGJ and RC-CGJ powder, respectively. The results of this study indicate that weight gain, mean food intake, and food efficiency ratio were not significantly different by the experimental diets among all groups. Spine bone mineral density (BMD) and femur BMD were not significantly different by the experimental diets. Spine bone mineral content (BMC) was significantly higher in the RC-CGJ and CGJ groups than in the control group, regardless of CGJ type. The femur BMC of the CGJ supplemented group was significantly higher compared with the control group and the RC-CGJ group. Compared with the control group, spine BMD and femur BMD per weight were markedly increased in the RC-CGJ and CGJ group regardless of CGJ type. Also, spine BMC per weight was significantly higher in the RC-CGJ group than in the CGJ group. However, femur BMC per weight was significantly higher in the CGJ group than in the RC-CGJ group. It can be concluded that RC-CGJ and CGJ supplemented diets have more beneficial effects on spine and femur peak bone mass in growing rats. PMID:26770913

  10. Effects of Rubus coreanus-Cheonggukjang on Bone Mineral Density and Bone Mineral Content in Growing Rats.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun-Jung; Choi, Mi-Ja

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the bone-conserving effects of Rubus coreanus-Cheonggukjang (RC-CGJ) supplemented with more intensified phytochemicals compared to general Cheonggukjang (CGJ) in growing rats. Eighteen rats were divided into 3 treatment groups (Control, CGJ, and RC-CGJ) and were given experimental diets for 9 weeks. All of the rats in this study were fed a AIN-93G-based diet. Both CGJ groups were fed with 33.1% CGJ and RC-CGJ powder, respectively. The results of this study indicate that weight gain, mean food intake, and food efficiency ratio were not significantly different by the experimental diets among all groups. Spine bone mineral density (BMD) and femur BMD were not significantly different by the experimental diets. Spine bone mineral content (BMC) was significantly higher in the RC-CGJ and CGJ groups than in the control group, regardless of CGJ type. The femur BMC of the CGJ supplemented group was significantly higher compared with the control group and the RC-CGJ group. Compared with the control group, spine BMD and femur BMD per weight were markedly increased in the RC-CGJ and CGJ group regardless of CGJ type. Also, spine BMC per weight was significantly higher in the RC-CGJ group than in the CGJ group. However, femur BMC per weight was significantly higher in the CGJ group than in the RC-CGJ group. It can be concluded that RC-CGJ and CGJ supplemented diets have more beneficial effects on spine and femur peak bone mass in growing rats. PMID:26770913

  11. Biomolecules and Natural Medicine Preparations: Analysis of New Sources of Bioactive Compounds from Ribes and Rubus spp. Buds.

    PubMed

    Donno, Dario; Mellano, Maria Gabriella; Cerutti, Alessandro Kim; Beccaro, Gabriele Loris

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that plants are important sources for the preparation of natural remedies as they contain many biologically active compounds. In particular, polyphenols, terpenic compounds, organic acids, and vitamins are the most widely occurring groups of phytochemicals. Some endemic species may be used for the production of herbal preparations containing phytochemicals with significant bioactivity, as antioxidant activity and anti-inflammatory capacities, and health benefits. Blackberry sprouts and blackcurrant buds are known to contain appreciable levels of bioactive compounds, including flavonols, phenolic acids, monoterpenes, vitamin C, and catechins, with several clinical effects. The aim of this research was to perform an analytical study of blackcurrant and blackberry bud-preparations, in order to identify and quantify the main biomarkers, obtaining a specific phytochemical fingerprint to evaluate the single botanical class contribution to total phytocomplex and relative bioactivity, using a High Performance Liquid Chromatograph-Diode Array Detector; the same analyses were performed both on the University laboratory and commercial preparations. Different chromatographic methods were used to determine concentrations of biomolecules in the preparations, allowing for quantification of statistically significant differences in their bioactive compound content both in the case of Ribes nigrum and Rubus cultivated varieties at different harvest stages. In blackcurrant bud-extracts the most important class was organic acids (50.98%) followed by monoterpenes (14.05%), while in blackberry preparations the main bioactive classes were catechins (50.06%) and organic acids (27.34%). Chemical, pharmaceutical and agronomic-environmental knowledge could be important for obtaining label certifications for the valorization of specific genotypes, with high clinical and pharmaceutical value: this study allowed to develop an effective tool for the natural preparation quality

  12. Herpetogramma bipunctalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) biology and techniques for rearing on leaves of the blackberry (Rubus spp., Rosaceae).

    PubMed

    Diez-Rodríguez, G I; Hübner, L K; Antunes, L E C; Nava, D E

    2013-02-01

    The larvae of the southern beet webworm Herpetogramma bipunctalis (Fabricius, 1794) damage the leaves of species in the plant genus Rubus. The present study investigated the biology of H. bipunctalis and developed a protocol for raising H. bipunctalis under laboratory conditions. On the basis of the biological data, we devised a life table. In order to develop the rearing procedures, we determined which oviposition substrate and blackberry cultivar were the most appropriate for larval development. The mean durations of the egg, larval, and pupal stages were 5.59 days, 26.37 days, and 13.37 days, respectively, and the corresponding survival rates were 80.83%, 49.07%, and 83.23%. The mean pupal weight was 0.0491 g for males and 0.0536 g for females. The mean life cycle (egg-to-adult) period was 45.33 days, and overall survival to adulthood was 33.01%. H. bipunctalis females laid a mean of 252.63 eggs over a mean of 13.60 days of oviposition; the mean pre-oviposition period was 2.67 days. Mean female and male life spans were 17.51 and 19.25 days, respectively, and the sex ratio was 0.51. The life-table data indicated that H. bipunctalis can reproduce 57.9 times per generation. Each cage contained one blackberry leaf placed on a paper towel. This method allowed us to obtain the greatest number of eggs. The larval stage was shorter for insects reared on leaves of the Guarani cultivar than for those reared on leaves of the Xavante cultivar (22.63 vs. 26.37 days). These basic data can aid in establishing strategies for the management of H. bipunctalis on blackberry farms. PMID:23644800

  13. The phenology of Rubus fruticosus in Ireland: herbarium specimens provide evidence for the response of phenophases to temperature, with implications for climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diskin, E.; Proctor, H.; Jebb, M.; Sparks, T.; Donnelly, A.

    2012-11-01

    To date, phenological research has provided evidence that climate warming is impacting both animals and plants, evidenced by the altered timing of phenophases. Much of the evidence supporting these findings has been provided by analysis of historic records and present-day fieldwork; herbaria have been identified recently as an alternative source of phenological data. Here, we used Rubus specimens to evaluate herbaria as potential sources of phenological data for use in climate change research and to develop the methodology for using herbaria specimens in phenological studies. Data relevant to phenology (collection date) were recorded from the information cards of over 600 herbarium specimens at Ireland's National Herbarium in Dublin. Each specimen was assigned a score (0-5) corresponding to its phenophase. Temperature data for the study period (1852 - 2007) were obtained from the University of East Anglia's Climate Research Unit (CRU); relationships between temperature and the dates of first flower, full flower, first fruit and full fruit were assessed using weighted linear regression. Of the five species of Rubus examined in this study, specimens of only one ( R. fruticosus) were sufficiently abundant to yield statistically significant relationships with temperature. The results revealed a trend towards earlier dates of first flower, full flower and first fruit phenophases with increasing temperature. Through its multi-phenophase approach, this research serves to extend the most recent work—which validated the use of herbaria through use of a single phenophase—to confirm herbarium-based research as a robust methodology for use in future phenological studies.

  14. Rubus coreanus Miq. extract promotes osteoblast differentiation and inhibits bone-resorbing mediators in MC3T3-E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Hee; Choi, Eun-Mi

    2006-01-01

    To prevent bone loss that occurs with increasing age, certain nutritional and pharmacological factors are needed. In the present study, the ethanol extract from the fruit of Rubus coreanus Miq. (RCE) was investigated for its effect on the function of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. RCE (10approximately50 microg/ml) caused a significant elevation in cell viability, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, collagen content, and osteocalcin secretion in the cells. The effect of RCE (50 microg/ml) in increasing cell viability, ALP activity, and collagen content was prevented by the presence of 10(-6) M cycloheximide and 10(-6) M tamoxifen, suggesting that RCE's effect results from a newly synthesized protein component and might be partly involved in estrogen action. We then examined the effect of RCE on the H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis and production of local factors in osteoblasts. Treatment with RCE (10approximately50 microg/ml) decreased the 0.2 mM H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis and production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6 and nitric oxide (NO) in osteoblasts. Our data indicate that the enhancement of osteoblast function by Rubus coreanus Miq. may result in the prevention of osteoporosis and inflammatory bone diseases. PMID:16883635

  15. 'Saanich' Red Raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Saanich' is a new floricane-fruiting red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) cultivar from the breeding program at the Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre (PARC) of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Agassiz, British Columbia. 'Saanich', tested as BC 89-34-41, was selected from a 1989 cross of BC 82-5-161 and BC...

