Science.gov

Sample records for free-electron laser-based projection

  1. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    SciTech Connect

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Nonlinear theory of the free-electron laser based upon a coaxial hybrid wiggler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, H. P.; Jackson, R. H.; Pershing, D. E.; Taccetti, J. M.

    1994-04-01

    A three-dimensional nonlinear formulation of a free-electron laser based upon a coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler is described. The CHI wiggler is created by insertion of a central rod and an outer ring [composed of alternating ferrite and dielectric spacers in which the ferrite (dielectric) spacer on the central rod is opposite to the dielectric (ferrite) spacer on the outer ring] along the axis of a solenoidal. An analytic model of the CHI wiggler is developed which is in good agreement with the Poisson/Superfish group of codes. The free-electron laser (FEL) formulation is a slow-time-scale analysis of the interaction of an annular electron beam with the CHI wiggler in a coaxial waveguide. The electromagnetic field is represented as the superposition of the vacuum transverse electric (TE), transverse magnetic (TM), and transverse electromagnetic (TEM) modes of the waveguide, and a set of nonlinear second-order differential equations is derived for the amplitudes and phases of these modes. These equations are solved simultaneously with the three-dimensional Lorentz force equations for the combined magnetostatic and electromagnetic fields. An adiabatic taper is used to model the injection of the beam, and an amplitude taper is included for efficiency enhancement. Simulations are presented for Ka-, Ku- and W-band operation. Multimode operation is also studied. The results indicate that operation over a wide bandwidth is practical with the CHI wiggler, and that the bandwidth in the tapered-wiggler cases is comparable to that for a uniform wiggler. Therefore, relatively high field strengths can be achieved with the CHI wiggler at shorter wiggler periods than is possible in many other conventional wiggler designs.

  3. NASA DOD Lead Free Electronics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2008-01-01

    The primary'technical objective of this project is to undertake comprehensive testing to generate information on failure modes/criteria to better understand the reliability of: Packages (e.g., Thin Small Outline Package [TSOP], Ball Grid Array [BGA], Plastic Dual In-line Package [PDIPD assembled and reworked with lead-free alloys Packages (e.g., TSOP, BGA, PDIP) assembled and reworked with mixed (lead/lead-free) alloys.

  4. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the current state of the lead-free electronics project. It characterizes the test articles, which were built with lead-free solder and lead-free component finishes. The tests performed and reported on are: thermal cycling, combine environments testing, mechanical shock testing, vibration testing and drop testing.

  5. Spectrometer for hard X-ray free-electron laser based on diffraction focusing.

    PubMed

    Kohn, V G; Gorobtsov, O Y; Vartanyants, I A

    2013-03-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) generate sequences of ultra-short spatially coherent pulses of X-ray radiation. A diffraction focusing spectrometer (DFS), which is able to measure the whole energy spectrum of the radiation of a single XFEL pulse with an energy resolution of ΔE/E 2 × 10(-6), is proposed. This is much better than for most modern X-ray spectrometers. Such resolution allows one to resolve the fine spectral structure of the XFEL pulse. The effect of diffraction focusing occurs in a single-crystal plate due to dynamical scattering, and is similar to focusing in a Pendry lens made from a metamaterial with a negative refraction index. Such a spectrometer is easier to operate than those based on bent crystals. It is shown that the DFS can be used in a wide energy range from 5 keV to 20 keV. PMID:23412482

  6. Considerations for a free-electron laser-based extreme-ultraviolet lithography program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosler, Erik R.; Wood, Obert R.; Barletta, William A.; Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; Preil, Moshe E.

    2015-03-01

    Recent years have seen great strides in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser-produced plasma sources. Field deployed EUV exposure tools are now capable of facilitating advanced technology node development. Nevertheless, as the required manufacturing exposure dose scales, EUV sources must follow suit and provide 500- 1000 W to maintain production throughputs. A free-electron laser (FEL) offers a cost effective, single-source alternative for powering an entire EUV lithography program. FEL integration into semiconductor fab architecture will require both unique facility considerations as well as a paradigm shift in lithography operations. Critical accelerator configurations relating to energy recovery, multi-turn acceleration, and operational mode are discussed from engineering/scientific, cost-minimization, and safety perspectives. Furthermore, the individual components of a FEL (electron injector, RF systems, undulator, etc.) are examined with respect to both design and cost, considering existing technology as well as prospective innovations. Finally, FEL development and deployment roadmaps are presented, focusing on manufacturer deployment for the 5 nm or 3 nm technology nodes.[1-3

  7. Eigenmode analysis of a high-gain free-electron laser based on a transverse gradient undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxevanis, Panagiotis; Huang, Zhirong; Ruth, Ronald; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a transverse gradient undulator (TGU) is viewed as an attractive option for free-electron lasers (FELs) driven by beams with a large energy spread. By suitably dispersing the electron beam and tilting the undulator poles, the energy spread effect can be substantially mitigated. However, adding the dispersion typically leads to electron beams with large aspect ratios. As a result, the presence of higher-order modes in the FEL radiation can become significant. To investigate this effect, we study the eigenmode properties of a TGU-based, high-gain FEL, using both an analytically-solvable model and a variational technique. Our analysis, which includes the fundamental and the higher-order FEL eigenmodes, can provide an estimate of the mode content for the output radiation. This formalism also enables us to study the trade-off between FEL gain and transverse coherence. Numerical results are presented for a representative soft X-ray, TGU FEL example.

  8. The analysis of single-electron orbits in a free electron laser based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordbacheh, A.; Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Maraghechi, B.

    2012-09-01

    A three-dimensional analysis of a novel free-electron laser (FEL) based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler (RHW) is presented. This RHW is designed in a configuration composed of rectangular rings with alternating ferrite and dielectric spacers immersed in a solenoidal magnetic field. An analytic model of RHW is introduced by solution of Laplace's equation for the magnetostatic fields under the appropriate boundary conditions. The single-electron orbits in combined RHW and axial guide magnetic fields are studied when only the first and the third spatial harmonic components of the RHW field are taken into account and the higher order terms are ignored. The results indicate that the third spatial harmonic leads to group III orbits with a strong negative mass regime particularly in large solenoidal magnetic fields. RHW is found to be a promising candidate with favorable characteristics to be used in microwave FEL.

  9. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2009-01-01

    In response to concerns about risks from lead-free induced faults to high reliability products, NASA has initiated a multi-year project to provide manufacturers and users with data to clarify the risks of lead-free materials in their products. The project will also be of interest to component manufacturers supplying to high reliability markets. The project was launched in November 2006. The primary technical objective of the project is to undertake comprehensive testing to generate information on failure modes/criteria to better understand the reliability of: - Packages (e.g., TSOP, BGA, PDIP) assembled and reworked with solder interconnects consisting of lead-free alloys - Packages (e.g., TSOP, BGA, PDIP) assembled and reworked with solder interconnects consisting of mixed alloys, lead component finish/lead-free solder and lead-free component finish/SnPb solder.

  10. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2009-01-01

    In response to concerns about risks from lead-free induced faults to high reliability products, NASA has initiated a multi-year project to provide manufacturers and users with data to clarify the risks of lead-free materials in their products. The project will also be of interest to component manufacturers supplying to high reliability markets. The project was launched in November 2006. The primary technical objective of the project is to undertake comprehensive testing to generate information on failure modes/criteria to better understand the reliability of: - Packages (e.g., TSOP, BOA, PDIP) assembled and reworked with solder interconnects consisting of lead-free alloys - Packages (e.g., TSOP, BOA, PDIP) assembled and reworked with solder interconnects consisting of mixed alloys, lead component finish/lead-free solder and lead-free component finish/SnPb solder.

  11. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    In response to concerns about risks from lead-free induced faults to high reliability products, NASA has initiated a multi-year project to provide manufacturers and users with data to clarify the risks of lead-free materials in their products. The project will also be of interest to component manufacturers supplying to high reliability markets. The project was launched in November 2006. The primary technical objective of the project is to undertake comprehensive testing to generate information on failure modes/criteria to better understand the reliability of: (1) Packages (e.g., Thin Small Outline Package [TSOP], Ball Grid Array [BGA], Plastic Dual In-line Package [PDIP]) assembled and reworked with solder interconnects consisting of lead-free alloys (2) Packages (e.g., TSOP, BGA, PDIP) assembled and reworked with solder interconnects consisting of mixed alloys, lead component finish/lead-free solder and lead-free component finish/SnPb solder

  12. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    The primary technical objective of the project is to undertake comprehensive testing to generate information on failure modes/criteria to better understand the reliability of: Packages (e.g., TSOP, BGA, PDIP) assembled and reworked with lead-free alloys Packages (e.g., TSOP, BGA, PDIP) assembled and reworked with mixed (lead/lead-free) alloys.

  13. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2009-01-01

    The primary technical objective of this project is to undertake comprehensive testing to generate information on failure modes/criteria to better understand the reliability of: (1) Packages (e.g., Thin Small Outline Package [TSOP], Ball Grid Array [BGA], Plastic Dual In-line Package [PDIP]) assembled and reworked with lead-free alloys, (2) Packages (e.g., TSOP, BGA, PDIP) assembled and reworked with mixed (lead/lead-free) alloys.

  14. Strategies towards a compact XUV free electron laser adopted for the LUNEX5 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Labat, M.; Evain, C.; Szwaj, C.; Bielawski, S.; Hubert, N.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Briquez, F.; Chapuis, L.; Marteau, F.; Valléau, M.; Marcouillé, O.; Marchand, P.; Diop, M.; Marlats, J. L.; Tavakoli, K.; Zerbib, D.; Cassinari, L.; Bouvet, F.; Herbeaux, C.; Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Dennetière, D.; Polack, F.; Lestrade, A.; Khojoyan, M.; Yang, W.; Sharma, G.; Morin, P.; Loulergue, A.

    2016-02-01

    More than 50 years after the laser discovery, X-ray free electron lasers (FEL), the first powerful tuneable, short pulse lasers in the X-ray spectral range, are now blooming in the world, enabling new discoveries on the ultra-fast dynamics of excited systems and imaging. LUNEX5 demonstrator project aims at investigating paths towards advanced and compact FELs. Two strategies are adopted. The first one concerns the FEL line where seeding and echo harmonic generation are implemented together with compact cryogenic in-vacuum undulators. In the second one, the electron beam is no longer provided by a conventional linear accelerator but by a laser plasma process, while a necessary particular electron beam manipulation is required to handle the electron properties to enable FEL amplification.

  15. Quasilinear theory of terahertz free-electron lasers based on Compton scattering of incoherent pump wave by intense relativistic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Kocharovskaya, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    The use of incoherent broadband pump radiation for improving the electron efficiency in the free-electron lasers (FEL) based on stimulated backscattering is considered. On the basis of a quasilinear approach, it is shown that the efficiency increases in proportion to the width of the pump spectrum. The effect is owing to a broadening of the spectrum of synchronous combination waves and realization of a mechanism of stochastic particle deceleration. The injection of a monochromatic seed signal in a single pass FEL amplifier or the implementation of a selective high-Q resonator in an FEL oscillator makes the high-frequency scattered radiation be monochromatic in spite of an incoherent pumping. In the regime of stochastic particle deceleration, the efficiency only slightly depends on the spread of the beam parameters, which is beneficial for a terahertz FEL powered by intense relativistic electron beams.

  16. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project: Vibration Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodrow, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Vibration testing was conducted by Boeing Research and Technology (Seattle) for the NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Solder Project. This project is a follow-on to the Joint Council on Aging Aircraft/Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JCAA/JG-PP) Lead-Free Solder Project which was the first group to test the reliability of lead-free solder joints against the requirements of the aerospace/miLItary community. Twenty seven test vehicles were subjected to the vibration test conditions (in two batches). The random vibration Power Spectral Density (PSD) input was increased during the test every 60 minutes in an effort to fail as many components as possible within the time allotted for the test. The solder joints on the components were electrically monitored using event detectors and any solder joint failures were recorded on a Labview-based data collection system. The number of test minutes required to fail a given component attached with SnPb solder was then compared to the number of test minutes required to fail the same component attached with lead-free solder. A complete modal analysis was conducted on one test vehicle using a laser vibrometer system which measured velocities, accelerations, and displacements at one . hundred points. The laser vibrometer data was used to determine the frequencies of the major modes of the test vehicle and the shapes of the modes. In addition, laser vibrometer data collected during the vibration test was used to calculate the strains generated by the first mode (using custom software). After completion of the testing, all of the test vehicles were visually inspected and cross sections were made. Broken component leads and other unwanted failure modes were documented.

  17. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project. DRAFT Joint Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    . The longer the transition period, the greater the likelihood of Pb-free parts inadvertently being mixed with Pb parts and ending up on what are supposed to be Pb systems. As a result, OEMs, depots, and support contractors need to take action now to either abate the influx of Pb-free parts, or accept it and deal with the likely interim consequences of reduced reliability due to a wide variety of matters, such as Pb contamination, high temperature incompatibility, and tin whiskering. Allowance of Pb-free components produces one of the greatest risks to the reliability of a weapon system. This is due to new and poorly understood failure mechanisms, as well as unknown long-term reliability. If the decision is made to consciously allow Pb-free solder and component finishes into SnPb electronics, additional effort (and cost) will be required to make the significant number of changes to drawings and task order procedures. This project is a follow-on effort to the Joint Council on Aging Aircraft/Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JCAA/JG-PP) Pb-free Solder Project which was the first group to test the reliability of Pb-free solder joints against the requirements of the aerospace and military community.

  18. Catalac free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  19. Catalac free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-12-12

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac is described. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator, or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  20. Projected performance of rf-linac-driven free-electron lasers in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral region

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, B.E.

    1988-01-01

    A free-electron laser user facility for scientific experimentation in the vacuum-ultraviolet and soft x-ray spectral regions (together termed the XUV) is being developed at Los Alamos. The design includes a series of laser oscillators and amplifiers, driven by a single, rf-linear accelerator, that will generate broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation from 1 to 400 nm. Below 300 nm, the peak- and average-power output of these FEL devices should surpass the capabilities of any existing, continuously tunable photon sources by many orders of magnitude. The design and output parameters of this facility will be described, including comparison with synchrotron radiation sources, and recent progress in developing the three primary components (electron beam, magnetic undulator, and resonator mirrors) will be reviewed. 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Free-Electron Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brau, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of free-electron lasers as a source of coherent radiation over a broad range of wavelengths from the far-infrared to the far-ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. Discusses some applications of these lasers, including medicine and strategic defense. (TW)

  2. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.; Vaughan, D.

    1986-04-01

    We can now produce intense, coherent light at wavelengths where no conventional lasers exist. The recent successes of devices known as free-electron lasers mark a striking confluence of two conceptual developments that themselves are only a few decades old. The first of these, the laser, is a product of the fifties and sixties whose essential characteristics have made it a staple resource in almost every field of science and technology. In a practical sense, what defines a laser is its emission of monochromatic, coherent light (that is, light of a single wavelength, with its waves locked in step) at a wavelength in the infrared, visible, or ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. A second kind of light, called synchrotron radiation, is a by-product of the age of particle accelerators and was first observed in the laboratory in 1947. As the energies of accelerators grew in the 1960s and 70s, intense, incoherent beams of ultraviolet radiation and x--rays became available at machines built for high-energy physics research. Today, several facilities operate solely as sources of synchrotron light. Unlike the well-collimated monochromatic light emitted by lasers, however, this incoherent radiation is like a sweeping searchlight--more accurately, like the headlight of a train on a circular track--whose wavelengths encompass a wide spectral band. Now, in several laboratories around the world, researchers have exploited the physics of these two light sources and have combined the virtues of both in a single contrivance, the free-electron laser, or FEL (1). The emitted light is laserlike in its narrow, sharply peaked spectral distribution and in its phase coherence, yet it can be of a wavelength unavailable with ordinary lasers. Furthermore, like synchrotron radiation, but unlike the output of most conventional lasers, the radiation emitted by free-electron lasers can be tuned, that is, its wavelength can be easily varied across a wide range. The promise of this

  3. Large-Scale Production of Carbon Nanotubes Using the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Brian C.

    2003-01-01

    We report on our interdisciplinary program to use the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (J-Lab) for high-volume pulsed laser vaporization synthesis of carbon nanotubes. Based in part on the funding of from this project, a novel nanotube production system was designed, tested, and patented. Using this new system nanotube production rates over 100 times faster than conventional laser systems were achieved. Analysis of the material produced shows that it is of as high a quality as the standard laser-based materials.

  4. Free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    A high gain, single-pass free electron laser formed of a high brilliance electron injector source, a linear accelerator which imparts high energy to the electron beam, and an undulator capable of extremely high magnetic fields, yet with a very short period. The electron injector source is the first stage (gap) of the linear accelerator or a radial line transformer driven by fast circular switch. The linear accelerator is formed of a plurality of accelerating gaps arranged in series. These gaps are energized in sequence by releasing a single pulse of energy which propagates simultaneously along a plurality of transmission lines, each of which feeds the gaps. The transmission lines are graduated in length so that pulse power is present at each gap as the accelerated electrons pass therethrough. The transmission lines for each gap are open circuited at their ends. The undualtor has a structure similar to the accelerator, except that the transmission lines for each gap are substantially short circuited at their ends, thus converting the electric field into magnetic field. A small amount of resistance is retained in order to generate a small electric field for replenishing the electron bunch with the energy lost as it traverses through the undulator structure.

  5. FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, W.B.; Sessler, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) uses a high quality relativistic beam of electrons passing through a periodic magnetic field to amplify a copropagating optical wave (1-4). In an oscillator configuration, the light is stored between the mirrors of an open optical resonator as shown in Figure 1. In an amplifier configuration, the optical wave and an intense electron beam pass through the undulator field to achieve high gain. In either case, the electrons must overlap the optical mode for good coupling. Typically, the peak electron beam current varies from several amperes to many hundreds of amperes and the electron energy ranges from a few MeV to a few GeV. The electrons are the power source in an FEL, and provide from a megawatt to more than a gigawatt flowing through the resonator or amplifier system. The undulator resonantly couples the electrons to the transverse electrical field of the optical wave in vacuum. The basic mechanism of the coherent energy exchange is the bunching of the electrons at optical wavelengths. Since the power source is large, even small coupling can result in a powerful laser. Energy extraction of 5% of the electron beam energy has already been demonstrated. The electron beam quality is crucial in maintaining the coupling over a significant interaction distance and of central importance to all FEL systems is the magnetic undulator. The peak undulator field strength is usually several kG and can be constructed from coil windings or permanent magnets. In the top part of Figure 2, the Halbach undulator design is shown for one period. The field can be achieved, to a good approximation, using permanent magnets made out of rare earth compounds; a technique developed by K. Halbach (5), and now employed in most undulators. The undulator wavelength is in the range of a few centimeters and the undulator length extends for a few meters, so that there are several hundred periods for the interaction (6-8). The polarization of the undulator can be either

  6. Circular free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Kurnit, Norman A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  7. Classification of projection images of proteins with structural polymorphism by manifold: A simulation study for x-ray free-electron laser diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshidome, Takashi; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2015-09-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) enables us to visualize noncrystalline sample particles with micrometer to submicrometer dimensions. Using x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources, two-dimensional diffraction patterns are collected from fresh samples supplied to the irradiation area in the "diffraction-before-destruction" scheme. A recent significant increase in the intensity of the XFEL pulse is promising and will allow us to visualize the three-dimensional structures of proteins using XFEL-CXDI in the future. For the protocol proposed for molecular structure determination using future XFEL-CXDI [T. Oroguchi and M. Nakasako, Phys. Rev. E 87, 022712 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.022712], we require an algorithm that can classify the data in accordance with the structural polymorphism of proteins arising from their conformational dynamics. However, most of the algorithms proposed primarily require the numbers of conformational classes, and then the results are biased by the numbers. To improve this point, here we examine whether a method based on the manifold concept can classify simulated XFEL-CXDI data with respect to the structural polymorphism of a protein that predominantly adopts two states. After random sampling of the conformations of the two states and in-between states from the trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations, a diffraction pattern is calculated from each conformation. Classification was performed by using our custom-made program suite named enma, in which the diffusion map (DM) method developed based on the manifold concept was implemented. We successfully classify most of the projection electron density maps phase retrieved from diffraction patterns into each of the two states and in-between conformations without the knowledge of the number of conformational classes. We also examined the classification of the projection electron density maps of each of the three states with respect to the Euler angle. The present results suggest

  8. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  9. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  10. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A. )

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e[sup [minus

  11. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A. ); Sandweiss, J. )

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e[sup [minus

  12. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated.

  13. Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, K.J.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The term Smith-Purcell free electron laser can be employed generally to describe any coherent radiation source in which a diffraction grating is used to couple an electron beam with the electromagnetic field. To date, most practical developments of this concept have focused on devices which operate in the millimeter spectral regime. In this paper construction of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser operating in the far-infrared (FIR) region using a novel resonator cavity design and the electron beam from a low energy (0.5-5 MeV) radio-frequency accelerator will be discussed. A tunable source in this region would have many applications and since the beam energy is low, the small size and low overall cost of such a device would make it a laboratory instrument. Current projects which are progressing towards developing a FIR source are the programs at Stanford and CREOL. Both of these projects are using permanent magnet undulators to couple the electron beam with the electromagnetic field. An alternative approach is to use an electron beam passing over a diffraction grating as the radiating mechanism. This phenomenon is known as Smith-Purcell radiation and was first demonstrated for incoherent emission at visible wavelengths. The addition of feedback enhances the stimulated component of the emission which leads to the growth of coherence. Recent calculations for spontaneous emission have shown that the wiggler parameter and the grating efficiency are analogous. This result has important implications for the development of a Smith-Purcell FEL because a grating based free-electron laser would offer a greater range of tunability at a lower cost than its wiggler based counterpart.