  16. 'Vintage' Red Raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Vintage' is a new primocane-fruiting red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service (USDA–ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR released in cooperation with the Oregon State Agricultural Experiment Station and the Washington State University Agricu...

  17. 'Cascade Gold' raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Cascade Gold’ is a new gold fruited, floricane fruiting raspberry cultivar (Rubus idaeus L.) jointly released by Washington State University (WSU), Oregon State University (OSU) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). It has been evaluated at Puyallup, Wash. in plantings from 1988 to 2008. ...

  18. Raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The red raspberry, Rubus idaeus L., is a valuable crop that has recently increased in production, generating a large interest in commercial ventures and in research. Traditionally, most of the crop has been sold to processors, for freezing, jam production, canning, juice, and flavorings for ice crea...

  19. Effect of Raspberry bushy dwarf virus, Raspberry leaf mottle virus, and Raspberry latent virus on plant growth and fruit crumbliness in ‘Meeker’ red Raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry crumbly fruit in red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.), widespread in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and British Columbia, Canada, is most commonly caused by a virus infection. Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) has long been attributed as the causal agent of the disease. Recently, t...

  20. Integration of brassicaceous seed meals into red raspberry production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brassicaceous seed meals are an alternative to synthetic chemical fumigation for the pre-plant soil management of soil borne organisms. Greenhouse, microplot, and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of Brassica juncea and Sinapis alba seed meals on raspberry (Rubus idaeus) soil ...

  1. Pseudomonas blight caused by Pseudomonas syringae on raspberry in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plantings of red raspberry (Rubus idaeus var. strigosus) exhibited symptoms of a previously undocumented disease. Lesions were observable from both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces. As disease progressed, lesions enlarged and coalesced, resulting in significant dark brown to black blighting of the ...

  2. ‘Cascade Harvest’ red raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Cascade Harvest’ is a new floricane fruiting raspberry cultivar (Rubus idaeus L.) jointly released by Washington State University (WSU), Oregon State University (OSU) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). ‘Cascade Harvest’ produces a high yield of large, firm fruit suited to machine harves...

  3. Pollen Transmitted Diseases, Raspberry bushy dwarf virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) occurs naturally worldwide in many Rubus species and cultivars. In North America, it naturally infects many red raspberry, black raspberry, blackberry and blackberry-raspberry hybrid cultivars. RBDV also occurs in wild R. idaeus L. var. strigosus, R. occidentali., ...

  4. Raspberry: introduction and description

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter provides introductory information concerning Rubus idaeus L., raspberries. It describes history, botany, and different types of raspberry fruits. History describes the interaction between brambles and humans over the course of several millennia. These plucky plants were described by the...

  5. Effects of Irrigation Method and Level of Water Application on Fruit Size and Yield in Red Raspberry during the First Year of Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was done to determine the effects of irrigation method and level of water application on early production of red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.). Two cultivars, ‘Meeker’ and ‘Coho’, were irrigated by overhead sprinkler or subsurface drip at 50, 100, and 150% of the estimated crop evapotranspirat...

  6. High performance liquid chromatography and photodiode array detection of ferulic acid in Rubus protoplasts elicited by O-glycans from Fusarium sp. M7-1.

    PubMed

    Nita-Lazar, Mihai; Chevolot, Lionel; Iwahara, Shojiro; Takegawa, Kaoru; Furmanek, Aleksandra; Lienart, Yvette

    2002-01-01

    So far only little data have been available concerning the eliciting capacity of well defined glycan molecules isolated from plant pathogens. This study brings new information about changes in plant cells caused by fungal pathogens. Sugar fractions derived from glycoproteins isolated from the fungus Fusarium sp. M7-1 have been tested here as signaling molecules. The ability of three O-glycan fractions (named in this work inducer I, II, III) to trigger responses in Rubus protoplasts has been examined. It was found that inducer III was the most efficient as it elicited changes in the levels of phenylpropanoid pathway intermediates in relation to phenylalanine-ammonia lyase (PAL) activation. PMID:12545209

  7. Antimicrobial activity of extracts and fractions from aerial parts of selected plants (Garcinia achachairu, Macrosiphonia velame, Rubus niveus and Pilea microphylla) against some pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Melim, Carla; Guimarães, Karoliny; Martin-Quintal, Zhelmy; Alves, Aurea Damaceno; Martins, Domingos Tabajara de Oliveira; Delle Monache, Franco; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Cruza, Alexandre Bella; Niero, Rivaldo

    2013-11-01

    As part of the program of our research group to search for new and effective substances from the Brazilian biodiversity, the present work evaluates the antibacterial activity of four species from the Brazilian flora (Garcinia achachairu, Macrosiphonia velame, Rubus niveus and Pilea microphylla) against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and S. saprophyticus (Gram-positive bacteria), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacterium) and Candida albicans (yeast). The extracts of R. niveus and M. velame showed promising antibacterial activity with MICs, ranging from 1000 to 125 microg/mL. Bio-guided fractionation of M. velame yielded four compounds, with the highest inhibition being observed for compound 3, with a MIC of 125 microg/mL against S. aureus. The combinations of fractions 2 and 4 showed beneficial effect against Gram-positive bacteria (additive effect), suggesting a possible synergistic effect. PMID:24427943

  8. Correlation of polyphenolic content with radical-scavenging capacity and anthelmintic effects of Rubus ulmifolius (Rosaceae) against Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Akkari, Hafidh; Hajaji, Soumaya; B'chir, Fatma; Rekik, Mourad; Gharbi, Mohamed

    2016-05-15

    Phenolic content, antioxidant and anthelmintic activities of herbal extracts are of particular interest to drug industry; plant extracts with significant anthelmintic activity have the potential to be used as alternatives to conventional chemical drugs. In the present study, Rubus ulmifolius fruit extracts obtained using solvents of increasing polarity (water, methanol, chloroform and hexane) were examined for their antioxidant and anthelmintic activities in correlation with their polyphenolic content. In vitro antioxidant activity of all extracts was carried out using free radical-scavenging activity by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethilenebenzotiazolin)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical cation. In vitro anthelmintic activities were investigated on the egg and adult worms of Haemonchus contortus from sheep in comparison to albendazole. Total polyphenol content of R. ulmifolius was higher in more polar extract, ranging from 64.5 in aqueous extract to 1.57mg gallic acid equivalents per gram of dry weight (GAE/g DW) in hexanic extract. Likewise, highest amounts of flavonoids and condensed tannins were found in aqueous extract (28.06mg QE/g and 7.42mg CE/g DW, respectively) compared to hexanic extract (0.71mg QE/g and 0.29mg CE/g DW, respectively) (p<0.05). Both DPPH and ABTS antioxidant assays showed that all tested extracts possess free radical scavenging activity, while the inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50) range values were similar for both assays (2.13-45.54μg/mL and 1.2-43.82μg/mL, respectively). All plant extracts showed ovicidal activity at all tested concentrations. Fruit methanolic (IC50=2.76mg/mL) and aqueous (IC50=2.08mg/mL) extracts showed higher inhibitory effects than chloroformic (IC50=7.62mg/mL) and hexanic (IC50=12.93mg/mL) extracts on egg hatching (p<0.05). There was a significant correlation of total polyphenol, flavonoids and tannins content with scavenging of either DPPH (r=0.722, 0.764 and 0.752, p<0

  9. Rubus spp., Blackberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Encylopedia of Fruit and Nuts is designed as a research reference source on temperate and tropical fruit and nut crops. Blackberries are distinguished from raspberries by whether the receptacle picks with the fruit (blackberries) or stays with the plant when picked (raspberries). The crop is dis...

  10. De-novo RNA Sequencing and Metabolite Profiling to Identify Genes Involved in Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Korean Black Raspberry (Rubus coreanus Miquel)

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Yeonggil; Kumar, Ritesh; Han, Xiao; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Choong Hwan; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2014-01-01

    The Korean black raspberry (Rubus coreanus Miquel, KB) on ripening is usually consumed as fresh fruit, whereas the unripe KB has been widely used as a source of traditional herbal medicine. Such a stage specific utilization of KB has been assumed due to the changing metabolite profile during fruit ripening process, but so far molecular and biochemical changes during its fruit maturation are poorly understood. To analyze biochemical changes during fruit ripening process at molecular level, firstly, we have sequenced, assembled, and annotated the transcriptome of KB fruits. Over 4.86 Gb of normalized cDNA prepared from fruits was sequenced using Illumina HiSeq™ 2000, and assembled into 43,723 unigenes. Secondly, we have reported that alterations in anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins are the major factors facilitating variations in these stages of fruits. In addition, up-regulation of F3′H1, DFR4 and LDOX1 resulted in the accumulation of cyanidin derivatives during the ripening process of KB, indicating the positive relationship between the expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes and the anthocyanin accumulation. Furthermore, the ability of RcMCHI2 (R. coreanus Miquel chalcone flavanone isomerase 2) gene to complement Arabidopsis transparent testa 5 mutant supported the feasibility of our transcriptome library to provide the gene resources for improving plant nutrition and pigmentation. Taken together, these datasets obtained from transcriptome library and metabolic profiling would be helpful to define the gene-metabolite relationships in this non-model plant. PMID:24505466

  11. The Evaluation of CP-001 (a Standardized Herbal Mixture of Houttuynia cordata, Rehmannia glutinosa, Betula platyphylla, and Rubus coreanus) for Cytochrome P450-Related Herb-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hye Hyun; Kim, Sun-A; Kim, In Sook; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of CP-001, a standardized herbal mixture of Houttuynia cordata, Rehmannia glutinosa, Betula platyphylla, and Rubus coreanus, on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme-mediated drug metabolism was investigated in vitro to evaluate the potential for herb-drug interactions. CP-001 was tested at concentrations of 1, 3, 10, 30, and 100  μ g/mL. A CYP-specific substrate mixture was incubated with CP-001 in human liver microsomes, and the metabolites generated by each CYP-specific metabolic reaction were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. CP-001 seemed to slightly inhibit some CYP isozymes, but the IC50 values for all CYP isozymes were greater than 100  μ g/mL. Furthermore, CP-001 did not exhibit time-dependent CYP inhibitory activities, indicating that it does not act as a mechanism-based inactivator of CYP enzymes. In conclusion, the effects of CP-001 on CYP isozyme activities were negligible at the concentrations tested. Therefore, the likelihood of herbal mixture-drug interaction is considered minimal. PMID:23935684

  12. Comparison of genetic diversity of the invasive weed Rubus alceifolius poir. (Rosaceae) in its native range and in areas of introduction, using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers.

    PubMed

    Amsellem, L; Noyer, J L; Le Bourgeois, T; Hossaert-McKey, M

    2000-04-01

    Theory predicts that colonization of new areas will be associated with population bottlenecks that reduce within-population genetic diversity and increase genetic differentiation among populations. This should be especially true for weedy plant species, which are often characterized by self-compatible breeding systems and vegetative propagation. To test this prediction, and to evaluate alternative scenarios for the history of introduction, the genetic diversity of Rubus alceifolius was studied with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers in its native range in southeast Asia and in several areas where this plant has been introduced and is now a serious weed (Indian Ocean islands, Australia). In its native range, R. alceifolius showed great genetic variability within populations and among geographically close populations (populations sampled ranging from northern Vietnam to Java). In Madagascar, genetic variability was somewhat lower than in its native range, but still considerable. Each population sampled in the other Indian Ocean islands (Mayotte, La Réunion, Mauritius) was characterized by a single different genotype of R. alceifolius for the markers studied, and closely related to individuals from Madagascar. Queensland populations also included only a single genotype, identical to that found in Mauritius. These results suggest that R. alceifolius was first introduced into Madagascar, perhaps on multiple occasions, and that Madagascan individuals were the immediate source of plants that colonized other areas of introduction. Successive nested founder events appear to have resulted in cumulative reduction in genetic diversity. Possible explanations for the monoclonality of R. alceifolius in many areas of introduction are discussed. PMID:10736047

  13. The Evaluation of CP-001 (a Standardized Herbal Mixture of Houttuynia cordata, Rehmannia glutinosa, Betula platyphylla, and Rubus coreanus) for Cytochrome P450-Related Herb-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hye Hyun; Kim, Sun-A; Kim, In Sook; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of CP-001, a standardized herbal mixture of Houttuynia cordata, Rehmannia glutinosa, Betula platyphylla, and Rubus coreanus, on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme-mediated drug metabolism was investigated in vitro to evaluate the potential for herb-drug interactions. CP-001 was tested at concentrations of 1, 3, 10, 30, and 100 μg/mL. A CYP-specific substrate mixture was incubated with CP-001 in human liver microsomes, and the metabolites generated by each CYP-specific metabolic reaction were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. CP-001 seemed to slightly inhibit some CYP isozymes, but the IC50 values for all CYP isozymes were greater than 100 μg/mL. Furthermore, CP-001 did not exhibit time-dependent CYP inhibitory activities, indicating that it does not act as a mechanism-based inactivator of CYP enzymes. In conclusion, the effects of CP-001 on CYP isozyme activities were negligible at the concentrations tested. Therefore, the likelihood of herbal mixture-drug interaction is considered minimal. PMID:23935684

  14. Antiobesity Effects of Unripe Rubus coreanus Miquel and Its Constituents: An In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of the Underlying Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dool-Ri; Kim, Yujin; Choi, Eun-jin; Hunmi-Lee; Jung, Myung-A; Bae, Donghyuck; Jo, Ara; Kim, Young Ran; Kim, Sunoh

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objective of the present study was to perform a bioguided fractionation of unripe Rubus coreanus Miquel (uRC) and evaluate the lipid accumulation system involvement in its antiobesity activity as well as study the uRC mechanism of action. Results. After the fractionation, the BuOH fraction of uRC (uRCB) was the most active fraction, suppressing the differentiation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, after an oral administration for 8 weeks in HFD-induced obese mice, uRCB (10 and 50 mg/kg/day) produced a significant decrease in body weight, food efficiency ratio, adipose tissue weight and LDL-cholesterol, serum glucose, TC, and TG levels. Similarly, uRCB significantly suppressed the elevated mRNA levels of PPARγ in the adipose tissue in vivo. Next, we investigated the antiobesity effects of ellagic acid, erycibelline, 5-hydroxy-2-pyridinemethanol, m-hydroxyphenylglycine, and 4-hydroxycoumarin isolated from uRCB. Without affecting cell viability, five bioactive compounds decreased the lipid accumulation in the 3T3-L1 cells and the mRNA expression levels of key adipogenic genes such as PPARγ, C/EBPα, SREBP-1c, ACC, and FAS. Conclusion. These results suggest that uRC and its five bioactive compounds may be a useful therapeutic agent for body weight control by downregulating adipogenesis and lipogenesis. PMID:26904142

  15. Antiobesity Effects of Unripe Rubus coreanus Miquel and Its Constituents: An In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of the Underlying Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dool-Ri; Kim, Yujin; Choi, Eun-Jin; Hunmi-Lee; Jung, Myung-A; Bae, Donghyuck; Jo, Ara; Kim, Young Ran; Kim, Sunoh

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objective of the present study was to perform a bioguided fractionation of unripe Rubus coreanus Miquel (uRC) and evaluate the lipid accumulation system involvement in its antiobesity activity as well as study the uRC mechanism of action. Results. After the fractionation, the BuOH fraction of uRC (uRCB) was the most active fraction, suppressing the differentiation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, after an oral administration for 8 weeks in HFD-induced obese mice, uRCB (10 and 50 mg/kg/day) produced a significant decrease in body weight, food efficiency ratio, adipose tissue weight and LDL-cholesterol, serum glucose, TC, and TG levels. Similarly, uRCB significantly suppressed the elevated mRNA levels of PPARγ in the adipose tissue in vivo. Next, we investigated the antiobesity effects of ellagic acid, erycibelline, 5-hydroxy-2-pyridinemethanol, m-hydroxyphenylglycine, and 4-hydroxycoumarin isolated from uRCB. Without affecting cell viability, five bioactive compounds decreased the lipid accumulation in the 3T3-L1 cells and the mRNA expression levels of key adipogenic genes such as PPARγ, C/EBPα, SREBP-1c, ACC, and FAS. Conclusion. These results suggest that uRC and its five bioactive compounds may be a useful therapeutic agent for body weight control by downregulating adipogenesis and lipogenesis. PMID:26904142

  16. Impact of metallurgical activities on the content of trace elements in the spatial soil and plant parts of Rubus fruticosus L.