  14. The TESLA Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossbach, Jörg

    1997-05-01

    The TESLA Free Electron Laser makes use of the high quality electron beam that can be provided by the superconducting TESLA linac to drive a single pass free electron laser (FEL) at wavelengths far below the visible. To reach a wavelength of 6 nanometers, the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY will be extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Because there are no mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, the principle of Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) will be employed. A first test of both the principle and technical components is foreseen at a photon wavelength larger than 42 nanometers. With respect to linac technology, the key prerequisite for such single-pass, high-gain FELs is a high intensity, diffraction limited, electron beam to be generated and accelerated without degradation. Key components are RF guns with photocathodes, bunch compressors, and related diagnostics. The status of design and construction as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. Once proven in the micrometer to nanometer regime, the SASE FEL scheme is considered applicable down to Angstrom wavelengths. It is pointed out that this latter option is particularly of interest in context with the construction of a linear collider, which requires very similar beam parameters. The status of conceptual design work on such a coherent X-ray user facility integrated into the TESLA linear collider design will be briefly sketched.

  15. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Vansteenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e(-) beam and the 10(exp 11) Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a approximately 1.5 percent/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power CW CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  16. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e- beam and the 1011 Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP), and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a ≊1.5%/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  17. High Power Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2004-04-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high pulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. User programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few. Recently the incorporation of energy recovery systems has permitted extension of the average power capabilities to the kW level and beyond. Development of substantially higher power systems with applications in defense and security is believed feasible with modest R&D efforts applied to a few technology areas. This paper will discuss at a summary level the physics of such devices, survey existing and planned facilities, and touch on the applications that have driven the development of these popular light sources.

  18. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e{sup {minus}} beam and the 10{sup 11} Watt CO{sub 2} laser beam of BNL`s Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a {approximately} 1.5 %/cm tapered period configuration. The CO{sub 2} laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO{sub 2} laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  19. The Medical Free Electron Laser Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Charles L.

    1989-08-01

    We owe the development of the free electron laser (FEL) to Dr. John M.J. Madey, formerly of Stanford University, and now at Duke University. In the early years of the research that lead ultimately to the device that actually produced coherent light, Dr. Madey had to work diligently to procure adequate funding for his FEL project. Sometimes it is much more difficult to find the appropriate funding source then it is to actually perform the research. After working with various basic research organizations, the Office of Naval Research, the Army Research Organization, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and others, to develop and test the basic scientific principles of the FEL, Dr. Madey looked to the future of the device. The FEL is indeed one of the principal defensive directed energy weapons under development in the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). However, Dr. Madey felt that the FEL could and should be used in the medical arena. The unique capabilities of the FEL certainly lend themselves to enhancing the practice of medicine which already uses lasers in the treatment of disease and in surgery. Dr. Madey and several physicians who also felt that the FEL belonged at least in medical research traveled to Washington, D.C., to visit the Congress and acquaint them with the potential of the FEL.

  20. Nearly free electron states in MXenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaei, Mohammad; Ranjbar, Ahmad; Ghorbani-Asl, Mahdi; Arai, Masao; Sasaki, Taizo; Liang, Yunye; Yunoki, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    Using a set of first-principles calculations, we studied the electronic structures of two-dimensional transition metal carbides and nitrides, so called MXenes, functionalized with F, O, and OH. Our projected band structures and electron localization function analyses reveal the existence of nearly free electron (NFE) states in a variety of MXenes. The NFE states are spatially located just outside the atomic structure of MXenes and are extended parallel to the surfaces. Moreover, we found that the OH-terminated MXenes offer the NFE states energetically close to the Fermi level. In particular, the NFE states in some of the OH-terminated MXenes, such as T i2C (OH) 2,Z r2C (OH) 2,Z r2N (OH) 2,H f2C (OH) 2,H f2N (OH) 2,N b2C (OH) 2 , and T a2C (OH) 2 , are partially occupied. This is in remarkable contrast to graphene, graphane, and Mo S2 , in which their NFE states are located far above the Fermi level and thus they are unoccupied. As a prototype of such systems, we investigated the electron transport properties of H f2C (OH) 2 and found that the NFE states in H f2C (OH) 2 provide almost perfect transmission channels without nuclear scattering for electron transport. Our results indicate that these systems might find applications in nanoelectronic devices. Our findings provide new insights into the unique electronic band structures of MXenes.

  1. Comparative study of coherent multi-color radiation generation in a seeded free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Xiang, Dao; Zhao, Zhentang

    2016-04-01

    We present the comparative study on three representative methods for producing the coherent multi-color radiation in a seeded free electron laser based on the high gain harmonic generation (HGHG). In these schemes, either the electron beam density or the seed laser intensity is modulated to produce a coherent radiation pulse train that yields multiple spectral lines in FEL output. Realistic beam parameters obtained in 3D start-to-end simulations are used to compare the performance of each scheme.

  2. Combination free electron and gaseous laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Stein, William E.

    1980-01-01

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  3. Combination free-electron and gaseous laser

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, C.A.; Rockwood, S.D.; Stein, W.E.

    1981-06-08

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages is described. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  4. Optical wavelength modulation in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, R.M.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    An attribute of the free electron laser (FEL) is the continuous tunability of the optical wavelength by modulation of the electron beam energy. The variation of the wavelength and power of the optical beam is studied as a function of FEL operating parameters. These results will be applied to the Stanford SCA FEL and Boeing FEL.

  5. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  6. Inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; Campisi, R.

    1982-01-01

    We first describe the basic physical properties of an inverse free-electron laser and make an estimate of the order of magnitude of the accelerating field obtainable with such a system; then apply the general ideas to the design of an actual device and through this example we give a more accurate evaluation of the fundamental as well as the technical limitations that this acceleration scheme imposes.

  7. Long range coherence in free electron lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The simple free electron laser (FEL) design uses a static, periodic, transverse magnetic field to undulate relativistic electrons traveling along its axis. This allows coupling to a co-propagating optical wave and results in bunching to produce coherent radiation. The advantages of the FEL are continuous tunability, operation at wavelengths ranging from centimeters to angstroms, and high efficiency resulting from the fact that the interaction region only contains light, relativistic electrons, and a magnetic field. Theoretical concepts and operational principles are discussed.

  8. Progress toward the Wisconsin Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, Joseph; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Jacobs, K; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J; Rogers, G C; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R

    2011-03-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison/Synchrotron Radiation Center is advancing its design for a seeded VUV/soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility called WiFEL. To support this vision of an ultimate light source, we are pursuing a program of strategic R&D addressing several crucial elements. This includes development of a high repetition rate, VHF superconducting RF electron gun, R&D on photocathode materials by ARPES studies, and evaluation of FEL facility architectures (e.g., recirculation, compressor scenarios, CSR dechirping, undulator technologies) with the specific goal of cost containment. Studies of high harmonic generation for laser seeding are also planned.

  9. Rippled-beam free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-10-01

    The authors describe a new microwave generation mechanism involving a scalloping annular electron beam. The beam interacts with the axial electric field of a TM{sub 0n} mode in a smooth circular waveguide through the axial free-electron laser interaction, in which the beam ripple period is synchronous with the phase slippage of the rf mode relative to the electron beam. Due to nonlinearities in the orbit equation, the interaction can be made autoresonant, where the phase and amplitude of the gain is independent of the beam energy.

  10. Free electron laser with masked chicane

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) is provided with an accelerator for outputting electron beam pulses; a buncher for modulating each one of the electron beam pulses to form each pulse into longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons; and a wiggler for generating coherent light from the longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons. The electron beam buncher is a chicane having a mask for physically modulating the electron beam pulses to form a series of electron beam bunches for input to the wiggler. In a preferred embodiment, the mask is located in the chicane at a position where each electron beam pulse has a maximum dispersion.

  11. Free electron laser designs for laser amplification

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, Donald; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

  12. Kinetic theory of free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hafizi, B.; Roberson, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a relativistic kinetic theory of free electron lasers (FELs). The growth rate, efficiency, filling factor and radius of curvature of the radiation wave fronts are determined. We have used the theory to examine the effects of beam compression on growth rate. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The surprising result is that the self field contribution to the beam quality is opposite to the emittance contribution. Hence self fields can improve beam quality, particularly in compact, low voltage FELs.

  13. The free electron laser: conceptual history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madey, John; Scully, Marlan O.; Sprangle, Phillip

    2016-08-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has lived up to its promise as given in (Madey 1971 J. Appl. Phys. 42 1906) to wit: ‘As shall be seen, finite gain is available …from the far-infrared through the visible region …with the further possibility of partially coherent radiation sources in the x-ray region’. In the present paper we review the history of the FEL drawing liberally (and where possible literally) from the original sources. Coauthors, Madey, Scully and Sprangle were involved in the early days of the subject and give a first hand account of the subject with an eye to the future.

  14. Visualization of plasma-induced processes by a projection system with a Cu-laser-based brightness amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, A. P.; Buzhinskij, R. O.; Gubskii, K. L.; Savjolov, A. S.; Sarantsev, S. A.; Terekhin, A. N.

    2010-05-15

    A novel method for visualization of the process of interaction of high-power energy fluxes with various surfaces is proposed. The possibility of the dynamic visualization of a surface covered with a {approx}3-cm-thick plasma layer with a linear density of {approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} is demonstrated experimentally. A scheme of intracavity shadowgraphy of phase objects with the use of a laser projection microscope is developed. Shadow images illustrating the development of the plasma torch of an erosion capillary discharge in air are presented.

  15. Free electron laser physical process code (FELPPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Schmitt, M.J.

    1995-02-01

    Even at the conceptual level, the strong coupling between subsystem elements complicates the understanding and design of a free electron laser (FEL). Given the requirements for high-performance FELS, the coupling between subsystems must be included to obtain a realistic picture of the potential operational capability. The concept of an Integrated Numerical Experiment (INEX) was implemented to accurately calculate the coupling between the FEL subsystems. During the late 1980`s, the INEX approach was successfully applied to a large number of accelerator and FEL experiments. Unfortunately, because of significant manpower and computational requirements, the integrated approach is difficult to apply to trade-off and initial design studies. However, the INEX codes provided a base from which realistic accelerator, wiggler, optics, and control models could be developed. The Free Electron Laser Physical Process Code (FELPPC) includes models developed from the INEX codes, provides coupling between the subsystem models, and incorporates application models relevant to a specific study. In other words, FELPPC solves the complete physical process model using realistic physics and technology constraints. FELPPC can calculate complex FEL configurations including multiple accelerator and wiggler combinations. When compared with the INEX codes, the subsystem models have been found to be quite accurate over many orders-of-magnitude. As a result, FELPPC has been used for the initial design studies of a large number of FEL applications: high-average-power ground, space, plane, and ship based FELS; beacon and illuminator FELS; medical and compact FELS; and XUV FELS.

  16. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  17. Modelling elliptically polarised free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, J. R.; Campbell, L. T.; Freund, H. P.; McNeil, B. W. J.

    2016-06-01

    A model of a free electron laser (FEL) operating with an elliptically polarised undulator is presented. The equations describing the FEL interaction, including resonant harmonic radiation fields, are averaged over an undulator period and generate a generalised Bessel function scaling factor, similar to that of planar undulator FEL theory. Comparison between simulations of the averaged model with those of an unaveraged model show very good agreement in the linear regime. Two unexpected results were found. Firstly, an increased coupling to harmonics for elliptical rather than planar polarisarised undulators. Secondly, and thought to be unrelated to the undulator polarisation, a significantly different evolution between the averaged and unaveraged simulations of the harmonic radiation evolution approaching FEL saturation.

  18. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  19. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  20. Rippled beam free electron Laser Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1998-04-21

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a T{sub 0n} mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and . A solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  1. Z-discharge free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schep, T.J.; Bazylev, V.A.; Tulupov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    A new kind of plasma based free-electron laser is proposed. An electromagnetic wave is generated by a relativistic electron beam moving along a stabilised z-discharge. The radiation wavelength is determined by the discharge current and the relativistic factor of the beam. It is shown that the interaction is based on two bunching mechanisms. One is due to the dependency of the longitudinal beam velocity on the energy of the electrons (inertial bunching). The second mechanism leads to azimuthal bunching and is related to the energy dependence of the oscillation frequency of electrons in the magnetic field of the discharge. At certain conditions both bunching mechanisms tend to compensate their mutual action and the system has an autoresonance. Near these conditions a high efficiency and, therefore, a high output power can be reached.

  2. The Galactic distribution of free electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Ryan, M.; Weisberg, J. M.; Frail, D. A.; Spangler, S. R.

    1991-01-01

    Various radioastronomical measurements are synthesized here to derive a large-scale Galactic model for the distribution of free electrons and for microstructure in the distribution that seems to be caused by turbulence in the ISM. A two-component axisymmetric model fitted on all scales from 100 km to a few pc, accounts for most of the data. A population of dense, discrete clouds is also needed, and there is some evidence for spiral structure. The model allows better distance estimates for pulsars to be made. The implications of the model for the structure and ionization of the ISM and for the distribution of interstellar turbulence and the diffusion of cosmic rays are discussed.

  3. The European XFEL Free Electron Laser at DESY

    ScienceCinema

    Weise, Hans [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Germany

    2009-09-01

    The European X-ray Free-Electron laser Facility (XFEL) is going to be built in an international collaboration at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Germany, and the Technical Design Report was published in 2006. The official project is expected for summer 2007. This new facility will offer photon beams at wavelengths as short as 1 angstrom with highest peak brilliance being more than 100 million times higher than present day synchrotron radiation sources. The radiation has a high degree of transverse coherence and the pulse duration is reduced from {approx}100 picoseconds (typ. for SR light sources) down to the {approx}10 femtosecond time domain. The overall layout of the XFEL will be described. This includes the envisaged operation parameters for the linear accelerator using superconducting TESLA technology. The complete design is based on the actually operated FLASH free-electron laser at DESY. Experience with the operation during first long user runs at wavelengths from 30 to 13 nm will be described in detail.

  4. Free Electron Lasers - Proceedings of the Beijing Fel Seminar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaer; Xie, Jialin; Du, Xiangwan; Zhao, Kui

    1989-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface to the Series * Preface * Seminar Opening Speech * Seminar Closing Address * SECTION 1. RF LINAC BASED FEL * Richard H. Pantell * Free-Electron Lasers * Gas-Loading the FEL * High-Efficiency, High-Power Free-Electron Lasers * A Tunable Submillimeter-to-Far-Infrared Coherent Radiation Source * Kwok-Chi Dominic Chan * Recent Results from the Los Alamos Free Electron Laser * Short-Range Wakefield Effects in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * Long-Range Wakefield Effects in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * High-Brightness Injectors For RF-Driven Free-Electron Lasers * Computer Codes for Wakefield Analysis in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * George R. Neil * The TRW RF Accelerator FEL Program * Superconducting Linac FEL Technology * Design Considerations of RF Oscillators * Chun-Ching Shih * Development of Multicomponent Wiggler Free Electron Lasers * Free Electron Laser Resonator * SECTION 2. INDUCTION LINAC BASED FEL * Richard J. Briggs * Overview of FEL Development with Induction Linacs at LLNL * Overview of Linear Induction Accelerators * High Current Electron-Beam Transport in Induction Linacs * Thaddeus J. Orzechowski * An Introduction to the Physics of High-Gain Free-Electron Lasers * Harmonics and Optical Guiding in Free Electron Lasers * The Electron Laser Facility: A millimeter Wave Free-Electron Laser Amplifier * The Electron Laser Facility: Measurement of Modes, Harmonics, Parametric Dependence, and Phase Shift * Paladin: A 10.6 μm Free-Electron Laser Amplifier * Aspects of Linear Induction Accelerator Technology * List of Participants

  5. Separating the Spin States of a Free Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rifkin, Neil

    2008-10-01

    In 1922 Otto Stern and Walther Gerlach set out to test the spacial quantization of the electron by passing a beam of neutral silver atoms through a transverse magnetic field. The interaction of the two projections of the electron's magnetic moment with the magnetic field resulted in a splitting of the beam. However, for some sixty years it was generally accepted that the spin of free electrons, and thus their magnetic moment, could not be measured with an experiment similar to that of Stern and Gerlach. The reason being that the lorentz force on charged particles is far greater than the force due to the magnetic moment of the electron, thus blurring any desired results. To reduce the lorentz force, the electrons could be passed through a magnetic field whose gradient is in the direction of the electrons' momentum. This longitudinal Stern-Gerlach device, with a superconducting magnet, could polarize the tails of a low energy electron beam.

  6. Proceedings of the free-electron generators of coherent radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, C.A.; Jacobs, S.F.; Scully, M.O.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the evolution of long pulses in a tapered wiggler Free Electron Laser (FEL), linear gain, and stable pulse propagation in an FEL oscillator, FEL injection locking by an alexandrite laser, accelerator technology for a high power, short wavelength FEL, an acoustooptic output coupler for FELs, second harmonic generation with high power short pulses from an IR FEL, the Los Alamos FEL project's experimental and developmental results to date, the Lawson-Penner limit and FEL operation by single pass devices, and the radially resolved simulation of a high gain FEL amplifier. Also covered are FEL amplifier performance in the Compton regime, unstable FEL resonators, the operation of a storage ring-free FEL, chaotic optical modes in FELs, bright electron beams for FELs, the three-dimensional theory of the Raman FEL, Cerenkov lasers in the Compton regime, and prospects for an X-ray FEL.

  7. Radiofrequency superconductivity applied to free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.; Benson, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    Low wall losses and low wakefields inherent in superconducting radiofrequency (srf) cavities make them attractive candidates for accelerators that operate efficiently at high continuous-wave (cw) gradients. Such accelerators are desirable for free-electron lasers (FELs) that extract high-power cw light from a high-average-current electron beam, or that produce ultrashort-wavelength light from a high-energy electron beam. Efficiency is a prime consideration in the former case, while high electron-beam quality is a prime consideration in the latter case. This paper summarizes the status of FEL projects involving srf accelerators. It also introduces Jefferson Lab`s srf FEL and surveys its design because it is a new machine, with commissioning having commenced in October 1997. Once commissioning is complete, this FEL should produce tunable, cw, kW-level light at 3-6 {mu}m wavelength.

  8. Resurrection of beam conditioning for free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2003-02-17

    Recently Emma and Stupakov identified a fatal flaw in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) beam conditioning scheme. They showed that the conditioning is always accompanied by a projected transverse emittance growth that is so large as to make the beam conditioning completely impractical for short wavelength FELs. Furthermore, they provided a general proof along with evidence of computer simulation and reached a conclusion that any beam conditioner, regardless of the method, would suffer from the same constraints and limitations. In this paper, the author proposes an easy surgical removal of the fatal flaw by making a critical yet simple modification to the very scheme analyzed, thus resurrect the beam conditioning for short wavelength FELs. More generally, the also explain why a general search for removing have failed, why the concept and definition of beam conditioning.

  9. Free electron lasers with small period wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsen, T. M., Jr.; Booske, J. H.; Destler, W. W.; Granatstein, V. L.; Mayergoyz, I. D.; Ott, E.

    1989-05-01

    Progress of research on a short period wiggler (SPW) free electron laser (FEL) with a sheet electron beam is reviewed. Most of the recent work has concentrated on addressing thermal engineering issued in the device. This particular emphasis was particularly stimulated by an evaluation by Panel XXI for the Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee which stated that there are serious thermal management engineering uncertainties in the electron gun, the microwave cavity, and the wiggler that will need to be addressed for CW operation. In the panel's judgment, these thermal problems are likely to be insurmountable for fusion applications. In fact, recent experimental and theoretical results challenge this judgment. For example, our most recent conceptual designs involve small-to-negligible RF losses in the cavity walls. In addition, we have convincingly established that for electron beams of quality achievable with thermionic Pierce guns, body currents should be negligible to nonexistent, thus ensuring a thermally stable cavity. These discoveries, as well as other research progress, are reviewed in detail in the following report. Plans are described for a pulsed (100 ns) proof-of-principle lasing experiment to be conducted during the remainder of this fiscal year. In addition, we present a revised statement of work and budget for the follow-on year of the current grant. These proposed tasks will address the remaining risk issues for an ERCH source based on the SPW sheet-beam FEL. Upon the completion of those tasks, sufficient information will exist to confidently assess the feasibility of the proposed concept.

  10. Biophysics applications of free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert H.

    1993-07-01

    There has been a significant financial effort poured into the technology of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) over the last 15 years or so. Much of that money was spent in the hopes that the FEL would be a key element in the Strategic Defense Initiative, but a small fraction of money was allocated for the Medical FEL program. The Medical FELs program was aimed at exploring how the unique capabilities of the FEL could be utilized in medical applications. Part of the Medical FEl effort has been in clinical applications, but some of the effort has also been put into exploring applications of the FEL for fundamental biological physics. It is the purpose of this brief text to outline some of the fundamental biophysics I have done, and some plans we have for the future. Since the FEL is (still) considered to be an avant garde device, the reader should not be surprised to find that much of the work proposed here is also rather radical and avant garde.

  11. W-band free-electron masers

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H. P.; Jackson, R. H.; Danly, B. G.; Levush, B.

    1999-05-07

    Theoretical analyses of high power W-band (i.e., {approx_equal}94 GHz) free-electron maser amplifiers are presented for a helical wiggler/cylindrical waveguide configuration using the three-dimensional slow-time-scale ARACHNE simulation code [9]. The geometry treated by ARACHNE is that of an electron beam propagating through the cylindrical waveguide subject to a helical wiggler and an axial guide magnetic field. Two configurations are discussed. The first is the case of a reversed-guide field geometry where the guide field is oriented antiparallel to the helicity of the wiggler field. Using a 330 kV/20 A electron beam, efficiencies of the order of 7% are calculated with a bandwidth (FWHM) of 5 GHz. The second example employs a strong guide field of 20 kG oriented parallel to the helicity of the wiggler. Here, efficiencies of greater than 8% are possible with a FWHM bandwidth of 4.5 GHz using a 300 kV/20 A electron beam. A normalized emittance of 95 mm-mrad is assumed in both cases, and no beam losses are observed for either case. Both cases assume interaction with the fundamental TE{sub 11} mode, which has acceptably low losses in the W-band.

  12. Synchrotron Facilities and Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Vaclav, Vylet; Liu, James; /SLAC

    2007-12-21

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle travels along a curved trajectory. Initially encountered as a nuisance around orbits of high energy synchrotron accelerators, it gradually became an indispensable research tool in many applications: crystallography, X-ray lithography, micromechanics, structural biology, microprobe X-ray experiments, etc. So-called first generation SR sources were exploiting SR in parasitic mode at electron accelerators built to study particle collisions. The second generation of SR sources was the first facilities solely devoted to SR production. They were optimized to achieve stable high currents in the accelerator ring to achieve substantially higher photon flux and to provide a large number of SR beam lines for users. Third generation sources were further optimized for increased brilliance, i.e. with photons densely packed into a beam of very small cross-sectional area and minimal angular divergence (see the Appendix for more detailed definitions of flux, brightness and brilliance) and makes extensive use of the insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators. Free Electron Lasers (FELs), the fourth generation SR sources, open new research possibilities by offering extremely short pulses of extremely bright and coherent radiation. The number of SR sources around the world now probably exceeds 100. These facilities vary greatly in size, energy of the electron (or positron) beams, range of photon energies and other characteristics of the photon beams produced. In what follows we will concentrate on describing some common aspects of SR facilities, their operation modes and specific radiation protection aspects.

  13. Optical Undulators for Free Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, James; Bisognano, Joseph; Bosch, Robert; Green, Michael; Jacobs, Kenneth; Yavuz, Deniz

    2014-05-01

    Free Electron Lasers (FELs) in the x-ray region are opening new research directions in AMO physics and other fields, but beam time is quite limited at these expensive facilities. There are conceptual designs for much less expensive soft x-ray FELs using sheared pulses from Table Top Terawatt (T3) lasers as optical undulators. A nearly co-propagating laser pulse can be angle tuned to yield soft x-rays, and shearing the pulse can optimize use of the laser photons. Undulator K values near unity are available from T3 lasers, and angle tuning provides almost arbitrary effective undulator periods. A combination of these optical undulator ideas with pre-``micro-bunching'' at a photocathode followed by electron beam emittance exchange can reduce the energy needed from the T3 laser. A combination of a nearly co-propagating optical undulator with a Bragg-reflection diamond mirror cavity may lower the cost of an x-ray frequency comb for metrology.

  14. An Inverse Free-Electron-Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C.; van Steenbergen, A.; Ulc, S.; Woodle, M.; Sandweiss, J.; Fang, Jyan-Min

    1993-08-01

    Recent work at BNL on electron acceleration using the Inverse Free-Electron Laser (IFEL) has considered a low-energy, high-gradient, multi-stage linear accelerator. Experiments are planned at BNL`s Accelerator Test Facility using its 50-MeV linac and 100-GW CO{sub 2} laser. We have built and tested a fast-excitation wiggler magnet with constant field, tapered period, and overall length of 47 cm. Vanadium-Permendur ferromagnetic laminations are stacked in alternation with copper, eddy-current-induced, field reflectors to achieve a 1.4-T peak field with a 4-mm gap and a typical period of 3 cm. The laser beam will pass through the wiggler in a low-loss, dielectric-coated stainless-steel, rectangular waveguide. The attenuation and transverse mode has been measured in waveguide sections of various lengths, with and without the dielectric. Results of 1-D and 3-D IFEL simulations, including wiggler errors, will be presented for several cases: the initial, single-module experiment with {Delta}E = 39 MeV, a four-module design giving {Delta}E = 100 MeV in a total length of 2 m, and an eight-module IFEL with {Delta}E = 210 MeV.

  15. Soviet free-electron laser research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassel, S.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate free-electron laser (FEL) research and development in the Soviet Union and to compare it with the corresponding activity in the U.S. In presenting this material, the intention is to acquaint U.S. researchers with the objectives, techniques, and results of their Soviet counterparts, as well as to provide the broad context of this area of Soviet R&D that consists of the organization, facilities, personalities, and leadership involved. The U.S. Soviet comparison has focused on the experimental programs, the most important area of this new technology. Section 2 compares individual experiments conducted by the USSR and the United States. In Section 3 the history of the theoretical development of FEL is presented, providing an insight into the conceptual issues that shaped FEL research in both countries. The remainder of the report is devoted primarily to the Soviet side of FEL research. Section 4 describes the organizational features of this research in terms of the performer institutes and leadership, focusing on the role of the Academy of Sciences, USSR. Section 5 analyzes the scientific objectives of Soviet FEL research, for the most part as discussed by Soviet reviewers of their research program. Section 6 presents conclusions.

  16. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Feldhaus, J.; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  17. Diffraction Properties of Periodic Lattices under Free Electron Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajkovic, I.; Busse, G.; Hallmann, J.; More, R.; Petri, M.; Quevedo, W.; Krasniqi, F.; Rudenko, A.; Tschentscher, T.; Stojanovic, N.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Tolkiehn, M.; Techert, S.

    2010-03-26

    In this Letter, we report the pioneering use of free electron laser radiation for the investigation of periodic crystalline structures. The diffraction properties of silver behenate single nanocrystals (5.8 nm periodicity) with the dimensions of 20 nmx20 nmx20 {mu}m and as powder with grain sizes smaller than 200 nm were investigated with 8 nm free electron laser radiation in single-shot modus with 30 fs long free electron laser pulses. This work emphasizes the possibility of using soft x-ray free electron laser radiation for these crystallographic studies on a nanometer scale.

  18. Frontiers of free-electron laser science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucksbaum, Philip; Möller, Thomas; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2013-08-01

    The special issue 'Frontiers of free-electron laser (FEL) science ' will highlight the achievement in AMO physics enabled by fourth generation light sources, i.e., short wavelength FELs in Europe, Japan and the USA. AMO physics at these FELs now covers a broad energy range from a few tens of eV to a few tens of keV. The key questions in this new field concern the nature of the interactions of intense FEL pulses with matter and the description of strong-field short-wavelength ionization dynamics. What are the dominant mechanisms of light absorption and electron emission in this new regime? What contrast mechanisms can enhance imaging with superintense pulses? How are the concepts of nonlinear optics altered at short wavelengths? Time-resolved studies are ideal to address many of these issues. The basic techniques of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy have now been extended to FELs, both with multiple FEL pulses and with synchronized optical and FEL pulses. The methods for timing synchronization of FEL pulses to optical laser-induced phenomena, including streaking, cross correlations and other time tools are now enabling new studies of time-resolved phenomena. A broad interdisciplinary research field has been formed, which extends the borders of AMO science into biology, chemical dynamics and plasma physics. Three review articles in this special issue summarize the performances of the fourth generation FEL light sources at FLASH, LCLS and SACLA/SCSS and the first years of research performed there. The contributing authors report on new experimental methods, instrumentations, including the endstation for AMO physics at a newly launched seeded FEL facility FERMI in Elettra, and theoretical tools. The present compilation of results is by no means complete. Examples of exciting research achieved at the new facilities in Europe, Japan and the USA are presented in separate sections. We expect that this collection will be a resource for the rapidly expanding scientific

  19. High power free-electron laser concepts and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) have long been thought to offer the potential of high average power operation. That potential exists because of several unique properties of FELs, such as the removal of ``waste heat`` at the velocity of light, the ``laser medium`` (the electron beam) is impervious to damage by very high optical intensitites, and the technology of generating very high average power relativistic electron beams. In particular, if one can build a laser with a power extraction efficiency 11 which is driven by an electron beam of average Power P{sub EB}, one expects a laser output power of P{sub L} = {eta} P{sub EB}. One approach to FEL devices with large values of {eta} (in excess of 10 %) is to use a ``tapered`` (or nonuniform) wiggler. This approach was followed at several laboratories during the FEL development Program for the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) project. In this paper, we review some concepts and technical requirements for high-power tapered-wiggler FELs driven by radio-frequency linear accelerators (rf-linacs) which were developed during the SDI project. Contributions from three quite different technologies - rf-accelerators, optics, and magnets - are needed to construct and operate an FEL oscillator. The particular requirements on these technologies for a high-power FEL were far beyond the state of the art in those areas when the SDI project started, so significant advances had to be made before a working device could be constructed. Many of those requirements were not clearly understood when the project started, but were developed during the course of the experimental and theoretical research for the project. This information can be useful in planning future high-power FEL projects.

  20. European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (EXFEL): local implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    European X-Ray FEL - free electron laser is under construction in DESY Hamburg. It is scheduled to be operational at 2015/16 at a cost more than 1 billion Euro. The laser uses SASE method to generate x-ray light. It is propelled by an electron linac of 17,5GeV energy and more than 2km in length. The linac uses superconducting SRF TESLA technology working at 1,3 GHz in frequency. The prototype of EXFEL is FLASH Laser (200 m in length), where the "proof of principle" was checked, and from the technologies were transferred to the bigger machine. The project was stared in the nineties by building a TTF Laboratory -Tesla Test Facility. The EXFEL laser is a child of a much bigger teraelectronovolt collider project TESLA (now abandoned in Germany but undertaken by international community in a form the ILC). A number of experts and young researchers from Poland participate in the design, construction and research of the FLASH and EXFEL lasers.

  1. Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Zholents, Alexander; Zolotorev, Max

    2001-01-01

    An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

  2. Rippled beam free-electron laser amplifier using the axial free-electron laser interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-05-01

    A new microwave generation mechanism involving a scalloping annular electron beam is discussed. The beam interacts with the axial electric field of a TM{sub 0n} mode in a smooth circular waveguide through the axial free-electron laser interaction, in which the beam ripple period is synchronous with the phase slippage of the rf mode relative to the electron beam. In this paper, we analyze the ripple motion of the electron beam and derive the dispersion relation describing the exponential growth of the rf mode. We calculate the gain for a nominal design and as a function of beam current and ripple amplitude, and show that power gain on the order of 30 dB/m of interaction is achievable. We additionally demonstrate that, under the right conditions, the interaction is autoresonant. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. THE PHYSICS AND PROPERTIES OF FREE - ELECTRON LASERS.

    SciTech Connect

    KRINSKY,S.

    2002-05-06

    We present an introduction to the operating principles of free-electron lasers, discussing the amplification process, and the requirements on the electron beam necessary to achieve desired performance.

  4. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Scharlemann, Ernst T.

    1988-01-01

    Free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped.

  5. Free electron laser using Rf coupled accelerating and decelerating structures

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    A free electron laser and free electron laser amplifier using beam transport devices for guiding an electron beam to a wiggler of a free electron laser and returning the electron beam to decelerating cavities disposed adjacent to the accelerating cavities of the free electron laser. Rf energy is generated from the energy depleted electron beam after it emerges from the wiggler by means of the decelerating cavities which are closely coupled to the accelerating cavities, or by means of a second bore within a single set of cavities. Rf energy generated from the decelerated electron beam is used to supplement energy provided by an external source, such as a klystron, to thereby enhance overall efficiency of the system.

  6. High-quality electron beams from a helical inverse free-electron laser accelerator.

    PubMed

    Duris, J; Musumeci, P; Babzien, M; Fedurin, M; Kusche, K; Li, R K; Moody, J; Pogorelsky, I; Polyanskiy, M; Rosenzweig, J B; Sakai, Y; Swinson, C; Threlkeld, E; Williams, O; Yakimenko, V

    2014-01-01

    Compact, table-top sized accelerators are key to improving access to high-quality beams for use in industry, medicine and academic research. Among laser-based accelerating schemes, the inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) enjoys unique advantages. By using an undulator magnetic field in combination with a laser, GeV m(-1) gradients may be sustained over metre-scale distances using laser intensities several orders of magnitude less than those used in laser wake-field accelerators. Here we show for the first time the capture and high-gradient acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams from a helical IFEL. Using a modest intensity (~10(13) W cm(-2)) laser pulse and strongly tapered 0.5 m long undulator, we demonstrate >100 MV m(-1) accelerating gradient, >50 MeV energy gain and excellent output beam quality. Our results pave the way towards compact, tunable GeV IFEL accelerators for applications such as driving soft X-ray free-electron lasers and producing γ-rays by inverse Compton scattering. PMID:25222026

  7. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  8. First high power experiments with the Dutch free electron maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Bongers, W. A.; Bratman, V. L.; Caplan, M.; Denisov, G. G.; van Dijk, G.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Manintveld, P.; Poelman, A. J.; Pluygers, J.; Shmelyov, M. Yu.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Sterk, A. B.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1998-05-01

    A free electron maser (FEM) has been built as a mm-wave source for applications on future fusion research devices such as ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor [M. A. Makowski, F. Elio, and D. Loeser, April 97, Proc. 10th Workshop on ECE and ECRH, EC10, 549-559. World Scientific (1998)]. A unique feature of the Dutch fusion-FEM is the possibility to tune the frequency over the entire range from 130 to 260 GHz at an output power exceeding 1 MW. In the first phase of the project, a so-called inverse setup is used. The electron gun is mounted inside the high-voltage terminal. The entire beam line was tested successfully with extremely low loss current, lower than 0.05%. This included the accelerating structure up to 2 MV level and the transport through the undulator. First generation of mm-waves was achieved in October 1997. With an electron beam current around 8 A and an accelerator voltage of 1.76 MV the mm-wave pulse starts after 3 μs and lasts for 3 μs, reaching a maximum saturated peak power level of more than 500 kW at a frequency of 200 GHz. Output power, start-up time, and frequency correspond well with simulation results.

  9. Low emittance injector design for free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, S.; Pedrozzi, M.; Reiche, S.

    2015-12-01

    Several parameters determine the performance of free electron lasers: the slice and the projected emittance, the slice energy spread, and the peak current are the most crucial ones. The peak current is essentially obtained by magnetic compression stages along the machine or occasionally assisted by velocity bunching at low energy. The minimum emittance and the alignment of the slices along the bunch are mainly determined in the low energy part of the accelerator (injector). Variations at the per-mille level of several parameters in this section of the machine strongly influence these quantities with highly nonlinear dynamic. We developed a numerical tool to perform the optimization of the injector. We applied this code to optimize the SwissFEL injector, assuming different gun designs, initial bunch lengths and intrinsic emittances. We obtained an emittance along the bunch of 0.14 mm mrad and around 0.08 mm mrad for the maximum and the minimum SwissFEL charges (200 and 10 pC, respectively). We applied the same tool to a running injector, where we automatized the optimization of the machine.

  10. Prospects for the FEL (Free Electron Laser)

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1989-04-01

    The future for FELs depends upon the very large number of applications which is envisioned for them. These grow out of the FEL extensive range of wavelengths, tunability, and high power capability. High power requires demonstration of optical guiding. Tunability has already been demonstrated. And the effort to extend the range of wavelengths is ever ongoing. The future will also bring more work on gas-loaded FELs, on electromagnetic wigglers, and on harmonic generation. We can, also, look forward to observation of various new effects, a few of which will be described. Finally, a list of various FEL projects around the world will be given. 12 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), depots, and support contract ors have to be prepared to deal with an electronics supply chain that increasingly provides parts with lead-free finishes, some labeled no differently and intermingled with their SnPb counterparts. Allowance of lead-free components presents one of the greatest risks to the r eliability of military and aerospace electronics. The introduction of components with lead-free terminations, termination finishes, or cir cuit boards presents a host of concerns to customers, suppliers, and maintainers of aerospace and military electronic systems such as: 1. Electrical shorting due to tin whiskers 2. Incompatibility of lead-f ree processes and parameters (including higher melting points of lead -free alloys) with other materials in the system 3. Unknown material properties and incompatibilities that could reduce solder joint reli ability As the transition to lead-free becomes a certain reality for military and aerospace applications, it will be critical to fully un derstand the implications of reworking lead-free assemblies.

  12. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs). depots. and support contractors have to be prepared to deal with an electronics supply chain thaI increasingly provides parts with lead-free finishes. some labeled no differently and intenningled with their SnPb counterparts. Allowance oflead-free components presents one of the greatest risks to the reliability of military and aerospace electronics. The introduction of components with lead-free lenninations, tennination finishes, or circuit boards presents a host of concerns to customers. suppliers, and maintainers of aerospace and military electronic systems such as: 1. Electrical shorting due to tin whiskers; 2. Incompatibility oflead-free processes and parameters (including higher melting points of lead-free alloys) with other materials in the system; and 3. Unknown material properties and incompatibilities that could reduce solder joint re liability.

  13. A spectral unaveraged algorithm for free electron laser simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Andriyash, I.A.; Lehe, R.; Malka, V.

    2015-02-01

    We propose and discuss a numerical method to model electromagnetic emission from the oscillating relativistic charged particles and its coherent amplification. The developed technique is well suited for free electron laser simulations, but it may also be useful for a wider range of physical problems involving resonant field–particles interactions. The algorithm integrates the unaveraged coupled equations for the particles and the electromagnetic fields in a discrete spectral domain. Using this algorithm, it is possible to perform full three-dimensional or axisymmetric simulations of short-wavelength amplification. In this paper we describe the method, its implementation, and we present examples of free electron laser simulations comparing the results with the ones provided by commonly known free electron laser codes.

  14. Wavelength modulation in free electron lasers. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkley, W.R.

    1995-03-01

    The optical wavelength of a Free Electron Laser (FEL) is dependent on the input electron beam energy. So, as the energy of this beam varies, the optical wavelength from the laser will vary as well. In many applications, this effect may be unwanted and in others, it may be desirable. At the Stanford University Superconducting Free Electron Laser Facility, a feedback mechanism has been implemented to study the effects of electron beam energy fluctuation. Here, numerical techniques are used to study optical wavelength modulation caused by electron beam energy modulation where the amplitude modulation is within the gain spectrum bandwidth of the FEL.

  15. Short wavelength optics for future free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.T.

    1984-04-01

    Although much free-electron laser work is directed toward achieving sufficient single-pass gain to be useful for research purposes, the availability of mirrors of high reflectance for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime would make resonant cavities a possibility. In addition, as in ordinary synchrotron radiation work, mirrors are required for the construction of realistic experiments and for beam manipulation purposes such as folding and extraction. The Working Group discussed a number of approaches to reflecting optics for free electron lasers, which are summarized here, and described in some detail. 16 references, 2 figures.

  16. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  17. Free-electron-like Hall effect and deviations from free-electron behavior in Ca-Al amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayeya, F. M.; Hickey, B. J.; Howson, M. A.

    1995-06-01

    The Hall coefficients of Ca-Al amorphous alloys have been measured at 4.2 K over a wide range of compositions. It is shown that the magnitude of the Hall coefficients are close to the nearly-free-electron (NFE) prediction for low Ca concentrations but deviate significantly from the NFE values for Ca concentration greater than 45 at. %. The deviations from the free-electron values have previously been attributed to the effects of s-d hybridization, while a reduction in magnitude by Au doping has been argued to result from the side-jump effect.

  18. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1985-11-21

    This disclosure describes a free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped.

  19. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1988-02-23

    Free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped. 5 figs.

  20. Two-dimensional optimization of free-electron-laser designs

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, D.; Haas, R.A.

    1982-05-04

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers are described that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a synchronous electron at an optimal transverse radius r > 0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  1. Two-dimensional optimization of free electron laser designs

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, Donald; Haas, Roger A.

    1985-01-01

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a "synchronous electron" at an optimal transverse radius r>0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  2. Free electron laser amplifier driven by an induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Neil, V.K.

    1986-06-03

    This paper discusses the use of a free-electron laser amplifier as a means of converting the kinetic energy of an electron beam into coherent radiation. In particular, the use of an induction linear accelerator is discussed. The motion of the elections in the tapered and untapered wiggler magnets is discussed as well as the beam emittance, and the radiation fields involved. (LSP)

  3. High-efficiency free-electron-laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, K.; Brau, C.A.; Goldstein, J.C.; Hohla, K.L.; Newnam, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments with a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser have demonstrated extraction of about 3% of the energy from the electron beam and measured the corresponding optical emission. These results are in excellent agreement with theory and represent an order-of-magnitude improvement over all previous results.

  4. XUV/VUV free-electron laser oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.; Newnam, B.E.; Cooper, R.K.; Comly, J.C. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    It is shown, from computations based on a detailed theoretical model, that modest improvements in electron beam and optical mirror technologies will enable a free-electron laser, driven by an rf linear accelerator, to operate in the 50 to 200-nm range of optical wavelengths. 10 references.

  5. FLASH, the Free-Electron Laser at DESY: Machine Performance and Recent Highlights from User Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurth, Wilfried

    2010-03-01

    FLASH, the Free-Electron Laser at DESY in Hamburg is a world-wide unique facility delivering intense ultra-short coherent radiation pulses in the wavelength range between 47 and 6.8 nm. FLASH is a high-gain free-electron laser based on a superconducting linear accelerator currently running at 1GeV. Laser amplification and saturation in the so-called SASE (self-amplified spontaneous emission) mode is achieved with a single pass of the electron bunch through a 30m undulator. A machine upgrade which has been started recently will boost the energy to 1.2 GeV expanding the wavelength range to below 5nm. After the upgrade FLASH will also include the seeding experiment sFLASH where an external laser will overlap with the electron beam to seed the SASE process. First beam with the upgraded facility is expected in spring 2010. Since 2005 FLASH has been operating as a user facility serving a large variety of experiments. The unprecedented brilliance of the femtosecond coherent pulses in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray regime has been used to study nonlinear process in laser-matter interaction for atoms and molecules, to gain new insights in the properties of matter under extreme conditions and to perform single shot lens-less imaging of nano-sized objects. Furthermore, the pulse duration of less than 30 femtoseconds has allowed to gain new insights in ultrafast dynamics of matter. In the talk I will review machine performance and give examples of highlight experiments.