    PubMed

    Nujkić, M M; Dimitrijević, M M; Alagić, S Č; Tošić, S B; Petrović, J V

    2016-03-01

    The concentrations of the trace elements (TEs), Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Cd, Ni, were determined in parts of Rubus fruticosus L. and in topsoil, collected from eight different locations around the copper smelter in Bor, Serbia. Extremely high concentrations of Cu were determined in the soil and in R. fruticosus L., and for arsenic at some locations. The enrichment factors for TEs in soil showed enrichment with Cu, Zn, Pb, and As among which extremely high values were determined for Cu (EFsoil = 8.5-126.1) and As (EFsoil = 6.6-44.4). The enrichment factors for the parts of R. fruticosus L. showed enrichment with all TEs, except for nickel. The most extreme enrichment was found to occur in roots and stems for Cu (EFplant = 56.2 and 51.1) and leaves for Pb (EFplant = 45.68). The mean values of the three ratios of concentrations between plant parts for all TEs indicated pollution via the atmosphere while leaves appeared to be the best indicators for this kind of pollution. Numerous and very strong Pearson's correlations between TEs in the R. fruticosus L. parts confirmed these results. Principal Component Analysis showed that the major pollution source is the copper smelter that contaminates vegetation through soil and air. PMID:26982885

  17. Nutrition Composition and Single, 14-Day and 13-Week Repeated Oral Dose Toxicity Studies of the Leaves and Stems of Rubus coreanus Miquel.

    PubMed

    Om, Ae-Son; Song, Yu-Na; Noh, GeonMin; Kim, HaengRan; Choe, JeongSook

    2016-01-01

    The leaves and stems of the plant Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCMLS) are rich in vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals which have antioxidant, anti-hemolytic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fatigue and anti-cancer effects. However, RCMLS is not included in the Korean Food Standards Codex due to the lack of safety assurance concerning RCMLS. We evaluated single and repeated oral dose toxicity of RCMLS in Sprague-Dawley rats. RCMLS did not induce any significant toxicological changes in both male and female rats at a single doses of 2500 mg/kg/day. Repeated oral dose toxicity studies showed no adverse effects in clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, ophthalmic examination, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, necropsy findings, organ weight, and histopathology at doses of 625, 1250, and 2500 mg/kg/day. The LD50 and LOAEL of RCMLS might be over 2500 mg/kg body weight/day and no target organs were identified. Therefore, this study revealed that single and repeated oral doses of RCMLS are safe. PMID:26760987

  18. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of the ethanol extract of Rubus coreanus in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Hong; Oh, Sun-Mee; Lim, Soon Sung; Lee, Yeon Sil; Shin, Hyun-Kyung; Oh, Yang-Seok; Choe, Nong-Hoon; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Kim, Jin-Kyung

    2006-12-01

    Foods of plant origin, especially fruits and vegetables, draw increased attention because of their potential benefits to human health. The aim of the present study was to determine in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of four different extracts obtained from the fruits of Rubus coreanus (aqueous and ethanol extracts of unripe and ripe fruits). Among the four extracts, the ethanol extract of unripe fruits of R. coreanus (URCE) suppressed nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 murine macrophages. We also demonstrated that URCE by itself is a potent inducer of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Inhibition of HO-1 activity by tin protoporphyrin, a specific HO-1 inhibitor, suppressed the URCE-induced reductions in the production of NO and PGE(2) as well as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Our data suggest that URCE exerts anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages via activation of the HO-1 pathway and helps to elucidate the mechanism underlying the potential therapeutic value of R. coreanus extracts. PMID:17049489

  19. Protective Effect of Tropical Highland Blackberry Juice (Rubus adenotrichos Schltdl.) Against UVB-Mediated Damage in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes and in a Reconstituted Skin Equivalent Model

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Castro, Laura; Syed, Deeba N.; Chamcheu, Jean C.; Vilela, Fernanda M. P.; Pérez, Ana M.; Vaillant, Fabrice; Rojas, Miguel; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly its UVB (280–320 nm) spectrum, is the primary environmental stimulus leading to skin carcinogenesis. Several botanical species with antioxidant properties have shown photochemopreventive effects against UVB damage. Costa Rica’s tropical highland blackberry (Rubus adenotrichos) contains important levels of phenolic compounds, mainly ellagitannins and anthocyanins, with strong antioxidant properties. In this study, we examined the photochemopreventive effect of R. adenotrichos blackberry juice (BBJ) on UVB-mediated responses in human epidermal keratinocytes and in a three-dimensional (3D) reconstituted normal human skin equivalent (SE). Pretreatment (2 h) and posttreatment (24 h) of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) with BBJ reduced UVB (25 mJ cm−2)-mediated (1) cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (2) 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formation. Furthermore, treatment of NHEKs with BBJ increased UVB-mediated (1) poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and (2) activation of caspases 3, 8 and 9. Thus, BBJ seems to alleviate UVB-induced effects by reducing DNA damage and increasing apoptosis of damaged cells. To establish the in vivo significance of these findings to human skin, immunohistochemistry studies were performed in a 3D SE model, where BBJ was also found to decrease CPDs formation. These data suggest that BBJ may be developed as an agent to ameliorate UV-induced skin damage. PMID:23711186

  20. Protective effect of tropical highland blackberry juice (Rubus adenotrichos Schltdl.) against UVB-mediated damage in human epidermal keratinocytes and in a reconstituted skin equivalent model.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Castro, Laura; Syed, Deeba N; Chamcheu, Jean C; Vilela, Fernanda M P; Pérez, Ana M; Vaillant, Fabrice; Rojas, Miguel; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly its UVB (280-320 nm) spectrum, is the primary environmental stimulus leading to skin carcinogenesis. Several botanical species with antioxidant properties have shown photochemopreventive effects against UVB damage. Costa Rica's tropical highland blackberry (Rubus adenotrichos) contains important levels of phenolic compounds, mainly ellagitannins and anthocyanins, with strong antioxidant properties. In this study, we examined the photochemopreventive effect of R. adenotrichos blackberry juice (BBJ) on UVB-mediated responses in human epidermal keratinocytes and in a three-dimensional (3D) reconstituted normal human skin equivalent (SE). Pretreatment (2 h) and posttreatment (24 h) of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) with BBJ reduced UVB (25 mJ cm(-2))-mediated (1) cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (2) 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formation. Furthermore, treatment of NHEKs with BBJ increased UVB-mediated (1) poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and (2) activation of caspases 3, 8 and 9. Thus, BBJ seems to alleviate UVB-induced effects by reducing DNA damage and increasing apoptosis of damaged cells. To establish the in vivo significance of these findings to human skin, immunohistochemistry studies were performed in a 3D SE model, where BBJ was also found to decrease CPDs formation. These data suggest that BBJ may be developed as an agent to ameliorate UV-induced skin damage. PMID:23711186

  1. Rubus coreanus Miquel extract causes apoptosis of doxorubicin-resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Choi, Hyeong Sim; Cho, Sung-Gook; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Cancer cells can acquire an anticancer, drug-resistant phenotype following chemotherapy, which is tightly linked to cancer malignancy and patient survival rates. Therefore, the identification of options to treat chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells is an urgent requirement. Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) has long been used as a source of food. In addition, it has been reported that RCM has effective functions against particular diseases, including cancer and inflammation. In the present study, it was demonstrated that RCM extract caused the apoptotic cell death of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR‑RES ovarian cancer cells by phosphorylating c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK). The RCM‑mediated reduction of cell viability showed no synergism with doxorubicin. In addition, ellagic acid and quercetin, which are phytochemicals found in RCM, also caused apoptosis of the NCI/ADR‑RES cells. In subsequent investigations of the RCM‑altered signaling pathway, RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin were found to commonly induce the phosphorylation of JNK and AKT. Additionally, the inhibition of JNK with SP600125 repressed the apoptotic cell death induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, and the inhibition of JNK appeared to switch apoptosis to necrosis. JNK inhibition also reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, which was induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, suggesting that the phosphorylation of JNK is required for AKT phosphorylation in RCM‑, ellagic acid‑ or quercetin‑induced apoptotic cell death. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study led to the conclusion that RCM caused apoptosis of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation, and suggested that RCM may be effective in the treatment of chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells. PMID:26986492

  2. Evaluation of the gastroprotective activity of the extracts, fractions, and pure compounds obtained from aerial parts of Rubus imperialis in different experimental models.