  6. Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Claudio

    2011-03-02

    During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

  7. Free Electron Laser Theory Using Two Times Green Function Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, we present a quatum theory for free electron laser obtained by firstly using the Two time's Green Function method developed by Matsubara for solid physics theory. The dispersion relation for the laser photon obtained is limited to the case of low intensity of the laser due to the decoupling the correlation function in low order. For the analysis of the self-amplified emission (SASE), the high intensity laser radiation which strongly affect the trajectory of the free electron is involved, the use of the classical approximation for laser can formulate the laser radiation with multiple frequency. To get the quantum effects in the high intensity laser, use of the perturbation theory, and the expansion methods of state function using the coherent, squeeze and super-radiant states have discussed.

  8. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    SciTech Connect

    White, Thomas A. Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M.; Kirian, Richard A.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  9. Resonant Laser Incisions: Molecular Targets Using the Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Lou; Bryant, Grady; Ossoff, Robert H.

    1996-03-01

    Laser ablation of tissue for medical incisions is normally concerned with the energy absorption and the subsequent vaporization of intracellular water. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we have identified specific non-water resonances within tissues. Then, using the Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser (wavelength tunable from 2 to 10 microns) and our Computer Assisted Surgical Techniques program (to standardize the laser delivery), we have targeted specific molecular resonances for laser incisions and tissue removal. Using both acute and chronic studies, we can map out the resonant action spectrum to improve surgical outcomes. We have modeled these ablation mechanisms and working to establish the link between these ablation mechanisms and wound healing. This work has been supported, in part, by a grant from the Department of Defense, Medical Free Electron Laser Program, ONR Grant #N000149411023.

  10. Simulation of free-electron lasers seeded with broadband radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bajlekov, Svetoslav; Fawley, William; Schroeder, Carl; Bartolini, Riccardo; Hooker, Simon

    2011-03-10

    The longitudinal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL) radiation can be enhanced by seeding the FEL with high harmonics of an optical laser pulse. The radiation produced by high-harmonic generation (HHG), however, has a fast-varying temporal profile that can violate the slowly varying envelope approximation and limited frequency window that is employed in conventional free-electron laser simulation codes. Here we investigate the implications of violating this approximation on the accuracy of simulations. On the basis of both analytical considerations and 1D numerical studies, it is concluded that, for most realistic scenarios, conventional FEL codes are capable of accurately simulating the FEL process even when the seed radiation violates the slowly varying envelope approximation. We additionally discuss the significance of filtering the harmonic content of broadband HHG seeds.

  11. Resonator modes in high gain free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming ); Deacon, D.A.G. ); Madey, J.M.J. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-10-01

    When the gain in a free electron laser is high enough to produce optical guiding, the resonator mode distorts and loses its forward-backward symmetry. We show that the resonator mode in a high gain FEL can be easily constructed using the mode expansion technique taken separately in the interaction and the free-space regions. We propose design strategies to achieve maximal gain and optimal mode quality, and discuss the stability of the optimized mode. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Quantum/classical mode evolution in free electron laser oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, P.; Colson, W. B.; Freedman, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of oscillator evolution and mode competition in free electron lasers is studied. Relativistic quantum field theory is used to calculate electron wave functions, the angular distribution of spontaneous emission, and the transition rates for stimulated emission and absorption in each mode. The photon rate equation for the weakfield regime is presented. This rate equation is applied to oscillator evolution with a conventional undulator, a two-stage optical klystron, and a tapered undulator. The effects of noise are briefly discussed.

  13. Free electron maser experiments in the low-frequency limit

    SciTech Connect

    Drori, R.; Jerby, E.; Shahadi, A.

    1995-12-31

    Table-top free-electron maser (FEM) experiments operating in the low-frequency (< 1 GHz) low-energy ({approximately} 1 keV) limit are reported. These FEM devices employ parallel-stripline non-dispersive waveguides (which support TEM-modes), and planar folded-foil wigglers. Thermionic cathodes and carbon-fiber cold-cathodes are used in these experiments. Results of oscillator and amplifier experiments are presented and compared with theory.

  14. Free-electron laser simulations on the MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonlaven, Scott A.; Liebrock, Lorie M.

    1987-01-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) are of interest because they provide high power, high efficiency, and broad tunability. FEL simulations can make efficient use of computers of the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) class because most of the processing consists of applying a simple equation to a set of identical particles. A test version of the KMS Fusion FEL simulation, which resides mainly in the MPPs host computer and only partially in the MPP, has run successfully.

  15. FEM (Free Electron Maser) for tokamak: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of a microwave source for heating a tokamak reactor. The free electron maser (FEM) shows great promise for being this source. The topics covered in this paper are microwave generation with FEM, efficiency enhancement, parameter scaling, space charge scaling, beam energy spread and efficiency scaling, electron beam line with energy recovery, achromatic bend, multi-stage depressed voltage electron beam collector, and development plans. 12 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs. (LSP)

  16. Chirping for efficiency enhancement of the free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.T.; Goldstein, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    One-dimensional numerical studies have been made of free-electron laser oscillators in which the incident electron energy varies (chirps) as a function of time over each micropulse. Optical radiation resonant with such micropulses is chirped in frequency. Highest calculated efficiency (up to 8.1% for wavelengths near 10 ..mu..m) has been obtained in cases where the optical pulse at saturation is short compared to the slippage. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. An Efficient Microwave Power Source: Free-electron Laser Afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Sessler, Andrew M.

    1993-03-04

    A kind of microwave power source, called a free-electron laser afterburner (FEL afterburner) which consists of a free-electron laser buncher and a slow-wave output structure sharing a magnetic wiggler field with the buncher, is proposed. The buncher and the slow-wave structure can operate in either a travelling-wave state or a standing-wave state. In the buncher, the wiggler field together with the radiation field makes an electron beam bunched, and in the slow-wave structure the wiggler field keeps the beam bunched while the bunched beam interacts strongly with the slow-wave structure and so produces rf power. The bunching process comes from the free-electron laser mechanism and the generating process of rf power is in a slow-wave structure. A three-dimensional, time-dependent code is used to simulate a particular standing-wave FEL afterburner and it is shown that rf power of up to 1.57 GW can be obtained, at 17.12 GHz, from a l-kA, 5-MeV electron beam.

  18. XTREME OPTICS: the behavior of cavity optics for the Jefferson Lab free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Behre; Stephen Benson; David Douglas; Fred Dylla; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Kevin Jordan; George Neil; and Shukui Zhanga

    2006-09-25

    The cavity optics within high power free-electron lasers based on energy-recovering accelerators are subjected to extreme conditions associated with illumination from a broad spectrum of radiation, often at high irradiances. This is especially true for the output coupler, where absorption of radiation by both the mirror substrate and coating places significant design restrictions to properly manage heat load and prevent mirror distortion. Besides the fundamental lasing wavelength, the mirrors are irradiated with light at harmonics of the fundamental, THz radiation generated by the bending magnets downstream of the wiggler, and x-rays produced when the electron beam strikes accelerator diagnostic components (e.g., wire scanners and view screens) or from inadvertent beam loss. The optics must reside within high vacuum at ~ 10-8 Torr and this requirement introduces its own set of complications. This talk discusses the performance of numerous high reflector and output coupler optics assemblies and provides a detailed list of lessons learned gleaned from years of experience operating the Upgrade IR FEL, a 10 kW-class, sub-ps laser with output wavelength from 1 to 6 microns.

  19. Simple convergent-nozzle aerosol injector for single-particle diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Kirian, R A; Awel, S; Eckerskorn, N; Fleckenstein, H; Wiedorn, M; Adriano, L; Bajt, S; Barthelmess, M; Bean, R; Beyerlein, K R; Chavas, L M G; Domaracky, M; Heymann, M; Horke, D A; Knoska, J; Metz, M; Morgan, A; Oberthuer, D; Roth, N; Sato, T; Xavier, P L; Yefanov, O; Rode, A V; Küpper, J; Chapman, H N

    2015-07-01

    A major challenge in high-resolution x-ray free-electron laser-based coherent diffractive imaging is the development of aerosol injectors that can efficiently deliver particles to the peak intensity of the focused X-ray beam. Here, we consider the use of a simple convergent-orifice nozzle for producing tightly focused beams of particles. Through optical imaging we show that 0.5 μm particles can be focused to a full-width at half maximum diameter of 4.2 μm, and we demonstrate the use of such a nozzle for injecting viruses into a micro-focused soft-X-ray FEL beam. PMID:26798816

  20. Simple convergent-nozzle aerosol injector for single-particle diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Kirian, R. A.; Awel, S.; Eckerskorn, N.; Fleckenstein, H.; Wiedorn, M.; Adriano, L.; Bajt, S.; Barthelmess, M.; Bean, R.; Beyerlein, K. R.; Chavas, L. M. G.; Domaracky, M.; Heymann, M.; Horke, D. A.; Knoska, J.; Metz, M.; Morgan, A.; Oberthuer, D.; Roth, N.; Sato, T.; Xavier, P. L.; Yefanov, O.; Rode, A. V.; Küpper, J.; Chapman, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in high-resolution x-ray free-electron laser-based coherent diffractive imaging is the development of aerosol injectors that can efficiently deliver particles to the peak intensity of the focused X-ray beam. Here, we consider the use of a simple convergent-orifice nozzle for producing tightly focused beams of particles. Through optical imaging we show that 0.5 μm particles can be focused to a full-width at half maximum diameter of 4.2 μm, and we demonstrate the use of such a nozzle for injecting viruses into a micro-focused soft-X-ray FEL beam. PMID:26798816

  1. Atomic inner-shell laser at 1.5-ångström wavelength pumped by an X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nagamine, Kazunori; Michine, Yurina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mimura, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Hikaru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-08-01

    Since the invention of the first lasers in the visible-light region, research has aimed to produce short-wavelength lasers that generate coherent X-rays; the shorter the wavelength, the better the imaging resolution of the laser and the shorter the pulse duration, leading to better temporal resolution in probe measurements. Recently, free-electron lasers based on self-amplified spontaneous emission have made it possible to generate a hard-X-ray laser (that is, the photon energy is of the order of ten kiloelectronvolts) in an ångström-wavelength regime, enabling advances in fields from ultrafast X-ray spectrosopy to X-ray quantum optics. An atomic laser based on neon atoms and pumped by a soft-X-ray (that is, a photon energy of less than one kiloelectronvolt) free-electron laser has been achieved at a wavelength of 14 nanometres. Here, we use a copper target and report a hard-X-ray inner-shell atomic laser operating at a wavelength of 1.5 ångströms. X-ray free-electron laser pulses with an intensity of about 1019 watts per square centimetre tuned to the copper K-absorption edge produced sufficient population inversion to generate strong amplified spontaneous emission on the copper Kα lines. Furthermore, we operated the X-ray free-electron laser source in a two-colour mode, with one colour tuned for pumping and the other for the seed (starting) light for the laser.

  2. Atomic inner-shell laser at 1.5-ångström wavelength pumped by an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nagamine, Kazunori; Michine, Yurina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mimura, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Hikaru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-08-27

    Since the invention of the first lasers in the visible-light region, research has aimed to produce short-wavelength lasers that generate coherent X-rays; the shorter the wavelength, the better the imaging resolution of the laser and the shorter the pulse duration, leading to better temporal resolution in probe measurements. Recently, free-electron lasers based on self-amplified spontaneous emission have made it possible to generate a hard-X-ray laser (that is, the photon energy is of the order of ten kiloelectronvolts) in an ångström-wavelength regime, enabling advances in fields from ultrafast X-ray spectrosopy to X-ray quantum optics. An atomic laser based on neon atoms and pumped by a soft-X-ray (that is, a photon energy of less than one kiloelectronvolt) free-electron laser has been achieved at a wavelength of 14 nanometres. Here, we use a copper target and report a hard-X-ray inner-shell atomic laser operating at a wavelength of 1.5 ångströms. X-ray free-electron laser pulses with an intensity of about 10(19) watts per square centimetre tuned to the copper K-absorption edge produced sufficient population inversion to generate strong amplified spontaneous emission on the copper Kα lines. Furthermore, we operated the X-ray free-electron laser source in a two-colour mode, with one colour tuned for pumping and the other for the seed (starting) light for the laser. PMID:26310765

  3. Design Alternatives for a Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, K; Bosch, R A; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Keil, R G; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J G; Rogers, G C; Wehlitz, R; Chiang, T; Miller, T J; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R A; York, R C

    2012-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison is continuing design efforts for a vacuum ultraviolet/X-ray Free Electron Laser facility. The design incorporates seeding the FEL to provide fully coherent photon output at energies up to {approx}1 keV. The focus of the present work is to minimize the cost of the facility while preserving its performance. To achieve this we are exploring variations in the electron beam driver for the FEL, in undulator design, and in the seeding mechanism. Design optimizations and trade-offs between the various technologies and how they affect the FEL scientific program will be presented.

  4. Puffin: A three dimensional, unaveraged free electron laser simulation code

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L. T.; McNeil, B. W. J.

    2012-09-15

    An unaveraged 3D model of the free electron laser (FEL) is presented which is capable of modelling electron interactions with broad bandwidth radiation that includes electron beam shot-noise and coherent spontaneous emission effects. Non-localised electron transport throughout the beam is modelled self-consistently allowing better modelling of systems where a larger electron energy range is required. The FEL interaction can be modelled with undulator fields of variable polarisation. A modular undulator system allows insertion of other magnetic structures, such as chicanes. A set of working equations that describe the model are derived, the parallel numerical method that solves them described, and some example FEL interactions presented.

  5. Undulator interruption in high-gain free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1997-10-01

    The effect of interrupting an undulator on the performance of high-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) is evaluated by analyzing 1-D Maxwell-Vlasov equations. It is found that the effect is small for a reasonable length of the interruptions for FEL parameters envisaged for short wavelength self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). Since the interruptions provide valuable space for quadrupoles and diagnostics, and at the same time permit a greater flexibility in mechanical design, the result of this paper is encouraging for construction of long undulator magnets required for SASE.

  6. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-04-17

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention as a method for producing transform-limited pulses in the soft x-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality and impede production of transform-limited pulses. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  7. Operation of higher harmonic oscillations in free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Sei, N; Ogawa, H; Yamada, K

    2012-01-01

    We report for the first time the experimental achievement of a seventh-harmonic free-electron laser (FEL) oscillation. The measured FEL gains and average FEL powers for higher harmonics were identical to those calculated by a one-dimensional FEL theory. The measured linewidths of the higher-harmonic FELs were narrower than that of the fundamental FEL owing to the narrower spectral widths of the spontaneous emissions. By applying the higher-harmonic FEL oscillation to a resonator-type FEL with an advanced accelerator, an x-ray FEL oscillator can be realized at lower electron-beam energy. PMID:22274354

  8. Pulse Splitting in Short Wavelength Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Labat, M.; Couprie, M. E.; Joly, N.; Bruni, C.

    2009-12-31

    We investigate a fundamental limitation occurring in vacuum ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet seeded free electron lasers (FELs). For a given electron beam and undulator configuration, an increase of the FEL output energy at saturation can be obtained via an increase of the seed pulse duration. We put in evidence a complex spatiotemporal deformation of the amplified pulse, leading ultimately to a pulse splitting effect. Numerical studies of the Colson-Bonifacio FEL equations reveal that slippage length and seed laser pulse wings are core ingredients of the dynamics.

  9. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Hutton, Andrew

    2009-03-03

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  10. SIMPLEX: simulator and postprocessor for free-electron laser experiments

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    SIMPLEX is a computer program developed for simulating the amplification process of free-electron lasers (FELs). It numerically solves the so-called FEL equations describing the evolution of the radiation field and growth of microbunching while the electron beam travels along the undulator. In order to reduce the numerical cost, the FEL equations have been reduced to more convenient forms for numerical implementation by applying reasonable approximations. SIMPLEX is equipped with a postprocessor to facilitate the retrieval of desired information from the simulation results, which is crucial for practical applications such as designing the beamline and analyzing the experimental results. PMID:26289287

  11. Characteristics of the MIT microwiggler for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Catravas, P.; Stoner, R.; Bekefi, G.

    1995-12-31

    We report work on the development of microwiggler technology for free electron laser research. The MIT microwiggler is a pulsed electromagnet with 70 periods of 8.8 mm each which generates a peak on-axis field of 4.2 kG. The wiggler is characterized by extensive tunability. We developed a novel tuning regimen to control 140 degrees of freedom afforded by the individually tunable half periods and achieved an rms spread in the peak amplitudes of 0.08%. This is the lowest attained to date in any sub-cm period wiggler. The microwiggler design and comprehensive measurements of its characteristics will be described.

  12. Superradiant cascade in a seeded free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Giannessi, L; Bellaveglia, M; Chiadroni, E; Cianchi, A; Couprie, M E; Del Franco, M; Di Pirro, G; Ferrario, M; Gatti, G; Labat, M; Marcus, G; Mostacci, A; Petralia, A; Petrillo, V; Quattromini, M; Rau, J V; Spampinati, S; Surrenti, V

    2013-01-25

    We report measurements demonstrating the concept of the free-electron laser (FEL) superradiant cascade. Radiation (λ(rad) = 200 nm) at the second harmonic of a short, intense seed laser pulse (λ(seed) = 400 nm) was generated by the cascaded FEL scheme at the transition between the modulator and radiator undulator sections. The superradiance of the ultrashort pulse is confirmed by detailed measurements of the resulting spectral structure, the intensity level of the produced harmonics, and the trend of the energy growth along the undulator. These results are compared to numerical particle simulations using the FEL code GENESIS 1.3 and show a satisfactory agreement. PMID:25166168

  13. Mode competition effects in free electron lasers and gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Levush, B.; Antonsen, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    In many cases in high frequency, high power coherent radiation generators (such as free electron laser and gyrotrons) the linear gain is positive for many modes and therefore these modes will grow and compete for the beam energy. The questions related to mode competition, coherency of the radiation and maximization of the interaction efficiency are of great importance. To address these issues simple multi-mode models have been formulated. This paper is a short review of the recent results from both simulation and analyses of these models. 3 figs.

  14. SIMPLEX: simulator and postprocessor for free-electron laser experiments.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    SIMPLEX is a computer program developed for simulating the amplification process of free-electron lasers (FELs). It numerically solves the so-called FEL equations describing the evolution of the radiation field and growth of microbunching while the electron beam travels along the undulator. In order to reduce the numerical cost, the FEL equations have been reduced to more convenient forms for numerical implementation by applying reasonable approximations. SIMPLEX is equipped with a postprocessor to facilitate the retrieval of desired information from the simulation results, which is crucial for practical applications such as designing the beamline and analyzing the experimental results. PMID:26289287

  15. Harmonic operation of a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr. ); Metzler, N. )

    1991-03-18

    Harmonic operation of a free-electron-laser amplifier is studied. The key issue investigated here is suppression of the fundamental. For a tapered amplifier with the right choice of parameters, it is found that the presence of the harmonic mode greatly reduces the growth rate of the fundamental. A limit on the reflection coefficient of the fundamental mode that will ensure stable operation is derived. The relative merits of tripling the frequency by operating at the third harmonic versus decreasing the wiggler period by a factor of 3 are discussed.

  16. A 1-kW power demonstration from the advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.; Conner, C.A.; Fortgang, C.M.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective of this project was to engineer and procure an electron beamline compatible with the operation of a 1-kW free-electron laser (FEL). Another major task is the physics design of the electron beam line from the end of the wiggler to the electron beam dump. This task is especially difficult because electron beam is expected to have 20 kW of average power and to simultaneously have a 25% energy spread. The project goals were accomplished. The high-power electron design was completed. All of the hardware necessary for high-power operation was designed and procured.

  17. Free-electron generators of coherent radiation - /Volumes 8 & 9/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, S. F.; Moore, G. T.; Pilloff, H. S.; Sargent, M., III; Scully, M. O.; Spitzer, R.

    The two volumes are based on lectures given at the third Workshop on Free-Electron Laser Devices sponsored by the Office of Naval Research. The relationship of free electron laser (FEL) physics to accelerator physics is considered along with additional experimental results from the Stanford three micron FEL, the Stanford superconducting linear accelerator, the results of the first phase of the ACO storage ring laser experiment, optical klystron spontaneous emission and gain, and status and perspectives of the FEL experiment at Brookhaven. Attention is given to the FEL program at the Adone storage ring, a FEL for the storage ring Bessy, a UK FEL proposal, the kinetic theory of a FEL amplifier with guide magnetic field, an experiment on FEL efficiency enhancement with a variable wiggler, the resonator mode structure, three-dimensional radiation fields in FEL using Lienard-Wiechert fields, the three-dimensional nonlinear theory of the FEL amplifier, and design considerations of a Compton scattering FEL with an axial electric field. A quantum approach to realizable wigglers of FEL is also considered. For individual items see A83-31102 to A83-31142

  18. A quantum model of the orotron free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soln, J.; Leavitt, R. P.

    1984-07-01

    A quantum model of the orotron (Smith-Purcell) free-electron laser is formulated in which the classical electron current density from a linearization of the equation of motion exhibits hybrid properties between the current densities of the Cerenkov and the wiggler free-electron lasers. Here, consistent with the (four-dimensional) current-density conservation law, the current density is proportional to the average change of the electron velocity in the interaction region. From the interaction of the electron current with the quantized radiation field in an interaction volume of finite extent, the multiphoton distribution function is obtained, which in turn yields the full 'quantum-mechanical' gain after quantum recoil is taken into account. In an example where the radiation wavelength is 0.4 cm and the electron beam velocity is 0.1 c (corresponding to the HDL orotron experiment), it is estimated that the maximum gain can easily be 8 percent or larger although the interaction length is chosen to be only 4 cm.

  19. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-09-08

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM{sub 10} mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  20. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Hongxiu; Neil, George R.