    PubMed

    Berté, Priscila Elisabeth; da Silva Lopes, Jhonny; Comandulli, Nicole Garbin; Rangel, Daniele Wolff; Monache, Franco Delle; Filho, Valdir Cechinel; Niero, Rivaldo; de Andrade, Sergio Faloni

    2014-04-01

    Previous phytochemical studies carried out with Rubus imperialis Chum. Schl. (Rosaceae) have demonstrated the presence of triterpenes (niga-ichigoside F1 and 2β,3β,19α-trihydroxyursolic acid) in this species. The literature indicates that triterpenes are closely related to some pharmacological activities, including antiulcer activity. Therefore, in view of the previous promising results with this species, this work extends the phytochemical studies, as well as investigates its gastroprotective action in different models using rodents. The hydroalcoholic extract was tested using the following protocols in mice: ethanol/HCl and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced ulcer, acetic acid-induced chronic ulcer, ligature pylorus model, and free mucus quantification in mucosa. Isolated triterpenes were investigated in the ethanol/HCl-induced ulcer model. The results of this study show that R. imperialis extract (100, 250, or 500 mg) displays gastroprotective activity in the ethanol-induced ulcer model with a percentage of inhibition of gastric lesions of 70, 71, and 86 %, respectively. The extract also significantly reduced the ulcerative lesions in the indomethacin-induced ulcer. In this model, the percentage of inhibition of ulcer was 41, 44, and 70 %, respectively. Regarding the model of gastric secretion, a reduction of gastric juice volume and total acidity was observed, as well as an increase in gastric pH; however, gastric mucus production was not altered by treatment with the extract. It was also observed that the ethyl acetate fraction presented higher activity, leading to the isolation of niga-ichigoside F1 and 2β,3β-19-α-trihydroxyursolic acid, which presented antiulcer activity comparable to that of omeprazole, with an inhibition percentage of 98 and 99 %, respectively. These results demonstrate that R. imperialis extract and isolated compounds (niga-ichigoside F1 and 2β,3β-19-α-trihydroxyursolic acid) produce gastroprotective effects

  3. Shrub communities as inhibitors of plant succession in southern Quebec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilleur, Alain; Véronneau, Hélène; Bouchard, André

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of our research was to identify shrub species growing in southern Quebec that inhibit ecological succession in power-line corridors. Results are presented in three parts. First, clonal characteristics that allowed the establishment of stable communities were identified. Second, successional vector analysis identified those species that have the potential to inhibit succession. In poorly drained sites those species were Cornus stolonifera, C. obliqua, Salix petiolaris, and Spiraea alba. In well-drained sites, those species were Zanthoxylum americanum, Rubus idaeus, Spiraea alba, Rhus typhina, and Thuja occidentalis. Third, analysis of variance showed that there is a significantly larger number of tree seedlings found in adjacent herbaceous communities than found under the dense cover of Cornus stolonifera, C. obliqua, Salix petiolaris, Spiraea alba, Rhus typhina, Rubus idaeus, Thuya occidentalis, and Zanthoxylum americanum. These results indicate that the planting of selected shrub species could, through biological control, delay reforestation.

  4. Raspberry leaf--should it be recommended to pregnant women?

    PubMed

    Holst, Lone; Haavik, Svein; Nordeng, Hedvig

    2009-11-01

    This review evaluates the safety and efficacy of raspberry leaf (Rubus idaeus) in pregnancy. The electronic databases PubMed, ISI Web of Science, AMED, EMBASE, Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database and Cochrane Library were searched. Altogether 12 original publications with focus on safety or efficacy during pregnancy, pharmacology and in vitro tests explaining mode of action or constituents in Rubus idaeus were reviewed. Limited documentation exists and part of it is 50 years old or older. Only the latest animal study indicates an increased risk for the unborn child; however, all the studies are small and cannot rule out negative effects on pregnancy outcome. The efficacy of raspberry leaf is not convincingly documented. The use of raspberry leaf in pregnancy is a traditional herbal therapy and is recommended by some midwives. Due to the lack of evidence for safety and efficacy such recommendations are questionable. Suggestions for future work are given. PMID:19880082

  5. Identification of Plants That Inhibit Lipid Droplet Formation in Liver Cells: Rubus suavissimus Leaf Extract Protects Mice from High-Fat Diet-Induced Fatty Liver by Directly Affecting Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tomohiro; Sugawara, Wataru; Takiguchi, Yuya; Takizawa, Kento; Nakabayashi, Ami; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Nagano-Ito, Michiyo; Ichikawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver disease is a condition in which abnormally large numbers of lipid droplets accumulate in liver cells. Fatty liver disease induces inflammation under conditions of oxidative stress and may result in cancer. To identify plants that protect against fatty liver disease, we examined the inhibitory effects of plant extracts on lipid droplet formation in mouse hepatoma cells. A screen of 98 water extracts of plants revealed 4 extracts with inhibitory effects. One of these extracts, Rubus suavissimus S. Lee (Tien-cha or Chinese sweet tea) leaf extract, which showed strong inhibitory effects, was tested in a mouse fatty liver model. In these mouse experiments, intake of the plant extract significantly protected mice against fatty liver disease without affecting body weight gain. Our results suggest that RSE directly affects liver cells and protects them from fatty liver disease. PMID:27429636

  6. Identification of Plants That Inhibit Lipid Droplet Formation in Liver Cells: Rubus suavissimus Leaf Extract Protects Mice from High-Fat Diet-Induced Fatty Liver by Directly Affecting Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tomohiro; Sugawara, Wataru; Takiguchi, Yuya; Takizawa, Kento; Nakabayashi, Ami; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Nagano-Ito, Michiyo; Ichikawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver disease is a condition in which abnormally large numbers of lipid droplets accumulate in liver cells. Fatty liver disease induces inflammation under conditions of oxidative stress and may result in cancer. To identify plants that protect against fatty liver disease, we examined the inhibitory effects of plant extracts on lipid droplet formation in mouse hepatoma cells. A screen of 98 water extracts of plants revealed 4 extracts with inhibitory effects. One of these extracts, Rubus suavissimus S. Lee (Tien-cha or Chinese sweet tea) leaf extract, which showed strong inhibitory effects, was tested in a mouse fatty liver model. In these mouse experiments, intake of the plant extract significantly protected mice against fatty liver disease without affecting body weight gain. Our results suggest that RSE directly affects liver cells and protects them from fatty liver disease. PMID:27429636

  7. Tobacco ringspot virus in Rubus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) has a broad host range among woody and perennial plants and has been reported from blackberry but not from red or black raspberry. The virus has been detected in blackberry in the southeastern United States with a single report from blackberry in British Columbia, Cana...

  8. Raspberry (Rubus spp.)-Ringspot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV), which is spread at a rate of about 6 ft a year in the row by dagger nematodes (Xiphinema americanum) and possibly related species. It is common in red raspberry in the northern Willamette valley in Oregon and in Clark County in southern Washington. Many weeds also are ...

  9. Berry fruits: compositional elements, biochemical activities, and the impact of their intake on human health, performance, and disease.

    PubMed

    Seeram, Navindra P

    2008-02-13

    An overwhelming body of research has now firmly established that the dietary intake of berry fruits has a positive and profound impact on human health, performance, and disease. Berry fruits, which are commercially cultivated and commonly consumed in fresh and processed forms in North America, include blackberry ( Rubus spp.), black raspberry ( Rubus occidentalis), blueberry ( Vaccinium corymbosum), cranberry (i.e., the American cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon, distinct from the European cranberry, V. oxycoccus), red raspberry ( Rubus idaeus) and strawberry ( Fragaria x ananassa). Other berry fruits, which are lesser known but consumed in the traditional diets of North American tribal communities, include chokecherry ( Prunus virginiana), highbush cranberry ( Viburnum trilobum), serviceberry ( Amelanchier alnifolia), and silver buffaloberry ( Shepherdia argentea). In addition, berry fruits such as arctic bramble ( Rubus articus), bilberries ( Vaccinuim myrtillus; also known as bog whortleberries), black currant ( Ribes nigrum), boysenberries ( Rubus spp.), cloudberries ( Rubus chamaemorus), crowberries ( Empetrum nigrum, E. hermaphroditum), elderberries ( Sambucus spp.), gooseberry ( Ribes uva-crispa), lingonberries ( Vaccinium vitis-idaea), loganberry ( Rubus loganobaccus), marionberries ( Rubus spp.), Rowan berries ( Sorbus spp.), and sea buckthorn ( Hippophae rhamnoides), are also popularly consumed in other parts of the world. Recently, there has also been a surge in the consumption of exotic "berry-type" fruits such as the pomegranate ( Punica granatum), goji berries ( Lycium barbarum; also known as wolfberry), mangosteen ( Garcinia mangostana), the Brazilian açaí berry ( Euterpe oleraceae), and the Chilean maqui berry ( Aristotelia chilensis). Given the wide consumption of berry fruits and their potential impact on human health and disease, conferences and symposia that target the latest scientific research (and, of equal importance, the dissemination of

  10. Medicinal plants used in British Columbia, Canada for reproductive health in pets.

    PubMed

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy; Brauer, Gerhard; Khan, Tonya

    2009-08-01

    In 2003, semi-structured interviews were conducted in British Columbia, Canada with participants obtained using a purposive sample on the ethnoveterinary remedies used for animals. Twenty-nine participants provided the information in this paper on the ethnoveterinary remedies used for reproductive health in dogs and cats. The plants used for pregnancy support and milk production in pets were raspberry-leaf (Rubus idaeus), motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca), flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) and ginger (Zingiber officinale). Uterine infections were treated with black cohosh (Actaea racemosa) and goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis). Most of the studies conducted on these plants have not been conducted on companion animals. PMID:19482367

  11. [Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of extracts from Siberian plants].

    PubMed

    Nesterova, Iu V; Povet'eva, T N; Aksinenko, S G; Suslov, N I; Gaĭdamovich, N N; Nagorniak, Iu G; Popova, E V; Kravtsova, S S; Andreeva, T I

    2009-01-01

    Experimental investigations have shown that water-alcohol extracts from plants containing alkaloids (Aconitum baikalense, Aconitum septentrionale, Delphinium elatum L., Conium maculatum) and salicylic acid (Filipendula ulmaria, Salix viminalis, Fragaria vesca, Rubus idaeus) inhibited the development of main symptoms of inflammation, viz. exudation, pain, fever, to the same extent as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. The substances studied in this work may be used to develop new efficient pharmacological preparations for the treatment of different inflammatory conditions associated with severe pain syndrome. PMID:20017405

  12. Antimicrobial effects of Finnish plant extracts containing flavonoids and other phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rauha, J P; Remes, S; Heinonen, M; Hopia, A; Kähkönen, M; Kujala, T; Pihlaja, K; Vuorela, H; Vuorela, P

    2000-05-25

    Plant phenolics, especially dietary flavonoids, are currently of growing interest owing to their supposed functional properties in promoting human health. Antimicrobial screening of 13 phenolic substances and 29 extracts prepared from Finnish plant materials against selected microbes was conducted in this study. The tests were carried out using diffusion methods with four to nine microbial species (Aspergillus niger, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis). Flavone, quercetin and naringenin were effective in inhibiting the growth of the organisms. The most active plant extracts were purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) against Candida albicans, meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim.), willow herb (Epilobium angustifolium L.), cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus L.) and raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) against bacteria, and white birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.), pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and potato (Solanum tuberosum. L.) against gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:10857921

  13. Over-seasons analysis of quantitative trait loci affecting phenolic content and antioxidant capacity in raspberry.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Patricia; Graham, Julie; Stewart, D; Brennan, Rex; Hackett, Christine A; McDougall, Gordon J

    2012-05-30

    This study examined the total phenol content (TPC) and total anthocyanin content (TAC) in ripe fruit of progeny of a mapping population generated from a cross between the European red raspberry cv. Glen Moy ( Rubus ideaus var. idaeus) and the North American red raspberry cv. Latham ( Rubus ideaus var. strigosus) over five seasons in two different growing environments. Measurements of antioxidant capacity (FRAP and TEAC) were also carried out. TPC was highly correlated with TEAC and FRAP across the entire data set. The subset of anthocyanin content was genotype-dependent but also correlated with TPC, although the proportion of anthocyanin compounds varied between progeny. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was carried out, and key markers were tested for consistency of effects over sites and years. Four regions, on linkage groups 2, 3, 5, and 6, were identified. These agree with QTLs from a previous study over a single season and indicate that QTL effects were robust over seasons. PMID:22583495

  14. Blackberry (Rubus spp.)-Virus Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many viruses have been found in blackberries in the Pacific Northwest. Blackberry calico virus (a carlavirus) is universally present in older commercial 'Thornless Loganberry' fields. Similar calico diseases occur in field-run 'Marion', 'Chehalem', 'Olallie', and 'Waldo' blackberries. Other virus di...

  15. Raspberry (Rubus spp.)-Crumbly Fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A virus complex consisting of Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) and Raspberry leaf mottle virus (RLMV) and/or Raspberry latent virus (RpLV). The cultivar 'Meeker' had more severe growth reductions when infected by RBDV and RLMV; whereas crumbly fruit was more prominent when infected by RBDV and RpL...

  16. Molecular genetics and genomics of the Rosoideae: state of the art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Sara; Giongo, Lara; Buti, Matteo; Surbanovski, Nada; Viola, Roberto; Velasco, Riccardo; Ward, Judson A; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The Rosoideae is a subfamily of the Rosaceae that contains a number of species of economic importance, including the soft fruit species strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa), red (Rubus idaeus) and black (Rubus occidentalis) raspberries, blackberries (Rubus spp.) and one of the most economically important cut flower genera, the roses (Rosa spp.). Molecular genetics and genomics resources for the Rosoideae have developed rapidly over the past two decades, beginning with the development and application of a number of molecular marker types including restriction fragment length polymorphisms, amplified fragment length polymorphisms and microsatellites, and culminating in the recent publication of the genome sequence of the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca, and the development of high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-genotyping resources for Fragaria, Rosa and Rubus. These tools have been used to identify genes and other functional elements that control traits of economic importance, to study the evolution of plant genome structure within the subfamily, and are beginning to facilitate genomic-assisted breeding through the development and deployment of markers linked to traits such as aspects of fruit quality, disease resistance and the timing of flowering. In this review, we report on the developments that have been made over the last 20 years in the field of molecular genetics and structural genomics within the Rosoideae, comment on how the knowledge gained will improve the efficiency of cultivar development and discuss how these advances will enhance our understanding of the biological processes determining agronomically important traits in all Rosoideae species. PMID:26504527

  17. Molecular genetics and genomics of the Rosoideae: state of the art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Longhi, Sara; Giongo, Lara; Buti, Matteo; Surbanovski, Nada; Viola, Roberto; Velasco, Riccardo; Ward, Judson A; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The Rosoideae is a subfamily of the Rosaceae that contains a number of species of economic importance, including the soft fruit species strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa), red (Rubus idaeus) and black (Rubus occidentalis) raspberries, blackberries (Rubus spp.) and one of the most economically important cut flower genera, the roses (Rosa spp.). Molecular genetics and genomics resources for the Rosoideae have developed rapidly over the past two decades, beginning with the development and application of a number of molecular marker types including restriction fragment length polymorphisms, amplified fragment length polymorphisms and microsatellites, and culminating in the recent publication of the genome sequence of the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca, and the development of high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-genotyping resources for Fragaria, Rosa and Rubus. These tools have been used to identify genes and other functional elements that control traits of economic importance, to study the evolution of plant genome structure within the subfamily, and are beginning to facilitate genomic-assisted breeding through the development and deployment of markers linked to traits such as aspects of fruit quality, disease resistance and the timing of flowering. In this review, we report on the developments that have been made over the last 20 years in the field of molecular genetics and structural genomics within the Rosoideae, comment on how the knowledge gained will improve the efficiency of cultivar development and discuss how these advances will enhance our understanding of the biological processes determining agronomically important traits in all Rosoideae species. PMID:26504527

  18. Does the Slow-Growth, High-Mortality Hypothesis Apply Below Ground?

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Alison E.; Johnson, Scott N.; Gange, Alan C.