    1998-01-01

    A focused optical is been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, colinearly with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM.sub.10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  1. An XUV/VUV free-electron laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, J. C.; Newnam, B. E.; Cooper, R. K.; Comly, J. C., Jr.

    Problems regarding the extension of free-electron laser technology from the visible and near infrared region, where such devices are currently operating, to the ultraviolet have recently been extensively discussed. It was found that significant technical problems must be overcome before free-electron lasers (FELs) can be operated in the VUV (100-200 nm) and the XUV (50-100). However, the present lack of other intense and tunable sources of coherent radiation at these wavelengths together with the intrinsic properties of FELs make the development of such devices potentially very rewarding. The properties of FELs include continuous tunability in wavelength and output in the form of a train of picosecond pulses. An investigation is conducted regarding the feasibility of an operation of a FEL in the XUV/VUV regions, taking into account a theoretical model. It is found that modest improvements in electron beam and optical mirror technologies will make the design of a FEL for operation in the 50-200-nm range of optical wavelength possible.

  2. A new beam source for free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.C.; Wang, Z.J.; Zhu, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    A high power, high current density and high voltage electron beam was generated with the pseudospark discharge (PS), this is a new beam source for free electron lasers. The design and construction of the pseudospark discharge was described, the device has low cost and is easy to fabricate. The experiments are presented, the configuration parameters of the modified pulse line accelerator (PLA) are as follows. The PS hollow cavity has a 3 cm diameter and 4.1 cm long. The discharge chamber consists of planar cathode with hollow cavity, sets of intermediate electrodes and insulators with a common channel, and a planar anode. The electrodes are made of brass and the insulators are made of Plexiglas. The diameter of the channel is 3.2 mm. The anode-cathode gap distance is varied in 10-100 mm. The electron beams have voltage of 200 KeV, current of 2 KA and beam diameter of 1mm. The beam penetrated a 0.3 mm hole on a copper foil of 0.05 mm thick at the distance of 5 cm from the anode and penetrated a 0.6 mm hole on an acid-sensitive film at the distance of 15 cm. A compact free electron laser with a table size is discussed.

  3. Free electron laser for a mildly relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.

    1983-08-01

    One of the most basic instabilities which characterize a relativistic electron beam propagating through a helical wiggler (or undulator) magnetic field is the free electron laser instability. This instability has been extensively investigated in recent years with particular emphasis on applications involving high power microwave radiation. Previous theoretical studies of this instability have tended to result in the conclusion that high energy beams with a relativistic factor much greater than 1 are required to generate high frequency microwave radiation. Beams with this high a relativistic factor have proven to be highly unsuited, however, to compact and practical microwave tubes. To this end, for a relativistic electron beam propagating through a dielectric loaded waveguide, this paper presents a method for the bandwidth and frequency enhancement of the free electron laser instability which makes use of a mild (less than 1.5) relativistic factor. It demonstrates that the instability bandwidth and frequency can be greatly enhanced for specified values of the beam energy and wiggler wavelength if the dielectric constant and the thickness of the dielectric material are appropriately selected. The paper also presents a new scheme for a broad bandwidth microwave amplifier.

  4. Theoretical Study of the Free-Electron Laser Sideband Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tser-Yuan Brian

    Detailed properties of the sideband instability are investigated for a helical wiggler free-electron laser. The model describes the nonlinear evolution of a right-circularly polarized primary electromagnetic wave. The nonlinear evolution of a free electron laser is investigated within the framework of a macroclump model for the trapped electrons. The macroclump model assumes that the trapped electrons can be treated as tightly bunched macroclumps that interact coherently with the radiation field. The nonlinear evolution of the primary signal is examined when there is no spatial variation of the wave amplitude and phase. The evolution equations are reduced to quadrature, and the maximum excursion of the wave amplitude a_{s,max} is calculated analytically. The nonlinear evolution of the sideband instability is investigated. In the present analysis, the sideband signals are treated as perturbations (not necessarily small) about a constant-amplitude primary electromagnetic wave with slowly varying phase. The coupled orbit and field equations are investigated analytically and numerically over a wide range of system parameters to determine detailed scaling properties of the sideband instability. The results of the present analysis suggest that free electron lasers operating with system parameters corresponding to the strong -pump regime are least vulnerable to the sideband instability. Detailed properties of the sideband instability are investigated for small-amplitude perturbations about a quasi-steady state. A formal dispersion relation is derived for perturbations about a general equilibrium distribution f^{0}(gamma_sp{0 }{'}) which may include both trapped and untrapped electrons. For the case where only trapped electrons are present, the dispersion relation is reduced to a simple analytical form. Detailed properties of the sideband instability are investigated for the case where the trapped electrons uniformly populate the ponderomotive potential up to an energy

  5. Performance and design concepts of a free electron laser operating in the x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.

    1997-03-01

    We report on the Design Study of a Free-Electron-Laser experiment designed to produce coherent radiation at the wavelength of 1.5 {Angstrom} and longer. The proposed experiment utilizes 1/3 of the SLAC linac to accelerate electrons to 15 GeV. The high brightness electron beam interacts with the magnetic field of a long undulator and generates coherent radiation by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The projected output peak power is about, 10 GW. The project presents several challenges in the realization of a high brightness electron beam, in the construction and tolerances of the undulator and in the transport, of the x-ray radiation. The technical solutions adopted for the design are discussed. Numerical simulations are used to show the performance as a function of system parameters.

  6. Medical free-electron laser: fact or fiction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James P.; Ponikvar, Donald R.

    1994-07-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has long been proposed as a flexible tool for a variety of medical applications, and yet the FEL has not seen widespread acceptance in the medical community. The issues have been the laser's size, cost, and complexity. Unfortunately, research on applications of FELs has outpaced the device development efforts. This paper describes the characteristics of the FEL, as they have been demonstrated in the U.S. Army's FEL technology development program, and identifies specific medical applications where demonstrated performance levels would suffice. This includes new photodynamic therapies for cancer and HIV treatment, orthopedic applications, tissue welding applications, and multiwavelength surgical techniques. A new tunable kilowatt class FEL device is described, which utilizes existing hardware from the U.S. Army program. An assessment of the future potential, based on realistic technology scaling is provided.

  7. High harmonic generation in the undulators for free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, K.

    2015-10-01

    We present the analysis of the undulator radiation (UR) with account for major sources of the spectral line broadening. For relativistic electrons we obtain the analytical expressions for the UR spectrum, the intensity and the emission line shape with account for the finite size of the beam, the emittance and the energy spread. Partial compensation of the divergency by properly imposed weak constant magnetic component is demonstrated in the analytical form. Considering the examples of radiation from single and double frequency undulators, we study high harmonic generation with account for all major sources of homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening with account for the characteristics of the electrons beam. We apply our analysis to free electron laser (FEL) calculations and we compare the obtained results with the radiation of a FEL on the supposition of the ideal undulator.

  8. Čerenkov free-electron laser with side walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Yashvir; Kumar, Vinit

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a Čerenkov free-electron laser (CFEL) with metallic side walls, which are used to confine an electromagnetic surface mode supported by a thin dielectric slab placed on top of a conducting surface. This leads to an enhancement in coupling between the optical mode and the co-propagating electron beam, and consequently, performance of the CFEL is improved. We set up coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations for the system, in analogy with an undulator based conventional FEL, and obtain formulas for the small-signal gain and growth rate. It is shown that small signal gain and growth rate in this configuration are larger compared to the configuration without the side walls. In the nonlinear regime, we solve the coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations numerically and study the saturation behaviour of the system. It is found that the Čerenkov FEL with side walls saturates quickly, and produces powerful coherent terahertz radiation.

  9. Storage ring two-color free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.; Hao, H.; Li, J. Y.; Mikhailov, S. F.; Popov, V. G.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Huang, S.; Wu, J.; Günster, S.; Wu, Y. K.

    2016-07-01

    We report a systematic experimental study of a storage ring two-color free-electron laser (FEL) operating simultaneously in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength regions. The two-color FEL lasing has been realized using a pair of dual-band high-reflectivity FEL mirrors with two different undulator configurations. We have demonstrated independent wavelength tuning in a wide range for each lasing color, as well as harmonically locked wavelength tuning when the UV lasing occurs at the second harmonic of the IR lasing. Precise power control of two-color lasing with good power stability has also been achieved. In addition, the impact of the degradation of FEL mirrors on the two-color FEL operation is reported. Furthermore, we have investigated the temporal structures of the two-color FEL beams, showing simultaneous two-color micropulses with their intensity modulations displayed as FEL macropulses.

  10. Recent Developments in Superconducting RF Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lia Merminga

    2001-09-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) Free Electron Lasers (FELs) worldwide are reviewed. Two examples of high performance SRF FELs are discussed in detail: First, the Tesla Test Facility (TTF) FEL at DESY, which recently demonstrated Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) saturation at the wavelength of 98 nm, an important milestone towards X-ray FELs in the {angstrom} regime. Second, the Jefferson Lab IR FEL, which recently lased with 2.1 kW of average power while energy recovering 5 mA of average current, an important milestone towards high average power FELs and towards Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) in general. We discuss the scientific potential and accelerator physics challenges of both classes of SRF-driven FELs.

  11. Temporal dynamics of storage ring free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Hara, T.; Gontier, D.; Troussel, P.; Garzella, D.; Delboulbé, A.; Billardon, M.

    1996-02-01

    The growth and saturation of a storage ring free electron laser (SRFEL) is driven by the beam behavior, including bunch lengthening or coherent modes of longitudinal motion (the bunch length being related to the energy spread), detuning effects, and a modification of the bunch distribution by the FEL interaction; all of these phenomena are accumulated for various passes, leading to complex dynamical processes. The knowledge and understanding of the dynamics, together with the stability over time are essential for efficient use of SRFEL sources. This is illustrated with the Super-ACO FEL experiment, analyzed from growth from the positron bunch to laser saturation and induced positron beam modification. Stability analysis (jitter, shape, intensity) is then performed carefully. A longitudinal feedback system can significantly improve it. Information provided with a streak camera reveals the distribution of a single FEL micropulse or synchrotron radiation pulse without any averaging or sampling.

  12. following an electron bunch for free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    A video artist's ultra-slow-motion impression of an APEX-style electron gun firing a continuous train of electron bunches into a superconducting linear accelerator (in reality this would happen a million times a second). As they approach the speed of light the bunches contract, maintaining beam quality. After acceleration, the electron bunches are diverted into one or more undulators, the key components of free electron lasers. Oscillating back and forth in the changing magnetic field, they create beams of structured x-ray pulses. Before entering the experimental areas the electron bunches are diverted to a beam dump. (Animation created by Illumina Visual, http://www.illuminavisual.com/, for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Music for this excerpt, "Feeling Dark (Behind The Mask)" is by 7OOP3D http://ccmixter.org/files/7OOP3D/29126 and is licensed under a Creative Commons license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)

  13. Effect of free electron laser (FEL) irradiation on tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Seiji; Awazu, Kunio; Tomimasu, Takio

    1996-12-01

    Free electron laser (FEL) gives high efficiency for the photo-induced effects when the laser is tuned to the absorption maximum of target materials. The effect on dentine was investigated using the FEL tuned to 9.4 micrometers , which is an absorption maximum of phosphoric acid in infrared region. As a result, irradiated dentine surface which was amorphous had changed to the recrystalized structure by the spectroscopic analysis of IR absorption and x-ray diffraction. Furthermore, the atomic ratio of P/Ca had reduced from 0.65 to 0.60. These results indicated that 9.4micrometers -FEL irradiation caused the selective ablation of phosphoric acid ion and the reconstruction of disordered atoms.

  14. X-Ray Free Electron Laser Interaction With Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S

    2009-05-12

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) will enable studying new areas of laser-matter interaction. We summarize the current understanding of the interaction of XFEL pulses with matter and describe some of the simulation approaches that are used to design experiments on future XFEL sources. Modified versions of these models have been successful in guiding and analyzing experiments performed at the extreme-ultraviolet FEL FLASH at wavelengths of 6 nm and longer. For photon energies of several keV, no XFEL-matter interaction experiments have been performed yet but data is anticipated to become available in the near future, which will allow to test our understanding of the interaction physics in this wavelength regime.

  15. Spectrotemporal Shaping of Seeded Free-Electron Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, David; Ribič, Primož Rebernik; De Ninno, Giovanni; Allaria, Enrico; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Danailov, Miltcho Bojanov; Demidovich, Alexander; Ferrari, Eugenio; Giannessi, Luca; Mahieu, Benoît.; Penco, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate the ability to control and shape the spectrotemporal content of extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulses produced by a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). The control over the spectrotemporal properties of XUV light was achieved by precisely manipulating the linear frequency chirp of the seed laser. Our results agree with existing theory, which allows us to retrieve the temporal properties (amplitude and phase) of the FEL pulse from measurements of the spectra as a function of the FEL operating parameters. Furthermore, we show the first direct evidence of the full temporal coherence of FEL light and generate Fourier limited pulses by fine-tuning the FEL temporal phase. The possibility of tailoring the spectrotemporal content of intense short-wavelength pulses represents the first step towards efficient nonlinear optics in the XUV to x-ray spectral region and will enable precise manipulation of core-electron excitations using the methods of coherent quantum control.

  16. Molecular Imaging Using X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, Anton; Küpper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-04-01

    The opening of hard X-ray free-electron laser facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the United States, has ushered in a new era in structural determination. With X-ray pulse durations down to 10 fs or shorter, and up to 1013 transversely coherent photons per pulse in a narrow spectral bandwidth, focused irradiances of 1018 to 1021 W cm-2 or higher can be produced at X-ray energies ranging from 500 eV to 10 keV. New techniques for determining the structure of systems that cannot be crystallized and for studying the time-resolved behavior of irreversible reactions at femtosecond timescales are now available.

  17. Gamma-ray free-electron lasers: Quantum fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H. M.; Serbeto, A.; Galvão, R. M. O.; Mendonça, J. T.; Monteiro, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    A quantum fluid model is used to describe the interaction of a nondegenerate cold relativistic electron beam with an intense optical wiggler taking into account the beam space-charge potential and photon recoil effect. A nonlinear set of coupled equations is obtained and solved numerically. The numerical results indicate that intense γ-ray free-electron laser emission, with intensities approaching the Schwinger limit, can be driven by the strong nonlinear space-charge wave, for feasible values of the electron beam parameters. However, the achievement of this regime of extreme intensities depends rather critically on the choice of the detuning and of the signal initial phase at the entrance of the interaction region.

  18. Introduction to the theory of free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Krinsky, S.

    1985-01-01

    We present an introduction to some fundamental aspects of the theory of free electron lasers. Spontaneous radiation emitted by electrons traversing a wiggler magnet is briefly reviewed, and stimulated emission in the low-gain regime is discussed using Colson's pendulum equations and Madey's theorems. The high-gain regime is treated by an extention of the work of Bonifacio, Pellegrini, and Narducci. We introduce dynamical variables to describe the radiation field, and a Hamiltonian formulation of Maxwell's equations is employed. A canonical transformation to the interaction representation factors out the fast time variation of the radiation field, and the slow time dependence is determined by linearized equations for the appropriate collective variables. As an application of this technique we consider self-amplified spontaneous radiation, and we comment upon the relationship between our approach and the use of coupled Vlasov-Maxwell equations.

  19. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  20. Unconventional Features of Free Electrons in Polycrystalline Metal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancea, J.

    New experimental results concerning basic electronic properties of fine grained metallic films call for theoretical models differing from standard theories: 1) The d.c. conductivity depends on the number of electrons crossing the grain boundary potentials along their background scattering length. An intrinsic scattering length for the whole polycrystal cannot be defined. 2) The Hall coefficient depends on the grain size. Below a “cut-off grain size”, electrons with p-symmetry are virtually confined within the grains. Consequently a virtual free electron value is observed. 3) The work function shows a long ranging thickness dependence. For film thicknesses comparable with electronic scattering lengths, the film’s surfaces start to interact.

  1. Free-electron laser as a laboratory instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.F.; Lewellen, J.W.; Huang, Y.C.; Feinstein, J.; Pantell, R.H.

    1995-06-01

    A free-electron laser (FEL), with a component cost, including the accelerator, of approximately $300,000, has a laser at a wavelength of 85 microns with approx. 12 ps micropulse duration, achieving a power growth four orders of magnitude greater than the coherent spontaneous emission, and with a small-signal, single-pass gain of 21%. The price is about an order of magnitude less than other FELs for the far infrared, and transforms the device from the role of a national facility to that of a laboratory instrument. Cost reduction was achieved by employing several novel features: a microwave cavity gun for the accelerator, a staggered-array wiggler, and an on-axis hole in the upstream cavity mirror for electron ingress and radiation egress.

  2. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N.

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  3. Beam Conditioning for Free Electron Lasers:Consequences and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, A.; Penn, G.; Sessler, A.; Wurtele, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

    2010-12-14

    The consequences of beam conditioning in four example cases [VISA, a soft x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), LCLS, and a 'Greenfield' FEL] are examined. It is shown that in emittance limited cases, proper conditioning reduces sensitivity to the transverse emittance and, furthermore, allows for stronger focusing in the undulator. Simulations show higher saturation power, with gain lengths reduced by a factor of 2 or more. The beam dynamics in a general conditioning system are studied, with 'matching conditions' derived for achieving conditioning without growth in the effective emittance. Various conditioning lattices are considered, and expressions derived for the amount of conditioning provided in each case when the matching conditions are satisfied. These results show that there is no fundamental obstacle to producing beam conditioning, and that the problem can be reduced to one of proper lattice design. Nevertheless, beam conditioning will not be easy to implement in practice.

  4. Vanderbilt University free-electron laser x-ray facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, Perry A.; Andrews, Weiwei D.; Brau, Charles A.; Waters, James A.; Carroll, Frank E.; Pickens, David R.; Price, Ronald R.; Roos, Carlton F.

    1993-02-01

    The Vanderbilt University Free-Electron Laser Program is developing the capability to create near-monochromatic x rays for medical imaging and other purposes. For this experiment we feed-back the normal infrared FEL light to collide with the electron beam. This causes Compton backscattering of the incident photons which creates x rays. These x rays cannot feed an x-ray laser, but they have a collimated intensity and tunability which make them highly suitable for medical imaging. This paper is particularly focused on the x-ray beam transport to be used with this experiment. This transport must collimate the x-ray beam and re-direct it to match a beam chase located in the vault ceiling at a 40 degree angle to the electron beam axis. A brief description of the creation mechanism and x-ray beam properties are included.

  5. Long-base free electron laser resonant cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.L.; Bender, S.C.; Appert, Q.D.; Saxman, A.C.; Swann, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    A 65-meter resonant cavity has been constructed in order to experimentally determine the characteristics of long resonant cavities as would be required for a free electron laser (FEL). A version using normal incidence mirrors is reported here, and another that includes a grazing incidence mirror is forthcoming. Either version is designed to simulate a FEL operating at 0.5 micron wavelength and is near-concentric with a stability parameter of 0.98. Argon-ion plasma tubes simulate the laser gain that would be provided by a wiggler in an actual FEL. The cavity was constructed on a seismic slab and air turbulence effects were reduced by surrounding the beam with helium in 6 in. diameter tubes. Alignment sensitivities are reported and compared to geometrical and diffraction predictions with good agreement.

  6. Thermal effect on prebunched two-beam free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mirian, N. S.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-08-15

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the two-beam free electron laser. The fundamental resonance of the fast electron beam coincides with the fifth harmonic of the slow electron beam in order to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation. Thermal effect in the form of the longitudinal velocity spread is included in the analysis. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, prebunched slow electron beam is considered. The evaluation of the radiation power, bunching parameter, distribution function of energy, and the distribution function of the pondermotive phase is studied. Sensitivity of the power of the fifth harmonic to the jitter in the energy difference between the two beams is also studied. A phase space is presented that shows the trapped electrons at the saturation point.

  7. Nonlinear model for thermal effects in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, E. Endler, A. Rizzato, F. B.

    2014-11-15

    In the present work, we extend results of a previous paper [Peter et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 12 3104 (2013)] and develop a semi-analytical model to account for thermal effects on the nonlinear dynamics of the electron beam in free-electron lasers. We relax the condition of a cold electron beam but still use the concept of compressibility, now associated with a warm beam model, to evaluate the time scale for saturation and the peak laser intensity in high-gain regimes. Although vanishing compressibilites and the associated divergent densities are absent in warm models, a series of discontinuities in the electron density precede the saturation process. We show that full wave-particle simulations agree well with the predictions of the model.

  8. Beam Conditioning and Harmonic Generation in Free ElectronLasers

    SciTech Connect

    Charman, A.E.; Penn, G.; Wolski, A.; Wurtele, J.S.

    2004-07-05

    The next generation of large-scale free-electron lasers (FELs) such as Euro-XFEL and LCLS are to be devices which produce coherent X-rays using Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). The performance of these devices is limited by the spread in longitudinal velocities of the beam. In the case where this spread arises primarily from large transverse oscillation amplitudes, beam conditioning can significantly enhance FEL performance. Future X-ray sources may also exploit harmonic generation starting from laser-seeded modulation. Preliminary analysis of such devices is discussed, based on a novel trial-function/variational-principle approach, which shows good agreement with more lengthy numerical simulations.

  9. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources.

    PubMed

    White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M; Kirian, Richard A; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Chapman, Henry N

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the `serial crystallography' methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam. PMID:23793149

  10. A free-electron laser at the Orsay storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elleaume, P.

    1984-12-01

    The design and operation of the free-electron-laser (FEL) apparatus installed at the Orsay storage-ring particle accelerator are characterized and illustrated with diagrams, graphs, and oscilloscope trades of the output. The history and fundamental physics of FELs are reviewed; the electron beam of the Orsay ring, the optical klystron (used instead of a wiggler due to the low gain klystron available), and the optical cavity (using a high-reflectance mirror) of the Orsay FEL are described; and experimental data on the spectrum, microtemporal and macrotemporal structure, and mean power of the FEL output are presented. The performance of the Orsay FEL is found to be in good agreement with the predictions of a classical theory based on the Lorentz force and the Maxwell equations.