    2016-01-01

    Belowground tri-trophic study systems present a challenging environment in which to study plant-herbivore-natural enemy interactions. For this reason, belowground examples are rarely available for testing general ecological theories. To redress this imbalance, we present, for the first time, data on a belowground tri-trophic system to test the slow growth, high mortality hypothesis. We investigated whether the differing performance of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) in controlling the common pest black vine weevil Otiorhynchus sulcatus could be linked to differently resistant cultivars of the red raspberry Rubus idaeus. The O. sulcatus larvae recovered from R. idaeus plants showed significantly slower growth and higher mortality on the Glen Rosa cultivar, relative to the more commercially favored Glen Ample cultivar creating a convenient system for testing this hypothesis. Heterorhabditis megidis was found to be less effective at controlling O. sulcatus than Steinernema kraussei, but conformed to the hypothesis. However, S. kraussei maintained high levels of O. sulcatus mortality regardless of how larval growth was influenced by R. idaeus cultivar. We link this to direct effects that S. kraussei had on reducing O. sulcatus larval mass, indicating potential sub-lethal effects of S. kraussei, which the slow-growth, high-mortality hypothesis does not account for. Possible origins of these sub-lethal effects of EPN infection and how they may impact on a hypothesis designed and tested with aboveground predator and parasitoid systems are discussed. PMID:27571368

  19. Antioxidant Properties and Neuroprotective Capacity of Strawberry Tree Fruit (Arbutus unedo)

    PubMed Central

    Fortalezas, Sofia; Tavares, Lucélia; Pimpão, Rui; Tyagi, Meenu; Pontes, Vera; Alves, Paula M.; McDougall, Gordon; Stewart, Derek; Ferreira, Ricardo B.; Santos, Cláudia N.

    2010-01-01

    Berries contain significant amounts of phytochemicals, including polyphenols, which are reported to reduce cancer risk, coronary heart disease and other degenerative diseases. These effects are mainly attributed to the antioxidant capacity of polyphenols found in berries. Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) berries are used in folk medicine but seldom eaten as fresh fruits. Their phenolic profile and antioxidant capacity reveal a high potential, but they are not well characterized as a “health promoting food”. The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant properties of the edible strawberry tree fruit in vitro and in a neurodegeneration cell model. Raspberry (Rubus idaeus), a well documented health-promoting fruit, was used as a control for comparison purposes. A. unedo yielded a similar content in polyphenols and a slightly lower value of total antioxidant capacity in comparison to R. idaeus. Although the chemically-measured antioxidant activity was similar between both fruits, R. idaeus increased neuroblastoma survival in a neurodegeneration cell model by 36.6% whereas A. unedo extracts caused no effect on neuroblastoma viability. These results clearly demonstrate that a promising level of chemically-determined antioxidant activity of a plant extract is not necessarily correlated with biological significance, as assessed by the effect of A. unedo fruit in a neurodegeneration cell model. PMID:22254017

  20. Antioxidant properties and neuroprotective capacity of strawberry tree fruit (Arbutus unedo).

    PubMed

    Fortalezas, Sofia; Tavares, Lucélia; Pimpão, Rui; Tyagi, Meenu; Pontes, Vera; Alves, Paula M; McDougall, Gordon; Stewart, Derek; Ferreira, Ricardo B; Santos, Cláudia N

    2010-02-01

    Berries contain significant amounts of phytochemicals, including polyphenols, which are reported to reduce cancer risk, coronary heart disease and other degenerative diseases. These effects are mainly attributed to the antioxidant capacity of polyphenols found in berries. Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) berries are used in folk medicine but seldom eaten as fresh fruits. Their phenolic profile and antioxidant capacity reveal a high potential, but they are not well characterized as a "health promoting food". The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant properties of the edible strawberry tree fruit in vitro and in a neurodegeneration cell model. Raspberry (Rubus idaeus), a well documented health-promoting fruit, was used as a control for comparison purposes. A. unedo yielded a similar content in polyphenols and a slightly lower value of total antioxidant capacity in comparison to R. idaeus. Although the chemically-measured antioxidant activity was similar between both fruits, R. idaeus increased neuroblastoma survival in a neurodegeneration cell model by 36.6% whereas A. unedo extracts caused no effect on neuroblastoma viability. These results clearly demonstrate that a promising level of chemically-determined antioxidant activity of a plant extract is not necessarily correlated with biological significance, as assessed by the effect of A. unedo fruit in a neurodegeneration cell model. PMID:22254017

  1. Photosynthesis of boreal ground vegetation after a forest clear-cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, L.; Pumpanen, J.; Vesala, T.; Hari, P.

    2009-11-01

    Heather (Calluna vulgaris), rosebay willowherb (Epilobium angustifolium), wavy hair-grass (Deschampsia flexuosa) and raspberry (Rubus idaeus) are typical species at boreal clear-cut sites. In this study, we measured their photosynthesis separately in the growing season of 2005 using a manual chamber. All measured species showed clear and species-specific seasonal cycles of photosynthetic activity (Pmax). The maxima of C. vulgaris and E. angustifolium occurred around June and July, while that of R. idaeus occurred as late as August. A simple model of photosynthetic activity is presented, addressing the photosynthesis of C. vulgaris was mainly explained by temperature history when the soil moisture is high. The activity of deciduous D. flexuosa also followed the temperature history, unlike the activities of E. angustifolium and R. idaeus. During a short drought, some shoots decreased their Pmax levels but none of the species showed similar reactions between individuals. We also observed that the comparison of the whole-plant Pmax or respiration of different-sized individuals were less scattered than the results based on full-grown leaf mass, implying that species-specific rates of photosynthesis at ground level are rather similar regardless of the plant size. Using species composition and continuous temperature and light measurements, we upscaled the species-specific process rates and integrated fixed and respired CO2 of ground vegetation for the entire 2005 growing season. The photosynthetic production per surface area of soil was 760 g C m-2 y-1 at the fertile site and 300 g C m-2 y-1 at the infertile site. During the snow-free period (18 April-21 November), the above ground parts of measured species released 75 g C m-2 y-1 at the infertile site. At the fertile site, E. angustifolium and R. idaeus respired 22 and 12 g C m-2 y-1, respectively.

  2. Photosynthetic production of boreal ground vegetation after a forest clear-cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, L.; Pumpanen, J.; Vesala, T.; Hari, P.

    2009-05-01

    Heather (Calluna vulgaris), rosebay willowherb (Epilobium angustifolium), wavy hair-grass (Deschampsia flexuosa) and raspberry (Rubus idaeus) are typical species on boreal clear-cut sites. According to our study, they all had clear and species-specific annual cycles of photosynthetic activity (Pmax). The maxima of C. vulgaris and E. angustifolium occurred around June and July, while that of R. idaeus occurred as late as in August. The photosynthetic activity of C. vulgaris followed the temperature history closely when the soil moisture was high. Deciduous D. flexuosa also followed the temperature history, unlike E. angustifolium and R. idaeus. During a short drought, some shoots decreased their Pmax levels but none of the species showed congruent reactions within individuals. In general, we noticed that the comparison of Pmax or respiration of different shoots caused less discrepancy when based on ground area than on leaf mass. Using species composition and continuous temperature and light measurements, we upscaled the species-specific process rates and integrated fixed and respired CO2 of ground vegetation during an entire growing season 2005. The photosynthetic production of ground vegetation was 760 g C m-2 y-1 at the fertile site and 300 g C m-2 y-1 at the infertile site. During the snow-free period (18 April-21 November), C. vulgaris respired 68 g C m-2 y-1 and E. angustifolium 7 g C m-2 y-1 at the infertile site. At the fertile site, E. angustifolium and R. idaeus respired 22 and 12 g C m-2 y-1, respectively.

  3. Environmental and seasonal influences on red raspberry anthocyanin antioxidant contents and identification of quantitative traits loci (QTL).

    PubMed

    Kassim, Angzzas; Poette, Julie; Paterson, Alistair; Zait, Dzeti; McCallum, Susan; Woodhead, Mary; Smith, Kay; Hackett, Christine; Graham, Julie

    2009-05-01

    Consumption of raspberries promotes human health through intake of pharmaceutically active antioxidants, including cyanidin and pelargonidin anthocyanins; products of flavonoid metabolism and also pigments conferring colour to fruit. Raspberry anthocyanin contents could be enhanced for nutritional health and quality benefits utilising DNA polymorphisms in modern marker assisted breeding. The objective was to elucidate factors determining anthocyanin production in these fruits. HPLC quantified eight anthocyanin cyanidin and pelargonidin glycosides: -3-sophoroside, -3-glucoside, -3-rutinoside and -3-glucosylrutinoside across two seasons and two environments in progeny from a cross between two Rubus subspecies, Rubus idaeus (cv. Glen Moy)xRubus strigosus (cv. Latham). Significant seasonal variation was detected across pigments less for different growing environments within seasons. Eight antioxidants mapped to the same chromosome region on linkage group (LG) 1, across both years and from fruits grown in field and under protected cultivation. Seven antioxidants also mapped to a region on LG 4 across years and for both growing sites. A chalcone synthase (PKS 1) gene sequence mapped to LG 7 but did not underlie the anthocyanin quantitative traits loci (QTL) identified. Other candidate genes including basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH), NAM/CUC2-like protein and bZIP transcription factor underlying the mapped anthocyanins were identified. PMID:19156716

  4. Plant phenolics affect oxidation of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Hanna; Heinonen, Marina

    2008-08-27

    The effect of berry phenolics such as anthocyanins, ellagitannins, and proanthocyanidins from raspberry (Rubus idaeus), black currant (Ribes nigrum), and cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and byproducts of deoiling processes rich in phenolics such as rapeseed (Brassica rapa L.), camelina (Camelina sativa), and soy (Glycine max L.) as well as scots pine bark (Pinus sylvestris) was investigated in an H2O2-oxidized tryptophan (Trp) solution. The oxidation of Trp was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography using both fluorescence and diode array detection of Trp and its oxidation products. Mechanisms of antioxidative action of the phenolic compounds toward the oxidation of Trp were different as the pattern of Trp oxidation products varied with different phenolic compounds. The antioxidant protection toward oxidation of Trp was best provided with pine bark phenolics, black currant anthocyanins, and camelina meal phenolics as well as cranberry proanthocyanidins. PMID:18646765

  5. Characterisation of the aroma profiles of different honeys and corresponding flowers using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Seisonen, Sirli; Kivima, Evelin; Vene, Kristel

    2015-02-15

    The aroma profiles of thirteen different honey samples from four botanical origins: heather (Calluna vulgaris), raspberry (Rubus idaeus), rape (Brassica napus), alder buckthorn (Frangula alnus) and the blossoms of the four corresponding flowers were investigated to find odour-active compounds exclusively representing specific honeys based on odour-active compounds from the blossoms. Gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas-chromatography-olfactometry were used to determine and identify the odour-active compounds. Data was analysed using agglomerative hierarchical clustering and correspondence analysis. Honeys from the same botanical origin clustered together; however, none of the identified compounds were exclusive to a particular honey/blossom combination. Heather honey had the flavour profile most different to the others. Isophorone and 2-methylbutyric acid were found only in heather honeys. Heather honey was characterised by having more "sweet" and "candy-like" notes, raspberry honeys had more "green" notes, while alder buckthorn had more "honey" and "floral" notes. PMID:25236195

  6. Antioxidant capacities and anthocyanin characteristics of the black-red wild berries obtained in Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chengyong; Su, Shang; Wang, Lijin; Wu, Jie; Tang, Zhongqiu; Xu, Yanjun; Shu, Qingyan; Wang, Liangsheng

    2016-08-01

    Various edible berries widely accessible in nature in Northeast China are poorly exploited. The compositions and contents of anthocyanins in black (Padus maackii, Padus avium, Lonicera caerulea, and Ribes nigrum) and red (Ribes rubrum, Sambucus williamsii, Rubus idaeus, and Ribes procumbens) wild berries in Northeast China were firstly characterized by HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS(2). Twenty-three anthocyanins were detected and identified. Cyanidin glycosides were dominant in both berries. Six anthocyanins were reported for the first time in P. avium, R. rubrum, and Sambucus. Total anthocyanin content (TAC) ranged from 10mg/100gfreshweight (FW) (R. procumbens) to 1058mg/100gFW (P. maackii) among berries. The TACs and antioxidant activities assessed by DPPH and FRAP assays were much higher in black than in red berries. Black-red berries, especially P. maackii and P. avium, can be used in developing functional foods and in improving breeding programs. PMID:26988488

  7. Reciprocal feeding facilitation between above- and below-ground herbivores.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Scott W; Vanbergen, Adam J; Hails, Rosemary S; Jones, T Hefin; Johnson, Scott N

    2013-10-23

    Interspecific interactions between insect herbivores predominantly involve asymmetric competition. By contrast, facilitation, whereby herbivory by one insect benefits another via induced plant susceptibility, is uncommon. Positive reciprocal interactions between insect herbivores are even rarer. Here, we reveal a novel case of reciprocal feeding facilitation between above-ground aphids (Amphorophora idaei) and root-feeding vine weevil larvae (Otiorhynchus sulcatus), attacking red raspberry (Rubus idaeus). Using two raspberry cultivars with varying resistance to these herbivores, we further demonstrate that feeding facilitation occurred regardless of host plant resistance. This positive reciprocal interaction operates via an, as yet, unreported mechanism. Specifically, the aphid induces compensatory growth, possibly as a prelude to greater resistance/tolerance, whereas the root herbivore causes the plant to abandon this strategy. Both herbivores may ultimately benefit from this facilitative interaction. PMID:23883576

  8. Volatile compounds of raspberry fruit: from analytical methods to biological role and sensory impact.

    PubMed

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Gasperi, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Volatile compounds play a key role in the formation of the well-recognized and widely appreciated raspberry aroma. Studies on the isolation and identification of volatile compounds in raspberry fruit (Rubus idaeus L.) are reviewed with a focus on aroma-related compounds. A table is drawn up containing a comprehensive list of the volatile compounds identified so far in raspberry along with main references and quantitative data where available. Two additional tables report the glycosidic bond and enantiomeric distributions of the volatile compounds investigated up to now in raspberry fruit. Studies on the development and evolution of volatile compounds during fruit formation, ripening and senescence, and genetic and environmental influences are also reviewed. Recent investigations showing the potential role of raspberry volatile compounds in cultivar differentiation and fruit resistance to mold disease are reported as well. Finally a summary of research done so far and our vision for future research lines are reported. PMID:25647579

  9. Genetic and environmental effects influencing fruit colour and QTL analysis in raspberry.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Susan; Woodhead, Mary; Hackett, Christine A; Kassim, Angzzas; Paterson, Alistair; Graham, Julie

    2010-08-01

    Raspberry (Rubus idaeus) fruit colour was assessed in the Latham x Glen Moy mapping population using a colour meter and visual scores over three seasons and three environments. The colour measurements were found to be significantly associated with pigment content, have high heritability, and stable QTL were identified across environments and seasons. Anthocyanin content has previously been shown to be the major contributor to fruit colour in red raspberry. Major structural genes (F3'H, FLS, DFR, IFR, OMT and GST) and transcription factors (bZIP, bHLH and MYB) influencing flavonoid biosynthesis have been identified, mapped and shown to underlie QTL for quantitative and qualitative anthocyanin composition. Favourable alleles for the selected traits were identified for the aspects of fruit colour and partitioning of individual pigments. PMID:20419285

  10. Refrigeration and edible coatings in blackberry (Rubus spp.) conservation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Dalany Menezes; Kwiatkowski, Angela; Rosa, Cassia Ines Lourenzi Franco; Clemente, Edmar

    2014-09-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the conservation of blackberry, cv. Tupy, stored under refrigeration and coated with different edible coatings. Four treatments were carried out: control T1 (uncoated), T2 (chitosan 1.5 %), T3 (cassava starch 2.5 %) and T4 (kefir grains in water 20 %), stored at temperatures of 0 and 10 °C; 1.0 % (m/v) sorbitol/glycerol was added as plasticizers. Chemical and physical-chemical evaluations (weight loss, firmness, pH, titratable acidity, soluble solids, SS/TA ratio and anthocyanins) were made, besides rot incidence. The results showed that cooling to 0 °C combined with T2 showed an effect in reducing the physiological loss of weight (4.41 %), in retaining fruit firmness (19.1 N) and presenting lower incidence of rot (6.19 %). Likewise, in physical and chemical parameters: SS did not alter significantly during the whole period of 18 days of storage. PMID:25190872