  11. Energy fluctuations of a finite free-electron Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Pekola, Jukka P; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo; Kupiainen, Antti; Galperin, Yuri M

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the energy distribution of free-electron Fermi-gas, a problem with a textbook solution of Gaussian energy fluctuations in the limit of a large system. We find that for a small system, characterized solely by its heat capacity C, the distribution can be solved analytically, and it is both skewed and it vanishes at low energies, exhibiting a sharp drop to zero at the energy corresponding to the filled Fermi sea. The results are relevant from the experimental point of view, since the predicted non-Gaussian effects become pronounced when C/k_{B}≲10^{3} (k_{B} is the Boltzmann constant), a regime that can be easily achieved for instance in mesoscopic metallic conductors at sub-kelvin temperatures. PMID:27627262

  12. Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Landahl, Eric C.

    2002-01-01

    A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

  13. Multidimensional simulations of the ELFA superradiant free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, P.; Fawley, W. M.; Sharp, W. M.

    1991-07-01

    ELFA (electron laser facility for acceleration) is a high-gain, microwave ( ν = 100 GHz) free electron laser (FEL) facility driven by an rf linac. ELFA will test the existence of the theoretically predicted regimes of strong and weak superradiance. Both regimes can be studied with the same FEL by changing the height of the interaction waveguide, which controls the radiation group velocity, and thus the relative slippage between electrons and photons. The operation of ELFA has been modeled using a modified version of the two-dimensional, time-dependent sideband code GINGER. The simulations take into account the time and space variations of the radiation field, as well as the space charge and transverse emittance of the electron beam. The sensitivity of the superradiant signal to variations of the beam emittance, energy and energy spread is examined.

  14. Beam conditioning for free electron lasers: Consequences and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolski, A.; Penn, G.; Sessler, A.; Wurtele, J.

    2004-08-01

    The consequences of beam conditioning in four example cases [VISA, a soft x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), LCLS, and a “Greenfield” FEL] are examined. It is shown that in emittance limited cases, proper conditioning reduces sensitivity to the transverse emittance and, furthermore, allows for stronger focusing in the undulator. Simulations show higher saturation power, with gain lengths reduced by a factor of2 or more. The beam dynamics in a general conditioning system are studied, with “matching conditions” derived for achieving conditioning without growth in the effective emittance. Various conditioning lattices are considered, and expressions derived for the amount of conditioning provided in each case when the matching conditions are satisfied. These results show that there is no fundamental obstacle to producing beam conditioning, and that the problem can be reduced to one of proper lattice design. Nevertheless, beam conditioning will not be easy to implement in practice.

  15. Optimization of a high efficiency free electron laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2015-03-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) amplifier is implemented in x-ray FEL facilities to generate short wavelength radiation. The problem of an efficiency increase of an FEL amplifier is now of great practical importance. The technique of undulator tapering in the postsaturation regime is used at the existing x-ray FELs LCLS, SACLA and FERMI, and is planned for use at FLASH, European XFEL, Swiss FEL, and PAL XFEL. There are also discussions on the future of high peak and average power FELs for scientific and industrial applications. In this paper we perform a detailed analysis of the tapering strategies for high power seeded FEL amplifiers. Analysis of the radiation properties from the modulated electron beam and application of similarity techniques allows us to derive the universal law of the undulator tapering.

  16. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. T.; Anderson, S. G.; Anderson, G.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Tremaine, A.; Musumeci, P.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200 MV /m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti :Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100 fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  17. Focusing mirror for x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mimura, Hidekazu; Kimura, Takashi; Yamakawa, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Morita, Shinya; Uehara, Yoshihiro; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Lin, Weimin; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko

    2008-08-15

    We present the design, fabrication, and evaluation of a large total-reflection mirror for focusing x-ray free-electron laser beams to nanometer dimensions. We used an elliptical focusing mirror made of silicon that was 400 mm long and had a focal length of 550 mm. Electrolytic in-process dressing grinding was used for initial-step figuring and elastic emission machining was employed for final figuring and surface smoothing. A figure accuracy with a peak-to-valley height of 2 nm was achieved across the entire area. Characterization of the focused beam was performed at BL29XUL of SPring-8. The focused beam size was 75 nm at 15 keV, which is almost equal to the theoretical size.

  18. Ultrasensitive Label-free Electronic Chip for DNA Analysis Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Koehne, Jessica; Chen, Hua; Cassell, Alan; Ng, Hou Tee; Ye, Qi; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    There is a strong need for faster, cheaper, and simpler methods for nucleic acid analysis in today s clinical tests. Nanotechnologies can potentially provide solutions to these requirements by integrating nanomaterials with biofunctionalities. Dramatic improvement in the sensitivity and multiplexing can be achieved through the high-degree miniaturization. Here, we present our study in the development of an ultrasensitive label-free electronic chip for DNA/RNA analysis based on carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays. A reliable nanoelectrode array based on vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) embedded in a SiO2 matrix is fabricated using a bottom-up approach. Characteristic nanoelectrode behavior is observed with a low-density MWNT nanoelectrode array in measuring both the bulk and surface immobilized redox species. The open-end of MWNTs are found to present similar properties as graphite edge-plane electrodes, with a wide potential window, flexible chemical functionalities, and good biocompatibility. A BRCA1 related oligonucleotide probe with 18 bases is covalently functionalized at the open ends of the MWNTs and specifically hybridized with an oligonucleotide target as well as a PCR amplicon. The guanine bases in the target molecules are employed as the signal moieties for the electrochemical measurements. Ru(bpy)3(2+) mediator is used to further amplify the guanine oxidation signal. This technique has been employed for direct electrochemical detection of label-free PCR amplicon through specific hybridization with the BRCAl probe. The detection limit is estimated to be less than approximately 1000 DNA molecules, approaching the limit of the sensitivity by laser-based fluorescence techniques in DNA microarray. This system provides a general electronic platform for rapid molecular diagnostics in applications requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, simple sample preparation, and low- cost operation.

  19. FPGA-based LLRF control module for x-ray free electron laser and TESLA feedback system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giergusiewicz, Wojciech; Kierzkowski, Krzysztof; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2005-02-01

    The paper introduces a dedicated LLRF control module developed for the Free Electron Laser (FEL) called internally also the "TESLA Test Facility phase II" because of some daring scientific plans to build in the future the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) as well as the TESLA project. This DSP-board has been dedicated for electron beam gun called RF-gun feedback system and also for the cavity (superconducting electromagnetic resonator) feedback system and cavity simulator implemented in one DSP system chip. The system for the elctromagnetic field parameters control is meant as the feedback system -- in this document. The board is based on a large modern Field Programmble Gate Array (FPGA) chip by "Xilinx" and fast Analog to Digital Converters (ADC) and Digital to Analog converters (DAC) by "Analog Devices."

  20. Superpositions of Free Electron Vortices and Measurement of Matter Wave Gouy Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMorran, Benjamin; Harvey, Tyler; Pierce, Jordan; Linck, Martin

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate superpositions of free electron matter wave orbital states using nanofabricated diffraction holograms. The orbital superposition is comprised of an electron beam that is a coherent mixture of two overlapped, co-propagating vortex beam modes with different topological charge. Whereas a pure mode electron vortex beam forms an annular spot when projected onto an imaging detector, the superposition has an intensity profile that is broken into azimuthal lobes. The number of lobes is given by the absolute difference in topological charge between the two orbital components. We created superpositions of vortices with various topological charges, from ml = 0 to 15. We use these superposition states to measure the Gouy phase measurement for matter waves. We discuss the possibility of using these beams to measure magnetic fields. Support from University of Oregon CAMCOR, and LBNL LDRD grant.

  1. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Perucchi, A.; Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Allaria, E.; Lupi, S.

    2013-02-15

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation.

  2. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility.

    PubMed

    Perucchi, A; Di Mitri, S; Penco, G; Allaria, E; Lupi, S

    2013-02-01

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation. PMID:23464184

  3. Design and test of frequency tuner for a CAEP high power THz free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Zheng-Hui; Zhao, Dan-Yang; Sun, Yi; Pan, Wei-Min; Lin, Hai-Ying; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Luo, Xing; Li, Ming; Yang, Xing-Fan; Wang, Guang-Wei; Dai, Jian-Ping; Li, Zhong-Quan; Ma, Qiang; Sha, Peng

    2015-02-01

    Peking University is developing a 1.3 GHz superconducting accelerating section highpower THz free-electron laser for the China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP). A compact fast/slow tuner has been developed by the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) for the accelerating section to control Lorentz detuning, compensate for beam loading effect, microphonics and liquid helium pressure fluctuations. The tuner design, warm test and cold test of the first prototype are presented, which has a guiding significance for the manufacture of the formal tuner and cryomodule assembly. Supported by the 500 MHz superconducting cavity electromechanical tuning system (Y190KFEOHD), NSAF (11176003) and National Major Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development projects(2011YQ130018)

  4. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    SciTech Connect

    Baptiste, Kenneth; Corlett, John; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Lidia, Steven; Qiang, Ji; Sannibale, Fernando; Sonnad, Kiran; Staples, John; Virostek, Steven; Wells, Russell

    2008-10-08

    Currently proposed energy recovery linac and high average power free electron laser projects require electron beam sources that can generate up to {approx} 1 nC bunch charges with less than 1 mmmrad normalized emittance at high repetition rates (greater than {approx} 1 MHz). Proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose an approach for a gun fully based on mature RF and mechanical technology that greatly diminishes many of such complications. The concepts for such a source as well as the present RF and mechanical design are described. Simulations that demonstrate the beam quality preservation and transport capability of an injector scheme based on such a gun are also presented.

  5. Imaging the dynamics of free-electron Landau states.

    PubMed

    Schattschneider, P; Schachinger, Th; Stöger-Pollach, M; Löffler, S; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A; Bliokh, K Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Landau levels and states of electrons in a magnetic field are fundamental quantum entities underlying the quantum Hall and related effects in condensed matter physics. However, the real-space properties and observation of Landau wave functions remain elusive. Here we report the real-space observation of Landau states and the internal rotational dynamics of free electrons. States with different quantum numbers are produced using nanometre-sized electron vortex beams, with a radius chosen to match the waist of the Landau states, in a quasi-uniform magnetic field. Scanning the beams along the propagation direction, we reconstruct the rotational dynamics of the Landau wave functions with angular frequency ~100 GHz. We observe that Landau modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers belong to three classes, which are characterized by rotations with zero, Larmor and cyclotron frequencies, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to the uniform cyclotron rotation of classical electrons, and in perfect agreement with recent theoretical predictions. PMID:25105563

  6. Simulation of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Sessler, A.M.; Whittum, D.H.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1990-09-01

    The standing-wave free-electron laser (FEL) differs from a conventional linear-wiggler microwave FEL in using irises along the wiggler to form a series of standing-wave cavities and in reaccelerating the beam between cavities to maintain the average energy. The device has been proposed for use in a two-beam accelerator (TBA) because microwave power can be extracted more effectively than from a traveling-wave FEL. The standing-wave FEL is modeled in the continuum limit by a set of equations describing the coupling of a one-dimensional beam to a TE{sub 01} rectangular-waveguide mode. Analytic calculations and numerical simulations are used to determine the time variation of the reacceleration field and the prebunching required so that the final microwave energy is the same in all cavities. The microwave energy and phase are found to be insensitive to modest spreads in the beam energy and phase and to errors in the reacceleration field and the beam current, but the output phase appears sensitive to beam-energy errors and to timing jitter.

  7. Optical guiding and beam bending in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The electron beam in a free-electron laser (FEL) can act as an optical fiber, guiding or bending the optical beam. The refractive and gain effects of the bunched electron beam can compensate for diffraction, making possible wigglers that are many Rayleigh ranges (i.e., characteristic diffraction lengths) long. The origin of optical guiding can be understood by examining gain and refractive guiding in a fiber with a complex index of refraction, providing a mathematical description applicable also to the FEL, with some extensions. In the exponential gain regime of the FEL, the electron equations of motion must be included, but a self-consistent description of exponential gain with diffraction fully included becomes possible. The origin of the effective index of refraction of an FEL is illustrated with a simple example of bunched, radiating dipoles. Some of the properties of the index of refraction are described. The limited experimental evidence for optical beam bending is summarized. The evidence does not yet provide conclusive proof of the existence of optical guiding, but supports the idea. Finally, the importance of refractive guiding for the performance of a high-gain tapered-wiggler FEL amplifier is illustrated with numerical simulations.

  8. Optical Shaping of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, A; Coffee, R; Vetter, S; Hering, P; West, G N; Gilevich, S; Lutman, A A; Li, S; Maxwell, T; Galayda, J; Fry, A; Huang, Z

    2016-06-24

    In this Letter we report the experimental demonstration of a new temporal shaping technique for x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). This technique is based on the use of a spectrally shaped infrared (IR) laser and allows optical control of the x-ray generation process. By accurately manipulating the spectral amplitude and phase of the IR laser, we can selectively modify the electron bunch longitudinal emittance thus controlling the duration of the resulting x-ray pulse down to the femtosecond time scale. Unlike other methods currently in use, optical shaping is directly applicable to the next generation of high-average power x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source-II or the European X-FEL, and it enables pulse shaping of FELs at the highest repetition rates. Furthermore, this laser-shaping technique paves the way for flexible tailoring of complex multicolor FEL pulse patterns required for nonlinear multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy as well as novel multicolor diffraction imaging schemes. PMID:27391728

  9. High efficiency, multiterawatt x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emma, C.; Fang, K.; Wu, J.; Pellegrini, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present undulator magnet tapering methods for obtaining high efficiency and multiterawatt peak powers in x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), a key requirement for enabling 3D atomic resolution single molecule imaging and nonlinear x-ray science. The peak power and efficiency of tapered XFELs is sensitive to time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. To analyze this dependence in detail we perform a comparative numerical optimization for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile including and intentionally disabling these effects. We show that the solution for the magnetic field taper profile obtained from time independent optimization does not yield the highest extraction efficiency when time dependent effects are included. Our comparative optimization is performed for a novel undulator designed specifically to obtain TW power x-ray pulses in the shortest distance: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. We determine that after a fully time dependent optimization of a 100 m long Linac coherent light source-like XFEL we can obtain a maximum efficiency of 7%, corresponding to 3.7 TW peak radiation power. Possible methods to suppress the synchrotron sidebands, and further enhance the FEL peak power, up to about 6 TW by increasing the seed power and reducing the electron beam energy spread, are also discussed.

  10. Optical Shaping of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, A.; Coffee, R.; Vetter, S.; Hering, P.; West, G. N.; Gilevich, S.; Lutman, A. A.; Li, S.; Maxwell, T.; Galayda, J.; Fry, A.; Huang, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this Letter we report the experimental demonstration of a new temporal shaping technique for x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). This technique is based on the use of a spectrally shaped infrared (IR) laser and allows optical control of the x-ray generation process. By accurately manipulating the spectral amplitude and phase of the IR laser, we can selectively modify the electron bunch longitudinal emittance thus controlling the duration of the resulting x-ray pulse down to the femtosecond time scale. Unlike other methods currently in use, optical shaping is directly applicable to the next generation of high-average power x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source-II or the European X-FEL, and it enables pulse shaping of FELs at the highest repetition rates. Furthermore, this laser-shaping technique paves the way for flexible tailoring of complex multicolor FEL pulse patterns required for nonlinear multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy as well as novel multicolor diffraction imaging schemes.

  11. The physics of x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Marinelli, A.; Reiche, S.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (x-ray FELs) give us for the first time the possibility to explore structures and dynamical processes of atomic and molecular systems at the angstrom-femtosecond space and time scales. They generate coherent photon pulses with time duration of a few to 100 fs, peak power of 10 to 100 GW, over a wavelength range extending from about 100 nm to less than 1 Å. Using these novel and unique capabilities new scientific results are being obtained in atomic and molecular sciences, in areas of physics, chemistry, and biology. This paper reviews the physical principles, the theoretical models, and the numerical codes on which x-ray FELs are based, starting from a single electron spontaneous undulator radiation to the FEL collective instability of a high density electron beam, strongly enhancing the electromagnetic radiation field intensity and its coherence properties. A short review is presented of the main experimental properties of x-ray FELs, and the results are discussed of the most recent research to improve their longitudinal coherence properties, increase the peak power, and generate multicolor spectra.

  12. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  13. The history of X-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C.

    2012-10-01

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 Å, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 1013 to 1011, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  14. Self-fields in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, C.W.; Hafizi, B.

    1995-12-31

    We have analyzed the free-electron laser (FEL) interaction in the high gain Compton regime. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The theory applies to the case where the optical beam is guided by the electron beam by gain focusing and maintains a constant profile through the wiggler. The finite-emittance electron beam, in turn, is matched to the wiggler. The bitatron motion of the electrons is determined by (i) the focusing force due to wiggler gradients and, (ii) the repulsive force due to self-fields. Based on the single-electron equations, it can be shown that self-field forces tend to increase the period of transverse oscillations of electrons in the wiggler. In the limit, the flow of electrons is purely laminar, with a uniform axial velocity along and across the wiggler resulting in an improved beam quality. We shall also discuss the effects of beam compression on growth rate.

  15. Deliberate misalignment in free electron lasers with a hole coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhulin, V.I.

    1995-12-31

    In a conventional laser operation misalignment of resonator mirrors leads usually to undesirable effects and has to be avoided. But in some certain types of cavity configurations deliberate introduction of misalignment makes it possible to improve considerably the characteristics of out-put radiation. The example of such configurations is an optical scheme with hole coupling. Two options are considered: (1) the free electron laser (FEL) with the radiation output through the on-axis hole at the exit mirror; (2) the external resonator (used for pulse stacking) where the exit FEL radiation enters this resonator through the on-axis hole at the input mirror. These configurations are investigated with the continuous wave 3-D code. It is shown that in a FEL with a hole coupling the transverse distribution of intracavity mode is characterised under certain conditions by a on-axis dip. The introduction of deliberate misalignment, characterised by a mirror tilt angle {theta}, leads to a shift and variation of the spacial structure. It is shown that due to the complicated structure of intracavity field, the dependences of the output power P on {theta} become nonmonotonic. For optimal value of {theta} = {theta}{sub opt} the output power could be much bigger than for the case {theta} = 0. Moreover, the introduction of deliberate misalignment into optical cavity provides an opportunity not only to increase the output power but also to smooth the dependences of the output characteristics on the radiation wavelength.

  16. Electrostatic-accelerator free-electron lasers for power beaming

    SciTech Connect

    Pinhasi, Y.; Yakover, I.M.; Gover, A.

    1995-12-31

    Novel concepts of electrostatic-accelerator free-electron lasers (EA-FELs) for energy transfer through the atmosphere are presented. The high average power attained from an EA-FEL makes it an efficient source of mm-wave for power beaming from a ground stations. General aspects of operating the FEL as a high power oscillator (like acceleration voltage, e-beam. current, gain and efficiency) are studied and design considerations are described. The study takes into account requirements of power beaming application such as characteristic dips in the atmospheric absorption spectrum, sizes of transmitting and receiving antennas and meteorological conditions. We present a conceptual design of a moderate voltage (.5-3 MeV) high current (1-10 Amp) EA-FEL operating at mm-wavelength bands, where the atmospheric attenuation allows efficient power beaming to space. The FEL parameters were calculated, employing analytical and numerical models. The performance parameters of the FEL (power, energy conversion efficiency average power) will be discussed in connection to the proposed application.

  17. Spectral dynamics of a collective free electron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Eecen, P.J.; Schep, T.J.; Tulupov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    A theoretical and numerical study of the nonlinear spectral dynamics of a Free Electron Maser (FEM) is reported. The electron beam is modulated by a step-tapered undulator consisting of two sections with different strengths and lengths. The sections have equal periodicity and are separated by a field-free gap. The millimeter wave beam is guided through a rectangular corrugated waveguide. The electron energy is rather low and the current density is large, therefore, the FEM operates in the collective (Raman) regime. Results of a computational study on the spectral dynamics of the FEM are presented. The numerical code is based on a multifrequency model in the continuous beam limit with a 3D description of the electron beam. Space-charge forces are included by a Fourier expansion. These forces strongly influence the behaviour of the generated spectrum of the FEM. The linear gain of the FEM is high, therefore, the system quickly reaches the nonlinear regime. In saturation the gain is still relatively high and the spectral signal at the resonant frequency of the second undulator is suppressed. The behaviour of the sidebands is analysed and their dependence on mirror reflectivity and undulator parameters will be discussed.

  18. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  19. Imaging the dynamics of free-electron Landau states

    PubMed Central

    Schattschneider, P.; Schachinger, Th.; Stöger-Pollach, M.; Löffler, S.; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A.; Bliokh, K. Y.; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Landau levels and states of electrons in a magnetic field are fundamental quantum entities underlying the quantum Hall and related effects in condensed matter physics. However, the real-space properties and observation of Landau wave functions remain elusive. Here we report the real-space observation of Landau states and the internal rotational dynamics of free electrons. States with different quantum numbers are produced using nanometre-sized electron vortex beams, with a radius chosen to match the waist of the Landau states, in a quasi-uniform magnetic field. Scanning the beams along the propagation direction, we reconstruct the rotational dynamics of the Landau wave functions with angular frequency ~100 GHz. We observe that Landau modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers belong to three classes, which are characterized by rotations with zero, Larmor and cyclotron frequencies, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to the uniform cyclotron rotation of classical electrons, and in perfect agreement with recent theoretical predictions. PMID:25105563

  20. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2015-03-15

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered.

  1. High-gain reverse guide field free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, K.H.

    1995-10-01

    Electron beam trajectories under circularly polarized external wigglers in free electron laser devices with axial guide fields are reconsidered by introducing the self-fields of the electron beam. The competition between the self-fields and the wiggler field plus the action of the guide field are not only responsible for the known positive guide field singularity, but also the new reverse guide field singularity. The physics of the new reverse field singularity relies on the fact that an azimuthal magnetic field uniform in {ital z} is able to generate steady-state helical beam orbits just as if it were a transverse wiggler. According to this theory, the handness of the circularly polarized microwave should depend on the guide field configuration. High-gain strong pump equations coupled to these trajectories are used to account for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology reverse guide field results [Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 67}, 3082 (1991)]. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  3. Numerical simulations of free-electron laser oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, B.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; Tokar, R.L.; Elliott, C.J.; Gitomer, S.J.; Schmitt, M.J.; Thode, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical simulation capability has been developed to model the physics and realistic design constraints of free electron laser oscillators driven by rf linear accelerators. Two computer codes have been written FELEX and FELP. The code FELP is a one spatial dimension code with essentially unlimited time or spectral resolution. The codes are complementary and their use is dependent upon the problem being addressed. The code FELP is used to model optical and electron micropulse structure, broadband noise, and the sideband instability. The code FELEX models accelerator generated electron beam distributions, the transport of these distributions through wigglers with misalignments and field errors, self-consistent interaction with the optical field, and propagation of the optical field through resonators with realistically modelled components. FELEX is routinely used to match resonator designs to the optical parameters of the electron beam, and used to investigate the physics of 3-D micropulse effects. Some details of the codes will be presented along with various examples of simulation results. 22 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered.

  5. Induction linac driven free-electron lasers for microwave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, William A.

    1992-03-01

    The recent development of highly reliable components for linear induction accelerators (LIA) and free-electron lasers (FEL) enable one to use these devices as economical sources of microwave power to drive magnetic fusion reactors and high gradient, rf linear accelerators. Based on the specifications and costs of the recently designed and fabricated LIA components at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Science Research Laboratory, Inc., and Pulse Sciences, Inc., this paper reviews the present technology of linear induction accelerators and presents an algorithm for scaling the cost of LIA-driven microwave sources to the high average power regime of interest for the next generation of fusion research machines and linear electorn-positron colliders at TeV energies. The algorithm allows one to optimize the output power of the sources with respect to cost (or other figure of merit) by varying he characteristics (pulse length, driven current, repetition rate, etc.) of the linear induction accelerator. It also allows one to explore cost sensitivities as a guide to formulating research strategies for developing advanced accelerator technologies.

  6. Characterization of amorphous carbon films as total-reflection mirrors for XUV free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, Sandra; Steeg, Barbara; Wiesmann, Jorg; Stormer, Michael; Feldhaus, Josef; Bormann, R.'diger; Michaelsen, Carsten

    2002-12-01

    As part of the TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) project a free electron laser (FEL) in the XUV (Extreme Ultra-Violet, (6-200 eV)) and X-ray (0.5-15 keV) range is being developed at DESY (Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, Hamburg). At the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) a prototype FEL has recently demonstrated maximum light amplification in the range of 80 nm to 120 nm. It is expected that the FEL will provide intense, sub-picosecond radiation pulses with photon energies up to 200 eV in the next development stage. In a joint project between DESY and GKSS, thin film optical elements with very high radiation stability, as required for FEL applications, are currently being developed. Sputter-deposited amorphous carbon coatings have been prepared for use as total reflection X-ray mirrors. The optical characterization of the mirrors has been carried out using the soft X-ray reflectometer at HASYLAB (Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor) beamline G1. The reflectivity of the carbon films at 2 deg incidence angle is close to the theoretical reflectivity of 95.6 %, demonstrating the high quality of the coatings. For comparison, layers produced by different methods (e.g. Chemical vapor deposition, Pulsed laser deposition) have been characterized as well. Annealing experiments have been performed to evaluate the thermal stability of the amorphous carbon films. Further investigations concerning the radiation stability of the X-ray mirrors have also been conducted. The mirrors were irradiated in the FELIS (Free Electron Laser-Interaction with Solids) experiment at the TTF-FEL. Microscopic investigations demonstrate that the carbon mirrors are fairly stable.

  7. Laser-based capillary polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Swinney, K; Hankins, J; Bornhop, D J

    1999-01-01

    A laser-based capillary polarimeter has been configured to allow for the detection of optically active molecules in capillary tubes with a characteristic inner diameter of 250 microm and a 39-nL (10(-9)) sample volume. The simple optical configuration consists of a HeNe laser, polarizing optic, fused-silica capillary, and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera in communication with a laser beam analyzer. The capillary scale polarimeter is based on the interaction between a polarized laser beam and a capillary tube, which results in a 360 degree fan of scattered light. This array of scattered light contains a set of interference fringe, which respond in a reproducible manner to changes in solute optical activity. The polarimetric utility of the instrument will be demonstrated by the analysis of two optically active solutes, R-mandelic acid and D-glucose, in addition to the nonoptically active control, glycerol. The polarimetric response of the system is quantifiable with detection limits facilitating 1.7 x 10(-3) M or 68 x 10(-12) nmol (7 psi 10(-9) g) sensitivity. PMID:11315158

  8. A wide bandwidth free-electron laser with mode locking using current modulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Kur, E.; Dunning, D. J.; McNeil, B. W. J.; Wurtele, J.; Zholents, A. A. )

    2011-01-20

    A new scheme for mode locking a free-electron laser amplifier is proposed based on electron beam current modulation. It is found that certain properties of the original concept, based on the energy modulation of electrons, are improved including the spectral brightness of the source and the purity of the series of short pulses. Numerical comparisons are made between the new and old schemes and between a mode-locked free-electron laser and self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser. Illustrative examples using a hypothetical mode-locked free-electron laser amplifier are provided. The ability to generate intense coherent radiation with a large bandwidth is demonstrated.

  9. Nonlinear pulse evolution in seeded free-electron laser amplifiers and in free-electron laser cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Giannessi, L.; Musumeci, P.; Spampinati, S.

    2005-08-15

    The advances in laser technology have made available very short and intense laser pulses which can be used to seed a high-gain single-pass free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier. With these seed pulses, a regime of the FEL interaction where the radiation evolution is simultaneously dominated by nonlinear effects (saturation) and time-dependent effects (slippage) can be explored. This regime is characterized by the propagation of a solitary wavelike pulse where the power of the optical wave grows quadratically with time, its pulse length decreases and the spectral bandwidth increases. We analyze the interplay between the field and particle dynamics of this propagation regime which was studied before and termed super-radiance. Furthermore we analyze the properties of the strong higher-order harmonic emission from this wave and its behavior when propagating in a cascade FEL. The super-radiant pulse is indeed capable of passing through the stages of a cascade FEL and to regenerate itself at the wavelength of the higher-order harmonic. The optical pulse obtained is shorter than a cooperation length and is strongly chirped in frequency, thus allowing further longitudinal compression down to the attosecond time scale.

  10. Implementing storage rings free electron lasers for users on synchrotron radiation facilities: from Super-ACO to SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Nutarelli, D.; Billardon, M.

    1998-09-01

    Storage Ring Free Electron Laser (SRFEL) sources can be implemented on synchrotron radiation facilities. Although in the beginning an additional experiment on the accelerator requires specific operating conditions as on Super-ACO at Orsay (France), they can now be conceived as an integral part of the project, providing coherent picosecond tunable light in the UV-VUV range, synchronized with synchrotron radiation for the scientific community, as on the SOLEIL project. Third generation storage ring beam characteristics are discussed in terms of synchrotron radiation and FEL optimization. FEL performances are presented, showing the improvement between the Super-ACO and the SOLEIL cases, including stability issues.

  11. Influence of laser parameters and staining on femtosecond laser-based intracellular nanosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Kuetemeyer, K.; Rezgui, R.; Lubatschowski, H.; Heisterkamp, A.

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond (fs) laser-based intracellular nanosurgery has become an important tool in cell biology, albeit the mechanisms in the so-called low-density plasma regime are largely unknown. Previous calculations of free-electron densities for intracellular surgery used water as a model substance for biological media and neglected the presence of dye and biomolecules. In addition, it is still unclear on which time scales free-electron and free-radical induced chemical effects take place in a cellular environment. Here, we present our experimental study on the influence of laser parameters and staining on the intracellular ablation threshold in the low-density plasma regime. We found that the ablation effect of fs laser pulse trains resulted from the accumulation of single-shot multiphoton-induced photochemical effects finished within a few nanoseconds. At the threshold, the number of applied pulses was inversely proportional to a higher order of the irradiance, depending on the laser repetition rate and wavelength. Furthermore, fluorescence staining of subcellular structures before surgery significantly decreased the ablation threshold. Based on our findings, we propose that dye molecules are the major source for providing seed electrons for the ionization cascade. Consequently, future calculations of free-electron densities for intracellular nanosurgery have to take them into account, especially in the calculations of multiphoton ionization rates. PMID:21258492

  12. Photoinjector-driven chirped-pulsed free electron maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesage, G. P.; Hartemann, F. V.; Feng, H. X. C.; Fochs, S. N.; Heritage, J. P.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Perry, M. D.; Westenskow, G. A.

    1995-03-01

    An ultra-short pulse, millimeter-wave free electron maser experiment is currently underway at UC Davis and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A 8.5 kG, 30 mm period helical wiggler is used to transversally accelerate a train of one hundred 5 MeV, 0.25 nC, 1 ps duration micro bunches synchronously energized by a 20 MW, X-band photocathode RF linac. The photocathode is irradiated by a burst-mode, UV laser system which produces up to 100 pulses at 207 nm, with an energy of 10 mJ/pulse, and a pulse duration of 200 fs, at a repetition rate of 2.142 GHz. This system includes a 400 fs jitter synchronously modelocked AlGaAs semiconductor laser oscillator which is amplified by an eight-pass Ti:Al2O3 chirped pulse laser amplifier. The output of this amplifier is subsequently frequency quadrupled into the UV. Because the electron micro bunches are shorter than the radiation wavelength, the system coherently synchrotron radiates and behaves essentially as a prebunched FEM. In addition, by operating in a waveguide structure at grazing, where the bunch axial velocity in the wiggler matches the group velocity of the electromagnetic waves, one obtains output radiation pulses which are extremely short, and have greatly enhanced peak power. The device operates in the TE(sub 12) mode of a cylindrical waveguide, and will produce up to 2 MW of coherent synchrotron radiation power at 140 GHz, in a 15 ps FWHM pulse. The -3 dB instantaneous interaction bandwidth extends from 125 GHz to 225 GHz. The output pulse is chirped over the full interaction bandwidth. One of the major potential applications of such a device is an ultra-wideband millimeter-wave radar.

  13. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.; Fazio, M.; Haynes, W.

    1995-12-31

    Free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that will make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that (1) the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and (2) such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. The axial FEL interaction is with a fast wave and does involve axial bunching of the electron beam, so the results found for this device also apply to transverse-coupling FELs. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. By changing the annulus radius, exact cancellation can be found for a variety of beam voltages and currents in the ranges of 0.5-1.0 MV and 1-5 kA. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons.

  14. Femtosecond Nanocrystallography with X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Henry

    2011-03-01

    The ultrafast pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers have opened up a new form of protein nanocrystallography. The X-ray pulses are of high enough intensity and of sufficiently short duration that individual single-shot diffraction patterns can be obtained from a sample before significant damage occurs. This ``diffraction before destruction'' method may enable the determination of structures of proteins that cannot be grown into large enough crystals or are too radiation sensitive for high- resolution crystallography. Ultrafast pump-probe studies of photoinduced dynamics can also be studied. We have carried out experiments in coherent diffraction from protein nanocrystals, including Photosystem I membrane protein, at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. The crystals are filtered to sizes less than 2 micron, and are delivered to the pulsed X-ray beam in a continuously flowing liquid jet. Millions of diffraction patterns were recorded at the LCLS repetition rate of 60 Hz. Tens of thousands of the single-shot diffraction patterns have been indexed, and combined into a single crystal diffraction pattern, which can be phased for structure determination and analysed for the effects of pulse duration and fluence. Experimental data collection was carried out as part of a large collaboration involving CFEL DESY, Arizona State University, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, University of Uppsala, SLAC, LBNL, LLNL, using the CAMP apparatus which was designed and built by the Max Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL. The LCLS is operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  15. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Fortgang, C.M.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; May, L.M.; Potter, J.M.

    1995-09-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Present-day pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that win make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling-wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons. Detailed particle-in-cell simulations are included to demonstrate the transverse wiggling of the rf mode and the axial FEL interaction.

  16. Acoustic analog of a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zavtrak, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    As well known, at the present time there are many types of laser the operation of which is based on the stimulated emission of light by an active medium. Lasers are generators of coherent electromagnetic waves in the range from ultraviolet to submillimeters. But acoustic analogs of such devices have not been created up to now in spite of the progress in laser technology. Meanwhile, an acoustic laser could have a lot of interesting applications. Recently a theoretical scheme for an acoustic laser was proposed by the present author. A liquid dielectric with dispersed particles was considered as an active medium. The pumping was created by an oscillating electric field deforming dispersed particle volumes. Different types of oils or distilled water can serve as a liquid dielectric with gas bubbles as dispersed particles. Gas bubbles in water can be created by an electrolysis. The phase bunching of the initially incoherent emitters (gas bubbles) was realized by acoustic radiation forces. This scheme is an analog of the free-electron laser (FEL). It was shown that two types of losses must be overcome for the beginning of a generation. The first type results from the energy dissipation in the active medium and the second one is caused by radiation losses at the boundaries of the resonator. The purposes of this report are: (1) to discuss the analogies between the acoustic laser and FEL; (2) to propose an effective scheme of an acoustic laser with a mechanical pumping (by a piezoelectric emitter of the piston type); (3) to consider the schemes of acoustic lasers with the different types of the resonators (rectangular and cylindrical); (4) to discuss the possibility of the creation of an impact acoustic laser (5) to discuss the experimental works which are planned to be carried out in cooperation with prof. L.A. Crum.

  17. Quantum free-electron laser: A fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, L. F.; Serbeto, A.; Tsui, K. H.

    2012-02-01

    Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) are today a very important area of research. Such devices can generate short pulses of high-power coherent radiation in wavelengths that are unreachable to conventional molecular lasers, such as X-Rays, and are based on the radiation emitted by a relativistic electron beam that performs a waving movement induced by an alternating electromagnetic field. They can be described by classical or quantum models. Classical models are simpler than the last, but they are valid only if the one-photon momentum recoil is not greater than the beam momentum spread, where the FEL operates in a new Quantum regime, and quantum models should be used. It is the case for high-energy fotons and low-energy electron beams. In this work we present a hydrodynamical model which incorporates quantum effects. Starting from Poisson equation and a Schrödinger-like equation deduced from the total relativistic energy of the electron under the action of a ponderomotive potential V associated with the combined wiggle and radiation fields, we obtain, by performing a Madelung transformation to the electron wave function, a set of fluid equations (continuity and momentum) to the beam dynamics, where a Bohm potential accumulates the quantum information. By coupling the wave equation, under the SVEA hypothesis, we get a set of nonlinear PDE system which describes the quantum-FEL as a three-wave interaction phenomena, where the amplified radiation is seen as Compton or Raman backscattered radiation. Our model is simpler than previous quantum models, and can be used in laser amplification theory as well.

  18. An inverse free electron laser accelerator: Experiment and theoretical interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jyan-Min

    1997-06-01

    Experimental and numerical studies of the Inverse Free Electron Laser using a GW-level 10.6 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser have been carried out at Brookhaven`s Accelerator Test Facility. An energy gain of 2.5 % ({Delta}E/E) on a 40 MeV electron beam has been observed E which compares well with theory. The effects on IFEL acceleration with respect to the variation of the laser electric field, the input electron beam energy, and the wiggler magnetic field strength were studied, and show the importance of matching the resonance condition in the IFEL. The numerical simulations were performed under various conditions and the importance of the electron bunching in the IFEL is shown. The numerical interpretation of our IFEL experimental results was examined. Although good numerical agreement with the experimental results was obtained, there is a discrepancy between the level of the laser power measured in the experiment and used in the simulation, possibly due to the non-Gaussian profile of the input high power laser beam. The electron energy distribution was studied numerically and a smoothing of the energy spectrum by the space charge effect at the location of the spectrometer was found, compared with the spectrum at the exit of the wiggler. The electron bunching by the IFEL and the possibility of using the IFEL as an electron prebuncher for another laser-driven accelerator were studied numerically. We found that bunching of the electrons at 1 meter downstream from the wiggler can be achieved using the existing facility. The simulation shows that there is a fundamental difference between the operating conditions for using the IFEL as a high gradient accelerator, and as a prebuncher for another accelerator.

  19. Special issue on frontiers of free electron laser science Special issue on frontiers of free electron laser science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucksbaum, Philip; Möller, Thomas; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2012-08-01

    Your invitation to submit. Journal of Physics. B: Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics (JPhysB) is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on 'Frontiers of free electron laser science', to appear in 2013, and invites you to submit a paper. This special issue will highlight recent advances in x-ray free electron laser (FEL) research enabled by the new generation of FELs in Europe, Japan and the USA. This is a particularly good moment to launch a special issue on this topic in JPhysB, to consolidate and place into a broader context some the recent novel research in the earliest years of x-ray FELs. We invite you to contribute original papers that describe some of these exciting results in several areas: AMO physics at x-ray FELs covering now a broad energy range from a few 10 eV to several tens keV is a central area of interest for this topical issue. We also especially welcome research papers on the topic of x-ray lasers that are pumped by FELs, as well as the physics of the x-ray FEL itself. Recent rapid developments in beam conditioning should also be covered, including seeding, echo and selective emittance spoiling. Such improved instrumentation has made possible the first femtosecond x-ray matter studies at FELs, and we invite papers in these areas as well. Pump-probe spectroscopy has now been extended to x-ray FELs, both with multiple x-ray pulses and with synchronized optical and x-ray pulses. The science related to timing x-ray pulses to laser-induced phenomena, including streaking, cross correlations and other time tools will be emphasized in this issue. Ultrafast x-ray FELs are also among the most intense laser sources available, and exceed the focusable intensity of other x-ray sources by many orders of magnitude. Therefore, intense x-ray atom and molecule interactions will be highlighted in this issue, as will the science of x-ray-induced damage. High intensities also give rise to the new field of nonlinear x-ray physics, and we would like

  20. Hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cram, Gary P., Jr.; Copeland, Michael L.

    1998-09-01

    We have investigated the hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser (FEL) and compared these properties to the most commonly used commercial lasers in neurosurgery, CO 2 and Nd:YAG, using an acute canine model. Arterial and venous vessels, of varying diameters from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, were divided with all three lasers. Analysis of five wavelengths of the FEL (3.0, 4.5, 6.1, 6.45, and 7.7 microns) resulted in bleeding without evidence of significant coagulation, regardless of whether the vessel was an artery or vein. Hemorrhage from vessels less than 0.4 mm diameter was subsequently easily controlled with Gelfoam® (topical hemostatic agent) alone, whereas larger vessels required bipolar electrocautery. No significant charring, or contraction of the surrounding parenchyma was noted with any of the wavelengths chosen from FEL source. The CO 2 laser, in continuous mode, easily coagulated vessels with diameters of 4 mm and less, while larger vessels displayed significant bleeding requiring bipolar electrocautery for control. Tissue charring was noted with application of the CO 2 laser. In super pulse mode, the CO 2 laser exhibited similar properties, including significant charring of the surrounding parenchyma. The Nd:YAG coagulated all vessels tested up to 1.4 mm, which was the largest diameter cortical artery found, however this laser displayed significant and extensive contraction and retraction of the surrounding parenchyma. In conclusion, the FEL appears to be a poor hemostatic agent. Our results did not show any benefit of the FEL over current conventional means of achieving hemostasis. However, control of hemorrhage was easily achieved with currently used methods of hemostasis, namely Gelfoam® or bipolar electrocuatery. Although only cortical vessels in dogs were tested, we feel this data can be applied to all animals, including humans, and the peripheral, as well as central, vasculature, as our data on the CO 2 and Nd:YAG appear to closely support previous

  1. Structural studies of P-type ATPase–ligand complexes using an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bublitz, Maike; Nass, Karol; Drachmann, Nikolaj D.; Markvardsen, Anders J.; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Mattle, Daniel; Shoeman, Robert L.; Doak, R. Bruce; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin M.; Williams, Garth J.; Foucar, Lutz; Reinhard, Linda; Sitsel, Oleg; Gregersen, Jonas L.; Clausen, Johannes D.; Boesen, Thomas; Gotfryd, Kamil; Wang, Kai -Tuo; Olesen, Claus; Møller, Jesper V.; Nissen, Poul; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-06-11

    Membrane proteins are key players in biological systems, mediating signalling events and the specific transport ofe.g.ions and metabolites. Consequently, membrane proteins are targeted by a large number of currently approved drugs. Understanding their functions and molecular mechanisms is greatly dependent on structural information, not least on complexes with functionally or medically important ligands. Structure determination, however, is hampered by the difficulty of obtaining well diffracting, macroscopic crystals. Here, the feasibility of X-ray free-electron-laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) for the structure determination of membrane protein–ligand complexes using microcrystals of various native-source and recombinant P-type ATPase complexes is demonstrated. The data reveal the binding sites of a variety of ligands, including lipids and inhibitors such as the hallmark P-type ATPase inhibitor orthovanadate. By analyzing the resolution dependence of ligand densities and overall model qualities, SFX data quality metrics as well as suitable refinement procedures are discussed. Even at relatively low resolution and multiplicity, the identification of ligands can be demonstrated. This makes SFX a useful tool for ligand screening and thus for unravelling the molecular mechanisms of biologically active proteins.

  2. Structural studies of P-type ATPase–ligand complexes using an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bublitz, Maike; Nass, Karol; Drachmann, Nikolaj D.; Markvardsen, Anders J.; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Mattle, Daniel; Shoeman, Robert L.; Doak, R. Bruce; Boutet, Sébastien; et al

    2015-06-11

    Membrane proteins are key players in biological systems, mediating signalling events and the specific transport ofe.g.ions and metabolites. Consequently, membrane proteins are targeted by a large number of currently approved drugs. Understanding their functions and molecular mechanisms is greatly dependent on structural information, not least on complexes with functionally or medically important ligands. Structure determination, however, is hampered by the difficulty of obtaining well diffracting, macroscopic crystals. Here, the feasibility of X-ray free-electron-laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) for the structure determination of membrane protein–ligand complexes using microcrystals of various native-source and recombinant P-type ATPase complexes is demonstrated. The data revealmore » the binding sites of a variety of ligands, including lipids and inhibitors such as the hallmark P-type ATPase inhibitor orthovanadate. By analyzing the resolution dependence of ligand densities and overall model qualities, SFX data quality metrics as well as suitable refinement procedures are discussed. Even at relatively low resolution and multiplicity, the identification of ligands can be demonstrated. This makes SFX a useful tool for ligand screening and thus for unravelling the molecular mechanisms of biologically active proteins.« less

  3. Structural studies of P-type ATPase–ligand complexes using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Bublitz, Maike; Nass, Karol; Drachmann, Nikolaj D.; Markvardsen, Anders J.; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Mattle, Daniel; Shoeman, Robert L.; Doak, R. Bruce; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin M.; Williams, Garth J.; Foucar, Lutz; Reinhard, Linda; Sitsel, Oleg; Gregersen, Jonas L.; Clausen, Johannes D.; Boesen, Thomas; Gotfryd, Kamil; Wang, Kai-Tuo; Olesen, Claus; Møller, Jesper V.; Nissen, Poul; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are key players in biological systems, mediating signalling events and the specific transport of e.g. ions and metabolites. Consequently, membrane proteins are targeted by a large number of currently approved drugs. Understanding their functions and molecular mechanisms is greatly dependent on structural information, not least on complexes with functionally or medically important ligands. Structure determination, however, is hampered by the difficulty of obtaining well diffracting, macroscopic crystals. Here, the feasibility of X-ray free-electron-laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) for the structure determination of membrane protein–ligand complexes using microcrystals of various native-source and recombinant P-type ATPase complexes is demonstrated. The data reveal the binding sites of a variety of ligands, including lipids and inhibitors such as the hallmark P-type ATPase inhibitor orthovanadate. By analyzing the resolution dependence of ligand densities and overall model qualities, SFX data quality metrics as well as suitable refinement procedures are discussed. Even at relatively low resolution and multiplicity, the identification of ligands can be demonstrated. This makes SFX a useful tool for ligand screening and thus for unravelling the molecular mechanisms of biologically active proteins. PMID:26175901

  4. Structural studies of P-type ATPase–ligand complexes using an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bublitz, Maike; Nass, Karol; Drachmann, Nikolaj D.; Markvardsen, Anders J.; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Mattle, Daniel; Shoeman, Robert L.; Doak, R. Bruce; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin M.; Williams, Garth J.; Foucar, Lutz; Reinhard, Linda; Sitsel, Oleg; Gregersen, Jonas L.; Clausen, Johannes D.; Boesen, Thomas; Gotfryd, Kamil; Wang, Kai-Tuo; Olesen, Claus; Møller, Jesper V.; Nissen, Poul; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-06-11

    Membrane proteins are key players in biological systems, mediating signalling events and the specific transport ofe.g.ions and metabolites. Consequently, membrane proteins are targeted by a large number of currently approved drugs. Understanding their functions and molecular mechanisms is greatly dependent on structural information, not least on complexes with functionally or medically important ligands. Structure determination, however, is hampered by the difficulty of obtaining well diffracting, macroscopic crystals. Here, the feasibility of X-ray free-electron-laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) for the structure determination of membrane protein–ligand complexes using microcrystals of various native-source and recombinant P-type ATPase complexes is demonstrated. The data reveal the binding sites of a variety of ligands, including lipids and inhibitors such as the hallmark P-type ATPase inhibitor orthovanadate. By analyzing the resolution dependence of ligand densities and overall model qualities, SFX data quality metrics as well as suitable refinement procedures are discussed. Even at relatively low resolution and multiplicity, the identification of ligands can be demonstrated. This makes SFX a useful tool for ligand screening and thus for unravelling the molecular mechanisms of biologically active proteins.

  5. Structural studies of P-type ATPase-ligand complexes using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Bublitz, Maike; Nass, Karol; Drachmann, Nikolaj D; Markvardsen, Anders J; Gutmann, Matthias J; Barends, Thomas R M; Mattle, Daniel; Shoeman, Robert L; Doak, R Bruce; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin M; Williams, Garth J; Foucar, Lutz; Reinhard, Linda; Sitsel, Oleg; Gregersen, Jonas L; Clausen, Johannes D; Boesen, Thomas; Gotfryd, Kamil; Wang, Kai-Tuo; Olesen, Claus; Møller, Jesper V; Nissen, Poul; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-07-01

    Membrane proteins are key players in biological systems, mediating signalling events and the specific transport of e.g. ions and metabolites. Consequently, membrane proteins are targeted by a large number of currently approved drugs. Understanding their functions and molecular mechanisms is greatly dependent on structural information, not least on complexes with functionally or medically important ligands. Structure determination, however, is hampered by the difficulty of obtaining well diffracting, macroscopic crystals. Here, the feasibility of X-ray free-electron-laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) for the structure determination of membrane protein-ligand complexes using microcrystals of various native-source and recombinant P-type ATPase complexes is demonstrated. The data reveal the binding sites of a variety of ligands, including lipids and inhibitors such as the hallmark P-type ATPase inhibitor orthovanadate. By analyzing the resolution dependence of ligand densities and overall model qualities, SFX data quality metrics as well as suitable refinement procedures are discussed. Even at relatively low resolution and multiplicity, the identification of ligands can be demonstrated. This makes SFX a useful tool for ligand screening and thus for unravelling the molecular mechanisms of biologically active proteins. PMID:26175901

  6. Dispersion, spatial growth rate, and start current of a Cherenkov free-electron laser with negative-index material

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Wei, Yanyu; Jiang, Xuebing; Tang, Xianfeng; Shi, Xianbao; Gong, Yubin; Li, Dazhi; Takano, Keisuke; Nakajima, Makoto; Feng, Jinjun; Miyamoto, Shuji

    2015-08-15

    We present an analysis of a Cherenkov free-electron laser based on a single slab made from negative-index materials. In this system, a flat electron beam with finite thickness travelling close to the surface of the slab interacts with the copropagating electromagnetic surface mode. The dispersion equation for a finitely thick slab is worked out and solved numerically to study the dispersion relation of surface modes supported by negative-index materials, and the calculations are in good agreement with the simulation results from a finite difference time domain code. We find that under suitable conditions there is inherent feedback in such a scheme due to the characteristics of negative-index materials, which means that the system can oscillate without external reflectors when the beam current exceeds a threshold value, i.e., start current. Using the hydrodynamic approach, we setup coupled equations for this system, and solve these equations analytically in the small signal regime to obtain formulas for the spatial growth rate and start current.

  7. Pb-free electronics: from nanotechnology to combinatorial materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Gonzalez, Alfredo J.

    , alloys that are prone to tin whiskers growth. These libraries are samples containing a range of sub-samples with varying compositions within it than can be processed simultaneously. Using sputtering, a physical vapor deposition technique, a gradient composed of Ag-Cu was deposited over a Sn-plated Cu substrate. After reflow, the growth mechanism of the whiskers was accelerated using the IEC60068-82-2 standard. SEM and EDS analysis was used to charac-terize the growth of the tin whiskers at different elemental compositions. The gradients found across the samples are in accordance with the theoretical geometrical spacing. Tin whiskers were found on control samples, whereas almost all elemental compositions showed mitigation or elimination of the whiskers. This combinatorial material science methodology proved to be an efficient and fast screening method for the plating materials selection process in Pb-free electronics.

  8. Single pass, THz spectral range free-electron laser driven by a photocathode hybrid rf linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Yu.; Friedman, A.; Pinhasi, Y.

    2015-07-01

    A single pass, THz spectral range free-electron laser (FEL) driven by a photocathode hybrid rf-LINAC is considered, taking the Israeli THz FEL project developed in Ariel University as an example. Two possible configurations of such FEL are discussed: an enhanced coherent spontaneous emission FEL, and a prebunched FEL utilizing periodically modulated short electron beam pulses. A general study of the FEL configurations is carried out in the framework of a space-frequency approach, realized in WB3D numerical code. The configurations are studied and compared based on preliminary parameters of a drive hybrid rf-LINAC gun under development in University of California, Los Angeles.

  9. Designs for optical components related to the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, D.A.; Bender, S.C.

    1993-07-01

    Several optomechanical tasks for the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL) Free-Electron Laser (FEL) were set by the envisioned project goals as early as 1988. Unfortunately, the FEL project has been set aside due to funding constraints. The tasks reported on here required extensive modeling for final adaptability into the FEL environment. The systems to be described are best identified as (1) a Brewster attenuation device, (2) an optical mode relay lens system, (3) a spectral harmonics band-filtering system, (4) a 25-nm micropulse spectrometer system, (5) a 12.5-nm micropulse spectrometer system, (6) a 0.6-nm micropulse spectrometer system, and (7) a reflective mode profile rotator. The Brewster attenuation device was successfully used inside the FEL resonator. The optical mode relay lens system, spectral harmonics band filtering system, and reflective mode profile rotator were completed but never used. The 25-nm micropulse spectrometer was optically and mechanically completed, but the detector electronics were never finished. The 12.5- and 0.6-nm micropulse spectrometers were never assembled, due to hardware that was common to the 25-nm system. These systems will be described in the order listed above. The nominal wavelength of operation for the listed systems is 3.0 {mu}m, except for the harmonics filtering which works on the subharmonics of 3.0 {mu}m. All of these systems were operated remotely due to the harsh radioactive/x-ray optical environment during FEL operation.

  10. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Prędki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schmidt, C.; Wegner, U.; Schlarb, H.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses. PMID:25600823

  11. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Prędki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schmidt, C.; Wegner, U.; Schlarb, H.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.

  12. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Schulz, S; Grguraš, I; Behrens, C; Bromberger, H; Costello, J T; Czwalinna, M K; Felber, M; Hoffmann, M C; Ilchen, M; Liu, H Y; Mazza, T; Meyer, M; Pfeiffer, S; Prędki, P; Schefer, S; Schmidt, C; Wegner, U; Schlarb, H; Cavalieri, A L

    2015-01-01

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses. PMID:25600823

  13. Can free-electron lasers answer critical questions in ultraviolet photobiology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, John C.

    2000-04-01

    This paper will evaluate the potential of ultraviolet free electron lasers, and particularly the soon to be available UV-FEL at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility for such experiments.

  14. Proceedings of the Workshop Prospects for a 1 Angstrom Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, J. C.

    Papers are presented on the following topics: free electron laser theory, scaling relations and simulations; micro-wigglers; photocathode and switched power gun; applications; and summary of working groups.

  15. Proceedings of the workshop prospects for a 1 angstrom free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics free-electron laser theory, scaling relations and simulations; micro-wigglers; photocathode and switched power gun; applications; and summary of working groups.

  16. Brightness and coherence of synchrotron radiation and high-gain free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1986-10-01

    The characteristics of synchrotron radiation are reviewed with particular attention to its phase-space properties and coherence. The transition of the simple undulator radiation to more intense, more coherent high-gain free electron lasers, is discussed.

  17. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Prędki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schmidt, C.; Wegner, U.; Schlarb, H.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2015-01-20

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.

  18. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; et al

    2015-01-20

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarilymore » by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.« less

  19. Dynamic filling factor in the Super-ACO free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutarelli, D.; Garzella, D.; Couprie, M.-E.; Billardon, M.

    1997-02-01

    Here, the Free Electron Laser evolution before the start-up from the spontaneous radiation of an undulator, is considered. This analysis is carried on through the dynamical behaviour of the Filling-factor, representing the transverse overlap between the light pulse and the electron bunch. In such a framework, the gain optimization before the laser start-up is presented and more generally applied to low-gain storage-ring free electron lasers, such as on Super-ACO.

  20. Three-dimensional simulation analysis of the standing-wave free- electron laser two beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Sessler, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have modified a two-dimensional relativistic klystron code, developed by Ryne and Yu, to simulate both the standing-wave free- electron laser two-beam accelerator and the relativistic klystron two- beam accelerator. In this paper, the code is used to study a standing-wave free-electron laser with three cavities. The effect of the radius of the electron beam on the RF output power; namely, a three-dimensional effect is examined.

  1. Optimization of a Seeded Free-Electron Laser with Helical Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Labat, M.; Hosaka, M.; Shimada, M.; Katoh, M.; Couprie, M. E.

    2008-10-17

    Seeded single pass free-electron lasers are promising coherent, short-duration, and intense light sources, from the visible to x rays. Operated with adjustable undulators, they are also a unique device for providing fully variable polarized radiation. We report here the first seeding of helical undulators with a variable polarized source. We demonstrate that the adjustment of the seed polarization and focusing allows the free-electron laser radiation to be optimized in terms of intensity and quality.

  2. Applications of infrared free electron lasers in picosecond and nonlinear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fann, W. S.; Benson, S. V.; Madey, J. M. J.; Etemad, S.; Baker, G. L.; Rothberg, L.; Roberson, M.; Austin, R. H.

    1990-10-01

    In this paper we describe two different types of spectroscopic experiments that exploit the characteristics of the infrared FEL, Mark III, for studies of condensed matter: - the spectrum of χ(3)(-3ω; ω, ω, ω) in polyacetylene: an application of the free electron laser in nonlinear optical spectroscopy, and - a dynamical test of Davydov-like solitons in acetanilide using a picosecond free electron laser. These two studies highlight the unique contributions FELs can make to condensed-matter spectroscopy.

  3. Free-electron laser-fusion drivers for inertial-confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schlitt, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    The use of tapered wiggler, free electron lasers as drivers for inertial confinement fusion requires an electron beam source which must meet specific and stringent requirements. The characteristics of ICF targets are combined with those of the free electron laser to obtain a general set of requirements and to define parameter tradeoffs. In particular, low beam emittance is essential to the system. A conceptual point design of an ICF-FEL driver is discussed.

  4. Laser- based Insect Tracker (LIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Leonardo; Sinha, Shiva; van Steveninck, Rob De Ruyter

    2011-03-01

    Insects are excellent model systems for studying learning and behavior, and the potential for genetic manipulation makes the fruitfly especially attractive. Many aspects of fruitfly behavior have been studied through video based tracking methods. However, to our knowledge no current system incorporates signals for behavioral conditioning in freely moving flies. We introduce a non-video based method that enables tracking of single insects over large volumes (> 8000cm3 at high spatial (<1mm) and temporal (<1ms) resolution for extended periods (>1 hour). The system uses a set of moveable mirrors that steer a tracking laser beam. Tracking is based on feedback from a four-quadrant sensor, sampling the beam after it bounces back from a retro reflector. Through the same mirrors we couple a high speed camera for flight dynamics analysis and an IR laser for aversive heat conditioning. Such heat shocks, combined with visual stimuli projected on a screen surrounding the flight arena, enable studies of learning and memory. By sampling the long term statistics of behavior, the system augments quantitative studies of behavioral phenotypes. Preliminary results of such studies will be presented.

  5. Design Challenges in High Power Free-electron Laser Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    S.V. Benson

    2005-08-21

    Several FELs have now demonstrated high power lasing and several projects are under construction to deliver higher power or shorter wavelengths. This presentation will summarize progress in upgrading FEL oscillators towards higher power and will discuss some of the challenges these projects face. The challenges fall into three categories: 1. energy recovery with large exhaust energy spread, 2. output coupling and maintaining mirror figure in the presence of high intracavity power loading, and 3. high current operation in an energy recovery linac (ERL). Progress in all three of these areas has been made in the last year. Energy recovery of over 12% of exhaust energy spread has been demonstrated and designs capable of accepting even larger energy spreads have been proposed. Cryogenic transmissive output couplers for narrow band operation and both hole and scraper output coupling have been developed. Investigation of short Rayleigh range operation has started as well. Energy recovery of over 20 mA CW has been demonstrated and several methods of mitigating transverse beam breakup instabilities were demonstrated. This talk will summarize these achievements and give a roadmap of where the field is headed.

  6. High-energy density experiments on planetary materials using high-power lasers and X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Norimasa

    2015-06-01

    Laser-driven dynamic compression allows us to investigate the behavior of planetary and exoplanetary materials at extreme conditions. Our high-energy density (HED) experiments for applications to planetary sciences began over five years ago. We measured the equation-of-state of cryogenic liquid hydrogen under laser-shock compression up to 55 GPa. Since then, various materials constituting the icy giant planets and the Earth-like planets have been studied using laser-driven dynamic compression techniques. Pressure-volume-temperature EOS data and optical property data of water and molecular mixtures were obtained at the planetary/exoplanetary interior conditions. Silicates and oxides data show interesting behaviors in the warm-dense matter regime due to their phase transformations. Most recently the structural changes of iron were observed for understanding the kinetics under the bcc-hcp transformation phenomena on a new HED science platform coupling power-lasers and the X-ray free electron laser (SACLA). This work was performed under the joint research project at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. It was partially supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 20654042, 22224012, 23540556, and 24103507) and also by grants from the Core-to-Core Program of JSPS on International Alliance for Material Science in Extreme States with High Power Laser and XFEL, and the X-ray Free Electron Laser Priority Strategy Program of MEXT.

  7. Criterion of transverse coherence of self-amplified spontaneous emission in high gain free electron laser amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, M.; Kim, K.J.

    1995-12-31

    In a high gain free electron laser amplifier based on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) the spontaneous radiation generated by an electron beam near the undulator entrance is amplified many orders of magnitude along the undulator. The transverse coherence properties of the amplified radiation depends on both the amplification process and the coherence of the seed radiation (the undulator radiation generated in the first gain length or so). The evolution of the transverse coherence in the amplification process is studied based on the solution of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations including higher order transverse modes. The coherence of the seed radiation is determined by the number of coherent modes in the phase space area of the undulator radiation. We discuss the criterion of transverse coherence and identify governing parameters over a broad range of parameters. In particular we re-examine the well known emittance criterion for the undulator radiation, which states that full transverse coherence is guaranteed if the rms emittance is smaller than the wavelength divided by 4{pi}. It is found that this criterion is modified for SASE because of the different optimization conditions required for the electron beam. Our analysis is a generalization of the previous study by Yu and Krinsky for the case of vanishing emittance with parallel electron beam. Understanding the transverse coherence of SASE is important for the X-ray free electron laser projects now under consideration at SLAC and DESY.

  8. The importance of lead-free electronics processes

    SciTech Connect

    Meltzer, M

    1999-10-21

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is placing increased importance on reducing lead-bearing wastes. Toward this end, the EPA has proposed that reporting thresholds for the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) be lowered to ten pounds of lead content per year. The US electronics industry is also placing a high priority on lead reduction or elimination. The Association of Connecting Electronics Industries, which is the major trade association for electronics packaging, including printed circuit (PC) board manufacturers, has launched a lead-free initiative that seeks to eliminate lead in solder, in PC board etch resists and finish coats, and as tinning for component leads. Europe and Japan are also considering various regulations that will phase out lead in the next few years. In response to EPA and electronics industry priorities, the DOE complex will soon need to address lead phase-out issues. LLNL is now developing approaches for eliminating lead from PC board etch-resist operations. LLNL is seeking funding to continue this work and to eliminate other major uses of lead in electronics operations, particularly in hot-air solder leveling as a PC board finish, and tin-lead solder for component assembly operations. LLNL seeks to take a proactive leadership role in the DOE complex with respect to the elimination of lead. The envisioned lead-elimination project will be approximately two years in length. During the first year, lead-free etch resists and finish coats will be analyzed, and the best ones identified for electronics assembly and PC board fabrication. During the second year, lead-free solders will be examined and tested for compatibility with alternative PC board finish coats. Cost avoidance opportunities resulting from lead elimination include avoided TRI reporting expenses and reduction in PC board fabrication-related wastes through implementation of more efficient fabrication processes. Integrated Safety Management considerations are also relevant. Handling

  9. Aerodynamic measurement techniques. [laser based diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Laser characteristics of intensity, monochromatic, spatial coherence, and temporal coherence were developed to advance laser based diagnostic techniques for aerodynamic related research. Two broad categories of visualization and optical measurements were considered, and three techniques received significant attention. These are holography, laser velocimetry, and Raman scattering. Examples of the quantitative laser velocimeter and Raman scattering measurements of velocity, temperature, and density indicated the potential of these nonintrusive techniques.

  10. Generation of Phase-Locked Pulses from a Seeded Free-Electron Laser.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, David; Ribič, Primož Rebernik; De Ninno, Giovanni; Allaria, Enrico; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Danailov, Miltcho Bojanov; Demidovich, Alexander; Ferrari, Eugenio; Giannessi, Luca

    2016-01-15

    In a coherent control experiment, light pulses are used to guide the real-time evolution of a quantum system. This requires the coherence and the control of the pulses' electric-field carrier waves. In this work, we use frequency-domain interferometry to demonstrate the mutual coherence of time-delayed pulses generated by an extreme ultraviolet seeded free-electron laser. Furthermore, we use the driving seed laser to lock and precisely control the relative phase between the two free-electron laser pulses. This new capability opens the way to a multitude of coherent control experiments, which will take advantage of the high intensity, short wavelength, and short duration of the pulses generated by seeded free-electron lasers. PMID:26824544